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APRIL 2017 VOL.24 NO.03

3 Square Meals A family takes Hunger Free Vermont's food challenge BY ERINN SIMON, P. 18

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Issue Allowance ABCs Saving for College DIY Greenhouse

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EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

STAFF QUESTION

What’s your family’s favorite rainy-day activity?

COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Meredith Coeyman meredith@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Carolyn Fox, Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Charlotte Scott, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Nancy Stearns Bercaw, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Megan James, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Jessica Lara Ticktin, Sarah Yahm PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sam Simon, Matthew Thorsen ILLUSTRATOR

Hatiye Garip P.O. BOX 1184 BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 KIDSVT.COM

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

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I like to take out OLD PHOTOS AND VIDEOS and look through them with my kids. We talk about friends and family, and when we’ll see them again. If we’ve just printed a bunch of photos, we’ll organize them into photo albums or change up the photos we display in frames. CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

We MAKE A FORT in the living room with every blanket and pillow we own! MEREDITH COEYMAN, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE NANCY STEARNS BERCAW (“Use Your Words,” page 43) is an NCAA All-American swimmer and national champion. Her new memoir, Dryland: One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety, was recently published by Grand Harbor Press and is available on Amazon. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, U.S. News & World Report and Seven Days. She is also the author of Brain in a Jar: A Daughter’s Journey Through Her Father’s Memory.

KIDS VT

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR

APRIL 2017

t the end of March, I joined my 9-year-old daughter, Mira, in the Spectrum Youth & Family Services Student Sleep Out. The annual event, a spin-off of the nonprofit’s adult Sleep Out, was started in 2014 t o raise money and awareness about homelessness in the state. During the Sleep Out, we heard from speakers, including a young woman who had once been homeless and a local police officer. We ate “stone soup” for dinner made with kids’ contributions. And we walked through town with signs urging people to help fight homelessness and support Spectrum. After campfire discussions, our group — more than 50 strong — packed into sleeping bags and slept, shoulder to shoulder, on the town office building’s hard floor. (Organizers decided to have kids sleep inside this year due to the wet, snowy ground and frigid temps.) As a community, we raised more than $10,000 to support Spectrum. It was an experience that will undoubtedly stick with Mira for a long time, and hopefully will make her a more compassionate and generous person. As for me? Well, in addition to a sore back, I felt tons of mom pride in Mira’s enthusiasm for the experience, as well as gratitude to my fellow parents who made this event possible. My own experience reminded me of contributor Erinn Simon’s piece in this month’s Money Issue. She took Hunger Free Vermont’s 3SquaresVT Challenge, which meant feeding her family of five for a week with only $115 — the average amount families of the same size receive for food when they qualify for government assistance. The challenge was created to draw attention to what it’s like to live on a strict food allowance. It’s our hope that, in addition to giving our readers tips on eating well on a budget, Simon’s piece will raise awareness of the fact that 17 percent of children in our state live in food-insecure homes. Other money-related content in this issue includes an interview with a financial adviser about saving for college, an advice column about allowance, and — as we ease into the spring season — articles about growing salad shoots and building a greenhouse on the cheap. Whether it’s taking your own version of the 3Squares challenge or embarking on a new gardening project, we hope this month’s issue will nudge you outside of your comfort zone and help you grow.

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Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Rising to the Challenge

We like to PULL OUT THE LEGOS in the living room and make a giant Lego city. Our collection includes my husband’s childhood Legos, so he especially enjoys it. We also love a good FAMILY MOVIE DAY. Sitting in front of the TV with a bowl of popcorn in the middle of the day feels overindulgent when the sun is shining but completely acceptable when it’s dreary out!

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APRIL 2017 SAM SIMON

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Calendar 26 Daily Listings 27 Egg Hunts 28 Live Performances 29 Classes 30 Science & Nature 32 Story Times 34 New Parents 36 Playgroups 37 Ongoing Exhibits

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3 Square Meals

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A mom of three takes Hunger Free Vermont’s 3SquaresVT Challenge, feeding her family for a week for just $115.

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Government 101 Vermont’s legislative pages spend their weekdays at the Statehouse. Three of these teens tell us what they’ve learned.

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Just for Kids 39 Piggy-Bank Puzzle 40 Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

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On the Cover FREE

APRIL 2017 VOL.24 NO.03

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

A family takes Hunger Free Vermont's food challenge PAGE 18

The

Money

Issue Allowance ABCs Saving for College DIY Greenhouse

KIDS VT

CENTER SECTION

Photographer Sam Simon took this post-grocery-shopping shot of wife, Erinn, and 5-year-old daughter, Sadie.

Norwich, VT | Open daily 10 am – 5 pm

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Kids Say What? Throwback Parenting Hacks #InstaKidsVT Trending Kids Beat

3 Square Meals

APRIL 2017

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 6

Columns 10 Balancing Act 11 Bookworms 12 Destination Recreation 13 Habitat 14 Checkup 15 The Art of 17 Mealtime 21 College Savings Q & A 43 Use Your Words

KIDSVT.COM

Welcome Editor’s Note 3


Should I give my kid an allowance?

KIDS VT

APRIL 2017

KIDSVT.COM

KIDS SAY WHAT?

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AUTUMN ANSWERS

spent throwing pretend parties until it was pretend gone and we were all just writing pretend bad checks. No one cared, there were no real consequences, and it was funny. Of course, bouncing checks isn’t funny in real life, and we all want our kids to become financially literate. Yet teaching money management can be an overwhelming task for parents. In his book The Opposite of Spoiled, New York Times finance columnist Ron Lieber offers a road map for raising kids who are smart about money. Lieber suggests that parents give their children an allowance and that children do chores, but that the two shouldn’t be connected. He explains that while our kids will have plenty of opportunity to develop a work ethic, the purpose of an allowance is to help kids learn about saving and spending money in a fairly low-stakes environment. Also, start early! No later than first grade, Lieber says. Begin with 50 cents or a dollar per year of age, and an annual birthday raise. Kids can track their money using a simple system: Label three containers with “spend,” “give” and “save.” Each week, half of their allowance goes

During my senior year in high school, I took the required home economics class, dauntingly titled “On Your Own.” What I remember most about the class is being assigned an egg to take care of as though it was an actual baby. Shortly after being given that task, I accidentally smashed my precious egg-baby while trying to open my locker. My teacher described the situation as “alarming.” Much less vividly, I remember that same teacher trying to teach us about budgets and taxes. We used pretend checkbooks to manage pretend money that we pretend

“Daddy, how does our brain think? And what makes us talk? I bet it’s tubes in our brain.

Right now, I’m talking about how I talk and thinking about how I think. It’s crazy!” —ESME, AGE 5

CALENDAR CLUES

into the “save” jar, and the remaining half is divided between “give” and “spend.” As for bank accounts, hold off until the teenage years. Younger children benefit from seeing loose change and dollar bills accumulate as a way to underscore key money management concepts. (In related news, I think this approach could really help me with my expensive latte habit.) What’s most important to remember is that however much or little you choose to give, and whatever system you decide on, an allowance is a learning opportunity. A wise friend once told me, “Money is numbers. Numbers tell a story.” It’s a story about our habits, choices, the risks we take or avoid, and what we value. We want our kids to be comfortable with numbers so they can read, and understand, the story. They’ll be writing one of their own soon enough. K In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

Baby Farm Animal Celebration

Friday, April 14, and Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m.5 p.m., at Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock

Party in Picture Book City

Wednesday, April 26, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Fletcher Free Library in Burlington

Lip Sync Battle

Saturday, April 29, 6 p.m., at the Paramount Theater in Rutland. See all the April calendar listings starting on page 26.

#INSTAKIDSVT Thanks for sharing your snowstorm photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We couldn’t resist these sleeping cuties posted by @ilovermontbiking. Share a picture of your kids doing something fun during the month of April. HERE’S HOW:

y Follow @kids_vt on Instagram x Post your photos on Instagram with

the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

@ilovermontbiking

And that’s what friends (and chariot rides on xc skis) are for. #naptime


TRENDING

PARENTING HACKS This month, parents share tricks they use to entertain their kids when dining out. Send your parenting hacks to ideas@kidsvt.com.

Nordstrom sells “mom jeans” with see-through plastic knee panels. Internet mockery ensues. Maybe they’d come in handy during mud season?

I try and come from a place of “yes.” You want chocolate milk with your food? Yes! You want Sprite? Yes! As far as toys, I always bring a small cloth bag full of MISFIT LEGO PIECES and let my son put something together, and I do the same for my 4-year-old daughter with her small toy figures. —HEATHER POLIFKA-RIVAS

I keep a TRAVEL TOOTHBRUSH HOLDER filled with bendy straws in my bag. Using a bendy straw lets my kids keep the drink on the table and prevents the dreaded public spill. —MINDI WIMETT

Adventures in BabyRearing MAY 2015

—BROOKE HENRY

A breastfeeding woman emoji is coming to your Apple device this June. Perfect for when you’re up at 3 a.m., nursing and texting with one hand.

Cheerios is sending out free wildflower seeds in an effort to help the declining bee population, but website Lifehacker says some of them are invasive species and shouldn’t be planted. Um, nice try?

Wee ones from 2 days to 6 months old can enjoy massages and hydrotherapy at Baby Spa Perth in Australia. Because life can be tough when you’re a baby.

APRIL 2017 KIDS VT

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/babyrearing.

For the first time in a decade, “Sesame Street” introduces a new character, Julia, a 4-year-old girl with autism. As if we didn’t love the show enough.

KIDSVT.COM

Two years ago, professional photographers Brian Mohr and Emily Johnson wrote about raising their then-2-year-old daughter, Maiana Snow, in the outdoors, backcountry skiing, camping, swimming and cycling. The couple have since added another daughter, Lenora Sky, to their adventurous family.

Outdoor dining is always a win! Also, casual/noisy places are good so we blend in better. We recently printed off a bunch of COLORING AND ACTIVITY PAGES and made each kid a little packet to bring when we go out. If all else fails, there’s the dessert bribe.

FILE: EMBER PHOTOGRAPHY

THROWBACK

Political science professor trying to give a BBC interview via Skype is interrupted by his two young kids busting into the room. The perils of working from home! We can relate.

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51st Annual

New Early Childhood Educator/Early Childhood Special Educator Cohort

51 and Let It Run

Starting Summer 2017

The VT-HEC is pleased to announce the start of a new Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Educator (EC/ECSE) cohort that leads to licensure. The first course in the series, Advanced Child Development, will be offered at a reduced cost as part of the Early Childhood educator Summer Institute being held at Castleton University, July 24-27.

ST. ALBANS, VERMONT

2017

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EVENT MMERCHAMBER SUVERMONT OF COMMERCE

April 28th–30th

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Summer Camp Programs Visit: heartworksvt.com/summer-programs

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Kindergarten - Fifth Grade

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Heartworks Preschools emphasize kindness, respect and a positive learning environment. Children have extensive time to play while engaged in learning. We offer an incredibly fun afternoon STEAM program, and an excellent Kindergarten Readiness program.

Renaissance students achieve academic excellence, develop a strong moral character, social and life skills in fun and engaging ways that bring joy to learning. Core academics, art, music, drama, French, Spanish, PE and character development occur inside and outside the classroom.

A rich and engaging academic and extracurricular program for 6th to 8th graders, the Endeavour experience supports the unique journey of discovery and exploration middle school students navigate with a special emphasis on building important social, emotional and life skills to ensure success in high school and college.

Shelburne, Burlington, Williston and Stowe Discover: heartworksvt.com

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PRESCHOOL

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SPORTS

Go Fore It!

BY A LISON NOVA K

Youth golfing is on the rise nationally. According to the Sports & Fitness Industry Association, the number of junior golfers increased from 2.4 million in 2011 to 3 million in 2015. Want to get your son or daughter into the swing of things? PGA of America is taking registrations for their PGA JUNIOR LEAGUE GOLF program at 10 locations across the state, from Rutland to Newport. Aspiring putters, ages 7 to 13, will get a chance to learn the sport from golf pros during weekly practices, don PGA jerseys and play on teams in an informal scramble format — where the emphasis is on fun rather than individual scores. The season runs from roughly mid-May to July and costs from $150 to $325 depending on the location.

To learn more about PGA Junior League Golf at locations in Vermont, visit pgajlg.com and click on the “Find a Team” button.

ACTIVISM

Change Makers

To learn more about Snowy Owl Tutoring, visit snowyowltutoring.com or contact Tom Loudon at tom@snowyowltutoring.com or 299-9642.

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To learn more about Wildflowers Studio’s new space and preschool program, visit wildflowerstudiobtv.com.

After receiving a degree in school counseling from Johnson State College last May, Thomas Loudon found a job as the planning room coordinator at Browns River Middle School in Jericho. In that position he started thinking about how kids’ individual needs aren’t always met in a school setting. That led to the idea for a business that would provide students of all ages with the opportunity for tailored learning at their fingertips. SNOWY OWL TUTORING, the venture Loudon launched last month, takes what he calls an “Uber-style” approach to learning. Students can log on to get extra help in subjects like math and language arts, as well as enrichment in music and drama. A stable of educators, many of whom are currently teachers in a school setting, provide interactive tutoring services using Scribblar, a digital platform that likens itself to an online whiteboard. Loudon envisions students using Snowy Owl’s services in a number of ways: to prepare for a test, learn a new language, get editing help for papers, build resumes and become proficient at using technology tools like Excel. Loudon says he’s hoping the high quality of the tutors, ease of the online platform and price point — $40 per hour — will draw in the virtual customers.

KIDS VT

WILDFLOWERS STUDIO, a multisensory creative play space, is moving to greener pastures. The business, which opened in September of 2015 in South Burlington, is relocating to the Barns at Lang Farm, an event space and plant nursery in Essex Junction. Wildflowers owner Lyndsy Blais found out last summer that the building where the studio is currently housed was being sold. While driving past Lang Farm, she thought how the rustic space, with plenty of land for kids to frolic, would be the perfect place to relocate. By serendipity, she soon discovered that Lang’s owners were leasing the building that housed their antique shop, and the two struck a deal. Wildflowers will be closed in June while Blais and her staff set up in their new space. They’ll add new features but will preserve sections devoted to tinkering, paint exploration, sensory activities and open-ended art. The venue will still have the homey atmosphere that families have grown to love, Blais said. In July, Wildflowers will reopen for camps and open studios in the Essex Junction location — which it will share with a small bakery. And, starting in September, Wildflowers will branch out with a small art- and nature-based preschool program called Sprouts, which will run on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings.

Log On to Learn

APRIL 2017

Find the latest info about the Youth Rally for the Planet at youthlobby.org/rallyfortheplanet.

Smart Move

EDUCATION

KIDSVT.COM

Middle, high school and college students will get a chance to voice their opinions about climate change at the second annual YOUTH RALLY FOR THE PLANET, taking place on Wednesday, April 12. Busloads of young adults from around the state will march from the Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier to the Statehouse lawn, where they’ll get to speak with lawmakers, visit informational booths, and listen to environmental advocates and musicians. Last year, 700 students attended the inaugural event, says organizer and Harwood Union High School social studies teacher Matt Henchen, and he’s hoping for even more this year. The day of action is organized by the Vermont Youth Lobby, a group devoted to giving young people in Vermont a stronger political voice in their communities, with committees at around a dozen high schools and three middle schools across the state. Lobby member and Harwood Union High School student Camille King says she’s looking forward to connecting with her local representatives at the rally “so they get to hear our opinions on possible laws that will affect us, from us.”

ENRICHMENT


BALANCING ACT BY J E S S I CA L A RA TI CKTIN MATTHEW THORSEN

reliable job, we used to kind of depend on the government and we used food stamps, but I can’t imagine having a second baby and living on food stamps. MURJAN: In order to have a good life, you need an education to move up. And for [the older generation], they don’t have education. When they were back home, they used to live a simple life, farming and having children. But in America, it’s hard to survive without an education or having a good job. On wanting a different life for their son: MURJAN: I don’t want [Hamza] to grow up in the kind of life I grew up in. That’s what moves me. You know, growing up in Africa, thinking about what you are going to eat tomorrow, they don’t have education or really good schools. When I was in Somalia, I never went to school. I only started going to school when I got here. Everything is corrupt over there. I never saw a good government and how things can work. The way I see it, without education you cannot go anywhere.

A Fresh Start A Somali American couple on the importance of family, education and preserving heritage

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generations of Somali refuwo-year-old Dad: Murjan Kassim gees who came to Vermont in Hamza plays Amir, 26, Macy’s the early 2000s. with his toys in the and Howard Center Fardowsa has adopted living room of his employee American mannerisms and family’s warm and expressions yet maintains tidy two-bedroom Mom: Fardowsa respect for her Somali apartment on Abdullahi Ibrahim, 21, full-time University elders. Through the help of Riverside Avenue of Vermont student a mentor — and with a lot in Burlington. He’s of self-motivation — she too young to underSon: Hamza, 2 graduated from Burlington stand the struggle High School in 2014 and his grandparents earned her way into a four-year degree endured to secure this life for him. program at the University of Vermont Years ago, they left their war-torn in medical laboratory science, where homeland of Somalia for Kenya. she’s currently a junior. Hamza’s 21-year-old mother, Each morning, Fardowsa drops her Fardowsa, was born in Kenya’s son off at her mother-in-law’s apartKakuma Refugee Camp, the largest ment, just across the complex, before of its kind in the world. In 2003, catching a shuttle bus to UVM. when she was 6 years old, her parents Her husband, Murjan, works 60 received their papers to start a new hours a week, cleaning at Macy’s on life in Vermont through the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program, one of weekday mornings and providing comthe official sites of the U.S. Committee munity support for the Howard Center three evenings a week. When Fardowsa for Refugees and Immigrants. finishes school and gets a job, it will Hamza’s father, Murjan Amir, spent be his turn to go back to school and one year in the Kakuma Refugee finish his associate’s degree in human Camp before settling in Burlington in services. His dream job is to work with 2006. the United Nations to help refugees in Hamza is among the first Africa. babies born in America to younger

On having a baby and starting college: FARDOWSA: He was like a month old the day I started school! While he wasn’t planned, school was a priority either way, so I just kept going. MURJAN: We were both going to school at that moment, and I didn’t have a reliable job, so I had to sacrifice. I decided she has to go to school and I have to [find a reliable job], and then maybe when she is done, I’ll go back to school. On preserving heritage while assimilating to American culture: FARDOWSA: I would say we are both very Americanized. MURJAN: I mean, we still try to keep our culture. On the weekends, I hang out with my friends, and we play soccer and get together with all the Somali Bantu community members and talk about life. FARDOWSA: Even at school, they give me a place where I can do my [Muslim] prayers. But it’s different with my parents because they learned to do things a certain way. Like, they say, “Why are you going to school? When is the next baby coming?” And I’m like, “I’m trying to finish school so that I can get a good job and have money to support a second baby.” And they say, “God will support the baby.” On the importance of education and self-reliance: FARDOWSA: Before my husband got a

On the domestic realm and bucking old traditions: MURJAN: One thing I can cook is mac and cheese! [Laughs.] Simple! FARDOWSA: I am happy that he is trying, because a lot of men in our community don’t feel like they should cook or clean. I am glad he is taking part in the house chores, because a lot of men in our culture don’t know how to clean a dish! And he takes care of [Hamza] the way I take care of him, which is so nice to have a man who will do that. MURJAN: And that has to do with culture. Back home, men expect women to do everything in the house. Washing, cooking, cleaning, taking care of kids — that’s for the woman. But here in America, we see a different culture. Everyone’s the same! The wife’s working, you gotta cook. Or you are working and you are not around, she is going to cook. It’s fair. We grew up here, and so we have gotten used to it. FARDOWSA: If I am at my mom’s house and there are a bunch of men there and she is not home, I will not tell them to go cook their own food! I will respect them and make them food, but here in our home it’s not like that. MURJAN: Back home, only men work. They are the providers. Here in America, everyone is a provider. So we take turns. K In “Balancing Act,” we ask parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.


