Page 1

GOOD ITIZEN SEPTEMBER 2018

SCORECARD INSIDE!

FREE

VOL.25 NO.08

CHALLENGE

INSIDE COOL CLASSROOMS PAGE 32

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

PACKING LUNCH, BENTO-STYLE PAGE 14

CAMPER PLAYHOUSE PAGE 16

YOUTH FOOTBALL: TACKLE VS. FLAG PAGE 20

CHALLENGE C HALLENGE


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KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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STAFF QUESTION

EDITOR’S NOTE COURTESY OF ALISON NOVAK

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Mary Ann Lickteig

maryann@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

Theo Novak holds a terrarium in his kindergarten clasroom in 2016

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Todd Scott, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Heather Fitzgerald, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Natalie Hormilla, Megan James, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh, James Buck, Sam Simon ILLUSTRATOR

Annelise Capossela

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2018 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

ALISON NOVAK, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

MARY ANN LICKTEIG, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

In my rural New Hampshire elementary school, the playground included metal swings, a ball field and a forest that just happened to have an old stone wall. That section of playground wasn’t designed with any particular play equipment, but we had a lot of fun building forts along that old wall. BRETT STANCIU, CALENDAR WRITER

I spent third grade on the road, traveling across the country in an RV with my family. We went to every point of interest and museum my mother could find — visiting Amish country in Pennsylvania, horseback riding on the Nebraska plains, hiking the Grand Canyon, visiting Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco. It was the single most formative experience of my life and I am so grateful for it. BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE

NATALIE HORMILLA (“Use Your Words,” page 51) is a writer, editor and publication designer who lives on a West Glover hillside with her husband and two children. When not thinking things over a zillion times, she practices using only her sixth sense. 5

KIDS VT

n middle school, I had an art teacher named Pecky Kaupelis. Her classroom was as unconventional as her name. To enter it, kids had to pass under a sheet of shiny silver streamers, hung from the doorway to create a waterfall effect. There was a heated pole running up the center of the room (most likely a covered water or heat pipe), that Mrs. Kaupelis had wrapped in multicolored streamers and yarn. She called it the “hugging pole” and told students that if they felt sad or needed positive energy, they could wrap their arms around it. That proposition was a hard sell for a bunch of jaded middle schoolers, and no doubt inspired quite a few eye rolls. But there was something about Mrs. Kaupelis’ sweet and fairylike demeanor — and the fact that she’d taken time to create a hugging pole — that felt affirming and soothing. Her colorful, magical classroom, with its aroma of clay and perfume, was a respite from the sometimes unkind and icy world of middle school. What Mrs. Kaupelis knew almost three decades ago was that it’s not just what kids are learning that’s important, but also where they’re learning it. In this month’s issue, we feature six classroom and school spaces that foster creativity, independence and student choice. Check out what educators have to say about their spectacular spaces — from a rustic classroom in the woods to a maker space filled with 21st-century tools — on page 32. September also signals the start of youth football season in Vermont. In early 2017, the Vermont Principals’ Association mandated that, starting this academic year, all school-sponsored football programs up through eighth grade must switch from tackle to paddedflag football. In “Heads in the Game” on page 20, Ken Picard outlines the reasons behind this decision, and talk with the independent Northern Vermont Youth Football League, which still plays tackle football at the middle school level. There’s lots more to love in this issue, including articles on how to make art supplies out of natural materials (page 17), where to go to find huge, old trees (page 12) and how two grandparents built an impressive camper-style playhouse (page 16). Also, for the last time, find the scorecard for our Good Citizen Challenge in the center of this issue. The deadline to enter is October 9, so there’s still time to complete the Challenge! Here’s to a wonderful school year, full of learning, fun and inspiration!

SEPTEMBER 2018

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

I

I went to Catholic schools from second through 12th grade. One of my fourth grade teachers was Sister Carla, a short, vibrant woman who occasionally played kickball with us during recess. It wasn’t the look of her classroom that I remember, but the sound. While we worked at our desks, she played background music, including Joe Wise albums. His mellifluous voice, accompanied by acoustic guitar, created a peaceful, nurturing environment I will always remember.

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GO

O

SEPTEMBER 2018

D C I TIZ

JUST FOR KIDS A-B-Seas

20

Writing Contest & Winners ..... 24 Coloring Contest Winners ........ 24 Coloring Contest ............................. 29 Puzzle Page ........................................30 Birthday Club ....................................30 Puzzle Answers ............................... 51

ese & wine Your chaend m ore! place

Well, kids, it’s that time of year again. Yes, it’s “Back to School of Fish” time! Even our finny friends can’t hang out by the shore anymore. But this little group of guppies are late for their first day back. Can you help these gilled girls and guys find the proper path to Ms. Squid’s classroom?

KIDSVT.COM

Heads in the Game

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

Will a switch from tackle to flag save youth football in Vermont?

23

JAMES BUCK

Just for Kids 23 A-B-Seas Maze 24 Writing Contest

History, government and community activities for kids! CHALLENGE

& Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

29 30

FIND SCORECARD IN CENTER PULLOUT

CALENDAR SEPT

Make Merry

Discounts on Natural, Gluten-Free and Kid-Friendly Foods and much more! ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

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Families and friends flock outside for local food and drink at EAT ON THE GREEN, with three live bands, a Hula-Hooping contest and lawn games — including corn hole, Plinko and giant Jenga. Sunday, September 16, noon-6 p.m., Vergennes City Park, Vergennes.

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SUN

SEPT 9 Pine Street Mile: In conjunction with Art Hop, this inaugural, point-topoint run includes a competitive category, a Merry Mile Fun Run (walkers welcome) and a youth loop for ages 14 and under. 9:30 a.m., Pine and Maple Streets, Burlington.

SAT

SEPT 22 Museum Day: Numerous historic sites and museums across the state open their doors to the public free of charge during this national event sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. Visit smithsonian.com/museumday/ museum-day-2018 for participating locations.

SAT

SEPT 29 Archaeology Day: How did people in the Upper Connecticut Valley live in the past? Curious families explore this question through pottery and tool-making demos, atlatl throwing practice, and sleuthing during this daylong celebration of ancient human history. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Montshire Museum, Norwich.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

Calendar 36 Daily Listings 37 Classes 38 Fairs & Festivals 40 Science & Nature 41 Live Performances 42 New Parents 43 Ongoing Exhibits 44 Story Times 46 Playgroups GO

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

O

On the Cover

D C I TIZ

GOOD ITIZEN GOOD ITIZEN

SEPTEMBER 2018

SCORECARD INSIDE!

FREE

VOL.25 NO.08

CHALLENGE

INSIDE COOL CLASSROOMS PAGE 32

PACKING LUNCH, BENTO-STYLE PAGE 14

CAMPER PLAYHOUSE PAGE 16

CHALLENGE C HALLENGE

KIDS VT

9

#InstaKidsVT Trending Parent Participation Pet Corner Throwback Kids Say What?

Columns 11 Kids Beat 12 Fit Families 13 Bookworms 14 Mealtime 15 One to Watch 16 Habitat 17 The Art of 19 Parent Portrait 31 Good Citizen Responses 51 Use Your Words

SEPTEMBER 2018

Welcome Editor’s Note 5

KIDSVT.COM

Learning environments that please the eye and stimulate the mind

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Week to Week

EN

COURTESY OF KATIE LEFRANCOIS

Spectacular Spaces

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

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YOUTH FOOTBALL: TACKLE VS. FLAG PAGE 20

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

We celebrate the beginning of the new school year with this cheerful illustration by Annelise Capossela.

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TRENDING AUTUMN ANSWERS

How do I help my kid deal with back-to-school anxiety?

D

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

uring the summer between sixth and seventh grade, a rumor spread that another kid was going to beat me up on the first day of the new school year. She was going to wait inside the school until I arrived, announce that she didn’t like me and then fight me — enough details to make it believable. I worried a lot. Would this girl really beat me up? What would I do? My mom’s usual response to any perceived threat to her children was one step shy of taking up arms in our defense, so I was reluctant to tell her about this situation. Eventually, I was so anxiety-ridden that I had no choice. She stayed miraculously calm. She didn’t dismiss me, she didn’t say it wouldn’t happen, and she didn’t tell me I was silly for believing it could. Instead, she acknowledged that my anxiety was real. She suggested that instead of dreading the unknown, we should run through the scenarios and come up with strategies. By the first day of school, I felt nervous but empowered. So when the rumor turned out to be true, and the girl was waiting for me, I was ready. I

8

on Tag us m! ra Instag

walked up to her, awkwardly stuck out my hand and said, “Hi, I’m Autumn. You’re not gonna beat me up. At least not today. We don’t even know each other. What’s your schedule? Maybe we have classes together.” Situation diffused, anxiety relieved. As adults, we know the toll anxiety can take and we never want our kids to feel it. But some anxiety in life is normal, particularly during transitions like going back to school. Nonprofit Child Mind Institute recommends that parents listen seriously when kids share their anxieties. “Rather than dismissing these fears … listening to them and acknowledging your child’s

feelings will help him feel more secure,” writes Caroline Miller in an article on the organization’s website. Johns Hopkins Medicine recommends helping your child connect with a peer from her class. Familiar peers improve a child’s academic and emotional adjustment to a new year. If the anxiety persists as the year goes on, ask for help from a school counselor or pediatrician. As parents, sometimes the hardest thing to do is to put aside a visceral reaction, like dismissing and denying, in favor of a more balanced response, like listening and strategizing. Instead of hoping to do the impossible – spare your child from anxiety forever – teach her to lean in, to know what she can handle, to walk right up to her biggest fear, put out her hand and introduce herself.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

#INSTAKIDSVT

Thanks for sharing your summer photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture of a young boy holding one of his monarch caterpillars. Share a picture of your kids going back to school this month.

HERE’S HOW:

 Follow @kids_vt on Instagram.

 Post your photos on

Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

Fourteen-year-old Ethan Sonneborn of Bristol lost his bid to be the Democratic nominee for Vermont governor, but earned 6% of the vote. Something tells us this precocious pol is just getting started. After 17 days of carrying her dead calf, 20-yearold orca whale Tahlequah finally let the baby go. A story for anyone who has ever doubted animals’ capacity to grieve.

At the world’s largest hacking conference in Las Vegas this August, 11-year-old Emmett Brewer took only 10 minutes to infiltrate a replica of the Florida secretary of state’s website and change election results. This doesn’t bode well for November.

For the first time, major retailers including Walmart and Home Depot are selling bulletproof backpacks or backpack inserts. Speechless.

hannleighs. This makes number 9 in our butterfly habitat. We have 7 chrysalises already. In less than 2 weeks we should have some monarch butterflies and one happy boy!


PET CORNER

PARENT PARTICIPATION

This month, we asked our Facebook followers to tell us what makes their kids’ school special. Find their answers below.

Chantal Cardinal shared this adorable photo of her 20-month-old daughter Matilda with some of the family’s eight backyard chickens. Matilda “collects eggs and feeds them, but also pets and holds them!” Cardinal wrote. “They are definitely a part of our family.” My children go to

My son is headed to

BREWSTER-PIERCE MEMORIAL SCHOOL in

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL and so far

Huntington. My favorite thing that BPMS does is the weekly All School Morning Meetings. Each Friday, classes take turns leading the school in morning meeting, complete with songs, community-building activities and information sharing. Parents are always invited and kids practice important public speaking skills. It is a wonderful way to build engagement with the school community for all!

—RACHEL HOFFMAN SMITH

—ANGELA KELLEY

My son goes to BFA FAIRFAX and is in a power wheelchair. Last summer, they put in a whole new accessible playground. He’s now able to join his friends instead of just watching. —BRITTANY LAWRENCE

My children go to CASTLETON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL and I would have

—CRISTY-ANN ELIZABETH LATULIPPE

—SJ BERNSTEIN

—TARA TYNAN ARNESON

My sons go to OTTAUQUECHEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. It has an amazing

outdoor kindergarten program, but all grades and specialties try their very best to bring the classroom outside as much as they can.

—SERENA BEST

Tricks of the Tray In last year’s Back to School issue, we wrote about Milton’s cutting-edge school lunch program. Food service director STEVE MARINELLI empowers kids by offering a colorful fruit and veggie bar, from-scratch meals, silverware instead of plastic cutlery and snacks throughout the day. Read more about Marinelli’s program and Vermont’s Farm to School movement at kidsvt.com/schoollunch.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“When I grow up I want to take care of unicorns and make love spells. KAITLYN, AGE 4

KIDS VT

We are HOMESCHOOLERS, so one of the great things about our school is flexibility!

—LISA MARIE BERRY

the kids, K-4, get to have recess at Cochran’s Ski Area. Mr. G arranges the schedule and transportation and works with Cochran’s to provide kids the opportunity to learn to ski at no cost to parents.

SEPTEMBER 2018

SEPTEMBER 2018

to say ALL the staff at the school is the best part. They do very well working together as a team to help every single child get exactly what they need.

My son goes to NESHOBE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL in Brandon. Kindness is the special quality there. From the kids, the staff, the parents and the community ... It’s like being part of a great big happy family.

RICHMOND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL! In the winter, all

THROWBACK

KIDSVT.COM

—MIRANDA PROVOST JOHNSON

what makes it special for us is the way they welcome freshmen, ease them in and make them feel at home before school even starts. Also, the awesome arts programs are given just as much attention as sports!

My son, Oliver, goes to UNION STREET SCHOOL in Springfield. The teachers and staff are what make the school amazing. Mrs. Rounds was Oliver’s teacher last year and she just published an awesome children’s book, Charlotte’s Bones: The Beluga Whale in a Farmer’s Field and we are all so proud of her!

9


Your child. Your orthodontist.

ORTHODONTICS

DRS.DRS. PETERSON, RYAN & RYAN EATON& EATON

Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile—that feels great, too.

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100 k4t-ChamplainOrtho0918.indd 1

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Braces for Children and Adults

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

Burlington Williston St. Albans 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 www.champlainortho.net

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COURTESY OF OAKLEDGE FOR ALL

BY A L I S ON N OVAK

PLAY

Fun for All

In 2010, Julia Wayne was working as an early childhood special educator for the Burlington School District when she realized there was no local playground accessible to all of her students, who had a variety of diverse needs — including autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and visual impairment. So she set out to get one built. OAKLEDGE FOR ALL, a volunteer group WayneCutline began, is embarking on a campaign to raise $500,000 by 2019 to support the construction of a playground in Burlington’s Oakledge Park. The new playground will replace the existing one, which was built in 1988. The space will have “different areas that meet different kids’ needs,” said former school counselor Jane Krasnow, a member of the steering committee. Features will include a PebbleFlex synthetic rubber ground surface instead of mulch, swings that accommodate different abilities and ages, an in-ground trampoline, as well as other inclusive elements like an extra-wide family slide, quiet green spaces, and wheelchair-accessible pathways between play equipment, parking and bathrooms. Burlington’s Parks,

Recreation & Waterfront department, a key partner in the initiative, selected Oakledge after conducting a site analysis of the city’s parks and playgrounds. Burlington Parks & Rec has committed $150,000 to the project and is pursuing additional state and federal grants. A $30,000 “Meet Me at the Park” grant from the Walt Disney Company will help purchase the first piece of permanent playground equipment — a swing — in October. Watch for a kickoff celebration with music, food and activities at the park next month.

SPORTS

Top Brass

Team Equinox

Learn more about ultimate frisbee in Vermont at Green Mountain Disc Alliance’s website, gmda.usetopscore.com.

KIDS VT

Desrochers held tryouts in April and May, and selected 10 girls and 11 boys for Team Equinox, which competed in the U20 mixed division. Now that ultimate frisbee is a varsity sport, said Steele, “Vermont hopes to continue sending high-level players and make a strong showing at next year’s [Youth Club Championships] and for years to come.”

SEPTEMBER 2018

team entered the tournament ranked last in its 16-team division. They played seven games over the course of three days and finished sixth, a performance that coach Michelle Steele said “exceeded our expectations.” The last time Vermont sent a team to the U.S. Championships, in 2015, they finished 13th out of 13 teams. For years, ultimate frisbee — a sport invented by a high school student in Maplewood, N.J., in 1968 — has been growing in popularity as a club sport at high schools across Vermont. Last year, there were 20 high school boys’ teams and seven girls’ teams, according to Steele, a French teacher and ultimate frisbee coach at Middlebury Union High School. All of those players provided a deep talent pool for the coed team Steele helped select for the national tournament. She and fellow coaches Nolan Benoit and Kate

KIDSVT.COM

FRISBEE U.S. OPEN’S YOUTH CLUB CHAMPIONSHIPS in Minnesota made news of its own. The

Vermont schools have reopened with a new leader at the helm. In August, Gov. Phil Scott appointed DAN FRENCH secretary of education. French, of Manchester Center, fills the position vacated by Rebecca Holcombe, who abruptly resigned in late March. Deputy Education Secretary Heather Bouchey has served as acting secretary in the interim. French started his career as a high school teacher in Canaan, and served as the superintendent of the Bennington-Rutland Supervisory Union from 2007 to 2016. In 2009, he was named Vermont Superintendent of the Year. Most recently, he was the coordinator of the School Leadership graduate program at Saint Michael’s College. He was one of three finalists the State Board of Education presented to Scott this spring. In a statement upon his appointment, French cited the organizational challenges in Vermont’s educational system and said that Act 46, the school district consolidation law passed in 2015, “has been very successful in moving us down a path toward rightsizing our governance structure.” He went on to say, “We must now leverage this work to transform our system into a world-class education system, a system that offers expanded learning opportunities for every Vermonter, and a system that contributes to broader social and economic development of our state.”

