Page 1

NOVEMBER 2018

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

FREE

VOL.25 NO.11

LEARNING THROUGH NATURE IMMERSION PAGE 10

CREATING A FAMILY COOKBOOK PAGE 17

A PERFECT

MATCH A supportive program connects parents of kids with special needs BY KEN PICARD, P. 20

GOOD CITIZENS FINISH THE CHALLENGE PAGE 19


k what I loo “if this is just , g in iv sg ank like for Th ing to put they’re go t a h w eone e in imag I wish som hristmas! to C t rd a ca in t if e m en me a g iv g st ju D had N A ChHinIL g et ONCEcoUuldPO pick som so I ! out myself

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Kids have questions. We find answers.

A podcast for curious kids.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

What’s your family’s favorite Thanksgiving tradition?

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Mary Ann Lickteig maryann@kidsvt.com

Cathy holds up a poster submitted with a Good Citizen entry

ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Todd Scott, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Astrid Hedbor Lague, Natalie Hormilla, Melissa Pasanen, Ken Picard, Kristen Ravin, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Katie Titterton PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh, Stefan Hard, Sam Simon ILLUSTRATORS

Thomas James, Marc Nadel

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2018 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

W

CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Aunt Joanne’s PUMPKIN ROLLS, made of pumpkin cake and cream-cheese filling. There were never any leftovers. CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cooking (and eating) with CLOSE FRIENDS who, like us, have no family on this half of the country. We used to alternate houses, getting together every year when our kids were younger, then more sporadically as our kids got busy. We’ll be together this year! And we’re hosting. Time to fast-track those home improvements! MARY ANN LICKTEIG, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

My family always played the card game HEARTS late into Thanksgiving night while eating turkey dinner leftovers. We play the game now with my daughters and nephews — with the same tradition of a late-night snack. BRETT STANCIU, CALENDAR WRITER

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE

KRISTEN RAVIN (“Destination Recreation,” page 10) is the Seven Days calendar writer. She lives with her daughter in Bristol. When not momming or writing, she’s usually listening to records and keeping up with celebrity gossip. She recently decided to give roller derby a whirl. 3

KIDS VT

hen I feel overwhelmed by the national news — the tribalism, the incivility, the intractable problems facing our democracy — I think about Grace Heller. The Moretown teen was one of 77 young ’s Good Citizen Challenge, which Vermonters who completed Kids VT’s wrapped up in October. The Challenge, underwritten by the Vermont Community Foundation, invited Vermont youth to engage in their communities, demonstrate their knowledge of government and practice advocating for their beliefs. Participants could choose which activities to complete on their quest to earn 251 points — the number of towns in Vermont. Grace, 14, was one of a handful of students to tackle Activity 64: “Find someone who disagrees with you about a political issue and ask them why they hold their belief. What did they tell you? Did it change your view of the issue?” Grace talked with a friend and documented their conversation in an essay. A supporter of President Donald Trump, Grace asserted that the recently passed tax cuts are good for the economy. Her friend argued that corporations and the wealthy should pay more in taxes, not less. Grace wrote that, after explaining their views, the teens reached an impasse, and agreed to disagree. But, she continued, the two “remain steadfast friends.” How many adults can report a similar outcome after a contentious political exchange? Other Challenge highlights include recordings of participants reciting the preamble to the Constitution; photos of young Vermonters making donations to their local food banks, picking up trash, or lending a helping hand to seniors; and numerous posters encouraging adults to vote. I’ve also loved the drawings of American patriots. We received several renderings of Benjamin Franklin and Abraham Lincoln. The final batch of entries included Ada Weaber’s impressive portrait of Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. I showed it to a coworker in the Seven Days design department. “Wow,” he said. “That’s so inspiring!” We’re still compiling the entries and working on distributing prizes; find a full list of finishers on page 19. We’re also planning for the next Challenge. Yes, we’d like to do this again. I’ll be voting on Tuesday, November 6, and I hope you will, too. No matter what the election outcome, I hope Vermonters of all political stripes can work together to strengthen our local communities. Our Good Citizens are counting on us. Let’s make them proud.

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

NOVEMBER 2018

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Better Citizens

We have a huge gathering at my parents’ house, and my mom always sets up her tripod and takes a GROUP PHOTO. The core cast of characters is always the same but the supporting players — new boyfriends and girlfriends and family friends — change from year to year. It’s fun to look at photos from past years and try to identify everyone.

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Broadway’s Next Hit Musical 4 Sunday at 2 pm

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13-15 Thurs. & Fri. 6 & 8 pm 26-27 Tues. & Wed. at 7 pm Sat. 1 & 3 pm The Sound of Music

Flynn Show Choirs

MARCH

14 Friday at 8 pm

3 Sunday at 7 & 9:30 pm

Parsons Dance

Jim Gaffigan: Quality Time Tour

31 Monday at 7:30 pm Flynn, Lyric Theatre, VSO

Burlington Does Broadway

9 Saturday at 8 pm

8-9 Thurs. & Fri. at 8 pm

JANUARY

15 Friday at 8 pm

Liza Jessie Peterson: Down the Rabbit Hole 10 Saturday at 7 & 9:30 pm

Daniel Kahn and the Painted Bird

11 Sunday at 11 am, 2 & 4 pm

Red Kite Green Mountain 11 Sunday at 7 pm

Mamadou Diabaté 14-15 Wed. & Thurs. at 7:30 pm

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

Burlington does

NTL: Allelujah!

8 Thursday at 2 & 7 pm

KIDS VT

gift certificates

Storm Large

10 Thursday at 6 pm

The Magic School Bus 11-12 Fri. & Sat. at 8 pm

Bill Shannon: Maker Moves

Bassem Youssef 31 Thursday at 2 & 7 pm

NTL: I’m Not Running

15-16 Thurs. & Fri. at 8 pm

4 Monday at 7 pm

Middlebury Actors: The Turn of the Screw

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

17 Saturday at 8 pm

6 Wednesday at 7:30 pm

Night of Drums

Herbie Hancock

20 Tuesday at 2 & 7 pm

13 Wednesday at 7 pm

Llamadoll: Silent Shorts 29 Thursday at 7:30 pm

Something Rotten

DECEMBER 2 Sunday at 6 & 8:30 pm

Julian Lage Trio

4 Tuesday at 7:30 pm

Cirque Mechanics

14 Thursday at 8 pm

3 Wednesday at 7:30 pm 4 Thursday at 7:30 pm

Jazzmeia Horn

6 Saturday at 8 pm

TURNmusic

World Party

17 Sunday at 6 & 8:30 pm

Sam Shalabi: Carnival of Souls

7 Sunday at 2 pm

The Beethovens of Today: Host Soovin Kim

17 Sunday at 6 & 8:30 pm

Peditro Martinez & Alfredo Rodriguez 21 Thursday at 7 pm

The Sweet Remains

7-8 Fri. & Sat. at 8 pm

23 Saturday at 8 pm

From Burma to the Balafon

APRIL Angélique Kidjo

NTL: Antony & Cleopatra

Keigwin and Company: Places Please!

Actor’s from the London Stage: King Lear Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

Cirque Éloize: Saloon

22 Friday at 8 pm

28-30 Thurs.-Sat. at 7 pm

31 Sunday at 7 pm

Candoco: Let’s Talk About Dis, Face In

6 Thursday at 2 & 7 pm

Kodo

The US Army Field Band & Soldiers’ Chorus

25 Friday at 8 pm

FEBRUARY

29 Thursday at 7:30 pm

18 Monday at 7 pm 27 Wed. at 7 pm [FREE]

Elf The Musical

NTL: The Madness of George III

Québecfest: Le Vent Du Nord & De Temps Antan

20 Saturday at 8 pm

Ballet Hispánico 26 Friday at 8 pm

Hot Brown Honey

MAY 11 Saturday at 8 pm

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Are you

THOMAS JAMES

NOVEMBER 2018 Writing Contest & Winners.....24 Coloring Contest Winners.........24 Coloring Contest..............................25 Puzzle Page..........................................26 Birthday Club......................................26 Puzzle Answers ................................47

JUST FOR KIDS Nature’s Gifts

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The giving season is here again! And because we’re so generous, we’re giving you the clues to this crossword puzzle. Here are some of Vermont’s favorite pets and animal friends, along with presents they would love to receive. Once you’ve filled in the answers, can you figure out which animal would like each gift?

ACROSS

DOWN

2. Skeleton part

1. Fish in a can

4. Lawn

3. Cheerios grains

7. Bird that climbs down trees

5. Sesame______ (not street!)

9. Big sled dog

6. Long-eared hopper

11. Thin blue-eyed cat

8. Black & white cow

12. Orange root veggies

10. Vermont steed breed

14. Striped cheek stuffer

13. Masked ringtail

16. Capped baby oak

15. What #13 always wants

KIDSVT.COM

A Perfect Match

ONBOARD for an adventure?

NOVEMBER 2018

ANSWER P. 47

23

Just for Kids 23 Nature Crossword 24

19

25 26 47

Celebrating kids who completed the Challenge

KIDS VT

A supportive program connects parents of kids with special needs

Puzzle Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club Puzzle Answers

CALENDAR

NOVEMBER

Registration for Lake Adventure Camps opens soon!

Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Vergennes, Vermont

Get on the list for early bird discounts at

SPONSORED BY:

https://camps.lcmm.org

Shine On

STEFAN HARD

Be On The

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Take Apart Day: Curious kiddos explore the “guts” of everyday items, from Museum of Science, Norwich.

SAT The Little Mermania Family Fun Fair: NOV 17 A mermaid-themed fair starts the fun for youngsters with games, stories, face painting and cookie decorating, followed by the Burlington High School Drama and Music Departments’ 2 p.m. musical matinee of the little heroine who offered her voice in exchange for becoming human. Noon, Burlington High School, Burlington.

FRI-SUN Thanksgiving Weekend: This NOV 23-25 working farm showcases Turkey Day traditions from the 1890s, with festivities including holiday food activities and wagon rides towed by a team of draft horses. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock.

KIDS VT

COURTESY OF SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

SAT

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

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Afterschool programs provide community, structure and enrichment for kids and teens

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 6

On the Cover NOVEMBER 2018

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

FREE

VOL.25 NO.11

LEARNING THROUGH NATURE IMMERSION PAGE 10

CREATING A FAMILY COOKBOOK PAGE 17

GOOD CITIZEN FINISH THE CHALLENGE PAGE 19

A PERFECT

MATCH A supportive program connects parents of kids with special needs BY KEN PICARD, P. 20

KIDS VT

7

#InstaKidsVT Trending Parent Participation Pet Corner Upcoming Events Kids Say What?

Columns Kids Beat 9 10 Destination Recreation 11 Habitat 12 Mealtime 13 Checkup 14 Bookworms 15 One to Watch 16 Parent Portrait 17 The Art of 18 By the Numbers 47 Use Your Words

Calendar 33 Daily Listings 34 Classes 35 Ongoing Exhibits 36 Seasonal Events 37 Science & Nature 38 Live Performances 40 New Parents 42 Story Times 44 Playgroups

NOVEMBER 2018

Welcome Editor’s Note 3

33

KIDSVT.COM

The Third Space

NOVEMBER 2018

Week to Week NOV 10 toasters to toys. Noon-3 p.m., Montshire

10/24/18 3:55 PM

KIDSVT.COM

SHIMMER: A WINTER CIRQUE REVERIE’s whimsical winter wonderland awes the audience with acrobatics, specialty acts and glittering costumes. Friday, November 23, 3 p.m. & 7 p.m., Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe.

Thomas James created this bold illustration to accompany our feature story on Vermont Family Network’s Parent Match program.

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AUTUMN ANSWERS

T

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

he cafeteria is a notoriously stressful environment for kids. In rural Vermont, where I attended high school, any given lunchtime was a crapshoot. One day was all cheeseburgers and laughs; the next, a steaming pile of goulash and exclusion. One particular lunchtime memory has stuck with me for nearly two and half decades. Several kids were bullying a student with a developmental delay, throwing garbage on the floor just to see her pick it up. It was terrible to watch, but that’s all I did: watch. Other kids watched. Lunch monitors watched. We all watched. Whatever our feelings, we didn’t do anything. We were bystanders. A couple of minutes crept by before a senior — a big, quiet kid rumored to live in a house with a dirt floor and a drunk dad — saw what was happening, walked over to the trash-throwing bully, grabbed him, shoved him up against the wall and said, “You think you’re better? You think it’s funny? What if it was you? You think it’d be funny then? You’re not better. You’re not

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different.” Then he let the kid go and walked away. What he so clearly demonstrated — and what the rest of us had failed to demonstrate — was empathy. He looked at the girl and put himself in her shoes, and he asked the bully to do the same.

Why is this important? In addition to making the world a generally nicer place to be, empathetic adults live happier, longer lives. In a Time magazine article, “To Raise Kids With More Empathy, We Need to Do Everything Wrong,” parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba writes, “Empathy ... is the cornerstone for becoming a happy, well-adjusted, successful adult. It makes our children more likable, more

#INSTAKIDSVT Thanks for sharing your photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture of a fall walk in the woods. Share a picture of your kids this month.

Why is empathy important, and how can I raise empathetic kids?

TRENDING

employable, more resilient, better leaders, more conscience-driven, and increases their life spans.” Empathy can be taught. In a Washington Post article, “10 Ways to Foster Kindness and Empathy in Kids,” licensed clinical counselor Phyllis L. Fagell reminds parents that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. She encourages parents to “model compassion by treating friends, acquaintances and colleagues with kindness.” She also suggests that exploring the natural world together, practicing mindfulness and giving back to the community are ways to cultivate empathy. Learning empathy doesn’t require a dramatic experience like that day in the cafeteria. Rather, it’s a daily practice of trying to connect with others, seeing ourselves in each other, bridging the space between “them” and “us,” and teaching our kids to do the same.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

wholesomelittlehouse Exploring the woods at his own pace.

HERE’S HOW:

 Follow @kids_vt on Instagram.

your photos  Post on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

Tag us o Instagr n am!

Nearly 50 years after it was first published, Judy Blume’s Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret is being made into a film. It’s our pre-teen dream come true! Five-month-old Harper Yeats of Toronto became the youngest person to visit all 50 states, ending her journey in Vermont. She saved the best for last.

Renowned mega toy store, FAO Schwarz — which closed in 2015 — will reopen this month at Rockefeller Plaza in New York City. Even the giant piano Tom Hanks played in Big is coming back!

Pop-culture company Funko released its new, limited-edition “Golden Girls” cereal — blue multigrain loops — at Target. A good way for children of the ‘80’s to introduce their kids to the fabulous foursome of Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia.


PET CORNER

PARENT PARTICIPATION

This month, we asked our Facebook followers to tell us about their dream family vacation. Find their answers below. One of my bucket list trips would be to travel the Northwestern coast of the U.S. — NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, OREGON, WASHINGTON — AND UP TO VANCOUVER in

a vintage camper van.

—AMBER POLLAK-BRUCE

My dream vacation would be to bring my family to ICELAND to see the Aurora Borealis and stay in an ice hotel! —CHRISTINE WHITE

—RACHEL O’DONALD

DENMARK, so the kids

could see where their great grandparents immigrated from. —HANNAH LONDON CHRISTIANSEN

—KIM MEILLEUR

I would go around EUROPE and visit all the major landmarks with family. My 7-year-old son loves to watch YouTube channels like The Bucket List Family and Travel With Kids. He would be thrilled. We would also bring his Nana so she could look up ancestry in Ireland, Scotland and England. She is a genealogy buff.

—LISA MARIE BERRY

We would love to go to ENGLAND and teach my grandson about his grandfather’s family. His grandfather passed away one year before he was born. —PAMELA BERRY

Spectacular Spectacular Attention kids! Do you play an instrument? Can you sing? Do you love creating dance routines with your friends? We want you to try out for the Kids VT Spectacular Spectacular — a talent show for Vermont’s rising stars. Auditions take place Saturday, November 10, at Higher Ground in South Burlington. The main event is on Saturday, December 8. Find out more at kidsvt.com/spectacularspectacular.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“This is one mean onion, because it’s making me cry!” JAMESON, AGE 4

KIDS VT

—NICOLE HOWARD

UPCOMING EVENTS

NOVEMBER 2018

My dream family vacation would be to go to JAPAN. I’d love the kids to visit a place where there is no chance they’ll be able to read or understand the signage and just understand that feeling, but also discover that your kindness towards others will help you find your way.

Allie Burke shared this cute photo of her daughter, Eliza, walking the family’s kitty, Penny. “They both love taking walks in the field together,” wrote Burke.

KIDSVT.COM

We want to go to ALASKA to see and explore Denali! My son is very interested in climbing and mountain climbers and it’s the home of his namesake, Mt. Saint Elias.

One place I’ve always dreamed of is AUSTRALIA. I wanted to be a marine biologist when I was a kid and was fascinated by the Great Barrier Reef. I would love to take my husband and our 6-year-old daughter and have a great adventure exploring the wildlife of the land and sea there. Maybe we could even meet the Irwin family at the Australia Zoo!