BOOKWORMS BY B RE TT S TA N CI U

Ready for Spring? M

y 11-year-old daughter recently returned from our local library raving about an author visit. Plainfield resident and first-time author Yael Werber just published Spring for Sophie, a picture book that captures a little girl’s wonder as she observes the natural world reawakening from winter. “It’s a beautiful book!” Gabriela enthused. Published by Simon & Schuster, it hit the shelves in late February, right when Vermonters start to long for warmer weather. Below, Werber explains what inspired her book, and lends advice to aspiring writers.

KIDS VT: This book is so beautifully imagined that I’m curious about its inspiration. YAEL WERBER: I worked one March and April on a farm in northwestern Connecticut, and I used to take long walks every day through the woods with my dog. As the season merged from winter into spring, I imagined a child experiencing that change and what that might mean to her.

KVT: You’re originally from Sharon, Mass. How do you like living in Vermont? YW: I love living here. I chose to live here. I’m not a particularly settled kind of person, but as of right now, this is where I want to be. 

CKS serves learners from pre-school (3 years old) through 8th grade

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KVT: The illustrator, Jen Hill, captures main character Sophie’s sense of wonder. How were you paired up with Jen? YW: I am really pleased with the illustrations. Simon & Schuster gave me great options for illustrators, and, although Jen and I have connected only briefly through social media, she’s been terrific.

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KVT: I noticed in your author’s bio that you’ve taught preschool. Can you tell us a little about yourself? YW: Well actually I’ve worked a number of different jobs. I was a preschool teacher for three years. I also spent time on a tree farm, which I loved, and right now I’m working at a restaurant in Montpelier, Down Home Kitchen.

MORE BOOKS TO WELCOME SPRING Robins!: How They Grow Up by Eileen Christelow Author signing on April 8, 10 a.m., followed by a reading at 11 a.m., at Phoenix Books in Essex. Story time and signing on April 8, 3 p.m., at Phoenix Books in Rutland.

Wee-Mail sponsored by:

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Fresh-Picked Poetry: A Day at the Farmers’ Market by Michelle Schaub, illustrated by Amy Huntington Meet the illustrator on April 22, 11 a.m., at Phoenix Books in Burlington, and April 29, 11 a.m., at Phoenix Books in Rutland.

APRIL 2017

Brave Little Finn by Jennifer and John Churchman John Churchman hosts a special story time on April 15, 11 a.m., at Phoenix Books in Essex.

Find information about local events and parenting resources every Thursday in the Kids VT Wee-Mail. Visit kidsvt.com/wee-mail to subscribe today.

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KVT: Do you have any advice for aspiring writers, particularly children? YW: My advice is: just keep writing. Everyone says that because it’s true. I’ve been writing since I was a child, and I’ve always made up stories, even if they were just for myself. If I can write and publish a book, anyone can do it. I didn’t have any unique connections, but I really wanted to do this. I was also persistent and confident about my book.

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DESTINATION RECREATION B Y S A RA H T U FF DU N N

OTIS EXCURSIONS

Québec-whoa! The Saguenay region beckons with early spring adventures

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stout and onion soup, merguez, naan, and warm “boreal milk,” infused with pine from the surrounding trees — all for less than $10. That left me with change in my pocket for the casino at the Fairmont Le Manoir Richelieu (fairmont.com/ richelieu), where I know my children would be captivated by the castlelike property overlooking the St. Lawrence River. Indoor and outdoor pools, horse-drawn carriage rides, and a full array of games including horseshoes, croquet and shuffleboard make it an ideal base camp for spring

COURTESY PROMOTION SAGUENAY/ALAIN DUMAS

t 9:30 a.m., I’m usually sipping coffee, typing at my keyboard and glancing at texts. I’m not, say, dipping my hand into a bag of cheese curds. But it’s squeaky cheese for breakfast when on a road trip in northern Québec, just outside the borough of La Baie — the cheese curd capital of Canada according to a resident of the area. La belle province has long attracted families from Vermont and beyond to its urban centers like Montréal and Québec City. But the upper reaches of the Charlevoix region and Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean — a 5 to 6 hour drive

Val-Jalbert

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Parc National du Fjord-du-Saguenay

from the Burlington area — aren’t as well trodden. I wanted to do some solo scouting for kid-friendly adventures, so I left my own offspring, ages 8 and 10, at home and headed north for a four-day reporting trip. One draw at this time of year is the extended ski season. Many of Québec’s 74 ski areas stay open well into April — and charge just a fraction of what large American resorts do. Mont GrandFonds (montgrandfonds.com), for example, has an average annual snowfall of 217 inches, and a full-day ticket is just $46.97 Canadian ($35.95) for adults and $32.18 ($24.63) for kids ages 6 to 17. During my visit, I skied thighhigh powder before sitting down for a chef-prepared lunch of homemade

activities (or lingering winter ones, such as broomball and ice skating). There’s even more snow at Mont Édouard (montedouard.com), where a lumberjack and a longtime backcountry enthusiast have recently cut off-piste trails suitable for tykes. Clear signage, ski patrol services and warming huts with woodstoves make it one of the safest places to try schussing down through the powder. Once the white stuff melts, the surrounding Saguenay Lac-SaintJean area turns into a springtime

A whale-watching trip

playground with white-water rafting, sea kayaking on a fjord, whale watching, hiking, hands-on museums and an authentic 1920s ghost town. At its center is the 200-square-mile Parc national du Fjord-du-Saguenay, where glacial erosion some 175 million years ago created a 62-mile-long fjord. To sea kayak the Saguenay Fjord, book a reservation with Fjord en Kayak (fjordenkayak.com), which has two-hour excursions for families with kids ages 3 to 9, and two-and-ahalf-hour trips for those ages 9 to 14. For a child-friendly white-water rafting experience, Aventure Expedition (aventure-expedition. com) runs threehour trips that bounce over nine rapids on the Class 3 Shipshaw River. Prefer to watch creatures navigate the waves rather than experience it firsthand? Starting in May, 13 species of whales travel to the mouth of the Saguenay River to feed. Special zodiac expeditions with Croisières AML (croisieresaml.com) bring kids close to the cetaceans. For a hiking challenge, consider tackling part of the scenic 133-mile Notre-Dame Kapatakan trail. Kids can dig into the tidal pools at the Musée Du Fjord (museedufjord.com) museum located in Saguenay, a city of 175,000 with several distinctive

neighborhoods. To travel back in time, tour Val-Jalbert. The historic village has preserved 1920s factory-town life, complete with a general store, school and a pulp mill. Visitors can even stay over in a period home. But this is just one of Saguenay’s myriad ways to spend the night. For an edgier experience, Zoo Sauvage de St-Félicien (zoosauvage.org) allows families to camp surrounded by a herd of caribou. And at Parc Aventures Cap Jaseux.com (capjaseux.com), overnight accommodations include a tree house or a fiberglass sphere suspended in the forest. During my Québécois foray, I stayed at Imago Village (imagovillage.com), one of the coolest places I’ve ever unpacked my bags. A fun French-Canadian family oversees the miniature town of six colorful yurts in the Valin Mountains. What was described as “glamping” delivered much more, with wood-pellet stoves and modern furnishings straight out of Dwell magazine. The village is just steps away from a Scandinavian spa, where I snapped photos of disco-lit whirlpools to show my kids. From spring skiing to whale watching to sleeping in the trees, there are many adventures in northern Québec that I look forward to sharing with my family. I couldn’t share my cheese curds, though — they were long gone by the time I arrived home.  Local parents review family-friendly attractions in “Destination Recreation.” Got a spot you’d like us to feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.


HABITAT BY MEREDI T H COE Y M A N

Plastic-Bottle Greenhouse Greenhouse frames in progress

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For instructions and a shopping list, Elaine suggests visiting reapscotland.org.uk/downloads/ and downloading the Plastic Bottle Greenhouse.pdf.

Elaine Coeyman with grandchildren Mila and Leo

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to plastic-bottle presents on her front porch. Her newspaper deliveryman brought some along with the paper. To get them greenhouse-ready, she cut an inch off the bottoms and removed the labels. Next she soaked them in her claw-foot tub to remove any residue, then dried and stacked them, upside down, on bamboo garden rods. When pushed together firmly, they formed sturdy, rigid columns. Gaps between the columns let rain in, making the greenhouse self-watering. A contractor friend helped build and erect the frames to create the 5-by-8foot greenhouse. My mom prepared around 600 bottles, a feat she said she achieved a bit at a time, while watching Boston Red Sox games and sipping tea. She even enlisted my kids to help tear off labels and pick out a thermometer for inside the greenhouse. Recently, she described the finishing touches over breakfast as the early spring sun shone through the window. She’ll attach the door, install shelves purchased from the ReSource Building Material Store in Burlington, lay a gravel floor and surround the greenhouse with a wooden-pallet patio, which she sketched out in my notepad. Though my mom’s greenhouse chapter is nearly complete, her enthusiasm is seemingly endless. “I actually did a cool project,” she says, reflecting on the process with a touch of disbelief. “I’m excited all over again!” 

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f Elaine Coeyman were to write a book about how to live well, it would include sage advice about tackling big projects — like growing your own food and renovating your home — on a budget, without sacrificing style. I know this because, as her daughter, I’ve seen the chapters come together. Since my mom, a retiree, moved to her house in Essex Junction in 2009, she has painted nearly every surface, tiled her bathroom floor and built a backyard patio. All with thrifty tricks, like scoring free bricks on Craigslist. For her raised-bed garden, she got a deal on soil after discovering, by accident, that the hardware store discounts damaged bags. In summer, her garden explodes with carrots, potatoes, beans and tomatoes, all of which my kids, ages 6 and 8, love to harvest. Like many Vermont gardeners, my mom lamented the short growing season. So when she saw fencing made from plastic bottles on the internet, her wheels began to turn. She wondered if the transparent material could be used for a greenhouse, where she could start plants before the last frost and continue cool-weather crops into the fall. Turns out it had been done. She found an instructional YouTube video and, last summer, began collecting clear two-liter bottles from family — and a few green ones for “windows” and decorative touches. “I quickly realized it would take me forever to collect as many as I’d need,” she told me. So she started paying 5 cents per bottle for large batches at the local redemption center. She also posted a request on her Front Porch Forum and soon started coming home


CHECKUP W IT H DR . L EW IS FIR ST • IN T ER VIEW C O M P IL ED A ND CO NDE NS E D B Y KE N P I CA R D Changing Perspectives

How can parents address restless legs syndrome and teeth grinding?

promoting awareness, inspiring empathy

Changing Perspectives is a non-profit organization which provides disability awareness programs in schools. Contact us to learn how your school can partner with Changing Perspectives to inspire empathy and awareness. Learn more by visiting cpne.org.

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hildren of all ages experience sleep disturbances from time to time. Though the causes aren’t usually serious, disruptions can last months and affect the sleep of others in the house. This month, Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, tackles two behaviors that can keep kids — and parents — up at night: restless legs syndrome and teeth grinding. Thankfully, both are usually harmless and can be addressed with a few simple home remedies. KIDS VT: What is restless legs syndrome? LEWIS FIRST: There are four criteria that characterize it: an irresistible urge to move your legs; symptoms start or become worse when at rest; symptoms are relieved temporarily when the leg is moved; and it’s almost always worse in the evening, when you’re lying down, or during a period of being immobile. It’s been described as an itching or tingling sensation. Some people say it feels like you have a carbonated beverage in your veins. KVT: What do we know about its causes? LF: It’s not well understood, but we do know that it occurs in about 6 percent of children and can run in families. About a quarter of the time, it’s associated with an iron deficiency. When we give those kids iron supplements for a period of six to 12 weeks, it usually gets better. In rare circumstances, it’s been associated with a folate, or folic acid, deficiency. KVT: Can restless legs syndrome become a lifelong condition? LF: It’s possible for restless legs syndrome to go away during childhood and reemerge when a child gets older. Most of the time it’s shortlived, lasting several weeks to a few

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KIDS VT

A relaxing nighttime routine will reduce stress at bedtime

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months, and may go away forever and never occur again. Or it may recur in adulthood. KVT: Does restless legs syndrome cause insomnia? LF: It does because the child may be up a lot trying to move their legs around. Then you start seeing daytime sleepiness and irritability due to lack of sound sleep. So it’s the sleep disruption that you really need to address. KVT: How do you address these disruptions? LF: The best way is to develop good bedtime habits, which means the child should go to bed when they’re tired and not sit in bed reading or watching TV. Caffeine has been associated with an increase in restless legs symptoms. Massage, walking or stretching before bedtime, using a heating pad, putting a pillow between the knees and other relaxation techniques can also help, as can a diet rich in iron. If none of these methods work, and it’s really causing problems with daytime behavior, then parents should consult their child’s healthcare professional and determine if a referral to a sleep specialist is recommended. There are some medications recommended for adults with restless legs syndrome but these medications are currently not recommended for children. KVT: What about nighttime teeth grinding? LF: This one is a little more common. About 30 percent of children will grind their teeth or clench their jaws in their sleep. This condition is formally known as bruxism. It’s most common in children ages 3 to 6. The nice thing is, until their permanent teeth come in, it’s usually short-lived and not a big problem — except for those who have to listen to it!

KVT: What causes it? LF: It could be a problem with the child’s bite. A pediatric dentist can check that the baby or adult teeth are growing in correctly. Other times it’s associated with stress. Children who are teething or have an earache may also grind their teeth. Some kids have big tonsils that obstruct the back of their mouth, which can lead to more teeth clenching as they try to pull their jaw forward to open up their airway. KVT: Can teeth grinding damage kids’ teeth or jaws? LF: The good news is that it really doesn’t hurt your children or their teeth. In very rare circumstances, kids with significant developmental delays who grind their teeth as a rhythmic behavior can wear down the enamel. KVT: Is there anything parents can do to prevent teeth grinding? LF: The best thing is to just close the door so you don’t have to listen to it. But if you’re still worried about it, have the dentist check your child’s teeth and bite. Also, an ear, nose and throat specialist can check their tonsils to make sure they’re not experiencing sleep-disorded breathing as a result of their airways being partially obstructed by those tonsils. As with restless legs syndrome, a relaxing nighttime routine will reduce stress at bedtime. For older kids with permanent teeth who are still grinding at night, a dentist may recommend a nighttime mouth guard. It eliminates the grinding sound and protects the enamel from being worn down. K Got health- and wellness-related questions? Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF PETER BURKE

THE ART OF BY A LIS ON N OVA K

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Growing greens on the windowsill Harvesting

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SUPPLIES FOR SPROUTING For 5 trays of greens: • 5 small trays, (3 by 6 inches, 2 inches deep). Half-loaf foil baking trays work well. • 1 tablespoon of seeds for each tray. You can purchase them on Burke’s website, the Daily Gardener (thedailygardener.com) or through Wolcott-based High Mowing Organic Seeds (highmowingseeds.com). Make sure you get seeds for sprouting rather than garden seeds. • 1 gallon standard potting soil (with no added chemical fertilizer) • 5 tablespoons manure compost

Sow: In the bottom of each tray, mix 1/2 teaspoon kelp meal and 1 tablespoon of compost. Fill the trays with about 1 1/4 cups of the moistened potting soil. Level the soil, leaving 1/4 inch to the rim. Drain water from seeds, then spread one tablespoon of seeds over soil, so seeds touch but don’t overlap (no need to bury them). Press soaked newspaper into each tray so it touches the seeds. Grow: Place planted trays in a warm, dark place — like a cabinet drawer — for 4 days. On day 5, remove the newspaper, water the trays and place them on a well-lit windowsill. Once a day, water with 2 to 4 tablespoons water per tray. Harvest: After 3 to 6 days, harvest the shoots by cutting the stems with scissors about 1/4 inch above the soil surface. (Radishes are the quickest; broccoli takes the longest. Don’t wait too long to harvest or the shoots may become tough or bitter.) Gently wash harvested greens. Eat: Chop greens into 1/4- to 1/2-inch pieces and toss in a salad, sandwich or stir-fry. Put unused greens in a plastic bag or sealed container and store in the fridge. They’ll stay fresh and crisp for up to a week.

KIDS VT

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Salad made with fresh greens

“The Art of” spotlights creative skills that enrich kids’ lives. Got a class, teacher or skill to recommend? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Soak: Submerge the seeds in water for at least 6 hours, or overnight. Meanwhile, add 4 cups of water to your potting soil and set aside. Fold newspaper to a size just a bit bigger than your trays. When seeds are ready to plant, soak your newspaper in water.

