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JULY 2019 VOL.26 NO.06

FREE

THE

ISSUE

LIFE LESSONS FROM LIVESTOCK

DOWN DOG WITH BUNNIES

BIRD IS THE WORD AT VINS NATURE CENTER

Hay Days Dairy farm kids know hard work, fresh air and freedom

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG, P. 20


FLYNN

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P E R F O R M I N G

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A R T S

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Timber Lane Pediatrics Reme mber to do your daily t ick check s!

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We’ve been providing pediatric care in the Burlington area for over 40 years. Our physicians and staff continue to dedicate themselves to the health and care of infants, children and adolescents from birth through age 22. Our goal is to provide you with the best medical care for your family. We are accepting new patients at our 3 locations.

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It’s summer at Shelburne Museum. Get here! July 14 | Circuspalooza Feats under the Big Top, games, food, and fun all over the Museum Grounds!

FREE First Friday Eve Series

Celebrating the farm families who own Cabot Live music, lawn games, tours, picnicking, and FREE admission to the entire Museum on glorious summer evenings! JULY 5 Explore the bonds between humans and their pets with Tracie Hotchner A blend of reggae, Motown, and retro-soul from The Big Takeover AUGUST 2 A special reading of artist Harold Weston’s writings Energetic, powerful, and vocally versatile tunes from Copilot SEPTEMBER 6 Sculptors Dan Snow and Jonathan D. Ebinger Bluegrass, jazz, and rock n’ roll from The Tenderbellies

2019 Exhibition Schedule Harold Weston: Freedom in the Wilds March 23–August 25 In Their Element: Jonathan D. Ebinger, Rodrigo Nava, Dan Snow (outdoor sculpture) May 1–October 31 Ink & Icons: Album Quilts from the Permanent Collection May 1–October 31 William Wegman: Outside In June 22–October 20 Joel Barber & the Modern Decoy September 14–January 12, 2020

Become a Member and get FREE admission for a year, discounts, special programs, and more.

shelburnemuseum.org William Wegman, Handstanding (detail), 2011. Pigment print, 22 x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist and Sperone Westwater, New York.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF PARTICIPATION

Tell about a favorite pet.

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Mary Ann Lickteig

maryann@kidsvt.com STAFF WRITER/CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Ann Stanciu brett@kidsvt.com

Theo hangs out with a cow at Ben & Jerry’s on Church Street

ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Todd Scott, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Astrid Hedbor Lague, Heather Fitzgerald, Elisa Järnefelt, Ken Picard, Ethan Tischler PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh, James Buck, Caleb Kenna ILLUSTRATOR

Marc Nadel P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2019 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Vegging Out

I

n September, my then-8-year-old son, Theo, told our family that he wanted to be a vegetarian. His announcement didn’t come as a total surprise. For quite a while, my empathetic and sensitive boy had been expressing how sad it made him when animals, from ants to pigs, were hurt or killed. Still, he’d subsisted on a steady diet of cheeseburgers that summer, so I wasn’t sure how long his newfound meatless lifestyle would last. Ten months later, Theo is still a vegetarian. My husband, Jeff, became one too — inspired by Theo —and he’s stuck with it as well. That means that even the omnivorous members of our family —me and my 12-year-old-daughter, Mira — eat a lot less meat these days. I’ve had to totally rethink my go-to weeknight dinner recipes. Suffice it to say, we eat a lot of chickpeas, beans and eggs. Parents make so many decisions for their kids. It struck me recently that deciding to become a vegetarian was the first time that Theo had made a consequential choice about the way he wants to live his life all by himself. And, for that, I’m proud of him. When you’re a kid growing up on a farm, not many decisions are left up to you. Milking cows, doing farm chores and chopping hay take precedence over friends’ birthday parties and sleeping late. On page 20, Mary Ann Lickteig writes about a multigenerational dairy farm family in Bridport that has been milking cows on the same farm since 1958. The Ouellette family is living proof that, though it is challenging at times, farming introduces kids to hard work and instills pride. Another thing that instills pride? Hiking the Long Trail — solo. In “One to Watch” on page 16, read about 17-year-old Zach Rothammer of Woodbury who completed the 272-mile trek, which runs along the spine of the Green Mountains from Massachusetts to Canada, by himself — save for a few nights when he was joined by his parents and younger brother. He came out of the experience with a greater appreciation for his home state, and a whole lot of blisters. Looking for some fun, new places for your family to explore this summer? On page 24, Brett Ann Stanciu writes about the Vermont Institute of Natural Science, or VINS, in Quechee. Visitors to the nature center can see wild birds, like owls, eagles and turkey vultures, in enclosures; explore interpretive trails; and pretend to be spiders or chipmunks on an Adventure Playscape. In Destination Recreation, on page 11, Heather Fitzgerald writes about Raven Ridge, a Nature Conservancy preserve that’s home to an array of animals, including bobcats, porcupines, bats and frogs. For more exciting, educational and yummy Vermont destinations, pick up a copy of our third annual Daytripper summer fun guide at a newsstand near you, or read it online at kidsvt.com. There’s still a whole lot of summer fun to be had! ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

THE

ISSUE

When I was in second grade we got a German shepherd mutt we named MAX. We took him everywhere, even when we moved across the country, then back. He was a constant companion, whether we were hiking the Grand Canyon, sleeping in our camper on the coast of California, riding in our boat in Arizona or at our camp in the Adirondacks. He finally passed when I was in college and, to this day, my mom will mistakenly call both my brothers “Max.” BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR

My first very own dog, BARCLAY, will always have his very own entire region in my heart. I got him as a 9-week-old puppy when my oldest daughter had just started walking at 9 months. Barclay grew up alongside all four of my kids; he kind of was one of them. He was my constant companion, copilot and general love muffin. I can’t imagine his intelligence, patience, humor, loyalty, love and overall extreme level of cuteness ever being matched. That might explain why I haven’t had another dog since Barclay passed away in 2016, at the ripe old age of 16. KIRSTEN CHENEY, DESIGNER

When we got ROSIE as a puppy, I lobbied to call her Roxie. “Roxie has moxie,” I told my family. It’s good that I lost my case. Rosie is a Rosie. She is simply sweet — all love, all the time, the calmest, most steady presence in our lives. MARY ANN LICKTEIG, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE (“Use Your Words,” page 43) was born in Burlington and raised in St. George. His grandparents, Stokes and Mary Jane Gentry, taught him the importance of caring for places that connect people of all ages to the beauty and richness of the Earth. After studying religion at Wesleyan University and abroad, he returned to Vermont, where he works as a mentor and camp director at Bread & Butter Farm in Shelburne. ETHAN TISCHLER

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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ORTHODONTICS

DRS. RYAN &RYAN EATON& EATON DRS. PETERSON,

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WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323 5/23/19 2:06 PM


JULY 2019

THE

ISSUE 20

Brought Up in the Barn Hard work, fresh air and freedom define life for dairy farm kids

Into the Wild

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS

Shell Game

ese & wine Your chaend m ore! place

PULL-OUT SECTION

Turtles and crabs, Turtles and crabs, With plenty of mussels, But no one has abs!

BY MARC NADEL

It’s summertime, kids, and that can mean just one thing... It’s time to take a long, happy family vacation to the nearest ocean! When you’re stuck in beach traffic, try entertaining — or annoying — your parents by endlessly reciting the epic poem on the right-hand corner of this page.

And here’s a puzzle to go along with that outstanding ode to oceanic animals: Only two sea turtles are identical, and the same is true of the crabs and the mussels. I think it’s a shore thing that you can find all three sets of twins!

PULL-OU SECTIONT

ANSWER P. 43

Just for Kids Sea Creature Puzzle Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club Puzzle Answers

24 CALENDAR JULY

One Giant Leap…

The LUNAR LANDING ASTRONOMY EXTRAVAGANZA honors this historic event with special planetarium shows, moon rocks, star-themed crafts, science activities for all ages and more. Saturday, July 20, 1-7 p.m., Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury.

SPONSORED BY:

Families explore stellar science activities the APOLLO 11 Kids” See Dr.at First videos “First With at uvmhealth.org. 50TH ANNIVERSARY: CELEBRATING OUR FIRST LUNAR STEPS. Investigate the technology that sent men to the moon and watch footage of astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin taking their first lunar leaps. Saturday, July 20, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich.

DREAMSTIME | © WISCONSINART

A Quechee science center teaches children about the natural world

Astronomers of all ages fête APOLLO ANNIVERSARY SPACE DAYS with out-of-this-world science fun, including air rockets and marshmallows floating in a vacuum chamber. Tuesday, July 23-Thursday, July 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington.

Discounts on Natural, Gluten-Free and Kid-Friendly Foods and much more! ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com k8v-CheeseTraders0718.indd 1

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Week to Week SAT

Parkapalooza: Live music, a giant slip ’n slide, kids’ activities, a skill swap featuring local crafters and artisans, and local food make for family fun in the park. 3-8 p.m., Hubbard Park, Montpelier.

FRI-SUN

Lamoille County Field Days: Families enjoy a pay-one-price event, kicking off the summer season of fairs. Kids’ fun includes pedal pulls, magic shows, games and rides. See lamoillefielddays.com for detailed schedule. Lamoille County Field Days Fairgrounds, Johnson.

SAT

Lake Champlain Maritime Festival Pirate Park: Ahoy! Captains of the seas dive into children’s activities, including tunes by Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate, games and a bouncy house in this memorable waterfront day devoted to the young. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Waterfront Park, Burlington.

JULY 20

JULY 26-28

JULY 27

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org. KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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Welcome 5 Editor’s Note Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Short Stuff Trending 8

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In the News Yoga Pose of the Month #InstaKidsVT Parent Participation The Daytripper Kids Say What? Pet Corner

Columns 10 Kids Beat 11 Destination Recreation 12 Fit Families 13 Checkup 14 Mom Takes Notes 15 Mealtime 16 One to Watch 17 Bookworms 18 Habitat 43 Use Your Words

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Calendar 27 Daily Listings 29 Classes 30 Seasonal Events 32 Live Performances 34 Science & Nature 36 New Parents 38 Story Times 40 Playgroups Ongoing Exhibits

On the Cover JULY 2019 VOL.26 NO.06

FREE

THE

ISSUE

LIFE LESSONS FROM LIVESTOCK

DOWN DOG WITH BUNNIES

BIRD IS THE WORD AT VINS NATURE CENTER

Hay Days Dairy farm kids know hard work, fresh air and freedom

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG, P. 20

Remy Pope, 4, plays in a barn on Iroquois Acres, a Bridport dairy farm founded in 1958 by his greatgrandfather Harmel Ouellette. Photograph by Caleb Kenna.

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Kraft has introduced a new product called Salad “Frosting” — which is really just ranch dressing packaged in a squeeze bag. “I’ve never been sadder about a food, and I’ve eaten Jello Salad,” said one Twitter user. The gender-reveal cake trend is waning, according to an article in the parenting section of the New York Times. No word on whether the Gender Reveal Lasagna from chain restaurant Villa Italian Kitchen is also a thing of the past.

Vermont’s first board game café, the Boardroom, will open in Burlington later this summer. An antidote to all that screen time. 8

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

Parent University BY ALISON NOVAK

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BURLINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT

Vermont State Parks launched VT State Parks Cooks — a new program aimed at helping campers prepare creative food over the fire, with recipes, cooking videos and blog posts. Smoky skirt steak and eggs with roasted tomatoes? We’re in!

YOGA POSE OF THE MONTH: LIZARD ON A ROCK

IN THE NEWS

TRENDING

Try this calming partner pose to stretch the chest, spine and hip flexors while strengthening the back and building a connection with those you love, courtesy of Susan Cline Lucey, owner of Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center in Burlington and Essex Junction.

O

n June 19, 22 Burlington parents, many clad in colorful garb that reflected their cultural backgrounds, crossed the stage of the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts in Burlington to accept certificates that declare them graduates of Parent University. The innovative program, which serves primarily New American families, was created in 2015 by Ali Dieng, a Burlington city councilor and the Burlington School District’s family outreach coordinator. It aims to engage parents with their children and the community by providing workshops and classes that teach skills, including navigating the school system, using the internet, applying for a job, and budgeting. The latest session took place after school five days a week for 11 weeks and focused on substance-abuse prevention. With the help of community partners like the Burlington Police Department, Turning Point Center of Chittenden County and the Vermont Department of Health, the group discussed topics like marijuana legalization, how prescription medication can lead to addiction and secondhand smoke. The graduation ceremony — featuring performances by Jeh Kulu and the A performer Bhutanese Nepali Cultural from Jeh Kulu Heritage Dance Group and a menu including samosas, dumplings and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream — was Parent speaker Ishno Ibrahim meant “not only to celebrate the accomplishments of the parents, but to celebrate the diversity that we have here,” said Dieng. 

1. One partner curls into a little ball, called “rock pose”. 2. The other partner lines up the base of his or her spine with the base of the partner’s spine and lies back.

Try holding hands to the side or above the head for a deeper stretch! Can you feel your backs move into each other as you breathe?

For more information about kids and family yoga classes, visit evolutionprenatalandfamily.com.

#INSTAKIDSVT Thanks for sharing your summer photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture of a boy and his feathered friends at Trillium Hollow Farms in Lake Elmore. Share your sweet summer snapshots with us this month.

HERE’S HOW:  Follow @kids_vt on Instagram.



Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

Tag us on Instagram !


PARENT PARTICIPATION

THE DAYTRIPPER

1

Sweet Treats

This month, we asked our Facebook followers to share photos of their families enjoying summer.

Got a sweet tooth? Check out the third edition of our Daytripper family summer fun guide for five fabulous confection creators in Vermont. From triple chocolate chip cookies to farm-to-spoon ice cream in flavors like curried peanut and maple walnut, we’re sharing some of the best spots to satisfy your dessert cravings! Find it at kidsvt.com/sweetstuff.

We loved seeing all your adventures! 2

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KIDS SAY WHAT?

Mom, are vitamins a real thing or are they fairy tales made up by adults?

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1. Merry Mount Farm, submitted by Audra Hughes 2. Bootleggers’ Basin at Smugglers’ Notch, Alice Dee 3. Eating dinner on the deck, Nancy Stearns Bercaw 4. Basin Harbor Club, Sher Joy 5. Elmore State Park, Rachel Shelley 6. Fishing at Maquam Shore in Swanton, Chelsey Gagne 7. Fishing on Lake Champlain, Alexandria McGuire 8. Chilling with a baby chick, Emily Sorensen 9. Huntington Gorge, Randi Becker 10. Hanging on the swing set, Andrea Jette Bushey 11. Shelburne Farms, Chelsea Witt 12. Creemee Stand in Wilmington, Jennifer Clary 13. Building at a swimming hole, Lily Trajman 14. Blueberry Lake, Jill Rickard 15. North Beach, Suzanne Brubaker

Aimee Tinker of Fletcher shared this photo of her 11-year-old son, Eli, with one of “his girls,” a 3-month-old Buff Orpington named Little Goldie. The family has eight chickens and “all the birds are friendly,” wrote Tinker, but this one “flies up on to him every time he enters the coop.” KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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B Y A LI S ON NOVA K

TRAVEL

C’est Magnifique! Venture across the border to Montréal this summer, and you’ll likely notice an anachronistic 81-foot pyramid on a pier of the city’s Old Port. Step inside and you’ll discover a 360-degree theater, the site of a new immersive, multimedia show called “Through the Echoes.” The project — dubbed PY1, which stands for Pyramid 1 — is the brainchild of Cirque du Soleil cofounder Guy Laliberté, in collaboration with his company, Lune Rouge Entertainment. The hour-long show uses video footage, music, lights, lasers, special effects and the voice of late British philosopher Alan Watts to take spectators on a virtual journey through time and space — from the Big Bang to the future — and to provoke weighty questions like “What does it mean to be human?” Appropriate for ages 8 and up, there are no assigned seats; visitors are encouraged to lie down in the space. For the 18+ set, PY1 also offers late-night shows Friday through Sunday, featuring seven different “worlds” and a clubby atmosphere. Catch the show until the end of September, when it heads to the warmer climes of Miami. PY1 is located at the Clock Tower Pier in Montréal’s Old Port. A four-person family package to “Through the Echoes” costs C$129. Shows run multiple times a day. PY1 is wheelchair accessible. Find more information and buy tickets at py1.co.

COMMUNITY

Listen & Learn In 1977, two gold-plated phonograph records with sounds and electronic images selected to represent the diversity of Trish Denton (left) and Mary Wesley of the Vermont life and culture on Earth Folklife Center will helm the Green Record Project were launched into space on NASA’s Voyager spacecraft. Known as the Golden Record, the contents were “intended to communicate a story of our world to extraterrestrials,” according to NASA. Curated by a committee chaired by famed astronomer Carl Sagan, they included photographs, songs, everyday noises and greetings in 55 different languages. This summer, Vermonters of all ages can take part in an initiative inspired by the Golden Record. THE GREEN RECORD PROJECT, a collaboration between the Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury and the Fletcher Free Library in Burlington, aims to produce “an audio time capsule” that represents life in Vermont, said the Folklife Center’s education program co-coordinator Trish Denton. Funded by a library grant from NASA, the initiative coincides with Vermont libraries’ space-themed summer reading program, “A Universe of Stories,” as well as the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Individuals and groups can sign up to make a recording that includes different sections — including a personalized greeting, sounds of the earth, musical selections and more. Participants can record on a mobile phone or on a voice recorder available for check-out. Recordings will be archived at the Folklife Center and showcased at a listening party at Champlain College’s Emergent Media Center in August. The project “fits so perfectly with the work we do at the Folklife Center of capturing stories of culture and individuals’ lived experience,” said Denton, and it also gives parents and kids the opportunity to “learn side by side.” Green Record Project drop-in workshops take place at the Fletcher Free Library in Burlington on Fridays July 12, 19, 26 and August 2 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Find out more about the project and sign up to make a recording at vermontfolklifecenter.org/greenrecord. 10

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

CELEBRATION

Tunes for Tots

Last year’s Big Tiny Love festival on the Burlington Waterfront

Think you need to secure a babysitter before heading out to a summer music festival? Not if it’s BIG TINY LOVE. The lakeside fest for families, launched last year by local eatery the Skinny Pancake, features kids’ entertainers — including Linda “Tickle Belly” Bassick, Ukulele Kids with Joe Beaird, the Hokum Brothers, and headliner Mister Chris and Friends — at the Burlington Waterfront on Sunday, July 28. Though the event is billed as a kid-focused companion to the four-day Lake Champlain Maritime Festival that runs from July 25-28, there’s plenty of fun for the grown-ups, too. Enjoy crepes from the Skinny Pancake, a Fiddlehead Brewing beer tent and Pingala Café’s Carrot Cart (the vegan answer to the hot dog stand). Family yoga with Sangha Studio; make-your-own granola with City Market, Onion River Co-op; kids’ activities with Wildflowers Studio; a SunCommon bouncy house and a performance by Modern Times Theater round out the day. Best of all: admission is free. Big Tiny Love: A Festival for Kids takes place at Waterfront Park in Burlington from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, July 28. A portion of vendors’ proceeds benefits University of Vermont Medical Center’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.