Last fall, Vermont made history — and got a shout-out on “Saturday Night Live” — when it became the first state to sanction ultimate frisbee as a varsity high school sport, beginning in the spring of 2019. In August, the Vermont youth team that competed in the ULTIMATE

EDUCATION COURTESY OF MICHELLE STEELE

Ultimate Competition

To learn more or to volunteer to help with the playground initiative, visit oakledgeforall.org.

11


Jesse exploring the massive white pines at Cambridge Pines

Exploring OldGrowth Forests

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

W

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hen my son, Jesse, was born 10 years ago, the one thing I knew for sure was that I would bring him to the library regularly. Other parenting advice might be complicated and contradictory, but the benefits of reading to him seemed simple enough. Suddenly, though, he was practically in kindergarten, and we hadn’t gone much. Then I read Sandra Steingraber’s wise parenting book, Raising Elijah, where she suggested going to the picture book area in the library, randomly pulling out books by authors with last names beginning with “A,” checking out the maximum allowed, then doing the same thing with the “B” authors the next week, and on through the alphabet. This advice freed me from my paralysis and, in short order, we became library regulars. I think something similar happens when we contemplate exploring the woods with our kids. We know we are supposed to get them outside, but we think we have to climb tall mountains with smiles on our faces and know all the answers to whatever nature questions they might lob our way. It can feel overwhelming. What I’ve come to realize is that all kids really need in an outdoor space is something interesting to explore — trees, water or rocks are good. But — just as picture books sometimes have intricate illustrations or children’s movies include a few “adult” jokes that go over kids’ heads — parents need something to think about while their kids explore at what can sometimes feel like a glacial pace. Old-growth forests can provide a rich experience for everyone. What is old growth? Ecologists are quite picky about how they use these words, and most Vermont forests, which started growing in the early 20th century on land that had been cleared multiple times, don’t qualify. Trees more than 30 inches in diameter are a good bet, but some trees can get big fast, and others can be small but ancient. So keep an eye out for other clues: dead trees that are

still standing, big branches or logs on the ground, gaps in the canopy, deep undulations on the forest floor created when trees fall and rot in place, and trees of different sizes. Bark that has coarse plates or looks unusually shaggy or furrowed (because older trees tend to produce smaller annual growth rings, but put on the same thickness of bark each year), and plentiful moss, fungi and lichens are also good signs. Today, less than 1 percent of the original forest in New England remains, so even if a forest is old, it’s probably not “virgin.” But if the forest is at least 150 years old, and it has never been completely cleared, it is considered primary old growth. Years ago, I found several local places to look for old-growth trees in The Sierra Club Guide to the Ancient Forests of the Northeast, and I recently brought my son to explore some of them. Here are a few of our favorites: Wilmarth Woods Natural Area, at the base of Snake Mountain in Addison, provides an instant gratification nature experience — it takes just 15 minutes to get from your car to your destination. Just a few minutes after you depart from the Snake Mountain trailhead, you’ll see a sign announcing land preserved by the Nature Conservancy. If you step off the trail to your right, a few hundred feet after the sign, you’ll start seeing huge, ramrod-straight oaks, hickories and maples within a few feet of the path. Some of these trees are three or four feet in diameter. The Guide to the Ancient Forests describes a history of livestock grazing and some selective logging in the 1800s in this area, and it says the trees here range from 130 to 220 years in age. Jesse and I made a game

of finding and hugging each big tree we found and returned to the car probably more satisfied than if we had climbed the mountain. Directions: Park in the lot near the corner of Wilmarth and Mountain roads in Addison, and head toward the trailhead for Snake Mountain. Cambridge Pines in the Cambridge Natural Area is another easy spot to visit, once you know where to find it. When you get out of your car, you’ll see the first huge white pine just a few feet away. From there, more behemoths are scattered across the small but steep hillside leading down to a sandy creek. According to the Guide to the Ancient Forests, the biggest hemlock here is more than 300 years old, though the pines may not have gotten their start until the 1800s. No significant logging has occurred here since 1860, and the state purchased the spot in 1944, so it is now protected. After we finished wandering down the hill to the creek and back up, my son, usually not one for stillness, suggested we sit next to a big tree at the top for a few minutes before getting back in the car. We topped off the expedition at the dessert case of the Cupboard Deli & Bakery, a few miles down Vermont Route 15, at the junction with 108 in Jeffersonville. Directions: Access is through a private driveway, so please be considerate. Drive through the driveway of the red house at 253 Bartlett Hill

Road, into Mountain View Cemetery. Continue up the right side of the cemetery and park at the end. The forest is down the slope to your right. Closer to Burlington, my favorite big trees — including pitch pines, oaks, and the biggest hop hornbeams I’ve ever seen — don’t make it into the guide book. They are at Shelburne Bay Park, along the Clarke Trail, which hugs the lake, and the Allen Hill Trail, which the Clarke Trail runs into after a little more than half a mile. There’s also a huge oak right along the Ti-Haul Trail, just across Bay Road. Directions: Park in the Shelburne Bay Park lot on Bay Road. Head toward the lake to pick up the Clarke Trail. Or cross Bay Road to get to the big oak on the Ti-Haul Trail. You’ll spot it from the parking lot. All of these old trees get me wondering about all the things that have happened around them since they first started growing, especially the ones that have been there since before Europeans began their extensive clearing of the Champlain Valley in the late 1700s. It’s a question to contemplate with your young explorer on the drive home. K Heather Fitzgerald is a graduate of the Ecological Planning program at the University of Vermont and has taught field ecology and environmental science courses at the Community College of Vermont and at UVM for more than 15 years.

COURTESY OF HEATHER FITZGERALD

FIT FAMILIES BY H E AT H E R F I TZ GE RA L D


BOOKWORMS BY B RE TT S TA N CI U

Standing Up, Speaking Out COURTESY OF ANN BRADEN

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n 2010, while Ann Braden was camped out on the couch with her preemie son, she read Louise Erdrich’s memoir of early motherhood, The Blue Jay’s Dance. Inspired by the author, Braden experimented with creative writing. In September, Braden’s debut novel, The Benefits of Being an Octopus, hits bookstore shelves, with a starred review from School Library Journal. The book, geared to ages 8 to 12, features 12-yearold Zoey, who lives in a Vermont trailer park with her two younger siblings and their single mother, a waitress at a pizza joint. With the encouragement of a teacher, Zoey overcomes her fear of joining the school’s debate team and discovers her emerging voice as she begins to speak out against injustice. A former middle school social studies teacher, Braden has used her own articulate voice in forums outside of writing. In 2013, in the wake of the Sandy Hook shooting, she founded Gun Sense Vermont, a grassroots organization dedicated to changing state gun laws. Three years later, she launched the Local Love Brigade, which coordinates group postcard writing to support people who have been targeted by hate. After receiving anonymous hate mail, the Islamic Society of Vermont received the Brigade’s first batch of cards. From her Brattleboro home, Braden, the mother of a 5-year-old daughter and an 8-year-old son, spoke with Kids VT.

Ann Braden

KIDS VT: What do you hope your book accomplishes? Ann Braden: It’s important for kids to see themselves in books, and a lot of kids in rural Vermont do not see themselves in books. I got these removable octopus tattoos for school visits, and I’m a little obsessed with them at the moment. For (main character) Zoey, the octopus reminded her of her inner strength. I tell kids these can remind them of their inner strength and that you can be stronger than you think. A girl came up to me (after a school visit) and told me she was going to save her tattoo for when her cat died, and I thought, Oh my gosh.

KVT: Could you elaborate on how speaking up and listening are themes that extend beyond your writing? AB: Gun Sense Vermont is an example of me being put in a situation where I would never have put myself. I didn’t necessarily think I was the right person to do it, but there was no one else doing it. So I think — like Zoey — I knew this is the right thing to do, and I’ve got to do it... I found out I was so much stronger than I would have thought. I mean, it’s a huge transformation for me. I was shy and sensitive beforehand. Now, I am not those things. KVT: You received some fierce criticism from people who opposed your position on changing Vermont’s gun laws. AB: I think what helped me was that I felt really good about the approach I was taking. I was holding up the common ground, and I was a champion for civil discourse and for having a deliberate and reasoned conversation about a difficult topic. Those are the things I was waving the flag for. Having that framework kept me going.

KVT: Tell us about the Local Love Brigade. AB: It feeds your soul. That got started soon after the last presidential election ... when it was already obvious that hate was emboldened. I knew we could do something right now to push back against hate... You have to say No, that’s not what I believe. You have to call it out. KVT: What draws you to bringing people together? AB: I majored in Russian in college, and I read a lot of Soviet works, and I knew a lot of Russian history. One of the things that always stands out is how isolated people were, and how powerless people are when they’re isolated. I think it comes from this desire to keep our society healthy and on the path toward justice. We’re not going to make it as individuals on our own. It only happens when we’re together. 

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Braden’s book launch features a short reading, food from her novel (including saltines with Easy Cheese), octopus cupcakes, stickers, tattoos and more. Friday, Sept. 14, 5-7 p.m., at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 10 Vernon St., Brattleboro. Donations benefit the Women’s Freedom Center, an organization working to end domestic and sexual violence in Windham and southern Windsor counties. Find more events at annbradenbooks.com.

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MEALTIME B Y A S T RI D H E D BOR L A GUE

Onigiri: Japanese Rice Balls A bento-inspired meal for the lunch box or dinner plate

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

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’ve been packing school lunches for 10 years, since my daughter started kindergarten. Early on, I found an online community of bloggers who wrote about how to create bento — the name for a Japanese-style lunch packed in a multi-compartment box — and bought all sorts of cute boxes, tools and cookie cutters to aid in the process. In my kids’ elementary school days, I would pack things like heart-shaped sandwiches and fruit on little skewers. I went as far as making tortilla art to celebrate Roald Dahl’s birthday, painstakingly recreating characters from our favorite books, like Fantastic Mr. Fox and Matilda, using toothpicks and food coloring to make designs on the tortillas. Now that my son is 12 and my daughter is 15, my lunches have gotten decidedly less “cute.” Recently, after I’d purged most of my bento supplies in favor of more practical and utilitarian lunch boxes, my daughter developed an appreciation for Japanese culture. She now yearns for the days of star-shaped hard-boiled eggs and clementines cut to look like flowers. She just started her sophomore year in high school, so I’ve told her that if she wants cute bentos, she can pack them herself. Since there are many days when I can hardly drag her out of bed, I don’t foresee this happening. What I am willing to do, however, is help her make fun food that we can pack in her lunches. Enter onigiri. These stuffed balls of sticky sushi rice

are the perfect lunch-box item. You can even make them a day or two ahead of time and wrap them tightly in plastic wrap to keep them from drying out. I decided to fill my creations with sushi-inspired fillings. I made both a California roll onigiri, and a smoked salmon onigiri. I have seen some recipes that call for using cooked rice without the added vinegar and sugar that make it into sticky rice, but I decided to use those extra ingredients because they add a delightful flavor and help keep the onigiri together. There are so many ways to customize these rice balls. Stuff them with tuna salad, pickled vegetables or leftover fried chicken for a crunch. I’ve even seen one stuffed with a boiled quail egg! They can also be rolled in seasoning like Japanese furikake or sesame seeds; fried lightly in butter to make them a little crispy; or wrapped with nori, the Japanese name for thin sheets of dried seaweed. Use special cutters or craft punches to make fun designs with the nori to stick on the onigiri. We had these for dinner with a delicious Japanese carrot-sesame salad, and some Japanese eggplant sautéed with scallions. Those leftovers would make great lunches as well. Now, to see if my teenager will actually start packing her own bento.  PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

KIDSVT.COM

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Directions: INGREDIENTS: For the rice •

2 cups sushi (mediumgrain) rice

2 cups cold water

4 tablespoons rice vinegar

3 tablespoons sugar

2 teaspoons salt

2 tablespoons mirin, or Japanese rice wine (This is optional, but delicious.)

TO MAKE THE RICE:

In a fine sieve, rinse the rice with cold water until the water runs clear. Put rice in a small pot (there shouldn’t be a lot of extra room) and add 2 cups cold water. Bring to a low rolling boil, then reduce heat to a simmer, cover tightly and cook for 12 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave covered for an additional 10 minutes. Scoop rice into a large glass or plastic bowl (don’t use metal, as it may create a metallic flavor when you add the vinegar). Cool for about 10 minutes, fluffing with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula occasionally.

Combine the vinegar, sugar, salt and mirin in a small bowl or measuring cup. Pour over the cooled rice, and stir with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula until well-coated and sticky. Cool completely.

For the California roll filling (for six onigiri) •

1/2 cup imitation or real crab meat, chopped into small pieces

1/2 small cucumber, chopped into small cubes (I like Persian cucumbers because they are small and have no seeds.)

1/2 small avocado, chopped into small cubes

3 tablespoons mayonnaise (Use wasabi mayonnaise if desired.)

For the smoked salmon filling (for three onigiri) •

1/4 cup smoked salmon, cut into small pieces

1/4 small cucumber, chopped into small pieces

3 tablespoons finely chopped carrots

2 tablespoons cream cheese

1 teaspoon black sesame seeds (optional)

TO ASSEMBLE THE ONIGIRI:

Scoop out about 1/2 cup of sticky rice onto a sheet of plastic wrap. Dip your fingers into a bowl of cool water (to keep the rice from sticking to them!) and flatten the rice into a disc with a small indentation in the center. Put desired fillings into the center, using no more than 2 tablespoons per ball. Using the plastic wrap, fold the rice over the filling to make a ball. Wrap it tightly and form into desired shape (the traditional shape is a triangle), making sure that the filling is not exposed. Press firmly to be sure the rice sticks together. Remove the plastic wrap, and place the onigiri on a serving platter (or keep in the plastic wrap if you are not serving right away). Sprinkle with sesame seeds if desired.


Jamie Heath with her book

Dream On Make-a-Wish kid’s book tells her tale of healing

BRETT STANCIU

ONE TO WATCH BY BRE TT S TA N CI U

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COURTESY OF JOANNE LECLERC

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Call or email about our Intro classes starting in September

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hree years ago, Jamie Heath swam with sea turtles in Hawaii, a dream come true thanks to MakeA-Wish Vermont. This experience, which the teen described as “breathtaking,” was an important part of her lasted healing process after a prolonged for nearly illness. three years. Jamie tells the story of her wish When Jamie NAME: JAMIE HEATH in a new book, Wishes Are Medicine! learned about AGE: 17 How Make-A-Wish Gave Me Hope Make-A-Wish & Helped Me Heal. Make-A-Wish Vermont, she TOWN: BARRE Vermont released the glossy asked her mother, hardcover — with illustrations by Joanne Leclerc, Leonard Wells Kenyon of Arlington to apply. Although Jamie is quick — in August, sending Jamie on a to credit the rock-solid support of well-publicized, two-week book tour her family — Leclerc, father Todd beyond her years” and her positive around the state. Heath and 21-year-old brother attitude. Hathaway emphasizes Jamie’s story began when she Josh — she acknowledged it was that Make-A-Wish Vermont helps was 7 and suffered a stroke, caused particularly hard for her mother to children with life-threatening — not by a brain aneurysm. She recovered apply to Make-A-Wish. “My mom just terminal — medical conditions, within six didn’t want me providing “the next chapter, not the weeks from that to think she ending.” first stroke but, was giving up After radiation treatments and five years later, on me,” Jamie what she describes as “a ton of thera second stroke said. “But I apy,” Jamie’s future looks bright. caused perdidn’t think The bubbly teenager’s accomplishmanent brain that.” ments include serving on student damage. During The wish council, managing the school’s an interview created an lacrosse team, and swimming with with Kids VT, opportunity the Central Vermont Swim Club and she gestured for Jamie to the Waterbury Rapids Swim Team. to a device on imagine life Additionally, Jamie volunteers as her right lower beyond her a Wish Ambassador, sharing her leg which, she sickbed — a life-altering experience with Makeexplained, fantasy that A-Wish Vermont with others. “helps me lift became real Now a senior at Spaulding Jamie swimming with sea my foot up” via when she High School and jointly enrolled turtles in Hawaii electromagswam and in early college coursework at netic waves. snorkeled Vermont Technical College, Jamie’s The stroke with the career goal is to study business affected Jamie’s cognitive skills, turtles. These emerald reptiles and someday work for Make-Atoo. “I can’t really word-find as well — who endure an arduous life Wish Vermont. “My mom told me as a normal person — but what’s cycle traveling between land and everything happens for a reason,” normal?” she explained, with a ocean — inspired Jamie in her own she said. “I’ve taken that to heart.” laugh. Jamie was in seventh grade slow but tenacious journey toward Although she never would at the time of the second stroke, healing. “My wish kind of allowed have chosen to have an illness, it and dropped from a tenth-grade to a me to run away for a week. When I “inspired so many things to come fourth-grade reading level. That loss got back I felt that I no longer had out of this,” she said. “I wouldn’t was “extremely difficult,” she said. to run away ... My wish was like the have gone back and done anything “I didn’t really realize how much I gateway to opening up the light,” she differently.”  valued the whole use of my body. explained. Wishes Are Medicine! How Make-AAfter the second stroke, I was really Jamie Hathaway, president and Wish Gave Me Hope & Helped Me Heal is glum, and I was like ... this can’t get CEO of Make-A-Wish Vermont, available for $15 at vermont.wish.org. any worse.” That difficult period praised the teenager’s “wisdom

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PHOTOS: COURTESY OF RICH LEVINE

HABITAT BY M E GA N J A M E S

Camper-Style Playhouse

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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atherine Drake and Rich Levine were itching for a project last mud season. The Stowe couple spend a lot of time with their two granddaughters — 4-year-old Nora and 2-year-old Claire — who also live in Stowe. They decided to build them a playhouse. Drake and Levine weren’t newbies to tiny-house building. Years ago, when their own two daughters were growing up, Drake and Levine built a treehouse for them in their New Jersey backyard. It wrapped around a tree that was about 500 feet away from their actual house, and even had a working intercom. “It was impressive,” Drake said. “Oh yeah,” recalled their older daughter, Julia Rogers, mom of Nora and Claire. “We could call into the main house.” The camper-style playhouse Drake and Levine made for their grandchildren lacks that particular amenity. But, Rogers said, “this one is way more stylish.” It is painted swimming-pool blue and white and has a window — with a screen — on each side of a Dutch door. It sits on four wheels and can be hitched up to a truck and moved if necessary. A rooftop porch sports two mini Adirondack chairs (decorative for now, since the roof railing is low and the girls are still young). Drake and Levine chose the camper design because they wanted to “inspire the girls to use their imaginations to go places and dream up play scenarios of traveling,” said Drake. Nora and Claire come from a family of avid travelers. Their mom works as a gap-year consultant, advising recent high school grads on where to go and what to do before they start college. Before she and her husband, Tom, got married, they took a year-long trip around the world. Last fall, the family spent a month in Hawaii; the girls have been pretend packing for exotic trips ever since. At first, Drake and Levine wanted to buy a vintage trailer and refurbish it as a playhouse. But they couldn’t

Drake sands the structure

Nora and Claire peek through the working windows of their new playhouse

Nora and Claire on a couch covered in watermelonprint fabric

find anything that fit the bill. So they began looking online for building plans, and found them at Paul’s Playhouses (paulsplayhouses.com). “We ordered the plans, which served as a general blueprint for the structure,” said Drake, “but we modified it significantly.” Their modifications included custom-cut wooden boards to make the playhouse watertight, added height, a functioning door and real tires. They came up with the impeccable interior design themselves: white walls, a black-and-white checkered floor, pink polka-dot curtains, and playful watermelon upholstery on the

dinette seats and couch. The pièce de résistance is a candy blue, vintagestyle play kitchen. Drake and Levine said they spent “hundreds of hours” on the project. They began in their garage in April, when there was still snow on the ground. Levine did the construction; Drake served as project manager and did the sanding, painting and interior decorating. They kept the playhouse under wraps, even as their daughter and granddaughters visited regularly. “I would not let them go in the backyard,” Drake said. It was finished in time for Claire’s second birthday, in June.