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• Newspaper (paper towels, napkins or packing paper also work)

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GROWING YOUR GREENS

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• 3 teaspoons dry kelp meal (find it at your nearest Agway or online)

have a confession: I’ve lived in Vermont for more than a dozen years, and I don’t know the first thing about gardening. In summer, I’m green with envy looking at friends’ Facebook and Instagram photos of their kids frolicking among backyard garden beds, cradling homegrown cucumbers and picking plump tomatoes right off the vine. Every year I think to myself, I’m going to learn to grow my own bounty one day. That idea has yet to germinate. But in February, I took a baby step toward earning my green thumb. My 9-year-old daughter, Mira, and I signed up for an indoor salad-growing workshop at Shelburne Farms. Calais resident Peter Burke — author of Year-Round Indoor Salad Gardening, published in 2015 by Vermont-based Chelsea Green Publishing — taught the class. He took Mira and me, plus several other parent-child pairs, through the surprisingly simple process of growing soil sprouts, which take only a week to mature and can be thrown into salads and stir-fries, used to garnish a sandwich, or nibbled for a healthy snack. There are all different sprout varieties; Burke favors sunflower, radish, buckwheat, pea and broccoli. The lifelong gardener and father of five adult children started growing sprouts indoors in the winter of 2005, driven by the desire to have fresh salads year-round. Not only does his simple method yield crisp, crunchy greens, but it’s cost-effective. In his book, Burke explains that growing your own sprouts costs roughly $2 a pound, whereas buying them at the market can set you back between $10 and $23 a pound. Burke’s motto is, “You can’t mess this up.” Following his process, Mira and I grew tasty pea shoots on our windowsill in about a week. If even this inexperienced gardener can do it, chances are it will work for you as well. K


Welcome Spring! Time for new shoes!

....and more!

BURLINGTON

COLCHESTER

SHELBURNE

DanformShoesVT.com

*Selection varies by store.

A Celebratio n of Girls being G

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The Girls on the Run 5ks are unlike any other! Tutus, music, face painting and an opportunity for our Vermont girls to shine. Join us for this community celebration of girl power!

KIDS VT

May 13th in Rutland June 3rd in Essex Junction Register to run or volunteer at

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MEALTIME BY A ST RI D H E D BOR L A GUE

Pull-Apart Maple Challah Roses A Vermont twist on a classic Jewish bread

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very time I mention challah, my kids erupt in choruses of “Holla!” The soft, lightly sweet bread — traditionally eaten on the Sabbath and Jewish holidays — is fun to say and even more fun to eat. Challah is usually braided, but I wanted to create a shape that would celebrate the beginning of spring. So I sculpted the pliable dough into rose-shaped coils that look fancy but are fairly simple to make. After letting the dough rise, I divided it into ropes, flattened them out, then rolled them into spirals, like tiny cinnamon rolls. I divided each little roll widthwise to form two rose shapes, then nestled the roses into a cake pan for a second rise before baking. Instead of the traditional honey for sweetness, I added pure Vermont maple syrup to my dough. I also mixed maple syrup into the butter I spread on the finished rolls. Splurge on a good cultured butter for this — it has a higher fat content than regular butter, which makes it extra creamy and delicious. A word of warning: This is not a quick bread to make. Although there’s not a lot of hands-on time, the rising process takes a while. Try this recipe on a lazy weekend. It’s well worth the wait. 

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

For the egg wash: • 1 egg • 2 tablespoons water For the maple butter: • 3 tablespoons softened butter • 1 tablespoon maple syrup

KIDS VT

6. Place the cake pan on a baking sheet so that the bottom is a bit insulated and less likely to burn. Bake for 45 minutes, folding a sheet of aluminum foil in the center and placing it in a tent shape over the bread after 20 minutes. You’ll know the bread is ready when it’s a light, golden brown. 7. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5 minutes on a cooling rack before turning it gently out of the pan. 8. Pull apart bread and enjoy while still warm, with a slathering of maple butter.

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14 roughly equal portions. One at a time, roll each into a rope about 8-10 inches long. Flatten each rope and roll up lengthwise into a spiral. Gently pinch each rolled portion widthwise, so that you create two roses. Place roses next to each other in a lightly greased 9-inch circular cake pan. Continue until all the dough is used up and the cake pan is full. 4. Cover with a towel and put in a warm place to rise about 60-90 minutes. 5. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Whisk the egg and water together to make the egg wash, then use a pastry brush to coat the surface of the dough.

For the dough: • 1/2 cup lukewarm water • 6 tablespoons vegetable oil • 2 large eggs • 1/4 cup pure Vermont maple syrup (the darker, the better) • 4 cups all-purpose flour • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt • 1 tablespoon yeast

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1. Combine all dough ingredients and mix them — in a bread machine, stand mixer or by hand — until they form a smooth, soft dough. Continue kneading for about 8-10 minutes in a stand mixer or 10-12 minutes by hand. 2. Turn dough out into a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap or a towel. Allow dough to rise until puffy and about doubled in size, about 2 hours. 3. Gently deflate the dough by turning it out on to a floured work surface and gently punching it down. To make the roses, separate dough into about

You’ll Need...

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3 Square Meals

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’m the chef and food program coordinator at the Burlington Children’s Space, a local daycare and preschool that serves 50 children ages 5 and under in Chittenden County. I also have three kids of my own to feed — including a teenage boy — so grocery shopping is pretty much always on my mind. When Kids VT asked if I would take Hunger Free Vermont’s 3SquaresVT Challenge and write about it, I agreed immediately. Hunger Free Vermont is a nonprofit organization that works to address the root causes of hunger statewide and improve Vermonters’ access to the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps), which Vermont calls 3SquaresVT. The challenge is designed to raise awareness about the program — and the challenges of eating well on a limited budget. Participants pledge to shop for food using the average 3Squares benefit amount, based on their household size. For me, that meant feeding my family of five on $115 a week. I knew staying within this budget was going to be a challenge, and when I sat down to make an itemized grocery list, I realized that I’d have to be more organized than usual. For example, I’d need to allot specific amounts for each meal. Thankfully, two of my kids have access to free, nutritious food in the Burlington schools. This was essential in order for us to survive on a limited budget. Also to my advantage was a stockpile of fairly low-cost, healthy recipes that I knew how to prepare. It takes time and energy to plan for a week’s worth of family meals on a tight budget, and to cook them every night. I thought of how much more difficult the challenge would have been if I

A family of five takes Hunger Free Vermont’s food challenge

BY ERINN SIMON | PHOTOS BY SAM SIMON


The

Money

Issue didn’t have much time for food prep and wasn’t an experienced cook. At the store, I was forced to change my habits and choices. I thought carefully about the ingredients for each meal and tried to be precise in determining what we’d need. Ordinarily I’d grab two boxes of pasta without thinking, but stocking up on supplies was not an option. Also cut from the list: two 12-packs of seltzer cans, ice cream, my Diet Coke stash, the seaweed sheets my 9-year-old loves to snack on, my teenager’s favorite cereal and supplies for baking projects.

The menu was utilitarian and didn’t evoke the pleasure I usually get from cooking and eating with my family.

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TIPS FOR EATING WELL ON A BUDGET

Number of food-insecure kids, by county:

Cook from scratch. It takes more time, but if you start with whole ingredients instead of processed stuff, you’ll be able to stretch your food dollars farther and your meals will be healthier.

A. Chittenden County (1 in 7)

Check out websites dedicated to recipes for delicious and budget-friendly meals. I like doublethebatch.com, which features lowcost recipes and thrifty tips. 5dollardinners. com has indexed recipes, meal plans, cooking tips and printable coupons to get you going. Realsimple.com often features tasty recipes with inexpensive ingredients.

B. Orange County (1 in 6)

C. Addison, Washington and Windsor Counties (1 in 5)

D. Bennington, Caledonia, Franklin, Lamoille, Rutland and Windham Counties (1 in 4)

% 17 of Vermont kids, or

20,400 children,

live in foodinsecure homes

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*Source: Hunger Free Vermont

Go for garlic and onions. A little of each sautéed in a bit of butter or oil can add flavor to just about anything you’re cooking. Trust me, when they release their magic fragrance, everyone in the house will say “Dinner smells great!”

KIDS VT

E. Essex, Grand Isle and Orleans Counties (1 in 3)

Use fresh veggies. They can be pricey, but they’re essential. Go for whatever’s in season, or closest to it. (Carrots, potatoes and beets are good in winter.) Frozen veggies are useful, too. We always keep peas and corn in the freezer. We couldn’t afford organic during the challenge, but that’s what I usually buy. They can add a boost to simple dishes like pasta with butter and Parmesan cheese, or rice and beans. Warm veggies with butter for an easy side dish.

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3 SQUARE MEALS, P. 20 »

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As I looked over the finished shopping list, my first thought was: It’s not very comforting, but we’ll live. The menu was utilitarian and didn’t evoke the pleasure I usually get from cooking and eating with my family. When you’re food insecure, the fun of cooking — the connection and community aspect of food — is lost. The priority becomes making sure everyone has enough calories. When our family sat down for a dinner of roasted veggies and quesadillas, I worried about how much the kids would eat, and if they’d still be hungry when the food was gone, rather than what to do with leftovers. It was clear that we couldn’t afford to invite friends to eat with us. And dining out, for convenience or

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preschool •-•6th grade holistic approach ••

financial aid available ••

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W! O N S N O R SUGA April 16th

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SUGAR ON SNOW MAPLE COTTON CANDY HOT MAPLE SYRUP MAPLE CREAM COVERED DONUTS Visit the goats at the petting zoo, watch sap being boiled and enjoy a walk in the forest.

After completing the challenge, I look at my weekly shopping trip differently. If I want to buy ice cream, or a six-pack of Diet Coke, I don’t have to subtract something else from the grocery list, and that’s a privilege. I like to think that my family has always appreciated that we have the resources to live comfortably. Still, the 3 Squares Challenge was sobering. Living on such a tight budget made us intensely aware of — and grateful for — our easy relationship with food. K

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celebration, was out of the question. A takeout meal for the five of us would have used up at least a third of our weekly allotment. I also realized that a well-stocked pantry is a luxury. Though it’s not encouraged during the challenge, I relied on spices, different kinds of oil, vinegar, seeds and herbs to add flavor and a little extra something to simple meals. If I hadn’t had an adequate food budget to begin with, I wouldn’t have had a pantry filled with staples to help me along, and meals would have been less enjoyable.

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1st to Open April pm Sundays 12-4 Saturdays & ! s ie

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Dinner of roasted veggies and quesadillas

HOW YOU CAN HELP

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KIDSVT.COM

Many Vermonters might be surprised that nearly one in five Vermont children experiences hunger or is food insecure. Growing children are especially vulnerable, as food insecurity raises their risk of having health problems, developmental delays, depression, obesity, poor school performance and attendance, and aggressive or hyperactive behavior. If you want to help decrease hunger in Vermont, here are some actions you can take: • Let your representatives know you value programs that benefit food-insecure Vermonters, and ask that they support them. • Support the lunch programs in your local schools any way you can. The Hunger Free Vermont website has a School Meals Hub section where you can learn about school food initiatives and donate or volunteer. • The Burlington School Food Project runs summer meal sites to feed kids when school isn’t in session. Make sure your local schools let everyone know where kids can access food over the summer, or volunteer to help out at a site near you. • Donate to Hunger Free Vermont, or visit hungerfreevt.org to find out about events your family can participate in to raise awareness. • Take the 3SquaresVT Challenge, then reflect on the experience with your family. Untitled-5 1

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Q & A WIT H D A N C UNN I N GH A M • I N T E RV I E W COM P IL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

Financial Ed

An expert gives his two cents about saving for college

D

an Cunningham knows something about investing for college. As the father of four kids ranging in age from 7 to 13, he’s already preparing for the day when his family will be paying multiple college tuitions simultaneously. But Cunningham thinks he’s got it covered. The Bennington native is founder of One Day in July, a Burlington-based financial advising firm that helps people manage their investments, be they 401(k)s, 529 plans or traditional brokerage accounts. The firm launched last fall and is already managing nearly $40 million in assets. Investors need a minimum of $25,000 to access his services. That might sound like a lot, but many firms require substantially more. Understandably, Cunningham can’t recommend just one flat percentage of income that parents should set aside for their kids’ college funds. Those decisions, he says, should be based on a family’s financial circumstances. Nevertheless, he recommends that all parents set aside money every month for higher education. Even if his clients just barely meet that $25,000 minimum, he says, “If people get on the right track, we can help them stay on that track.”

KIDS VT: What’s the first bit of financial advice you give parents? DAN CUNNINGHAM: One of the good things about your readers is that they’re often reading Kids VT when their kids are little. That’s exactly the time they should be thinking about investing for college, with the “magic” of compounding interest [when accrued interest is added to the principal investment]. I actually opened a 529 plan for my daughter the week she was born. Start as soon as possible. KVT: Can you explain 529 plans? DC: They’re savings plans that allow money to grow in a tax-deferred way, as long as it’s withdrawn and spent at a qualifying educational institution. You can choose a plan from any state you want. You don’t have to use Vermont’s plan. I personally use Utah’s plan.

No matter how much a family can afford to set aside, the key thing is to create that discipline.

KVT: Why? DC: Utah uses extremely low-cost funds and has a lot more options for where you can invest. It doesn’t have a tax credit, which Vermont’s plan does. But Vermont’s plan has about double the fees.

The

Money

KVT: Do 529 accounts have to be spent on college tuition? DC: The federal government has expanded the definition to include other expenses such as computers and school supplies. Also, it can be used not just for four-year colleges but also for other training programs, even educational courses for adults.

have to pay interest on those loans, but you’re also not making gains on investments. So if you have a 7 percent interest rate on a loan versus earning 8 percent on an investment, you’re talking about a difference of 15 percentage points a year.

Issue

KVT: Why is it so important to start saving early? DC: If a family can save $1,000 a month, and do that reliably, at the point the child got into college, that would be worth about $450,000 — and by their senior year it’d be worth about $665,000. That’s assuming an 8 percent return. No matter how much a family can afford to set aside, the key thing is to create that discipline and get that money out of your checking account and into an investment plan diligently every month. KVT: I’ve read that if parents must choose between investing for their retirement versus their kids’ college, they should choose the former because you can borrow money for college. Thoughts? DC: The problem with borrowing money and using loans for college is that you’re losing a lot more money than you think. Not only do you now

KVT: Any advice for getting kids “invested” in the practice of saving money? DC: With my kids, we definitely talk about why we don’t spend money on nonessential things. So we don’t have cable TV. Here’s another example: Growing up in Bennington, I often played basketball with a friend who always bought the latest Nike Air Jordan sneakers. He bought at least six pairs. I calculated that, had he bought shares of Nike instead, today that stock would be worth well over $150,000. KVT: Any other tricks you use? DC: I actually simulate a bank for my kids, called Cunningham Bank. I don’t want my kids just putting their money in a savings account because they don’t really pay much interest. Cunningham Bank pays 6 percent. K Find more information about Cunningham’s firm, One Day in July, at onedayinjuly.com.

Get the popcorn and join Vermont PBS Kids for KIDSVT.COM

Family Night!

APRIL 2017

Friday nights at 7 pm, starting April 21 with Odd Squad: The Movie

KIDS VT

Watch on TV or online at vermontpbs.org/kids

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Government

101

Legislative pages discuss what they’ve learned in the halls of the Statehouse BY SARAH YAHM

W

letter and a letter from the applicant’s hile the Vermont legprincipal, are due in October. islature is in session, On an especially busy Friday in from January to May, the March — this session’s “crossover” Statehouse in Montpelier is crowded with lawmakers, lobbyists and report- deadline, the chaotic final day for bills to move from one chamber to ers. It’s not uncommon to see groups the other and have any chance of of students under the golden dome, as becoming law this year — three pages well. Wandering uncertainly through took a break from their duties for the hallowed halls, they stick out, an interview with Kids VT. The trio looking mystified — or bored — by an strode confidently through a maze of up-close view of their state governbusy rooms to a quiet table in the back ment in action. of the cafeteria, and knew nearly every But a select group of students adult they passed along the way. seems at home here: legislative pages. The teens hail from all over Each year, the Sergeant-at-Arms the state: Sylvan Zeitlyn lives office chooses 30 eighth graders to in Burlington and stays with an serve as pages, who hand-deliver aunt in Montpelier during the messages to members of the Senate, week, Cassandra the House of Summarsell hails Representatives and from Woodstock the legislative offices. and lives with a Pages serve for six host family while weeks at a time while in Montpelier, the legislature is and Theresa Hoar in session, rotating lives nearby and through the program commutes to the in groups of 10. They Statehouse. attend their middle But they were all schools on Mondays, dressed alike — pages then spend Tuesdays wear a crisp green through Fridays in SYLVAN ZEITLYN, LEGISLATIVE PAGE blazer, a white shirt, Montpelier. and dress pants or The page program a skirt or dress for has been around for more than a century, and has launched girls. Boys sport ties. All pages wear black shoes and black or grey socks. the political careers of numerous Assistant Doorkeeper Michael Vermont politicians, including current members of the legislature. More Wiater and Cornelius Reed, the chief doorkeeper and director of the page than 100 students apply each year for these coveted positions. Just one child program, wear the same uniform as the pages and expect the kids to take it from each family is allowed to serve. seriously. Earlier this year, Reed sent Applications, which include a cover a page home for wearing red socks.

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If you’re just going off of what your parents think or what your friends think, the country’s never going to change.

Both men emphasized the traditional element of the program. Reed sees instilling responsibility and accountability in all new pages as an important part of teaching the civility he feels is sorely lacking in national politics these days. This includes addressing adults respectfully. The pages don’t just deliver messages. During their stint in the state capital, they rotate between three primary jobs: sitting in on the House; sitting in on the Senate; and staffing the Sergeant-at-Arms desk. They also each track a House and a Senate bill, sitting in on debates on the floor and committee meetings when possible, to learn about the legislative process.

For their labor, they receive a considerable stipend for an eighth grader: $130 a week. “It’s their first real paycheck,” explained Wiater. “It promotes maturity.” Pages are required to stay politically impartial when talking to the public, but among themselves they have spirited discussions and debates, which they say can get tense sometimes. What advice do these political newbies have for the adult lawmakers in this country? “Find a common goal that everyone’s trying to get to,” Sylvan said solemnly. “Work together, and focus on that before you focus on the things that aren’t important.”


r e C m amp m u S

, y d a e R . . . m i A SCIENCE OUTDOORS ARTS GYMNASTICS EDUCATION ANIMALS SPORTS

E X P L O R E

V E R M O N T

&

B E Y O N D


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Acr2528720295400963305598.pdf

Summer Day Camp for Adopted Children & Teens 2017 TWO ONE-WEEK SESSIONS

July 10-14 & July 17-21 Stowe High School in Stowe, Vermont With bus service from Burlington, Williston & Waterbury FOR AGES 7 – 17 Visit our website for registration forms and information: www.camp4me.org | info@camp4me.org

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Talent Development Institute Celebrating 20 Years! Summer 2017

For advanced students entering grades 4-9 who want to have fun while learning!