Raven Ridge Natural Area

PHOTOS: HEATHER FITZGERALD

DESTINATION RECREATION BY H E AT H ER FIT ZG ER A L D THE ISSUE

1279 Rotax Rd., North Ferrisburgh

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y 11-year-old son, Jesse, and I The caves have been visiting Raven Ridge, along the ridge are a Nature Conservancy preserve, of great interest for years. It’s located at the intersection to female bobcats, Jesse and Noah of Charlotte, Hinesburg and Monkton who use them explore the wetlands from — with a mailing address in North as denning sites. the boardwalk Ferrisburgh. For this reason, There’s lots to see here, including the uppermost beautiful ridgetop views and small caves. portion of the trail A wheelchair-accessible boardwalk and is closed from path lead visitors from the parking lot, March 15 through over a wetland that brims with vocal June 15, when the frogs in summer, to a beaver meadow. bobcats gestate Several truck-sized boulders, dropped and give birth. Not to worry, though; by glaciers 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, sit bobcats tend to steer clear of humans. near the path. Nature poems, including a On the return leg of the loop you’ll find few kid-friendly haiku, are mounted on an enchanted-feeling woods with some posts along the way. venerable old trees, a few vintage kitchen During a recent visit with Jesse; his appliances that were part of an old dump friend Noah; and Noah’s grandmother, site used by a farmer, and an aging apple Annie, we left the accessible path before orchard. We once found a nest of very reaching the beaver meadow and headed cute baby mice in the stove. up toward the ridge on a well-marked If you find yourself with a quiet trail. We soon came upon the burned moment while your kids are exploring, timbers of a house. According to Lynn you might consider the remarkable McNamara, director of stewardship for the Nature Taking a break at a ridgetop overlook Conservancy in Vermont, these are the remains of a house that was built in the 1970s and struck by lightning twice. The second time, it burned down almost completely except for some cedar posts, the chimney, and pieces of glass and pottery. Down a short, steep set of stone stairs next to the house is a cave, known to geologists as an exposed anticline. This rainbow-shaped fold of rock brings to mind a gigantic pizza oven, hence its name, “The Oven.” At times, it has been used as a den by porcupines, who have left “a big pile of porcupine poop at the entrance,” said McNamara. ecological properties of this land, which pools provide a breeding habitat for the Back on the ridgetop path, you’ll pass led the Conservancy to purchase it in wood frogs and spotted salamanders a few overlooks of the Champlain Valley, 2009. It is home to an amazing number that live in the adjacent woods. Some of Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks. of plant and animal species, and it is part these woods look a lot like they did before Further down the trail, you’ll see some of a wildlife corridor of more than 1,600 European settlers arrived. rocky crevices leading to another cave acres between Shelburne Pond and the The loop to the ridgetop and back that begs to be explored. My son and his Bristol Cliffs Wilderness area. is about 2 miles round trip. To protect friend pretended to be bats and used my Female Indiana bats, an endangered the wildlife, no dogs are allowed in the camera to “practice echolocation,” actispecies, roost with their babies in a stand preserve. Many smaller trails are closed vating the flash in the deepest reaches of of mature shagbark hickories and find — they are blocked with branches — to the cave. Ravens, who nest on the cliffs, food in neighboring wetlands. Otters promote restoration. circled above us as we climbed through travel along the tributary of Lewis Creek It is important to check for ticks after the rocks. that runs through the preserve. Vernal all above-freezing nature outings. In

Ravens, who nest on the cliffs, circled above us as we climbed through the rocks.

A deep, narrow cave makes for a perfect climbing spot

my family, we try to wear light-colored clothing and immediately throw it in the laundry upon returning home. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends washing them in hot water or putting them in the dryer on high heat for 10 minutes. We check each other for ticks before showering or putting on fresh clothing. If you like to end your nature expeditions with a sweet treat, visit Papa Nick’s for a creemee or the Parkside Café (formerly the Hinesburg outpost of Bristol Bakery and Café), both located nearby on Route 116.  Heather Fitzgerald teaches field ecology and environmental science at the Community College of Vermont and the University of Vermont. To learn more about the Raven Ridge Natural Area, visit nature.org and search for “Raven Ridge.” KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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FIT FAMILIES BY A L I S ON N OVA K

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COURTESY OF WATER AND ROCK STUDIO

Rabbit Pose

THE

A mother-daughter yoga session with bunnies afoot

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rior to this article, I’d never had my reporter’s notebook nibbled while on assignment. But then, I’d never done yoga with bunnies before. On a Saturday afternoon in late May, all that changed. My 12-year-old daughter, Mira, and I chatted excitedly as we drove to Water and Rock Studio in Burlington for a Bunny Yoga class. The 1.5-year-old studio is the second outpost of a business started in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia by Suzanne and Japheth Brubaker, who now live in Shelburne with their two young children. The Philadelphia studio offers kitten and goat yoga, while Burlington classes include bunnies, puppies and, in the near future, goats. “Are we going to watch the bunnies do yoga?” Mira mused. “Do you think we’ll do poses with them?” I explained to her what I had gleaned from social media and my brief conversation with the owners. We’d be doing the poses while the bunnies free-ranged around the room. Still, I wondered aloud, how much yoga would we actually practice with a cluster of cute cottontails to distract us? Research shows that doing yoga and being around animals are both good for your health — and “doing these things together is amazing,” explained Japheth. Animal yoga, he added, is a great way to combat the social isolation that comes with the rise in internet activity. The classes benefit the non-human participants, too. Water and Rock donates half of the class proceeds to the rescues, sanctuaries or farms that provide the animals. And the Brubakers promote animal adoption when appropriate. Plus, said Suzanne, “many of these animals long for attention, exercise, play and snuggles,” and Water and Rock’s classes “provide a calm, safe space” for just that. Jessie Jerry and John Diegel, who run the Fluffy Bunny Rabbit Sanctuary in Panton, brought seven rabbits to the studio for our class, which cost $25 per person. Two of them — a copper-colored mini lop named Goldie Hawn and a brown American sable named Moose — were available for adoption that day, while the remaining five were either

permanent residents of the sanctuary or not yet ready for a new home. Before class got underway, Suzanne explained to the 16 of us — primarily women, and a few kids and teens — that the bunnies had already participated in a morning class so they might be a little tuckered out. Most of them relaxed on a fleece blanket in the front of the room, while a few hopped over to peoples’ mats, eliciting giggles. “Let them come to you,” Jerry advised. Because rabbits are more fragile than dogs or cats, she explained, they shouldn’t be picked up during class. She circulated with a basket of grass and dandelions, inviting us to take a handful to place on our mats as bribes. She then gave us some info that might come in handy if “Jeopardy!” ever has a “Hare-Raising Facts” category. Rabbits are crepuscular, which means they are most active at dawn and dusk. And if you see a bunny grinding its teeth or vibrating its jaw, it’s likely a sign of contentment, similar to a cat K VA purring. As for their, er, NO ON S droppings? Not to LI worry, explained Jerry. Bunny poop is like little marbles, not slimy or stinky at all. Even so, a Water and Rock staffer stood by with a dust pan. “We understand that more than half the reason you’re here is for the animals,” said Suzanne, who explained the class was all about being joyful. With that, she instructed us in a series of asanas, from downward dog to warrior I to tree. For a second, I forgot that this was bunny yoga, until I looked down during a series of cat-cow poses to see a ball of fluff scurrying under my torso. The rabbits got more lively — and the laughter more frequent — as the class went on. Midway through, I looked up to see Goldie forgoing the dandelions on my mat to munch on the pages of my notebook. The bunnies made it a bit difficult to

Mira Novak and Grace, Peter and Jill Warrington (top to bottom) enjoy bunnies and yoga

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I looked up to see Goldie forgoing the dandelions on my mat to munch on the pages of my notebook.

Goldie nibbles on Alison’s notebook

totally find my flow. When I tried to lie down, I realized a bunny had made itself comfortable on my mat. Balance poses took on higher stakes, as I worked hard to ensure I didn’t topple over onto a rabbit. Still, yoga can sometimes feel a little too “sacred” to me, and I appreciated the light-hearted vibe the bunnies brought to the room. In his decade of working in the wellness field, Japheth said, “I have never seen the reaction I’ve seen — the smiles on peoples’ faces, the joy” as with animal yoga. During class, the animals gradually relax, he continued, and then the people

become calm, too. “There’s something magical that happens there … Everyone coming out of these classes is so happy.” Mira’s assessment? The bunnies “cheered up” the class a bit, she said on the drive home. “I really liked seeing their little noses twitching. It was mindfulness in its own way.” K Water and Rock Studio is located at 294 N. Winooski Ave., Suite 125 in Burlington. Bunny yoga classes will be offered on Saturdays, July 6 and August 3, at 11 a.m. For information on dog and puppy, kitten, and goat yoga classes, visit waterandrockstudio.com and select the Burlington location, or visit Water and Rock Studio - Goat Yoga on Facebook.


CHECKUP WIT H D R. L E WI S F I RS T

I N T E RV I E W C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

What Should Parents and Caregivers Know About e-Cigarettes?

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ost parents already know the dangers associated with traditional cigarettes and secondhand tobacco smoke. But in the last few years, the use of electronic or e-cigarettes has exploded, especially among teens and young adults. E-cigarettes go by different names, including “e-cigs,” “mods,” “vape pens,” “pods,” “tanks,” “tank systems,” and “Juuls,” the last of which refers to the company, Juul, which makes e-cigarettes in flavors, such as mango and mint, that appeal to kids. Regardless of the name, Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at Vermont Children’s Hospital, wants parents and caregivers to know the health hazards that electronic cigarettes pose to young people.

assumption that the carcinogens from combustible cigarettes are not in the vapor of e-cigarettes. The truth is, when you inhale the vapor from a vaping device, it’s laced with a variety of carcinogens, many of which are the same as those in combustible cigarettes. Whether they will directly cause cancer, we can’t say yet. But that vapor is also usually filled with high concentrations of nicotine, which is highly addictive. One vaping cartridge or pod has as much nicotine as a whole pack of cigarettes. A teenager can go through one in a single school day and have no idea how much nicotine they’re getting, putting themselves on a significant pathway to addiction.

KIDS VT: How bad is the e-cigarette problem among children and teens? LEWIS FIRST: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2017 and 2018, the use of e-cigarettes among teens increased 78 percent. In 2011, 1.5 percent of teens were vaping nationally. By 2018, it was 20 percent. That includes about one in five high school students, who reported vaping in the last 30 days. Use among middle schoolers has also gone up 48 percent in the last year. So, it’s pretty serious.

KVT: What does nicotine do to a young person’s brain? LF: We know that a young-adult brain doesn’t finish developing until around age 25. Nicotine slows brain development in ways that affect memory, focus, concentration, learning, mood and self-control. Nicotine can also cause an increased heart rate, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms and even death. Now, among adults who are already smokers, there are data showing that they may be able to reduce their nicotine and carcinogen exposure by switching to e-cigarettes. But when children or teens have tried nothing before and then try e-cigs, study after study shows that they are a gateway to combustible smoking, and that they’re highly addictive in a very short time period.

KVT: Are e-cigarettes an easier pathway into nicotine use than traditional cigarettes? LF: Yes. Often teens are under the

KVT: What are the risks of accidental exposure? LF: Some e-cigarette cartridges are refillable. Exposure to as little as half a

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teaspoon of the “e-juice” in one of these devices can literally kill a small child if they ingest it. In addition, getting that chemical on your skin is akin to absorbing a very concentrated nicotine patch. The number of calls to the national Poison Control Center for e-cigarette exposure doubled in the last two years. Symptoms of nicotine poisoning include sweating, dizziness, vomiting, seizures, high blood pressure and difficulty breathing. So these e-cigarettes and cartridges need to be locked away from children. KVT: What about the combination of nicotine and other drugs in vaping devices? LF: Some teens now combine nicotine vape juice with marijuana or synthetic cannabinoids, the latter of which are much more potent and dangerous. We still do not know what the health effects are of adding these substances to vaping devices, but we do know that they’re getting the same toxins in the vapor. KVT: How would parents or caregivers know if their child is using e-cigarettes? LF: Part of the problem is that many e-cigarette devices look innocuous or like other things, such as computer flash drives. Teachers report turning around from the blackboard and catching kids sneaking a puff from their pocket. They don’t generate clouds of smoke and the vapor dissipates quickly. But if kids are using them, parents may notice that their kids are always thirsty and urinating frequently. That’s because vaping removes hydration from the mouth and throat and leaves them with dry mouth. These devices can also cause nosebleeds. Kids may have more frequent respiratory

infections due to the chemicals in the vapor. Parents may find what look like spare flash drive parts, battery chargers, USB adapters and spent e-cigarette cartridges or pods in the trash. KVT: What can adults do to prevent kids from trying them? LF: First, parents and caregivers should begin with a supportive and loving discussion, not a lecture, which should start before their children enter middle school. Hopefully, parents will have ongoing discussions with their kids, perhaps triggered by an e-cigarette advertisement, seeing someone using one in public, or going past a vape shop. Parents should explain to kids that they don’t want them using these devices because they want their brains to develop normally. Parents get can additional info at e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral.gov, which is a good, family-centered government website. Consider sitting down and reading the data together to see how dangerous these devices are, how addictive they are, and how expensive this habit is. KVT: What if a child is already using e-cigarettes? LF: Parents need to keep their cool, listen and tell their child that they know it’s difficult to stay away from vaping. They should also give kids some strategies for avoiding peer pressure. For example, if a teen plays sports, he or she can tell their friends, “Not now, I’m in training.” And just reiterate that you love your child and you care so much about their health and will be there for them. Finally, if parents or caregivers smoke or vape themselves, this is a good opportunity to quit and set a good example for their children. K

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MOM TAKES NOTES BY E L I S A J Ă„ RN E F E LT

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y dog, Lumo, is my original pack member. I sometimes wonder how the past 10 years and nine moves have appeared to her. So many new neighborhoods in which to mark her territory, so many squirrels that got away. In the past decade, Lumo has gone from being my only family member to being our family dog. On my second date with the man who would become my husband, she was there to wag her tail at him. Patiently, she traveled with us every time we moved to follow jobs. Now, she is navigating the ever-changing terrain that comes with living with a little human. When I first got Lumo, I tried to picture my life 10 years in the future. I realized that she would likely be there with me if I became a mother. Two years ago, while driving home from the hospital after my daughter was born, it felt like the past and the future were about to come together. Within a few minutes, we would see Lumo, who would be there to welcome our pack’s newest addition, and share new adventures and secrets with her. K

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MEALTIME BY A ST RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

Chicken Tinga Tacos

CHICKEN TINGA TACOS INGREDIENTS:

A Mexican meal that’s not just for Tuesdays ANDY BRUMBAUGH

3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast

1 yellow onion, peeled and quartered

3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

1 bay leaf

1/2 teaspoon whole peppercorns

3 small tomatoes, chopped

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano

1 can (7.5 ounces) chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

salt to taste

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corn tortillas

sliced red onion

crumbled cotija cheese

cilantro

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DIRECTIONS: 1.

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hen summer arrives, I’m always looking to treat my family to fun food that doesn’t take a lot of time to prepare, since we’d rather spend our time hiking and boating. Mexican food is a crowd pleaser in my house. My daughter, especially, is a big believer in tacos on Tuesday, or, really, any day of the week. If you are looking for a twist on this Mexican staple, I suggest trying a smoky, spicy tinga sauce. Originally from the Mexican state of Puebla — the same region where the famously complicated mole sauce comes from — tinga sauce is much simpler. It’s made with chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, which can be found canned in most grocery stores. Chipotles are dried, smoked jalapeño peppers; the adobo sauce they are packed in is a slightly sweet, tangy red sauce. If you want a milder dish, use fewer of the canned chipotle peppers and all of the adobo sauce. The chipotle in adobo, combined with tomatoes, onion, cumin and Mexican oregano, which has a more

grassy, citrusy flavor than the more common Mediterranean oregano, make the tinga sauce really special. I ordered Mexican oregano online at Penzeys Spices, but if you have trouble finding it, sub in marjoram or a smaller amount of Mediterranean oregano. I used chicken in this recipe, but you can also use pork, beef or even jackfruit as a vegan alternative. The key is to shred your meat (or substitute meat). One of my favorite tips for shredding cooked chicken is to use a stand mixer with a paddle attachment. It takes almost no time, and turns what could be a tedious task into a cinch. I served the chicken tinga on warmed corn tortillas, topped with crumbled cotija cheese (which is like a Mexican feta, very mild and crumbly), sliced red onion and cilantro, for those who like it. As sides, we had a Mexican street corn-inspired salad and guacamole. If you have leftover meat, try using it as a filling for burritos or taquitos, as a nacho topping, or in sandwiches. It really packs a delightful, and unexpected, punch of flavor. K

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Put chicken in a large saucepan, along with onion, garlic, bay leaf and peppercorns. Add just enough water to cover the chicken, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for about 15 minutes, or until the chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Remove chicken from the cooking liquid and set aside to cool. Strain the cooking liquid, reserving the onions and garlic, along with 1 cup of the liquid. To make the sauce, combine the reserved cooking liquid, the reserved onion and garlic, tomatoes, cumin, oregano and chipotle peppers in adobo in a blender. Blend until smooth. Add salt to taste. Shred the chicken by putting it in a stand mixer with a paddle attachment and beat on low until completely shredded. Alternatively, shred the chicken with two forks. Combine the chicken and tinga sauce, and serve on top of warmed corn tortillas, topped with sliced red onion, crumbled cotija cheese and cilantro. Refrigerate or freeze leftover meat for future meals.