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NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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Saturday, December 1st

KIDS VT

10am - 6pm

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BY MARY A NN L IC KT EIG A N D A L I S ON N OVA K

BUSINESS

Green Mountain Pride

Looking to buy a gift that says “Vermont” for a little one in your life this holiday season? Look no further than VERMONT TRIBE. Started by Moretown native Sophie Kirpan three years ago, the local company makes onesies and kids’ shirts emblazoned with patches in the shape of Vermont that are made from scraps of flannel she buys by the bagful from the Vermont Flannel Company. Kirpan, who is 29 and one of 11 siblings, said that when she was growing up, she was aware of the throngs of tourists who came to Vermont and always thought the clothing offered at souvenir shops was “tacky and gaudy.” In starting her one-woman company, she aimed to create tasteful, simple items that reflect the state’s “coveted lifestyle.” Kirpan embodies the culture she tries to capture in her clothing. She and her partner recently moved from a yurt with no electricity in Duxbury to a renovated 1850s schoolhouse in Fayston, where she spends up to 10 hours a day, seven days a week, sewing as she prepares for the arrival of her first child next year. In addition to onesies and tees, Kirpan makes plush bunnies, bandana bibs, dog bandanas and Vermont undies with a state patch on the fly. This year, she rolled out a new product she calls the Vermont Pride Power Suit — a onesie featuring a rainbow Green Mountain State patch — to celebrate LGBTQ families. —AN

EDUCATION

Making the Grade

ENTERTAINMENT

Season of Song

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

Five new episode of Mr. Chris and Friends premiere on Wednesday, November 21 on Vermont PBS. Activities related to the show will be accessible through the Vermont PBS Kids’ Club at vermontpbs.org/kids.

KIDSVT.COM

Last November, Vermont PBS released the pilot episode of MR. CHRIS AND FRIENDS, an original children’s television program geared to 3- to 6-year-olds starring local musician Chris Dorman. One year later, Dorman and Vermont PBS are at it again — this time with five new 30-minute installments of the farm-based musical show. The episodes are organized around different themes. In “Seeds,” young viewers learn about the life cycle of a plant, while “Water” follows the journey of a raindrop and takes viewers to the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain. The shows follow a three-act format, starting with a wish to learn something, followed by an adventure, and culminating in what the show calls a “Big, Big Concert.” The program is “centered around what kiddos are going through” and “rooted in this idea that we have a deep respect for children,” said Dorman, who teaches Music for Sprouts classes at Bread & Butter Farm in Shelburne. “I’m just coming wide-eyed and open-hearted and learning as much as I can,” he continued. “I see this as such a huge responsibility, to be making media for children.” —AN COURTESY OF VERMONT PBS

All people are math people, according to the Winooski High School math teacher recently named 2019 VERMONT TEACHER OF THE YEAR. Tom Payeur received the honor from the Vermont Agency of Education in October. Beth Fraser, a mathematics teacher at Blue Mountain Union School in Wells River, was recognized as the 2019 Vermont Alternate Teacher of the Year, and Shane Heath, a science teacher at Northfield Middle & High School, was a distinguished finalist. Payeur, 30, is in his seventh year of teaching math in Winooski. “This honor is an absolute validation of the struggle to reform education with a focus on 21st-century skills, across the state of Vermont and the nation as a whole,” he said. Payeur makes learning “relevant, engaging and empowering,” said Winooski High School co-principal Leon Wheeler. “Grounded in research and math best practices, his vision of ‘what can be’ led our math team to fundamentally redesign the math program to become truly student-centered.” Superintendent Sean McMannon credited Payeur with building trusting relationships with his students. “‘Chill,’ ‘snappy dresser’ and ‘wicked smart’ are just a few of the descriptors I have heard from Winooski High School students about Tom Payeur,” McMannon said. The teacher said he gives fist bumps in the hallways and likes to match his tie with his shirt and socks. His Teacher of the Year duties will take him statewide in the coming year to visit schools and work with other teachers. He will also be Vermont’s candidate for the National Teacher of the Year award. Said Payeur, “I tell my students every day that they are mathematicians, and that their ideas are amazing and worth being heard by the world.” —MAL

Check out Vermont Tribe on Instagram at @vermont.tribe.art or etsy.com/shop/VermontTribe. Vermont Tribe goods are available at around 26 stores in Vermont, including Birdfolk Collective in Winooski and Waterbury, The Hive in Middlesex, Bear & Moosh in South Burlington, and Peanut & Mouse in Waitsfield.

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DESTINATION RECREATION B Y KR IST EN R AVIN

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup North Branch Nature Center, 713 Elm St., Montpelier

I

Zentara. Unlike outdoor education, which, Zentara explained, “denotes structured activities with a structured outcome,” nature immersion is open-ended. “It allows for children to be leaders in their learning and to take ownership in their learning process.” A typical nature playgroup session, Kennedy said, starts with free play. After about 50 minutes, a cleanup song leads to a group circle and another tune. Then, kiddos and caregivers gather their belongings and walk to a nearby second destination, such as the river or a shaded play area called Deer Camp. Here, seasonal songs and stories, sometimes with puppets, ensue. Tots can then eat parent-packed snacks and enjoy more playtime. The schedule resembles a condensed version of a day in the center’s Forest Preschool. Zentara started the playgroup in 2014 as a feeder program for the preschool, and “as a way for parents and children to connect with each other outside.” Because of the low attendance and gloomy weather on this particular day, Kennedy opted to make the most of the Nature Playscape rather than venturing to a second destination. This was fine with us. Shortly after Kennedy made that call, my mud-covered daughter had a minimeltdown, apparently fed up with her cold hands and damp clothes. (Pro tip: Pack extra clothing, and bring waterproof outerwear.) After about an hour of play, Virginia and I called it a day. Despite the rain and the chill in the air, I was glad we got in on the fun. As Zentara told me, “The most potent learning is when we are outside of our comfort zone.” K The free Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup meets — rain or shine — every Monday through December 3, from 10 a.m. to noon. Call 229-6206 or visit northbranchnaturecenter.org for more information.

KIDSVT.COM

love being outdoors with my 2-year-old, Virginia, particularly when it’s 80 degrees and sunny. Cold, rainy days are a bit harder to navigate. A recent trip to the Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup at North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier challenged us to make the best of lousy weather. It also gave Virginia and me an introduction to education through nature immersion. Just two miles north of downtown, the nature center boasts 28 acres of fields and forest preserved for public use. Trails provide access to the North Branch of the Winooski River and Hubbard and North Branch River parks. On a Monday morning in October, we parked in the on-site lot and popped into the main building, where an employee directed us to an outdoor corral called the Nature Playscape. Virginia and I were the first to arrive for the free, two-hour, drop-in session for kids 5 and under and their caregivers. Facilitator Melora Kennedy walked us through the materials in the fenced-in playscape. Known as provocations, because they provoke exploration, they included a table-like rock holding cups of colored water waiting to be mixed; a collection of planks, stumps and blocks called “loose parts”; and a mud kitchen with a wooden countertop stocked with pots, spoons and other cooking utensils. Virginia was drawn to a muddy hole in the ground, where she dug with a metal shovel. She also whipped up a dish or two in the mud kitchen and drew on a log with chalk. About 20 parents brought their kids on one fall morning, Kennedy said, but on this wet and chilly day, there were never more than three families at a time in the playscape. Adults helped and supervised, but let their children pick their preferred apparatus. This choose-your-own-adventure approach is central to the concept of nature immersion, said the center’s Forest Preschool director and teacher Mary

Virginia enjoys the Nature Playscape

LEARNING ON THE LAND

“Forest Preschool is an exploratory, nature and play-based program with an indoor classroom that empowers children to be active in their own learning while connecting to one another and the natural world,” reads the North Branch Nature Center website. Barring extreme weather, such as high winds or thunder and lightning, the nature center’s Forest Preschool students spend at least part of each day outdoors — yes, even in the winter. Below is a small sampling of forest preschool programs around Vermont. •

Burlington Forest Preschool, Ethan Allen Homestead, 4 Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington, 310-7028, burlingtonforestpreschool.com

Forest Preschool, Green Mountain Audubon Center, 255 Sherman Hollow Rd., Huntington, 434-3068, vtaudubon.org

Forest Preschool, North Branch Nature Center, 713 Elm St., Montpelier, 229-6206, northbranchnaturecenter.org

Wren’s Nest Forest Preschool, 82 Mitchell Dr., Vergennes, 545-2410, willowell.org

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PHOTOS: BRETT STANCIU

HABITAT BY BRETT S TA N CI U

Sapling Woods T

A salvaged seesaw Sarah and Sean Prentiss with daughter Winter

NOVEMBER 2018 Dan Huskes and son Jayce stop by for a swing

KIDS VT

“This is Winnie’s zone,” Sean emphasized. “The kids’ zone… It’s their place to do what they want to do. And she gets to… choose her own risk level. It varies by day.” The trail leads to the nearby home of Nina Livellara, Nate Doyon and their almost-crawling daughter, Chloe. The couple, both professional chefs, envision adding an outdoor oven with a grill beside the path for festive neighborhood gatherings. Livellara said she and Sarah spent many summer hours chatting on the path’s bench while their daughters amused themselves in the nearby double swing. For the Prentisses, nurturing community is especially important. Sean imagines the path will expand as his daughter grows, and he anticipates neighborhood kids wandering free-range from house to house. To complement the lakeside landscape, he envisions adding a boat-inspired treehouse when his daughter is ready to climb high. For now, the nature-loving family spends plenty of time on the ground in the Sapling Woods, making early morning pilgrimages with coffee in hand. “At the breakfast table, Winnie says, ‘Swing? Swing?’” Sarah said with a laugh. “We’re like, ‘OK, we’re going.’” K

Winter explores the rope web

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his summer, a neighbor offered Sarah and Sean Prentiss a free plastic child’s swing for their almost2-year-old daughter, Winter. Projectoriented Sean, who didn’t want their neighbor believing “she wasted her time getting it to us,” promptly hung the caterpillar-shaped swing from a tree near their home on Turtle Cove, a private bay on Greenwood Lake in Woodbury with scenic mountain views. Thus began a homemade playground project. Within weeks, the couple created a unique forest path dotted with DIY playground equipment, using scrap wood, plenty of imagination and just a small amount of money. Inspired by a similar project from Sarah’s childhood, the family christened their creation the Sapling Woods. The path winds gradually up a gentle hillside. Along the way are a donated slide and swings, smooth stumps for climbing, several balance beams, a wooden swing that Sean built, and a bench for parents to rest. In one bend, a spider web of rope strung between two trees creates an unusual climbing challenge. Nearby, a triangle-shaped handhold suspended from a branch with rope serves as a swing that can be easily adjusted to accommodate children of different heights. Sean, a writer and teacher at Norwich University and the Vermont College of Fine Arts, built a seesaw with a 60-year-old board salvaged from the childhood seesaw of Sarah’s uncle. Still in process is a “woods kitchen,” centered around a childsized table, constructed of evenly cut branches bound with rope. Sarah plans to stock the kitchen with muffin tins and durable pots and pans. Toddler-sized obstacles along the path — like small ladders for climbing and bridges made from wood slats — give Winnie “a sense of where her body’s going,” strengthening her developing sense of spatial awareness, while also allowing her to have fun, explained Sarah, a physical therapist at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice.

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MEALTIME B Y A S T R ID H EDB O R L AG U E

Autumnal Vegetable Mash An alternative to plain potatoes for your Thanksgiving table

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 10:00 am – 3:00 pm

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Shop from local vendors and enjoy festive activities for kids!

hanksgiving has always been a favorite holiday in our family. We grew up with all the traditional staples: turkey and gravy, cranberry sauce, fresh warm rolls, mashed potatoes and pies, pies, pies. But sometimes — when the garden was particularly bountiful — my father would get more creative, and we would be treated to a wonderful variation of mashed potatoes that incorporated all kinds of fall veggies. Those years were my favorites. My parents always had a very impressive garden. They grew tomatoes; green beans; summer squash; winter squash; and root vegetables, including sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips and rutabagas. When making his mashed vegetables for Thanksgiving, Dad would often just gather whatever was left from the harvest and create something that varied from year to year. Some things remained constant though. The backbone of the mash was always the humble potato. Dad’s special touch was adding evaporated milk and a dab of sour cream instead of plain cream. The slight tang from the sour cream really plays off the earthy flavor of the vegetables. We like to leave a few small chunks in the mash instead of trying to get it perfectly smooth. Add fresh sage and plenty of salt and freshly ground pepper to finish off the dish. So go ahead. Experiment with your mash. You’ll be thankful you did. K

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

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Fall veggies

PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

Holiday

Vegetable mash makes a great side dish

INGREDIENTS (Serves 4-6) •

2 large russet potatoes

1 small rutabaga

1/4 small butternut squash

1 small sweet potato

2 turnips

1 parsnip

1/4 cup butter

1/4 cup evaporated milk

3 tablespoons sour cream (regular or low-fat)

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage

Salt and pepper to taste

AUTUMNAL VEGETABLE MASH DIRECTIONS: 1. Peel vegetables and cut into 1-inch cubes. 2. Boil in a large pot of salted water until soft, about 30-35 minutes. 3. Carefully drain, and transfer the vegetables back to the pot. 4. Add the butter and stir to melt. 5. Stir in the evaporated milk and sour cream. 6. Using a potato masher, mash until most of the chunks are gone. 7. Add the sage, stir well, then season with salt and pepper to taste.


CHECKUP WIT H D R. S UJ ATA S I N GH • I N T E RV I E W C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

What should parents know about eye exams, bilateral vision and the proverbial ‘lazy eye’? P

ediatric ophthalmologists have to be specialists in the art of the nonverbal eye exam. Their patients may be just a couple of days old, and even the older ones sometimes cannot identify the letters on a wall chart. What’s more, children may be intimidated by bulky eye exam equipment or fearful of someone putting drops in their eyes. Dr. Sujata Singh is one of two pediatric ophthalmologists in Vermont and an assistant professor at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of Medicine. Some vision problems are caught by pediatricians or teachers, she says. Usually, though, parents are the first to notice abnormalities in their kids’ eyes or vision. When they do, she has the answers. Dr. Singh answers our questions about children’s eye health.

KVT: How do you treat it? SS: The first thing we try is patching, which kids usually hate. The idea is that you give the brain only one option — the bad eye. But kids know they have a good eye so they’ll often take off the patch. Patching can be traumatic for parents to live through, let alone for the kids who want the patch off. But this low-tech approach can improve vision and give a child lifelong depth perception.

KVT: Do you see more eye problems now that kids spend more time on screens than they did years ago? SS: In general, it’s good for kids to be outdoors playing in natural light and to limit their screen time. But we don’t have evidence currently that screen time is harming kids’ vision.

KVT: Anything else? SS: The vast majority of children don’t need a routine eye exam unless we catch something in a vision screening, if they’re complaining about their eyes or if their parents notice something unusual. If parents are at all worried about their kids’ eyes or vision, they should talk to their pediatrician early on. He or she can do an evaluation and, if necessary, refer the child to us. Most parents have pretty good clinical intuition about their kids’ vision. Sometimes parents will assume a child’s eyes are crossed, but it’s really just an optical illusion. There’s a skin fold that can cover the whites of their eyes. They may look crossed, but they’re not. But I’m always happy to check it out and make sure. 

KIDS VT

KVT: How long do kids typically need to wear the patch? SS: It varies. Early on in pediatric ophthalmology, they would patch the good eye all day. We don’t do that anymore, because you can make the good eye the bad eye if you do it for too long. If the crossing is very minor, we might only do it 30 minutes a day. Generally we don’t patch for more than four to six hours per day. Studies have shown that you don’t get much improvement for patching longer than that. Some kids only need to patch for weeks or months; some kids need to patch for years. We can start patching at any age.

KVT: Are there downsides to doing dilation in children? SS: I’ve found that some parents are nervous about dilation because their kids will really kick and scream. They don’t like getting drops in their eyes. But once I give them a toy or bubbles afterwards, they’re completely fine. Their reaction is all about the anxiety of getting the drops. It’s not painful. The vast majority of the time, dilation has no negative effects on children, and it’s a great diagnostic tool.

KVT: Do you advise kids not to rub their eyes? SS: When kids rub their eyes, usually something is going on; they have allergies, viral conjunctivitis or something else irritating their eyes. Adults often rub their eyes when they get dry. You can damage your eyes from rubbing and pressing them too aggressively, but it’s usually not something to worry about.

NOVEMBER 2018

KVT: What causes amblyopia? SS: A person can have poor vision due to an eye injury, glaucoma, retinal detachment or because they didn’t develop good vision in childhood. But much of it is genetic. In order to develop good vision, you must have two clear, equal images going through your eyes to your brain. The brain puts those two images together to

KVT: What is a “lazy eye”? SS: Actually, “lazy eye” is not a clinical term, and it can mean a lot of different things. Some people take it to mean poor vision in one eye. Other people take it to mean a wandering eye, a crossing eye or a drooping lid. For me, as a pediatric ophthalmologist, it just means two eyes that aren’t working well together.