Johnson State College June 18-24 & June 25-July 1

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10:23 AM

DAY CAMP

“TDI has provided an environment where being intelligent is encouraged … TDI has given me confidence to be myself outside the camp and introduced me to friends I look forward to seeing each year.” — Camper

TDIVERMONT.ORG • 802-658-9941 LUCYBOGUE@YAHOO.COM

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1

VOICE

BALLET

DANCE

ACTING

M U S I C A L T H E AT E R

H I S TO RY

CLAYMATION STREET DANCE

JAZZ

MOVIE

MAKING

F I L M RADIO SCIENCE

1/13/17 1:04 PM

Green Mountain Youth Symphony

Creative Arts & Music Program August 6-12 @ Johnson State College

Early bird discount until March 11

April Vacation Camp!

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plus adult & teen classes

REGISTER NOW

French through cooking, arts and other hands-on activities. Join our immersion classes, camps, and language trips!

www.thehandsonlanguageprogram.com

FOR AGES 4-19

Financial aid is available.

leah@gmys-vt.org • www.gmys-vt.org

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APRIL 24–28, 2017

TODAY

Does your child love Shelburne Museum? Join us for single days or the full week for exploration, art creation and outdoor activities as we celebrate earth week at Shelburne Museum! $65 per child each day $300 for the full week

Lego Engineering, Robotic Programming, Stop Motion Animation, Minecraft

To register email Mollie Trow at mtrow@shelburnemuseum.org, call 985.3346 x 3392, or visit Vacationcamp.eventbright.com.

Burlington, Essex Junction, South Burlington, Winooski

Build it BIG!

shelburnemuseum.org

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SUMMER SYMPHONY CAMP Fun introduction to symphony & jazz orchestra

JUNE 26TH – 30TH COLCHESTER, VT

Winds, brass, percussion entering grades 6-9 Strings entering grades 5-9

Limited space available Early-bird discount

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For kids who are wild about animals

For kids who wild animals! Forare kids who areabout wild about animals! Kids Ages 5-7: $195

New age group this year!

Kids Ages 8-10: $195

Week 3: Monday - Friday, Animal Adventures (ages 7-9) Week 1: Monday-Friday, Afternoons July 24-28 only still available! July 10-14 Four: 9 AM - 12 PM July 13-17Session ● July 20-24 Session One: 9only AM - 12 PMavailable! Afternoons still Session Five: 1 PM - 4 PM

Kids Ages 11-12: $390

Animal Adventures (ages 7-9)

Week 5: Monday-Friday, August 7-11 Session Eight: 9 AM - 3 PM

SummerWeek Safari 4: (ages 10-12)- Friday, Week13-17 2: Monday - Friday, Monday July ● July 20-24

Week 6: Monday - Friday, August 14-18 Session Nine: 9 AM - 3 PM

July 17-21 Full-day camp: A few slots available July 31-August 4 Session Two: 9 AM - 12 PM Session Six: - 12 PM July 27– July 31● Aug 3-79●AM Aug.10-14 Session Three: 1 PM - 4 PM Session Seven: 1 PM - 4 PM Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Full-day camp: A few available Or slots visit chittendenhumane.org.

Summer Safari (ages 10-12)

July 27– July 31● Aug 3-7 ● Aug.10-14 Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Or visit chittendenhumane.org.

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Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

1/10/17 11:33 AM

CAMP ABNAKI

REGISTRATION OPEN NOW • Overnight camp for boys that have completed grades 1-10 • 100 years on North Hero’s shores • Archery, sailing, camp fires, more • Learn skills, build confidence, have fun!

campabnaki.org The Y’s Community Partner

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2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Steve Gonsalves, PGA

Junior Golf Academy est. 2017

LOOK CLOSER…

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IT’S TIME TO DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW!

SUMMER CAMPS & RECREATION

9 WEEKLY SUMMER CAMPS STARTING JUNE 12-16 9AM-3PM DAILY PGA Award Winning Instructors • Ages 8-14 • Lunch provided daily • Under “The Big Top”: Pool, Ping Pong & Shuffleboard 802-233-6019 • stevegkwini@gmail.com

www.thekwiniclub.com

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ATTENTION, CLASS INSTRUCTORS! List your class in Kids VT for only $15/month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or classes@kidsvt.com

Register Today!

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This Summer Let Nature Nurture...

TENNIS & SWIM BURLINGTON TENNIS CLUB

NG E-LO F I L 2 TS SPOR Canoeing, fishing, archery, campfires and s’mores. What a great way to spend a week this summer. Discover Vermont’s wildlife and master outdoor skills. Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department offers one-week sessions for girls and boys, ages 12 to 14. Sessions run from June through August at two beautiful lake-side locations.

VERMONT’S TOP INSTRUCTORS USTA Jr Tennis Barracudas Swim Team Group/Private Lessons

June/July Team Programming August Camps JOIN OUR FAMILY!

burlingtontennis.com tennis@burlingtontennis.com

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Celebrating 17 Years!

JUNE 19 - AUGUST 25, 2017

egal

SUMMER

July 10th - July 14th, 2017

Camps

Curriculum/activities will include:

REGAL GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

Learn from music teachers, band directors, and stage performers with decades of experience

2 CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, VT

Register at vtjazzcamp.com or contact Tony Pietricola at tonyvje@gmail.com Located at Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, VT

DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 3-7

Regal’s science -based summer camp is designed especially for children ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will focus on sensory play and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options

JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM

Pine Street, Burlington southendjoinery.org/workshops (802) 846-4016

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YWCA VT Camp Hochelaga!

Every day of fun-filled camp Includes: • 1 hour of instructional gymnastics • Open gym time • Cooperative games • Outdoor explorations & play • Theme-based experiments, stories, crafts & activities • Nutritious lunch and snacks provided

Instructional Gymnastics Camp

HAND-TOOLS ONLY

! R E M M U S THINK Think

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JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM

Residential and day camp for girls ages 6-17, in South Hero

HIRING FOR STAFF NOW! Information at: www.ywcavt.org • contactus@ywcavt.org • 802-862-7520

After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 6-14

Come experience all that Regal has to offer! Our full-day camp includes morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activities including water slides and arts & crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an end of week gymnastics exhibition!

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp

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Night Eagle

A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲ ▲

Alternating weeks and After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 7+

Our Ninja Camp is filled with a variety training from ninja warrior, parkour, trampoline, tumbling, free running, yoga. Outdoor activities including hiking and water slides. REGISTER N OW!

802-655-3300

WWW.REGALGYM.COM 1/26/17 10:58 AM

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Wilderness Adventures

JUNE 26-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM

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THE SOUTH END JOINERY

Improvisation Sessions Basic Theory and Music Composition Listening and Jamming Sessions

Call for a full brochure:

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

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e s o o h C u o Y d i hy D

COMPILED BY ALISON NOVAK ILLUSTRATIONS BY HATIYE GARIP

I

t takes a special kind of person to work at a summer camp. Whether it’s tending to skinned knees and bug bites or wrangling dozens of kids with different needs and interests, it’s not an easy job. On the other hand, spending the bulk of the summer swimming, exploring nature and making art seems like a pretty sweet deal. This month, we asked local camp directors and staff to tell us why they chose camp life and what they like about their job. Not surprisingly, many of them said their experience attending camp was a driving force behind working at one.

Camp Farnsworth (run by Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains), Thetford I started going to Camp Farnsworth at the age of 9, and it has been my home away from home ever since. As a counselor, I really love being able to give campers the same enjoyable experience that I had as a camper. I want new and old campers alike to leave feeling more confident in themselves, having learned new skills and tried new things, as well as realize that there will always be a place for them there. The dynamic of the staff at Camp Farnsworth is something that is powerful and unique. We work together for just two months, but the friendships we make and the professional skills we acquire last a lifetime. I took on the counselor-in-training director position last summer because I wanted to provide a positive learning experience in which the oldest campers, who would soon become staff, feel confident and prepared to take on such an important job.  JESSICA “SULLY” GUSTAFSON, COUNSELOR-IN-TRAINING DIRECTOR

University of Vermont Environmental Science Day Camp, Burlington I feel everyone who lives on planet Earth should know something about the home they live on. I studied geology, but there are plenty of other “Earth-related” sciences too. Science education brings excitement and knowledge to people of all ages. What better way is there to instill a love of scientific inquiry than to start with young students? CHRISTINE MASSEY, DIRECTOR

Smugglers’ Notch Resort Summer Fun University, Jeffersonville I started working at the Smugglers’ Notch Summer Fun University when I was 16 years old as a junior camp counselor. I wanted a job where I could be outside playing with kids and sharing my passion for Vermont and our natural surroundings. I have since graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in recreation management, all while working at Smugglers’. I continue to enjoy working with children in our camp programs entering into my 29th summer! HARLEY JOHNSON, DIRECTOR


e to Work at a Ca mp? Wingspan Studio, Burlington

Circus Smirkus Camp, Greensboro

I first started working with kids and running youth art camps as a resident artist at [the arts and cultural center] Glen Echo Park in Maryland, early in my career. The natural and historic setting there lent itself to combining nature with programs and supported my view of nature as our greatest teacher. I was tutoring in French, having lived in Paris and Yaoundé, Cameroon, and previously working in international development, so combining French came into it. Relocating to Vermont in 1999, after an art residency at the Vermont Studio Center, I opened Wingspan Studio and voilà! Our youth programs weave together the arts, French and nature-inspired projects. I love working with kids because of their curiosity and honesty. It’s also super important to me to make programs accessible to all, thus the founding of Spread Your Wings!, our youth scholarship program.

After being a camper for six years, I knew that the summer I was old enough to work, I wanted to apply. Working now as a counselor is my way of giving back after so many years of receiving the “magic” that camp offers and doing my best to create my own magic for kids. Working alongside some of my best friends that I grew up with at camp makes it all the more meaningful.

MAGGIE STANDLEY, DIRECTOR

EMMA STEINERT, COUNSELOR

University of Vermont Adventure Day Camp, Burlington Since the age of 3, I have been attending day camps, and then sleepaway camps when I was old enough. Once I entered college and knew I wanted to be an educator, working for camps during the summer seemed like a natural (and fun) fit! I first began working as a counselor for UVM’s Adventure Day Camp the summer going into my senior year. The next year I returned as the sports and games counselor. Then, after a few years working as a high school teacher, I missed it and returned as the assistant director last year, and this

year as the director. ADC has become my happy place, and I can’t imagine not returning. EMILY GILMORE, DIRECTOR

ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain Camps, Burlington As a lifelong learner, I truly delight in sharing my passion for science, engineering and the natural world with others, especially inquisitive future scientists. ECHO camps provide that special place to let children’s natural curiosity and creativity run wild. CHRIS WHITAKER, EDUCATOR

Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Camp, Quechee Summer camp has always been an important part of my life. I actually attended a VINS summer camp when it was located in Woodstock in the early ’90s. I don’t remember much, but I still have some very vivid memories of meeting an enormous snapping turtle face-toface and running around

outdoors. After that, I attended an overnight camp for girls for eight summers, then returned as a CIT and a counselor for four summers after that. The life-changing friendships I made and the sense of belonging and selfconfidence that I cultivated during my summers at camp have instilled in me the enormous importance of summer camp experiences for all children.  I never dreamed that I would be in charge of leading a summer camp; however, I absolutely love the job. I always loved working with kids and the natural world, and so combining the two in an environmental education degree was an obvious choice. Graduating from my master’s program, I had no idea where my schooling would take me, but in a wonderful, coming-full-circle sort of way, the position with VINS Nature Camp was available, and I’ve been so grateful to be in this role for the past two and a half years.

SARAH SINCERBEAUX, NATURE CAMP AND ADULT PROGRAMS LEAD


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Cabin life promotes community and team work

All-elective program encourages self-confidence and decision making.

Campers at Betsy Cox and Sangamon have real independence. They make ALL their own choices every activity period, every day.

WINDSURFING CAMP WND&WVS is offering weekly half-day windsurfing camps from June 19th through August 25th. The camp runs from 8:45 to 1:45 Monday through Friday followed by a free lunch at The Spot. Visit wndnwvs.com/play for more information or call 802 540-2529. 688 PINE STREET BURLINGTON Untitled-3 1

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learn more @ crowspath.org

k‐8 camps | middle school apprenticeships primitive skills | exploration | nature games | art music | natural history | storytelling

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GUTTERSON ARENA UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT On- and off-ice training — Catamount style! 802-324-6876 ksneddon_21@hotmail.com | www.kshockeyschool.com k12h-KevinSneddonHockey0317.indd 1

August 14-17, 2017

Ages 5-8, 9-12

Kevin Sneddon’s Hockey School

2/17/17 1:29 PM

Camp Programs Pre-K to 8th Grade Scholarships & Discounts Available!

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LITTLE ADVENTURERS CAMP LITTLE ADVENTURERS CAMP WEEKLY SESSIONS FROM JUNE 26-AUGUST 18 $230/WEEK—7:30AM TO 5:30PM—SESSIONS FOR AGES 3-5 AND AGES 6-8 HALF-DAY SESSIONS ($115 PER WEEK; PICK UP AT 12:30) Campers will love the Little Adventurers Camp at Mater Christi School. These eight exciting, action-packed, weekly themed summer programs offer something for everyone! Sessions are available for two separate age groups: 3-5 year olds and 6-8 year olds. Session 1: June 26-30 — TIME TRAVELERS

Session 5: July 24-28 — SPORTS MANIA

Session 2: July 3-7 — CAMP USA *No session on July 4

Session 6: July 31-4 —TO INFINITY AND BEYOND

Session 3: July 10-14 — WILD KINGDOM

Session 7: August 7-11 — QUEEN CITY IN VT

Session 4: July 17-21 — FIRST RESPONDERS, FOOD,

Session 8: August 14-18 — OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

AND FUN!

(802)658-3992 — www.mcschool.org Untitled-24 1

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2017 Class Schedule

Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

teen performing arts

camps with the best

Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School! All Ages…All Levels

of summer fun

Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps!

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

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Call or email to hold a spot in our summer camps!

BURLINGTON & EAST BURKE VERMONT FILMMAKING ACTING PHOTOGRAPHY DANCE MOUNTAIN BIKING MUSIC

WWW.SOCAPA.ORG

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SCHOOLHOUSE

THE

2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA SUMMER CAMPS!

Visit our website for our

Classes offered in Colchester & Middlebury

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 celtikutie@aol.com www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

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Now enrolling grades K-8 for 2017-18

1/26/17 12:00 PM

Observation Morning: 4/13 April Vacation Camp, too

www.theschoolousevt.org

BEST. SUMMER. EVER. Y Summer Camps

• Boys and girls ages 5 - 16 • Burlington, Essex, Fairfax, Ferrisburgh, Georgia, North Hero, Waterbury

www.gbymca.org The Y’s Community Partner

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New Village Farm Camps A division of

Summer Camps!

Art, Music, Movement & More! info@artistreevt.org www.artistreevt.org

om Fr ck! s o le Mi oodst 3 W nly

802.457.3500

2095 Pomfret Road, South Pomfret, VT

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Building Confidence

Farm & Garden Ages 5-10

April Vacation Field & Forest Ages 10-13

Shelburne, VT www.NewVillageFarm.com

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NORWICH UNIVERSITY • 2017 Summer Camps Cyber Security and Architecture + Art

Summer Design July 9 – 15, 2017

Bring your ideas to life in a week-long design program at the only NAAB accredited architecture school in Northern New England! • Learn, explore and experiment as you study architecture with your peers and faculty mentors. • Studio, seminar, and hands-on learning to improve your design-build skills and enhance your portfolio. • Workshops, lectures, demonstrations and off-campus field trips plus extracurricular activities. • Open to all junior and senior students effective Fall 2017.

$750 per student

includes tuition, room and board expenses, studio supplies and transportation for field trips. The application deadline is April 25, 2017. To apply, visit profschools.norwich.edu/architectureart/ summer-camp-application/

Cyber Defense Camp An intensive introduction to a critical emerging field.

July 23 – 29, 2017 • Free for all participants! Get involved in information security and digital forensics. Learn about online protection and how to defend against cyber attacks.

GenCyber@NU features: • An intensive introduction to data security and cyber forensics. • Hands-on exercises in a cyber security “War Room.” • An outdoor cyber treasure hunt with rogue WiFi hotspots. • Cyber table-top exercises in real world locations where you combat cyber attacks; surprise cyber forensic challenges with prizes. GenCyber@NU is funded by a grant from the National Security Agency and National Science Foundation. FREE to students who will be juniors or seniors in Fall 2017.

The application deadline is April 30, 2017. To apply, visit profschools.norwich.edu/business/gen-cyber-camp/ Ranked #2

as the “Best School for Cybersecurity” in the U.S. by

Norwich University, designated as a

Center of Academic Excellence

in Information Assurance Education

and as a Center of

DIGITAL FORENSICS

Excellence by Department of Defense

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2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Keep your campers happy

Summer Camp

Use this handy sheet to plan your summer camp schedule. Find a downloadable version at kidsvt.com/campplanner. JUNE 19-23

JULY 10-14

JULY31AUG. 4

JUNE 26-30

JULY 17-21

AUG. 7-11

JULY 24-28

AUG. 14-18

JULY 3-7

Tuesday, July 4th

AUG. 21-25

CLIP & SAVE

LAKE ADVENTURE

CAMPS

Run away to circus camp! More than half of this year’s troupers learned to fly, flip, juggle, and clown at Smirkus Camp - and you can, too! Nestled in the hills of Greensboro, VT, we promise a camp experience like no other.

Ages 5-18 and Adult Camps: June-August Grownups, why should kids have all the fun? Adult camp: Aug 20-27

www.smirkus.org

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FREE SHUTTLE FROM BURLINGTON AND MIDDLEBURY

Ag e s 7-16 INFO & REGISTRATION:

3/29/17 12:23 PM

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lcmm.org 1/25/17 10:03 AM


JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Left to right: Cassandra, Theresa and Sylvan

Theresa Hoar

Why did you want to become a page? Because I wanted to see the inner workings of the government and how decisions are made — because there are different opinions — and how it’s settled. I think it’s been really cool to just see how everything is run from an inside perspective. What bills are you following? S.32 and H.39. H.39 is on storm water permits and how big of a land you need to be developing to require a permit. The present law is it’s an acre,

I like to keep feelings out of it, but morals in it. THERESA HOAR, LEGISLATIVE PAGE

GOVERNMENT 101, P. 24 »

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What do you want to be when you grow up? My grandfather asked me if I’d ever run for senator. I’ve never considered it but since he asked me I think it would be interesting. I don’t think I’d do it as a solid profession. My profession is sort of out of politics — I want to be a maternity nurse. But I also want a degree in business, and partially photography. Is it fun to miss school? I enjoy missing school. I would say at my school there’s a lot of drama. I think you escape it all. There’s a little drama [at the Statehouse], especially with our discussions, but it’s nice to be in the real world and work with adults.