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ONE TO WATCH BY BRE TT A N N S TA N CI U

Blisters, Bears & Beautiful Views

NAME: ZACH ROTHAMMER AGE: 17 TOWN: WOODBURY

A local teen hikes the Long Trail solo

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— a self-described perfectionist — and his mother attended an informational presentation at the Green Mountain Club in Waterbury for hikers aspiring to complete the trail, who are also known as “through hikers” or “end-to-enders.” He read numerous books and asked experienced hikers for advice. The most useful information, however, he gleaned from hikers’ blogs — particularly about what to eat. His standbys were chocolates, granola bars, dried fruit, freeze-dried dinners, and gummies for pick-me-ups. His official Long Trail map, purchased for $12.95, was his guidebook. Printed on waterproof paper, it survived the journey in admirable condition. The small Jetboil stove he used to boil water for instant suppers and oatmeal and a Sawyer Squeeze water filter were prized pieces of gear. His “really expensive” backpack remains permanently sweat-stained. Beginning his hike near Williamstown, Mass., Zach estimated his trip would take around 26 days, an average time for a hiker to complete the trail. On his fourth day, however, he met a man in his 60s — known by his trail name, Sliced Beets — who quickly passed him. Later, the two met up in a shelter, and spent part of the next day hiking together, until the older man

COURTESY OF ZACH ROTHAMMER

hen Zach Rothammer tells people he hiked the Long Trail alone last summer, they usually ask him whether he was ever scared. “Twice,” he says. One time, a grouse’s whirring wings startled him at the end of a rainy day. The second, and more frightening, experience was when he saw two baby bears without their mama on the trail. He managed to slip around the cubs without incident. Zach was 16 when he hiked Vermont’s famous 272-mile foot trail in just 16 days, an average of 17 miles a day. The wiry and articulate young man — who will enroll this fall as a Craftsbury Academy senior and as a freshman at Northern Vermont University — trekked most of the trail alone. While Zach was an experienced day hiker, he had never backpacked before. Seasoned hikers assured him that fear would virtually vanish after a few days on the trail. “I didn’t think it was true,” he said, “but it is.” The Long Trail, constructed by the Green Mountain Club between 1910 and 1930, follows the main ridge of the Green Mountains from Massachusetts to Canada. The trail’s southern 100 miles overlap the 2,200-mile-long Appalachian Trail, which spans from Georgia to Maine. Zach took inspiration from his older brother, Greg, who hiked the trail during his senior year of high school. In 2007, Greg died in a car accident at age 21. To prepare for the journey, Zach

outpaced Zach. While together, Zach mentioned his dream to finish the hike in 16 days, to match his 16 years of age. “You can do it if you set your mind to it,” counseled Sliced Beets, before the two parted ways. Inspired, Zach became determined to meet his goal. The going wasn’t always easy, though. “There were moments that were awful,” he admitted. On his second day, he got drenched by rain, read the map incorrectly and ended up at an open-sided fire tower instead of the solid shelter where he had anticipated he could dry off. He sat beneath the tower, miserable and wet, eating cheese and crackers. But Zach persisted — and reaped both blisters galore and a greater appreciation for his native state. With awe, he described summiting Mt. Mansfield in the evening and encountering only one other hiker. In the distance, he saw a thunderstorm rolling in, far enough away that he wasn’t alarmed. “The show was absolutely amazing,” he remembered. Not realizing that a few shelters

require a $5 fee, he hadn’t packed any cash. Twice, strangers gladly offered to pay his way. “Hikers are really cool people,” he said. His parents, Sarah and Rick Rothammer, and then-12-year-old brother, Connor, brought him food and dry clothes along the way and spent a few nights with him. Sarah, an aspiring Appalachian Trail hiker, was an enthusiastic supporter. When Zach finished, however, she realized, “I had been holding my breath, unconsciously.” The final day, he walked out at the Canadian border, near North Troy, with his brother, mother and aunt. Knowing he had finished — in the time frame he had hoped for — was “amazing and joyful, but also somewhat surreal.” For so long, he had been in a Go, eat, sleep mindset that it was hard to grasp he had reached the end. “That’s when,” he said, “my feet really hurt.” K For more information about the Long Trail, visit greenmountainclub.org.

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BOOKWORMS BY BRE TT A N N S TA N CI U

Primate Pro

A new biography for kids chronicles the life of a dedicated orangutan scientist

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n December 1971, Biruté Mary Galdikas had been living in Borneo’s remote rainforest for two months when she received what she described in her journal as “the best Christmas present.” A female orangutan and her baby emerged from the wild and lingered by her research site. Galdikas followed the pair for five days, observing the mother foraging for food and her baby playing with twigs. The 25-year-old Ph.D. candidate in primatology had endured illness, leeches, continuous damp, and a diet of rice and tinned sardines for this unusual opportunity. Kids will discover that Galdikas is no stranger to challenges in Undaunted: The Wild Life of Biruté Mary Galdikas and Her Fearless Quest to Save Orangutans, a new biography written by Anita Silvey, who teaches Modern Book Publishing and Librarianship at Simmons University in Boston and Children’s Book Author Studies at St. Michael’s College in Colchester during the summer. Born in post-World War II West Berlin to Lithuanian parents, Galdikas’ family settled in Canada when she was 2. As a child, Galdikas fell in love with the wild at High Park, a 400-acre oasis in urban Toronto. In 1998, she established the Orangutan Care Center and Quarantine in Indonesia, a facility designed to care for orphaned and ex-captive animals before returning

away from the wilderness. What intrigued me about Dr. Galdikas was she didn’t do that. She had become devoted to the orangutans, so she stayed with them, which was remarkable. Wilderness living is not my thing, but I really admire someone who can do that for so long. Not surprisingly, she’s very spiritual, as I imagine someone would have to be if they lived in the wilderness for this amount of time. There’s a great connection between her and the larger world.

THE

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them to the wild. To this day, Galdikas, now 73, continues to research orangutans in Borneo and to advocate for primate conservation. Undaunted is the second in Silvey’s National Geographic Kids trilogy of biographies about “breakthrough women scientists in the ’60s and ’70s.” Her biography of Jane Goodall, Untamed, was published in 2015. Currently, she is writing a book about gorilla researcher Dian Fossey. Galdikas, Goodall and Fossey were friends, and famous paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey mentored all of them in their field studies. Silvey has written 13 books and was a founding faculty member of the Vermont College of Fine Arts Writing for Children & Young Adults program. The school awarded her an honorary Master of Fine Arts degree for children’s book writing in 2000. For 11 years, she was editorin-chief of The Horn Book Magazine, a journal that reviews children’s literature. Silvey spoke with Kids VT in June. Kids VT: Why did you start writing for children? Anita Silvey: One of the editors I had known for a long time said to me, “I think you could be a children’s nonfiction writer.” I laughed at her and said, “I don’t think I have the talent.” It’s funny, because I had written several books by then

for adults. Obviously, I could put together a book, but I value writing for children so much I didn’t know if I could do it. Right around then, a lot of information was coming out in the academic world about women who fought in the Civil War dressed up as men. That was something I had never read about in children’s literature. My editor said, “Go write it.” I went to Civil War battlefields, and I have big Bernese mountain dogs who love running around battlefields who came with me … The research was so wonderful that I got hooked. And I realized this is what I want to do. KVT: What drew you to write about Galdikas? AS: Most animal researchers go out for five, six, seven years and do their research and write it up for their doctorate. Then they go and live in a university happily

KVT: Can you share a little about the process of writing this book? AS: I wanted the orangutans to have real star roles, and to feature as many orangutans as possible. Dr. Galdikas was really concerned that the images be right, which is part of the excitement of watching a book come together … I get to work with a lot of people who really know how to put a book together. That’s part of the fun. KVT: What is it like to be an author of nonfiction for children? AS: This is a fabulous time for nonfiction — sort of a renaissance for all sorts of reasons. Part of that is technological changes. National Geographic can use all these wonderful photographs and reproduce them. There was a time when nonfiction for kids was all black and white, and that can be a bit dull for kids. I write true stories about real people. It’s particularly important in this day and age to give young readers a sense of what’s true.  Learn more about Galdikas’ work at orangutan.org. For more information about Anita Silvey, visit anitasilvey.com.

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Backyard Sculpture Garden & Fire Theater

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t’s difficult to drive past Kim and Chris Cleary’s home on Browns Trace Road in Jericho without slowing down to take a closer look. That’s because 7-foottall wooden letters that spell “BELIEVE” stretch across the front yard of their dark red 1850 farmhouse. Chris, a sculptor who works in stone, wood and copper, created the walloping word — which someone stops to photograph at least once a day — for a summer solstice celebration in Bolton three years ago. That fall, it won first place in the South End Art Hop’s outdoor juried show. Chris has made a variety of other letters, and periodically changes the sculpture to read “HI,” “HEY,” “THRIVE” “LIVE” and “TRY” — much to the delight of kids riding by in the school bus. The Clearys have lent out the letters L-O-V-E for two local weddings. The front-yard messages just hint at the couple’s artistic talents. Their lush backyard is a sculpture garden featuring about 10 of Chris’ creations and a theater venue for Chris and Kim’s daredevil performances. For the last five years, the Clearys have led a troupe called Cirque de Fuego that has wowed audiences with shows in which they twirl, juggle and, in Chris’ case, breathe fire. They performed in Burlington’s 2019 Highlight New Year’s Eve celebration and take their show to festivals, weddings and private parties. Their after-dark summer house parties are more informal affairs that draw around 150 locals of all ages. Attendees are asked to make a donation of at least $10 and bring their own chairs and drinks. The Clearys provide the popcorn, ambient music and a spell-binding fire show. Their backyard is rigged with stage lighting, a sound system, handmade flags and a curtain from which the fire performers emerge. “It’s like a night at the movies, but cooler,” explains Chris. Audience members can peruse the sculpture garden before the show. Among the treasures they will find is a hodgepodge of soldered-together pipes 18

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

Kim and Chris Cleary

Chris Cleary breathes fire

A copper scorpion sculpture made by Chris Cleary

The front yard of the Clearys’ home in Jericho Center

that looks like a contraption Chitty Chitty Bang Bang’s Caractacus Potts might have dreamed up. When Chris built it in 2012, he rigged a compressor to shoot air through the center when a cord was pulled. That year, he collaborated with the late Seven Days photographer Matthew Thorsen on a photo project called “The Monroe Doctrine,” in which

people donned a blonde wig and halter dress, stood inside the sculpture and pulled the cord so the dress would fly up à la Marilyn Monroe. In another corner of the yard is a carpet of gravel scattered with stones of different shapes, sizes and colors, each engraved with a single word, ranging from “inspire” to “bacon.” Visitors can

use them to create sentences and poems. Chris calls this a “word garden.” He sold his first one to St. Michael’s College in 2011 and has made about a dozen others for elementary schools, private residences, and arboretums in Connecticut and Alaska. In 2009, the couple — who have 12- and 19-year-old sons — started doing


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A copper-pipe sculpture used for “The Monroe Doctrine” photo project

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“burns,” events in which large-scale wooden sculptures are built, then set ablaze. The practice pays homage to the world-renowned Burning Man festival in the Black Rock Desert of northern Nevada, which started when California artist Larry Harvey built a 9-foot-tall sculpture of a man, then burned it at a beach bonfire in 1986. In the last decade, the Clearys have burned around 25 of Chris’ wooden sculptures — including a woolly mammoth, Old Man Winter and a robot for winter solstice celebrations; a motorcycle for a Killington motorcycle rally; and the letter “M” and a cougar for Mount Mansfield Union High School events. Last October, the couple traveled to Québec City to put on a fire performance and burn a 19-foot dragon for a tech company’s private event. They’ve also done smaller burns to celebrate family milestones. For Chris’ 35th birthday, they burned a sculpture

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of Father Time. For Kim and Chris’ 15th wedding anniversary, Chris built a wooden heart and the family took turns shooting flaming arrows at it. For their younger son’s 7th birthday party, they constructed a 10-foot-tall dragon and let him stab it with a burning sword. Still, says Kim, “our kids are very unimpressed with us.” K The Clearys’ July backyard fire theater takes place on Saturday, July 20, at 8 p.m. at 353 Browns Trace Road in Jericho Center. $10 suggested donation. Bring chairs or blankets, bug spray and snacks — and use the bathroom beforehand, as the antique plumbing can’t accommodate public use. Catch Cirque de Fuego’s fire show on the Jericho Town Green, Friday, August 2, from 8:30 to 9 p.m. Visit ontherocksvt.com to see more of Chris Cleary’s work. Untitled-17 1

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Brought Up in the Barn Hard work, fresh air and freedom define life for dairy farm kids BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG

Cousins (oldest to youngest) Ashlynn Foster, Rowdy and Remy Pope, and Allegra Ouellette visit a calf

CALEB KENNA

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n April 1, 1958, Harmel and Lila Ouellette bought 365 acres and 39 cows in the Addison County town of Bridport. It was the only farm they visited after they had decided to buy. “Everything looked good,” Harmel recalls. “It had good buildings, good land, so we decided to make a move.” At the time, he and Lila had a 1-year-old son, Steven. The idea that, someday, his greatgrandchildren would be working and playing on this land “never entered my mind,” he says. But 61 years later, Harmel, 85, is still driving tractors here on the farm that his late wife named Iroquois Acres. Now owned and operated by five of his descendants, the farm has 700 cows and more than 1,500 acres and employs eight non-family members. It’s the site of a cheesemaking business run by another descendant, and it allows Harmel’s greatgrandchildren to make a claim that fewer than 1 percent of the people in the United States can make: They are growing up on a farm. Once common in Vermont, and still more common here — 1.6 percent of working Vermonters are farmers compared to 0.9 percent of workers nationwide — farm life introduces kids to hard work and the subsequent pride that comes from a job well done. It instills responsibility and common sense. Kids on a farm quickly learn that life doesn’t revolve around their baseball practices or social lives, but milking, chores and cutting hay when the sun shines. If it’s the Fourth of July or Christmas or your birthday, you celebrate, then you do chores, though probably the other way around. Life and work are inextricably knitted together here. And when the cows get out, there’s even more work to be done — or a great adventure to be had, depending on whether you’re 60 or 6. Harmel Ouellette’s five great grandchildren range in age from 19 months to 19 years. They got barn boots before they could walk, and they each get a calf to start their savings accounts, like their parents did. They can sell it or breed it to start a herd; it’s their choice. They’ve never gone to daycare. When they were tiny, they were strapped to their parents in front packs or backpacks or they hung out in strollers and wagons in the barn. Their parents, as children, spent time in baby swings and playpens in the barn, and their grandma tells a story about a cat curling up on one baby’s head.

“When they say, ‘brought up in the barn,’ they really were,” says the grandma, Harmel’s daughter-in-law, Sherry Ouellette. Now, there’s always a parent, aunt, uncle, grandma or cousin around to supervise the youngest children on this working landscape that doubles as a playground. The mournful moo of a cow, the staccato bleat of baby goats and the putt-putt-putt of tractors — that shifts to a higher key when they pick up speed — provide the soundtrack of their lives. Four-year-old Remy Pope is playing in the deep, muddy tire tracks behind the dry cow/freshening barn, where cows stay when they’re not milking and when they “freshen,” or give birth. He balances a fat chunk of mud on his head, then lets it roll off the brim of his camo cap and splash into the water that fills the track. He giggles. And does it again. What’s it like to be a kid on a farm? “Great,” says Remy’s grandpa, THE Steven Ouellette. “You get to do a lot of things, drive a lot of ISSUE stuff that nobody else gets to, and play with a lot of stuff and have a lot of pets and a lot of freedom…” When meeting the Ouellettes, a flow chart would be helpful. The family has married into two other dairy families and has members working on three different Addison County farms. But it’s actually not that complicated. Steven is Harmel and Lila’s only child. He and his wife, Sherry, both 62, live on the farm where Steven grew up and have three children: Nicole (Nicky), who is 42; Aaron, 41; and Stephanie, 37. Harmel lives across the road. Nicky and her husband, Mark Foster, have two children: Ashlynn, 19, and Colin, 15, who both intend to farm. Mark and Colin work on Mark’s family’s farm, Foster Brothers Farm, in Middlebury. Nicky owns and operates Bridport Creamery, located here, at Iroquois Acres. Her five-year-old business buys 7 or 8 percent of the farm’s milk to make cheese that is sold throughout New England. Ashlynn works at Iroquois Acres. She has an associate’s degree in farm management from Vermont Technical College and will study animal science and entrepreneurship at the University of Vermont this fall. Aaron is one of the farm’s owners, along with his parents, his sister


you guide?” she asks. But Rowdy, with his close-cropped blond hair and sun-kissed face, wedges his tongue between his lips and muscles on. “I got it,” he says. Rowdy seems born to farm, Sherry says. “It’s in his blood. He lives and breathes it … In my house he’s got his whole farm set up with gates and pastures. And when he’s not out here, he’s in there doing that.” Stephanie says she will not be disappointed if her two sons decide not to become dairy farmers. “For my children, I want, obviously, for them to be happy in life, but I also want them to be good people,” she says. She and her siblings weren’t pressured to farm, either. “We sent them to college so they could make up their own mind, but they all came back,” Sherry says. Stephanie worked as a loan officer in a bank for five or six years, but she fed calves before work and helped out after work and on weekends. Her brother, who has always wondered what it’s like to have a 9-to-5 job and who laughs at the phrase “three-day weekend,” marvels at another aspect Harmel’s brother, Jenna of work off the Claude Ouellette Ouellette farm — guaranteed income. “That’s Harmel another thing that Ouellette Allegra blows my mind,” he Ouellette Rowdy says. Pope So far, the next generation is on track to farm. The oldest grandchild, Ashlynn, who spent school vacations going to sales to buy cows with her grandpa, wants to farm. “When I was getting ready to look at college, everybody — my parents, and my whole family and my grandfather — was like, ‘You know you don’t have to go for dairy. You’re smart enough. You can do anything you want.’ And I was like, ‘I don’t know anything else. Like, this is what I do.’” And she likes it? “Yes,” she says, without a second’s

cast-er-ated,” he teacher, when offers — has to be you pick them reined in. One of up or drop them his favorite places off, if she comes is the freshening and talks to barn. If he sees you, there has been an event…” wet spots in a birthing stall, he Stephanie says. grabs a shovel to “And one morning, scrape them out, I dropped him off, then puts down and she was waitfresh sawdust, his ing by the door.” grandma Sherry The weekend GAIL POPE, TALKING prior, a cow on the says. “We’ve had ABOUT HER SON SETH to correct him farm had had a on that because prolapsed uterus. there’s some cows, that when they have During share time, Rowdy was antsy babies, they just want to be left alone.” waiting for his turn to talk, Ms. Way told He also likes to move calves — by Stephanie. And when he got the floor, he himself — from the freshening barn to blurted, “My cow’s uterus fell out!” Stephanie and her brother and sister the hutches where they are milk-fed. On this day, he guides a wobbly 12-hour-old started helping on the farm when they Holstein across the mountainous, muddy were 6 or 7. Their children have done tire tracks. They zigzag a bit and Ashlynn the same. Rowdy, already a font of farm offers help: “You want me to push and knowledge — “All of my boy goats are

When the time came to test him for preschool, he didn’t know his colors, but he could tell you which tractor was a John Deere and which was an International.