When the girls stepped inside for the first time, “they were pretty excited,” recalled Drake. “They were psyched about the colorfulness.” Drake estimates they spent about $1,500 on materials. “We got carried away,” she admitted. “The girls would have been happy with anything, but I kept coming up with things.” When Nora and Claire are older, their grandparents may install a ladder to allow them access to the roof porch. And Levine just hooked up electricity to the playhouse. “One light on the outside, one light on the inside,” said Drake. “No cable TV.” K


THE ART OF BY MARY A N N L I CKT E I G

Foraging for Art Supplies

COURTESY OF SUSAN TEARE COURTESY OF NICK NEDDO

group of students

saturation. Add 1 teaspoon vinegar and 1 teaspoon salt to help it last longer. For magenta ink, juice fresh beets or puree them in a blender, squeeze them in a cheesecloth and collect the vibrant juice. Any berry in season can make ink. “The more succulent and juicy they are, the better,” Neddo writes in his book. “The hardest part of making ink with berries is that you cannot eat them.” The easiest way to make ink is to put the berries in a Ziploc bag, crush them and freeze them. When the berries thaw, pigment will puddle in the bottom of the bag. These are small-batch inks intended for immediate use. Refrigerate them, and they will last a few days. Adding rosemary essential oil to them will inhibit growth of mold and bacteria.

KIDS VT

To make paint, find a rock that draws like chalk, one that leaves a line when you scratch it on another stone. Grind it onto a larger rock, going back and forth over the same line, pushing hard, until you have a pile of powder. That’s your pigment. (Vermont rocks yield hues of virtually every color of the rainbow.) All you need to do after that is add a binding agent. “You can just spit in it and mix it with your finger, and you have a really simple paint,” Neddo said. However, he acknowledged, “The spit thing can get kind of gross.” Diluted honey, Elmer’s glue or maple syrup also work. Proportions don’t need to be exact: about one part honey, glue or syrup to five or 10 parts water. Make a pen by finding a pen-sized stick. With a pocket knife, carve one end to a sharp point, and remove the bark two inches up the shaft from the point. Soak the debarked end in water for 30 minutes to open the wood and improve ink retention and flow. Then, dip the pen in ink and draw! Inks can be made from coffee, beets and berries. Try these techniques: Brew a strong pot of coffee. Pour some for your parents, and use the rest as ink. If you want it to be darker, reduce it on low heat until it reaches the desired saturation. Cover one cup of finely chopped beets with two cups of water and boil them for about 45 Nick Neddo minutes. The resulting water is instructing a brown ink. Reduce it to desired

Left, Neddo’s drawings of berries using ink made from each berry

SEPTEMBER 2018

To learn more, visit nickneddo.com.

HUNT, GATHER AND DRAW

Neddo draws with charcoal he made from wild grapevine

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fter years of feeling pulled between two passions: making art and studying, teaching and practicing Stone Age technology, Nick Neddo asked himself two questions. “If I lived in the Stone Age, would I consider myself an artist? And I realized that the answer would be yes because that’s just who I am. And the next question was, what would art look like if I did live in the Stone Age?” That question has led him to an ongoing exploration of making art supplies — charcoal sticks, pens, brushes, crayons, inks, paints, and even inkwells and paint dishes — from natural materials and then, making art with them. The results can be seen in his 2015 how-to book, The Organic Artist: Make Your Own Paint, Paper, Pigments, Prints, and More from Nature. His drawings and paintings depict bamboo, willow, acorns, berries and other sources of the materials he uses. Although high-quality commercial art supplies are readily available, they are expensive and some, such as brush-cleaning solvents and lead-sourced pigments, can be toxic, Neddo said. His creative process could start with a pen in his hand at his desk, he said. “Or it can start with my feet on the ground out in some beautiful place... Being on the landscape foraging feels natural to me, and it feels good.” It offers Neddo, a sixth-generation Vermonter, the chance to develop a deeper knowledge of plants, a perspective on geology, connection to the landscape and a sense of place, he said. A recent outing brought him face-to-face with a young barred owl. He was following a stream in the forest near his East Montpelier home, looking for stones from which to make paint, when he heard fluttering in the branches. He and the owl studied each other for a few moments. That, he said, never happens in an art store. For 18 years, Neddo, 39, has worked as an independent educator, teaching kids and adults wilderness survival and living skills, tracking, drawing and nature awareness in Vermont and elsewhere. He has visited several Vermont schools as an artist-in-residence. Since his book was published, demand for his art classes has increased. While making paint from rocks and ink from berries is fun, his overarching goal is to help his students reclaim their relationship with nature and become ecologically responsible. “That land steward, caretaker relationship is the bigger picture here,” he said. “All creatures have a give-and-take relationship with the ecosystem. For humans, it’s the same thing.” 

COURTESY OF NICK NEDDO

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Where Jewish education is fun! Your child’s Jewish future is too important to be left to chance. Together, we can give your children the foundation they need to be confident in their Judaism and proud of their heritage, and have some fun along the way.

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Friday, September 7

5:30pm

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SHELBURNE FARMS’ 40TH ANNUAL

H AR VE ST FES T I VA L

Celebrate Vermont’s Farms, Forests & Future Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning

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SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

K-8 Academics • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art Music • Spanish • PE • Project Based Learning• Individual Learning Goals

Saturday, September 15, 10:00AM - 4:00PM full details @ shelburnefarms.org/harvestfest Forest, farm & traditional arts exhibits & demonstrations Vermont Abenaki Artists Association • Children’s activities Children’s Farmyard • Wagon rides • Locally produced food Performers & musicians • Young Tradition Vermont ADULTS $10 • SENIORS & CHILDREN $5 • MEMBERS & CHILDREN 2 & UNDER FREE 1611 HARBOR ROAD, SHELBURNE • ATM ON PREMISES • NO PETS, PLEASE special thanks to Charlotte-Shelburne Rotary

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PARENT PORTRAIT P H OTO S BY S AM S I M O N • I N T ER V I EW B Y ER I N N S I MO N

James, Eli & Oliver

James Kochalka, 50, Vermont’s first cartoonist laureate and author of the Johnny Boo series of graphic novels, with sons Oliver, 10, and Eli, 15

It’s like a morning greeting?

Want to be featured in an upcoming Parent Portrait? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Eli, it’s your second year of high school. Are you excited for the first day of school or dreading it? Eli: Kind of dreading it. I don’t really want to get back into the schedule of school. James: Maybe I could come in and do a huge Johnny Boo mural at the high school!! Eli: (laughing) No. Please don’t! 

KIDS VT

James: Yeah, I try to pay attention to what’s going on that day at school and kind of follow the theme.

Eli, did you miss the Johnny Boos when you went off to middle school? Eli: (laughing) Uh, no. James: I mostly do it because I want all the kids to start off the day happy, so maybe if I do this little thing that starts their day off in a good way, the whole class will have an easier day the whole way through! Ollie, do you think it works? Oliver: Yeah, it does.

SEPTEMBER 2018

James: I think I started when Eli was in second grade. And the only reason I didn’t do it before then was I couldn’t find a whiteboard in his classroom to draw on! I just go in every morning and draw, as long as the teacher is into it, of course. If they’re not, I don’t do it!

Oliver, do your friends ever talk about the daily Johnny Boo? Oliver: Yeah, sometimes. James: I think his friends are probably more into it than he is most of the time!

KIDSVT.COM

Every morning for years you’ve drawn your cartoon character, Johnny Boo, in your kids’ elementary school classrooms when you drop them off at school. When did you start?

19


KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

Colchester Catamounts players training for the fall football season

20

Heads in the

Game Will a switch from tackle to flag save youth football in Vermont? BY KEN PICARD PHOTOS BY JAMES BUCK

n a humid August evening, around two dozen boys and two girls ages 6 to 14 assembled on a field at Bayside Park in Colchester for a preseason practice of the Colchester Catamounts coed youth football program. Longtime coach Glenn Cummings called a pair of eighth graders to the front of the group to lead them in jumping jacks and other warm-up exercises, while the other players counted along in unison. Cummings approached a small, quiet first grader and gave the boy his first lesson in football’s culture of toughness. “Noah, football players have voices that are deep and loud,” he said. “Can I hear your big-boy voice?” “Yeah!” Noah shouted back. The eighth graders continued barking out warm-up drills, and

the players counted just as loudly. Two Castleton University football players, who both rose through the Catamounts’ ranks, watched from the sidelines with arms crossed. One, Cummings’ son, Grant, is senior captain of the Castleton Spartans football team. In the Northern Vermont Youth Football League, the state’s largest independent league, with 17 teams, Cummings is an institution. Not only did he build the Catamounts’ equipment shed and convince the town to reserve this practice field for football, he was also the league’s longest serving president. During his nineyear tenure, which ended in 2016, the league adopted the rules of USA Football, the amateur youth sport’s governing body. Those rules require that all coaches complete criminal background checks and get certified


at the elementary and middle school level. In February 2017, the Vermont Principals’ Association, an organization that oversees school sports, issued a directive to all of its 300 member schools: Beginning in the fall of 2017, all school-sponsored fifthand sixth-grade football programs in

Other football programs around Vermont have followed the VPA’s lead. Earlier this year, Burlington Parks, Recreation & Waterfront adopted flag football for all three of its divisions (grades 2 through 8) starting this fall. However, some independent leagues, including the one in which

[Coaches and other athletic professionals] all agreed that we’ve got to do something different or we’re going to lose this sport. BOB JOHNSON, VERMONT PRINCIPALS’ ASSOCIATION Vermont had to switch from tackle to so-called padded-flag football. The rules of padded flag aren’t very different from tackle, in that players still suit up in helmets, shoulder pads and padded pants. However, defenders must grab a flag on the ball carrier’s waist rather than tackling or pushing the player out of bounds. This fall, the padded-flag mandate will extend to all of Vermont’s schoolsponsored middle-school programs at the seventh- and eighth-grade levels, regardless of whether those programs are run by the schools themselves or, more commonly, by community rec departments.

the Colchester Catamounts play, are sticking with traditional tackle rules. Cummings said he isn’t personally opposed to flag football — his league uses it from kindergarten through fourth grade — but he believes that if his middle school teams switched to flag, “I would lose my players. They would go play for other teams.” That assertion is backed up by Aimee Sheltra of Milton, mom to 10-year-old Mason. After the Milton Broncos switched from tackle to flag, she signed her son up with the Colchester Catamounts instead. “Mason couldn’t wait to get out of flag,” Sheltra explained. “They’re

Colchester Catamounts’ preseason practice

KIDS VT

HEADS IN THE GAME, P. 22 »

SEPTEMBER 2018

eventually going to tackle when they get to high school, so I’d rather he learns now.” Michelle Mayo of Colchester agreed. Her sixth-grade son, Hunter, started playing tackle football last year. Mayo said the VPA’s directive was a bad call because she thinks kids won’t be prepared for the rigors of tackle when they reach high school. As she put it, “If he’s going to play, I’d rather it be real football.” Bob Johnson, the VPA’s associate executive director who supervises all middle school and high school sports, said he’s heard such criticisms before and noted that the decision wasn’t reached lightly. The VPA started looking at this issue three years ago to address the shrinking number of kids playing football throughout Vermont, he explained. Much of that decline, the VPA discovered after conferring with coaches and other athletic professionals around the state, was attributable to the concerns of parents and healthcare professionals about the effects of repeated blows to the head on children and teens’ developing brains. “They all agreed that we’ve got to do something different,” Johnson said, “or we’re going to lose this sport.” By now, the long-term dangers posed by repeated head injuries in full-contact sports are coming into sharper focus. In 2005, researchers discovered that shockingly high numbers of former National Football League players had developed Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms of CTE include memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment, impulse control problems, aggression, depression, suicidal thoughts and dementia. The 2015 sports biopic, Concussion, documented CTE’s discovery by forensic pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu, and his crusade to get the NFL to address its debilitating and often lethal effects. As recently as five years ago, brain researchers assumed that CTE took years, even decades, to develop and occurred only in athletes who had

KIDSVT.COM

in USA Football’s Heads Up Football training program for concussion prevention and safer tackling and blocking. Cummings is trying to keep these kids playing the game for as long as possible. But his toughest opponent may not be one his team will face on the gridiron. In recent years, football itself has been blitzed by a growing body of research linking repeated blows to the head — the kind endemic to football and other full-contact sports — with permanent brain damage. Concerns about concussions have contributed to declining youth enrollment in tackle football programs, in Vermont and elsewhere. “The kids aren’t playing because their parents aren’t letting them play,” Cummings asserted. His league’s ranks dropped from about 2,000 players 12 years ago to about 1,200 today. Vermont, he said, is now 49th in the country for youth participation in football and is rapidly losing players and programs. Youth football’s decline in Vermont reflects a national trend, in which participation in tackle football by kids ages 6 to 14 fell from about 4 million kids nine years ago to about 3 million today, according to data from the National Sporting Goods Association. Case in point: South Burlington and Burlington high schools have merged their football programs due to dwindling numbers of players. For safety reasons, the Northern Vermont Youth Football League no longer allows “old-school” training drills, such as “bull in the ring,” in which one player runs inside a circle of teammates, while one or more players rush in and try to tackle him or her, Cummings explained. The league has also reduced or eliminated high-injury plays such as kickoff and punt returns, where rapid, head-on collisions are more likely. For K-6 programs, teams kick off only at the beginning of each half. When one team scores a touchdown, the opposing team starts at its own 25-yard line. Growing concerns about concussions have also prompted many public schools, community recreational programs and independent leagues to switch from tackle to flag football

21


KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

HEADS IN THE GAME

22

suffered numerous concussions as well as sub-concussive events, or blows to the head not serious enough to take players out of the game. However, more recent — albeit preliminary — research now suggests that the early stages of CTE and other brain anomalies may begin in athletes at the college and even high school levels. In September 2017, a long-term study conducted at Boston University found that athletes who started playing tackle football before age 12 had more behavioral and cognitive problems than those who started playing after age 12. In 2016, researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine published a study in the journal Radiology that found “measurable brain changes in children after a single season of playing youth football, even without a concussion diagnosis.” Players studied were between the ages of 8 and 13. No one has suggested that football is unique in posing such risks. Other team sports, including gymnastics, ice hockey, soccer, lacrosse and cheerleading also have high rates of injuries, including concussions. Researchers at Purdue University, for example, have likened the force of heading a soccer ball to dropping a brick on one’s head from two feet above it. But, as Johnson, of the Vermont Principals’ Association, pointed out, “Football is the one under the spotlight right now.” One healthcare professional who spends a lot time thinking about head injuries is Alan Maynard, a certified athletic trainer, associate professor at the University of Vermont’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences, and an expert on concussive injuries. Maynard educates local physicians, trainers and coaches on how to determine when it’s safe for student athletes to return to play. He’s also advocated before the legislature for better concussion awareness and training in Vermont’s athletic programs. Maynard wasn’t directly involved in the VPA’s decision but supports it, calling it “something that should have happened a long time ago.” Maynard won’t go so far as to say

CONTINUED FROM P. 21

that kids should never play tackle football. For one, he said, recent studies of youth football don’t address whether observed changes in kids’ brains occur in other contact sports as well. It’s possible that the

especially because no high school teams in Vermont play padded flag. “The main downside of flag football is it’s going to create these bad habits for the players who hope to transition to tackle football in the

Youth football’s decline in Vermont reflects a national trend. cumulative effects of sub-concussive blows are just as common in, say, girls’ lacrosse, whose rate of in-game concussions equals that of tackle football, Maynard noted. Also unclear is how well young brains recover from such injuries over time. “I don’t know the answer. I don’t

future,” said Don Demar, seventh and eighth grade head coach of the Fairfax Patriots, one of the Northern Vermont Youth Football League’s member teams. Tackling and blocking are skills that take years to perfect, he added, and kids who learn too late “will have some catching up to do.”