KIDS VT

son by her side. She voted yes because she was defending second chances. There was another representative from the same party (Democrat) and she voted no because if she wanted somebody to take care of her 90-yearold mother she would want to know if this person was a drug dealer or a thief. Not-so-inspiring moment? My second week here. I was helping out these two people in the coatroom and one of them mentioned that one day I’ll realize how stingy or how awful politics are, and that once I’m done with the six weeks that I’ll stay as far away as I can from politics. So that was a shocking moment.

APRIL 2017

Why did you want to become a page? It was mostly the election that got me interested — why people have different opinions when the facts are the same. What bills are you following? S.86 and H.171. They’re both about expungement [sealing a person’s criminal record, effectively erasing it]. There was a big debate, the week before last, that lasted for — it felt like forever. What is inspiring about your job? The debate on expungements really inspired me because there were two representatives that had completely different points of view. One representative, she has a 5-year-old son and was robbed in her own home with her

KIDSVT.COM

Cassandra Summarsell

and they want to change it to half an acre. And S.32 is on state procurements regarding climate change — so when the state would hire people to do jobs. The bill is basically saying that they want to give thoughtful consideration to [environmentally responsible companies]. What is inspiring about your job? I think it’s really neat how there are so many different people. There’s men, there’s women, some of the representatives are in their early twenties, and then there’s much older people. There’s such a diverse group of people, and I think it’s neat how they all come together to make up our government. Not-so-inspiring moment? Some things that aren’t as pressing


Celebrate your Birthday at the Vermont Teddy Bear Factory!

Government 101

CONTINUED FROM P. 23

All parties include: • A private tour • A Make a Friend for Life® Bear for each child • Private party space staffed by a Vermont Ted d y Bear Ambassador. Ambassador.

To learn about our party packages, visit packages, visit vermontteddybear.com/birthday-parties The Vermont Teddy Bear Company 6655 Shelburne Road, Shelburne, VT (802)985-3001 ext. 1700 • bearshop@vtbear.com Untitled-7 1

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KIDSVT.COM

First, see the good...

200hr YOGA

APRIL 2017

TEACHER TRAINING

KIDS VT

Unveil your greatness during the 6th Annual Integrated On-Campus Yoga Teacher Training beginning in fall 2017. Open to the community.

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that seem to be discussed more than the rally and everyone there was in support of it. I haven’t gotten to hear the items that are. My first day in any arguments against it, so I’m the senate it was something about excited to hear the other political the Battle of Bennington and where view.    it was, and the wording of where it was because technically, apparently What is inspiring about your job? How much the Senate and the it was in New York, and that’s what House often seem very divided, it had said. And one of the senators but they also often work together. actually said: I feel like there’s been I thought that a trend that was kind of cool we’ve been disthat even though cussing things they work in that aren’t separate areas important, and and they don’t see this is silly. each other, other What do you than in the joint want to be sessions, they still when you work together on grow up? the same issues.   I like working Not-so-inspiring with younger CASSANDRA SUMMARSELL, moment? kids. I have a LEGISLATIVE PAGE Sometimes when lot of siblings. there are things So I’ve thought that to us feel about being irrelevant and they go on for hours a teacher. This [experience] has on end and it’s just like, Why are brought more light to the fact that you spending so much time on I wouldn’t mind being a politician this? I personally feel this is [an] either. I do like to see all the sides important [issue] but I think there to everything. I like to keep feelings was a five- or four-hour session, out of it, but morals in it. I’ve also and they were talking for two hours thought of being a lawyer. I’m not about one particular bill, which was dead set on anything yet. H.218, an act relating to adequate treatment of dogs and cats. I think Sylvan Zeitlyn the main debate was all about the wording. Why did you want Do you think eighth graders could to become a page? do the same work legislators do? It seemed like an interesting It’s really difficult to change your experience, and I thought it would be a good way to meet a lot of people opinion, especially if your parents or your close relatives or your friends in politics.   believe something. It’s hard to go What bills are you following? against them because these are the S.116 is the bill that I’m following. people you know and trust, and then It’s an act relating to the establishoften you don’t formulate your own ment of a racial justice oversight opinions. So I think it’s important board. Well, I haven’t actually that you are able to formulate your gotten to sit in on a committee yet because I haven’t really found when own opinions, because if you’re just going off of what your parents they’re going to be talking about think or what your friends think, the that because it’s difficult to track country’s never going to change. And down. I’ve talked to some of the senators and they direct me to a dif- we definitely need change right now.   ferent senator, and they direct me to Have your opinions changed because of this experience? a different senator, and that person Not the political views, but my directs me back to the first senator, opinions about how to approach and it just goes around in a circle. someone with different political Did you know there was a rally views have definitely changed, just about this issue yesterday? because I have more experience I went to it. I was afraid I was going talking to people who I disagree to get hypothermia because it was with. It’s very important to underso cold! I’ve only gotten to hear stand the opposition.  K arguments for it because I went to

There’s such a diverse group of people, and I think it’s neat how they all come together to make up our government.


CALL YOUR SITTER!

APRIL 21-30 During Vermont Restaurant Week, participating locations across the state offer inventive prix-fixe dinners for $20, $30 or $40 per person. Try lunch, brunch or breakfast specials, too!

*

SPECIAL EVENTS INCLUDE

Aperitivo: A Snacky Social Hour, Bottomless Brunch Bash, Culinary Pub Quiz, Feeding Frenzy and The Dish. TO BENEFIT

$1 provides 3 meals to Vermonters in need.

¡Duino! Duende 3 Squares Café 51 Main at the Bridge A Single Pebble Apple Core Luncheonette & Brew (Cold Hollow Cider Mill) Ariel’s Restaurant ArtsRiot August First Bakery & Café The Bagel Place Bar Antidote The Bearded Frog The Bench Bistro de Margot Black Krim Tavern Bleu Northeast Seafood Blue Cat Steak & Wine Bar Blue Moose Bistro Italian Restaurant Blue Paddle Bistro Bluebird Barbecue The Bobcat Café & Brewery The Bryant House Butch + Babe’s Café Provence Charlie B’s Pub & Restaurant at Stoweflake Church & Main Citizen Cider City Market/ Onion River Co-op

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* = New in 2017!

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Kismet The Kitchen Table Bistro La Puerta Negra Leunig’s Bistro & Café The Lighthouse Restaurant and Lounge The Lobby The Mad Taco (Montpelier, Waitsfield) Maple City Diner The Marina Maxi’s Restaurant Michael’s on the Hill Misery Loves Co. Morgan’s Tavern at the Middlebury Inn Mule Bar Myer’s Bagel Bakery NECI on Main New Moon Café Our House Bistro Park Squeeze The Parker House Inn & Restaurant Pascolo Ristorante Pauline’s Café Picnic Social Pizzeria Verità Positive Pie (Hardwick) Prohibition Pig The Quechee Inn at Marshland Farm The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room Roots the Restaurant Sarducci’s Restaurant & Bar

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The Scuffer Tap & Table Sherpa Kitchen Silver Palace Simon Pearce Smokin’ Butt’s Bar-B-Q Sotto Enoteca Starry Night Café Stone Corral Brewery Storm Café Stowe Bowl Sugarhouse Bar & Grill Superfresh! Organic Café Sweetwaters Table 24 Restaurant Tavern at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa Thai Dishes The Spot Three Brothers Pizza & Grill Three Penny Taproom Toscano Café & Bistro Tourterelle Trattoria Delia Vermont Pub & Brewery Waterworks Food + Drink Whetstone Station Restaurant & Brewery Wicked Wings (Essex, Johnson) The Windjammer Restaurant Windsor Station Zenbarn

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ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM

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vermontrestaurantweek.com

KIDS VT

For the latest dish ...

APRIL 2017

PREMIER SPONSORS

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Colatina Exit Cook Academy at the Essex Resort Cornerstone Pub & Kitchen The Daily Planet Dedalus Wine, Market & Bar Doc Ponds Down Home Kitchen duo Restaurant East West Café El Cortijo Taqueria y Cantina Esperanza Restaurante The Farmhouse Tap & Grill Fire & Ice Restaurant Foam Brewers Gaku Ramen Grazers The Gryphon Guild Tavern Happy Belly Deli (Winooski) Hazel Hen of the Wood (Burlington, Waterbury) Hired Hand Brewing Hyde Away Inn and Restaurant J. Morgan’s Steakhouse Joyce’s Noodle House Junction at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa Juniper Kingdom Taproom

KIDSVT.COM

In 2016, with your help, we raised more than $20,000 for the Vermont Foodbank. This year, The Vermont Community Foundation will once again match our total donation up to $5,000. Help us connect all Vermonters with local healthy food. Donate today at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

117 PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS (SO FAR!)


SPONSORED BY:

CALENDAR APRIL

g n i r Sp l a v i Rev

Week to Week SAT

Big Rig Day: Families get up close and personal with large vehicles, then visit Swanton School for indoor games and activities. 9 a.m.-noon at the Swanton Village Municipal Building in Swanton.

SAT

APR 22

ECHO Earth Weeks MudFest: Young ecologists celebrate Vermont’s messiest season with activities, games, live music and a daily “mud fling.” 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the ECHO Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. Through Sunday, April 30.

FRI

APR 28

Vermont Maple Festival: A giant parade, marionette shows, Main Street entertainment, specialty foods and more showcase Vermont’s signature sweet. Downtown St. Albans. Through Sunday, April 30.

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APRIL 2017

KIDSVT.COM

APR 8

EARTH GARDENS AND THE SEEDS OF LIFE: PLANTING A TRADITIONAL FAMILY GARDEN: Using storytelling, slides, music and hands-on demonstrations, environmental educator Michael Caduto entertains and educates familes on the topic of gardening. Ages 5 and up. Sunday, April 30, 1 p.m., at the Justin Morrill Homestead in Strafford.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


SUBMIT YOUR MAY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY APRIL 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM.

4 Tuesday

WINDSOR Art Monkeys: With rotating weekly themes, this drop-in class encourages children to explore color, paint, markers, oil pastels, clay, movement and the joy of creativity. Ages 18 months to 5 years. Children under 3 must be accompanied by a caregiver. ArtisTree/ Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $12 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

ADDISON

Youth Media Lab: Aspiring movie makers film, edit and produce videos while exploring the depths of digital media. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 388-4097. FREE CHITTENDEN

Lego Tuesdays: Young builders bust out blocks and get building. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184.

Crafternoon: Maker-minded kiddos create cool projects. Ages 7 and up. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m. preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE

FREE

Library Elementary Event Planners: Middle school students make plans and chow down on munchies. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Free Cone Day: The concept is simple — ice cream gratis at Ben & Jerry’s scoop shops worldwide — but choosing between flavors like Cherry Garcia and Chubby Hubby is oh-so-hard. Burlington, Waterbury, Rutland & Manchester Ben & Jerry’s scoop shops, noon-8 p.m. Info, 846-1500. FREE

Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m.; preregister for a time slot. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Read to a Dog: Pet-lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN

Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Family Game Night: Families drop in and take over the library’s tabletops for a lively evening. All ages. Fairfax Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: Players of all skill levels team up for card playing. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE

RUTLAND

WASHINGTON

SOUTH BURLINGTON EGG HUNT: Little ones hop on down to the library and enjoy stories, songs, games and crafts. Ages 6 and under. South Burlington Community Library, Thursday, April 13, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

MILTON EGG HUNT: Young scavengers ages

BARRE EGG HUNT: Kids find the goods in an egg-cellent adventure. Ages 3-10. Rotary Park, Barre, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Nonperishable food-shelf donations accepted. Info, 476-0256. FREE

kiddos search out sweet treats. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Info, 225-8699. FREE

COLCHESTER EGG HUNT: Well-placed eggs await capture by little hands. Colchester Bayside Park, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Bring a nonperishable item for the food shelf. Info, 264-5500. FREE ESSEX EGG HUNT: Little gatherers collect

6 and under meet the Easter Bunny and race to find candy-filled eggs. Bombardier Park, Milton, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4922. FREE

MONTPELIER EGG HUNT: Laser-focused

MUD SEASON EGG HUNT: Laughing Moon Chocolates and the Green Mountain Club present a festive morning featuring eggs hidden along a trail. Afterward, families head to Laughing Moon to meet the Easter Bunny from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Green Mountain Club, Waterbury, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Info, 253-9591. FREE

eggs and treats to celebrate the start of spring. Toddlers through grade 4. Maple Street Park, Essex Junction, Saturday, April 15, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Nonperishable food-shelf donations accepted. Info, 878-1375. FREE

NEWPORT EGG HUNT: Sprightly youngsters meet the Easter Bunny, make crafts, play games and search for sweet treasures. Ages 10 and under. Prouty Beach, Newport, Saturday, April 15, 10:45 a.m.noon. $3. Info, 334-6345.

FAIRFAX EGG HUNT: Kiddos line up for a

ST. ALBANS EGG HUNT: Eager youngsters seek sugary delights. Ages 9 and under. Taylor Park, St. Albans, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266. FREE

finding frenzy, searching for rewards in plastic eggs. Immediately following, the Fairfax Library offers hot cocoa, photo-ops with the Bunny and craft activities until 12:30 p.m. Fairfax Community Park & Recreation Path, Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. Info, 849-6111, ext. 20. FREE

LOST NATION THEATER INDOOR EGG HUNT: Sharp-eyed

youth search for sweets. Space is limited to the first 40 participants. Ages 11 and under. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, Saturday, April 15, noon. Donations accepted. Info, 229-0492. FREE

STOWE EGG HUNT: Little and big kids spread

out in separate egg hunts, followed by face painting and festive activities, featuring photos with the special bunny of the day. All ages. Memorial Park, Stowe, Saturday, April 15, 10-11:30 a.m. $5. Info, 253-6138. WILLISTON EGG HUNT: A parade of celebrators culminates in frenzied sweet seeking. Williston Central School, Saturday, April 15, 8-9:30 a.m. Info, 865-2738. FREE

Mister Ethan Musical Concert for Children: Little ones revel in musical merriment with a special local guest. Ages 6 and under. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 4:30 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences students coach elementary-age kids in reading, math and science. Grades 1-6. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5-8 p.m. Reading Buddies: Little readers pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN

Fairfax Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Little Explorer Program: Nature-minded preschoolers discover signs of spring with Mr. K. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

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Bring a basket or bag for your goodies!

Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players use their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

KIDS VT

CD Hovercraft Class: Crafty kiddos create a balloon hovercraft and rally for a round of racing. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m. Preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

Easter EggHunts

Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick Escape From Baxter’s Barn by Rebecca Bond. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

APRIL 2017

Chess Club: Strategists enjoy competition and camaraderie. All ages. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

CHITTENDEN

KIDSVT.COM

Sewing Club: Crafty kids try out a sewing machine and stitch a project. Ages 10 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

5 Wednesday


CALENDAR

APRIL

Akwaaba Traditional African Drum and Dance Ensemble

5 Wednesday (cont.)

Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918.

Mommy and Me Fitness Meetup: While moms work out, tykes cavort with provided childcare for 30 minutes, then kids enjoy tumble time. Ages 5 and under. Raw Strength and Fitness, St. Albans, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $3. Info, 288-1141.

Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with colorful interlocking blocks. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Sewing Club: See April 4. LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: Little ones move and groove in forts, games and free play. Caregiver supervision required. Stowe Arena, 10-11 a.m. $5 per child. Info, 253-6138. RUTLAND

Killington Lego Club: Junior builders bust out the blocks and creativity in themed sessions. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE Life in the Studio: David Macaulay, Vermont’s own award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral and The Way Things Work, shares his current projects and challenges. All ages. Rutland Free Library, 7 p.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE Rutland Library Book Sale: Bibliophiles thumb through hundreds of hardcovers, paperbacks, CDs and DVDs. Proceeds support library collections and activities. Rutland Free Library, 3-7 p.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than fifty vendors peddle produce, from fresh salad greens to apples and cider, alongside artisan cheese, homemade bread and other local products. All ages. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. FREE Wonderfeet New Exhibit Reception: Appetizers will be served during this schmooze session to celebrate a new installation. On April 6, the exhibit officially opens and admission is on the house from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum, Rutland, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 282-2678. FREE WINDSOR

Sensory Lab for Tots: Tiny tots try out selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $5. Info, 457-3500.

6 Thursday

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APRIL 2017

KIDSVT.COM

ADDISON

Quiet Crafternoon: Visual learners try their hand at involved art projects which may take more than one week to complete. Grades 3 and up. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 388-7588. FREE CHITTENDEN

Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect life to bird habitat. Ages 6-8. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Live Performances

‘WILLY WONKA! THE MUSICAL’: Young thespians take their talent to the stage in the spring musical of an eccentric chocolatier who seeks a child heir to his sweet fortune. All ages. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, Thursday, April 6, 4 p.m.; Friday, April 7, 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 8, 7 p.m. Info, 654-8469. FREE

HOPSTOP: AKWAABA TRADITIONAL AFRICAN DRUM AND DANCE ENSEMBLE: Led by master

percussionist and teacher Theophilus Nii Martey, this energetic ensemble encourages the audience to get on their feet and embrace the rhythms and style of West Africa. Ages 3 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H. Saturday, April 8, 11 a.m. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE

MILK & COOKIES WITH MISS MAY: May

‘NICK OF TIME’: No Strings Marionette Company mesmerizes school groups and homeschooling families in this comedy about time travelers’ sci-fi quest to save the planet. Ages 5-12. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury, Wednesday, April 26, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $4; group of 50 discount $3.50; preregistration encouraged. Info, 888-757-5559. ‘PEPPA PIG’: The pig star of the popular TV

series takes her first theatrical tour, to the pleasure of preschoolers. Doors open at 5 p.m. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, Wednesday, April 26, 6 p.m. $44-57; free admission for infants up to 1 year. Info, 863-5966.

VERMONT VAUDEVILLE: Old-school

Erlewine, teacher of Music for Sprouts, enchants an audience of all ages with her melodious and magical musical adventures. Coffee and doughnuts available for purchase. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, Saturday, April 8, 10 & 11:30 a.m. $8; free for children under 1. Info, 985-9200.

entertainment combines with cutting-edge music, acrobatic stunts and comedy for a one-of-a-kind theater experience. Back Road BBQ serves up savory fare. All ages. Hardwick Town House, Thursday, April 27, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, April 28, 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 29, 2 & 7:30 p.m. $8-15. Info, 748-2600.