KVT: Are there other treatment options? SS: If a child doesn’t tolerate patching, we can make the vision in the good eye fuzzy with an eye drop that impairs the ability to focus. That way, the child can only pay attention to the bad eye. The eye drop also causes dilation. The dilation lasts a long time, but the fuzziness wears off much sooner, so parents have to administer the drop more than once a week. Sometimes parents think that the drop is still working because the pupil is still dilated, and they start skipping doses, which results in suboptimal amblyopia therapy. The other options are glasses or, in more involved cases, surgery.

KIDSVT.COM

KIDS VT: What are the most common issues you treat in children? SUJATA SINGH: The main focus of pediatric ophthalmology is trying to reduce or prevent amblyopia, which is poor vision resulting from poor vision development. You can have bilateral amblyopia, which is poor vision in both eyes, or unilateral amblyopia, which is poor vision in just one eye. Kids can have amblyopia because their vision is still developing until they’re 8 to 10 years old. When they’re young, their brains are plastic enough so that we may be able to improve their vision. After age 10, it’s much more difficult to rehabilitate it.

create depth perception and good equal vision, so you’re not relying on one eye over the other. Do you remember the viral internet question that asked whether you see the dress as black and blue or white and gold? That tells us that your brain creates vision, not your eyes.

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BOOKWORMS B Y B R ET T STAN C IU

History Lesson D

BE THE DIFFERENCE FOR ME...

10/25/18 12:58 PM

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

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Become a Guardian ad Litem, a trained, court-appointed community volunteer who looks out for the best interests of a child.

VOLUNTEER TODAY! Call 1-800-622-6359 or visit vermontjudiciary.org/GAL

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7/10/18 11:26 AM

aphne Kalmar brings along a was approached back in the taxidermy mouse named Bob day… Right now, we avoid it when she shares her middle-grade at all costs. Most kids have historical fiction novel, A Stitch never seen a dead body. in Time, with kids at schools and They haven’t even seen a libraries. It’s an outside-the-box dead animal. It’s considered presentation, but Kalmar is a bit extraordinarily traumatic, outside-the-box, too. She became a rather than a part of being first-time novelist at age 63 when A alive. Stitch in Time was released in June. Before turning to writing full time, KVT: You read journals from she had a career as an elementary that period? and middle school teacher, with DK: The thing about prior stints as a short-order cook Vermonters is that their and apprentice electrician. journals are totally quantiKalmar’s book centers around fied. Picked two bushels of 11-year-old Donut, a plucky, apples. Caught 40 perch. Six headstrong protagonist growing up inches of snow. They might say in rural Vermont in 1927. Recently someone visited. But there is no orphaned, Donut protests what she emotional content at all, which is a perceives as the world’s injustice little frustrating, but it’s informawhen her Aunt Agnes — who wears tive, too… It’s very New England. “a dress so full of flowers, so pink and purple, it was looking KVT: Can you speak a little for a fight” — insists about why taxidermy Donut move to is important in your Boston with her. novel? Determined DK: Taxidermy is a to escape, hands-on approach Donut rows to death, but it’s a small metal also an illusion. boat, built It’s a denial, a sort by her father, of a magic trick to across a lake. avoid the fact that On the other side, this creature should be she takes refuge lying on the floor looking in an unused hunting very much not alive. The Daphne Kalmar cabin. Surrounded by original taxidermists who did all people who care for her, including the natural history museum works her taxidermist godfather, Donut were real artists… It was the only undertakes a coming-of-age journey. way most people in those days saw Last month, Kalmar took a break exotic animals. In fact, it encourfrom writing to speak with Kids VT aged conservation, ironically. The at the bustling Buffalo Mountain presentation of these animals in all Food Co-op & Café in Hardwick, their beauty gave people a sense of where she lives. reverence. Kids VT: What made you choose to set the book in 1927? Daphne Kalmar: I think, first of all, I wanted to write a book about a time that wasn’t some monumental moment, that wasn’t tied to a war or a depression. It would be the life of a kid in the past… I think part of what I was exploring was how death

KVT: How accurate are the details from the past in A Stitch in Time? DK: My first fan letter was from an 87-year-old man who read the book to his wife at a nursing home. He grew up on a dirt-road farm, and he listed all these things he noticed from when he was a kid that were in the book. It was really cool.

KVT: Tell us about your next middle-grade novel, which will be released in the winter of 2020. DK: It’s set in 1974 in Somerville, Mass., the summer Nixon resigned. It’s about bad presidents, and a bad mother. She runs off… To be sympathetic to her for just a moment, she’s not evil … but I’m presenting it from the girl’s point of view, for whom it’s unforgivable. I’m exploring the idea that children do not owe forgiveness to parents.  As part of the Traditional Christmas in Stowe festivities, Kalmar will read from her book on Friday, November 30, at 3:45 p.m. at the Stowe Free Library. For more information, visit daphnekalmar.com.

DAY TRIP! The Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury boasts an extensive taxidermy collection and a historical display of the craft. Specimens come from Vermont and around the world. They include birds, snakes, Arctic creatures and the extinct passenger pigeon. Find more at fairbanksmuseum.org.


ONE TO WATCH B Y KATI E TI TT E RTON

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NOVEMBER 2018

it was also something I just became passionate about,” she said. Through events like the Race Against Racism and Rally for the Planet, Hope and her fellow student organizers in Montpelier and other Vermont schools are making student activism – and its results – visible. Tricia Petraro calls living with her daughter “an amazing journey,” and relishes watching Hope blaze her own trail. When Hope was a baby, Tricia papered her room with posters. “I had Martin Luther King Jr. and Mother Teresa, and I also had the periodic table and human anatomy. I just said to her, ‘You choose,’” Tricia said. Indeed, Hope’s interests have remained varied. This past summer, she had an internship at the University of Vermont — not in organizing, but in science. After she graduates from high school in 2020, Hope plans to attend college. She’ll probably study social sciences, like anthropology, economics or political science, she said. She’s considering running for political office at some point. Most importantly, she said, her work will “always include some sort of social mission and the ability to make change and give back.” Her activism is part of who she is. “It’s pushing for a greater society.” K

PTA ield itsf Wa

t 16, Hope Petraro isn’t old enough to vote. But she’s still registering others. The Montpelier High School junior is an intern in Sen. Bernie Sanders’ office, working on voter outNAME: HOPE PETRARO reach ahead of Election AGE: 16 Day. “It’s funny, because TOWN: MONTPELIER there are sometimes questions I don’t know the answers to, because I haven’t gone through the process myself,” she admitted, “so I’ve had to educate myself.” Hope often talks about educating herself, a notably humble mindset for someone who spends a lot of time teaching others as she works to persuade them to support a variety of causes. Her accomplishments are many. follow through, given her age. She’s As a sophomore, Hope founded a force,” said Hope’s principal, the Race Against Racism, an annual Michael McRaith. He and social 5K race and rally in Montpelier, studies teacher Heather McLane are which took place for the second two faculty members Hope credits time in September. She is vice with creating a culture at her high president of Montpelier High school that supports students in School’s student activism associacivic engagement, one in which tion, Club Action. She’s involved adults “are more willing to listen to with her school’s Racial Justice kids,” Hope said. Alliance and Earth Group. She Hope was launched into action helped plan both the annual student by circumstance. At age 12, she and climate justice event, Rally for the her mother, Tricia Petraro, moved Planet, organized by student-led from Brooklyn to Montpelier. It advocacy group Vermont Youth was a cultural shift at an important Lobby, and the Livelihood Music life stage. Moving from a city to Festival to support the Vermont a close-knit community helped Ibutwa Initiative, an organization her recognize the advantages of that supports Congolese women her new environment — and the harmed by sexual violence. limitations, specifically Vermont’s She spoke at a Montpelier school relative lack of racial and ethnic board meeting earlier this year to diversity. Because she had firsthand encourage board members to make experience with living in a diverse Montpelier the first Vermont high community, she was unique among school to fly a Black Lives Matter her peers in her ability to advocate flag. The board agreed, inspiring for the importance of diversity. students in other districts to She followed the advice of an advocate for the same. Hope now older friend and sought out clubs serves as a student representative and volunteer experiences to meet on the school board. In January, she people. “I had to find a support plans to return to the Statehouse for system outside my immediate a second year interning with Rep. environment. That’s how I became Mollie Burke of Brattleboro. educated about youth activism and “She has a passion for these politics. It was partly a way for me things, and an unusual level of to cope with moving to Vermont, but

COURTESY OF HOPE PETRARO

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PARENT PORTRAIT P H OTO BY S A M SIM O N • IN T ER VIEW B Y ER IN N S IM O N

Anna Marie, Autumn & Julianna

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

You recently relocated from New Jersey with your husband, Michael, and two young kids and started a new job. How is it going? Anna Marie: As a family, it’s been a big adjustment, but this community has been awesome. Everything has just reinforced our decision to come here. The quality of life and the arts community are so incredibly rich. There are so many things that we’re still exploring, but everyone has been so supportive.

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How are you settling in at the Flynn? Anna Marie: For someone who loves the arts so much, to come into this environment — where there’s such diversity of offerings and so many amazing organizations that collaborate and work together — has been incredible. Are your girls interested in theater as well? Anna Marie: Oh, they grew up in the theater! I’ve brought them to performances since they were 2 months old! Autumn is a dancer, and Jules is taking theater classes here at the Flynn. Autumn, do you study ballet? Autumn: Yes, and tap! Julianna: I want to sing on the stage! Want to be featured in an upcoming Parent Portrait? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Anna Marie Gewirtz, 40, executive director of the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, with daughters Autumn, 5, and Julianna, 3


THE ART OF BY ME L I S S A PA S A N E N

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n her first cookbook, From the Cook’s Garden, Vermont Ellen Ecker Ogden food and garden writer Ellen Ecker Ogden included a recipe for apple crisp along with sweet memories of helping make the dessert when she was a child. Her version of the classic, she explained in the recipe introduction, “is inspired by one of my dearest food memories.” Ogden encourages others to preserve their own cooking rituals and shared food experiences by creating a family cookbook. Take your warm recollections of helping in the kitchen: rolling cookie dough, nibbling cheese while grating, that first successfully flipped pancake. Stir in aromatic memories of family favorites like Grandma’s chicken soup and Uncle Joe’s maple-mustard holiday roast. Garnish with the joy of watching your own kids appreciate those better at it than most adults), do research on same traditions. dishes with international roots, help with “Writing your family cookbook is layout and design, and interview relatives for more than simply recording the stories to go with favorite recipes. (Suggest For more recipes,” she says. “It’s a way to they record them; the voice memo app on information, preserve traditions and pass on many smartphones works well for this.) history. Recipes can tell the stories of visit ellenogden. com. Find a recipe for our families.” 3. Make it easy to contribute. You don’t have to be a professional ginger molasses cookies If you are planning to gather recipes from from one of Ogden’s cookbook author to pull together a other family members, prepare a form to mail treasured heirloom, Ogden promises. cookbooks at kidsvt.com. out with a self-addressed, stamped envelope (or Though she has six books about food email it). Set a clear deadline and remind your and gardening to her name, she offers these guidelines contributors at least once (but not too many times). It to help anyone get started. can also be helpful to include an example recipe. The form should include lines and prompts for: 1. Best laid plans. • an appealing and descriptive recipe title. Figure out how much time and other resources • a short introduction (called a headnote in profesyou have to spend on the project and don’t overextend sional cookbook lingo) with details on who first yourself, especially as the holidays approach. A booklet cooked it in the family and why it’s special. This of 25 favorite recipes with a hand-drawn cover can be section should also include how it looks and tastes, just as special as an 80-page, indexed, spiral-bound, and what to serve with it. professionally printed cookbook. • a citation of the original source if the recipe was There are plenty of free design templates on the first found in a professional cookbook, magazine or internet or, simpler still, use your word processing website. software or a desktop publishing program with easy • an outline of a basic recipe style with number of “drag and drop” tools to build pages with recipes and servings or yield; the list of ingredients in the order family photos. they appear in the instructions; and easy-to-follow steps, either numbered, bulleted or written in short 2. Many hands. paragraphs. Look at some of your favorite recipes to A family cookbook makes a special handmade gift find the style you like best. for near and far-flung relatives and can also be a fun, • special tips to help ensure success. hands-on project to create as a family. • The youngest can draw their favorite ingredients, 4. Say thank you. dishes or other thematic decorations. Make sure to acknowledge everyone who helped • Elementary school kids can help brainstorm recipe with a big thank you in the front of the cookbook, as well titles, create a table of contents, and do critical proof- as with a copy of the finished product. reading tasks like checking that every ingredient in If you can, send it out far and wide to connect family the recipe instructions is actually in the ingredients members who might not see each other that often, even list. if they didn’t contribute. It will likely prompt them to • Middle and high school students can take recipe think of other family recipes that should be included in photos if you choose to include them (kids are way your second volume. 

COURTESY OF THE VERMONT COUNTRY STORE COOKBOOK

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BY THE NUMBERS I N F ORM ATI ON CO M PIL ED B Y M AR Y AN N L IC K T EIG

Neighbors in Need

Data show efforts to combat poverty and hunger in Vermont

1 in 4

3,952

1,291 Vermonters were homeless the night of Jan. 31, 2018

people were housed in Vermont’s publicly funded homeless shelters in fiscal year 2017

1,095 of them were children Average length of stay:

County with the lowest percentage of kids living in poverty: GRAND ISLE 8.9%2

for participation in the Summer Food Service Program

3RD in the U.S.

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

for participation in Afterschool Supper Program

18

4TH in the U.S. for participation in the national School Breakfast Program4

59%

22% are children

5

of Vermont kids qualified for free or reduced-price school lunch in 2016-20174

44 days1

23% were children3

2ND in the U.S.

Vermonters utilize food shelves and meal service programs.

76,558 Vermonters received 3SquaresVT benefits each month in fiscal year 2017

11.6%

of Vermonters live in poverty

$123

15.1%

of Vermont children live in poverty2

Average monthly benefit, per person4

90,000

diapers were collected for COTS by the Dee PT Great Diaper Drive last year

County with the highest percentage of kids living in poverty: BENNINGTON 21%2 SOURCE: VERMONT OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU, 2012-2016 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY 5-YEAR ESTIMATES SOURCE: 2018 POINT IN TIME COUNT REPORT, VERMONT COALITION TO END HOMELESSNESS AND CHITTENDEN COUNTY HOMELESS ALLIANCE

1,353

kids take home a bag of food from school each Friday in Vermont Foodbank’s BackPack program6

345,000 have been collected since 20077 SOURCE: FOOD RESEARCH AND ACTION CENTER, 2017 SOURCE: HUNGER IN AMERICA 2014, A STUDY BY VERMONT FOODBANK AND FEEDING AMERICA SOURCE: VERMONT FOODBANK 7 SOURCE: DEE PHYSICAL THERAPY

1

4

2

5

3

6

11,558

Vermonters received WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) benefits each month in fiscal year 20174

In “By the Numbers,” we present data about topics of interest to parents. Got a subject you’d like us to dig into? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.


Congratulations, Good Citizens!

T

hese Vermont students finished Kids VT’s first Good Citizen Challenge, underwritten by the Vermont Community Foundation. They will each receive a Good Citizen sticker, medal and T-shirt, as well as a pocket constitution donated by Phoenix Books. They will also be honored at a reception at the Vermont Statehouse in January. Thanks to all who participated in our first Challenge! All of us here at Kids VT are inspired by your work. 