CALEB KENNA

Stephanie and Stephanie’s husband. Aaron’s wife, Jenna, had no prior farm experience. “I was afraid of cows,” she says. She works in the creamery a couple of days a week and helps with the kids. Stephanie and her husband, Seth Pope, have two sons: Rowdy, 6, and Remy, 4. North Wind Acres, a Pope family farm in nearby Shoreham, houses part of the Ouellette family dairy herd. Rowdy and Remy spend their days here at Iroquois Acres. Rowdy recently finished kindergarten. Every day, when the bus dropped him off after school, he flung his backpack onto the porch, put on his boots and ran to the freshening barn to see how many calves were born while he was away. One June day produced eight, all heifers. Rowdy had never been on a computer before he started school, his mom says. “They were saying, ‘Oh, he’s going to be behind.’ I was like, If that’s where he’s behind, I’m fine.” Rowdy’s paternal grandmother tells a similar story about Rowdy’s dad, Seth, one that Cabot Creamery Cooperative uses to promote its member farmers. “When the time came to test him for preschool, he didn’t know his colors,” Gail Ashlynn Foster Pope says, “but he could tell you which tractor was a John Deere and which was Friend, an International. He Kyle Cioffi could tell you the difference between a mower, a rake and a baler and if a cow was a Holstein or a Jersey.” Rowdy can tell when a cow is ready to give birth, and he was upset one day this spring when the family didn’t heed his words, and a cow gave birth before she was moved to a maternity stall. He’s the kid who flips over his toy cattle to teach the neighbor boy how to tell a bull from a cow, and he relays some eye-popping anecdotes during kindergarten share time. “So Rowdy’s

Seth Pope

Stephanie Pope

Sherry Ouellette

Steven Ouellette

Remy Pope

BROUGHT UP IN THE BARN, P. 22 » KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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CALEB KENNA CALEB KENNA

MARY ANN LICKTEIG

Clockwise from above: Remy dances in the mud; Rowdy feeds calves; Rowdy and Remy play farm

Brought Up in the Barn

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pause. “I love it. It’s all I know. And I love it. I love my cows.” But dairy farming isn’t easy. This is the fifth straight year milk prices have remained below the cost of production. Though starting to rebound, they have dipped to 1980s prices, forcing many farmers out of business. Last year at this time, farmers were selling their milk for $14 or $15 per hundred pounds, well below the cost of production, according to Laura Ginsburg, section chief for the agriculture development division at the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. Prices are up to about $17 now. Some farmers are making money, Ginsburg says, even though the average cost of production on a conventional Vermont dairy farm is $18 per hundredweight. 22

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

being aggressive. “There’s a lot of things Nine percent, or 71, of the state’s dairy farms closed between 2017 and that have changed, and we’ve had to change with them,” Sherry says. They up2018. Another 23 have closed this year, bringing the number of dairy farms still graded to a round baler to make moving operating to 677, hay more efficient; they installed a parallel one-third fewer than the 1,015 in 2010. milking parlor, allowing them to milk 22 Weather presents cows at a time instead another challenge. A of one; and they added wet spring delayed registered Brown the planting of crops, and Midwest flooding Swiss cattle to their herd so they could sell pushes up grain prices here. Still, Vermont their calves and frozen ASHLYNN FOSTER, 19 embryos. Brand new produces 60 percent is their automatic calf of New England’s fluid milk, and dairy farming remains the feeder, which tracks each animal’s intake. The flip side of advancing the farm is dominant sector in the state’s agricultural economy. sacrifice elsewhere. When Steven and “It’s definitely one of those occupations Sherry’s kids were growing up, they took just two family vacations. And Sherry has where you keep your fingers crossed and been waiting for a garage for her car since keep moving forward,” Ginsburg says. 1979. Whenever she thinks this might be Steve and Sherry Ouellette say they managed to survive by expanding and the year, “we put up a barn,” she says. They

I love it. It’s all I know. And I love it. I love my cows.

got their first air conditioner — a window unit — about six years ago. “But here our cows have got 40 fans on them,” and a misting system to stay cool. But that’s how it is, Sherry says. “The cows come first. That’s our living. If you don’t take care of cows, you don’t have a living.” She doesn’t resent that. She has her family around her. She has watched her kids grow up and learn to love farming. So she will wait for her garage. “Buildings are buildings, but the part of farming I like are the memories,” she says, like watching Stephanie “wheeling and dealing” to buy calves when she was in middle school and seeing how excited Rowdy gets about calves being born and how Allegra lights up playing with goats. “And smelling hay when you’re cutting it,” she adds. “That’s what’s important — and the relationships you build in the farming community. “What do you put for a price on that?” K


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

Shell Game BY MARC NADEL

It’s summertime, kids, and that can mean just one thing... It’s time to take a long, happy family vacation to the nearest ocean! When you’re stuck in beach traffic, try entertaining — or annoying — your parents by endlessly reciting the epic poem on the right-hand corner of this page.

PULL-OU SECTIONT

Turtles and crabs, Turtles and crabs, With plenty of mussels, But no one has abs! And here’s a puzzle to go along with that outstanding ode to oceanic animals: Only two sea turtles are identical, and the same is true of the crabs and the mussels. I think it’s a shore thing that you can find all three sets of twins!

ANSWER P. 43


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

Summer is a time for outdoor adventures and exploration. Write a paragraph or poem about a fun and exciting summer adventure — real or imagined — with the title “The Best Summer Adventure.”

COLORING CONTEST WINNERS Kids put lots of heart into this month’s amazing submissions — embodied by 8-year-old Eliza’s sweet masterpiece, titled “Tiger in Love.” Our judges went gaga over the gorgeous artwork we received. Vivian, 9, sent us a teal tiger on green grass, with a rainbow sky in muted pastels. Mabel, 4, colored her cat a brilliant gold, made even more fabulous by a candypink background. Soak up the sun, kids, and send us your best work again in July.

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS “NIGHT VS. DAY”

Kyla Abair, 10, St. Albans “LOVIN’ MY BABY TIGER”

Brooklyn Belfield, 9, Jericho

“Tiger, Tiger” Nora Bissonnette, 5

5& under

SOUTH BURLINGTON

“LOST IN THE FOREST”

Shae Sanz, 7, Rochester “TIA THE TIGER IS HAVING A BIRTHDAY”

Cadence Mae Stotyn, 5, Winooski We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is July 15. Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

“MY BUDDY” Name ________________________________

Daniel Kipp, 5, Newport

Age __________________________________

“TIGER IN THE CLOUDS”

Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

Eliza Stanton, 6, Montpelier “WHERE’S MY MAMA?”

Leah Manley, 5, Milton “THIRSTY TIGER IN THE DESERT”

Henry Butler, 4, Underhill

WRITING WINNERS

“IT’S RAINING TACOS”

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to make a summer “bucket list” with five to 10 things they hoped to do before school starts up again. August and Mabel each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

“JUNGLE INHABITANT”

August Simakaski, 10 GROTON

I plan to: al Make a sign for our loc library. Learn more about the outdoors. Go swimming a lot. . Sew myself a leather bag nt. pla er Grow a cucumb Have fun!

Mabel Huard, 13

CRAFTSBURY

Dance more. When I do a leap I wan t to feel the wind in my face and my legs go even higher in the air. Choreograph more duets for me and my sister. I love to teach her new moves! Get my left split by working hard and stretching. Flexibility is a key part of dance. Do another solo at the dance com petition. I want to be more confident on stag e. Do an aerial for the first time! Doin g an aerial is just like flying, I think. Be a better violinist. Knowledge is power. Stay fit by eating right and exercisin g. I refuse to be a couch potato. Learn to swim. I want to cut thro ugh the water like a pro. Read more. Intelligence without ambition is like a bird without wings.

Aniela Amato, 9, Essex

“Rainbow Tiger” Anaia Uthmann, 7 WEBSTERVILLE

6 to 8

Levon McCuen, 6, Hubbardton “COLORFUL TIGER”

Harkin Paulson, 6, Sheldon “HUNTING FOR FOOD”

Alex Longe, 9, Georgia

TOP TITLES “THE TIGER IN THE KINGDOM”

Ellie Wood, 5, Derby Line “TENDER HEART”

Evelyn Manley, 7, Milton “COLOR ME AND I WILL BE HAPPY”

Medea Dane, 10, Barre City

“Silver Tiger” Savitt First, 9 RICHMOND

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by July 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the August issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________


JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

Birthday Club

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

Congratulations to these July Birthday Club winners! ford and CHARLIE lives in West a fun-loving, ’s He 1. y Jul on turns 10 who enjoys generous and artistic kid the piano g yin pla swimming, biking, ings of Fire W g din rea d and drums, an loves movies, and Minecraft books. He babies laugh. g superheroes and makin passes and four Charlie wins four day HO Leahy Center EC to 3D movie tickets Burlington. for Lake Champlain in You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Simone, Grayson and Olivia each win four ECHO day passes.

Burlington and turns 6 on July 7. She is a brave, social and charming young lady who loves to play dress up, have her face painted, read and write. She admires Martin Luther King Jr., whom she learned about this year in kindergarten at Orchard School.

BY HELENA HOVANEC GRAYSON lives in

Plainfield and turns 6 on July 11. He loves to play with Matchbox cars, spend time with his siblings, ride on the tractor with Grampa and take walks in the woods to look for deer tracks. He is outgoing and loves to tell jokes.

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: What do golfers snack on?

HOLE IN ONE IRON LESSON PRO ROUND SCORE TEEING OFF TOURNAMENT VISOR

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club

SIMONE lives in South

Riddle Search — LET’S PLAY GOLF!

CADDIE COURSE FLAG FORE GLOVE GOLF CART GREEN GRIP HAZARD

Join the Club!

OLIVIA lives in North Clarendon and turns 2 on July 24. She loves drawing, painting, taking notes and signing her name. She loves her dog, Iris, cat, Miller, and seven new baby chicks. Her family moved to Vermont from Virginia in May.

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 43 Untitled-21 1

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Into the Wild A Quechee science center teaches children about the natural world

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“that’s a little more successful than trying to tackle a big problem.” Gelroth described how a preschooler in the Small Wonders program recently approached her with a bug Gelroth had never seen before. While small children frequently share their treasures from the natural world, this unusual find was a reminder to her that “there’s so much to learn and discover. We don’t know everything.” Nature is interconnected, Gelroth said, from the river to raptors to trees. Whether strolling along a path with informative placards about how pollinators interact with wildflowers or chatting with a raptor trainer while observing a wild bird feed, visitors are encouraged to explore the marvelous complexity of the natural world. “You can’t pull out any one part, and say, I care only about raptors,” said Gelroth. “As soon as you start that, you realize you care about everything else.” In addition to their structured programs, the center is open daily for visitors to wander at their own pace. Families can pack a picnic lunch, ooh and aah over the wild birds in the enclosures, and explore the interpretive trails interspersed with stone and wood sculptures. Behind the visitors’ center, parents can relax on a shaded bench while children pretend to be spi-

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environment through education, research and avian wildlife rehabilitation.” Last year, the rehabilitation program took in 652 birds, from crows to hawks — up from 466 the previous year. While the Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife brings some wounded birds to VINS, individuals also contact the center when they discover an injured bird, often after it has been hit by a vehicle or attacked by a domesticated cat. About 40 percent of these creatures are eventually released back into the wild, said Lauren Adams, development coordinator and former leader of the wildlife rehabilitation program. Others — who have permanently damaged eyesight or a lame wing, for exA screech owl ample — remain at the center at VINS because they would not be able to survive in the wild. Some of those birds become animal ambassadors in VINS educational programs in Vermont and New Hampshire schools, senior centers and libraries. Additionally, more than 40 raptors — including turkey vultures, owls and kestrels — live permanently in the center’s 17 exhibit enclosures, where the public can visit them. Observing an animal like a bald eagle up close can be a powerful, educational experience, said Adams. VINS offers learning opportunities for all ages, from a Small Wonders preschool program to educational talks for older kids and adults. Every year, the center hosts field trips, leads science-based professional development for teachers and sends VINS staff into classrooms to lead hands-on science lessons. The center also organizes annual events like the Incredible Insect Festival in July and an owl festival in February. Hannah Gelroth, director of school programs and teacher professional development, said that VINS works diligently to design age-appropriate curricula when they work with schools. Younger kids are encouraged to form what she calls a passionate “heart connection” to the natural world by following their own natural curiosity, aided by engaging puppet shows, artifacts they can touch — like bones and feathers — and lots of time for outdoor exploration. By elementary school, children are taught to investigate and ask questions like scientists and engineers. Dissecting an owl pellet, for example, offers young naturalists a chance to discover what these wild birds eat and how their bodies digest food. Middle school students tackle local problems, like how to reduce waste by getting rid of plastic straws in their school cafeteria. “If we start small,” Gelroth said,

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lthough the Vermont Institute of Natural Science — known more commonly as VINS — is located just off busy Route 4 in Quechee, its peaceful atmosphere is palpable as soon as you step out of your car in the gravel parking lot. There, a path beckons visitors to the shady, cool forest. It’s a fitting starting point for a place that immerses visitors in nature through its various offerings, from programs for day visitors to summer camps. VINS is perhaps most well known as a wild bird rehabilitation center. Each year, hundreds of injured and orphaned birds from Vermont and New Hampshire are treated there by licensed wildlife rehabilitators. The center’s roots, however, trace back to the Ottauquechee River. In 1970, a Woodstock dentist named David Laughlin teamed up with other like-minded locals to form a commission to study the river’s water quality. At the time, the river suffered from waste and runoff pollution, in part from the upstream Bridgewater Woolen Mill. Eventually, the group succeeded in winning the state’s first water quality litigation and halted the mill’s dumping. After their victory, the activists realized that only concerted and ongoing education would ensure the long-term protection of the river — and the wider natural world. In 1972, the group named itself the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and became a nonprofit organization focused on educating people — and specifically children — about nature. In 1987, VINS opened the Vermont Raptor Center in Woodstock, as both an infirmary for injured birds and an exhibit area for the public to view resident birds. Raptors — also known as birds of prey — are most easily identified by their hooked beaks and curved talons. Individual donations and a grant from the Kresge Foundation aided construction. Businessman and philanthropist Laurance Rockefeller gave money to help build an auditorium; Woodstock architect Charles Helmer contributed the design. Eventually, the organization outgrew its original site and purchased 47 acres along the Quechee Gorge in 2001. The current center was built with donations from individuals, foundations and area businesses, and a federal grant secured by the late Sen. James Jeffords. In 2004, the center opened to the public with a mission “to motivate individuals to care for the natural

BY BRETT ANN STANCIU


THE

ISSUE

ders in a web or mammals scurrying through an underground burrow in the Adventure Playscape, a playground made of stone and wood. An indoor forest exhibit features a 7-foot-wide model tree youngsters can climb inside. This interactive, two-story tree allows children to smell different tree scents and hold a real moose hoof and an antler. A tunnel slide starts on a balcony and ends in the woods. This summer, visitors will see a roped-off construction area just off the forest path. It’s the site of a Forest Canopy Walk, slated to open this fall. The walk — 65 feet above ground at its highest point — will lead visitors on an 800-foot-long path through the trees. Designed to be accessible to strollers and visitors in wheelchairs, the path uses the natural drop of the landscape to rise into the trees while remaining relatively level. At one end, a 100-foot tree house tower will rise for more agile explorers, with a spiral staircase leading to its crest. From there, visitors will find a sweeping view of Dewey’s Pond and the Ottauquechee River just before it enters Quechee

Black-capped chickadees being fed at VINS’ wild bird rehabilitation center

Children climbing on a spider web play structure in VINS’ Adventure Playscape

Gorge. Pivoting around, climbers will face the forest canopy at eye level — just like a bird. Another feature of the canopy walk is the Eagle’s Nest, an octagonal cargo-net structure suspended above the ground, designed to ignite imagination about what it’s like to live in the trees. As they prepare for the new attraction to open, the staff at VINS continue to offer kids a front-row seat to the wonders of nature. Gelroth recalled a recent group of middle school students who were able to hold a rehabilitated songbird before the tiny creature was released. “That’s like, wow, how often does that happen? They’ll probably remember that — maybe for their whole life,” she said. “That’s what we do.”  Learn more at vinsweb.org.

UPCOMING EVENTS AT VINS

A bird’s-eye view of VINS’ 47-acre campus

At VINS’ Incredible Insect Festival on Saturday, July 6, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., bug expert Sam Jaffe showcases live critters in his Caterpillar Lab, entomologists and a local beekeeper answer questions, and kids participate in demonstrations, games and crafts. Wear your wings and construct a magical dwelling at the center’s Forest Fairy Hunt on Saturday, July 13, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Regular admission, $14.50-16.50; free for children under 4. KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

Storytime with Ted

One to Watch

Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? Tell us more! He or she could be featured as One to Watch in an upcoming issue of Kids VT.

Tuesdays in July, in the Bear Shop at 10:30 am Join us for Bear Hugs, stories, snacks and photo ops with Ted!

Visit Kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

6655 Shelbu rn e Rd , S h e lbu rn e • 802.985.1319 Untitled-7 1

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FALL 2019

SWIM

SCHOOL TM

Private and Group Swim Lessons at the UVM Indoor Pool 8-Week Session Begins September 8 Registration open August 5-September 2

Private lessons for ages 4 and up Group swim lessons for ages 4-8 years Stroke development for ages 8 and up

Open to the community go.uvm.edu/vtswimschool (802) 656-4483 26

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CALENDAR JULY Families explore stellar science activities at the APOLLO 11 50TH ANNIVERSARY: CELEBRATING OUR FIRST LUNAR STEPS. Investigate the technology that sent men to the moon and watch footage of astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin taking their first lunar leaps. Saturday, July 20, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich.

DREAMSTIME | © WISCONSINART

One Giant Leap…

The LUNAR LANDING ASTRONOMY EXTRAVAGANZA honors this historic event with special planetarium shows, moon rocks, star-themed crafts, science activities for all ages and more. Saturday, July 20, 1-7 p.m., Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury.

SPONSORED BY:

Astronomers of all ages fête APOLLO ANNIVERSARY SPACE DAYS with out-of-this-world science fun, including air rockets and marshmallows floating in a vacuum chamber. Tuesday, July 23-Thursday, July 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington.

Week to Week SAT

Parkapalooza: Live music, a giant slip ’n slide, kids’ activities, a skill swap featuring local crafters and artisans, and local food make for family fun in the park. 3-8 p.m., Hubbard Park, Montpelier.

FRI-SUN

Lamoille County Field Days: Families enjoy a pay-one-price event, kicking off the summer season of fairs. Kids’ fun includes pedal pulls, magic shows, games and rides. See lamoillefielddays.com for detailed schedule. Lamoille County Field Days Fairgrounds, Johnson.

SAT

Lake Champlain Maritime Festival Pirate Park: Ahoy! Captains of the seas dive into children’s activities, including tunes by Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate, games and a bouncy house in this memorable waterfront day devoted to the young. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Waterfront Park, Burlington.