FAMILY CONCERT: Jeh Kulu’s master artists

JUNIOR JAM: POETRY READING: As part of

from Guinea, Senegal, Mali and the United States get the audience moving and grooving with West African dancing and drumming. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, Sunday, April 9, 2 p.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

WILD KRATTS LIVE!: The brainy brothers,

Chris and Martin Kratt, amusingly educate the audience about wild and weird creatures in the animal kingdom, based on the popular PBS Kids show. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, Wednesday, April 19, 6 p.m. and Thursday, April 20, 6 p.m. $25-45. Info, 863-5966.

‘A BETTER PLACE, A TWIST ON OLIVER’: A cast

of 45 elementary, middle and high school students dazzle the audience through dance, acting and imaginative staging, in this contemporary spin on Dickens’ classic orphan story. All ages. Mount Mansfield Union High School, Jericho, Friday, April 21, 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 22, 1:30 p.m. $8-10. Info, 899-1174. VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA SPRING CONCERT: David Kaynor directs a lively

evening of traditional Québécois music, with guest soloist Pascal Gemme. Hyde Park Opera House, Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m. $12-15; free for children under 13. Info, 229-4191. ‘ANNIE’: This classic musical of a

courageous curly-haired girl inspires the audience with rousing song and dramatic scenery as wit and grit overcome Depression-era hopelessness. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, Tuesday, April 25, 7 p.m. $25-75. Info, 863-5966.

Poem Town St. Johnsbury, middle and high school students get the crowd clapping for original and favorite work. All ages. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, Friday, April 28, 6 p.m. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. FREE LIP SYNC BATTLE: Teams of local residents take to the stage and strut their talents before the judges, with the audience choosing the winners via text-to-vote. All ages. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, Saturday, April 29, 6 p.m. $22.50; proceeds benefit Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum. Info, 282-2678. SOUND BITES CONCERT WITH JUSTIN ROBERTS: This grammy-nominated

all-star rocks the family music scene in a solo performance benefitting Evergreen Preschool and the Boys and Girls Club of Vergennes. Doors open at 10:30 a.m.; performance at 11:30 a.m. All ages. Vergennes Opera House, Saturday, April 29, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. $5-10; free for children under 2 and adults accompanying children. Info, 430-4825.

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC SPRING CONCERT:

Conductor Lou Kosma starts the spring season with selections from Shostakovich, Sibelius and Dvořák. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, Saturday, April 29, 7:30 p.m. $5-12. Barre Opera House, Sunday, April 30, 2 p.m. $5-15. Info, 229-4191.

Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE FRANKLIN

Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while crafting and listening to stories. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Read to a Dog: Little book lovers select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420. FREE WINDSOR

Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:30-11:15 a.m. $12 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

7 Friday CALEDONIA

PBS Kids! Film: Youngsters enjoy an educational flick while filling up on free popcorn. Ages 2-7 with caregivers. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 9:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. FREE CHITTENDEN

All-Ages Story Time: Picture books, finger play and rhymes amuse all. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Early Bird Math Story Time: Little ones learn math literacy through games and play. Ages 2-5. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. FREE Essex Junction Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. New players welcome. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:1511:45 a.m. $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.


SUBMIT YOUR MAY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY APRIL 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM.

SWING INTO SPRING SALE

Friday Free for All: Junior explorers investigate the world, from rocks to bugs. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE Kids in the Kitchen: Bacon Corn Dogs: Junior chefs gear up for the summer hot dog season with this classic meal, beating up a cornmeal batter and mastering the fundamentals of frying. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 863-2569. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents socialize about library projects and savor snacks. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE LAMOILLE

Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and games. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m. $15 per child. Info, 253-6138.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. RUTLAND

Killington Magic: The Gathering: Novice and experienced players team up for card challenges. Ages 8 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE ORLEANS

Lego Club: Youngsters build with plastic blocks and enjoy companionship. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

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Family Story Time: Librarian and storyteller Molly Pease leads little ones in stories, crafts and music. Bridgeside Books, Waterbury, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 244-1441. FREE 7 FRIDAY, P.30

Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by April 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com. BIRTH ARTS INTERNATIONAL DOULA TRAINING: Labor Doula Training, Friday

& Saturday, June 2-3, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Postpartum Doula Training, Sunday & Monday, June 4 & 5, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Location: Essex Junction, Vermont. $450 for each two day training. $100 per session deposit required. Register for both sessions and receive a $100 discount. Contact Helena Wu, Birth Arts International Doula Trainer, Helena@goodmedicinetree.com or 325-3259 for registration and program specific questions.

pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring your body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Saturdays, 11:30 am; Sundays, 10 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m. Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Fridays, noon (postnatal core).  Drop-ins welcome; $15/class, $130/10 class pass, or $75/monthly unlimited. Location:  Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington.  Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339

NBT Bank offers iStrive Checking, Debit and Savings products, built

specifically for youth and young adults. Designed to grow with their individual needs, iStrive provides hands-on experience in managing their money and

supports a positive relationship with personal finance. NBT Bank also provides valuable educational resources to help grow their money skills. At NBT Bank, we’re as committed as you are to helping them achieve their goals. For more information visit nbtbank.com/istrive or our local office today.

KIDS VT

series of EvoKids and EvoBabies Yoga, ages 6 months to teen. Weekday and weekend classes available. Location: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington.  Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339.

B A N K I N G F O R YO U T H A N D YO U N G A D U LT S .

APRIL 2017

EVOKIDS AND EVOBABIES YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Register now for our spring

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BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, selfconfidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Have a more comfortable

3/16/17 10:41 AM


CALENDAR

APRIL

7 Friday (cont.) Mother Up! Central Vermont: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m. RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE

8 Saturday Author Eileen Christelow: This Vermont writer shares her new picture book, Robins! How They Grow Up, a humorous and informative story about two feathered friends. Christelow signs books at Phoenix Books in Essex Junction at 10 a.m., followed by storyhour at 11 a.m., then stops by Phoenix Books in Rutland at 3 p.m. All ages. Essex Junction info, 872-7111; Rutland info, 855-8078. FREE Second Saturdays: This child-friendly afternoon, a collaboration between the Norwich Public Library and the Norwich Bookstore, celebrates reading with various themed activities. Check norwichlibrary.org for location. 1-2 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE ADDISON

‘Girl Rising’ Film & Discussion: Bear Pond Books teams up with Tanya Lee Stone for a screening and discussion about the global campaign for access to education for females, and what that means for communities and countries. Recommended for ages 12 and up. Savoy Theater, Montpelier, noon. $25 for 1 ticket and a copy of the book; $30 for 2 tickets and 2 copies. Info, 229-0774.

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CHITTENDEN

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Ages 3-7. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $15. Info, 899-0339. One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Paint & Play: Young artists take an imaginative leap outside the box and paint without brushes, then leave with a take-home project. Ages 3-10. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $10-20; preregister. Info, 864-0123.

Science & Nature

SCIENCE AND STORIES: Preschoolers rally ‘round for nature-inspired tales and activities. Ages 8 and under. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., through April 19. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. ANIMAL BUDDIES: NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM:

Preschoolers take their stuffed friends to the Museum for a “hibernation” night on Friday before 6 p.m. The next morning at 9 a.m., little tykes enjoy a light breakfast and learn how Vermont’s woodland animals spend their wintery nights. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Friday, April 7 and Saturday, April 8, 9-10 a.m. $10 per buddy includes light breakfast for the whole family. Info, 748-2372.

Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. FREE

BARK BASKETS WORKSHOP: Mentor Anika Klem demonstrates how to harvest pine bark and sew baskets using spruce roots. Ages 6 and up. EarthWalk Vermont, Plainfield, Saturday, April 8, 1-4 p.m. $10-25. Info, 454-8500.

Common Roots FUNdraiser: The community comes together to raise funds for a commercial refrigerator and freezer for the Wheeler Homestead, while creating art, eating well and making merry. 5-6:30 p.m. recommended for families with children in grades 4 and under; 7:30-9 p.m. recommended for families with children in grades 2-8. Davis Studio, Shelburne, $10 per person; $40 per family. Info, 652-0188.

monthly gathering explores Burlington’s urban wilds through the seasons. Bring a notebook, writing implement and your curiosity. Open to the community; ages 5 and up. Rock Point, Burlington, Saturday, April 8, 9 a.m.-noon. Suggested donation $10; $20 per family. Info, 557-7127.

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: : Artsy types make seasonal masterpieces in this everchanging weekly series. Projects available for pickup at a later date. Ages 5 and up with caregiver. Shelburne Craft School, 10-11 a.m. $10 per child. Info, 985-3648. Engineer For a Day: Mechanically-minded youngsters make paper airplane prototypes and present their designs to the group. Recommended for grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

CORVID COMMUNITY NATURALISTS: This

PHYSICS PHUN DAY: ECHO staff and UVM

Society of Physics students explore the force of energy and matter through hands-on activities and awe-inspiring demos. All ages. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Saturday, April 8, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. SHEEP AND SHEAR DELIGHTS: Little lambs leap

while spring-lovers drop in and watch a sheep get its yearly haircut, then wash wool, and learn how to spin and felt. All ages. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, April 8, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $5-6. Info, 985-8686.

TOUR THE COSMOS: This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Saturdays and Sundays, 1:30 p.m. $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

Saturday Drama Club: Junior thespians create a character, spin a story and put on a performance, all in three hours. Ages 6-12. Old North End Community Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15. Info, 355-1461. Shelburne Sugar-on-Snow Party: Families sample the state’s “liquid gold” on ice and delight in boiling demonstrations, a petting zoo, walking trails and live music. Palmer’s Sugarhouse, Shelburne, noon-4 p.m. Info, 985-5054. FREE

Sibshops for Siblings of Children with Special Needs: Sisters and brothers of special needs kids join together for group games and a craft, then share a meal and conversation. Ages 6-12. Older siblings welcome. Howard Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $5 suggested donation; RSVP. Info, 876-5315.

DISCOVERY SUNDAYS: Families have fun with hands-on science experiments and investigations using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. All ages. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12.50-14.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Little

explorers and their caregivers discover the sights and sounds of the forest and field, while learning how the natural environment can be used as an adventurous classroom. Dress in outdoor clothing. Ages 5 and under. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Mondays, 9:30-11:30 a.m., through June 5. Donations welcome. Info, 229-6206. BABY FARM ANIMAL CELEBRATION: Visitors “ooh” and “ah” over cute and cuddly calves, lambs, chicks, ducklings and goslings. Horsedrawn wagon rides, tours of the heirloom garden and children’s activities round out the day. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Friday, April 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-14; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. MONTSHIRE UNLEASHED: AN EVENING FOR ADULTS: The museum opens its doors after

SPRING MIGRATION BIRD WALK: Avian aficionados of all ages bend their birding ear to warblers, vireos, thrushes and waterfowl, with the assistance of nature center staff. All ages. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Friday, April 28, 7-8:30 a.m. $10; free for members. Info, 229-6206. VERMONT MAPLE FESTIVAL: Come on, get

sappy! A giant parade, marionette shows, Main Street entertainment, specialty foods and more showcase Vermont’s signature sweet. All ages. Check vtmaplefestival. org for schedule. Downtown St. Albans, Friday, April 28; Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30. Most events are free. Info, 524-5800.

hours so grown-ups can let their inner curiosity run wild. Beer, wine and food available for purchase. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Friday, April 14, 6-9 p.m. Regular museum admission, $15; free for members. Info, 649-2200.

BERLIN POND BIRDING: All-age ornithologists

SALAMANDER SLEUTHS: Nature lovers seek springtime amphibians under damp forest rocks and logs. Ages 3-5 with an adult companion. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Thursday, April 20, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 per additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

BIRD-MONITORING WALK: Eagle-eyed

BUZZING WITH VERMONT’S NATIVE BEES:

Nature-lovers learn about Vermont’s own pollinators and build a bee nest box to take home for these un-BEE-lievable beauties. Ages 5 and up with caregiver. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, April 22, 10 a.m.-noon. $10-12 per adult-child pair; $5-6 per each additional child; preregister. Info, 985-8686. MUDFEST: Young ecologists celebrate

Vermont’s messiest season with activities, games, live music and a daily “mud fling.” All ages. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, April 22-30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

look for song birds, waterfowl, loons and herons returning from their winter in the south. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Saturday, April 29, 6:30-11:30 a.m. $20-25; preregister. Info, 229-6206.

participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Saturday, April 29, 7:30 a.m. donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE

ST. JOHNSBURY WORLD MAPLE FESTIVAL: This sweet celebration features the 5K Sap Lap, a hearty pancake breakfast complete with this year’s bounty, a downtown street fair and a kids’ fun zone. All ages. Downtown St. Johnsbury, Saturday, April 29, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 626-4124. FREE EARTH GARDENS AND THE SEEDS OF LIFE: PLANTING A TRADITIONAL FAMILY GARDEN:

Using storytelling, slides and music, Michael Caduto entertains while connecting family gardens with the season of renewal and provides hands-on demonstrations for families to use in their own spring planting. Ages 5 and up. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford Village, Sunday, April 30, 1-2:15 p.m. $5; $10 maximum per family. Info, 765-4288.


SUBMIT YOUR MAY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY APRIL 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books, songs and crafts en español entertain niños. Snacks provided. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:1511:45 a.m. $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.

Webby’s Art Studio: The museum’s temporary and permanent exhibits inspire specialized art activities for all ages. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Firehouse Pancake Breakfast: Firefighters fix a full spread of morning eats for community members, with touch-a-truck and the Vermont Division of Fire Safety’s interactive mobile Fire Safety House. All ages. Williston Fire Department, 8 a.m.-noon. $5-8; free for children under 2; proceeds benefit the firefighters. Info, 878-5622.

FRANKLIN

Big Rig Day: Families get up close and personal with large vehicles, then visit Swanton Elementary School for indoor games and activities. All ages. Swanton Village Municipal Building, 9 a.m.-noon. Donations accepted. Info, 868-5077. FREE LAMOILLE

Art Play: Creative-minded youngsters indulge their imaginations during this drop-in morning, where moving, dancing and making a mess are encouraged as artistic expression. Materials and live acoustic music provided; bring a change of shoes and play clothes. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 10 a.m.-noon. $5. Info, 253 8358. Lego Family Afternoon: The entire family busts out the building blocks for solo or team creations. Grades K and up with accompanying adult. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 1-3 p.m. $15 per adult-child pair; $5 each additional child; preregister; space is limited. Info, 253-8358. RUTLAND

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Vermont Scholastic Chess Championships: Checkmate! Players of all abilities sit down for strategy games focusing on fun and sportsmanship. Grades K-12, in nine divisions. Register between 8:30-9:30 a.m.; games begin at 10 a.m. Berlin Elementary School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $12-20 per player; free to spectate; preregistration encouraged. Info, 223-1948. WINDSOR

9 Sunday

Dance, Sing & Jump Around: A lively intergenerational afternoon includes traditional dances with instruction and live music, followed by a soup and bread dinner. Ages 4 and up. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation; free for children. Info, 223-1509.

10 Monday Passover Begins CALEDONIA

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: Educator Emily Lanxner gets the beat going with creative storytelling, movement and rhythm. Geared towards preschoolers, but all are welcome. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN

Audubon Nature Playgroup: Little ones and their caregivers explore the woods, meadows, beaver and peeper ponds while meeting new friends. Ages birth to 5 years. Open to Richmond, Huntington, and Hinesburg residents. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9:30-11 a.m. preregister. Info, 434-3068. FREE Colchester Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Essex Junction Lego Club: Inventive kiddos press together plastic-piece creations. Ages 5-12. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See April 8, 5-8 p.m. Pajama Story Time: Flannel-clad wee ones bring their stuffed pals for tales, crafts and a bedtime snack. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Photography Club: Amateur lens-lovers learn tips to improve their camera skills. Grades 6-8. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Preschool Music: See April 6, 11 a.m.

FRANKLIN

Fairfax Crafternoon: Fairy Gardens: Artsy kids make miniature gardens from natural materials and live plants and seeds. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5. RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: Little musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

11 Tuesday ADDISON

Youth Media Lab: See April 4. CHITTENDEN

Preschool Music: See April 4. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See April 4. Spanish Musical Kids: See April 4. FRANKLIN

Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See April 4. WASHINGTON

Lego Challenge: Kids drop in and test their STEM imaginations with plastic blocks. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m. Info, 244-7036. WINDSOR

Lego Tuesdays: See April 4.

12 Wednesday CHITTENDEN

Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: See April 5. Dungeons & Dragons Night: Players don invented personas and use cleverness and luck to overcome challenges, defeat enemies and save the day. Beginners welcome. Ages 9-13. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

FREE

Homeschool Program: Tree of Wonder – Life in the Rainforest: Under the direction of environmental educator Kristen Littlefield, home learners soak up stories and create their own Almendro trees, try basic Spanish vocabulary, and tackle Rainforest Math and Jungle Jeopardy. Ages 6 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Kids in the Kitchen: Carrot Patch Cupcakes: This whimsical class gets budding bakers dreaming of garden days as they create chocolate cupcakes with buried sweet treasures of strawberries dipped in orangedyed white chocolate. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 863-2569. One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5. Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Yoga for Kids: See April 5. FRANKLIN

Author Gigi Priebe: The creator of the beloved early chapter book series Henry Whiskers meets fans and signs books. All ages. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Mommy and Me Fitness Meetup: See April 5. LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5. RUTLAND

Killington Lego Club: See April 5. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. WASHINGTON

Song Circle: Community Sing-Along: Songbirds raise their voices with singer/ songwriter Heidi Wilson in the lead. All ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR

Sensory Lab for Tots: See April 5.

13 THURSDAY, P.32

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Family Fun Night: The whole family turns out for games, Legos, crafts and more. All ages. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 5-6:30 p.m.; pizza available with preregistration. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around their favorite pick of the year. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

KIDS VT

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m. $8. Info, 655-3300.

WASHINGTON

Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

APRIL 2017

CHITTENDEN

Shelburne Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 8.