Students who finished the Good Citizen Challenge Lucas Switser, West Burke Makyliah Tellier, Salisbury Lindsey Treat, Manchester Center Tyreese Tucker, Salisbury Noah Vandenburg, Stowe Evangeline Vandenburg, Stowe Gabe Velez, Salisbury Cody Warner, Salisbury Grace Warrington, Shelburne Peter Warrington, Shelburne Ada Weaber, Salisbury Henry Weston, Middlebury Matt Whelan, Salisbury Mykayla White, Salisbury Holly Whitney, Salisbury

HONORABLE MENTIONS

KIDS VT

Colt Cervantes, Montpelier Cali Desrochers-Meyer, Montpelier Torin Etheridge, Montpelier Sidney Harris, Montpelier Jackson Mason, Montpelier Schuyler Penniman, Montpelier Indy Roberts, Montpelier Max Walder, Montpelier Connor Yefchak, Montpelier

NOVEMBER 2018

Jameson Maguire, Salisbury Rosalynn Manalo, South Burlington Lily Meyer, Montpelier Addison Moats, Salisbury Alan Moody, Cabot Emma Morrissey, Salisbury Harvey Neddo, East Montpelier Joseph Neddo, East Montpelier Arthur Neddo, East Montpelier Anna Newara, Montpelier Luke Nuceder, Salisbury Bella Olinger, Burlington Ethan Oszureck, St. Albans Sophia Oszureck, St. Albans Chris Palagonia, Colchester Ben Palagonia, Colchester Somerset Pierce, Montpelier Lachlan Pierce, Montpelier Sam Reilly, Burlington Graham Resmer, Winooski Ivy Resmer, Winooski Yankee Rheaume, Salisbury Miles Robbison, West Rutland Alia Ross, Winooski Sutton Rubright, Salisbury Lada Salida, Stowe Mercedes Sheldrick, Salisbury Pela Slater, Salisbury Hannah Smiley, Milton Henry Swisher, Jericho Ella Switser, West Burke

KIDSVT.COM

Riley Amerio, Salisbury Thomas Bishop, Salisbury Ethan Bishop, Clarendon Sophia Boise, Salisbury Thea Boyles, Montpelier Teagan Brennan, Montpelier Channing Brush, Salisbury Henry Bushey, Charlotte Lila Bushey, Charlotte Meredith Cameron, Salisbury Kayla Charbonneau, Salisbury Keenan Chicoine, Salisbury Ethan Delorme, Salisbury Isaac Dodge, Essex Junction Aly Dorman, Underhill Jack Dragoo, Essex Owen Flanagan, Salisbury Josie Gaiotti, Salisbury Chris Gile, Salisbury Natalie Gillette, Salisbury Tyler Graves, Barre Grace Heller, Moretown Phyler Holt, St. Johnsbury Janelle Hoskins, Waterbury Center Mabel Huard, Morrisville Zoe Keuhl, Montpelier Jackson Kitts, Rutland Sawyer Kless, Essex Junction Vance Larocque, Salisbury Michael Levitt, Quechee Hazel Longe, Morristown

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A PERFECT MATCH A supportive program connects parents of kids with special needs BY KEN PICARD

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

I

20

n 1895, the American poet, preacher and suffragist Mary Torrans Lathrap published a poem called “Judge Softly,” which begins: Pray, don’t find fault with the man that limps Or stumbles along the road. Unless you have worn the moccasins he wears, Or stumbled beneath the same load. Lathrap’s poem isn’t well known today, but most people are familiar with the proverb it spawned: Before judging someone else, walk a mile in his or her shoes. Kim Mergenthaler’s life got a little easier after she met another mother who’d already “walked a mile in her shoes.” Last February, Mergenthaler’s 10-year-old son, Will, who is autistic, experienced what she called “a very traumatizing situation” at his school in Burlington. Will had had his “occasional ups and downs” in class, she said, but this time felt different. Fearing for her son’s safety, Mergenthaler quickly pulled him out of school and opted to homeschool him instead. Completing the necessary paperwork with the school district and the state wasn’t difficult. But it soon dawned on Mergenthaler how many other responsibilities she hadn’t anticipated. “I realized I had to completely re-create a community, a support system, everything,” Mergenthaler said. “I hadn’t planned anything, and I was starting from scratch. So who could I call?” Mergenthaler reached out to the Vermont Family Network, a Williston-based nonprofit which supports and advises families of children with special needs. There, a family support coordinator asked Mergenthaler if she’d be interested in talking to another Burlington mother who had faced similar challenges: Kele Bourdeau, whose 9-yearold son, Phineas, is also autistic. Though Bourdeau doesn’t homeschool her kids, the family support coordinator suspected that the two women might hit it off. She was right. “The first time Kele and I talked, we were on the phone for an hour,” Mergenthaler recalled. “Kele and I found that we were on the same page for so many things right from the start, and that was very encouraging.” Bourdeau remembered their first conversation somewhat differently. According to her, the two women chatted on the phone for two and a half hours. Like Mergenthaler, Bourdeau was pleased

to connect with another mother who shared her parenting philosophy and approach to autism. “It’s so refreshing when you find someone else who doesn’t want to ‘fix’ their child, but loves and supports them in any way they can,” Bourdeau explained. For parents of children with special needs, such as mental illness, genetic disorders or other lifelong conditions, feelings of uncertainty, fear, anxiety and isolation often can be eased by finding other parents who face similar challenges. Even compared with trained professionals, these parents often are the most educated, informed and experienced “experts” on their child’s diagnosis, because they live with it 24-7.

It’s so refreshing when you find someone else who doesn’t want to “fix” their child, but loves and supports them in any way they can. SUPPORT PARENT KELE BOURDEAU That’s the concept behind Parent Match, a program administered by the Vermont Family Network, which arranges free, one-to-one connections between the parents of children who have physical, mental, emotional or behavioral challenges. The goal is to provide the “referred parent,” or parent seeking help, with a volunteer “support parent” who can offer guidance, encouragement and problem-solving skills to address the day-today challenges of parenting kids with special needs. Jan Hancock is a Vermont Family Network family support consultant, who matches support parents with referred parents. Like all the family support consultants there, Hancock is herself the parent of a child with a special need; her son has mental health issues. Her coworkers include the parent of adopted immigrant children with traumatic upbringings, one whose child has Duchenne

muscular dystrophy, and others whose kids have behavioral, emotional or learning disabilities. As Hancock put it, “We’ve all walked the walk.” Despite its name, the Parent Match program is available to anyone who has assumed the mantle of parenting a child with special needs,


including grandparents, foster parents or other legal guardians. Parent Match began as Parent to Parent of Vermont, a statewide organization founded in October 1987 by Nancy DiVenere. The Essex Junction mother, whose son, Brett, had suffered a birth injury, went on to cofound Parent to Parent USA, which now has chapters in 36 states. In 2008, Vermont Family Network incorporated Parent to Parent into its roster of programs. As Hancock explained, Parent to Parent USA’s nationwide database enables her to match referred parents in Vermont with support parents, regardless of where they live. Though most support parents and referred parents live in the same state — Mergenthaler and Bourdeau are only a two-minute drive from each other — sometimes it’s difficult or impossible to find another family within Vermont whose child has the same disease or congenital condition. Regardless of the distance between matched parents, there are very few obligations

KIDS VT

To learn more about the Parent Match program, contact the Vermont Family Network at 1-800-800-4005 or visit vermontfamilynetwork.org.

NOVEMBER 2018

for resources and activities for kids who are autistic. Very quickly, however, their relationship blossomed into something more substantive. Shortly after their initial phone conversation last spring, Bourdeau and Mergenthaler decided to meet in person at Ethan Allen Park in Burlington. While they chatted, Phineas and Will found each other on the playground even before their mothers had a chance to introduce them. Within minutes, the boys announced to their moms that they were all going on a hike together. “They clicked right away… I hadn’t seen Will do that,” Mergenthaler recalled. “To see them get each other that way was really impressive.” “It was a beautiful thing,” Bourdeau added. The families have since gotten together for several more outings. Bourdeau, who’s served as a support parent for other parents, acknowledged that such friendships don’t always blossom. “Some parents I really connected with, like Kim,” she said. “Other parents, they just needed someone to hear their story, and that’s all they wanted from me.” At times, Bourdeau has been matched with parents whose attitude and approach toward their child’s autism differed significantly from her own, to the point where she recommended they seek out a different parent match. Bourdeau, a special education paraeducator who has a master’s degree in disability and family studies, described her son’s autism not as a disability but as a reflection of the neurodiversity of the human species, similar to variations in race, ethnicity or hair color. “Phineas hates it when people say he ‘has’ autism … It sounds like he’s carrying a bag,” she said. “It’s not what he carries. It’s who he is.” Mergenthaler echoed that sentiment. “I don’t think either of us are the kind of parents who see autism as a tragedy or a burden in our families,” she said. “We weren’t mourning for this typical kid that we didn’t have. We really accept our boys for who they are and help them embrace their autistic identities.” In the parlance of the advocates and experts, Parent Match enabled Will and Phineas to “find their tribe.” And, they weren’t the only ones to benefit from it. “For parents, we’re finding our tribe, too,” Mergenthaler added. “There are a lot of ways that families like ours are isolated from schools and communities. So, to find someone else whose atypical life is normal is really a rare thing, but it’s so important to us.” 

KIDSVT.COM

THOMAS JAMES

put on each family. Both parents agree to speak a few times by phone, maintain strict confidentiality at all times, lend an empathetic and nonjudgmental ear, and refrain from offering advice, unless it’s requested. Though some support parents, like Bourdeau, have undergone a daylong training session through Vermont Family Network, Hancock said that’s no longer a prerequisite to volunteer. She also pointed out that it’s never required that parents meet in person or introduce their families. Families seek out the Parent Match program for a variety of reasons, she continued. Some people have specific questions about a particular medication, therapy, medical procedure or assistive technology and want to talk to another parent who’s already tried it. Other parents are searching for a new pediatrician, psychologist or medical facility. “And, it’s not just anecdotal advice. These parents really are experts in their children’s situation because they’ve lived with them and kept them alive,” Hancock added. She noted that many support parents have attended national conferences to learn more about their child’s condition and keep themselves informed about the latest drug trials, medical studies and journal articles. But the Parent Match program isn’t just for parents seeking recommendations on, say, the latest motorized wheelchair or cystic fibrosis drug. A referred parent may want advice for dealing with an insurance company, a state agency or a special education program. Or, he or she may want suggestions on how to best parent the sibling of a child with a special need. To that end, Vermont Family Network has recreational programs, called Sibshops, that are tailored to the brothers and sisters of kids with special needs. Other times, a referred parent simply wants to find other parents who understand, implicitly, their child’s unique way of moving through the world, without having to explain or justify it. “If Phin wants Cheerios and we’re out of them, I’m sending a kid to school who’s going to have a bad day. That’s just part of the autism,” Bourdeau said. “It’s important [for parents] to be heard and understand that you’re not the only one with a child who eats just seven foods. You’re not.” For her part, Mergenthaler said that she initially reached out to Bourdeau to get recommendations

21


It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

One to Watch

Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? Tell us more! He or she could be featured as One to Watch in an upcoming issue of Kids VT.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

Visit Kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

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JUST FOR KIDS Nature’s Gifts The giving season is here again! And because we’re so generous, we’re giving you the clues to this crossword puzzle. Here are some of Vermont’s favorite pets and animal friends, along with presents they would love to receive. Once you’ve filled in the answers, can you figure out which animal would like each gift?

Writing Contest & Winners.....24 Coloring Contest Winners.........24 Coloring Contest..............................25 Puzzle Page..........................................26 Birthday Club......................................26 Puzzle Answers ................................47

ACROSS

DOWN

2. Skeleton part

1. Fish in a can

4. Lawn

3. Cheerios grains

7. Bird that climbs down trees

5. Sesame______ (not street!)

9. Big sled dog

6. Long-eared hopper

11. Thin blue-eyed cat

8. Black & white cow

12. Orange root veggies

10. Vermont steed breed

14. Striped cheek stuffer

13. Masked ringtail

16. Capped baby oak

15. What #13 always wants

KIDSVT.COM NOVEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

ANSWER P. 47

23


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

On Thursday, November 22, families come together to celebrate Thanksgiving. Write about your family’s Thanksgiving traditions. Do you have special foods you eat or things you do together on Turkey Day? Feel free to write in poem or paragraph form.

A slew of spectacular superheroes flew into our mailbox this month. Ten-year-old Kyla created a cuddly panda with a bright pink cape, surrounded by a starstudded night sky and a shining silver moon. Lia, 8, wowed our judges with a marvelous mosaic of rainbow colors and purple and black buttons on her bear. Cora, 4, carefully colored her creature with different hues of brown and a bright turquoise snout. Thanks to all who entered. It would be super if you could mail us your most magnificent work again this month!

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS “FIRST MONKEY ON THE MOON”

Josie Maxwell, 9, South Burlington “BANANA-HERO”

“Blast Off Monkey” Liliveve Cueto, 5

“RAINBOW MONKEY”

ST. ALBANS

Kady Cassani, 12, Williston

5& under

Rio Neyenkoff, 5, Walden “TWO GHOSTS WITH SUPER MONKEY”

Mason King, 8, Milton “MOON AND STARS”

Florence Johnson, 5, St. Johnsbury “SUPER DESIGN MONKEY”

Kala Russell, 10, Colchester “HALLOWEEN ON MARS” We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is November 15.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

24

Sophia Johnson, 11, Vergennes Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________

Sophia Wakeen, 8, Woodbury “ROBERT”

Email ________________________________

Abigail Frizzell, 4, Bristol

Phone ________________________________

“BLOOD-O-WEEN”

WRITING WINNERS

In our October issue, we asked kids to write about their favorite Halloween night. Below, find the winning entries. Mateo and Drew each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

Drew Thoeni, 9 HYDE PARK

“SUPER MONKEY”

Crunch, crunch, crunch. You think it’s leaves, But it’s really bones that are cracking on each step. d Whoosh! You think it’s win rushing through your hair, ad! But it’s really a witch overhe a human, “Trick or Treat!” You think it’s n! alie an lly rea But it’s

Mateo Baker-Djele, 12

BURLINGTON

The coldness bites at my cheeks Like birds with sharp beaks But I don’t really mind As long as my candy income is not confined My candy bag is filling up It almost weighs as much as a new pup Twix, Snickers, M&M’s delight I won’t let my siblings have even one bite Halloween is coming to an end Can’t wait ’til next year to do this again

Logan Peters-Smith, 5, South Burlington

“The Dark Monkey” Jacob Quinn, 8 GEORGIA

6 to 8

“THE LOVE FAIRY AND SUPER MONKEY SAY BOO!”

Stella Devitt, 6, Williston “HALLOWEEN NIGHT”

Eibe Zaloon, 7, Burlington

TOP TITLES “SUPER TIGER MONKEY”

Charlie Coleman, 5, Burlington “SUPER MONKEY WITH LIGHT-UP BOOTS IN THE SKY”

Henry Cadoret, 6, Middlebury “DARTH BANANAS”

Elijah Burton, 11, Williston

“Super Monkey” Mackenzie Chase, 11 MONKTON

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by November 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the December/January issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@ kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM NOVEMBER 2018 KIDS VT

25


Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

ston CHARLIE lives in Willi er 1. He mb and turns 4 on Nove ant and ph Ele the enjoys reading and g hin fis , ies ser Piggie book ckyard. ba family ice skating in the little t ee sw , He is a wildly funny er. gg hu guy and a fierce ent of Charlie wins an assortm s. ok bo ’s children

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

EMERY lives in Williston and turns 2 on November 16. She enjoys dancing, playing with dogs, going to the playground, and splashing and swimming in the water. She’s also a new big sister who loves to hug and kiss her baby brother.

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

lives in Corinth and turns 7 on November 18. She enjoys swimming, playing music and drawing.

BY HELENA HOVANEC

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM KIDS VT

26

Each word will fit into one spot in the grid. Use the starting letters as a guide to fit the words into the grid. All words will be used, so cross off each one after you add it.

6 LETTERS BABOON GOBLIN PIRATE

4 LETTERS BEAR DOLL FISH HERO OGRE

7 LETTERS EMPEROR MONSTER PILGRIM

5 LETTERS GENIE GHOST HORSE NURSE ROBOT TIGER

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Emery, Mekhenna and Evan each win a children’s book.

MEKHENNA

CRISSCROSS — Halloween Costume Choices

3 LETTERS DOG ELF RAT

Congratulations to these November Birthday Club winners!

Follow us on Instagram at

@kids_vt

EVAN lives in

8 LETTERS DINOSAUR EXPLORER PRINCESS

ANSWERS P. 47

Georgia and turns 8 on November 28. He loves running, swimming and soccer. He also enjoys reading and drawing — especially reading about and drawing dinosaurs! He plans to be a paleontologist when he grows up.

Share your photos with us using #instakidsvt 8V-Kvt-Instagram-1018.indd 1

9/28/18 10:37 AM


2 018 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

CASTING CALL!

VERMONT’S RISING STARS

Auditions held Saturday, November 10, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage. Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act.

SPONSORED BY:


STEFAN HARD

The Third Space Dave Bennett (right) explains features of the sugar bush to kids from the Community Connections afterschool program, as Elise Bennett and program coordinator Drew McNaughton (second from left) look on.

Afterschool programs provide community, structure and enrichment for kids and teens BY NATALIE HORMILLA, ALISON NOVAK AND BRETT STANCIU

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

K

28

ids spend most of their waking hours at school or at home. When they’re not at one of those two places, many Vermont children and teens — 79 percent of whom have no stay-athome parent — go to afterschool programs, known in education circles as the third learning space. “I think we’re hampered by a bifurcated view of kids’ lives — home and school, and we cut out everything else,” said Holly Morehouse, executive director of Vermont Afterschool, a public-private statewide partnership that supports innovative afterschool learning opportunities. “Yes, we need formal learning, but there’s this whole other piece of discovery and development in that third space that needs to be elevated… We’re never going to make progress if we’re not looking at that space.” Studies show that quality afterschool programs boost kids’ school attendance, engagement in learning, rate of homework completion and

likelihood of attending college, Morehouse said. They also help kids develop social and emotional skills, like problem solving and cooperation — and they help prevent risky behaviors. According to Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, a program of the national, bipartisan nonprofit Council for a Strong America, school days between 3 and 6 p.m. are peak hours for youth to commit crimes, be in or cause automobile accidents, smoke, drink alcohol or use drugs. To that end, in October, the Vermont Agency of Human Services pledged $600,000 over three years to increase access to afterschool programs, using funds earmarked for substance use disorder programs. A main source of current afterschool funding in Vermont is the 21st Century Community Learning Centers federal grant program, which awards more than $5.7 million a year to Vermont communities with highpoverty or low-performing schools.