JULY 20

JULY 26-28

JULY 27

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org. KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

2 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: Fledgling architects assemble creations collaboratively with colorful blocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN ‘Pinocchio’: Very Merry Theatre enchants an audience of all ages with the classic tale of the wooden puppet who dreamed of becoming a boy. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, noon-1 p.m. Info, 899-4962. FREE Board Game Day: Strategy lovers spend an afternoon with tabletop fun. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 1-3 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Maker Tuesdays: Imaginative crafters explore the universe with stellar solar system-themed projects. Ages 6-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Tinker Tuesdays: Kids investigate what makes technology tick by taking apart objects and designing new creations. Use the library’s materials or bring in computers, keyboards or other old electronics. Winooski Memorial Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: Athletes of all ages and abilities choose between 2.5K and 5K courses or a short “cubs” race — with a 10K option on the second Tuesday of each month — during this fun evening race. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 5:30-8 p.m., $10; free for children under 18. Info, 879-6001. Youth Escape Room: Clever kiddos try to crack a cosmic challenge. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 & 4 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE WINDSOR Time-Travel Tuesdays: History buffs of all ages learn what daily life was like in 1890 by helping prepare seasonal meals, churn butter and wash laundry the old-fashioned way. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

CALEDONIA Night Sky Spectacular: Small ones soak up a star story and create their own constellation booklet. Ages 5-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Info, 748-8291. FREE CHITTENDEN ‘Pinocchio’: Very Merry Theatre’s thespians wow the audience, followed by a free lunch. Recommended for ages 5 and up. All welcome. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE 4th of July Crafting Workshop: Holiday-spirited small ones create projects in celebration of Independence Day. Ages 12 and under. Milton Public Library, 2-3:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE B.A.R.K. at the Library: Pam Loeb of the American Kennel Club brings the Be a Reading Kid program to the library’s temporary location and offers little ones a chance to read to a dog. Ages 4-12. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., preregister for a particular time. Info, 985-5124. FREE Burlington 3rd of July Independence Day Celebration: Live bands and fun-filled activities — including a biplane airshow, face painting and food trucks — set the scene for spectacular fireworks over Lake Champlain. See btvjuly3.com for specific schedules in Burlington parks. Various locations, Burlington. Info, 864-0123. FREE Kite Making & Festival: Kids create crafts from dowels and plastic bags, from 3-4 p.m. Adult required for age 6 and under. From 4-5 p.m., the community launches kites. Meet at the library and walk to the Summit St. fields. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-5 p.m. Info, 878-6955. FREE Leddy Park Beach Bites: Families relax during a lakeside afternoon lavish with kids’ activities, food trucks and entertainment. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE

FRANKLIN Astrology 101: Curious kids explore the meaning of the stars they were born beneath and create a personalized craft. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m., preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE Outer Space Collage: Children collaborate to make an art mural for the library. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: Local vendors peddle farm-fresh produce and fruits, handcrafted breads, artisan cheese, and more at this large outdoor emporium. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Barton: Children ages 18 and under receive nutritious, locally sourced meals at no cost from this mobile kitchen. Food available for purchase for adults. Barton Public Library, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 334-2044. FREE

Glass pressing

Glass Blowing Workshop: In this 20-minute session, you get to blow a suncatcher and press an ornament. Everyone gets to make something and take it home! Great for ages 5 and up. “One of the best parts of my job is watching the wonder on kids’ faces when they experience glassblowing,” says instructor Jacob. Located in Vergennes. Info, 948-2209, john@hubglass.com.

WASHINGTON Family Fun Day at the Pool: Summer-minded folks meet up for fun in the water and at the poolside. Open to all. Montpelier Public Pool, 1:30-4 p.m., food available for purchase. Info, 225-8699. FREE Montpelier July 3 Independence Day Celebration: The State House lawn hosts 3 p.m. opening ceremonies for the 2019 Family Olympics with friendly games promoting teamwork and self-confidence. The Montpelier Mile footrace at 6 p.m., followed by a parade, live music, loads of food vendors — and fireworks — finish the evening with a flourish. State House lawn, Montpelier, 3-10 p.m., food available for purchase. Info, 223-9604. WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: Fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local meats and cheeses, cut flowers, and seasonal fruits and berries represent the best of the growing season, with the accompaniment of live music. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Info, 457-3555.

4 Thursday Happy Indpendence Day! ADDISON Bristol Fourth of July Celebration: See July 3. CHITTENDEN Colchester Fourth of July Celebration: AllAmerican revelry includes a fun run at 8:15 a.m., a parade at 11 a.m. — starting at Colchester High School — and live music, topped off with fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Colchester, $5 for fun run. Info, 264-5500. Milton 4th of July: Independence is fêted with an 11 a.m. grand parade, food galore, the Milton Community Band at 7:30 p.m. and a pyrotechnic display. Bombardier Park, Milton, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Info, 893-8083. FREE Williston Fourth of July: See July 3, 9 a.m.

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

ADDISON Bristol Fourth of July Celebration: This small town celebrates the Fourth in a big way with a chicken BBQ, games, live music and fireworks at dusk on Wednesday, followed by a 7:30 a.m. 5K on the 4th, a 10:30 a.m. parade, food and craft vendors and more festivities. Various locations, Bristol, 6 p.m.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Williston Fourth of July: Williston fêtes the national holiday over two days, with a 5K Firecracker Fun Run Tuesday at 6 p.m., an ice cream social and a concert on the town green. A 10 a.m. festival parade launches Thursday, followed by music and activities, including a Fire Department Open House from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and a fireworks display at dusk. Williston Green, 4 p.m., fees for some activities. Info, 876-1160.

Classes

3 Wednesday

Middlebury Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies, eggs and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: Pedalers of all ages and abilities wend their way along the trails in a non-intimidating atmosphere. This fun event includes 2.5K or 5K options and a short loop for ages 8 and under, beginning at 6 p.m. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 5:30-8 p.m., $10; free for kids under 18. Info, 879-6001.

Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a complete martial arts system based on leverage (provides a greater advantage and effect on a much larger opponent) and technique (fundamentals of dominant body position to use the technique to overcome size and strength). Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu enhances balance, flexibility, strength, cardiorespiratory fitness, and builds personal courage and self-confidence. Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu offers Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Self-Defense classes (all levels), Boxing and NHB programs available. Brazilian head instructor with over 30 years of experience (Five-time Brazilian champion, Rio de Janeiro), certified under Carlson Gracie. Positive and safe environment. Effective and easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life. Accept no imitations. Monday-Friday, 6-9 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m. The “Punch Line” Boxing Class, Tuesday and Thursday, 6-7 p.m. Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Road, Suite 35, Williston. First class free. Info, 660-4072, visit www. bjjusa.com or email Julio@bjjusa.com.

FRANKLIN Fairfax Fourth of July: With a 1 p.m. start, this popular two-mile parade gets the crowd clapping. Fairfax Community Park & Recreation Path, 1 p.m. Info, 849-6111, ext. 20. LAMOILLE Stowe Fourth of July Celebration: An old-fashioned shindig starts at 10 a.m. with the Moscow parade. Live entertainment, music, a 1 p.m. village parade and more follow from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The fun picks up at Mayo Farm at 6 p.m., with fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Stowe. Info, 503-5771. FREE WASHINGTON Cabot Fourth of July: A Main Street parade at 11 a.m. leads to an afternoon of fun in the sun, including field games, a bounce house, a chicken barbecue and a dunk tank. Cabot Recreation Field, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 563-3338. FREE Warren Fourth of July: Thousands don red, white and blue to attend one of the state’s largest parades at 10 a.m., followed by a street dance. Events continue all day at Sugarbush Resort until a finale of fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Warren, suggested donation $1. Info, 498-8545. WINDSOR ‘An Old Vermont Fourth’: Traditional music, flag making, hand-cranked ice cream, patriotic speeches and a historic debate make for a merry holiday on this famous day. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. THURSDAY 4, P. 30 » KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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CALENDAR JULY 4 Thursday (cont.)

5 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: Local produce, plants, artisan cheese, syrup and more fill shoppers’ market baskets. Diverse dinner fare available. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 3-6 p.m. Info, 832-498-4734. CHITTENDEN Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment provides tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under with caregivers. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members; preregister. Info, 862-9622. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. Richmond Farmers Market: Vendors peddle handheld pies, dinner delectables, homemade pickles, just-picked produce and much more at this lively showcase of locavorism. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Info, 391-0806. Teen Movie Night: Young adults take in a film about the galaxy while munching free popcorn. Ages 13 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE FRANKLIN Out-of-This-World Papier-Mâché: Kids of all ages get messy making cosmic creations. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 2 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE RUTLAND Brandon Independence Day Celebration: The fun kicks off Friday at Seminary Park with a food fest and street dance. Saturday festivities are held at Park Village, with a 10 a.m. parade this year followed by a Moose Crossing live concert, family games, vendors, karaoke with Tenacious T — all topped off with fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Brandon, 5-10 p.m., most events are free. Info, 247-3635. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: Petite ones play with plastic cubes and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. Kids’ Fridays: History buffs dig into heritage crafts and hands-on learning, followed by a free lunch. Old Stone House Museum, Brownington, 11 a.m.noon. Info, 754-2022. FREE WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: Guests tour the heirloom garden, then watch as veggies make their way into historic recipes prepared in the 1890 farmhouse kitchen, with different take-home recipes every week. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 4, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Seasonal Events ARTSRIOT TRUCK STOP BURLINGTON:

Foodies enjoy an eclectic array of local grub and live music during this hip block party. ArtsRiot, Burlington, FRIDAYS, 5-10 P.M.; cost for food. Info, 540-0406.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure ArtsRiot Truck Stop prominently in displays of “shop local” options. St. Johnsbury Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. St. Johnsbury Lapsit Storytime: Parents and wee ones partake in stories, fingerplay and bounce songs. Ages 2 and under. Older siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 748-8291. FREE

STOWEFLAKE HOT AIR BALLOON FESTIVAL: Floating orbs transport

people through the sky at a balloon-launch fest with plenty of entertainment and eats. Festival and kids’ tent opens at 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. 7 p.m. approximate time for sunset launches on Friday and Saturday. Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa, FRIDAY, JULY 5, TO SUNDAY, JULY 7, free to view the 6:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday morning launches; $10 admission to festival events; free for children under 12; $10 for tethered rides. Info, 253-7355. COURTESY OF LUKE AWTRY

NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: History buffs honor America by watching reenactments and listening to patriotic music on the grounds where soldiers served to secure independence. Fort Ticonderoga, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $12-24; free for children under 5. Info, 518-585-2821.

6 Saturday

PARTY IN THE PARK: Fairfax fêtes summer with local musicians, food trucks, lawn games, the 27th annual Ducky Race and fireworks at dusk. Fairfax Community Park & Recreation Path, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 6 P.M. Info, 849-6111, ext. 20. FREE EAT UP AT THE GREEN: Live music, a playground, food trucks and libations make for a merry summer evening. Camp Meade, Middlesex, SUNDAYS, 4-9 P.M. Info, 496-2108. FREE

SOBU NITE OUT: Festive-minded folks flock

to the park for a fête of live music and food trucks. Veterans Memorial Park, South Burlington, THURSDAYS, 5-8 P.M. Info, 846-4108. SUMMERVALE: Slow Food Vermont tastings,

live music, kids’ crafts and food-focused activities varying by the week promise locavore fun in the sun. No pets. Burlington Intervale Center, THURSDAYS, 5:30-8 P.M.; food and drink available for purchase. Info, 660-0440. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE: Live music entertains the downtown crowd, coupled with good food and children’s activities. Downtown Rutland, FRIDAYS, 5-10 P.M. Info, 773-9380. FREE WATERBURY ARTS FEST: This small town’s

streets transform into a lively outdoor gallery and fair with gourmet food, music and goods from over 100 artists. Downtown Waterbury, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 5:30-10 P.M., AND SATURDAY, JULY 13, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. Info, 496-6466. FREE ANTIQUES & UNIQUES: 100 antiques and col-

lectibles vendors, jewelry makers, quilters, food vendors, woodworkers, and potters share their goodies. Roaming buskers and picnicking round out the day. Craftsbury Common, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 10 A.M.-4 P.M.; donations accepted for area non-profits; $5 parking fee for Craftsbury fire department. Info, 586-2823.

DO GOOD FEST: Michael Franti & Spearhead headline this musical shindig on National Life’s lawn, with opening act Hailey Knox, food trucks, a nonprofit village, children’s activities and fireworks. National Life Group, Montpelier, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 2:30-9:30 P.M., free admission, $20-25 parking fee; proceeds benefit Branches of Hope, a Cancer Patient Fund. Info, 223-9604.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: In a new location this year, growers and artisans offer fresh and ready-to-eat foods, crafts, free face-painting by Little Artsy Faces, and more in a bustling marketplace. Pine Street, Burlington, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. NEWPORT’S FRIDAY NIGHT SHUFFLE: The

community comes out for a downtown stroll to enjoy live music, art exhibits and specials at local eateries. Various locations, Newport, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 5-8:30 P.M. Info, 988-2611. CRAFT AND VENDOR OPEN AIR MARKET:

Shoppers browse goods crafted by local artisans in a festive, outdoor venue. Rusty Parker Memorial Park, Waterbury, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., proceeds benefit the Brain Injury Association of Vermont. Info, 244-6850. FREE MAPLE MADNESS: Sugaring season is

celebrated in July with all things maple, including sugar-on-snow, tree tapping, storytime, a maple maze and much more sweetness. Morse Farm Maple Sugarworks, Montpelier, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 10 A.M.-8 P.M. Info, 223-2740. FREE LAMOILLE COUNTY FIELD DAYS: Families flock

to this pay-one-price event, kicking off the summer season of fairs. Kids’ fun includes pedal pulls, magic shows, games, rides and prizes. Lamoille County Field Days Fairgrounds, Johnson, FRIDAY, JULY 26, TO SUNDAY, JULY 28, $10-12; includes midway rides. Info, 635-7113.

LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL PIRATE PARK: Ahoy, mateys! Captains of the seas dive

into children’s activities, including Rockin’ Ron the Pirate, games with Big Blue Trunk, bouncy houses and more, in this memorable waterfront day devoted to the young. Waterfront Park, Burlington, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 9 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 482-3313. BIG TINY LOVE: A FESTIVAL FOR KIDS: As part of the Lake Champlain Maritime Festival, the Skinny Pancake hosts a family-friendly shindig with live music from Mister Chris and Friends, Linda Bassick and Ukelele Kids’ Joe Beaird; a Circus Smirkus performance; kids’ yoga classes from Sangha Studio; and more. Burlington’s Waterfront Park, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 10 A.M.-3 P.M.; proceeds from food and beverage sales will be donated to the University of Vermont Medical Center’s Neo-Natal Intensive Care Unit. Info, 861-9753. FREE

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: New mamas tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, Essex Junction, 9:45 a.m., $17; $120-140 for a 10-class pass; childcare for ages 6 months-6 years available. Info, 899-0339. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn doit-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon, preregister at workshops. homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Shelburne Farmers Market: Musical entertainment adds merriment to this exchange of local fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, maple syrup and more. Shelburne Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 482-4279. FRANKLIN Bakersfield Independence Day Celebration: The community comes out for old-fashioned fun, with a parade at noon, followed by a chicken BBQ, a horseshoe tournament, fun run, live music, an airshow at 7 p.m. and a fireworks grand finale at dusk. Route 36 and Route 108, Bakersfield, 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Info, 827-6145. FREE RUTLAND Battle of Hubbardton Revolutionary War Encampment Weekend: During the early morning hours of July 7, 1777, British General John Burgoyne’s army met the resistance of American colonists. This two-day reenactment invites the public to witness ongoing demonstrations of camp life, military tactics, engineering, cooking, crafts, medicine, artillery demonstrations and more. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $3; free for children under 15. Info, 273-2282. Brandon Independence Day Celebration: See July 5, 9:30 a.m. Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: Locals load up on garden-fresh produce, Vermontmade crafts, baked goods and more. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Greensboro Fourth of July: “The Funky Fourth of July” features a fun-filled parade and “Vermont’s Own” 40th Army Band at 10 a.m. and fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Greensboro. Info, 533-2911. FREE


HELP SOMEONE'S DREAM BECOME A REALITY.

WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: Veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at a celebration of farm-grown food and handmade crafts. Downtown Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 279-7293. Waitsfield Farmers Market: Saturday shoppers search out handmade crafts and local produce, meat and maple products, while enjoying lunch fare and live music in a grassy outdoor venue. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 4, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

7 Sunday ADDISON Family Play: Moms, dads and children have fun with free court time and use of equipment. Open to all experience levels. Middlebury Indoor Tennis, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 388-3733. FREE CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: Little ones and caregivers drop in and get messy with multiple materials to spark imagination. Ages 18 months to 5 years with caregiver. Radiate Art Space, Richmond, 10-11:30 a.m., $5 per child; $8 max per family; $40 for a 10-visit punch card. Info, 324-9938. Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14 per child. Info, 655-3300. Family Gym: See July 5. Winooski Farmers Market: Local produce, farm goods, artisan crafts, kids’ activities and tunes come together on the banks of the Winooski River. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: Live music and agricultural and craft vendors make for a bustling atmosphere. Stowe Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 472-8027. RUTLAND Battle of Hubbardton Revolutionary War Encampment Weekend: See July 6. ORLEANS Color the Kingdom Run: In this noncompetitive 5K, runners and walkers dressed in white get splattered with a rainbow of nontoxic colors. Craftsbury Academy, Craftsbury Common, 10-11 a.m., $10-15; free for children under 12; $30 per family of 2 adults and 2 children; proceeds benefit WonderArts programs. Info, 533-9370. NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 4, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

8 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BECOMING A GESTATIONAL SURROGATE.

Family Karaoke: The whole family has fun singing and dancing with tunes. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Gardening at the Library: Junior green thumbs dig in the dirt and sample their harvest. Ages 8-11. Milton Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Model Rocket Launch: Eager young engineers ages 6 and up engage in building projects, sponsored by Brownell Library and Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, with two sessions at 4:30 and 5:15 p.m. Everyone welcome to the 6 p.m. flight. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4:30-7 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. All ages. Milton Public Library, 10-11 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Teen Space: Adolescents enjoy games, music, snacks and a different activity each week. Milton Public Library, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Locomotive 220: Inspired by the Museum’s rail car Grand Isle, children construct and color their own wooden train toy. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. WASHINGTON Judi Byron and her Little/Big Harp: This musician leads a morning of singing with a hands-on chance to check out her unusual instrument. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

9 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See July 2.