Spanish Musical Kids: Amigos learn Latin American songs and games with experienced teacher Constancia Gómez. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

KIDSVT.COM

Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 384-7447. FREE

Open House and Passover Tasting: Curious families check out educational opportunities for kids in preschool through age 12. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218. FREE

Queer Care Support: Family members and caregivers of queer and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE


CALENDAR

APRIL

13 Thursday ADDISON

Quiet Crafternoon: See April 6. CHITTENDEN

Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from measuring forests to aquatic ecosystems. Ages 9-12. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare provided by request. All ages. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 765-337-2778. FREE

Lego Club: See April 6. Preschool Music: See April 6. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See April 6. FRANKLIN

Lego Thursdays: See April 6. St. Albans Library Legos: Aspiring architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these readaloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial Library,

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: See

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME: Essex Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628. NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME:

Brown Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621. RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

KIDSVT.COM

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME:

Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: Craftsbury

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East

Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118. ESSEX JUNCTION BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

9:10-9:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Brownell Library, 10-10:45

a.m.; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St. Albans

FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3-YEAROLDS: Stowe Library, 10:30-11:30

APRIL 2017

Monday.

SHELBURNE STORY TIME: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

KIDS VT

ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

32

TUESDAY

a.m. Info, 253-6145.

WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 496-4205. WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library, 10

a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME:

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Fairfax Community Library, 9:3010:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420. HIGHGATE STORY TIME: Highgate

Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse Library,

9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: Cobleigh

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

MILTON INFANT STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

14 Friday

Friday Free for All: See April 7.

CALEDONIA

Fairbanks Homeschool Day: Students expand their scholastic horizons with a variety of programs. Call for specific topics and location. Grades K-8. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $8-10 includes museum admission; $5 for planetarium; one free adult per paying child. Info, 748-2372. CHITTENDEN

Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Kids in the Kitchen: Carrot Patch Cupcakes: See April 12. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See April 7. Music With Robert: Families sing along with a local legend. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Pizza & Painted Pottery: Parents and kids put a pleasurable end to the week by painting together. Pizza, salad and ice cream available for purchase at 5 p.m.; art begins at 6 p.m. Children must be accompanied by a participating adult. Davis Studio, Shelburne, 6-7:30 p.m. $25 per person; preregister. Info, 425-2700.

Early Bird Math Story Time: See April 7. Family Gym: See April 7.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: Kellogg-

SWANTON STORYTIME: Swanton

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

SOUTH BURLINGTON TINY TOT TIME:

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORY & ENRICHMENT HOUR: Warren Public

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME:

Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

South Burlington Community Library, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

WILLISTON STORY TIME: Dorothy

Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY

BARNES & NOBLE STORY TIME: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001. HIGHGATE STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

10 a.m.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See Monday,

10 a.m.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith Public Library,

10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

MILTON RHYTHM & MOVEMENT TODDLER STORY TIME: Milton Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME:

Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184.

Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 595-2582. THURSDAY

BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence

MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

FRANKLIN STORY TIME: Haston

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505. HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday. NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME:

See Monday.

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860. SHELBURNE MUSICAL STORY TIME:

Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124. ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: See

Monday.

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211. WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

SOUTH BURLINGTON BABY BOOK TIME:

South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

STOWE STORY TIME FOR 3-5-YEAROLDS: Stowe Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m.

Info, 253-6145.

Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Monday.

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

RICHMOND STORY TIME: Richmond

KILLINGTON STORYTIME: Sherburne

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln

Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

Kimball Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583.

Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643.

FRIDAY

BRANDON STORY TIME: Brandon

Public Library, 2 p.m. Info, 247-8230. CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library,

9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME: Essex

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME:

Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073. SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA:

Barnes & Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001.

ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291. STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME:

Stowe Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. SWANTON STORYTIME: See

Wednesday.

WINOOSKI STORY TIME: Winooski

Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424. SATURDAY

BARRE STORY TIME: Next Chapter

Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114. COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. FRANKLIN WALK-IN STORY HOUR:

Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505.

MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public Library,

10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.


SUBMIT YOUR MAY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY APRIL 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Songs & Stories With Matthew: Musician Matthew Witten kicks off the morning with tunes and tales. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE RUTLAND

Killington Magic: The Gathering: See April 7. ORLEANS

Easter Craft: Artsy-minded kiddos congregate for imaginative crafting. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

RUTLAND

WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON

CALEDONIA

‘The Elves and the Shoemaker’: The Traveling Storytellers enchant the audience with the timeless tale of a hardworking cobbler and his miniature friends. All ages. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN

Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See April 8.

16 Sunday Happy Easter! CHITTENDEN

Essex Open Gym: See April 9. Family Gym: See April 7. Shelburne Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 8.

17 Monday CALEDONIA

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See April 8.

Essex Junction Lego Club: See April 10.

John Churchman: ‘Brave Little Finn’: Springtime and Easter are celebrated in this special storytime with the author of imaginative farm-centered picture books. All ages. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11 a.m. Info, 872-7111. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday Drama Club: See April 8.

Webby’s Art Studio: See April 8.

CHITTENDEN

Audubon Nature Playgroup: See April 10. Milton Legos at the Library: Junior builders bust out interlocking blocks. Snacks served. Grades K-5. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5. Preschool Music: See April 6, 11 a.m. Spanish Musical Kids: See April 10. Stories with Megan: See April 10. FRANKLIN

Lab Girls: Young women empower themselves by exploring science through hands-on experiments. This month, girls examine their own DNA with the assistance of a microbiologist. Grades 6-12. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5.

APRIL 2017

Spring Volunteer Work Day: Folks of all ages lend their helping hands at the museum, both inside and outside. Sandwiches provided. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See April 10.

KIDSVT.COM

Shelburne Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 8.

Visit Kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

Capital City Winter Farmers Market: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and crafts change hands at an indoor offseason celebration of locavorism. All ages. Montpelier City Center, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 223-2958. FREE

Emily Donegan: This local musician enchants with melodious, family-friendly folk tunes, encouraging the audience to sing and dance, too. All ages. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 11 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Family Movie Matinee: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. All ages. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? Tell us more! He or she could be featured as One to Watch in an upcoming issue of Kids VT.

FRANKLIN

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

15 Saturday

One to Watch

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Lego Club: See April 7. Family Story Time: See April 7.

It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See April 10.

KIDS VT

33

18 TUESDAY, P.34 k2v-OneToWatch-0216.indd 1

1/29/16 12:21 PM


CALENDAR

APRIL 18 Tuesday

New Parents

Passover Ends ADDISON

Youth Media Lab: See April 4. CHITTENDEN

EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: Moms tote

their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Tuesdays, 10-11:15 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45-11:55 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m. & noon-1 p.m. and Sundays, 12:15-1:30 p.m. $15; $130 for a 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

Kids in the Kitchen: Taco Pizza: Chefs-intraining try a new twist on Taco Tuesday while mastering from-scratch dough, stove safety and how to pile a pizza high with veggie toppings. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 863-2569.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-to-be

Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: See April 4.

build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Mondays, 5:45-7 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15-5:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45-7 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m.; Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. and Sundays, 10-11:30 a.m. $15 or $130 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA: Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, Mondays, 12:15-1:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 12:15-1:15 p.m.; Thursdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. and Saturdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. MIDDLEBURY LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING AND PLAYGROUP: Families with infants and

toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, first Wednesday of every month, 10 a.m. FREE MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas and

their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 223-5302.

MOTHER’S GATHERING: Moms and new babies

spread out, sip tea, nurse and swap stories. Children under 2 welcome. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 223-5302. FREE

PRENATAL EMPOWERMENT CLINIC: Expectant mamas get guidance on health, nutrition and exercise. Hemmett Health, South Burlington, Wednesdays, 12-12:30 p.m., through April 26; preregister. Info, 879-1703. FREE ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their

34

KIDS VT

APRIL 2017

KIDSVT.COM

little ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, first Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. FREE

PRENATAL EMPOWERMENT CLINIC: Expectant mamas get guidance on health, nutrition and exercise. Hemmett Health, Montpelier, Thursdays, 12-12:30 p.m., through April 27; preregister. Info, 879-1703. FREE NEW MAMA YOGA: New and experienced

moms tote their tiny ones to a relaxed and social class, followed by a playgroup. Bring a few blankets for your baby’s comfort. Ages 6 weeks to 6 months. Kula Yoga Center, Stowe, Saturdays, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $16.

Preschool Music: See April 4. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See April 4.

Spanish Musical Kids: See April 4. Williston Read to a Dog: See April 4. BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New moms

bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, second Tuesday of every month, 10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228.

FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM:

Expectant, novice and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, second Tuesday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE

TODDLER LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Moms

who are nursing beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, third Monday of every month, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 388-0363. FREE BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Moms nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, third Tuesday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 349-3825. FREE BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing

moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, third Wednesday of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 888-3470. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

FRANKLIN

Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See April 4. WASHINGTON

Family Lego Free Build: The whole family has fun with the library’s abundance of plastic blocks. Ages 5 and up. Adult supervision required for children under 8. Waterbury Public Library, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR

Lego Tuesdays: See April 4. NEW YORK

Plattsburgh Preschool Story Hour: Aspiring art connoisseurs and their caregivers listen to a picture book, look at original works and create a project to take home. Ages 3-5. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, N.Y., 10 a.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 518-564-2474. FREE

19 Wednesday CHITTENDEN

Baby Charms: Non-walking babies sing silly songs, dance and make music. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: See April 5.

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, third Thursday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE

Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

CENTRAL VERMONT NURSING BEYOND A YEAR:

Yoga for Kids: See April 5.

Mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding, including nighttime parenting, weaning, healthy eating habits and setting limits, in a supportive setting. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, third Friday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor

Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting while savoring snacks. Middlebury Recreation Center, fourth Wednesday of every month, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 349-9084. FREE

One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5. FRANKLIN

Mommy and Me Fitness Meetup: See April 5. STEM Club: Sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5. RUTLAND

Killington Lego Club: See April 5.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. WASHINGTON

Children’s Film Night: Cinema-lovers of all ages take in a short flick before community dinner is served. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30-6 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE Family Movie Night: The Vermont Historical Society returns to the 1970s for an original family-oriented flick. Popcorn and drinks available for sale; children must be accompanied by an adult. Vermont History Center, Barre, 6:30 p.m. Info, 479-8500. FREE

20 Thursday ADDISON

Quiet Crafternoon: See April 6. CALEDONIA

ShoeFly Trail Running & Walking Series: Fleet-footed families enjoy fitness together in a 5K, 10K or one-mile walk/run. Entry includes admission to Thursday races on the Kingdom Trails through August and on the second Tuesday of each month at 5 p.m. at the PRKR Trails in Littleton, N.H. Ages 3 and up. Kingdom Trails Yurt, East Burke, 5-7:30 p.m. $45; free for children ages 10 and under; preregister. Info, 703-598-1934. CHITTENDEN

Lego Club: See April 6. Preschool Music: See April 6. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See April 6. FRANKLIN

Lego Thursdays: See April 6. PJ Story Hour: Tykes in nightwear nestle together for nursery rhymes, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE Read to a Dog: See April 6.

21 Friday CALEDONIA

Pizza and Movie Night: Cinema-lovers enjoy dinner at the library and an all-ages flick. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 6 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN

All-Ages Story Time: See April 7. Early Bird Math Story Time: See April 7. Family Gym: See April 7. Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a familyfriendly film while feasting on free popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Friday Free for All: See April 7. Homeschool Project Day: Out-of-classroom students bring projects to pursue, or share their learning with an audience of parents and siblings. Grades K-12. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Jiggity Jog: A musical meet-up includes singing, dancing and instrument playing. Ages 2-5. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See April 7.


SUBMIT YOUR MAY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY APRIL 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Music With Robert: See April 14. Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents interested in assisting with Essex Eats Out meet at the library at 3:45 p.m. or St. James Church at 5 p.m. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:45-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE RUTLAND

Killington Magic: The Gathering: See April 7. ORLEANS

Lego Club: See April 7. WASHINGTON

Family Story Time: See April 7.

22 Saturday ADDISON

Relay for Life: Purple-clad team members camp out and enjoy speakers, live music, Zumba and a luminaria celebration during this fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. All ages. Middlebury College, 1-9 p.m. $10. Info, 872-6321. CHITTENDEN

Amy Huntington: ‘Fresh-Picked Poetry: A Day at the Farmers’ Market’: The local illustrator of this children’s poetry book teams up with City Market to celebrate the beginning of the market and gardening season. All ages. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 448-3350. FREE Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See April 8. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See April 8. Look Up to the Stars! Astronomy Show: After an indoor presentation, admiring eyes turn up to the sky and view sunspots using a telescope with a solar filter. Weather permitting. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. RUTLAND

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WASHINGTON

Berry Growing: The Jaquith Library teams up with berry grower Jeff Swift for a field trip to the farm, with hands-on instructions about choosing a planting site, where to get plants, how to handle bare-root plants, pruning, fertilizing and more. Bramble & Berry Farm, Plainfield, 11 a.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR

Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See April 8.

23 Sunday CHITTENDEN

Family Gym: See April 7. Indoor WOKO Flea Market: Savvy shoppers browse tag-sale items, crafts and antiques. All ages. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. $3; free for children under 13. Info, 878-5545.

24 Monday CALEDONIA

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See April 10.

• Week-long ballet Mini-Intensive for ages 12-18, for the serious dancer looking to stay in shape for various summer-long intensives • Weekly ballet classes for young dancers - adults - beginner - advanced • Ongoing yoga and fitness classes for adults

3/8/17 11:04 AM

Want to Quit Smoking? VCBH can help

Preschool Music: See April 6, 11 a.m.

The Vermont Center on Behavior and Health is conducting a study to help mothers quit smoking. With your participation, you could earn up to $1,310. If you have at least one child under the age of 12, you may qualify for this study. To see if you qualify, go online at http://j.mp/1MSDgeE to take our online survey or call (802) 656-1906 to learn more about this study.

Stories with Megan: See April 10. FRANKLIN

Camp Build-It!: Creative kiddos challenge their hands and imaginations using recycled materials. Ages 5 and up. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9-11 a.m. Preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE

KIDSVT.COM

Kids’ Craft: Trolls: Clever handworkers drop in and create cute magnets. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

APRIL 2017

LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5. RUTLAND

KIDS VT

Library Art Bop: Creativity fills the library with Susan Gerson Galusha’s paintings on display, watercolor demonstrations by the artist and a hands-on children’s art program. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE

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Audubon Nature Playgroup: See April 10.

Stories on the Screen: Cinema lovers mix up a snack at the library’s Munch and Crunch station, then settle down for an animated showing. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE

‘Dragons Love Tacos’ Fundraiser Dinner: Inspired by the beloved picture book, the library dishes up dinner with games, raffles, book giveaways and more adding to the excitement. All ages. Swanton Village Municipal Building, 3-6 p.m. $5 minimum donation requested. Info, 868-5077.

• Week-long ballet themed camps for ages 3-9; Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Nutcracker and more!

This summer come dance with the best at VBTS! For schedule and enrollment information, visit us at WWW.VBTS.ORG, or call 878-2941, or email INFO@VBTS.ORG

CHITTENDEN

Saturday Drama Club: See April 8.

FRANKLIN

Saturday May 27, 2017 at 1:00 & 6:30 pm.

Classes & Camps 2017 SUMMER

Essex Open Gym: See April 9.

Colchester Crafts for Kids: See April 10.

Wildlife Encounters: Curious kids meet North American and exotic animals in an educational and up-close encounter. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Our annual showcase of talent from ages 4 through pre-professional will dance their way onto the Flynn Main Stage in Burlington for 2 exciting performances,

For show & ticket information visit www.vbts.org.

One-on-One Tutoring: See April 5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Webby’s Art Studio: See April 8.

Vermont Ballet Theater School presents Celebration of Dance 2017!

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See April 10.

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CALENDAR

APRIL

25 Tuesday ADDISON

Youth Media Lab: See April 4. CHITTENDEN

Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. Childcare and dinner provided. All welcome. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Fairy Stories and Fairy Houses: Spritely kids hear whimsical tales, followed by a drop-in fairy house craft session from noon-2 p.m. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

Kids in the Kitchen: Peanut Butter Banana Wontons: Junior culinary creators put an American spin on a Cantonese classic, while mastering basic cooking skills. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. $25; preregister. Info, 863-2569. Pop Art: Crafty kiddos get going with glitter, glue and tissue paper to transform Tootsie Pops into Troll characters. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE Preschool Music: See April 4. FRANKLIN

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: Robert

Miller Community & Recreation Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 578-6471.

CAMBRIDGE PLAYGROUP:

Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

Charlotte Central School Early Education Program, 9:30-11 a.m. MILTON PLAYGROUP: Milton

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457. MORRISVILLE PLAYGROUP:

Morristown Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. OPEN GYM: Central VT

Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m. $7. Info, 882-8324. TUESDAY

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

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United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

BURLINGTON DADS’ NIGHT: VNA

Family Room, 4-7 p.m. Info, 860-4420.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

CHARLOTTE BABYTIME: Charlotte

Public Library, first Tuesday of every month, 9-10 a.m.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

Maple Street Recreation Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

Coding for Kids: Young techies conquer basic computer code with Scratch Jr. and Hopscotch apps. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m. Preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR

Lego Tuesdays: See April 4.

Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See April 4.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. BURLINGTON CRAWLERS & TODDLERS: VNA Family Room,

WASHINGTON

Camp Build-It!: See April 24.

Playgroups

MONDAY

Movie Matinee: This flick during daylight hours means dim lights and lots of popcorn. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution Prenatal

& Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339.

JERICHO PLAYGROUP: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

HINESBURG FAMILY PLAYTIME:

Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

Richmond Library, 8:45-10:15 a.m. Info, 899-4415. SHELBURNE PLAYGROUP: Trinity

Episcopal Church, 9:30-11 a.m.

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

ST. JOHNSBURY TODDLER TIME:

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291, ext. 303. THURSDAY

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 527-5426.

JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Church of the Nazarene, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-3470.

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: VNA Family Room, 9 a.m.-1

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien

Community Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

WOLCOTT PLAYGROUP: Wolcott

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP: See

Depot Center Preschool, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

p.m. Info, 862-2121.

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

Tuesday.

HINESBURG BABY TIME: United

WEDNESDAY

Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m.

ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 457-3500.

JOHNSON PLAYGROUP: United Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

ARTISTREE PLAYGROUP:

BURLINGTON INFANT MASSAGE:

VNA Family Room, 11 a.m.-noon, Info, 862-2121.

MILTON PLAYGROUP: See Monday.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Montgomery Town Library, 9-11 a.m. Info, 527-5426.

Monday.

CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

Charlotte Central School Early Education Program, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Info, 338-7021. COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 316-2918.