The Vermont Agency of Education administers the competitive grants, which currently fund programs in around 100 communities. Another 70 to 80 communities are eligible, but they either didn’t apply or didn’t get a grant. There are “way more applications than federal funding,” said Morehouse. And there are more kids who would participate in afterschool programs if they could, continued Morehouse. She cited a 2014 national study by the Afterschool Alliance which found that 22,000 additional children in Vermont would participate if not for barriers like financial constraints and lack of transportation. In the face of such challenges, some Vermont communities get creative to provide afterschool services. Sometimes they struggle to sustain them. Below, we spotlight programs in three different parts of the state — Burlington, Montpelier and the Northeast Kingdom — looking

at the unique ways they address the needs of young people. -AN

Digging Deep Every Tuesday after school, Drew McNaughton — director of the afterschool program at Main Street Middle School in Montpelier — drives a minivan of students to a hillside farm at the end of a dirt road in nearby Worcester. There, the kids dig into basic homesteading chores. They’ve cared for pigs, fed tilapia in a greenhouse tank and worked in the garden. Last spring, they sugared. The program is part of Community Connections, a community-school partnership that provides afterschool, before school and preschool programs in towns including Montpelier, Worcester, Middlesex, Berlin, East Montpelier and Calais. For older kids, the Washington County Youth Service Bureau/Boys & Girls Club runs the Basement Teen Center, a drop-in center in the basement of Montpelier’s City Hall that’s open


like mountain biking, he or she can begin to build deeper relationships with staff and peers, McNaughton said. Five years ago, his program lost 21st Century grant funding because the segment of the student population qualifying for free or reduced-price school meals dropped below 40 percent. Now, it relies on a contribution from the MontpelierRoxbury Public Schools, a smaller amount from the city of Montpelier and parent fees — generally in the range of $45 to $60 for a six- to eight-week session that meets once a week. The staff thinks creatively to find low-cost, enriching learning opportunities. Students are never turned away for lack of funds; approximately one in 12 receives some form of fee waiver, and McNaughton accepts payments in installments. Back at the farm, the Main Street middle schoolers washed their hands at the Bennetts’ kitchen sink. While the children devoured savory potato wedges — hot from the oven and harvested from the garden they helped tend — Bennett and McNaughton asked questions to get them thinking about the benefits of growing and eating vegetables.

Kids paired up, sprawling on the couch with the Bennetts’ two dogs or hanging out beside the crackling blaze in the fireplace, to ponder two questions: “How does growing your own food help with your nutritional health?” and “How does growing your food help with climate change problems?” After a short time, Bennett and McNaughton pulled the group together and asked for answers. The kids nailed the connection between health and food from the garden immediately — less processed, less sugar, tastier. One boy thoughtfully noted that if more people grew their own potatoes, the factories that put so much work into boiling and skinning potatoes would work less. Those factories would then produce fewer greenhouse gasses. Before the kids pulled on their jackets, McNaughton remarked how good it felt “jamming our hands into the soil, even though it’s cold.” Not a single kid complained all afternoon. Reflecting on his student-centered job, McNaughton said, “I could not, at this point, imagine a better way to pursue what I am passionate about with deeper meaning. While not the most financially lucrative work, the

The Sara Holbrook Community Center occupies a modest brick building on Burlington’s North Avenue. It doesn’t look like much from the outside, but this institution — which was founded 81 years ago and is located in one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the state — offers a wide range of afterschool programs to youth in Burlington’s Old and New North Ends. Started by University of Vermont professor and clinical psychologist Sara M. Holbrook in 1937, and modeled after the New York City settlement houses where Holbrook had worked, the center initially provided English classes for Irish, Italian and French-Canadian immigrants, as well as a nursery school for their children. It still offers English classes for adults every morning, as well as a small food pantry that provides groceries to families in need. It’s been an invaluable resource for the youth it serves. More than two decades ago, the center played an important role in Ahmed Foco’s life. In 1994, when he was 14 years old, the Bosnian refugee settled with his family in the Old North End and soon found Sara Holbrook. At that time, Foco recalled, the center ran a drop-in program for teens. On Fridays, high schoolers would meet at the center, near the intersection of North Avenue and North Street, and a van would take them to the Greater Burlington YMCA, where they’d swim with their friends for a few hours. Foco became a Sara Holbrook regular and eventually began working there as a counselor in the center’s New Arrivals summer program for English Language Learners. During his college years at the University of Vermont, he served as the assistant teen program director. He joined the center’s board, moved to California for six years to earn his MBA and work, then rejoined the board when he moved back to Vermont two years ago. Now a technical support consultant for healthcare company THE THIRD SPACE, P. 30 »

KIDS VT

Kids in Sara Holbrook’s elementary afterschool program bike in the center’s back lot

A Collection of Cultures

NOVEMBER 2018

COURTESY OF SARA HOLBROOK COMMUNITY CENTER

School days between 3 and 6 p.m. are peak hours for youth to commit crimes, be in or cause automobile accidents, smoke, drink alcohol or use drugs.

intrinsic benefits far exceed those of any other profession, from my perspective.”-BS

KIDSVT.COM

after school Monday through Friday, and on Friday nights. On a sunny and cool October day, six 10- and 11-year-olds fed and watered chickens in Worcester. Dave Bennett — who owns the farmstead with his wife, Elise — asked the kids to recall the five basic needs for all creatures, a repeated theme in their farmwork: physical health, freedom of self-expression and movement, good food, clean water and shelter. The group then headed to the garden and enthusiastically unearthed fingerling potatoes. There, surrounded by blooming calendula, McNaughton said that when he first started as the afterschool director, 14 years ago, he took the kids to talented local people he knew, including a blacksmith, who had the kids hammering nails from red-hot steel. Over the years, the program has evolved, guided by McNaughton’s goals of helping kids develop resilience and the ability to focus, and creating an opportunity to experience the therapy of nature. Designed to appeal to a range of interests, offerings now include woodworking, kayaking, art, cooking and wilderness skills. While some programs take place at the school, others are held off-site, at locations including Montpelier’s Hubbard Park and Kingdom Trails in East Burke. McNaughton estimates his program reaches 70 to 90 percent of Montpelier’s middle school students. Participants come from different social and academic groups, and they have varied home lives; some are welloff financially, while others struggle with poverty or family drug use. For all of them, McNaughton said, middle school is an intense time when “physical, social, psychological and situational differences converge on kids just at the time their bodies are in the most flux.” He explained that his program utilizes creative exploration, movement and wilderness to create “a therapeutic endeavor which can armor kids with self-awareness and confidence.” He aims to help kids differentiate between healthy and unhealthy risk and to become aware of their own behavior. When a student who’s out of control in school is able to expend energy through an activity

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elementary schools and a few staff members were spread between three different rooms on the first floor. Some built with Legos. Others painted sunsets or stretched sparkly homemade slime. In the largest room, which serves as a classroom for 15 preschoolers on weekday mornings, a few younger kids played on the floor with plastic dinosaurs. The kids will soon have more room to play and learn; the center is in the midst of a $3.9 million capital campaign, which will expand the space from 5,000 to 12,000 square feet. A few miles up North Avenue, as Hunt Middle School let out for the day, Gabriel Diaz, the site director for Sara Holbrook’s afterschool program for middle schoolers, waited in the school’s lobby with a clipboard. Every COURTESY OF MOLLY VEYSEY

COURTESY OF SARA HOLBROOK COMMUNITY CENTER

Allscripts, Foco speaks earnestly about the impact the Sara Holbrook center had on him. As a Muslim American, he said, there was “always a bit of hesitation I experienced throughout life.” Sara Holbrook was an open and inclusive space where — at the time Foco was growing up — kids from the Bosnian and Vietnamese refugee communities, as well as longtime Old North Enders, hung out together and explored different places in Vermont. “It gave me a sense of community,” he explained, and the “ability to go different places without any sort of fear.” More than two decades after Foco first discovered Sara Holbrook, it continues to provide opportunities for social development, education and recreation for local youth, whose

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Teens at Sara Holbrook’s drop-in center with middle school program director Gabriel Diaz

families now hail from 15 to 20 different countries, according to the center’s executive director of almost 20 years, Leisa Pollander. One of the most important aspects of the afterschool programming the center runs, said Pollander, is “supporting low-income families to know that they can stay at work and know that their kid is safely involved in something and being supervised by responsible people who truly care about kids.” The elementary afterschool program runs Monday through Friday until 5:30 p.m. at the North Avenue center, which was built in 1965. It serves around 40 kids and costs $100 per week, but most families qualify for a state childcare subsidy, which covers the fee, said Pollander. On a recent Monday after school, around a dozen kids from different Burlington

Supper is served after school for any kids who would like it. For kids who want less structured activities, Sara Holbrook runs a teen drop-in center at the Robert Miller Community and Recreation Center, just a short walk from Hunt, which is free — though Pollander said she asks families who can afford it to make a donation to help subsidize the cost. There, middle school kids can stop by from 3 to 5:30 p.m. to play pool, ping-pong or foosball, relax on the overstuffed sofas that line the space, do arts and crafts, play basketball in the center’s spacious gym, or chat with the friendly staff and collegeage volunteers. High schoolers can use the space from 6 to 9 p.m. One thing that’s off limits? Cellphones. Pollander said she implemented

said. Acharya hopes he can use his position to empower kids to strive for success and help them work through problems. In Foco’s estimation, the needs of kids haven’t changed much since he was in school. They still require a safe place to go after school while their parents work, where they can hang out with their friends, get help with their homework and talk about family issues, Foco said. “The core issues have stayed the same.” -AN

From Paddling to Puppets Some kids in the Northeast Kingdom go paddling down the Clyde River with outdoor educators after school. Others learn to make satchels and cellphone cases from a local leather worker. These classes are part of the

COURTESY OF MOLLY VEYSEY

THE THIRD SPACE

Creating tornadoes in a bottle at Irasburg’s Leach Public Library

Monday, Diaz drives a group of kids to Petra Cliffs Climbing Center for an afternoon of rock climbing. In a large classroom where the school band also practices, school social worker Liz Trackim oversaw a group of seven kids making cupcakes with buttercream frosting at kitchen stations as part of a baking and cooking club. Down the hallway, in a maker space off the library, a group of boisterous students built structures out of cardboard and created sketches that will be turned into custom decal stickers using a vinyl cutter. Throughout the week, other Sara Holbrook offerings include bowling at Spare Time lanes, a Random Acts of Kindness Club and a birding club led by UVM students. In addition, the program offers morning homework help from 7 to 8 a.m. and afternoon homework help four days a week.

Hairstyling in Irasburg

the no cellphone policy a few years ago after seeing kids staring at their phones, texting, and not interacting with each other. For about two weeks there was pushback on the policy, but now, she said, they’re used to it. Umesh Acharya is the new director of the drop-in center, which serves 600 kids a year — some of whom come every day and others who drop in occasionally. Acharya, who is Bhutanese, came to Vermont in 2012 as a 21-year-old after spending most of his life in a refugee camp in Nepal. Last year, he graduated from UVM with a degree in neuroscience. “I know what it means not to have opportunities,” he said. “Sara Holbrook is providing the opportunities I didn’t have as a youth.” He notes that many of the kids who frequent the center are New Americans like himself. “Their story is my story,” he

Encore afterschool program, which operates in all 10 of North Country Supervisory Union’s elementary schools, with funding from the 21st Century federal grant program. Last year, 1,043 students participated, 473 of whom came every day, said Encore’s director Beth Chambers. Encore provides food and time for homework, followed by hour-long enrichment classes that change every eight weeks. Topics include soccer, survival skills, crafts and theater. Chambers, who spent several years as an outdoor educator herself, noticed that kids were sometimes afraid to take risks, whether it be climbing a rock wall or exploring in the woods. “I think there’s a rising anxiety about failing,” she said, “and that’s something we certainly try to battle in the afterschool world.”


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school boards no longer wanted to include in their budgets. In 2015, Veysey began a oneday-a-week afterschool program for kindergartners at the Leach Public Library, in part because she thought her daughter could benefit from the enrichment. Kids would practice reading aloud to the group, present projects on specific subjects and create crafts or skits based on the day’s reading. The school bus took kids to the library, and Veysey, the program’s sole volunteer, provided a snack. It became so popular that she now offers classes four days a week for kids in kindergarten through eighth grade, serving roughly 60 kids per semester. The program now focuses on experiential learning. Staff from NorthWoods Stewardship Center in East Charleston teach kids about geology. Siskin Ecological Adventures, based in Derby, provides archery and tumbling instruction. This semester, older kids can take a hairstyling class where they get to try out their skills on mannequins or learn puppet making with a teacher from Morrisville’s River Arts. The program includes an organic snack and busing from the Irasburg Village School to the classes, which take place at the library, town hall or, sometimes, an art studio in a historic home on the town common. One of the biggest challenges of running a grassroots program is securing funding, said Veysey, who is also the director of the Old Stone House Museum in Brownington. She received a grant early on from the Vermont Community Foundation and also got support from the town after she made a public plea at the 2017 Irasburg town meeting. Voters added $6,500 to the library budget to defer her programming costs. Families pay only $2.30 for each class. Veysey sees the work as important for the local kids who might otherwise not have much to do after school. “I get the sense that a lot of kids would go home and be on some kind of electronic,” she said. -NH K

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The 21st Century grant makes Encore possible, but for NCSU, it only covers about half of the program’s operating cost. Chambers spends considerable time hunting down additional funding, which means applying for smaller grants on a regular basis. “It’s an ongoing battle and it’s changing all the time,” she said. Across the 10 schools, there are around 10 different funding sources, she estimated, including federal, state and private grants, money from the school board, and student fees, which average a modest $1 per session. Loss of federal and state funds forced the Newport Teen Center — the region’s only drop-in program for high schoolers — to close two years ago. “It was their safe place, just to be,” said Kathy Griffin, a program director at Northeast Kingdom Community Action, an anti-poverty agency. “We would help them with homework, play video games, take field trips. We did coffee with a cop,” Griffin said. NEKCA staff also offered services like mental health intervention and substance abuse counseling, and a hot meal every day. “We had a lot of kids who weren’t eating,” she explained. Many of the teens who frequented the center came from generational poverty. “You have to help them get out of the same cycles,” she explained. Because many afterschool programs end after eighth grade, Griffin wonders what those teens do after school now. In Irasburg — a Northeast Kingdom town that is part of the neighboring Orleans Central Supervisory Union — local parent Molly Veysey decided to take matters into her own hands to create an afterschool enrichment program. That supervisory union used to apply for the 21st Century grant but stopped about a decade ago. “You have to kick in local money each year at an increasing amount as the grant money decreases,” explained Orleans superintendent Bev Davis. And that was something the local

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The Little Mermania Family Fun Fair: A mermaid-themed fair starts the fun for youngsters with games, stories, face painting and cookie decorating, followed by the Burlington High School Drama and Music Departments’ 2 p.m. musical matinee of the little heroine who offered her voice in exchange for becoming human. Noon, Burlington High School, Burlington.

FRI-SUN Thanksgiving Weekend: This NOV 23-25

working farm showcases Turkey Day traditions from the 1890s, with festivities including holiday food activities and wagon rides towed by a team of draft horses. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

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COURTESY OF SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Take Apart Day: Curious kiddos explore SAT the “guts” of everyday items, from NOV 10 toasters to toys. Noon-3 p.m., Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich.

SAT

NOV 17

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Week to Week

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SHIMMER: A WINTER CIRQUE REVERIE’s whimsical winter wonderland awes the audience with acrobatics, specialty acts and glittering costumes. Friday, November 23, 3 p.m. & 7 p.m., Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe.

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CALENDAR NOVEMBER 1 Thursday CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, handmade crafts, meat and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of Vermont wares. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. CHITTENDEN Babytime: Infants through pre-walkers have a ball with books, rhymes, songs and socializing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Dia De Los Muertos: The community crafts tissue flowers, skeletons and skulls, and savors pan de Muertos and cocoa in celebration of the Day of the Dead. Grades K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. Fierce Heroines: YA Author Panel: Julie Dao, Amy Rose Capetta and Katherine Arden exchange experiences and ideas with an eager audience about writing for middle grade and young adult readers. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m., $3; proceeds benefit the Vermont Foodbank; free for children under 18. Info, 448-3350.

Colchester Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking toys. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit your listing by November 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com. THE MILTON ARTISTS’ GUILD HOME SCHOOLER’S ART PROGRAM: Fun

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NOVEMBER 2018

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with Fiber Arts!: This unit begins by meeting a special, secret wooly guest! Fiber art becomes lively as students explore spinning, felting, fleece and carding as they create functional art from fiber! Appropriate for ages 5-12. Teacher: Donna Blatchly. Wednesdays, Nov. 14-Dec. 19, 10 a.m.noon. No class Thanksgiving week. For more information and registration forms, visit miltonartistsguild.org/home-schoolart-classes or email lstech@comcast.net.