(802) 497-6579

INFO@VTSURROGACY.COM

VTSURROGACY.COM k4t-VTSurrogacyNetwork0519.indd 1

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DANCE CLASSES FOR EVERYONE! SUPERIOR CLASSICAL BALLET TRAINING VAGANOVA & BALANCHINE METHOD

For class schedules rg visit vbts.o or call 878-2941

CHITTENDEN ‘The Perils of Mr. Punch’: Modern Times Theatre’s hand-puppet Mr. Punch makes the audience roar with his rascally adventures in outer space. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

STORM

Inspiring dancers, bringing art to life

Competition Team

Auditions!!!

Ballet & Pointe Ages 3 to Pre-Professional Fitness • Jazz • Lyrical • Tap VBTS Storm Dance Co. Director Kate Stevens Contemporary • Hip Hop

VBTS Center for Dance STORM Competition Team will be holding auditions for their 2019802-878-2941 2020 season on Saturday, June 1st!

vbts.org • info@vbts.org

Beautiful Bugs: What do bugs eat? The Humane Society shares some stories about these tiny critters, followed by a craft. Ages 4-13. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 899-4962. FREE

STORM is an excellent opportunity for Dance VBTS theThe dancer thatShop lovesat the competition and 802-879-7001 convention atmosphere, wants exposure to the industry professionals and master classes available, and values personalized feedback to advance and grow as an artist.

Big Blue Trunk Returns: Kids have a blast with games and challenges on the library’s lawn. All ages. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 1-3 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

TWO LOCATIONS!

Auditions held at our Essex campus: Essex Campus, 21 Carmichael St., Unit 203 21 Carmichael St., Suite 203

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m.

Shelburne Campus, 4066 Shelburne Rd. June 1:30-3:30pm at 1st, Shelburne Commons

Ages 7 - 18

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STORM details and team requirements can be found online at www.vbts.org


CALENDAR JULY

FARM TO BALLET AT RETREAT FARM: Art and agriculture come

Live Performances

CASTLETON SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Listeners enjoy a live performance under open skies. Castleton University, TUESDAYS, 7 P.M. Info, 800-639-8521. FREE CIRCUS SMIRKUS BIG TOP TOUR IN ST. JOHNSBURY:

High-flying feats into the wild blue yonder abound as Smirkus Troupers ages 10 to 18 dazzle crowds with jugglers, high-larious clowns and airborne aerialists. Green Mountain Mall, St Johnsbury, TUESDAY,

JULY 2, 1 & 6 P.M. AND WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1 & 6 P.M., $16-20; free for children under 2. Info,

877-764-7587.

MILTON MUSIC IN THE PARK: Families settle

down with lawn chairs and a picnic basket — or purchase tasty fare on site — while listening to live bands and playing lawn games. Bombardier Park, Milton, TUESDAY, JULY 2, 7-8:30

P.M., TUESDAY, JULY 9, 6-8:30 P.M., TUESDAY, JULY 16, 7-8:30 P.M., TUESDAY, JULY 23, 7-8:30 P.M. AND TUESDAY, JULY 30, 6-8:30 P.M. Info, 893-4111. FREE BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND SUMMER SERIES:

Music lovers unpack a picnic dinner and enjoy a Sunday evening performance. Battery Park, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 7 P.M. AND WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 7 P.M. Info, 864-0123. FREE BURLINGTON SUMMER CONCERTS: The lunch

crowd soaks up open-air performances held twice a week, this year on lower Church Street near City Hall. Check burlingtoncityarts.org for specific lineup. Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS AND FRIDAYS, 12:30 P.M. Info, 865-7166. FREE POPS CONCERT & FIREWORKS: The Sheldon Museum presents a performance by the Vermont Philharmonic, followed by explosive entertainment. Bring chairs, blankets and flashlights. Grounds open at 5:30 p.m. for picnicking. Middlebury College, WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 7:30 P.M., $10-30; free for children under 12. Info, 388-2117. MARSHFIELD SUMMER CONCERT SERIES:

Picnickers settle down for the evening with a family-friendly band, local food vendors, and the library’s bake and book sale. Old Schoolhouse Common Gazebo, Marshfield, THURSDAYS, 6:30-8:30 P.M. Info, 426-3581. FREE ‘VERMONT’S OWN’ 40TH ARMY BAND: Patriotic

tunes and contemporary American favorites make for an inspiring musical evening, with a finale of Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture” and fireworks. Smugglers’ Notch Resort, THURSDAY, JULY 4, 8 P.M. Info, 338-3480. FREE CIRCUS SMIRKUS BIG TOP TOUR IN ESSEX JUNCTION: High-flying feats into the wild blue

yonder abound as Smirkus Troupers ages 10 to 18 dazzle crowds with jugglers, high-larious clowns and airborne aerialists. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, FRIDAY, JULY 5, NOON & 6 P.M., SATURDAY, JULY 6, NOON & 6 P.M. AND SUNDAY, JULY 7, 11 A.M. & 4 P.M., $19-22; free

for children under 2. Info, 877-764-7587.

PEKING ACROBATS: With the festive pageantry of a Chinese carnival, this troupe astounds the audience with daring maneuvers which defy gravity, including trick-cycling, precision tumbling, juggling, somersaulting and gymnastics. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, FRIDAY, JULY 5, 3 & 7 P.M., $23-45. Info, 760-4634.

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together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont’s farming culture. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. to visit animals and enjoy indoor and outdoor play spaces. Bring a blanket or chairs. Fare available from local food trucks. Retreat Farm, Brattleboro, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 5:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25.

BREAD & PUPPET PERFORMANCE: The

renowned politically oriented theatrical company performs new works with live music and papier-mâché puppets. Bread and Puppet Museum, Glover, SUNDAYS, 2:30 P.M., suggested donation $10. Info, 525-3031.

PARKAPALOOZA: Live music, a giant slip ’n slide, kids’ activities, a skill swap featuring local crafters and artisans, and a food vendor mean family fun in the park. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 3-8 P.M., $3-5; $10 per family; preregister for $10-15 per campsite. Info, 223-7335.

MIDDLEBURY FESTIVAL-ON-THE-GREEN:

Music-loving families delight in daily concerts all week long, including “brown bag” family-friendly performances at noon each day, including No Strings Marionette Company on Wednesday, July 10. Festivities begin Sunday at 7 p.m. and evening performances fill the night air Monday through Friday. A Vermont Jazz Ensemble street dance closes the festival Saturday, July 13, starting at 7 p.m. Middlebury Green, SUNDAY, JULY 7, TO SATURDAY, JULY 13, donations welcome. Info, 462-3555. FREE

FARM TO BALLET IN SHELBURNE: Art

Circus Smirkus Big Top Tour

MUSIC IN THE MEADOW: Sunset over the mountains burnishes the backdrop for an outdoor concert, with ample picnicking space. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, SUNDAY, JULY 7, 7:30-10 P.M. AND SUNDAY, JULY 14, 7-9 P.M., $5-35; free for children under 5. Info, 253-5720. FREE RANDOLPH COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES:

Families, friends and neighbors bring lawn chairs and blankets for an evening of festive live bands — varying each week from country to jazz — and food for sale by area nonprofits. Music begins at 6 p.m. Gifford Park, Randolph, TUESDAYS, 5:30 P.M. Info, 728-2380. FREE SHELBURNE TOWN CONCERT SERIES: Festive

folks relax on summer evenings with live music, a picnic from home or fresh food prepared from farm fare. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Shelburne Farms, WEDNESDAYS, 6:30-8 P.M., donations accepted for Town of Shelburne Recreation Department. Info, 985-9551.

BATTERY PARK CONCERT SERIES: Listeners gaze

out at Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks while swaying to summer tunes. Check pointfm.com for specific lineup. Battery Park, Burlington, THURSDAYS, 6:30-8:30 P.M. FREE

‘WINNIE THE POOH’: Pooh welcomes the audience into the Hundred Acre Wood, where his friends plot to rescue Christopher Robin from the mysterious Backson while learning about teamwork, friendship and — of course — sharing snacks. All ages. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville, THURSDAY, JULY 11, TO

FARM TO BALLET IN WEST CORINTH: Arts and agriculture come together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont’s farming culture. Doors open at 5 p.m. for picnicking and farm tours. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and a picnic dinner, or purchase locally sourced farm fare. Crossmolina Farm, W. Corinth, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 6:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25. Info, balletvermont.org. CIRCUS PALOOZA: Aerial artists pull off fanciful feats under the big top while kids take part in carnival games and activities galore. Johnny Peers and the Muttville Comix claim the day’s spotlight. Shelburne Museum, SUNDAY, JULY 14, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. FARM TO BALLET IN WOLCOTT: Art and

agriculture come together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont’s farming culture. Doors open at 5 p.m. for picnicking or farm dinner fare and self-guided tours. Bring a blanket or chair. Sandiwood Farm, Wolcott, SUNDAY, JULY 14, 6:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25. Info, balletvermont.org. LEVITT AMP ST. JOHNSBURY MUSIC SERIES:

SATURDAY, JULY 13, 7 P.M. AND SUNDAY, JULY 14, 2 P.M., $5. Info, 626-5358.

Produced by Catamount Arts, these kid- and canine-friendly shindigs at Dog Mountain make for relaxed Sundays. Dog Mountain, St Johnsbury, SUNDAYS, 4 P.M., food and drink available for purchase. Info, 888-757-5559. FREE

CIRCUS SMIRKUS BIG TOP TOUR IN MANCHESTER:

OWL’S HEAD MUSIC NIGHT: Weather permitting,

High-flying feats into the wild blue yonder abound as Smirkus Troupers ages 10 to 18 dazzle crowds with jugglers, high-larious clowns and airborne aerialists. Manchester Parks and Rec, FRIDAY, JULY 12, 1 & 6 P.M. AND SATURDAY, JULY 13, 1 & 6 P.M., $18-22; free for children under 2. Info, 877-764-7587.

berry pickers groove to local bands while gathering nature’s little treasures and enjoying a picnic dinner from home. Fields open at 5 p.m.; music begins at 6 p.m. Space is limited. Owl’s Head Blueberry Farm, Richmond, TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, two-quart minimum per adult blueberry purchase for entry. Info, 434-3387.

‘ELF THE MUSICAL JR’: Thespians entertain the

audience in a musical based on the beloved holiday film, with laughs for the whole family. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville,

THURSDAY, JULY 18, TO SATURDAY, JULY 20, 7 P.M. AND SUNDAY, JULY 21, 2 P.M., $10. Info, 626-5358.

and agriculture come together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont’s farming culture. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for picnicking or dinner fare from local farms. Bring a blanket or chairs. Shelburne Farms, SUNDAY, JULY 21, 6:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25. Info, balletvermont.org.STOWE GAZEBO CONCERT: Musicians make a merry outdoor evening. Check website for specific performers. Stowe Free Library, TUESDAYS, 6-7 P.M., donations accepted. Info, 253-7792. YOUNG TRADITION VERMONT SHOWCASE:

Summer participants in Camp Trad — which focuses on learning and performing traditional music and dance — entertain the audience with a varied repertoire. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Shelburne Farms, TUESDAY, JULY 23, 6-7 P.M., Info, 985-8686. FREE ‘THE DOCTOR AND THE DOWRY’: Under open skies, the community cheers for an original comedy based on the works of Moliere. Bring a lawn chair or blanket and snacks. WonderArts Community Greenspace, Craftsbury, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 7-8:30 P.M., donations accepted. Info, 533-9370. ‘NEWSIES’: Local thespians engage the audience

with this family-friendly production based on the historic 1899 strike when New York City newspaper boys fought against unfair working conditions. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville, THURSDAY, JULY 25, TO SATURDAY, JULY 27, 7 P.M. AND SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2 P.M., $10. Info, 626-5358. FARM TO BALLET IN WOODSTOCK: Arts and agriculture come together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont’s farming culture. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. for picnicking and farm tours. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and a picnic dinner, or purchase locally sourced farm fare. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 6:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25. Info, balletvermont.org. FARM TO BALLET IN ESSEX: Arts and agriculture come together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont agriculture on the farm which inspired the beloved children’s book Sweet Pea & Friends. Doors open at 5 p.m. Bring a picnic or purchase farm dinner fare. Moonrise Farm, Essex Junction, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 6:30 P.M., $20; free for children under 13 if pre-purchased; day of event, $10-25. Info, balletvermont.org.


9 Tuesday (cont.) Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around The Adventures of a Girl Called Bicycle by Christina Uss. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Firecracker Fruit Kabobs: City Market mixes food and fun at the Old North End Farmers Market. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Info, 861-8753. FREE Maker Tuesdays: See July 2. Papier-Mâché Planet Workshop: In this two-day workshop, artsy kids make and decorate their very own planet. Ages 8-11. Milton Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Strategy Board Games: Game lovers partake in complicated tabletop pastimes. Ages 13 and up. Milton Public Library, 5-7:45 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Movies at the Library: Families in sleepywear snuggle in for space-themed movies and munch free popcorn. South Burlington Public Library, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 846-4140. FREE Papier-Mâché Planet Workshop: See July 9. Taradiddle: This traditional storytelling duo weaves songs and stories into a delightful morning for the audience. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 3.

Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See July 2.

Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

FRANKLIN Blastoff!: Engineer-minded kids invent a spacecraft to carry an egg to a soft landing. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3-4 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

FRANKLIN Making Space for Pollinators: Junior naturalists soak up stories, then create a special t-shirt. Ages 6 and up. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m., preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: This renowned library fundraiser features 25 categories of gently used, bargain-priced books, restocked daily, held dawn to dusk on the porch and grounds. Stowe Free Library. Info, 253-6145.

Southern Vermont Natural History Museum: A visiting storyteller naturalist tells tales about animals and magic, with special guests of live animals. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 11 a.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

Tinker Tuesdays: See July 2.

WINDSOR Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 2.

10 Wednesday

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3.

ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Barton: See July 3.

CALEDONIA Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate: Ahoy, mateys! Summer readers cheer a swashbuckling performance by a musical pirate. Ages 12 and under. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE

WASHINGTON Family Fun Night: Family-focused activities alternate each week, from a puppet show to a sing-along. See website for specifics. All ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:45-8 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

Storywalk on the Hardwick Trails: The Jeudevine Library takes bibliophiles on a short walk into the woods for stories. Hazen Trails, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 3.

CHITTENDEN B.A.R.K. at the Library: See July 3. Booktivity: Based on the summer reading theme of space, imaginative kiddos get crafty with a hands-on project. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Extreme Book Giveaway: The Children’s Literacy Foundation captivates kiddos with interactive stories and hands out free books, too. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Leddy Park Beach Bites: See July 3. Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. For ages 11 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

11 Thursday CALEDONIA Knitting for Kids: Small crafters learn simple skills with Hazen Union High School student Audrey Grant. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-4 p.m., RSVP if yarn and needles are needed. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN Cardboard Box Parade: Youngsters wearing their ‘Universe of Stories’ t-shirt or donning a decorated cardboard box meet in front of City Hall for a mirthful march to Battery Park. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Colchester Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking toys. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

SUMMER of

SCIENCE LGBTSTEM DAY Friday, July 5

SENSORY-FRIENDLY SUNDAY, July 7 FIZZY FEST Friday & Saturday, July 19 & 20 APOLLO ANNIVERSARY SPACE DAYS Tuesday-Thursday, July 23-25 TRIVIAL PURSUIT: A 50-STATE ADVENTURE Exhibit Open thru Sept. 15 CHECK OUT THESE EVENTS & MORE AT ECHOVT.ORG

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CALENDAR JULY 11 Thursday (cont.) Jericho Farmers Market: Local growers offer heirloom tomatoes, fresh greens, fragrant herbs, wildflowers and more at this family-friendly market made merry with live music. Mills Riverside Park, Jericho, 3-6:30 p.m. LCATV Young Producers Workshop: Up-andcoming directors learn to use video equipment, put together a program and produce a take-home DVD. Ages 7-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2-3:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

CHITTENDEN Burger Night: Picnickers bring a blanket or chair to this local feast of grilled from-the-land fare and festive music by Mister Chris and Friends. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, $10-25; season’s passes $25-90; free for children under 2; preregister. Info, 985-9200.

Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Game starts at 6:30 p.m.; come early for assistance with character design. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Champlain College Summer Open House: Prospective students check out the college’s unique Upside-Down Curriculum and Career Collaborative. Champlain College, Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 860-2700. FREE

Family Painted Pottery: Dads, moms and kids enjoy an instructional and creative evening together. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person; preregister. Info, 425-2700.

Milton Farmers Market: Farmers, foodies and crafters come together to celebrate the bounty of the growing season. Hannaford Supermarket, Milton, 3:30-7 p.m. Info, 893-1009. Music with Ukulele Joe: This local musician gets the kiddie crowd rocking. All ages. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

PJ Storytime: Little ones snuggle up in their sleepy clothes for bedtime yarns. Ages 7 and under. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:15 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Space Age Coding Club Fun: Inquisitive kids experiment with bots, block-based coding, droids and more. Ages 8 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See July 8, 10:30 a.m. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their imagination with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. Glow in the Dark STEM: Curious kids investigate science, technology, engineering and math skills using illuminated sticks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Hard’ack Trail Running Series: Running and walking feet get going in 1K, 3K and 5K races for all ages and abilities. Hard’ack Recreation Area, St. Albans, 6 p.m., $4-6; free for kids in the 1k. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266. Maker Space: Imaginative youngsters drop in and investigate the library’s stash of toys and recycled materials, circuits, lights, motors and more. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

RAPTORS IN RESIDENCE: The mysteries

NESTLINGS FIND NATURE: What is

STORY ACTIVITY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS:

SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30-11:30 A.M., regular

surrounding birds of prey are revealed as visitors come face-to-face with live feathered creatures. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAYS, TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS, 1-1:30 P.M., regular museum admission, $5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686. Farm activities wow little learners with themed stories, a snack, hands-on activities and a special visit to the barn. Ages 3 and up. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, WEDNESDAYS, 9-10:30 A.M., $3-5; includes farm and museum admission; preregister. Info, 457-2355. BOTANICAL INVESTIGATION DAY: Amateur naturalists dig deep into our wild world, with a day of dissecting flowers, reading tree rings, identifying ferns and more. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 11 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $15-18; free for children under 3. Info, 649-2200.

LAMOILLE Art on Park: White tents house the works of jewelers, potters, painters, fiber artists, food vendors and more. Live music, street artists and food trucks add to the atmosphere. Park Street, Stowe, 5-8 p.m. Info, 253-7321. FREE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

SENSORY-FRIENDLY SUNDAY AT ECHO: Kids,

12 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 5.

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Galactic Stories and Food: Inquisitive kids investigate the universe with stories and snacks. Ages 6-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Science & Nature

INCREDIBLE INSECT FESTIVAL: Nature fans navigate the lives of these amazing creatures through hands-on activities, demonstrations, story and crafts. In the Caterpillar Lab, expert Sam Jaffe introduces eager guests to multiple live critters. Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Quechee, SATURDAY, JULY 6, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $14.50-16.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000.

ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Newport: Children ages 18 and under receive nutritious, locally sourced meals at no cost from this mobile kitchen. Food available for purchase for adults. Gardner Memorial Park, Newport, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 334-2044. FREE

Family Gym: See July 5.

teens and adults with sensory processing differences, autism spectrum disorder or developmental disabilities experience a calm museum, closed to the general public. Visitors interact with exhibits, participate in hands-on science activities or watch a short film with accommodations. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, SUNDAY, JULY 7, 9-10 A.M., free for families with sensoryprocessing differences. Info, 864-1848. SUMMER CAMPFIRE WITH OUTREACH FOR EARTH STEWARDSHIP: Families have fun around flick-

ering flames and meet a special winged guest. Ages 5 and up. Shelburne Farms, MONDAY, JULY 8, 6:30-8 P.M., $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 5. Lego Day: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design, followed by a themed PG-rated flick at noon. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Music with Raph: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:3010:15 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Richmond Farmers Market: See July 5.

Forest Fairy Hunt at Vermont Institute of Natural Science

pollination? Junior naturalists explore the world of tiny working creatures through observation, crafts and hands-on activities. Ages 4-8. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington,

museum admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

FAMILY FAERIE HOUSE BUILDING: Whimsical

nature-lovers construct wee dwellings from found forest materials. All ages. Mill Trail Property, Stowe, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 10 A.M.NOON, preregister. Info, 253-7221. FREE FOREST FAIRY HUNT: Milkweed pods become

bathtubs and beds, and acorn caps become dinnerware in this respectful and engaging woods adventure with a special visit from the Fairy Grandmother. Fairy wings encouraged. Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Quechee, SATURDAY, JULY 13, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $14.50-16.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000.

BATS IN THE BARN: Nocturnal flyers steal the show with a colorful slideshow and an evening flight from the Farm Barn, orchestrated by Barry Genzlinger — known as Barry the Bat Guy and founder of the Vermont Bat Center. Ages 7 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, FRIDAY, JULY 19, 7:30-9 P.M., $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686. FIZZY FEST: In this hands-on, messy festival, young scientists search out the secrets behind carbonated beverages, explore experiments that bubble and ooze, and investigate the extremely popular giant pile of foam. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, FRIDAY, JULY 19, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. AND SATURDAY, JULY 20, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum

admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

APOLLO 11 50TH ANNIVERSARY: CELEBRATING OUR FIRST LUNAR STEPS: Stellar science

activities celebrate this milestone in space exploration. Curious families investigate the technology used to send a person to the moon and admire astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin taking their first lunar steps. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 10:30 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $15-18; free for children under age 3. Info, 649-2200.

LUNAR LANDING ASTRONOMY EXTRAVAGANZA:

The Museum throws an astronomy party for the community to celebrate the lunar landing’s 50th anniversary with special planetarium shows, moon rocks on display, telescope instruction, astronomy-themed crafts, science activities for every age and much more. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1-7 P.M., donations appreciated. Info, 748-2372. FREE

APOLLO ANNIVERSARY SPACE DAYS:

Astronomers of all ages celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing with space-themed activities, including propelling rockets by stomping feet and observing marshmallows in a vacuum chamber. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, TUESDAY, JULY 23, TO THURSDAY, JULY 25, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50;

free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. BIRD-MONITORING WALK: Eagle-eyed

participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers, followed by coffee. Best for adults and older children. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, LAST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 7:30 A.M., donations welcome; preregistration encouraged. Info, 434-2167. GARDEN TEA PARTY AT THE INN: Pinkies up! Tea time follows a treasure hunt and exploration of the picturesque gardens. Ages 4 and up. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1-3 P.M., $10 per person; preregister. Info, 985-8686. VERMONT BREAKFAST ON THE FARM: Families

fill their bellies with a free breakfast, then meet the cows and farmers who produce safe, delicious, wholesome food. Sprague Ranch, Brookfield, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 8 A.M.-1 P.M., preregister. Info, 828-2430. FREE


Space Camp: Hosted by the South Burlington Library, small ones use the treehouse and gardens to build, construct and create like scientists and deep space explorers. Wheeler Homestead and Garden Park, South Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 846-4140. FREE VT Folklife Green Record Project: The Vermont Folklife Center teaches community members of all ages how to create an audio time capsule in the spirit of Carl Sagan’s Voyager Golden Records. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN Exordium Presents: The Planets with Mr. K: This science teacher shares a short presentation with curious children about each planet in our solar system, followed by a hands-on project. All ages. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently used clothing and toys, sizes newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 6.

14 Sunday

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

ADDISON Family Play: See July 7.

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See July 5.

CHITTENDEN A2VT: This ensemble rocks the audience with native African music and dance combined with Western hip-hop sensibilities. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Kids’ Fridays: See July 5. WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See July 5.

13 Saturday

Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

Meet a NASA Ambassador: Curious kids get their questions about space answered by Scott Turnbull, a NASA ambassador. Ages 5 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 6. FRANKLIN Telescopes are Cool: Families drop in and try the library’s telescope and binoculars with a make-believe moon on the ceiling. St. Albans Free Library, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Touch-a-Truck: Kids check out the big rigs with concessions, Vermont State Police K-9 demonstrations and car seat safety checks. Parking on Town Hill Road. Pittsford Village Farm, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $5 suggested donation per family. Info, 483-6335. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 6. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See July 6.

k12v-RobbiHandyHolmes0719.indd 1

6/21/19 Untitled-50 1:56 PM 1

3/28/19 10:25 AM

Winooski Farmers Market: See July 7.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 6.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6.

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

Family Gym: See July 5. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See July 7.

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 6.

EXPERT

Essex Open Gym: See July 7.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3.

CHITTENDEN Astronomy for Everyone: Former NASA consultant Kevin Manning guides families on a virtual journey across the cosmos, including outdoor sky gazing. Ages 8 and up with caregiver. South Burlington Public Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 846-4140. FREE

A Home-Grown

15 Monday CHITTENDEN Alien Earth: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum shares stories with curious kids about our planet’s prehistory, including live animals and fossils. Ages 3 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5-6 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Colchester Preschool Music: See July 8. Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Gardening at the Library: See July 8. Moon Landing Celebration Webcast: The community sips Tang while celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing with a guided re-creation of the spacecraft’s journey. South Burlington Public Library, 4-5 p.m. Info, 846-4140. FREE Teen Space: See July 8. Webby’s Art Studio: Full Steam Ahead: Amateur artists paint a paper boat with watercolors en plein air on the lawn beside the Ticonderoga steamboat. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. Wildlife Tales with Real Animals: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum mesmerizes the audience with an assortment of live animal friends and answers to questions. All ages. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See July 8. LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. WASHINGTON Family Fun Night: See July 10, 4 p.m.

Research Opportunity for Participants With and Without Autism

Researchers at the University of Vermont (Burlington, VT) are studying how language and cognition may differ between individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results may be used to help design and develop education and training programs for individuals with ASD. Who qualifies? • Children and adults (ages 5-75) without a history of traumatic brain injury, neurological disorder, psychiatric disorder, substance abuse, or learning disability • Children and adults (ages 5-75) with a professional diagnosis of ASD—including autism, autism spectrum disorder, Asperger’s Syndrome, or Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) What is involved? Testing will take place at the research lab in Burlington, VT (although some testing may take place elsewhere upon request). The study will take approximately 3 hours in total. • Participants will complete an initial screening session (approximately 2 hours) to assess eligibility. This will include questionnaires, behavioral tasks, and interview questions. • Participants will also complete a testing session which may involve reading words or sentences, listening to stories, or viewing pictures. • During these tasks, electroencephalography (EEG) may also be recorded. EEG is a non-invasive method of recording brain activity and involves wearing an elastic cap on the head which is soaked in a salt-water solution. • Eye movement monitoring may also be performed while participants perform computer tasks. Eye-tracking is a non-invasive method of tracking the location of the pupil and involves placing the chin in a chin rest to minimize head movement. Compensation: Participants will be compensated $15 per hour for study participation (prorated for partial completion of the study). Parking costs will be reimbursed. Participants under age 18 will receive compensation in the form of a gift card or an age-appropriate toy. If interested, participants will also receive the results of the study. Interested in participating? Questions? If you are interested in participating or would like to learn more, please contact Emily Coderre, the principal investigator, at Emily.Coderre@med.uvm.edu or (802) 656-0202. k3v-uvm-research0718.indd 1

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CALENDAR JULY 16 Tuesday BENNINGTON Author Chris Tebbetts: This young adult writer shares his newest release — Me, Myself, & Him — and talks about writing and the way our choices change us — and don’t. Ages 14-18. Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 800-437-3700. FREE CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See July 2. CHITTENDEN Crankie Shows: This original illustrated story amuses the audience. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Maker Tuesdays: See July 2. Space Camp: Out-of-this-world activities, games and crafts amuse kids on school break. Ages 4-6, 10-11:30 a.m.; ages 7-9, 2-3:30 p.m. Milton Public Library, preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Tinker Tuesdays: See July 2. Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See July 2. FRANKLIN Watercolor Galaxy Painting: Young artists are guided through a step-by-step painting process to create their own cosmic masterpiece. Ages 8 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. WINDSOR Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 2.

Writing Workshop with Author Daphne Kalmar: The author of A Stitch in Time teaches craft to young writers during a pizza dinner. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3.

CHITTENDEN ‘Frozen’: Very Merry Theatre’s thespians wow the audience, followed by a free lunch. Recommended for ages 5 and up. All welcome. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

CALEDONIA Train Like An Astronaut: Aspiring astronauts get moving with activities inspired by a handbook for space travel. Ages 5-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Info, 748-8291. FREE

Astronaut Training Camp: Space Robots: Inventive youngsters build and decorate motorized creatures to take home. Ages 5 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

17 Wednesday

B.A.R.K. at the Library: See July 3. Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Kids Eat Healthy: Veggie Power: Registered dietitian Joanne Heidkamp hosts a hands-on session about this food group’s fun and flavors. Grades K-4 with adult. South Burlington Hannaford, 1:30-2:30 p.m., preregister. FREE

New Parents BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M., Info, 371-4415. FREE EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA BURLINGTON: New

mamas tote their pre-crawling kids to an alllevels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, NOON, TUESDAYS, 10 A.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45 A.M. AND FRIDAYS, NOON-1 P.M., $17; $120-140 for a 10-class pass. Info,

899-0339.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA BURLINGTON:

Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their babies. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington,

SUNDAYS, 10:15-11:30 A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15 A.M. AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M., $17 per class; $120-140

for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA ESSEX: Mothers-

to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their babies. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, Essex Junction, TUESDAYS, 6 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15 P.M. AND SATURDAYS, 8:15 A.M., $17 per class; $120-140 for 10-class

pass. Info, 899-0339.

MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas and

their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $11. Info, 223-5302.

PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be stretch and bend. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 6-7:15 P.M., $16 per drop-in class. Info, 778 -0300. BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE:

This mother-infant group includes baby massage and postpartum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. FREE

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KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

Leddy Park Beach Bites: See July 3. Movies at the Library: See July 10. Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE:

New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM:

Expectant, novice and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M., Info, 720-272-8841. FREE MAMA’S CIRCLE BARRE: This supportive gathering brings moms of new babies and toddlers together to foster friendship through unique-but-shared experiences. Imagine Yoga, Barre, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M.

Info, 236-4136. FREE

BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing

moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: In a supportive

setting, mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding children approaching one year old and beyond. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE BABYWEARERS OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Brand-new mamas and papas check out infant carriers, get advice and spend some socializing time with other new parents. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, FOURTH MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:45-7:45 P.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M., preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M.

Info, 349-9084. FREE

TINY TWILIGHT CAFE: Caregivers and children

ages 3 and under connect with each other in a safe and welcoming environment. Light dinner provided; older siblings welcome. Downstreet Community Room, Barre,

FOURTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6:30 P.M.,

RSVPs appreciated. Info, 595-7953. FREE

Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate: Ahoy, mateys! Swashbuckling little ones soak up a ‘sea story,’ guessing games, pirate songs and dancing. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE StarLab: The Vermont Institute of Natural Science sets up their mobile planetarium for children to check out a lesson about the night sky. Ages 8-12. Milton Public Library, 10-11 & 11 a.m.noon, preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE VINS StarLab Planetarium: Astronomers soak up a show in a portable planetarium. Ages 7-12. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 & 3 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 3. FRANKLIN Cosmic Felt Craft: Artsy kiddos create out-ofthis-world cool crafts. Ages 9-12. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m., preregistration encouraged. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3. ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Barton: See July 3. WASHINGTON Just for Fun Movies: Family flicks entertain viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 3.

18 Thursday CALEDONIA Knitting for Kids: See July 11.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CHITTENDEN ‘Frozen’: Very Merry Theatre thespians get the crowd cheering for a cool performance. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Astronaut Cooking Class: Pudding: Intrepid chefs cook a dessert for out-of-this-world dining. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Colchester Lego Club: See July 11. DCF Book Discussion: Little literati chat about the award-winning Inkling by Kenneth Oppel. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Jericho Farmers Market: See July 11. Kids Eat Healthy: Veggie Power: Registered dietitian Joanne Heidkamp hosts a hands-on session about this food group’s fun and flavors. Grades K-4 with adult. Essex Hannaford Supermarkets, Essex Junction, 1:30-2:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-0274. FREE Milton Farmers Market: See July 11. Space Age Coding Club Fun: See July 11. Williston Preschool Music: See July 8, 10:30 a.m. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See July 11. Hard’ack Trail Running Series: See July 11. Maker Space: See July 11.

Space Camp: See July 12.

Star Wars Escape Room: Clever kids join the rebel alliance to defeat the dark side. Recommended for ages 10 and up, but families with younger children welcome to participate together. Fairfax Community Library, 5:30-7:30 p.m., preregister for a specific time. Info, 849-2420. FREE

VT Folklife Green Record Project: See July 12. LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Newport: See July 11.

19 Friday ADDISON Preschoolers at the Point: Small ones soak up stories and crafts, with rotating locally historic themes, from archaeology to lighthouses. Ages 3-5 with adult caregiver. Siblings and snacks welcome. Chimney Point State Historic Site and Museum, Addison, 10:30-11:15 a.m., suggested donation $5 per family. Info, 759-2412. CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 5. CHITTENDEN Burger Night: See July 12. Family Gym: See July 5.

Iron Cosplay for Teens: Teams of teens face off in cosplay challenges, using only the library’s collection of random materials. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Kids Eat Healthy: Veggie Power: Registered dietitian Joanne Heidkamp hosts a hands-on session about this food group’s fun and flavors. Grades K-4 with adult. Williston Hannaford, 1:30-2:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-0032. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 5. Movie Night: Families snack on free popcorn while watching a PG-rated flick about a lonely boy who befriends a space alien. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Play Time for Little Ones: Little ones rollick. Ages 5 and under. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See July 5. Kids’ Fridays: See July 5. WASHINGTON Alien Earth: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum mesmerizes an audience of all ages with stories about our planet’s prehistory, live animals and fossils. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE Family Fun Night: See July 10, 6 p.m. Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and naturefriendly world. Dinner and nature-themed kids’ programming included. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See July 5.

Richmond Farmers Market: See July 5.

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July 25-28 Waltham, MA July 30-31 Simsbury, CT August 2-3 Newbury, MA Aug 5-6 Freeport, ME August 8-9 Kennebunkport, ME Aug 11-12 Wolfeboro, NH Aug 14-16 Montpelier, VT Aug 18 Greensboro, VT Special thanks to our tour media sponsor:

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CALENDAR JULY 20 Saturday

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 6.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 6. Lunar Library Celebration: Crafty kiddos celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with stories and projects. Ages 2-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, noon-1 p.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE CHITTENDEN A Visit with Piggie and Elephant: Admiring fans of the stars of Mo Willems’ best-selling picture books meet-and-greet this animal duo. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

Community Tile Making: Artist-in-residence Brigitta Varadi leads a community project to craft some of the 3,000 ceramic tiles she will feature in her upcoming Burlington City Arts exhibit. Participants join a larger discussion about land, sustainability, craft and rediscovered traditions. All ages. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., regular museum admission, $5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686. Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6. Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 6. Stargazing Party: The Fletcher Free Library hosts an outdoor fest to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Bring your own telescope; a few will be available. Rain or heavy cloud date Sunday, July 21. Lakeview Cemetery, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these readaloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. MONDAY

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

ESSEX STORYTIME WITH EMILY:

Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. HUNTINGTON STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Huntington Public

Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-4583.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher

Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library, 10-11

a.m. Info, 485-4621.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: St. Albans Free

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free Library,

10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

SUMMER STORY TIME: Burnham

Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME:

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. TUESDAY

ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

See Monday.

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME:

Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683. EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East

Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118.

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KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

ESSEX JUNCTION STORY TIME:

Brownell Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTER STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse Library,

9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

MILTON STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10-10:20 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: Kellogg-

ADDISON Family Play: See July 7.

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

Community Tile Making: See July 20.

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 6. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See July 6. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 6.

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP AND STORY HOUR: Bent Northrop Memorial

Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

Enosburgh Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

JERICHO STORY TIME: Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 899-4962.

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith Public

Homestead and Garden Park, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 846-4140. WILLISTON SUMMER STORY TIME:

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY

BARNES & NOBLE STORY TIME: Barnes & Noble, South

Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

ESSEX BABYTIME: Essex Free Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

Essex Open Gym: See July 7. Family Gym: See July 5. Winooski Farmers Market: See July 7. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See July 7. Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. WINDSOR National Ice Cream Day: Got a sweet tooth? Visitors learn the story and science of “the great American dessert” by hand-cranking their own frozen treats in four flavors. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-16; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

ENOSBURG READ & PLAY FRIDAYS:

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643. KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

22 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See July 8. Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Gardening at the Library: See July 8. Movie Monday: A space-themed film and snacks wows youngsters ages 7 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: See July 8.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME:

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln MILTON STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10-11:15 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

Webby’s Art Studio: Hoot! Hoot!: Whoo-hoo! Small artists sculpt an owl from Model Magic. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

Williston Preschool Music: See July 8.

Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 11

South Burlington Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 846-4140.

SOUTH BURLINGTON STORYTIME AT THE GARDENS: Wheeler

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See July 7.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

JERICHO STORY HOUR: Jericho Town Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686.

MORRISVILLE PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Morristown Centennial

Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2524.

Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. Tuesday.

a.m. Info, 728-5073.

SHELDON STORY TIME: Sheldon

FRIDAY

COLCHESTER BABY STORY TIME:

Monday, 10 a.m.

Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 888-3853.

21 Sunday

FRANKLIN Welcome Baby Story Time: New babies are welcomed to the library with nursery rhymes, songs and simple stories. Ages 2 and under with caregivers. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

SOUTH BURLINGTON BABY TIME:

SWANTON STORY TIME: Swanton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Warren Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-3913. THURSDAY

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday. RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland

Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St. Albans

Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

Tuesday.