Eighth grader Jake Labell practices his tackling technique at a Colchester Catamounts preseason practice

think anyone does,” Maynard said. But while the jury is still out, he advocates for erring on the side of caution. As he put it, “Having a safety-minded mentality is always a positive thing, especially with kids’ brains.” Some coaches and parents suggest that delaying kids’ introduction to tackle rules will only increase their likelihood of getting hurt later on,

But Maynard pointed to one of Vermont’s most successful football programs to counter that argument: Middlebury Union High School. Activities director Sean Farrell has been at Middlebury for 15 years — not including his time there as a student, when he played football for the Middlebury Tigers. Unlike many other communities, Middlebury’s youth

teams have been playing flag football up through eighth grade for decades, “and we have a fairly good success record at the high school level.” That’s an understatement. In recent years, the Division I Tigers have almost always made the playoffs and are often strong contenders for a state championship. From 2013 to 2015, the team had a three-year undefeated run, with a record of 32-0, making the finals three years in a row. “That was a group of kids who, when they were fifth and sixth graders, were small guys,” Farrell pointed out. “If they’d played full-contact football, I don’t know if they would have continued to play all the way through high school.” One advantage of flag football, Farrell explained, is that it can enable smaller players to be successful because the rules require running backs to focus on evading defenders “rather than just putting a shoulder down and running over people.” Farrell acknowledged that sometimes it takes freshmen players a few games to acclimate to tackle. But, he added, “In my 15 years here ... I can count the number of concussions we’ve had on one hand in [flag] football.” For his part, Maynard thinks that the athleticism and physicality of teams such as Middlebury’s are proof that padded-flag football can produce players who are just as competitive and physical — while also reducing their exposure to concussions. Maynard’s own 8-year-old son, Payton, who was named after Chicago Bears hall of fame running back Walter Payton, will play flag football for the first time this year. “I love football,” Maynard said. At the same time, he added, he’s glad he’ll have the “luxury of seven or eight more years” of brain research before he has to decide whether to allow his son to play tackle football in high school. “I worry about parents who don’t have that luxury,” he added, “because football can be an important part of a young man’s life.” K Disclosure: Kids VT executive editor Cathy Resmer’s son plays for the Colchester Catamounts.


JUST FOR KIDS A-B-Seas

Writing Contest & Winners...... 24 Coloring Contest Winners......... 24 Coloring Contest.............................. 29 Puzzle Page .........................................30 Birthday Club.....................................30 Puzzle Answers................................ 51

Well, kids, it’s that time of year again. Yes, it’s “Back to School of Fish” time! Even our finny friends can’t hang out by the shore anymore. But this little group of guppies are late for their first day. Can you help these gilled girls and guys find the proper path to Ms. Squid’s classroom?

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

23


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

September is our Back to School Issue. Tell us what you’re most excited about as you begin a new school year. Feel free to write your response in the form of a paragraph or poem.

Entries to this month’s coloring contest celebrated our superb summer. Fouryear-old Enoch’s lion appeared in a magic jungle, with fluttering fairies and starshaped flowers. Deborah, 10, created a mountain-range backdrop for her orangeand-gold cat chilling at the beach, with Vermont’s own lake monster, Champ, poking above the blue water. Maddy, 6, drew two brilliant lightning bolts bursting through dark storm clouds. Savor the early fall, kiddos, and send us your snazziest work this month.

HONORABLE MENTIONS “TOO MANY TATTOOS”

Blithe Bigelow, 11, Underhill “THE LION IN THE SUNGLASSES”

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“Tie Dye Tiger” Bruce Creason, 5

5& under

BURLINGTON

Charlie Coleman, 4, Burlington “THE ‘COOL CAT’”

Emma McMahon, 9, Essex Junction “RAINBOW SPRINKLES”

Cash Kontos, 4, Jeffersonville “SCARED IN THE DARK”

Asher Weissberger, 6, Winooski “FISHER LION”

Sophie Scott, 5, Shelburne We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and entries in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is September 15.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

24

WRITING WINNERS

In our August issue, we asked kids to tell us about their dream garden. Below, find the winning entries. Saylor and Margo each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

Saylor Hemond, 9 WEST BURKE

In my garden of dreams, I would plant strawberries, carrots, watermelons, tomatoes, radishes, pink roses, red roses, lilies, sunflowers, squash, zucchini, cucumber and eggplant. After I pick all the fruits and vegetables, I would give them to poor people that can’t afford them!

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

Margo Cannella, 8

EAST MONTPELIER

The entrance of the garden of my dreams is a big gate and an archway made out of clovers. Birds fly in and out. Th also be flowers in the ere would entryway. There would be a lot of flowers and some tropical fru its. In the middle of my garden , there would be a pond with lily pads and fish in it. In the middle of the pond, there would be a sta tue of a frog with water coming out of it like a fountain. There wo uld also be an island next to the frog. There would be a ring of fl owers around it. There would be so me trees on the island making so me shade. In the garden, there would also be some vegetables . That is my dream garden.

“JUST CHILLIN’”

Isabelle Romane, 9, Fairfax “RAINBOW ROCK”

Sawyer Willard, 8, Barnet “KING OF THE PLAYGROUND”

Laurie-Ann Fournier, 12, Montpelier

“Chillin’ and Grillin’” Emilia Poczobut, 8 BARRE

6 to 8

“SUN LION”

Hayden Bernard, 6, New Haven “THE FUNNY LION”

Wyatt Stanhope, 5, North Hero “COOL LION”

James Langan, 8, South Burlington

TOP TITLES “SHARP WHISKERS”

Emmett Tursini, 4, Cambridge “SUNTASTIC LION”

Hazel Ritzer, 7, Northfield “ROARINGTON KING OF THE BEACH”

Kaydence White, 12, Bristol

“The Grateful Lion” Somerset Pierce, 12 MONTPELIER

9 to 12


TIZEN History Suggested resources: ourdocuments.gov, vermont.gov, your local library, your local historical society

Take the...

CHALLENGE

2018 GOOD CITIZEN SCORECARD

CHALLENGE On these pages you’ll find a list of questions and activities

Please complete at least 3 of these activities: 1.

BONUS: What does it mean to you? 5 PTS

_________________________ 2.

Keep track of the activities you complete by checking the box next to the activity. Some of these tasks you can record

251 points

When you earn — the number of towns in Vermont — send us your scorecard and proof of completion to receive a Good Citizen medal. You’ll also be invited to a reception at the Vermont Statehouse where you’ll meet state officials. The first 100 participants to complete the Challenge will also receive a Good Citizen T-shirt. If you attempt but do not complete the Challenge, send us your scorecard anyway! We’ll send you a Good Citizen sticker and a participation prize. We’ve divided the activities into 7

categories.

To complete the challenge, you need to complete a minimum number of activities in each category, specified at the top of each section. To assist you in your quest, we’ve listed some resources that will help you find the answers you seek.

Mail your scorecard

Memorize the preamble to the U.S. Constitution and record a video of yourself delivering it. Find it at ourdocuments.gov. 15 PTS

4.

Memorize the Gettysburg Address and record a video of yourself delivering it. Find it at ourdocuments.gov. 40 PTS

5.

Listen to or read Frederick Douglass’ 1852 speech “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro.” Find it at vermonthumanities. org/douglass. 10 PTS BONUS: Every year, the Vermont Humanities Council organizes events at which this speech is read. Attend one of these events. 20 PTS

Upload a scan of your scorecard

OR

with photos, recordings and other supporting materials to Dropbox, Google Drive or another cloudbased album and send the link to goodcitizen@kidsvt.com.

BONUS: Organize your own event where the speech is

All activities must be completed between April 15 and October 9, 2018. A parent, guardian or teacher must sign off on your work at the end of the scorecard.

7.

and we can help! Call 802-864-5684, or email goodcitizen@kidsvt.com.

with support from:

powered by:

KEY

read. 40 PTS 6.

If you’re having a problem uploading your photos online, contact us

_____________________

3.

When your challenge is complete... with photos, copies of recordings and other supporting materials to: Good Citizen Challenge, Kids VT, 255 S. Champlain St. Suite 5, Burlington, VT 05401

Read a chapter book about U.S. history recommended by your local librarian. 20 PTS BOOK

+5 Add 5 bonus points for each activity you or a parent post on social media using the hashtag #GoodCitizenVT.

5 PTS

_________________________

related to the rights and duties of U.S. citizenship. Answer the questions and complete the activities to earn points and win prizes. Designed for youth ages 9 to 14, the Challenge is open to all Vermont K-12 students under 18.

directly on your scorecard. For the ones that you can’t, we ask that you show your work by taking a photo, recording audio or video, or attaching additional sheets of paper clearly labeled with the activity number.

What is Vermont’s state motto?

8.

PHOTO

Visit the Vermont History Museum.

RECORD

10 PTS

READ

Visit Fort Ticonderoga in New York. 10 PTS

WRITE

Visit a stop on the Vermont Civil War Heritage Trail. Find it at vtcivilwarheritage.net.

INFORM CONVERSE CREATE

10 PTS PER STOP Empowering Vermont’s youth to close the opportunity gap.

9.

Visit a stop on the African American Heritage Trail. Find it at vermontvacation.com/ africanamericanheritagetrail. 10 PTS PER STOP

Find this scorecard and updates at GoodCitizenVT.com.

HISTORY CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


2018 GOOD CITIZEN SCORECARD

GOOD ITIZEN

History (CONTINUED) 10.

Visit any of the Vermont Historic Sites including the Calvin Coolidge Homestead, the Bennington Battle Monument and the Old Constitution House. Find a list of historic sites at sites.vermont.gov. 10 PTS PER STOP BONUS: Go to the Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site during the reenactment encampment on July 7 and 8. 20 PTS

GOOD ITIZEN

11.

Match the wars below with their dates. 5 PTS

����U.S.-Afghanistan War ����Civil War ����Revolutionary War/War for Independence

D. 1939-1945

Please answer this question in a medium of your choice — write a paragraph or a poem, draw a cartoon or picture, or record a song:

E. 1950-1953

14.

B. 1861-1865 C. 1914-1918

BONUS: Participate as a reenactor.

F. 1955-1975

20 PTS

����Vietnam War

G. 1990-1991

Find a monument or memorial in your town. Whom does it honor?

����Korean War

H. 2001-present

HONOREE(S)

_________________

Reflection

A. 1775-1783

����World War II

10 PTS

12.

13.

10 PTS

+5

����World War I ����Gulf War

Add 5 bonus points for each activity you or a parent post on social media using the hashtag #GoodCitizenVT.

Pick a street or park in your town and learn about its name. When was it named, and why does it have the name it does? 10 PTS

CHALLENGE

Government

CHALLENGE

24.

Saying “I take the fifth” or “I plead the fifth” is a reference to the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, which states that the government cannot make you testify or give evidence against whom? 1 PT

Suggested resources: vermont.gov, sec.state.vt.us/kids, your local library

Please complete at least 10 of these tasks: 15.

Name the three branches of government. 5 PTS

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________ 22.

Name the governor of Vermont. 1 PT

19.

Name your state senators and representatives. 5 PTS

_________________________ _________________________ 20.

Name Vermont’s lone member of the national House of Representatives. 1 PT

_________________________

26.

_________________________ _________________________ 23.

27.

_________________________ _________________________

Pass the citizenship tests put together by the Joe Foss Institute: joefossinstitute.org/civicscurriculum/us-citizenship-test. 10 PTS FOR THE 10-QUESTION TEST 25 PTS FOR THE 25-QUESTION TEST 40 PTS FOR THE 100-QUESTION TEST

_________________________

_________________________

Vermont voters elect city or town officers, and approve city and school budgets, on the first Tuesday in March. What is this day called? 1 PT

_________________________

Name the five freedoms protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution. 5 PTS

_________________________

Every four years, voters around the country cast their votes for president on the first Tuesday following the first Monday in which month? 1 PTS

_________________________

_________________________

Name the state treasurer. 1 PT

_________________________

25.

Name Vermont’s five Supreme Court justices. 5 PTS

_________________________

Name the lieutenant governor of Vermont. 1 PT

_________________________ 18.

_________________________

_________________________

_________________________ 17.

Name Vermont’s two senators who serve in the U.S. Senate. 2 PTS

_________________________ _________________________ 16.

21.

What does being a good citizen mean to you?

of completion certificate.

28.

Gerrymandering is the practice of drawing congressional districts in a way that favors one political party over another. Learn how this practice affects elections by playing Gerry Mander: A Voting District Puzzle Game by Vermont-based GameTheory. Find it at playgerrymander.com. 10 PTS


Media

36.

Suggested resources: your local library, iTunes

Please complete at least 3 of these activities: Find a copy of your school newspaper or school district newsletter and read it all. 5 PTS

33.

34.

37.

Find a copy of a local newspaper (such as the Colchester Sun, Stowe Reporter, Barton Chronicle or Seven Days) and read three stories.

35.

38.

_________________

Find a copy of a national newspaper (such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post or USA Today) and read three stories. 10 PTS NEWSPAPER

Find a copy of a national news magazine (such as TIME, Newsweek, Economist, New Republic or the Atlantic) and read three stories. 10 PTS MAGAZINE

10 PTS NEWSPAPER

Find the masthead of each newspaper, the page that tells you who owns the newspaper, who works for the newspaper, and where it is printed and circulated. 5 PTS FOR EACH

__________________

___________________

5 PTS 41.

Listen to a news podcast (such as the Deeper Dig from VTDigger.org, Brave Little State from VPR or the Daily from the New York Times). 10 PTS PODCAST

42.

___________________

Read three stories on a local news website. 10 PTS WEBSITE

10 PTS

_________________

__________________

BONUS: Hear the station identify its frequency and location.

Watch part of a local meeting on your public access cable channel.

MEETING

Listen to a newscast or news program on WDEV or Vermont Public Radio. 5 PTS PROGRAM

Watch a broadcast of the local TV news. 10 PTS CHANNEL

39.

40.

___________________

BONUS: Find out where the website is based, who owns it and how often it is updated. 5 PTS

___________________

_________________________

Visit the Vermont Statehouse.

29.

10 PTS

Go to a city council or selectboard meeting. What were the main items under discussion? 10 PTS

30.

_________________________ _________________________ BONUS: Introduce yourself during the public comment period and explain why you’re there. 10 PTS

Creativity Suggested resources: Young Writers Project — a free, online platform where Vermont’s young writers can share writing, photos and art at youngwritersproject.org

Please complete at least 2 of these activities and submit your work — or a scan or photocopy — with your scorecard:

_________________________

Create a free account on the Young Writers Project website. 5 PTS

44.

Write a poem about America.

48.

30 PTS

BONUS: Submit it to the Young Writers Project. 5 PTS 45.

Write a song about the First Amendment naming the five freedoms it protects. 30 PTS BONUS: Submit it to the Young Writers Project. 5 PTS

BONUS: Introduce yourself during the public comment period and explain why you’re there. 10 PTS

Draw a comic strip that explains how the three branches of government work. 30 PTS BONUS: Submit it to the Young Writers Project. 5 PTS

CONVERSE CREATE

Visit the Democracy sculpture on Main Street in Burlington. 10 PTS BONUS: Why aren’t the puzzle pieces connected? Explain. 5 PTS

51.

The U.S. Constitution was signed by the delegates to the constitutional convention on September 17, 1787. Celebrate Constitution Day, September 17, by making a birthday card for the Constitution or recording a birthday greeting for it. Learn more at constitutionday.com. 20 PTS

52.

Draw a detailed map of your city or town and include your favorite landmarks. 20 PTS*

BONUS: Submit it to the Young Writers Project. 5 PTS 47.

INFORM

50.

20 PTS

20 PTS

*Also part of the Vermont State Parks’ Venture Vermont Outdoor Challenge. Find more info and download a scorecard at vtstateparks.com/venture-vermont.html.

Draw a picture of a current or past American patriot. Explain who it is and why you chose this figure.

WRITE

Make a poster or a video encouraging adults to vote. 20 PTS

BONUS: Record yourself singing it. 46.

Learn to sing the “Star Spangled Banner,” “America the Beautiful” or “This Land Is Your Land” by heart, or learn to play it on your instrument. Record yourself singing or playing the song. 20 PTS FOR EACH

49.

15 PTS

Apply for the legislative page program (open only to eighth graders; deadline September 30, 2018). Find the application at: legislature. vermont.gov/the-state-house/civiceducation/become-a-legislative-page.

RECORD

2018 GOOD CITIZEN SCORECARD

_________________________

32.

PHOTO

READ 43.

Go to a school board meeting. What were the main items under discussion? 10 PTS

31.

KEY


ZEN Advocacy Suggested resources: Front Porch Forum — a free, locally owned communitybuilding service that connects neighbors at frontporchforum.com

CHALLENGE LLENGE Community Suggested resources: Your city or town website; Front Porch Forum — a free, locally owned community-building service that connects neighbors at frontporchforum.com

Please complete at least 2 of these activities: 53.

54.

Get a library card if you don’t have one already. 5 PTS Sign up to receive your local Front Porch Forum. (Kids can sign up to receive Front Porch Forum emails, but only adults may post to the service). 5 PTS BONUS: Get help from an adult to organize a neighborhood event using Front Porch Forum. Print or send the issue in which your message appeared. 20 PTS Plant a native tree or plant in your yard. 10 PTS *

56.

Plant flowers in your yard where anyone passing by can see them. 10 PTS

63.

64.

65.

KEY

With your parents’ or guardians’ permission, interview one of the elected officials who represents you. Ask them about the most difficult vote they ever had to cast and why they voted the way they did. Report what you learned. 20 PTS Find someone who disagrees with you about an important political issue and ask them why they hold their belief. What did they tell you? Did it change your view of the issue? How? Explain. 20 PTS Find someone in your family or community who has attended a political protest or rally. Ask them what they were protesting and why. Report what you learned. 20 PTS

66.

Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper about an issue that’s important to you. How is writing a letter to the editor of a newspaper different from leaving a comment on Facebook? 20 PTS

67.

Write to one of your elected officials about an issue that’s important to you. 20 PTS

68.

Have you been to a protest or rally? Tell us what was it about, why you went and what you remember most about the experience. 20 PTS

Help a neighbor or senior citizen with gardening, planting, yard work or other chores. 10 PTS *

TOTAL POINTS: I affirm that ________________________ has completed these activities.

58.

Talk with a senior citizen about their childhood hometown. How were things different then? 20 PTS

59.

Talk with a veteran about military service. Why did he or she serve? 20 PTS

60.

Donate food to your local food bank. 10 PTS *

61.

Pick up litter by a road in your town. 10 PTS *

62.

Talk with someone who serves on a board or commission in your town or volunteers with the local rescue squad. Ask why they volunteer and what they get out of serving, and report on their answers. 20 PTS FOR EACH CONVERSATION

BONUS: Do any of these entities accept student volunteers? Find out. 5 PTS

BONUS: Are you qualified to serve? If so, volunteer your time. 30 PTS BONUS: Brainstorm some ways your city or town could increase the number of volunteers and write a letter suggesting them to the mayor, city council or selectboard. 20 PTS

Signed __________________________ Printed _______________________ PARENT, GUARDIAN OR TEACHER

RECORD READ WRITE INFORM CONVERSE CREATE

AL: 251 GO

STUDENT NAME

57.

PHOTO

PARENT, GUARDIAN OR TEACHER

Email: _________________________ Phone: _____________________

Can We Use Your Photos and Audio/Video Recordings? Thanks for participating in the Good Citizen Challenge! We would like to share your experience to spread the word about the Challenge and inspire others. Please have a parent or guardian fill out and sign this release form. Parents: If you do not wish to share photos and audios of you, your family members and children with others, you do not have to complete this form. In consideration of my child’s or children’s participation in the Good Citizen Challenge, I give permission to Da Capo Publishing, Inc. (d/b/a Seven Days, Kids VT) and its affiliates: (a) To use, reuse, publish and republish photographic and digital images and audio recordings of myself, my family and my children (individually and collectively, “participants”), in whole or part, individually or in conjunction with other photographs, artwork and poetry, or any medium and for any purpose whatsoever, including (but not by way of limitation) illustration, promotion, and advertising and trade; and (b) To use the participant’s name in conjunction therewith if Da Capo Publishing so chooses. I hereby release and discharge Da Capo Publishing from any and all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with the use of the photographic and digital images and audio recordings of participants, artwork, poetry and any other submission, including any and all claims for libel.

I am over the age of 21. I have read the foregoing and fully understand the contents thereof.

Signature ________________________________________ Date _________________ Name _________________________________________________________________ Name of Child __________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ Witness Name __________________________________________________________ Witness Signature_______________________________________________________

2018 GOOD CITIZEN SCORECARD

55.

Please complete at least 1 of these activities and share your notes:


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by September 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the October issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

29


Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

and ISLA lives in Waitsfield She 25. er mb pte Se on turns 4 who ite spr le is an outgoing litt ging sin d an let bal , ing loves bak s joy en o als e her heart out. Sh h her wit s ble edi d wil for foraging h her dad. parents and fishing wit s Isla wins four day passe s to ket tic vie mo 3D r and fou e Lak for r ECHO Leahy Cente n. gto rlin Bu in in Champla

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

LOGAN lives in Essex Junction and turns 3 on September 1. He’s a chatty, good-natured little guy with a big personality. He loves to play outside and never stops going.

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Each word will fit into one spot in the grid. Use the starting letters as a guide and fit each word into its spot. All words will be used, so cross off each one after you put it into the the grid.

OLIVER

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Crisscross — FLYING

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LIAM lives in Vergennes and turns 9 on September 4. He’s studied tae kwon do since he was 3 years old, and is a junior black belt. He loves to fish, and he is a drummer in a rock band with two of his brothers and his dad.

ANSWERS P. 51

spends his summers in South Burlington and turns 9 on September 14. He loves playing soccer and tennis, mountain biking and golfing. He’s especially interested in robotics, and loves inventing and making things. His favorite ice cream, Cherry Garcia, makes him smile!

Congratulations to these September Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Logan, Liam and Oliver each win four ECHO day passes.


GOOD CITIZEN CHALLENGE COM P I L E D B Y C AT H Y R ES M ER

Being a “Good Citizen” In their own words, Challenge participants explain what the term means to them

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hat does it mean to be a good citizen? That’s one of the questions in the Good Citizen Challenge, a civics project in which Vermont K-12 students can earn points by visiting historic sites, learning about government and engaging in their communities. According to the kids who’ve completed the Challenge, good citizens are helpful, kind and dependable. They speak up, pitch in, and inspire others to do the same. Read some of their uplifting responses below.

The deadline to complete the Challenge is October 9, so there’s still time to get started. Find a scorecard in the center of this issue, or at goodcitizenvt.com. K Students who complete the Challenge receive a Good Citizen medal, a pocket-sized U.S. Constitution donated by Phoenix Books, as well as an invitation to the Statehouse, where they will meet state officials and be recognized for their work. The first 100 participants to finish will also receive a Good Citizen T-shirt.

Grace Heller next to W.F. Herrick’s sculpture “Democracy” in Burlington (Activity 50)

Being a good citizen means to go the extra mile in my community. And, a good citizen is dependable and can be counted on in times of need. To be a good citizen is to uphold the literal definition of “salt of the earth” because it encompasses key values of a model citizen: trustworthiness, honesty and responsibility. Not only does a good citizen need to uphold such convictions, but they need to encourage others in their community to be like them. I participated in the Vermont Good Citizen Challenge so I could encourage more young people to take charge of their community and catapult others to success. GRACE HELLER, 14

Being a good citizen is helping your community, and picking up litter. Doing good things around your neighborhood, like holding the door for people. It’s also being kind to nature and animals, and planting gardens. And if you see an animal in distress, then do something about it!

Hannah Smiley making a donation to the Milton Food Shelf (Activity 60)

• Riley Amerio, Salisbury • Thomas Bishop, Salisbury

• Henry Bushey, Charlotte

Alan Moody in front of the monument for Civil War soldiers in Cabot (Activity 11)

• Lila Bushey, Charlotte

HANNAH SMILEY, 11

• Ethan Delorme, Salisbury • Owen Flanagan, Salisbury • Grace Heller, Moretown • Sawyer Kless, Essex Junction • Addison Moats, Salisbury • Alan Moody, Cabot • Emma Morrissey, Salisbury • Lachlan Pierce, Montpelier • Somerset Pierce, Montpelier • Graham Resmer, Winooski

SEPTEMBER 2018

ALAN MOODY, 12

To me, being a good citizen means you are doing things for the environment, helping others, being active in the community, and always being kind to everyone. Doing these things doesn’t mean you have to do something huge. You can still be a good citizen by doing little things. For example, you could help a senior citizen load their groceries into their car. There is always a way to be a good citizen.

KIDSVT.COM

• Kayla Charbonneau, Salisbury

Being a good citizen means knowing the history of your country. It means knowing the laws of your country as well as knowing how to contact your government and state officials. It means being up to date on what is happening around you and at the national level in your country and even others.

• Channing Brush, Salisbury

SOMERSET PIERCE, 12

Somerset Pierce visiting the Thaddeus Stevens historical marker, on Vermont’s AfricanAmerican Heritage Trail (Activity 9)

THESE VERMONT STUDENTS HAVE COMPLETED THE CHALLENGE!

• Ivy Resmer, Winooski • Lada Salida, Stowe • Mercedes Sheldrick, Salisbury • Hannah Smiley, Milton • Lindsey Treat, Manchester Center • Holly Whitney, Salisbury

KIDS VT

BONUS

Get 30 points for attending “Speaking Youth to Power.” Ethan Sonneborn and his teenage political strategists explain how they ran his historic campaign for the 2018 Democratic nomination for governor. Sunday, September 16, from 3-4 p.m. in the Fletcher Room at the Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

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Spectacular Spaces

Learning environments that please the eye and stimulate the mind BY ALISON NOVAK WITH ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG

F

or nine months of the year, kids spend about seven hours a day at school — a considerable chunk of time. It makes sense that the spaces they occupy during those hours can contribute to their academic success. As teacher and educational journalist Mark Phillips writes on the website Edutopia, “The physical structure of a classroom is a critical variable in affecting student morale and learning.” The ideal educational environment stimulates curiosity, sparks creativity and fosters a love of learning. We reached out to local educators to find classrooms that fit the bill. These six stand out. Though they span a variety of age levels and subject matters, they’re united by a common theme: These are places that make students feel empowered. In some cases, that’s because kids actually helped create them. In others, it’s because students are given the freedom to explore within them. “It is so important for students to make the classroom their own,” wrote Richmond Elementary School fourth grade teacher Katie LeFrancois. “We start the year by sharing who we are and what is most important to us. We then begin transforming the space with words and art that express our values, hopes and dreams. Our environment represents our core values and drives our learning and my teaching all year long.”

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

A CLASSROOM THAT GROWS

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A disco ball casts sunlight across the wall at UVM’s Campus Children’s School

At the University of Vermont Campus Children’s School, where Jen Olson has been working for six years, teachers “loop” with their students, meaning that they start teaching them as babies, then stay with them through their toddler and preschool years. In mid-August, the school, which offers year-round care, closes for a week to give teachers time to transform their rooms into developmentally appropriate spaces. The idea, said Olson, is that the classroom is “growing with the kids.” Olson shared how her classroom has changed from year to year. In the baby room, “a disco ball captures rays of sunlight, casting light across the wall and, later in the day, the floor,” explained Olson, “allowing children to observe and interact with the reflections.” As children learn to pull themselves up to standing, they can turn the ball. In the corner of the room, a “nest” — a round, sunken space with pillows

and stuffed animals — “provides an intimate gathering space for young infants to observe and interact with one another, building peer relationships and a sense of self.” In Olson’s young toddler room, an assortment of containers encourages students to “explore mathematical and spatial relationships” and “honors children’s interest in filling and emptying containers and trial and error,” she said. In her older toddler room “small figures and recycled materials make wonderful props for children to tell stories with.” And in the preschool room, wooden blocks, organized by shape and size, fill a small shelf opposite a large open rug. “The children interpret the open space as an invitation to build,” Olson wrote, “demonstrating their knowledge of mathematical and scientific concepts, including balance, spatial relations, design, symmetry and force.” -A N


Right: Pete Boardman in front of his classroom door

Far right: Shelburne Community School students in front of the playground mural they painted

THE SCHOOL AS A CANVAS When Pete Boardman began teaching art at Shelburne Community School three years ago, he created an entryway to his classroom that would expose kids to different styles of art. On the door, he painted people and dogs in the pop-art style of one of his favorite artists, Keith Haring. Above it, there’s a swirly rendering of Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.” To the right, an abstract geometric design is inspired by Dutch artist Piet Mondrian. Boardman’s artistic work spills out of his classroom. On an exterior brick wall of the school, across from a large playground, a mural in bright hues of blue, green, yellow and pink depicts a sailboat with the words, “Safe, Respectful, Responsible” — tenets of the school’s Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports program. The boat pulls a load of interlocking triangles, which represent “positive energy,” explained Boardman. Woven into the waves are playground rules: “Be mindful of everyone’s space” and “Take turns.” Funded

by the school’s PTO, the mural is comprised of four panels. Boardman and middle school art teacher Carin Lilly sketched the drawing and third through eighth grade students painted it. Two years ago, Boardman created a similarly themed mural in an interior hallway. It depicts a fanciful Vermont landscape of lake, forest and mountains, with a sailboat that can be moved across the wall as students accrue Cat Coins, rewards they earn for positive behavior. When the boat reached the end of the wall a few years ago, students were treated to a schoolwide dance party. Last year, Boardman and colleague Lisa Bresler worked with the entire third grade to create a geometric artwork for another hallway. They taught their classes about color mixing, and each student was responsible for creating one rectangle of the final piece. The experience gave Boardman the opportunity to talk with students about “what art can do to a public space,” he explained. “It just feels like there’s more energy in the hallway. It makes it feel less institutional and more like a place of learning.”

THE POWER OF CHOICE Students play an important role in creating many of the creative and colorful spaces in Katie LeFrancois’ fourth grade classroom at Richmond Elementary School. Last year, they brightened up the coat closet with a mural. Students suggested different designs and the class voted to determine the winner: a tree, with a heart emblazoned with the word “Love” in the middle, submitted by Eliot Robinson. He and his classmates worked together to paint it, stamping

-AN

MIddle: A spot for practicing mindfulness

SPECTACULAR SPACES, P. 34 »

KIDS VT

Top: A coat closet mural

SEPTEMBER 2018

-AN

KIDSVT.COM

Left: A bathtub for independent work in Katie LeFrancois’ Richmond Elementary School classroom

their fingerprints on the wall to create the tree’s leaves. They painted the runner-up design, a Rubik’s Cube with the phrase “Life can be complicated,” on a rocking chair in the room. Every year, kids also help design the Peaceful Place, a spot in the classroom where students can take a breather or practice mindfulness. It’s stocked with items like Legos, drawing materials and clay. One staple of LeFrancois’ classroom is the Delicious Word Wall, a tool to build kids’ vocabulary. When students discover an interesting word, they record it on paper, then create an illustration showing what it means. The words are categorized by part of speech and serve as a reminder to use descriptive language. Giving students choice is an important part of LeFrancois’ teaching philosophy. Students can do independent work in a number of different places in the classroom. “Some kids just do better sitting at a table and chair, and some kids don’t learn well that way,” LeFrancois explained. That means that, while doing reading, writing or math work, students might be sitting on an exercise ball, reclining on a floor pillow or curled up in one of the two deep bathtubs in the room. “When I was a little girl, my teacher had a bathtub in his math class,” LeFrancois explained. “I loved it and knew I had to have one when I became a teacher.”

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Spectacular Spaces

CONTINUED FROM P. 33

Orwell Village School kindergarteners in the school’s outdoor classroom

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

INTO THE WOODS

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When K-8 students at Orwell Village School need a change of scenery, teachers lead them down a pathway through the woods to the school’s outdoor classroom. The project was initiated by a former middle school language arts teacher, who tasked teams of students with designing an outdoor learning space, explained principal Patrick Walters. The middle schoolers then had a chance to present their ideas to George Helmer, a contractor who owns much of the property around the school. The final design — a timber frame structure with a 25-by-25-foot wooden platform — embodies elements of several students’ designs. Helmer donated $1,000 to help build the structure and rents the land where it sits to the school for $1 a year. The space is used for a variety of purposes, from independent writing time to restorative-justice peace circles, Walters said. Kindergarten teacher Josh Martin takes his class into the woods for the bulk of the day every other week for Forest Mondays. When it’s raining, they seek shelter in the outdoor classroom.

Martin said that being outdoors imbues his kindergarteners with a sense of calm. “Sixteen or seventeen wiggly children — when I take them out to the forest, you see what a good fit bringing kids out to the woods is,” he said. “They’re allowed to climb and take risks.”

DREAM IT, MAKE IT At St. Albans City School, kids have access to technology that most adults have likely never used. The school’s maker space, a room off the library, boasts a variety of 21st-century tools, including a 3D printer, laser cutter, vinyl cutter, heat press and circuitry kits. Low-tech materials, like toilet paper tubes, Popsicle sticks, Legos and beads, are also available for students to use for engineering and design projects. The school’s innovation specialists, Erica Bertucci and Grace Borst, teach students what the equipment can do starting in kindergarten. By the time students are in middle school, they’re able to operate it independently. Open lab time allows them to come in to work on projects ranging from laser-cut covers for photo albums and notebooks to a 3D-printed, interactive model of Thomas Jefferson. Students who competed in the Jr Iron Chef VT competition last March used the vinyl cutter and heat press to create designs to embellish their

-AN

St. Albans City School students watching the laser cutter work its magic

St. Albans students selling their products at last year’s school mall

aprons and chef hats. And a group of middle schoolers used 3D modeling software and the 3D printer to create a model of the historic Fairfield Street School for the 3D Vermont competition, where they placed second. Last year, students schoolwide were divided into teams that were each responsible for creating a product to sell at a school mall. Products included coasters and hot plates with designs made using laser-cut stencils, lavender-infused soap with laser-cut tags, and more crafty items like crocheted hats. That project earned the school the 2018 Student Voices award from the State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA). This fall, the school will send a delegation of students and staff to Washington, D.C., to give a presentation about the project at the national nonprofit’s conference. The maker space tools have “opened up doors” to students, said Bertucci, and shown them that they can create anything they can imagine. -AN


Irène Côté-Wurzler in her Christ the King School classroom

C’EST MAGNIFIQUE

8/24/18 10:04 AM

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8/24/18 9:58 AM

Interrupting the Worry Cycle Advanced Strategies for Managing Anxious Students (& Parents!)

OCTOBER 10 & 11, 2018 • STOWFLAKE, STOWE, VT

Please visit www.vthec.org to register!

KIDS VT

Anxiety in school-aged kids has grown to epidemic proportions, and many things families and schools do to help can actually make anxiety stronger. In this 2-day workshop, Lynn will offer proven strategies that help children, and their teachers and parents, manage anxiety and prevent serious long-term challenges.

SEPTEMBER 2018

The VT-HEC is pleased to present LYNN LYONS, author and psychotherapist, featured in NY Times Magazine, NPR’s On Point & Psychology Today.