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STEAM IT UP WITH MAG: Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics — the MAG Learning Train is picking up STEAM! Join Milton Artists’ Guild for our first STEAM workshop series, STEAM it up with MAG, and give those young minds a hearty helping of brain food and creative juice! All sessions will have materials provided. Ages 8-12. 2-4 p.m. Oct. 28: Skeletal Creations; Nov. 3: Have you met Fibonacci?; Nov. 17: Let’s Play with Electricity; Dec. 1: Mystery Bag Challenge. Cost: $25/class; $80 for all. For more information and registration forms, visit miltonartistsguild.org/ workshops or contact Jessie Swétel at magvtworkshops@gmail.com. EVOKIDS AND EVOBABIES YOGA CLASSES:

Registration opens Monday, November 12 for winter classes in Burlington and Essex Junction! Weekday and weekend classes available in both locations for all ages, new babies up to teenagers. Evolution Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington and 37 Lincoln Street, Essex Junction. Info, evolutionprenatalandfamily.com.

PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA AND STRENGTH TRAINING CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA CENTER: Now

with two locations, Burlington and Essex Junction! Have a more comfortable pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation — and then bring body back to balance and strength in our postnatal classes. Join our community at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. $17/ class, $140/10 class pass ($20 off if purchased on your first class), or $90/ monthly unlimited. Location: Evolution Prenatal Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn Street, Burlington and 37 Lincoln Street, Essex Junction.  Info, evolutionprenatalandfamily.com.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our

nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa. com to register your son or daughter! FAMILY ART SATURDAY: Families are invited to drop in to the BCA Center every third Saturday of the month to make their own artwork inspired by our current exhibitions. Each Family Art Saturday offers a different art making project that will ignite the imaginations of your family members! Create an original work of art inspired by BCA’s current exhibitions. Saturday, November 17, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Location: BCA Center, 135 Church Street.

Hinesburg Lego Club: Imaginative kids get creative with colorful blocks. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Haunted Escape Room!: The library’s Food for Thought teen group presents a puzzle where youngsters solve clues to unlock a mystery. Grades 5 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

FRIDAY FAMILY CLAY: Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to join the fun and either hand build or use a wheel of their own. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. Finished pottery will be available for pick-up three weeks after visit. Ticket purchases for this class are non-refundable. Registration is required. Price is per visit. All ages. Fridays through November 16, 5-7 p.m. Instructors: Alex Costantino & Lindsay vanLeir. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street. $10 per visit/$9 BCA members. SUNDAY FAMILY PAINT: Spend an afternoon with our teaching artists in BCA’s painting and drawing studio. Using our paints, brushes, easels and more, your family will create beautiful works of art. All supplies are provided, no experience needed. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to join the fun and paint on their own. Ticket purchases for this class are non-refundable. Registration is required. Price is per visit. All Ages. Sunday, November 11, 2018, 2-4 p.m. or Sunday, December 2, 2018, 2-4 p.m. Instructor: Kate McKernan. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street. $10 per participant/$9 BCA Members SOUNDCHECK BY YOUNG WRITER’S PROJECT:

Join Slam Poet and Artistic Director Rajnii Eddins with Young Writers Project for a Writing Workshop and Open Mic at Burlington City Arts. It’s free! Open to all! The writing workshop is at 6 p.m., and Open Mic begins at 7 p.m. SoundCheck is held on Thursdays, once a month, until April 18, 2019. Thursday, November 15, 6-8 p.m. Location: BCA Center, 135 Church Street.

Monthly Home School Program: Home learners soak up nature-related studies in an outdoor classroom. Parent participation optional. Ages 6-8. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Preschool Yoga: Children’s yoga teacher Melissa Nutting charms wee ones and caregivers with a half-hour of singing, relaxing, reading and stretching. Ages 3-6. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Storytime: Wee ones and caregivers cozy in for stories, songs and games en español. Ages 5 and under. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their imagination with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while crafting and listening to stories. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

LAMOILLE Pre-K Art Play: Toddlers drop in and create personal projects with diverse art supplies. Ages 1-4; caregiver required. No class on school breaks. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 10-11 a.m., $5. Info, 253-8358. WINDSOR Toddler Time: Little ones immerse in art projects and free play activities, stimulating socialization and motor, language, and cognitive development. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 2:30-4:30 p.m., $5; $20 for a 5-visit punchcard. Info, 457-3500.

2 Friday CHITTENDEN Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment provides tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under with caregivers. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members; preregister. Info, 862-9622. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. Magic the Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Grade 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Small ones stretch and relax. Ages 2-5. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE


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Ongoing

Exhibits

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 INNOVATION PLAYGROUND V2.0 EXHIBIT: In a celebration of lifelong

play, visitors of all ages unleash their imaginations building lifesized worlds with giant blue blocks, swimming and soaring beside virtual wildlife, and inventing contraptions in the museum’s maker space. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through January 6. LAMOILLE FAMILY CENTER, MORRISVILLE Info, 888-5229 MORRISVILLE STORY WALK: Natureloving families savor an outdoor stroll and an autumnal story about a fox who spies leaves falling from his favorite tree. FREE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 MAKING MUSIC: Families explore the inner workings of all things musical — from cellos to electronic synthesizers — play and make instruments, and engage with multimedia exhibits which share stories of musicians, scientists and craftspeople, highlighting traditional and new practices, techniques and materials. Regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Through May 15. SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 MAPPING AN UNEVEN COUNTRY: BIRD’S EYE VIEWS OF VERMONT: More

MACAULAY IN MONTPELIER: SELECTED DRAWINGS AND SKETCHES: Author/

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. WINDSOR Bethel First Friday Flicks: Families flock together for free films on the first Friday of each month. Seating available, or bring blankets and beanbags. Bethel Town Hall, 6:30-8:30 p.m., donations accepted; popcorn and drinks available for purchase. Info, 234-6305.

3 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: Locally produced crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes, with free coffee and tea and children’s books to read at the market. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. CHITTENDEN Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon, preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE

Cherish your kids. Nurture their future. Give the gift of education with the Vermont 529 savings plan. By saving for college or training, you’re creating opportunities for your child that will last a lifetime. With Vermont’s state-sponsored 529 college savings program, you can open an account with just $25 or contribute any amount to a friend’s or family’s account. Plus, the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan is the only 529 savings plan that qualifies for a 10% Vermont income tax credit on annual contributions for college or training after high school.

Play, Laugh, Learn: Little ones explore the library in engaging and interactive activities with early learning specialist Tina Boljevac from Allow Play and Yoga. Ages 5 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Open or add to an account by December 31 to get a Vermont tax credit for 2018!

Read to Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Ages 2-12. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

vheip.org/529 1-800-637-5860

Sibling Revival: Songs for Peace: Natanya and Raphael serenade the audience with folk harmonies, focusing on peace and lighthearted fun. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Falling Leaves: Families have fun fashioning felted leaf coasters. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., winter museum admission, $5-10; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346. West African Dance & Drum Festival: See November 2.

The Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan is sponsored by the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a public nonprofit established by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermont students and families plan, save and pay for college. Before investing, please read the Disclosure Booklet carefully (available at vheip.org) or call 800-637-5860).

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illustrator of the famous The Way Things Work exhibits art from eight of his books, offering a glimpse of his “draw ’til you drop” creative process through preliminary sketches and finished art, from 1982 to 2010. Through November 2. FREE

FRANKLIN Yoga Story Time Yoga with Ms. Liza: Small ones soak up a storytime with stories, songs, stretches and bubbles. Swanton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-7656. FREE

NOVEMBER 2018

SPOTLIGHT GALLERY, MONTPELIER Info, 828-3291

STEAM Fridays: Eager youngsters engage with inventive science, technology, engineering, art and math projects. Check online for specific program details. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

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than three dozen drawn, painted and printed views of the Green Mountain State — from Bennington and Burlington to Vergennes and Waterbury — investigate through illustration the popular phenomenon of “perspective” or “bird’s eye” views of Vermont’s growing towns in the second half of the 19th century. Through March 3.

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CALENDAR NOVEMBER 3 Saturday (cont.) Williston Craft Show: Over 100 artists and speciality vendors showcase their handmade holiday wares. Williston Central School, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 871-6001. LAMOILLE Spanish Musical Kids: Buenos Aires native Constancia Gomez shares stories, singing, dancing and Latin culture with small ones and caregivers. Ages 5 and under. Varnum Memorial Library, Jeffersonville, 10-11 a.m. Info, 644-2117. FREE RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than 50 vendors peddle produce, fresh salad greens, apples and cider, artisan cheeses, homemade breads, and other local products. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727.

4 Sunday

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Story Time with Robert Broder: This local author shares his new picture book — a musical story about the sweet satisfaction of wandering — with young listeners. Phoenix Books, Rutland, 11 a.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair; $5 each additional child. Info, 457-3500. Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 384-7447.

Seasonal Events

LET’S TALK TURKEYS: What do gobblers eat for Thanksgiving? Preschoolers and their parents hit the trail to learn more about these wild birds. Ages 3-5 with adult. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, THURSDAY, NOV. 1, 9-10:30 A.M., $6-8 per child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. WESTFORD TURKEY TROT: Families

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NOVEMBER 2018

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seeking fresh air choose from a 10K run or 3K walk/run on rural roads, with medals for age-group winners and treats and chili for sale. A Tot Trot is geared toward the littlest athletes. Registration opens at 8:30 a.m.; race begins at 10 a.m. Westford School, SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 8:30 A.M.-1 P.M., $12 for preregistration, $15 on race day; free for Tot Trot. Info, 777-2667.

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ZACK’S PLACE TURKEY TROT: This scenic

5K walk/run raises funds for a free enrichment center serving community members with special needs. Live music, hot chocolate and coffee add to the holiday festivities. Registration open 4-6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 11, or 8-9 a.m. day of race. Woodstock Elementary School, THURSDAY, NOV. 22, 10 A.M., $30-35. Info, 457-5868.

Family Concert: Local musicians make a melodious afternoon for library listeners. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Info, 899-4962. FREE Family Gym: See November 2. Vermont Day School Open House: Prospective parents mingle with teachers and check out educational options for grades K-7, while kids check out a children’s activity. Vermont Day School, Shelburne, 3-5 p.m. Info, 495-5150. FREE West African Dance & Drum Festival Kids’ Classes: Dance and drum classes for the younger set are offered as part of this three-day celebration. Contois Auditorium, Burlington, 12:30-2:45 p.m., $22 per class. Visit jehkulu.org for full festival schedule. Info, 859-1802. WASHINGTON Early Childhood Dance Party: Rachel O’Donald and AB2 — active body, active brain — host an autumn-themed dance party with an open exploration of instruments and props, dance activities, parachute play and an obstacle course. Ages 7 and under. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury Center, 3-5 p.m., $10 for one child; $5 each additional sibling; no charge for parents; preregistration encouraged. Info, info@ab2vt.com.

5 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

an appetite along a flat and scenic course. Check-in opens at 10 a.m. at the municipal gym. Middlebury Recreation Center, SUNDAY, NOV. 18, NOON, $35-40; a portion of proceeds benefits the Addison County Food Shelf; bring nonperishable items for the Food Shelf. Info, dhunt@ townofmiddlebury.org.

Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

TURKEY SKATE: Kids of all ages work up

TURKEY TROT: A quarter-mile kids’ race starts the fun at 9:45 a.m., just before the 5K jaunt. Registration opens at 9 a.m. UVM Gutterson Field House, Burlington, THURSDAY, NOV. 22, 10 A.M., suggested donation $5, $10 per family; proceeds benefit the Chittenden Food Shelf. Info, 656-0851.

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $10 per child. Info, 655-3300.

Westford Turkey Trot

MIDDLEBURY TURKEY TROT & GOBBLE WOBBLE 5 AND 10K: Runners work up

an appetite by whizzing and whirling on ice. Stowe Arena, THURSDAY, NOV. 22, 10 A.M.-NOON, $3-5; $5 skate rental. Info, 253-3054.

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: Little ones and caregivers drop in and get messy with multiple materials to spark imagination. Ages 18 months to 5 years with caregiver. Radiate Art Space, Richmond, 10-11:30 a.m., $5 per child; $8 max per family; $40 for a 10-visit punch card.

THANKSGIVING WEEKEND: This working farm showcases Turkey Day traditions from 1890, including holiday food activities and wagon rides towed by a team of draft horses. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, FRIDAY, NOV. 23, TO SUNDAY, NOV. 25, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Free ACT Practice Test: The library partners with the Princeton Review to offer teens proctored practice American College Tests. Bring snacks for this 4-hour exam. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Gamers Group: Youngsters pursue pastimes including Dungeons & Dragons and board games. Grades 5-8. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

One-on-One Tutoring: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences students coach elementary-age kids in reading, math and science. Grades 1-6. Some assistance available for other grades in certain subjects with inquiry. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 1, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

6 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: Fledgling architects construct collaboratively with colorful blocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN Afterschool Snacks on Tuesdays: The library teams up with the Hinesburg Community Resource Center and offers munchies for afterschool readers and library users. All ages. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 2-3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Creative Tuesdays: Young artists involve their imaginations with interesting materials. Kids under 6 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3:15-4:45 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around a DCF pick. Call the library for the title. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Lego Day: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Teen Advisory Board: Teens take time together and plan projects for the upcoming year. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists of all skill levels partner up for playing. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: Imaginative architects bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE Toddler Time: See November 1.

The Vermont Cub Project

7 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Harry Potter Wand-Making Workshop: Wizards and witches make merriment with magical activities. Grades 3 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today!

7 WEDNESDAY, P.38

Science & Nature

Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

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SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO:

Sled Dogs Live at ECHO

Preschoolers rally ’round for natureinspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, TUESDAYS, 10:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $11.5014.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. HAWKS, OWLS & FALCONS: Avian aficio-

nados drop in and meet live raptors. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 10 A.M.-1 P.M., $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686. TAKE APART DAY: Curious kiddos

MONTSHIRE MAKERS: Middle school inventors use their imaginations and the museum’s materials to create cool projects, with different monthly themes. Grades 6-9. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, FRIDAY, NOV. 2, 6:30-8 P.M., $8-15; preregistration encouraged. Info, 649-2200. HORSE-DRAWN WAGON RIDES:

NOVEMBER WEEKENDS: As the season

BOOKS & BEYOND: SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Children’s literature

BIRD-MONITORING WALK: Eagle-eyed

participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers, followed by coffee. Best for adults and older children. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, LAST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 8-9 P.M., donations welcome; preregistration encouraged. Info, 434-2167.