MONTGOMERY PLAYGROUP:

Montpelier Playgroup: St. Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: The

Playroom, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

ESSEX BABY PLAYGROUP: Sunset

OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP: Bent

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s

Studio, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218.

Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

WILLISTON PLAY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.noon. Info, 878-4918. WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: See

Tuesday. FRIDAY

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP: See

Wednesday.

HINESBURG PRESCHOOL PLAYGROUP: Hinesburg

26 Wednesday CHITTENDEN

Chess Club: Young players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: See April 5. Dungeons & Dragons Night: See April 12. Lego Fun: Budding builders bust out the blocks. Grades K and up; kids under 5 are welcome to participate with adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Movin’ & Groovin’: This troll-themed dance party mixes it up with musical-instrument making. Mini dance classes offered by B-True Dance for ages 5 and up with preregistration. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE Owls & Their Calls: The Vermont Institute of Natural Science stops into the library with three live birds, allowing avian admirers to learn about these nocturnal predators in a first-hand encounter. All ages. Milton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Huntington Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

Party In Picture Book City: The community comes out to celebrate the library’s new-and-improved picture book collection with music and treats. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

MONTGOMERY TUMBLE TIME:

Yoga for Kids: See April 5.

Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946. HUNTINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11 a.m. Info, 347-1780. OPEN GYM: See Monday. RANDOLPH TODDLER TIME:

Kimball Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 728-5073. RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. STOWE PLAYGROUP: Stowe

Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

WILLISTON PLAYGROUP: Allen

Brook School, first Friday of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 272-6509. SATURDAY

MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT:

Lamoille Family Center, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229. STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga

Center, 1-2 p.m. $10; or free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m.

FRANKLIN

Balloon Car Derby: Clever makers create cool cars and rally for a race. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Mommy and Me Fitness Meetup: See April 5. LAMOILLE

Tots on the Turf: See April 5. RUTLAND

Killington Lego Club: See April 5. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. WINDSOR

Sensory Lab for Tots: See April 5.

27 Thursday ADDISON

Quiet Crafternoon: See April 6. CHITTENDEN

Family Movie Matinee: See April 15. Lego Club: See April 6. Make & Take: Glitter Art: Craft lovers shake out sprinkles and create a journal, card, bookmark and more. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE Preschool Music: See April 6. Ukulele Kids: Itty-bitty ones try out instruments and dance to traditional children’s songs. Ages 5 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE


FRANKLIN

RUTLAND

Bunnies Visit Story Hour: Little book lovers enjoy a morning with special furry guests, bunny stories, songs and crafts. Haston Library, Franklin, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE Lego Thursdays: See April 6. St. Albans Library Legos: See April 13, 3-5 p.m. WASHINGTON

Books Come to Life: This active class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Ages 3-6. Waterbury Public Library, 9:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR

Clay for Tots: See April 6.

28 Friday CHITTENDEN

Dungeons & Dragons: See April 14. Early Bird Math Story Time: See April 7. Family Gym: See April 7. Friday Afternoon Movie: Kids snuggle in for snacks and a screening. Children under 10 must be accompanied by a caregiver. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Friday Free for All: See April 7. Games! Games! Games!: Troll bingo amuses the crowd with prizes of new books. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE Jedi Academy: The Star Wars galaxy commandeers the library with costumes, crafts, games and other-worldly refreshments. Ages 4-10. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See April 7. Money Smart Kids: Savvy savers get the scoop about banking through books and activities. Grades K-4. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Songs & Stories With Matthew: See April 14. FRANKLIN

Yo Jo What a Guy!: Joe Howard returns by popular demand to get the crowd cheering with antics of juggling, clowning, puppetry and audience involvement. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 1:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND

ORLEANS

WASHINGTON

29 Saturday CALEDONIA

Visual Storytelling Workshop: Small Spielbergs collaborate with Robin Kristoff of the School of Creative and Performing Arts to compose a group film screened April 30. Ages 5-7. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 10-11:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. FREE CHITTENDEN

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See April 8. Healthy Kids Day: In this national YMCA initiative, youngsters explore the importance of nutrition and exercise with active play, entertainment, snacks and prizes. All ages. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 852-8147. FREE Saturday Drama Club: See April 8. Webby’s Art Studio: See April 8. FRANKLIN

Book Cellar: Teens run this gently-used book sale; proceeds benefit the library’s summer reading program. All ages. St. Albans Free Library, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Ongoing Exhibits

WASHINGTON

CHANDLER MUSIC HALL, RANDOLPH Info, 728-9878 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS: Showcased student work from ten area PK-grade 12 schools illustrates imaginative inquiry at the heart of the creative process. All ages. Through April 23. FREE

Green Mountain Swing: This 17-piece big band gets the crowd grooving with favorites of swing, Latin, blues and funk. Dance lessons available from 6:45-7:30 p.m.; live music begins at 7:30 p.m. Ages 10 and up. The Old Labor Hall, Barre, $10-15; proceeds benefit the Green Mountain Youth Symphony. Info, 888-4470.

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 BUTTERFLIES, LIVE AT ECHO: A pavilion of fluttering creatures enchants visitors who learn about these winged beauties’ lifecycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Through September 4. All ages.

Come & Play Day: Families interested in an alternative education check out the school’s campus and chat with teachers, while kids pursue playtime. Ages 5-14. River Rock School, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 223-4700. FREE

30 Sunday CHITTENDEN

Essex Open Gym: See April 9. Family Gym: See April 7. WASHINGTON

Pirate Day: Ahoy, mates! Buccaneers of all ages search out big pirate treasure on a scavenger hunt, while solving salty riddles and enjoying swashbuckling arts and crafts. All ages. Mad River Green Shops, Waitsfield, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 583-3669. FREE 

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM, ST. JOHNSBURY

X-RAY VISION: FISH INSIDE AND OUT:

This temporary exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution illustrates the history of evolution through the translucent images of ancient fish, in an elegant union of science and art. Through May 2017. HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM OF VERMONT HISTORY, MIDDLEBURY Info, 388-2117 FOCUS ON THE SHELDON: FIVE-POINT PERSPECTIVE: Five Middlebury-area

photographers display their artwork capturing the museum’s extensive collection of Vermont history, ranging from fabrics and eyeglasses to a sculpted dog and a life-size horse, including photographs of antique dolls. Through May 13. MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS: The stories, ideas and

science behind the creation of musical instruments mesmerize visitors. Through displays, videos and hands-on opportunities, music lovers make and play a variety of instruments using Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. All ages. Through September 4. VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER, MIDDLEBURY Info, 388-4964

FAMILY TRAITS: ART, HUMOR AND EVERYDAY LIFE: Vermonter and artist

Stanley Lyndes uses his experience growing up on a multigenerational farm to capture the unique folklore of family life through art. All ages. Through May 15. FREE

37

Family Story Time: See April 7.

Branch Out: Creative Activities for Teens: Teens have time together with open art studios for painting and mixed media projects, finger food and music. Grades 9-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 6-9:45 p.m. Info, 457-3500. FREE

KIDS VT

Lego Club: See April 7.

WINDSOR

Pittsford Trail Run: Athletes young and old lace up for a 5K or one-mile run/walk on town trails to benefit the Pittsford Recreation Department. Pittsford Rec Area, 9 a.m. $5-15. Info, 483-6500.

APRIL 2017

Author M. T. Anderson: This Calais writer of children’s and young adult literature lights up the crowd with his literary prowess. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 7 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

KIDSVT.COM

Killington Magic: The Gathering: See April 7.

Amy Huntington: ‘Fresh-Picked Poetry: A Day at the Farmers’ Market’: See April 22. Phoenix Books Rutland, 11 a.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE


Saturday, May 6th Waterfront Park Parade Starts at 9:30 am 10 am - 3 pm

Free Admission Join our sponsors for a day of celebrating kids and fun at Waterfront Park! The parade kicks off the day with goodies and giveaways. Enjoy a variety of events and entertainment – everything from petting zoos to train rides to face painting to building your own terrarium! Dance to music from Young Tradition Vermont and others, make crafts with Recycle Art, and take your picture on our oversized Adirondack chair.

Produced by

Underwriting Sponsor

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Sponsors

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3/30/17 1:01 PM


JUST FOR KIDS

40 40 41 42 42 43

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club Puzzle Answers

Code Cash

Pigpenny is a very happy piggy bank. She is stuffed full of coins: pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and half-dollars. She is counting on you to crack the emoji code at right, to tell her how many she has of each. Once you have figured that out, add the coin values together so that Pigpenny can exchange her money for some corn. Yum! The answer is on page 43.

KIDSVT.COM APRIL 2017 KIDS VT

39


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

A sensory poem is one in which you USE YOUR FIVE SENSES — SIGHT, SMELL, HEARING, TASTE AND TOUCH — TO DESCRIBE SOMETHING. Write a sensory poem about spring. What do you see, smell, hear, taste and touch as the winter snow melts and the weather gets warmer? Your poem does not have to rhyme, and you don’t need to use all five senses in your poem. Attach an extra piece of paper if you need more space to write.

COLORING CONTEST WINNERS Nearly 150 charmingly creative submissions covered our judging tables this month! Eleven-year-old Zoey Copp summed up the spring season with her bright yellow duck surrounded by a storm of rainbow drops. Madeleine Lantman, 5, dressed her waterfowl in a green top hat and matching shoes, surrounded by multicolored grass. Lucia Hackerman gave her masterpiece an interactive twist, challenging our judges to find the four-leaf clovers hiding in her green mosaic. Congratulations to all of the imaginative artists.

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS

“Rainbow Space Duck” Bronwyn Withers, 5

QUACK, QUACK

CHARLOTTE

Cash Trudell, 5, Colchester

5& under

LEAPING LEPRECHAUN We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is April 15.

Name ________________________________

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Email ________________________________

Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

Sophie Oszurek, 8, St. Albans CROWING AT THE ROOSTER

Hayden Hopkins, 4, Woodbury DANCING DUCK

Abygayle Lanpher, 11, Leicester FLOWERY FIREWORKS

Lizzie Considine, 8, Hardwick FANCY TOPPER

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KIDS VT

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WRITING CONTEST WINNERS

Sam Skolnik, 9

MIDDLESEX

Seven months ago my mother was diagnosed with cancer. I remember In last month’s issue, we asked kids to the night so clearly, me and my sister out write about a FEMALE WHO INSPIRED on the porch in the crisp, tranquil night air THEM, in honor of Women’s History , the tears. The air, the Earth and the trees Month. We were so impressed by the felt so indifferent, powerful and thoughtful entries readers blowing around in the late autumn silence. submitted. The two winners each I was shocked. I had no idea, not even the receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow slightest hint, that my mom, a healthy, fit, Bookshop in Burlington. You’ll find their productive woman, som eho writing below. have a risk of getting suc w could even h a horrible disease. I was still shocked when , months later, she Zahrah Muhammad, 9 decided to do chemo. An d again I was shocked when the beautiful hai ESSEX r began to ruthlessly but slowly fall off her Someone who inspires me head. more amazed at how she But I was even is my older sister, Firdaus. handled this horrible process of destroying She inspires me by being the monster that was She trying to eat her, take confident about herself. her. She stood strong and tall above that mo does this by talking in a loud nster, beating it back but paying for every inc and clear voice. Another h of it. She still isn’t done beating that horri thing she does that inspires ble monster back, but never she’s close. She didn’t me is to persevere and flinch, or try to hide. No, not my mom. She give up. For example, I take took that monster and and wrung its neck. She too ice-skating lessons, k it and tossed it right out the window, stron there’s one trick that I can’t g and hard. And that is knew the woman who inspir complete. My sister ed me, told me through her actions that even wh that I was struggling so she en things are hard, trick. you keep fighting, don’t helped me learn the flinch away. Never back down. And I will tak I appreciate her and I am e that and listen to it. pleased to call her my sister. Thank you, Mom, for sho wing this to me.

Conan Burroughs, 4, St. Albans CAMOUFLAGED QUACKER

Colton Harley, 10, Georgia LET IT RAIN

Tenley Peloquin, 6, Williamstown CANDY LAND

“Squeaky Stripes” Hallie Miller, 7 MILTON

6 to 8

Alex Poczobut, 9, Barre DELECTABLE DESIGNS

Stella Smian, 8, Burlington SPUN SUGAR

Kendall Marsh, 4, Coventry DUCKY FOR MAYOR

Kelman Pirie, 9, Montpelier

TOP TITLES “A DUCK GOING UNDERGROUND”

Esmé Isla Koicuba, 3, Starksboro “DUCKUCHAUN”

Shelby Smith, 7, Swanton “THE MAD QUACKER”

Keenan Garlieb-Meno, 10, South Burlington

“Lucky Ducky” Iana Mecca, 12 SOUTH BURLINGTON

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by APRIL 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the May issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________________ Age ______________ Town __________________________ Email _____________________________________________ Phone _____________________________________________

KIDSVT.COM APRIL 2017 KIDS VT

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JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

Birthday Club

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

oski BAYLEY lives in Wino . She’s 14 ril Ap and turns 7 on th wi l gir ky uc a happy-go-l for e lov a d an art a big he s and animals. She enjoys art . ng ati crafts and ice-sk two to Bayley wins entry for t Kids gh Ni y ida Fr ’ ffs Petra Cli Club.

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

NAOMI lives in Moretown and turns 9 on April 3. She loves skiing, biking, climbing, swimming and playing sports with her friends. She has a contagious smile that matches her great sense of humor.

Print your answer here:

CORWYN

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

RIDDLE SEARCH — STRONG

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APRIL 2017

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Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: WHY ARE POLICE OFFICERS SO STRONG?

BIG BOLD DARING DURABLE ENERGETIC FEARLESS FIRM FORCEFUL GUTSY

HALE HUSKY MUSCULAR NERVY SOLID SPUNKY STURDY TOUGH

lives in Burlington and turns 6 on April 9. His hobbies include skiing, mountain biking and playing games with friends, especially the board game King of Tokyo. He’s also a huge go-kart and Star Wars fan.

BRYCE lives in Orwell and turns 4 on April 26. He’s a happy kid who enjoys riding his four-wheeler and playing superhero games outside. He also loves his new baby sister, Kayleigh.

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 43

Congratulations to these April Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Naomi, Corwyn and Bryce each win a day pass to Petra Cliffs.


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Eventually, my love of vodka eclipsed the love I felt for my child.

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woman who lifted drink after drink to her lips. If I wanted to live to see my son become an adult, I’d have to change my ways. But could I? We were in Abu Dhabi at the time, thanks to my husband’s work as an itinerant filmmaker and cinema professor. I had a job in communications at an Arab university, and David attended the American International School. The country is a peaceful oasis nestled between the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Desert, but I saw it as a fish bowl in a sea of piranha — safe unless the glass breaks. Alcohol is off-limits to the majority of its population, and therefore difficult to procure. I purchased whatever booze I could find at the “forbidden” liquor store, exclusively patronized by expats. Sometimes I’d shop for my fix while David waited outside in the back seat of a cab with a complete stranger. As fate would have it, my “come to Jesus” moment — where I admitted that I was powerless against alcohol and that booze posed a greater threat to my life than terrorism — took place in a Muslim country. Inspired by the people and the place, this former swimmer decided to go dry for good. I got through my very first night without a drink by watching Lawrence of Arabia with my husband and son in our high-rise apartment. Turns out that the Middle East is a darn good place to get sober. I didn’t have to contend with booze in every grocery store and restaurant, or on television and billboard advertisements. The location, however, didn’t make the detox process any less painful. For weeks, I cried myself to sleep and vomited upon waking. But the muezzin’s call to prayer, five times a day, tethered me to Earth and to a power far greater than my addiction. I now consider myself a Muslim, as well as a recovering addict. Moving back to the United States three months later, I was shocked to reenter the world I’d once inhabited — and imbibed in. There were never-ending excuses for me to drink and seemingly endless ways of getting alcohol. Now, to cope with fear and longing, I employ a tactic I used on the starting block before a swimming race: I stare at a fixed point on the horizon, similar to how Bedouins navigate vast seas of sand, and I imagine myself on the other side of adversity. I’ve been sober for two years now. Am I a better mother? I’m certainly a more present and patient one. I’m also vastly less anxious. Rather than eliminating my worries, alcohol had only ever intensified them. I recently came across an Arab proverb that sums up my journey: “It’s the same rain you loved that drowned you.” The only things overflowing in me now are devotion to my 13-year-old son and appreciation for life on dry land. K

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aising a child can drive a person to drink, as many parents in the trenches jokingly attest. But for this mom, having a vodka martini and a bottle of wine every night was serious business. Being a parent terrified me. How would I keep this tiny human safe? I thought of my infant son, David. What if something happened to this baby I loved with all my heart? While I changed his diapers and fretted about my mothering skills, happy hour was my dangling carrot. At exactly 5 p.m., I “celebrated” David’s approaching bedtime — and the fact that we’d both survived another day — with a raised martini glass. As my son got older, my worries intensified, and happy hour morphed into cocktails all evening long. I hid the depths of my despair, and my drinking, from my fun-loving husband, who had already raised two sons and seemed more emotionally equipped for the task. Eventually, my love of vodka eclipsed the love I felt for my child. There was a time when I delighted in another liquid altogether. In my youth, I was a star swimmer — one of the fastest sprinters in Florida. Until I was 20, I defined myself by the very water in which I was immersed for two to four hours every day. I earned a scholarship to swim for the University of South Florida, where I was part of a national championship team and qualified for the 1988 Olympic Trials in the 50-meter freestyle. Back then, I loved winning, and adrenaline, more than anything. Once I hung up my cap and goggles, I missed the high I’d gotten from racing in the water and overcompensated by drinking alcohol. Many of those drinks went down overseas when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya and a journalist in South Korea. Whenever I found myself in challenging places, which was most of the time, I drowned my worries in alcohol. Nervous about malaria? Drink gin and tonic, which is loaded with parasite-killing quinine! Fearful about North Koreans threatening to invade? Drink high-octane soju with soldiers on leave from the Korean Demilitarized Zone! Drowning my worries was so much fun, but, as Frida Kahlo so aptly put it, the damned things learned to swim. In 2009, I was inducted into the University of South Florida’s Athletic Hall of Fame, with 5-year-old David in the audience. I drank before, during and after the ceremony. My fingers were too swollen to wear the diamondencrusted ring with which I was presented. It wasn’t until 2015 — right after my son turned 11, and just months before I turned 50 — that I confronted my drinking problem. I’d felt awful for decades: My blood pressure was high, and my liver was swollen. The lithe girl who once lifted trophies over her head was now a pudgy

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