KIDSVT.COM

Students at Burlington’s Christ the King School enter Irène Côté-Wurzler’s thirdfloor French classroom and step into Paris. Before them, Gare du Nord, Notre-Dame, Black line drawings of Sacré-Cœur and the Arc de Paris landmarks on the Triomphe appear in black line window shades drawings on wide window shades. In the far right corner, on Place de la Tour Eiffel, is a scene in the corner. It includes a rendering of a pâtisserie next to a cat sitting on cobblestones next Metro stop. to a basket of baguettes. Painted The color scheme in the third curtains adorn a fake pâtisserie floor room with views of Lake window, under which Côté-Wurzler Champlain is pink and black with attached a real flower box. lime green accents. “Pink and In addition to vocabulary and black is so French, right?” said conjugation, her students learn Côté-Wurzler. “ It’s so chic, so ooh French culture. They eat king cake la la, you know?” Her K-8 students for Mardi Gras and make threecall her simply, “Madame” — or, dimensional shoes from paper or in the case of some of the younger felt to be filled with candy on Saint ones, “Mrs. Madame.” She wants Nicholas Day. Just before they gradher classroom to transport them. uate, Côté-Wurzler treats eighth “I wanted it to be that they walked graders to a multicourse meal that in and they had stepped into a includes pâté, Brie, croissants, fig different place, a different realm, jam, crêpes and lavender cupcakes. that they were no longer in the “It’s just a celebration,” she said. school but somewhere special and “And in France, like everywhere somewhere different.” else, we like to celebrate with food.” She painted the walls pale pink, The daughter of French sanded the orange-toned woodwork Canadians, Côté-Wurzler grew and stained it black, drew on the up in New Hampshire and visited shades with a Sharpie, and hung a France for the first time two years striped valance over the windows. ago, she said. “I felt at home the Burlington artist Annelein minute I landed.” K Beukenkamp painted the street -MAL

Say you saw it in

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CALENDAR SEPT

KIDS VT

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Families and friends flock outside for local food and drink at EAT ON THE GREEN, with three live bands, a Hula-Hooping contest and lawn games — including corn hole, Plinko and giant Jenga. Sunday, September 16, noon-6 p.m., Vergennes City Park, Vergennes.

Week to Week SUN

SEPT 9

Pine Street Mile: In conjunction with Art Hop, this inaugural, point-topoint run includes a competitive category, a Merry Mile Fun Run (walkers welcome) and a youth loop for ages 14 and under. 9:30 a.m., Pine and Maple streets, Burlington.

SAT

SEPT 22 Museum Day: Numerous historic sites

and museums across the state open their doors to the public free of charge during this national event sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. Visit smithsonian.com/museumday/ museum-day-2018 for participating locations.

SAT

SEPT 29 Archaeology Day: How did people in

the Upper Connecticut Valley live in the past? Curious families explore this question through pottery and tool-making demos, atlatl throwing practice, and sleuthing during this daylong celebration of ancient human history. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Montshire Museum, Norwich.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

COURTESY OF VERGENNES PARTNERSHIP

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

e k a M y r r Me

SPONSORED BY:


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

1 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies, eggs and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.12:30 p.m. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. St. Johnsbury Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: Growers and artisans offer fresh and ready-to-eat foods, crafts and more in a bustling marketplace. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. Over the Edge for the Flynn: 100 intrepid adventurers rappel nine stories down one of the tallest buildings in Burlington to raise funds for the theater’s cultural and educational programs. Courtyard Marriott Harbor Hotel, Burlington, free to view. Info, 652-4533. Shelburne Farmers Market: Musical entertainment adds merriment to this exchange of local fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, maple syrup and more. Shelburne Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 482-4279. Webby’s Art Studio: Take Flight: Inspired by the museum’s collection, visitors have high-flying fun by fashioning their own craft. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346. GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: Growers, specialty food businesses and artisans sell their high-quality wares. St. Joseph Church, Grand Isle, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: Local vendors peddle farm-fresh produce and fruits, handcrafted breads, artisan cheese, and more at this outdoor emporium. Downtown Rutland, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727.

Essex Junction! Register now for our fall sessions of baby and kids yoga, ages 6 weeks to teen. Weekday and weekend classes available in both locations: Evolution Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington and 37 Lincoln Street, Essex Junction. Info, evolutionprenatalandfamily. com. PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA CENTER: Have a more comfortable

pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.; Sundays, 10:15 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 p.m. Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays 10 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m. Drop-ins welcome, $15/ class, $130/10-class pass, or $75/ monthly unlimited. Location: Evolution Prenatal Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn Street, Burlington. Info, evolutionprenatalandfamily. com.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes selfesteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa. com to register your son or daughter!

LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: Live music and agricultural and craft vendors make for a bustling atmosphere. Stowe Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 279-3444.

3 Monday Labor Day

4 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: Little ones and caregivers drop in and get messy with multiple materials to spark imagination. Ages 18 months to 5 years with caregiver. Radiate Art Space, Richmond, 8:45-10:15 a.m., $5 per child, $8 max per family, $40 for a 10-visit punch card. Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around a DCF pick. Call the library for the title. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Lego Day: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. Children ages 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: Athletes of all ages and abilities choose between 2.5and 5-kilometer courses or a short “cubs” race — with a 10K option on the second Tuesday of each month — during this fun evening race. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6 p.m., $4-12; free for children under 8. Info, 879-6001. Winooski Lego Club: Budding builders bust out plastic-block creations with the weekly Lego challenge. Free meals available for ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists of all skill levels partner up for playing. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: Imaginative architects bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: Grownups and youngsters rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Free meals available for ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Five Corners Farmers Market: Downtown shoppers fill their baskets with locally grown fresh foods, agricultural products and handmade crafts. Five Corners, Essex Junction, 3:30-6:30 p.m. FRANKLIN Fit Moms: Expectant mamas work out together, preparing for labor with cardio, strength, stretching and breathing. Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 288-1141. FREE GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: Growers, specialty food businesses and artisans sell their homemade wares. St. Rose of Lima Parish, South Hero, 3-6 p.m. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: Fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local meats and cheeses, cut flowers, and seasonal fruits and berries represent the best of the growing season, with the accompaniment of live music. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Info, 457-3555.

6 Thursday CHITTENDEN Colchester Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking toys. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. 6 THURSDAY, P.39

KIDS VT

NEW YORK Plattsburgh Farmers Market: From honey to freshly baked breads, homegrown produce and handmade crafts, folks enjoy live music and family-friendly events. Downtown Plattsburgh, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 518-493-4644.

EVOKIDS AND EVOBABIES YOGA CLASSES: Now in Burlington AND

Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment provides tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under with caregivers. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members; preregister. Info, 862-9622.

5 Wednesday

SEPTEMBER 2018

WINDSOR Labor & Leisure Day: How have people worked and played in New England across time? The National Park and Billings Farm & Museum celebrate this working lands estate with games, golf, tennis, art and special tours. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by September 15 at kidsvt. com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $10 per child. Info, 655-3300.

Yoga for Girls: Girls ages 12 and up work on body awareness, posture alignment and core strength in a supportive and all-abilities setting. Bethel Moves, 3:30-4:45 p.m., $15. Info, 234-8902.

KIDSVT.COM

WASHINGTON Musical Munchkins Beach Boogie & Jungle Beat Open House: Wee ones and caregivers check out this demo class of songs, dancing, instrumental play, puppets and more. Ages 1-2, 9-9:45 a.m.; ages 2-5, 10-10:45 a.m.; babies and non-walkers, 11-11:45 a.m. Green Mountain Performing Arts, Waterbury. Info, 845-802-2311. FREE

Classes

2 Sunday

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CALENDAR SEPTEMBER BETTER L8 THAN NEVER CAR SHOW: Speed enthusiasts marvel at hundreds of shiny, sporty vehicles. Live DJ, raffles, kids’ activities and food galore add to the high-octane action. Bristol Recreation Fields, SUNDAY, SEP. 23, 9 A.M.-4 P.M., free to spectate, donations accepted for Camp Ta-Kum-Ta; $15-20 to register a vehicle. Info, 388-7951, ext. 101. BURKE FALL FOLIAGE FESTIVAL: Families

fall in love with autumn during daylong festivities including a parade at 10 a.m., a rubber duck race, bounce houses, horse-drawn wagon rides, a farm animal petting zoo and an interactive show from Reptiles on the Move. Village Green, East Burke, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 9 A.M. Info, 626-4124. FREE

Fairs & Festivals CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET FALL FESTIVAL: Families flock to the capital

city for an old-fashioned corn roast to raise funds for the Vermont Foodbank, live music, face painting and a veggie growing contest. Bring your largest or most interesting homegrown produce for prizes. Downtown Montpelier, SATURDAY, SEP. 1, 9 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 793-8347. FREE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY FAIR: Cotton-candy

fun and carny curiosities collide at the state’s largest fair, complete with midway rides, daily parades and live entertainment. Midway opens at 11 a.m. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, THROUGH SEP. 2, $5-12; free for children under 5; 25% off advance discount tickets available at Price Chopper stores; ride bracelets $30; additional tickets required for grandstand concerts. Info, 878-5545.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

STARS PARTY: Live music — including

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Evansville Transit Authority — food trucks and stargazing with the Fairbanks Museum astronomers at dusk combine for a community evening. Gates open at 4:30 p.m. Old Stone House Museum, Brownington, SATURDAY, SEP. 1, $5-10, $25 per family; proceeds benefit the Old Stone House Museum. Info, 754-2022.

EAT UP ON THE GREEN AT CAMP MEADE:

Live music, art, food trucks and libations make for a merry summer evening. Camp Meade, Middlesex, SUNDAYS, 4-9 P.M. Info, 496-2108. FREE

NEW WORLD FESTIVAL: Multiple musicians take over the town of Randolph and celebrate Vermont’s Celtic and French Canadian heritage through traditional tunes, children’s activities and dance. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, SUNDAY, SEP. 2, NOON-MIDNIGHT, $12-39; free for children under 13. Info, 728-6464. SOBU NITE OUT: Festive-minded folks flock to the park for a fête of live music and food trucks. Veterans Memorial Park, South Burlington, THURSDAY, SEP. 6, 5-8 P.M. Info, 846-4108.

ARTSRIOT TRUCK STOP BURLINGTON: Foodie families enjoy an eclectic array of local grub and live music during this hip block party. ArtsRiot, Burlington, FRIDAYS, 5-10 P.M.; cost for food. Info, 540-0406. BOVE’S HOMECOMING: Customers,

employees and community members celebrate Bove’s of Vermont Homecoming with music, food trucks, face painting, SunCommon’s solarpowered bouncy house and a viewing of the documentary The Last Day at Bove’s Cafe. Bove’s of Vermont, Milton, SATURDAY, SEP. 8, 11 A.M.-4 P.M. Info, 862-7235. FREE GLORY DAYS FESTIVAL: This 25th annual

family-oriented shindig fêtes the town’s choo-choo history with children’s entertainment, a model train show, a Lego exhibit, a mini steam engine and more. Green Mountain Train Excursion rides on both days; check website for specific times. Downtown White River Junction,

SATURDAY, SEP. 8, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. AND SUNDAY, SEP. 9, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., $10-15 for train

excursion; free for children under 3. Info, 295-5036.

KIDS HOP: This child-friendly complement

to SEABA’s South End Art Hop offers creative opportunities including children’s crafts and various demonstrations. See seaba.com for more events and locations. Designed for kids ages 3-12. SEABA Tent, Burlington, SATURDAY, SEP. 8, 10 A.M.-2 P.M. Info, 859-9222. FREE THE TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: This old-fashioned farm-centric extravaganza boasts a nineteenth-century village main street, pig races, music and livestock shows. Thursday, September 13, features Agricultural Education Day. Tunbridge Fairgrounds, THURSDAY, SEP. 13, 8 A.M.-9 P.M., FRIDAY, SEP. 14, 7 A.M.-9 P.M., SATURDAY, SEP. 15, 7 A.M.-10 P.M. AND SUNDAY, SEP. 16, 8 A.M.-6 P.M., $10-15, $35 season pass; free

for children under 12; additional charge for midway rides. Info, 889-5555.

NEWPORT’S FRIDAY NIGHT SHUFFLE: The community comes out for a downtown stroll to enjoy live music, art exhibits and specials at local eateries. Various locations, Newport, FRIDAY, SEP. 14, 5-8:30 P.M. Info, 988-2611. COLORS OF THE KINGDOM AUTUMN FESTIVAL: Fall family fun starts with a

pancake breakfast, followed by a parade at 10 a.m., plus train rides, kids activities, a farmers market, live music and more. Downtown St. Johnsbury, SATURDAY, SEP. 15, 8 A.M.-5 P.M.; fees for some events. Info, 748-3678. SHELBURNE FARMS HARVEST FESTIVAL:

Celebrate autumnal abundance in style with farm and food traditions, hayrides, children’s activities, fall foods, and musicians on multiple stages. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, SEP. 15, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., $5-10; free for members and children under 3. Info, 985-8686. EAT ON THE GREEN: Families and friends

flock outside for local food and drink, three live bands, a Hula-Hooping contest, and lawn games, including corn hole, Plinko and giant Jenga. Vergennes City Park, SUNDAY, SEP. 16, NOON-6 P.M., games are free; food and drink available for purchase. Info, 877-1163.

PARKAPALOOZA: Live music, a giant slip

’n’ slide, and a BBQ trailer fired up for folks to grill their own picnic fixings make for family fun in the park. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, SUNDAY, SEP. 16, 3-6 P.M. Info, 225-8694. FREE BRISTOL HARVEST FESTIVAL: The community comes out for a full day of bandstand music, craft vendors and demonstrations. Bristol Town Green, SATURDAY, SEP. 22, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. Info, 388-7951. FREE FOREST FESTIVAL: Woods lovers explore

the park’s history and ecology while enjoying horse-drawn wagon rides, woodworking and portable sawmill demonstrations, hikes with foresters, and crafts for kids. Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, SATURDAY, SEP. 22, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Info, 457-3368. FREE

FAIRY HOUSE FESTIVAL: Visitors delight in small structures made of acorn caps, soft moss and lichens, birch bark, and pinecones, then create their own petite dwellings in the gardens and enjoy crafts, face painting, bubbles and Hula-Hooping. Picnicking encouraged. The Nature Museum at Grafton, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. AND SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., $5-12; free for children under 2; light

refreshments available for purchase. Info, 843-2111. PITTSFORD HARVEST FAIR: Handmade or home-grown is the theme in this outdoor festival. Pittsford Village Green, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 10 A.M.-3 P.M. Info, 773-2843. FREE PUMPKIN & APPLE CELEBRATION: Apple tasting, cider pressing, ice cream churning, pumpkin bowling and wagon rides combine for a seasonal celebration. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. AND SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular

museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

19TH-CENTURY APPLE & HARVEST FESTIVAL:

In celebration of Johnny Appleseed’s birthday, visitors meet live farm animals, press cider, sample heirloom apples and ice cream, play old-fashioned games, and listen to live jazz and old-timey banjo and fiddle tunes from Out on a Limb. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford Village, SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 11 A.M.-3 P.M., $5-10, includes lunch. Info, 765-4288. MARSHFIELD HARVEST FESTIVAL: This

family-friendly fall shindig includes cider pressing, field games, a noon slideshow about Marshfield cemeteries, live music and a chili cook-off. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 11 A.M.-3 P.M., lunch available for $4-8. Info, 426-3581.

OPEN STREETS BTV: Festive-minded folks

explore miles of Burlington’s urban streets on bike and on foot in a safe and car-free environment, while enjoying healthy and family-oriented activities. Burlington South End, SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 11

A.M.-4 P.M. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

6 Thursday (cont.) FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their imagination with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 1-6 p.m. Info, 285-6505. Stay and Play: Little ones rally for romping in the youth room. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Pre-K Art Play: Toddlers drop in and create self-directed projects with diverse art supplies. Ages 1-4; caregiver required. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 10-11:30 a.m., $5. Info, 253-8358.

7 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: Local produce, plants, artisan cheese, syrup and more fill shoppers’ market baskets. Diverse dinner fare available. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 3-6 p.m. Info, 832-603-9334. CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4. Family Gym: See September 2. Family Movie Night: Film lovers of all ages settle down for a screening while snacking on popcorn. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 6:30 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. Kids’ Night Out: While parents take wellearned time off, kids delight in dinner and fun. Ages 3-12. Greater Burlington YMCA, 6-8:30 p.m., $10-19; preregister. Info, 862-9622. Magic the Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Foodways Fridays: Guests tour the heirloom garden, then watch as veggies make their way into historic recipes prepared in the 1890 farmhouse kitchen, with different menus every Friday. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. NEW YORK Homeschool Day: Students soak up history in this day devoted to homelearning programming, including musket and cannon demonstrations. Grades K-12. Fort Ticonderoga, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $6 per student with one free parent, additional adults $14, preregister. Info, 518-585-6370.

Open Daily, Sept. 5 thru Oct. 31

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8 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1. BENNINGTON Children’s Author Christy Mihaly: This local author reads her new picture book to small ones about a mother and daughter haymaking duo. Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center, 11 a.m. Info, 362-2200. FREE CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN ‘If You Give A Mouse A Cookie’ Storytime: City Market and Phoenix Books team up for a reading of this beloved picture book by Laura Joffe Numeroff, followed by a fun, food-related activity. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 861-9700. FREE Burlington Farmers Market: See September 1. Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 1. Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books and songs en español entertain niños. Ages 5 and under. Non-Spanish speakers welcome. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Crafting like Cawley: Inspired by an exhibition in the museum’s Hat and Fragrance Textile Gallery, hand-workers of all ages create their own artwork with printing and embroidery techniques. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

KIDS VT

WINDSOR Bethel First Friday Flicks: Families flock together for free films on the first Friday of each month. Seating available, or bring blankets and beanbags. Bethel Town Hall, 6:30-8:30 p.m., donations accepted; popcorn and drinks available for purchase. Info, 234-6305.