SLED DOGS LIVE AT ECHO: The October

Siberians Sled Dogs greet admiring fans up close. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 11 A.M.-2 P.M., regular museum admission, $11.5014.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

KIDS VT

and hands-on activities combine for fun science learning and exploration. Ages 3-5 with a parent or caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, MONDAY, NOV. 5, 10:15 & 11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Vermont’s favorite fruit into tasty treats, while exploring the multiple ways this abundant crop may be enjoyed. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 10 A.M.-NOON, $3-7; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

NOVEMBER 2018

winds down, the livestock barns, 1890 farmhouse and exhibits keep their doors open, with daily activities and programs. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

‘A’ IS FOR APPLES!: Families turn

KIDSVT.COM

Giddy-up! Families have open-air fun sailing over farm fields. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 4:15, 5, 5:45 & 6:30 P.M., $7-10; preregister for a specific time. Info, 985-8686.

explore the “guts” of everyday items, from toasters to toys. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, NOV. 10, NOON-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

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CALENDAR NOVEMBER 7 Wednesday (cont.) Read With Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with professional instructor Melissa from Evolution Yoga. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Renaissance School Open House: Prospective families with children ages 4-11 tour this independent school campus, take in a class and meet the director of the school. Renaissance School, Shelburne, 9-10 a.m. Info, 951-1831. FREE See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

“Elf The Musical”

Fit Moms: Expectant mamas work out together, preparing for labor with cardio, strength, stretching and breathing. Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 288-1141. FREE

Live Performances

RADIO JAROCHO AND ZENEN ZEFERINO:

This father and son duo mesmerize the audience in a student matinee performance with original songs and new arrangements combining flamenco, cumbia, rock, baroque and jazz. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, FRIDAY, NOV. 2, 10 A.M., $8.50; preregister. Info, 652-4548, ext. 1. SWING PEEPERS CONCERT: Vermont-made,

earth-friendly music and storytelling gets kiddos moving and grooving. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 10 A.M. Info, 457-3500. FREE

‘ANNIE: THE MUSICAL’: The Lyric Theatre takes to the stage with the uplifting story of a plucky red-headed girl, based on Harold Gray’s comic strip Little Orphan Annie, and featuring an award-winning score, including the optimistic number “Tomorrow.” Ages 5 and up. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, THURSDAY, NOV. 8, AND FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 7:30 P.M., SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 1 & 7:30 P.M. AND SUNDAY, NOV. 11, 1 & 6 P.M., $24-42. Info, 863-5966.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

‘EXPRESSING MOTHERHOOD’: In the

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Burlington debut of this nationallyknown show, local women wow the audience by singing, dancing and sharing stories of motherhood. For adults. Doors open at 6 p.m. Main Street Landing, Burlington, THURSDAY, NOV. 8, AND FRIDAY, NOV. 9, 7 P.M., $25; preregister. Info, 540-3018. ‘JIGSAW JONES AND THE CASE OF THE CLASS CLOWN’: Based on the book, Jigsaw Jones

and the Case of the Class Clown by James Preller, ArtsPower’s production cracks up the audience with a tale of the practical joker on the loose in Ms. Gleason’s classroom. Ages 4-9. Woodstock Town Hall Theater, SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 10 A.M., $6; preregister. Info, 457-3981. KIDS VT SPECTACULAR SPECTACULAR AUDITIONS: Creative kiddos try out for

a spot in the December 8th Spectacular Spectacular youth talent show. Ages 5-13. Preregister on the website to receive a time slot between noon and 3 p.m. Higher Ground, South Burlington, SATURDAY, NOV. 10, NOON-3 P.M. Info, 985-5482. FREE

WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

‘RED KITE GREEN MOUNTAIN’: This

interactive theatrical experience with live music and sensory moments — created specifically for young people on the autism spectrum — takes the audience on an imaginative journey, exploring Vermont’s history and nature through the state’s ecosystem and native animals. Chase Studio, Burlignton, SUNDAY, NOV. 11, 11 A.M., 2 & 4 P.M., $15-25. Info, 863-5966. ‘ELF THE MUSICAL’: A bumbling young

orphan who is mistakenly transported to the North Pole in Santa’s sack amuses the all-ages audience as he discovers his true father and helps New York City remember the true meaning of Christmas. Flynn MainStage, Burlington,

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14, AND THURSDAY, NOV. 15, 7:30 P.M., $25-75. Info, 863-5966. ROALD DAHL’S ‘MATILDA THE MUSICAL’: This

award-winning musical mesmerizes the audience with the magical story of a young girl who struggles to make a better life. Ages 5 and up. Northern Stage, White River Junction, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14, THROUGH TUESDAY, JAN. 1, 2019. See northernstage.org for specific dates and times, $19-59. Info, 296-7000. ‘THE LITTLE MERMAID’: Teens from Burlington High School Drama and the Burlington High School Music Department enchant the audience with this musical rendition of the mermaid who wishes to give up her voice to be human. Burlington High School, THURSDAY, NOV. 15, TO SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 7-9 P.M., $8-12. Info, 864-8411. THE LITTLE MERMANIA FAMILY FUN FAIR: A

mermaid-themed fair starts the fun for youngsters with face painting, games, stories and cookie decorating, followed by the Burlington High School Drama and Music Departments’ 2 p.m. musical matinee of the little heroine who offered her voice in exchange for becoming human. Burlington High School, SATURDAY, NOV. 17, NOON, $5 per child; no charge for accompanying adult; combo fair/matinee tickets $12 per child or adult. Info, 864-8411.

FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Pumpkin Pie Playdough: Artsy kiddos get imaginative with the library’s materials. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

MILK & COOKIES WITH MISS MAY, MR. CHRIS & FRIENDS: May Erlewine, her band and

local musicians enchant an audience of all ages with her melodious and magical musical adventures. Coffee and glutenfree goodies available for purchase. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, SUNDAY, NOV. 18, 10-11 A.M., $8; free for children under 1; preregister. Info, 985-9200.

‘STUNT NITE’: This annual Rice High

School event gets the audience clapping as student classes take to the stage with original skits. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, TUESDAY, NOV. 20, 4 & 8 P.M., $20. Info, 425-2379. SHIMMER: A WINTER CIRQUE REVERIE: A

whimsical winter wonderland awes the audience of all ages with acrobatics, specialty acts and glittering costumes. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, FRIDAY, NOV. 23, 3 & 7 P.M., $45. Info, 760-4634.

JOHNNY PEERS AND THE MUTTVILLE COMIX:

A canine-loving crowd cracks up with slapstick dog acts. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1 & 4 P.M., $10-22; preregister. Info, 388-1436.

‘THE NUTCRACKER’: Professionals from

the Albany Berkshire Ballet and local dance students visit the Land of Sweets and conquer the Mouse King in this beloved holiday classic. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 3 & 7 P.M. AND SUNDAY, NOV. 25, 1 P.M., $19-43.50. Info, 863-5966. ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: Vermont Youth

Theater’s actors, singers and dancers, and Broadway veteran Bill Carmichael get the audience clapping for this fast-paced production of Charles Dickens’ classic tale of the meaning of Christmas. Ages 4 and up. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, FRIDAY, NOV. 30, 7:30 P.M., $20-25. Info, 760-4634.

WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

8 Thursday CHITTENDEN Babytime: See November 1. Colchester Lego Club: See November 1. Hinesburg Lego Club: See November 1. Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Monthly Home School Program: Home learners soak up nature-related studies in an outdoor classroom. Parent participation optional. Ages 9-12. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25 per child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. PJ Storytime: Little ones snuggle up in their sleepy clothes for bedtime yarns. Ages 2-7. Milton Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Preschool Yoga: See November 1. Read to a Dog: Pet lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 1. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 1. St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1.


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

9 Friday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Gym: See November 2. Family Painted Pottery: Dads, moms and kids enjoy an instructional and creative evening together. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person; preregister. Info, 425-2700. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 2. Music with Raph: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10:15 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See November 5, 3:30-6 p.m. STEAM Fridays: See November 2. Wild Weather: Lead Meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Burlington, John Goff, talks about his occupation and some tools meteorologists use, and explores the water cycle and atmospheric phenomena including thunderstorms, lightning and tornadoes. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE LAMOILLE Stowe Open Gym: Community members of all ages play pick-up sports. Equipment provided. Stowe Elementary School, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., $2 per participant. Info, 253-6138. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See November 2. WASHINGTON Art Night: Digital Photography Exhibition: Twinfield Union School students showcase their artistic work. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6-8 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

10 Saturday

Play, Laugh, Learn: See November 3.

Your child's

Drag Queen Story Hour: Vermont drag queens Emoji Nightmare and Nikki Champagne host a story hour for all ages, focussing on individuality, activism, gender, creativity and social responsibility. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 11 a.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

Education Schedule your tour today!

LAMOILLE Spanish Musical Kids: See November 3. RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 3. WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632.

Contact Lori York, Admissions Director (802) 985-2827 ext. 212 admissions@lakechamplainwaldorfschool.org

Vermont’s largest independent pre-k to 12th grade school. www.lakechamplainwaldorfschool.org Untitled-17 1

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River of Light Lantern-Making Workshop: Families craft magical willowand-tissue-paper lights in preparation for Waterbury’s December 1 River of Light Community Lantern Procession, with a theme this year of Fantastical Favorite Foods — From Farms to Families. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Thatcher Brook Primary School, Waterbury, 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m., donations welcome; preregister. Info, 244-7195. Scholastic Chess Tournament: Checkmate! Players of all abilities sit down for a strategy game, focusing on fun and sportsmanship. Grades K-12. Berlin Elementary School, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., $8 per player; preregister; free to spectate. Info, 223-1948. Waitsfield Ski and Skate Sale: Families gear up for winter sports. Consignment preregistration weekdays, beginning Monday, November 5, 7:45 a.m.-3 p.m.; consignment drop-off Friday, November 9, 4-7 p.m. Waitsfield Elementary School, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., proceeds benefit the Waitsfield Elementary School PTA. Info, 496-3643.

11 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 4.

KIDS VT

CHITTENDEN Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 656-4636.

reimagine

Doodle Art: While caregivers chat, children create with crayons, dot markers and watercolors. All ages. Sheldon Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 933-2524. FREE

NOVEMBER 2018

Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 3.

FRANKLIN Baby Storytime: New babies are welcomed to the library with nursery rhymes, songs and simple stories. Ages 2 and under with caregivers. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

KIDSVT.COM

ADDISON Discover Bears at the Bixby: Small ones snuggle in to soak up stories about Vermont’s large furry friends. Ages 5 and up. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 10:30-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 877-2211. FREE

Webby’s Art Studio: Mapping It Out: Inspired by the Museum’s exhibit ‘Mapping an Uneven Country: Bird’s Eye Views of Vermont,’ kids of all ages practice cartography skills. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., winter museum admission, $5-10; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Family Gym: See November 2.

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11 SUNDAY, P.40


CALENDAR NOVEMBER

New Parents ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their

bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M.

Info, 899-5490. FREE

EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: New mamas

tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS,

includes baby massage and postpartum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. FREE BABYWEARERS OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-

SECOND THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:3011:30 A.M. AND FOURTH MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:45-7:45 P.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15 A.M. AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M., $17 per class;

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: Nursing mamas (and soon-to-be mothers!) make the most of La Leche League support while socializing with other moms and wee ones. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 281731-7313. FREE

$120-140 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA ESSEX:

Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their babies. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, Essex Junction, SUNDAYS, 5:30 P.M.,

MONDAYS, 10:30 A.M., TUESDAYS, 6:15 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:30 P.M., THURSDAYS, 4:15 P.M. AND SATURDAYS, 8:15 A.M., $17 per

class; $120-140 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339. HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents with

babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M.

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE: This mother-infant group

12:15 P.M., TUESDAYS, 10 A.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45 A.M. AND FRIDAYS, NOON-1 P.M.,

to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their babies. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 10-11:30

KIDS VT

778-0300.

Brand-new mamas and papas check out infant carriers, get advice and spend some socializing time with other new parents. Good Beginnings, Montpelier,

$17; $120-140 for a 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

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PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be stretch and bend. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 6-7:15 P.M., $16 per drop-in class. Info,

Info, 888-5229.

BOSOM BUDDIES: New and expectant

mothers, babies and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin,

FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M.

Info, 371-4415. FREE

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of

toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $11. Info, 223-5302.

MAMA’S CIRCLE BARRE: This supportive

gathering brings moms of new babies and toddlers together to foster friendship through unique-but-shared experiences. Imagine Yoga, Barre, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE EARLY PARENTING WORKSHOP: A local

certified postpartum doula helps families expecting a new baby create a realistic plan. Topics include how to build your support system, what is normal/ abnormal for a newborn, what new babies need from their caregivers and practical ways to effectively meet these needs while also practicing self-care. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, SATURDAY, NOV. 10, 10 A.M.-1 P.M., preregister. Info, 595-7953. FREE

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents with babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M.

Info, 888-5229.

BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New

moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and expe-

rienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE ELIMINATION COMMUNICATION: Novice

parents pursue advice about this practice where a caregiver uses timing, signals, cues and intuition to address a baby’s need to eliminate waste without using a diaper. Good Beginnings, Montpelier,

11 Sunday (cont.) WASHINGTON Dance, Sing & Jump Around: Families delight in a lively afternoon of circle and line dances and singing games with instruction and live music with Liz Benjamin, Ethan Guiles and Stan Carlson, callers. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m., suggested donation $5; free for children. Info, 223-1509. Waitsfield Ski and Skate Sale: See November 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1-2 P.M.

Info, 595-7953. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

12 Monday

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 5.

NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: In a supportive setting, mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding children approaching one year old and beyond. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD

CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 6.

FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M.

Info, 595-7953. FREE

BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse their

babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 236-4136. FREE

BLADDER HEALTH FOR PREGNANCY:

Certified health coach Sarah Chila discusses bladder health and home care practices for expecting mamas. For adults. Online, Burlington, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 21, 8 P.M., $20; free for Birth Love Family members; preregister. Info, 373-8060. HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M., preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info, 349-9084. FREE

13 Tuesday CHITTENDEN ‘After Houdini’: This Vermont author shares his new graphic novel — a revisionist look at this mysterious historical figure. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m., $3; proceeds benefit the Vermont Foodbank. Info, 448-3350. Afterschool Snacks on Tuesdays: See November 6. Creative Tuesdays: See November 6. Library Elementary Event Planners: Junior helpers prepare snacks and plan projects for younger students. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 6. Toddler Time: See November 1.

14 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Dine & Discuss: Families partake in a potluck dinner, then participate in an intergenerational discussion around this year’s Vermont Reads book Bread and Roses, Too. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around award-winning books. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Read With Daisy the Therapy Dog: See November 7. Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-4. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Renaissance School Open House: See November 7.

Homeschool Program: Breakout some Science: Homeschoolers check out the library’s educational kits to create an interactive game using a story, time limit and puzzle activities with a math theme. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE

WASHINGTON Maker Program: See November 7. WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

15 Thursday CHITTENDEN Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 862-5630. FREE Colchester Lego Club: See November 1. Dorothy’s Book Discussion: Little literati chat about DCF pick Halfway Normal by Barbara Lee. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Preschool Yoga: See November 1. Read to a Dog: See November 8. Spanish Storytime: See November 1.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 1.

Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a familyfriendly flick while feasting on free popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 2. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 5, 3:30-6 p.m. Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE STEAM Fridays: See November 2. FRANKLIN Yoga Story Time Yoga with Ms. Liza: See November 2.

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LAMOILLE Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and themed activities. Grades K-5. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m., $15-20 per child; drop-ins welcome. Info, 253-6138. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See November 2. WASHINGTON Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Dinner and nature-themed kids’ programming included. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE

PRESENTED BY

17 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 3. CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: See November 1, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Saturday, December 1, 7:30PM Contois Auditorium, City Hall, Burlington Buy tickets at sevendaystickets.com Black Tie Benefit for Ronald McDonald House Charities of Burlington

WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1. 17 SATURDAY, P.42

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KIDS VT

WASHINGTON AB2: Books Come to Life: This Active Body-Active Brain class, led by literacy professional Rachel O’Donald, combines reading, music and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

Family Gym: See November 2.

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NOVEMBER 2018

FRANKLIN Family STEAM Night: Moms, dads and kids team up for activities around science, technology, engineering, art and/or math, with a theme of “Dinovember.� Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

CHITTENDEN Baby Time: Families with wee ones socialize, read board books, learn some sign language and play. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

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Williston Preschool Music: See November 1.

16 Friday

VITAMIN DISCOUNT PROGRAM • DAILY 10% SENIOR 60+ DISCOUNT

Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Project-based class Learn to use a laser machine and 3D printer Design and construct game boards and pieces

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids� at uvmhealth.org.

FRESH PRODUCE • VT MEATS • NATURAL BABY FOODS

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See November 7.

L E A R N   C R E A T E   P L AY

Game Board & Pieces Class beginning 11/15

Yoga for Kids: See November 7. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Join Us!

41


CALENDAR NOVEMBER

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details.

Monday BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: Aldrich Public Library,

10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550. COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Burnham

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Huntington

Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-4583.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME:

Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library,

10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: St. Albans

Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3-YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Waterbury

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018 KIDSVT.COM

Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

42

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME:

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Tuesday ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

ESSEX JUNCTION TODDLER STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

9:10-9:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Fairfax Community

Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse

Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475. MILTON INFANT STORY TIME:

Milton Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 893-4644. MONTPELIER STORY TIME:

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith Public

Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

MILTON TODDLER RHYTHM & MOVEMENT STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

RICHMOND MOVERS AND SHAKERS STORYTIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. SOUTH BURLINGTON BABY TIME: South Burlington Public

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

SHELDON STORY TIME: Sheldon Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 933-2524.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

SOUTH BURLINGTON TODDLER TIME: South Burlington Public

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams

Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Wednesday BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIME:

Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Tuesday. HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

Monday, 10 a.m.

JERICHO STORY HOUR: Jericho Town Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686. LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

Burlington Winter Farmers Market: See November 10.

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get hands-on with an artistic endeavor. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE

10 a.m. Info, 524-4643.

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Milton Public Library,

10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

SWANTON STORYTIME:

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Warren Public

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland

Tuesday.

ST. JOHNSBURY ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury

Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free

Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: See November 3.

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

Saturday COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham

Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: See Monday.

ESSEX WEEKEND STORYTIME:

Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby

Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury

Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WESTFORD STORY TIME:

Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Friday BRANDON STORY TIME:

Brandon Free Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 247-8230.

Harry Potter Party: The Hinesburg Hogwarts chapter hosts a happening of magical activities, crafts, and snacks for wee witches and wizards. Ages 3-8 with adult caregivers. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 1-2 p.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Lake Monsters Family Fun Fest: Champ’s fans get a chance to shake hands with this mascot. Games, crafts, inflatables and free hot dogs add to the amusement. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Info, 655-4200. FREE

10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St.

FREE

KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

Swanton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-2493.

It’s November: Let’s Talk Turkey: Novice naturalists learn about a day in the life of these wild birds, presented by the Lamoille County Nature Center. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948.

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Georgia Public Library,

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME:

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

10-10:30 a.m. Info, 872-7111.