ST. JOHNSBURY ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum,

FRANKLIN Comic Book Workshop: Vermont cartoonist Jon Chad shares tips and tricks with eager young artists about how to make their pages come alive. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m., preregistration encouraged. Info, 524-1507. FREE

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME:

Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. SATURDAY

COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

ESSEX WEEKEND STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORY TIME: Milton Public Library,

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library,

10-10:30 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford

NEXT CHAPTER BOOKSTORE STORY TIME: Next Chapter Bookstore,

July 11, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Teen Space: See July 8.

Barre, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114.

23 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See July 2. Paint by Pages: Little listeners soak up the story Misunderstood Shark by Ame Dyckman, then make their own artistic masterpiece. Ages 5-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2-3 p.m. Info, 748-8291. FREE CHITTENDEN ‘The Sun, The Moon and The Stars’: Based on a Navajo creation myth, junior thespians participate in a workshop hosted by Summer Encore Theatre at 3:30 p.m., followed by a performance at 4:30 p.m. All ages. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-5:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Astronaut Training Camp: Trip to Mars Game: Space-minded small ones soak up fun facts about the red planet in an interactive activity. Ages 6-10. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE


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Encore Theatre Troupe: Teen thespians from Rutland High School wow the audience with an original and interactive space-themed show. Wheeler Homestead and Garden Park, South Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 846-4140. FREE Maker Tuesdays: See July 2.

CHITTENDEN B.A.R.K. at the Library: See July 3.

WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 3.

Booktivity: See July 10, 2 & 3 p.m.

Leddy Park Beach Bites: See July 3.

Strategy Board Games: See July 9.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Live-Action Role Play: See July 10.

Tinker Tuesdays: See July 2. Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See July 2. FRANKLIN Astronaut Training: Want to take a trip to the moon? Kids get moving in NASA training activities. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3-4 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. WINDSOR Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 2.

24 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3. CALEDONIA Exordium-Solar System Edition: Kurt Valenta shares fun facts about our solar system with small ones, followed by crafts. Ages 2-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE

25 Thursday

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m.

Movies at the Library: See July 10. Radio Astronomy: Curious families check out a demonstration of radio astronomy, followed by an informal discussion of how radio waves reveal hidden astronomical objects. Ages 12 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE

FRANKLIN Eggs in Space With Starbase: This special program encourages youngsters to think like an engineer by designing a safety restraint system for “Eggbert.” Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 2-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Read to Willy Wonka the Therapy Dog: See July 17.

Touching the Sky Dome: Storyteller, author and musician Michael Caduto immerses the audience of all ages in a performance of songs, chants, native instruments and stories from indigenous cultures. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 2:30 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

Shimmer and Shine: Local artist Susan Lepple shares stories about celestial gems and gets kids crafting. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Terrarium-Making with Recycle Rhonda: Using repurposed materials, junior green thumbs create a container for growing plants. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 1-2 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Trad Camp Showcase: Campers and instructors from this musical summer program get the crowd cheering with song and dance. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3. ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Barton: See July 3.

Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 3.

CALEDONIA Knitting for Kids: See July 11. CHITTENDEN Celestial Shadow Puppets: Clever kids make puppets, who take center stage in a star-story performance at 4 p.m. Grades 3-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Colchester Lego Club: See July 11. Fly-In Movie Night: Junior builders construct a rocket ship from cardboard boxes, then watch a short movie in their spacecraft. Ages 4-7, with adult. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:45 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Food for Thought Teen Library Volunteers: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Jericho Farmers Market: See July 11. LCATV Video Day Camp: Aspiring Spielbergs experiment using film equipment, then create a program with Lake Champlain Access Television. Ages 8-9. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644.

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KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

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CALENDAR JULY 25 Thursday (cont.) Milton Farmers Market: See July 11. Space Age Coding Club Fun: See July 11. Williston Preschool Music: See July 8, 10:30 a.m. Youth Escape Room: See July 2, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See July 11. Hard’ack Trail Running Series: See July 11. Maker Space: See July 11. PJ Story Hour: Sleepyheads get ready for bed, then arrive at the library for themed stories, snacks and a craft. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Space Movie: Families snuggle in for a far-out flick based on a book by Chris Van Allsburg while munching free popcorn. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

WASHINGTON AB2: Books Come to Life: This Active BodyActive Brain class, led by literacy professional Rachel O’Donald, combines reading, music and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

26 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 5. CHITTENDEN Burger Night: See July 12. Dungeons & Dragons: See July 12. Family Gym: See July 5. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 5. Music with Raph: See July 12.

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

Richmond Farmers Market: See July 5.

ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Newport: See July 11.

Stuffies’ Night Out: Furry friends have a sleepover blast with games, dress-up, movies and fabulous teen babysitters. Pick up Saturday morning with report cards and photos. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Space Camp: See July 12.

Playgroups

LAMOILLE Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See July 5. WASHINGTON Family Fun Night: See July 10.

27 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3. BENNINGTON Author Stacia Tolman: With a teen audience, this debut New Hampshire novelist shares her awardwinning book, The Spaces Between Us, the story of two outcast best friends desperate to survive senior year and break away from their rural factory town. Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 800-437-3700. FREE Authors Sam J. Miller and Pratima Cranse: Two young adult authors present their new novels — Destroy All Monsters and All The Major Constellations — to a curious adolescent audience. Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 800-437-3700. FREE

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See July 6. Comics and Cartooning: Expert cartoonist Ben Cohen shares his skills with aspiring amateurs. Ages 9-14. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 879-0313. FREE

Vermont, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3068.

on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6.

BURLINGTON CRAWLERS, WADDLERS AND TODDLERS: Janet S. Munt Parent-Child

ST. JOHNSBURY TODDLER TIME: St. Johnsbury

Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get hands-on with an artistic endeavor. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE

Center, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121. CHARLOTTE SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Charlotte

Central School, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 425-2771. MIDDLEBURY PLAYGROUP: Quarry Hill School,

9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 388-7297.

OPEN GYM: Central VT Gymnastics Academy,

Waterbury, 10 a.m.-noon, $7-10. Info, 882-8324. TUESDAY

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace United

Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First Congregational

Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

BURLINGTON FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S. Munt Parent-Child

Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: Winooski Family Center,

9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422. WEDNESDAY

BARRE PLAYGROUP: Aldrich Public Library,

July 10, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

MAMA’S CIRCLE: Good Beginnings, 10 a.m.noon. Info, 595-7953. MIDDLEBURY PLAYGROUP: See Monday. OFF 89 SUMMER PLAYGROUP BY VERMONT HANDS & VOICES: Volunteers Green,

Richmond, 4-6 p.m. Info, 399-5092.

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KIDSVT.COM JULY 2019

Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-1391. THURSDAY

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, July 11, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church,

9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264. FRIDAY

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh Public Library,

9:30-11 a.m. Info, 582-9942.

BURLINGTON WALKING PLAYGROUP: Evolution

Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 10 a.m. Info, 899-0339. FREE

ESSEX PLAYGROUP: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 899-0339. FREE OPEN GYM: See Monday. RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland Free Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 6. FRANKLIN Fairfax Mini Renaissance Faire: This familyoriented festival features sword fighting, blacksmithing and chainmail demonstrations, a Galileo-inspired creation station, live music, food, games galore, and more. Fairfax Elementary/ Middle School, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Special Teen Movie Presentation: Young adults relax with a PG-rated action film while feasting on free popcorn. St. Albans Free Library, 12:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Family Night in the Park: Summer’s sweetness is fêted in the open air with a fantasy movie. Memorial Park, Stowe, 8:15-10:15 a.m., $3-5. Info, 253-6138.

WINSOOSKI MOVE, PLAY, CONNECT PLAYGROUP:

Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

SATURDAY

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Center of Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 190.

ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 6.

O’Brien Community Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family

Ongoing Exhibits

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See July 5.

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP: United Church

AUDUBON NATURE PLAYGROUP: Audubon

STEAM Event: Families drop in to investigate science, technology, engineering, art and math through hands-on activity stations — including force and motion, building challenges, understanding the pull of gravity, and more. Ages 5 and up. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

Kids’ Fridays: See July 5.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 6.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal get-togethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. MONDAY

VT Folklife Green Record Project: See July 12.

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848

TRIVIAL PURSUIT: A 50 STATE ADVENTURE EXHIBIT: More than 50 interactive and

hands-on activities immerse families in the geography, science, history and uniqueness of the United States. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through September 15.

GALAXY BOOKSHOP, HARDWICK Info, 472-5533 FIND WALDO: Sharp-eyed bookworms check out Hardwick and Greensboro businesses for this beloved children’s book character wearing a red-and-white-striped shirt and black-rimmed specs. Passports to track progress and enter for prizes available at the Galaxy Bookshop. Through July 31. FREE

HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM OF VERMONT HISTORY, MIDDLEBURY Info, 388-2117 WHIMSICAL WONDERS: FAIRY HOUSES FROM NATURE: Magical dwellings constructed

from natural materials by environmental artist and author Sally J. Smith enchant admirers with this fanciful art. TuesdaysSaturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Through September 1.

LAMOILLE FAMILY CENTER, MORRISVILLE Info, 888-5229 MORRISVILLE STORY WALK: Nature-loving families savor an outdoor stroll and a summery story Here We Go ’Round the Mulberry Bush, told and illustrated by Iza Trapani. MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 DESTINATION: SPACE!: In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission’s moon landing, space fans take a tour of the technology that landed astronauts on the moon, check out what’s happening on our sun and earth, and travel to the far reaches of outer space. Regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under age 2. Through August 4. MINDBENDER MANSION: Puzzle fans try to master brainteasers and interactive challenges in this temporary exhibit devoted to testing the problem-solving skills of all ages. Regular museum admission, $13-18; free for children under 2. Through September 2.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See July 6. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 6.

28 Sunday ADDISON Family Play: See July 7. CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See July 7. Family Gym: See July 5. LONT Fair: Curious folks of all ages try out games, musical instruments and more from the Fletcher’s new ‘Library of Non-Traditional Things’ collection. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Stowe Free Library Book Sale: See July 9.

29 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See July 8. Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Gardening at the Library: See July 8.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 3.

Teen Space: See July 8. Vermont Astronomical Society: A Closer Look at the Sun: Aspiring astronomers learn all about the sun through a presentation, photographs and a special solar telescope. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Make Some Noise: Crafts kids build their own percussion instrument and bang out a tune. Through August 4. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $8-25; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. Williston Preschool Music: See July 8.

Winooski Farmers Market: See July 7. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See July 7.

31 Wednesday

Lego Blast: Amateur architects listen to an adventure story, then construct creatively. Ages 4 and up with adult. South Burlington Public Library, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 846-4140. FREE

30 Tuesday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See July 2. CHITTENDEN Maker Tuesdays: See July 2. Making Rockets: Aspiring astronauts assemble spacecraft from balloons, elastic and cardboard, followed by a launch. Ages 7-9. Milton Public Library, 10-11 a.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Tuesday Night Trail Running Series: See July 2. Vermont Suzuki Violins: Local young musicians amaze the audience. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN Breaking Out: Clever code-breakers solve a mystery. For school-age children. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3-4 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE WASHINGTON Vermont Wild: Adventures of Fish & Game Wardens: Megan Price — author of the popular book series Vermont Wild — shares secrets with a rapt audience of all ages with stories-behind-thestories of game wardens from Vermont to Maine. Ages 9 and up. Waterbury Public Library, 7-8 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 2.

BENNINGTON Summer Sidewalk Chalk Art: Imaginative kids have a blast with the bookstore’s chalk and giveaways. Ages 4-18. Northshire Bookstore, Manchester Center, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 800-4373700. FREE CALEDONIA Phases of the Moon: NASA Ambassador Jessica Rowshandel explains the mysteries of the moon to inquisitive young astronomers. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE Stellar Space Junk: Little listeners are spellbound by a reading of How the Meteorite Got to the Museum by Jessie Hartland, then get into interactive experiments with the library’s materials. Ages 5-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Info, 748-8291. FREE CHITTENDEN Alien Slime Day: Kids have a blast with this slick craft and get creative with recipes, colors and add-ins. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE

FREE

Tinker Tuesdays: See July 2. WEDNESDAY 31, P. 42 »

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CALENDAR JULY

WELCOME TO

aai

Autism Advocacy & Intervention

Providing the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont Providing the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont with With quality services for children with Autism quality services for children with Autism

In-Home Services – Clinic Setting – School Contracts – Staff Training – Parent Training - Consultation In-Home Services – Clinic Setting – Scholl Contracts – Staff Training – Parent Training - Consultation

(802) 487-9421

2542 Vt Rte 105 Newport Center, VT 05857

31 Wednesday (cont.) Astronaut Training Camp: Lawn Game Day: Kids on summer break relax with putt-putt golf, bocce ball, badminton and more on the library’s grass. All ages. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 1-3 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE B.A.R.K. at the Library: See July 3. Booktivity: See July 10. Cooking Around the Globe: Chefsin-training explore culinary styles from around the world. Milton Public Library, 2-4 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Dance With Ashley: Choreographer Ashley Hensel-Browning gets little ones moving and grooving as they explore movement as a source of expression, connection and investigation. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: See July 6, 10:45 a.m. Leddy Park Beach Bites: See July 3. Movies at the Library: See July 10. Star Trek Marathon: Fans of the franchise drop in to view these famous movies. For teens and adults. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 3. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See July 3. ORLEANS The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program in Barton: See July 3.

Taking Referrals Now!

WASHINGTON Family Fun Night: See July 10. WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 3. K

Say you saw it in…

www.autismai.com • 802-487-9421 • 2542 Vt Route 105, Newport Center, Vt. 42

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USE YOUR WORDS BY E T H A N TI S CH L E R

O

n a sunlit spring Wednesday, Village Schoolers sprint from the grassy knoll above Bread & Butter Farm back to farm central for a particularly special lunch. The kids, ages 7 to 12, are still buzzing with stories from the day’s activities, or “guilds,” when they are greeted by farm owner, Corie, and her four-person lunch team. Mentors and students alike struggle not to rush to the bounty of taco shells, chorizo, freshly harvested cilantro, cheddar cheese, sour cream and salsa, as Corie signals for a quiet moment. This lunch, she explains, is special not just because of the abundance of deliciousness, but because the chorizo itself came from Gertie, beloved great-great-grandmother pig on the farm. The resulting quiet is dense. Though not everyone will choose to partake of Gertie’s meat, the meal all of a sudden becomes personal, tangible, important. We take a silent moment together to honor her life, her role in the farm family, and the responsibility of carrying on her energy within ourselves. As we sing our song of gratitude for the day’s meal, I look around and think, What an amazing community this is. Bread & Butter Farm is the site of three hoophouses, two outdoor gardens, a herd of cattle and pigs, a flock of chickens, summer camps, and a community Burger Night on summer Fridays. Once the site of a major dairy operation, the Shelburne farm is also home to Village School, a farm, food and forest school where I serve as a mentor. This program combines farm work, outdoor skills, mentorship and community building within a context of collective responsibility for life on the farm. Some students who participate are homeschooled; others leave their

schools one day a week to attend Village School. As their year on the farm unfolds, they discover their ability to contribute to and take responsibility for life on the farm. And as connections to farm animals deepen, questions emerge: Why can’t the farm keep animals for their whole lives? Who decides which ones live or go to slaughter? How can we eat animals that we’ve cared for, loved and connected with? There are no simple answers. In a culture where animals are either beloved pets at home — fed and cared for through the end of their lives — or unrecognizably packaged for sale in the supermarket, making the connection that all meat, indeed all food, comes

itself. Whether the harvest of spinach from the hoophouse, baby greens in the farm store, or Gertie going to slaughter, energy transfer is a core part of what it means to be alive. This is why we sing gratitude before Village School lunch each day, to honor the lives taken to sustain our own, and to set an intention to carry this energy forward into love and care for the lives on and around the farm. Understanding where our food comes from — literally pulling it from the earth, plucking it off a vine or tree, or caring for an animal that provides eggs, milk or even its body, as meat — is a privilege we take seriously. Alongside the ethical weight is the joy: the delight of on-the-fly snacking on salad greens in the garden, of sirloin steaks flash-grilled over a wood fire by beaming 10-year-olds, of hand-carrying food and water to the families of pigs loving their new hedgerow habitat. And the deepest joy: seeing young people growing and unfolding their best selves through this work. Village Schoolers learn to feel the messiness and wonder of life Gertie itself. To care for the spinach grown in the hoophouses, and also to harvest it for community lunch. To learn how cattle enrich soil as they travel from pasture to pasture, and feel the joy with which they run into fresh fields. To deeply grieve the loss of Gertie, but to honor her life by taking her into themselves as food they prepare for each other. Or, maybe, by deciding to take a break from eating meat, to see how their feelings settle as time goes on! Through all of this, we hope to invite the sentiment that the Earth — and life itself — is not something to be claimed as a from once-living beings is simply not a resource, but something to tend, apprecomfortable realization for many young ciate and grow alongside. Getting real people. In my own case, it prompted about food — where it comes from, how a few weeks of vegetarianism after a it’s grown, tended and harvested — helps family fishing trip in middle school. people of all ages realize a connection Similarly, a few Village Schoolers with the Earth, its richness, beauty decided to take a break from eating meat and gifts. That, in turn, helps bring us after Gertie went to slaughter. back into a relationship of gratitude, And yet, this realization is a chance appreciation, and care for life itself and to confront the truth that people are our part within it. always a part of the world we live in — Looking around at this community that we must take food as energy into of young people enjoying lunch together our bodies, and this food comes from in the warm spring sun, the feeling of life, whether plant or animal. Taking life gratitude is inescapable: How lucky we is an essential part of forwarding life are to be in this work together. K

Taking life is an essential part of forwarding life itself.

List it for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your August event by Monday, July 15th online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

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Teach the children. We don’t matter so much, but the children do ... Give them the fields and the woods and the possibility of the world salvaged from the lords of profit. Stand them in the stream, head them upstream, rejoice as they learn to love this green space they live in, its sticks and leaves and then the silent, beautiful blossoms. — Mary Oliver, Upstream

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A farm school mentor reflects on what animals’ lives — and deaths — can teach children

When the elevator buttons didn’t get much use, they were —DE-PRESSED

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Cultivating Connection

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Kids VT — July 2019  

The Animal Issue: Dairy Farm Kids Know Hard Work, Fresh Air and Freedom; Life Lessons From Livestock; Down Dog With Bunnies; Birds Is the Wo...

Kids VT — July 2019  

The Animal Issue: Dairy Farm Kids Know Hard Work, Fresh Air and Freedom; Life Lessons From Livestock; Down Dog With Bunnies; Birds Is the Wo...

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