WEEKENDS

SEPTEMBER 2018

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683.

MAZZA’S 8 ACRE CORN MAZE

HARVEST FUN

KIDSVT.COM

Richmond Farmers Market: Vendors peddle handheld pies, dinner delectables, homemade pickles, just-picked produce and much more at this lively showcase of locavorism. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Info, 391-0806.

HEY KIDS! COME ON OUT & HAVE SOME FUN

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CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 8 Saturday (cont.) Wildlife Rocks!: The Southern Vermont History Museum engages curious kids with an up close encounter with live animals, their skills and adaptations, Vermont’s ecosystem, and how wild animals work together. Ages 3 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-6956. FREE FRANKLIN Welcome Baby!: New babies are welcomed to the library with nursery rhymes, songs and simple stories. Ages 2 and under with caregivers. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 1. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: Veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at a celebration of farm-grown food and handmade crafts. Downtown Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 223-2958.

Science & Nature

RAPTORS IN RESIDENCE: The mysteries surrounding birds of prey are revealed as visitors come face-to-face with live feathered creatures. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAYS, TUESDAYS, AND THURSDAYS, 1-1:30 P.M., regular museum admission,

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

$5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686.

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SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO: Preschoolers rally ’round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, TUESDAYS, 10:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. MONARCH TAGGING AND NATURAL HISTORY:

Naturalists-in-training drop in and gently catch, tag, measure and release these black-and-orange migrants. Bring a net if you have one. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, WEDNESDAY, SEP. 5, 3:30-5:30 P.M. AND WEDNESDAY, SEP. 19, 3:30-5:30 P.M., by donation. Info, 229-6206. WAGON RIDE WEDNESDAYS: Horse-drawn

rides deliver delight to the whole family. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, sizes newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. WINDSOR Traditional Craft Saturdays: Experienced crafters demonstrate their skills and share their lore about historical process and use. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. NEW YORK Plattsburgh Farmers Market: See September 1.

9 Sunday CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4, 10-11:30 a.m. Essex Open Gym: See September 2. Family Gym: See September 2.

CELEBRATING SACRED WATERS: PADDLE, ROW AND TRAIL WALK: The community

honors Lake Champlain and the waters that feed her through educational and sacred activities guided by faith leaders, field naturalists, educators and artists. Activities include rowing a longboat, paddling a canoe up the river and exploring nature trails. Shelburne Bay Park, SATURDAY, SEP. 8, 9:30 A.M.-3:30 P.M., $10, $30 per group of 4, preregister; space is limited. Info, 985-8686. NESTLINGS FIND NATURE: Preschoolers

discover how feathered friends grow using imaginative play, books, crafts, nature walks and activities. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SECOND AND FOURTH TUESDAYS OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30-11:30 A.M., regular museum

admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

A WALK IN THE WOODS: WILDLIFE TRACKING:

Expert tracker and longtime UVM instructor, Mike Kessler, leads curious nature lovers on an educational exploration. Ages 6 and up. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, THIRD SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $3.50-7; free for members and children under 3. Info, 434-2167. Orienteering at Shelburne Farms

Pine Street Mile: In conjunction with Art Hop, this inaugural, point-to-point run includes a competitive category, a Merry Mile Fun Run — walkers welcome — and a youth loop for ages 14 and under. Start time 9:30 a.m. Pine and Maple Streets, Burlington, $10-20, preregister. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Cabot Ride the Ridges: Biking buffs enjoy a picturesque 10K cycling tour, while more experienced riders navigate 30-100K courses. A feast of local foods follows. Races begin at 8 a.m.; check website for details. Cabot School, $20-40; free for children under 12; $60 per family; after Sept. 3, add $15; $10 for non-rider’s lunch; proceeds benefit Cabot Connects. Info, 563-3338.

10 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE BOOKS & BEYOND: SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Children’s literature

and hands-on activities combine for fun science learning and exploration. Ages 3-5 with a parent or caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, MONDAY, SEP. 17, 10:15 & 11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. CRITTER CONSTRUCTION: Hold on to your

hard hat! Preschoolers explore different styles of animal structures, from bird nests to beaver lodges, then create their own cozy hideaway. Ages 3-5 with adult companion. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, THURSDAY, SEP. 20, 9-10:30 A.M., $6-8 per child, preregister. Info, 434-3068.

SAVING SEEDS FOR KIDS: Junior green thumbs get a lesson on gathering seeds from tomatoes, peppers and lettuce; design packets; and get tips about planting next spring. Ages 5-12. City Market, Onion River Co-op (Burlington South End), TUESDAY, SEP. 25, 5:30-8:30 P.M., $5, preregister. Info, 861-9700. ARCHAEOLOGY DAY: How did people live in the Upper Connecticut Valley in the past? This question is explored through pottery and tool-making demos, atlatl throwing practice, and sleuthing during this daylong celebration of ancient human history. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 10:30 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. ORIENTEERING: With a map and compass,

trekkers of all skill levels find their way across the terrain. Beginners’ clinic from 9-10 a.m.; courses open 10 a.m. to noon. Children under 10 must be accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, $5-6, preregister for clinic. Info, 985-8686.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See September 6, 11 a.m. FRANKLIN Back to School with the Library: Students stop by the library after school for games galore, including giant Twister and Jenga. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE WASHINGTON Musical Munchkins: This interactive morning gets babies, toddlers and preschoolers moving and grooving. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

11 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4. Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Storytime: Wee ones and caregivers cozy in for stories, songs and games en español. Ages 5 and under. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See September 4. Winooski Lego Club: See September 4. FRANKLIN Homeschoolers’ Swap Meet: Home educators buy, sell or trade books and educational materials, network with other families and participate in a children’s activity while savoring snacks. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See September 4. Yoga for Girls: See September 4.


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Vermont

fall Open House Sunday, Oct. 14th, 1PM

Commons School

Live Performances LEVITT AMP CONCERT SERIES AT DOG MOUNTAIN: Produced by Catamount

Arts, these family and caninefriendly Sundays at Dog Mountain include four-legged agility exhibitions and musical pre-performances beginning at 2 p.m., food truck vendors, games and activities, with the main stage shows from 4-7 p.m. The Stephen Huneck Art Gallery opens at 10 a.m. Dog Mountain, St Johnsbury, SUNDAYS, 4-7 P.M. THROUGH SEP. 16; food and drink available for purchase. Info, 800-449-2580.

Experience love of learning in small classes with engaged students and faculty, multi-disciplinary academics, and community service locally and globally.

‘MY MOUTH IS A VOLCANO’: Based on

the award-winning book by Julia Cook, this performance entertains the audience with the story of a little boy who always interrupts, but learns to wait his turn to talk. Ages 4-8. Woodstock Town Hall Theater, FRIDAY, SEP. 28, 10-11 A.M., $6, preregister. Info, 457-3981.

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Wee-Mail!

WINOOSKI WEDNESDAYS: City folks sprawl out in the evening with live music, downtown specials and free meals for kids under 18. Rain location is Monkey House. Rotary Park, Winooski, FIRST

Find information about local events and parenting resources every Thursday in the Kids VT Wee-Mail. Visit kidsvt.com/wee-mail to subscribe today.

WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6-8 P.M.; food and drink available to

purchase. Info, 777-1621.

UNION TRAIN: Sponsored by the

Heritage Winooski Mill Museum to kick off the community-wide reading of the Vermont Reads 2018 Bread and Roses, Too, by Katherine Paterson, Vermont-based folk entertainer Rik Palieri performs historic labor songs, storytelling and a sing-along about the history of labor unions and the power of song to unify. Free community dinner at 6 p.m. Limited seating. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, FRIDAY, SEP. 7, 6-8 P.M. Info, 355-9937. FREE ‘HANDSOME AND GRETEL’: This

marionette version of the Brothers Grimm fairytale enchants the audience with the notion of children learning to speak for themselves. Ages 8-12. Woodstock Town Hall Theater, WEDNESDAY, SEP. 12, 11 A.M., $6, preregister. Info, 457-3981.

audience marvel. Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, SATURDAY, SEP. 29, 5 P.M., $2-5. Info, 655-5030.

Wee-Mail sponsored by:

‘THE RAINBOW FISH’: The Mermaid

Theatre of Nova Scotia enchants the audience with Marcus Pfister’s story of a fish who learns to share his shimmering scales in a performance using black light puppetry and original music. Spaulding Auditorium, Hanover, N.H., SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 3 P.M., $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422.

Local, affordable, and on your side.™

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Shelburne Orchards

VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA FALL CONCERT: Young teens entertain the

audience with this exploration of self-expression and the portrayal of friends in Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations.” The concert also commemorates Leonard Bernstein’s centennial and features Grace Lu, soloist in the romantic second movement of Bruch’s G minor Concerto for Violin. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, SUNDAY, SEP. 30, 3 P.M., $12-17. Info, 655-5030.

Come pick apples and shop at the cider house farm market 17th Annual Pie Fest

Sunday, September 23, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

12 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1.

Five Corners Farmers Market: See September 5.

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See September 5. GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 5. 12 WEDNESDAY, P.42

Senior Citizen's Days

Thursday & Friday, October 18 & 19

Truckload & Hard Cider Days Saturday & Sunday, October 20 & 21

216 Orchard Road, Shelburne (802) 985-2753 www.shelburneorchards.com k4t-ShelburneOrchards0917.indd 1

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KIDS VT

CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See September 5.

Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Seasonal Hours September & October Everyday 9–5 Opening Day September 1st

SEPTEMBER 2018

educator Mouli Pal and her students demonstrate the grace and intricacy of classical Indian dances like Bharatanatyam and Odissi, then the audience tries some sample moves. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H., SATURDAY, SEP. 22, 11 A.M. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE

VERMONT YOUTH PHILHARMONIA FALL CONCERT: Young musicians make the

KIDSVT.COM

‘MOULI PAL AND FRIENDS – DANCE FROM INDIA’: Professional performer and

RSVP: Jill Strawbridge, Director of Admission jstrawbridge@vermontcommons.org or 865-8084 ext. 190

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CALENDAR SEPTEMBER

New Parents

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-

to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 10-11:30

A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30-1:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M. AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M.12:30 P.M., $15 or $130 for a 10-class pass.

Info, 899-0339.

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA:

Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, MONDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M. AND SATURDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $15. Info,

829-0211.

EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: New mamas

tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS,

12:15-1:30 P.M., TUESDAYS, 11 A.M.-12:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45-11:55 A.M., AND FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M. AND NOON-1 P.M., $15 or $130

for a 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of

toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $11. Info, 223-5302.

PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be stretch and bend. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 6-7:15 P.M., $16 per drop-in class. Info,

778-0300.

BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE: This mother-infant group

includes baby massage and postpartum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. FREE ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their

bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M.

Info, 899-5490. FREE

HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents with

babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

KIDS VT

Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 236-4136. FREE

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT:

BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing moms

Parents with babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND

SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info,

888-5229.

PICNIC AT THE PLAYGROUND:

Families who have had a new wee one in the last year flock together for food, baby-friendly fun, free resources about the transition to toddlerhood, and a music and movement activity with Rachel O’Donald. Trow Hill Playground, Barre, SUNDAY, SEP. 9, 3-5 P.M., RSVP requested. Info, 595-7953. FREE BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and

experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE BABYWEARERS OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Brand-new mamas and papas check out infant carriers, get advice and spend some socializing time with other new parents. Good Beginnings, Montpelier,

SECOND THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:3011:30 A.M. AND FOURTH MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:45-7:45 P.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: Nursing

mamas (and soon-to-be mothers!) make the most of La Leche League support while socializing with other moms and wee ones. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 281-731-7313. FREE

MAMA’S CIRCLE BARRE: This supportive gathering brings moms of new babies and toddlers together to foster friendship through unique-but-shared experiences. Imagine Yoga, Barre, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M.

Info, 595-7953. FREE

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BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ:

(and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD

12 Wednesday (cont.) RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See September 5. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See September 5. WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 5.

WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info,

888-3470. FREE

ELIMINATION COMMUNICATION: Novice

parents pursue advice about this practice where a caregiver uses timing, signals, cues and intuition to address a baby’s need to eliminate waste without using a diaper. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1-2 P.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: In a supportive setting, mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding children approaching one year old and beyond. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M.

Info, 595-7953. FREE

AYURVEDA FOR BIRTH AND FAMILY: Allison Smith, owner and therapist at Maha Veda Wellness, shares with an adult online audience ancient Indian Ayurvedic protocols for a healthy birth. Online, Burlington, SUNDAY, SEP. 23, 8 P.M., $20. Info, 373-8060. HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M., preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

13 Thursday CALEDONIA ShoeFly Trail Run Series: Fleet-footed families enjoy fitness together in a 5K, 10K or 1M walk/run. Entry includes admission to select Thursday races on the Kingdom Trails and on the second Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at the PRKR Trails in Littleton, N.H. Kingdom Trails Yurt, E. Burke, 5:30 p.m., $65 for the season; free for children ages 10 and under; preregister. Info, 626-0737. CHITTENDEN Colchester Lego Club: See September 6. Healthy After-School Snacks: Students on their way home from school stop in to sample munchies, stay for a demo and test out a recipe. City Market, Onion River Co-op (Burlington South End), 3:30-5:30 p.m. Info, 540-6400. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See September 6. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See September 6. St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507.

14 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 7.

mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4.

MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center,

Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. Middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info, 349-9084. FREE

Family Gym: See September 2. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 7.

Music with Raph: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE 14 FRIDAY, P.44


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

The Vermont Cub Project

Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 HOW PEOPLE MAKE THINGS: This temporary exhibit explores the story of how familiar childhood objects are manufactured from raw materials into finished products. Visitors step onto a factory floor for hands-on cutting, molding, deforming and assembling activities, and create objects to take home. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through September 3. INNOVATION PLAYGROUND V2.0 EXHIBIT:

In a celebration of lifelong play, visitors of all ages unleash their imaginations building life-sized worlds with giant blue blocks, swimming and soaring beside virtual wildlife and inventing contraptions in the museum’s maker space. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through January 6.

HELEN DAY ART CENTER, STOWE Info, 253-8358 RECLAMATION: Nationally acclaimed, contemporary figurative female artists display paintings featuring women from their perspective, transforming the way women are currently portrayed. Through September 8. FREE

Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today! Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

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Jamie Two Coats Toyshop

‘EXPOSED’: National and local outdoor sculpture of all sizes and shapes spreads through the town of Stowe. Through October 20. FREE

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 AIR WORKS: Through hands-on engineering exhibits and activities, curious investigators of all ages examine the scientific properties of air, learn how to move this invisible element and utilize it in fun and practical ways. Regular museum admission, $13-17; free for children under 2. Through September 3. MAKING MUSIC: Families explore the inner workings of all things musical — from cellos to electronic synthesizers — play and make instruments, and engage with multimedia exhibits, which share stories of musicians, scientists and craftspeople, highlighting traditional and new practices, techniques, and materials. Regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Through May 15.

Lo c at e d i n t h e

of Shelburne

5 4 fa ll s r o a d | M o n - S at 1 0 - 6 , S u n da y 1 1 - 5 | 8 02 - 9 8 5 - 3 2 2 1

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BEAR AND MOOSH 6H

Thoughtfully curated organic clothing, gifts and essentials for the natural baby and tot.

!$ 802.800.1986 41 Idx Drive South Burlington www.bearmooshbaby.com

KIDS VT

SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 PLAYING COWBOY: The formative ways turn-of-the-century performing and visual arts mythologized cowboys and villainized Indians is investigated through popular forms of mass media and entertainment, including dime novels, live stage performances, traveling exhibitions, illustrations, paintings and sculpture. Regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Through October 21.

Back to School!

SEPTEMBER 2018

FORT TICONDEROGA, TICONDEROGA, N.Y. Info, 518-585-2821 HEROIC CORN MAZE: Get lost! Families navigate their way through a giant puzzle in the shape of this historic fort while searching for history clues among the stalks. Regular museum admission, $10-24; free for children under 5. Fall weekends through October 21.

THE GREAT VERMONT CORN MAZE, DANVILLE Info, 748-1399 GREAT VERMONT CORN MAZE: A 24-acre maze of maize lures labyrinth lovers. If possible, arrive before 1 p.m. to solve the puzzle without clues. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; open until 4:30 p.m. on weekends. Through October 14.

KIDSVT.COM

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM, ST. JOHNSBURY Info, 748-2372 BUTTERFLY HOUSE: This living exhibit features fluttering painted ladies, monarchs, red admirals and more, including info about the life stages of these winged beauties and tips for creating a home butterfly garden. Regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Open until the first frost.

Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

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CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 14 Friday (cont.)

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 7.

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Richmond Farmers Market: See September 7. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See September 7. WINDHAM Ann Braden Book Launch: Readers young and old celebrate the release of The Benefits of Being an Octopus with book-themed foods such as saltines with Easy Cheese, a short reading, octopus cupcakes, stickers, tattoos and much more. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 5-7 p.m., donations accepted for the Women’s Freedom Center. Info, 257-0124.

15 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1. The Fabulous Flea Market: In this annual event, savvy shoppers browse antiques, jewelry, furniture, rugs, woven textiles and handknits offered by 25 vendors and dealers. Fabulous food by Almost Home of Bristol. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., proceeds from sales benefit the Town Hall Theater. Info, 388-1436. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 1.

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these readaloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details.

Monday BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550. COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME: Essex

Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

SEPTEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Huntington Public

Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-4583.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher

KIDS VT

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Tuesday ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East

Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library,

FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: St. Albans

Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free Library,

10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

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WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME:

WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin

Memorial Library, Sep. 10, 10 a.m. Info, 496-4205.

Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get hands-on with an artistic endeavor. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE Milton Touch a Truck: Beep, beep! Kids climb aboard awesome autos and chat with their drivers. Bombardier Park, Milton, 9 a.m.noon; food and drink available to purchase. Info, 893-4922. Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Ages 2-12. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 1. Webby’s Art Studio: Smudging the Lines: Inspired by Peter Fried’s work in the museum’s new special exhibit “New England Now,” artists of all ages create their own photo collages. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

WILLISTON STORY TIME: Dorothy

Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 1. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 8. Children’s Author Christy Mihaly: This local author reads her new picture book about making hay with small listeners and signs copies. Next Chapter Bookstore, Barre, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114. FREE WINDSOR Traditional Craft Saturdays: See September 8. NEW YORK Plattsburgh Farmers Market: See September 1.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME:

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland

Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIIME:

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St.

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby

WINOOSKI STORY TIME: Winooski

Monday, 10 a.m.

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

JERICHO STORY HOUR: Jericho Town Library, Wednesday, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library,

Saturday

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford

Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME:

Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

Sep. 13, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Friday

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 11

COLCHESTER BABY STORY TIME:

MILTON DROP-IN STORYTIME:

a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

Milton Public Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

RICHMOND MOVERS AND SHAKERS STORYTIME: Richmond

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

NEXT CHAPTER BOOKSTORE STORY TIME: Next Chapter Bookstore,

Tuesday.

Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 888-3853.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

SWANTON STORYTIME: Swanton

MORRISVILLE PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Morristown Centennial

Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ESSEX WEEKEND STORYTIME:

9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

COLCHESTER DROP-IN STORY TIME:

Free Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 247-8230.

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN ESSEX: Phoenix Books, 10-10:30

MONTPELIER STORY TIME:

11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

BRANDON STORY TIME: Brandon

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse Library,

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

ST. JOHNSBURY ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: See Monday.

Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Wednesday

Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

Tuesday.

a.m. Info, 872-7111.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-2493.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME:

Warren Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-3913.

Thursday BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library, ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME:

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643. KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765. LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

Barre, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114.

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN BURLINGTON: Phoenix Books,

11-11:30 a.m. Info, 448-3350.

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN RUTLAND: Phoenix Books, 1-2

p.m. Info, 855-8078.

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN ESSEX: See Wednesday, 11-11:30

a.m.


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

ANNOUNCING THE EXPANSION OF

16 Sunday ADDISON TAM Trek: Runners lace up to raise funds to support the Trail Around Middlebury, in a 2-mile family fun run, a 10K and a 19-mile course, followed by refreshments and festivities. Fun Run at 10 a.m. Wright Park, Middlebury, 8 a.m., $20-55; free for children under 13. Info, 388-1007.

Winooski Lego Club: See September 4.

CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See September 2.

WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See September 4.

Family Gym: See September 2. Speaking Youth to Power: Ethan Sonneborn and his teenage campaign team explain how they won 6 percent of the Democratic vote in the 2018 gubernatorial primary, in this event promoting the Good Citizen Challenge. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 864-5684 ext. 14 LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Barn Dance: Live music, hayrides, games, a silent auction and harvest snacks make for family fun. Beard’s Barn, Waterbury Center, 2-5 p.m., $20 per family; proceeds benefit the Children’s Room. Info, 244-5605. WINDSOR Author Erin Rounds: This local author shares her new picture book about Vermont ancient history, Charlotte’s Bones: The Beluga Whale in a Farmer’s Field, with eager young listeners. Phoenix Books Misty Valley, Chester, noon-2 p.m. Info, 875-3400. FREE

17 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See September 10. Williston Preschool Music: See September 6, 11 a.m.

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See September 10.

18 Tuesday Cartooning Club: Kids meet with other kids who are crazy about drawing comics. Grades 3 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See September 4.

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ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1.

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Jewish learning for kids

CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages and experience levels. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Exploring Jewish heritage, tradition, and community through Hebrew, art, stories, music, and service projects

Family Game Day: See September 5.

Sunday School program starts Sept. 16

Five Corners Farmers Market: See September 5.

10 Harrison Ave., Montpelier More info at: bethjacobvt.org

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See September 5. GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 5. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See September 5.

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WASHINGTON Maker Program: See September 5. WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 5.

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20 Thursday CHITTENDEN Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level, and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 490-6393. FREE Colchester Lego Club: See September 6. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Little literati chat about DCF pick Ban This Book by Alan Gratz while licking ice cream. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE 20 THURSDAY, P.46

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Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 5 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

19 Wednesday

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SEPTEMBER 2018

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4.

Yoga for Girls: See September 4.

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FRANKLIN Back to School with the Library: See September 10.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

45


CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 20 Thursday (cont.) Williston Preschool Music: See September 6. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See September 6. Teen.Comm Meeting: Teenagers bring their ideas and their calendars as they plan an upcoming Halloween event. Ages 12-18. St. Albans Free Library, 6 p.m., RSVP. Info, 524-1507. FREE

22 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 1.

WASHINGTON AB2: Books Come to Life: This Active Body-Active Brain class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

21 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 7. CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4. Family Gym: See September 2. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 7. Richmond Farmers Market: See September 7. STEAMFest: Science, technology, engineering, art and math aficionados check out an interactive display and participate in a button-making activity. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See September 7. WASHINGTON Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Dinner and naturethemed kids’ programming included. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE

Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 1.

Playgroups Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details.

Story Time with Robert Broder: This local author shares his new picture book — a musical story about the sweet satisfaction of wandering — with young listeners. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 448-3350. FREE VELI-STEM Family Program: Families participate in a musical morning exploring sound. Ages 12 and under with a caregiver. Milton Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Wednesday BARRE PLAYGROUP: Aldrich

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

MAMA’S CIRCLE: Good

WAITSFIELD PLAYGROUP: Big Picture Theater, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

Beginnings, Montpelier,10 a.m.-noon. Info, 595-7953.

NORTHFIELD PLAYGROUP:

United Church of Northfield, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115. RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

Monday

Tuesday

Richmond Free Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-3036.

AUDUBON NATURE PLAYGROUP:

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

Audubon Vermont, Huntington,9:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3068. BURLINGTON CRAWLERS, WADDLERS AND TODDLERS:

Janet S. Munt Parent-Child Center, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121. CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First

Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

BURLINGTON FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S.

Charlotte Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 425-2771.

Munt Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

OPEN GYM: Central VT

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution

Gymnastics Academy, Waterbury, 10 a.m.-noon, $10. Info, 882-8324.

TWINFIELD PLAYGROUP:

Twinfield Union School, Marshfield, 8:15-9:45 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339. WATERBURY PLAYGROUP:

Thatcher Brook Primary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 244-5605.

WILLISTON PLAYGROUP:

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

Friday ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

OPEN GYM: See Monday.

ST. JOHNSBURY TODDLER TIME:

Free Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-1391.

Thursday DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

Family Center of Washington County, Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP: St.

Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland

WINOOSKI PLAYGROUP:

Winooski Memorial Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

Saturday MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 190.

OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

Synagogue, Burlington, 9:3010:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218.

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 7.

Burlington Prevent Child Abuse Walk For Children: The community shows support for child-abuse prevention by participating in a family-friendly event, with festivities including an appearance of Spiderman. Snacks, beverages and t-shirts provided. 8 a.m. check-in. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 10 a.m., fundraising encouraged. Info, 229-5724.

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SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 2.

24 Monday See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Webby’s Art Studio: Round and Round: Crafters of all abilities create a circular weaving, inspired by the museum’s artwork. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346. GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 1. LAMOILLE Mountainfilm on Tour: Families soak up a matinee selection of culturally rich, adventure-packed and inspiring documentary short films, curated from the Mountainfilm festival in Telluride, Colorado. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 3 p.m., $5-15. Info, 760-4634. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1. Rutland Prevent Child Abuse Walk For Children: The community shows support for child-abuse prevention by participating in a family-friendly event, with festivities including an appearance of Spiderman. Snacks, beverages and t-shirts provided. 8 a.m. check-in. Howe Center, Rutland, 10 a.m., fundraising encouraged. Info, 229-5724. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 8. NEW YORK Plattsburgh Farmers Market: See September 1.

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4, 10-11:30 a.m. Essex Open Gym: See September 2. Family Gym: See September 2.

FRANKLIN Back to School with the Library: See September 10. Banned Books Week: Kids Craft: Literary-minded kiddos receive a craft and educational packet, and check out the library’s display of banned books to get inspired. Through September 29. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See September 10.

25 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4. Burlington Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included without fee. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Drop-In Craft: Gnome Houses: Small artists stop in the library to fabricate a small dwelling. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Speaking

YOUTH to Power

Ethan Sonneborn and his teenage strategists discuss his historic 2018 campaign for governor.

Sunday, Sept. 16 3-4 p.m. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library Burlington * Worth a 30-point bonus if you attend!

and lose yourself at the same time.” -Peter Townsend

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Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: See September 11. Tuesday Movie: Viewers relax with an inspiring flick. Popcorn and drinks provided. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956.

“Dance enables you to find yourself

Modern, Irish, Jazz, Tap, Ballet

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Winooski Lego Club: See September 4. WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See September 4. Yoga for Girls: See September 4.

26 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See September 5. Five Corners Farmers Market: See September 5. Young Writers & Storytellers: See September 12.

KIDS VT

Meet Kate DiCamillo and Harry Bliss: Hosted by Flying Pig Books, this awardwinning author and illustrator duo share their new joint picture book, Good Rosie!, answer questions from admiring youngsters and sign books. Ages 4-8. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 2-4 p.m., preregistration required; space is limited. Info, 985-3999. FREE

Williston Preschool Music: See September 6, 11 a.m.

SEPTEMBER 2018

23 Sunday

Crafts for Kids: See September 10.

KIDSVT.COM

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Museum Day: Numerous historic sites and museums across the state open their doors to the public free of charge during this national event sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. Visit smithsonian. com/museumday/museum-day-2018 to search for participating locations. Various locations statewide. Info, museumday@ si.edu. FREE

CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See September 10.

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See September 5.

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CALENDAR SEPTEMBER

26 Wednesday (cont.) RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See September 5. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See September 5. P: URBAN ARROW

WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 5.

27 Thursday

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CHITTENDEN Colchester Lego Club: See September 6. Milton Community Activities Fair: The Milton Community Youth Coalition sponsors this 12th annual fair, offering one-stop shopping for families to learn about local sports, recreation, clubs and services. Come with an appetite for the community dinner and enjoy the school’s Open House, too. Milton Elementary/ Middle School, 6-8 p.m. Info, 893-1009. FREE

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Family Gym: See September 2.

48

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Family Paint Night: Moms, dads and kids take pleasure in painting together with Dr. Suess-themed suggestions. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person, preregister. Info, 425-2700.

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Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 7. Live-Action Role Play: See September 14.

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CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 1. Miles for Migraine Burlington: Amateur and experienced athletes lace up for this inaugural 2-mile walk or 5-10K walk/run. Veterans Memorial Park, South Burlington, 9-10:30 a.m., $25-40; free for children under 10; preregister; fundraising encouraged to support the University of Vermont Medical Center’s Headache Clinic. Info, 734-7598.

Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 1.

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See September 4.

∙ 5-8 fosters autonomy, curiosity, and intellectual engagement.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 1.

FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See September 6.

CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 7.

Become a Guardian ad Litem, a trained, court-appointed community volunteer who looks out for the best interests of a child.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 1.

Movie at the Library: The big screen shows a family-friendly feature. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

28 Friday

∙ K-4 is child-led, experiential, and nature-based.

29 Saturday

Williston Preschool Music: See September 6.

St. Albans Library Legos: See September 13.

Oak Meadow is a trusted educational option for K-12 homeschooling and distance learning. Stay home this fall and rediscover the joy of learning. Our �lexible curriculum and accredited distance school will challenge, inspire, and support you.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Music with Raph: See September 14. Richmond Farmers Market: See September 7.

Webby’s Art Studio: Monet the Master: Amateur artists check out a spongepainting technique to create their own masterpieces modeled on Monet’s famous lily pad paintings. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346. GRAND ISLE Champlain Islands Farmers Market: See September 1. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 1. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 8. NEW YORK Plattsburgh Farmers Market: See September 1.

30 Sunday

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See September 7.

CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See September 2.

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 7.

Family Gym: See September 2. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 2. 


Education Programs

Education Programs

Education Programs Gallery Workshops • Passport to Learning • Life in Early Vermont • Vacation Camps

Offering a range of hands-on experiences for students and educators throughout the year—from brief instructor-led experiences in our buildings and galleries to in-depth art making visits; from summer camps to professional development opportunities for educators.

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Essex Campus: 21 Carmichael Street, Suite 203 Shelburne Campus: 4066 Shelburne Road

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I had shared our story so many times that I couldn’t help but pick apart my own argument.

CALENDAR

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

SEE “JUST FOR KIDS” SECTION FOR PUZZLES

KIDS VT

real concern was that Luna might be bored with another year of preschool. But what about the flip side? That she might be much smaller than her classmates. That she would miss the chance to mature socially and emotionally before mixing with kids in older grades. That she would miss out on time to play and explore. At this point, I had far less conviction than when the whole thing started. The safest thing to do, it seemed, was to wait. Now that my daughter has completed her final year of preschool, I have real information rather than theories. Luna was not bored at school. Her teacher tailored activities to her abilities, like having her write words with lowercase letters instead of all capitals. Luna took part in a smaller, weekly enrichment class where she got to write and illustrate her own storybook. “I taught a ballet class today,” she said at pick-up one day. Her social skills also improved. Luna began that last year as the kind of kid who likes to chat up the adults in the room. She evolved into more of a kid’s kid, the kind who knows when to play it cool even though somebody snatched your toy, and when it’s a good idea to tell an adult. When we visited her new kindergarten classroom at the end of last year, we learned that another oft-repeated tale — that kindergarten is the new first grade — is just not true, at least in Glover. Not only is there no homework, there aren’t even desks. But I doubt Luna will be bored. The teacher plays guitar, leads the kids in songs about spelling, and seems to have a Maria von Trapp-esque approach to guiding students through the day. The other day, Luna said she’s so excited for kindergarten this year. And I feel confident about it, too. Right after this school year starts, my younger daughter will turn 3. In a couple years, she’ll miss the kindergarten cutoff date by less than a week. But this time around, I won’t sweat it. School can wait. 

SEPTEMBER 2018

to convince our local school board to let Luna start kindergarten early. I learned that the Vermont Agency of Education states that the cutoff date must be between August 31 and January 1, leaving the exact date up to school districts. I reasoned there must be some process for early admittance. It turns out that, in our school district, there isn’t. So I found myself trying to lay the groundwork. I called up a family I’d heard had their child admitted early several years ago, and learned that they’d had to have her assessed by an out-of-district teacher, and that she was still doing very well. But the administrators involved in that case were long gone. At several school board meetings, I shared research on the benefits of being the youngest in the class. But my local school board insisted that the cutoff date is chosen by the supervisory union and there was nothing they could do. Around this time, I was at a kid’s birthday party, giving my kindergarten spiel, when another mother tuned in. She couldn’t believe I was trying to enroll my child early. She talked about research showing that kids do better in kindergarten as 6-year-olds. Another mother said she planned on holding back her own child, who cleared the school cutoff date by several months, because she wanted her kid to be ready for the challenges of kindergarten. I felt mom-shamed, like I was trying to shove my preschooler out of the nest and into the big, bad world too early. Still, I persisted, and soon uncovered a key fact from the chair of the supervisory union board: that it was actually up to individual schools to decide their own rules on early entrance. The next step would have been to return to the Glover School Board with this game-changing information. But I didn’t. Uncertainty had been growing inside me for a while. I had shared our story so many times that I couldn’t help but pick apart my own argument. My only

KIDSVT.COM

y first child, Luna, who turns 6 this October, was still a baby when friends and family started asking the question: What are you going to do about school? Before long, I learned the significance of Luna’s fall birthday. She was an “October baby,” which translates loosely to, “Hoo boy, you just missed that school cutoff date.” In Glover, where we’ve lived since 2011, our school district — like most in Vermont — says that a child must be 5 years old by September 1 of the year they start kindergarten. When Luna was little, we told ourselves that there must be some leeway on that date. Whenever I told another parent, they would cast me a doubtful look and tell me about so-and-so’s kid who was born on September 2 at 12:01 a.m. and still had to wait. As our daughter’s personality emerged, our resolve solidified. By 3 years old, Luna was a precocious firecracker. She knew all her letters, could do simple math and had an exacting vocabulary. Since she missed the cutoff date for public preschool, we signed her up for a couple mornings a week at a private school 25 minutes away. “Preschool is boring,” she would sometimes say. “There isn’t any real work. It’s more like a daycare.” Then I learned from family in New Jersey that my niece, born two months before Luna, would start kindergarten right after she turned 5. “Luna too, right?” they asked. They are basically the same age, I would explain, but they are on either side of the cutoff date. “That’s such a shame,” was the typical reply. I agreed. I had assumed all along that the girls would be in the same grade. I even pictured them traveling together after high school. But Luna would be a year behind. When she was in her second year of preschool, I started trying

JUMBLES

M

List it for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your October event by September 15th online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

VAN. WISH. TANK. FEET.

Why I dropped my fight for early enrollment

RIDDLE ANSWER:

Ready, Set, Kindergarten

Planning a kids event?

When they surfed on the very hot day, it was a — HEAT WAVE

USE YOUR WORDS BY N ATA L I E H ORM I L L A

51


The first customizable cardboard tabletop pinball system

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Kids VT — September 2018  

Back to School: Inside Cool Classrooms; Packing Lunch, Bento-Style; Camper Playhouse; Youth Football: Tackle Vs. Flag

Kids VT — September 2018  

Back to School: Inside Cool Classrooms; Packing Lunch, Bento-Style; Camper Playhouse; Youth Football: Tackle Vs. Flag

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