17 Saturday (cont.)

CHITTENDEN American Girl Tea Party: Young ladies in fancy dress enjoy an afternoon of crafts, games and refreshments, with or without dolls. Ages 8-12 with adult caregiver. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN ESSEX: Phoenix Books,

Thursday

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

Tuesday.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh

QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

MORRISVILLE PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Morristown

WILLISTON STORY TIME:

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-3913.

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 846-4110.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME: Norwich Public Library,

Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

Centennial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 888-3853.

COLCHESTER BABY STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NEXT CHAPTER BOOKSTORE STORY TIME: Next Chapter

Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114.

SATURDAY STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN BURLINGTON: Phoenix Books,

11-11:30 a.m. Info, 448-3350.

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS IN ESSEX: See Wednesday,

11-11:30 a.m.

Sibling Revival: Songs for Peace: Natanya and Raphael serenade the audience with folk harmonies, focusing on peace and lighthearted fun. Ages 3-5. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Sailing Away: Inspired by the museum’s examples of ship scenes, museum visitors create their own watercolor collage. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., winter museum admission, $5-10; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346. LAMOILLE Spanish Musical Kids: See November 3. RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 3. WASHINGTON Capital City Thanksgiving Farmers Market: More than 50 farmers, food producers and craftspeople offer root veggies, savory baked goods, maple syrup and much more at this off-season celebration of locavorism. Montpelier High School, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 793-8347. Orchard Valley Holiday Market: This Waldorf-inspired bazaar features fine crafts, books, local products and lunch fare. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 456-7400. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Winter Clothing Drive: Community members exchange good-quality clothing at no cost. Donations accepted the previous week at the Jaquith Library. Old Schoolhouse Common, Marshfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See November 3.

18 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 4. Star Wars Reads Day: This national event kicks off with famed character appearances, Star Wars-themed crafts and books. Costumes encouraged. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 1-2:30 p.m. Info, 448-3350.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. WASHINGTON Family Lego Free Build: The whole family has fun with the library’s abundance of plastic blocks. Ages 5 and up. Adult supervision required for children under 8. Waterbury Public Library, 2-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See November 5. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 5. Stories with Megan: See November 5. Thanksgiving Crafts: Clever kiddos celebrate the holiday with handmade creativity. Ages 6-9. Milton Public Library, 2 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 1, 11 a.m. FRANKLIN Family Movie Night & Pizza: Moms, dads and kiddos relax with a family-friendly flick and free refreshments. Sheldon Public Library, 5-7 p.m. Info, 933-2524.

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WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 6. Toddler Time: See November 1.

FREE

19 Monday

Toyshop

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

21 Wednesday

k6h-GMTC0218.indd 1

CHITTENDEN Zine Club: Imaginative youngsters experiment with different writing styles and art techniques to create personal publications. Grade 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956.

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 5.

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FREE

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22 Thursday

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23 Friday CHITTENDEN Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 2.

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CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 6.

Family Movie: See November 16, 2-4:10 p.m. Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: See November 6.

FREE

ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 3. CHITTENDEN Jingle Bell Express: All aboard! Holiday revelers take to the rails for a roundtrip train ride from Burlington to Charlotte, complete with a goodie bag from local businesses and sing-a-long visits from Santa, Frosty and friends. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 10 a.m., noon & 2 p.m., $25; free for children under 3 who sit on an adult’s lap; proceeds benefit the Ronald McDonald House; preregister. Info, 864-7999.

k6h-JamieTwoCoats1118.indd 1

10/25/18 1:08 PM

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8/23/18 12:55 PM

Movie at the Library: The big screen shows a family-friendly feature. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Reflections: Inspired by the museum’s collections, visitors experiment with creating a watercolor reflection scene using a special printing technique. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., winter museum admission, $5-10; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

KIDS VT

FRANKLIN Book Detectives: Homeschoolers find their next favorite read by giving book talks and recommendations and exploring other resources. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 524-1507.

24 Saturday

NOVEMBER 2018

CHITTENDEN Afterschool Snacks on Tuesdays: See November 6.

of Shelburne

5 4 fa ll s r o a d | M o n - S at 1 0 - 6 , S u n da y 1 1 - 5 | 8 0 2 - 9 8 5 - 3 2 2 1

KIDSVT.COM

20 Tuesday

CELEBRATE THE GIFT OF GIVING

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

FREE

Stay and Play: Little ones rally for romping in the youth room. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 524-1507. FREE

1/24/18 10:38 AM

43

24 SATURDAY, P.44


CALENDAR NOVEMBER Wednesday

Playgroups

UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

BARRE PLAYGROUP: Aldrich

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details.

MAMA’S CIRCLE: Good

Beginnings, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 595-7953.

Tuesday

AUDUBON NATURE PLAYGROUP:

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

Audubon Vermont, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3068. BURLINGTON CRAWLERS, WADDLERS AND TODDLERS:

Janet S. Munt Parent-Child Center, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

NORTHFIELD PLAYGROUP:

United Church of Northfield, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

Charlotte Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 425-2771. JERICHO PLAYGROUP: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-3932. OPEN GYM: Central VT

Gymnastics Academy, 10 a.m.-noon, $10. Info, 882-8324.

ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: North Branch

Nature Center, 10 a.m.-noon, donations welcome. Info, 229-6206. TWINFIELD PLAYGROUP:

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

Munt Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121. CHARLOTTE BABYTIME:

Charlotte Public Library, 9-9:45 a.m. Info, 425-3864.

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP BURLINGTON:

Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m. Info, 899-0339.

WATERBURY PLAYGROUP:

Thatcher Brook Primary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 244-5605. WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien Community Center, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: A Friday night gala, caroling, holiday stories, live music and an auction are part of this week-long holiday extravaganza. See festivaloftreesvt.com for event details. Downtown St. Albans, various fees for select events; proceeds benefit the Franklin County Animal Shelter.

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP ESSEX: Evolution

Sheldon Lego Creations: Imaginative builders of all ages bust out sculptures. Sheldon Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 933-2524.

OPEN GYM: See Monday.

LAMOILLE Spanish Musical Kids: See November 3.

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: See

Tuesday.

Friday Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

BURLINGTON FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S.

Picture Theater, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

Richmond Free Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-3036. United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

ST. JOHNSBURY TODDLER TIME:

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-1391.

Thursday DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

Women’s Festival Of Crafts: Female artisans sell bags, jewelry, clothing, pottery and more just in time for the giving season. Burlington City Hall, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 865-7000.

Prenatal & Family Yoga, 11 a.m. Info, 899-0339.

RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland

Free Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Saturday MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 190.

RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 3.

25 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 4.

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP: St. Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

Family Gym: See November 2.

OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

Women’s Festival Of Crafts: See November 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218. RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Jingle Bell Express: See November 24, 10 a.m. & noon.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Twinfield Union School, 8:15-9:45 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:30-11:30 a.m., donations accepted. Info, 457-3500.

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

WAITSFIELD PLAYGROUP: Big

WILLISTON PLAYTIME: Dorothy

PURPLE CRAYON PLAY GROUP:

Monday

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4676.

24 Saturday (cont.)

give

a bit of yoga

whimsy Explore over 130 handcrafted ornaments from 18 countries

25% OFF

ONE ITEM

1004154

44 Untitled-20 1

87 Church St, Burlington, VT 05401 Offer valid at participating stores until 12/24/18.

Not valid with other offers or discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs, or consumables. One coupon per customer.

10/25/18 1:00 PM

Untitled-22 1

9/26/18 10:42 AM


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM WINDSOR Save, Shop, Explore: The museum starts off the holiday season with discounts, games, activities, demos and a book signing with KJ Dell’Antonia, author of How to be a Happier Parent: Raising a Family, Having a Life, and Loving (Almost) Every Minute. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for members and children under 2; admission not required to shop. Info, 649-2200.

26 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See November 5. Crafts for Kids: See November 5. Gamers Group: See November 5. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 5.

Read With Daisy the Therapy Dog: See November 7. Renaissance School Open House: See November 7. Yoga for Kids: See November 7. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Burlington Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included without fee. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Cartooning Club: Kids meet with other kids who are crazy about drawing comics, with graphic artist Kristen Littlefield. Grades 3 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Creative Tuesdays: See November 6.

Stories with Megan: See November 5. Williston Preschool Music: See November 1, 11 a.m.

Wii Bowling: Teams of young and old compete. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24.

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 5.

Holiday PJ Story Hour: Teaming up with the Festival of Trees, the library welcomes small ones in sleepwear for seasonal stories, songs, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

27 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 6. CHITTENDEN Afterschool Snacks on Tuesdays: See November 6.

WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 6. Toddler Time: See November 1.

28 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Live-Action Role Play: See November 7, 3-5 p.m.

WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1.

30 Friday

Young Writers & Storytellers: See November 14.

CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: See November 9.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24.

Family Gym: See November 2.

Fit Moms: See November 7. Read to a Dog: Little bibliophiles select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m., preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420. FREE STEM Club: Under the lead of local inventor Ralph Lemnah, sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE WASHINGTON Maker Program: See November 7. WINDSOR Toddler Time: See November 1, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

29 Thursday CHITTENDEN Babytime: See November 1. Colchester Lego Club: See November 1. Geographic Information Systems Day: Inquisitive explorers learn how to tell a story with maps. Ages 5-10. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 1. FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24. Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 1.

Holiday Fair: Grown-ups browse handcrafted gifts from a wide array of artisans while little ones enjoy candle dipping, live music demonstrations, bistro foods and more. For adults and older teens. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 6:30-7:30 p.m., free admission, $1-5 for some activities. Info, 985-2827. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 2. Music with Raph: See November 9. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 5, 3:30-6 p.m. STEAM Fridays: See November 2. FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 24. LAMOILLE A Traditional Christmas in Stowe: The idyllic town rings in the season with a lantern parade, holiday music, a tree lighting, wagon rides, Santa and reindeer visits and more. Various locations, Stowe, check stowevibrancy.com for detailed schedule; fees for some activities. Info, 585-5131. Christmas Reading for Middle Schoolers: Local author Daphne Kalmar kicks off holiday weekend festivities —including a tree-lighting — with a reading from her new middle school novel, A Stitch in Time. Ages 8-12. Stowe Free Library, 3:45-4:30 p.m. Info, 253-6145. FREE ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See November 2. 

the

Halls!

Games, art-making, live music, wagon rides, delicious nibbles, a model train, festive decorations, and Museum Store holiday sales.

MAKE MERRY WITH US!

KIDS VT

shelburnemuseum.org

NOVEMBER 2018

Deck

KIDSVT.COM

December 1 & 2 10 a.m.– 4 p.m.

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Put on your patty pants and bite into Seven Days Burger Week! november 2-8

Participating restaurants are serving up burger specials that you’ll really flip for. Think breakfast burgers, triple-deckers, veggie burgers and, of course, good old-fashioned beef patties. The biggest burger fanatics will win epic prizes throughout the week. And remember — calories don’t count during Burger Week! 3 Squares Café Archie's Grill Barkeaters Restaurant Berda’s THE Bearded Frog Bluebird Barbecue Blue Paddle Bistro Butch + Babe's The Chubby Muffin Drifter's ¡Duino! (Duende) Erica's American Diner Fire & Ice Restaurant Grazers (Williston, St. Albans) Halvorson's Upstreet Café Hourglass Lounge at Stowe Moutain Lodge J. Morgan's Steakhouse Juniper La Villa Bistro & Pizzeria Leunig's Bistro & Café Lost Nation Brewing Mad Burger at the Hostel

it’s not too late to ketchup. c’mon, get on the list! burgerweek@sevendaysvt.com

brought

to

you

McGillicuddy's Five Corners McGillicuddy's on the Green McGillicuddy's Irish Ale House Mill River Brewing BBQ & Smokehouse Mule Bar Our House Bistro Park Squeeze Pauline's Café Pingala café Prohibition Pig Ri Ra Irish Pub Shelburne Tap House Skinny Pancake Burlington Stone Corral Brewery Table 24 Restaurant The Tavern at The Essex Culinary Resort & Spa Three Penny Taproom Tourterelle Waterworks Food + Drink

burgerweekvt.com

by


USE YOUR WORDS BY BRE TT S TA N CI U

Planning a kids event?

A Bounty of Books

List it for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your December event by November 15th online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

SEE “JUST FOR KIDS” SECTION FOR PUZZLES

KIDS VT

RIDDLE ANSWER:

PEN. RASH. MATH. STAY.

JUMBLES

In my own journey through life, literature has opened up my heart and mind in ways I never could have anticipated.

profoundly Tennessee Williams’ famous line about “the kindness of strangers” rings true in our small state. These glossy books demonstrate to rural kids, on a conscious or subconscious level, that they’re deserving of beautiful, new books. The books are a gift to me, too. In a world increasingly divided and strident, they illustrate kindness, tangible proof of the fervent belief in literacy’s might. In addition to widening career opportunities and providing necessary skills for our society, reading is an inherently imaginative act, and imagination strengthens and enriches a child’s ability to carve out her or his own destiny in the world. In my own journey through life, literature has opened up my heart and mind in ways I never could have anticipated, leading me down twisting dirt-road detours with unfamiliar scenery, to places both uncomfortable and sublime. Just as violence often leads to more violence, kindness begets kindness. When I was a girl growing up in a small New Hampshire village, the children’s librarian, widowed Mrs. Elliott, gave me first dibs on the few new books she was able to purchase each year. I was a shy kid, wild about reading, and she gave me what little she had to give, with no strings attached. I think of her when I offer the Mercy Watson books — the beginning reader series my own daughters adored — to my young library patrons. This fall, I was walking into the library when a group of children surrounded me, tugging two wagons piled high with long-stemmed purple asters. From the far edge of the soccer field, the girls and boys had picked these wildflowers — some in full bloom, others past their prime and already turning to feathery brown seed — to give to me. I bent down and gathered the gift in my hands. K

NOVEMBER 2018

user, I know many librarians in the area, all of whom patiently answer my questions, from where to buy due-date slips to how to implement library policies. One afternoon, after I helped the Hardwick librarian mop up an overflowing toilet, we sat on the library’s granite front steps. She answered my questions about switching online catalog systems, and I sympathized as she shared the challenges of building an addition. When I had to grapple with issues relating to the opioid crisis, I leaned on a state library consultant for direction, but also simply for comfort. It didn’t take long to realize just how much Woodbury’s little library depends on the generosity of others. Although the children who use the library — who read on the rug or in the overstuffed chairs, play chess, sew scraps of felt, or paint popsicle sticks — aren’t aware of this, the building itself was constructed from grants and volunteer labor. Over the years, countless residents have served — unpaid and generally unacknowledged — on the board of trustees, making decisions on everything from budgets to guest speakers. Others have given unrestricted checks and donations of books, art supplies and boxes of tea. On the third Saturday of each March, deep in the heart of mud season, the library hosts the annual Woodbury Pie Breakfast. The event raises a fifth of the library’s yearly budget and reigns as the town’s culinary claim to fame. On the evening before, townspeople appear at the elementary school kitchen, carrying donated pies, many still warm from the oven, carefully wrapped in towels and aluminum foil. My back road detour to Waterbury Center that September afternoon reinforced for me how

KIDSVT.COM

riving along a dirt road in Waterbury Center, I was sure I was lost. On my way home from work at Kids VT, I was searching for the Children’s Literacy Foundation office. I drove uphill, passing hayfields and enormous maples. Finally, convinced I’d gone too far, I pulled over, got out of my Toyota and stood on the weedy roadside, admiring a spectacular view of Mount Mansfield, shimmering with early autumn gold. Then, up ahead, I spied the right mailbox number. In addition to working at Kids VT in Burlington, I’m the director of the singleroom Woodbury Community Library, one of the few hybrid public/school libraries in the state. This year, our tiny town of fewer than 900 people received a Rural Libraries grant from the Children’s Literacy Foundation, also known as CLiF. The grant offers a dozen public libraries $2,000 worth of books, plus an additional $500 for the school library — and storytelling presentations, too. That afternoon, I was picking up boxes of brand-new titles, from board books to fat middle-grade novels. The lavish gift exceeds my yearly children’s book budget. I didn’t set out to become a librarian. But when my marriage fell apart and our sugaring business sold, a friend convinced me to take the Woodbury directorship for more income. As a bonus, my younger daughter could come to the library after school, resolving the issue of childcare. I had a few stints shelving books as a high school and college student. But when I took the job two years ago, I knew next to nothing about how to actually manage a library. What I quickly discovered, however, was that, while I am the sole employee at the Woodbury Library, I’m hardly marooned. A lifetime library

The man who invented blue jeans was a —SMARTY PANTS

D

Grass for the Holstein Cow Seeds for the Nuthatch Oats for the Morgan Horse Acorn for the Chipmunk Bone for the Malamute Carrots for the Rabbit Tuna for the Siamese More for the Raccoon

What a literary gift means to a rural library — and its librarian

47


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Kids VT — November 2018  

A Supportive Program Connects Parents of Kids With Special Needs; Learning Through Nature Immersion; Creating a Family Cookbook; Good Citize...

Kids VT — November 2018  

A Supportive Program Connects Parents of Kids With Special Needs; Learning Through Nature Immersion; Creating a Family Cookbook; Good Citize...

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