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FEBRUARY 2020

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IN THE CLASSROOM EVERY DAY FOR YOUR CHILDREN

Learning From the

Inside out Discover a curriculum that combines strong academics with the arts, outdoor education, and knowledge of self. Early Childhood through High School

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Coming to Burlington • Feb. 4th & 5th! Flynn Center for the Performing Arts For more information visit NickJrLive.com ©2020 Viacom . ©2020 ©&TM Spin Master Ltd. 4

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EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF QUESTION

Which do you prefer: coffee, tea or hot chocolate?

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

COFFEE, 100 percent. Sometimes before I go to bed, I think about how I get to drink coffee when I wake up, and that makes me excited. I love waking up, making coffee in my French press, and sitting down and drinking it while I’m all cozy.

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Mary Ann Lickteig

maryann@kidsvt.com STAFF WRITER/CALENDAR WRITER

COREY GRENIER, MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Brett Ann Stanciu brett@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Two cups COFFEE, BLACK. Simple, yummy and purposeful.

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

Alison with son Theo and daughter Mira

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT SPECIALIST

Gillian English PROOFREADERS

Carolyn Fox, Katherine Isaacs PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

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Keegan Albaugh, Meredith Bay-Tyack, Amy Doyle Keller, Heather Fitzgerald, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Elisa Järnefelt, Trish Van Vliet, Vicki Wilson PHOTOGRAPHERS

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Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2020 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved. Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

A Valentine to My Kids

I

n honor of February’s most notable holiday — no, not Groundhog Day, silly — I decided to think about what I love most about being a parent. After going through the mental highlight reel I’ve amassed from my 12 years and nine months of being a mom, my mind settled on a strange thought. When I was in seventh grade, I bombed home economics. (Bear with me; I promise I’ll get to my point.) I had no problem when it came to writing an essay on the themes in The Call of the Wild or solving an algebra equation, but my butter fingers just couldn’t skillfully wield a needle and thread. Our big end-of-year sewing project was to stitch up a stuffed animal of our choosing. Sounds like no big deal, right? Well, I was apparently not up to the task. I remember my home ec teacher calling me at home as the end of the grading period approached and telling me, pointblank, that I would fail the course if I did not complete my stuffed animal. “Thanks for letting me know,” I told her perfunctorily, before hanging up. Normally a diligent student, I just couldn’t muster the resolve or skill to complete the stuffed animal. And, because of that, I failed the class. Fast-forward 29 years. Home ec has gone the way of the dinosaur in most schools. I am now a parent. I have a daughter. That daughter loves to sew. She has made tote bags and A-line skirts in sewing classes. She has mended my clothing. She has created stylish outfits in fashion design camp. For Christmas this year, she received a sewing machine, and she has already whipped up beautiful pillows for every member of our family. She can sew circles around me. And here is where I get to the part inspired by Valentine’s Day. In spite of the fact that I had a large role in making my children, they are so much better than me, in so many ways. They started out as little, mushy creatures who relied on me for everything, but now they have skills and passions and traits that I have never had, and never will. I marvel at what they are capable of, big and small, every day. And that’s what I love most about being a parent. Though you won’t find articles about DIY Valentine’s Day cards or recipes for chocolate treats in our February issue (check our online archives at kidsvt.com for that content), we do celebrate the seemingly small ways parents show their love for their children, from enjoying outdoor excursions together (“Destination Recreation,” page 14) to sharing stories over a steaming mug of herbal tea (“The Art of Tisanes, page 12) to packing school lunches. So. Many. Lunches. (“Growing Up Green,” page 15). On page 20, read about how three longtime friends are spreading love and kindness through the sole Vermont chapter of Sleep in Heavenly Peace, an organization that builds and delivers beds to families in need. And check out our new “Pop Culture” column on page 19, where Dad Guild founder Keegan Albaugh writes about how to navigate relationship challenges after having kids. We’re happy to welcome Keegan to Kids VT as a monthly contributor. The arrival of our February issue also means we’re at the halfway point of winter. My hearty congratulations on making it this far. Here’s wishing you lots of snuggles and cozy time with the ones you love for the remainder of the season. ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

COLBY ROBERTS, COPUBLISHER

After skiing with kids for the past seven years, it has just dawned on us to bring HOT CHOCOLATE with us! And that, my friends, has made all the difference. BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR COFFEE. I didn’t start

drinking it until I was in my twenties. Fell in love and quickly discovered the effects of overindulging — so I switched to half regular, half decaf. I drink it hot with a little milk all day, all year — even in the summer. KIRSTEN CHENEY, DESIGNER

CAPPUCCINO! With thick milk foam and an

oily ring around the cup. At a little round table on the sidewalk outside Café de Flore in Paris.

MARY ANN LICKTEIG, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Espresso is delicious, but I like KOMBUCHA in winter, too, particularly the cranberry variety. BRETT STANCIU, STAFF/CALENDAR WRITER

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE (“Destination Recreation,” page 14) is a freelance writer and children’s book author who calls Killington her second home. She lives with her husband, Matt, and her son, Jack, who are teaching her to ski, and their dog, Ellie, who is teaching her to slow down on their morning walks. VICKI WILSON

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FEBRUARY 2020 CALENDAR FEBRUARY

Frozen Fun!

Longtime friends deliver a good night’s sleep to children in need

20

Left to Their Own Devices Middle schoolers create art that reflects their feelings and knowledge about screens

24

SPONSORED BY:

CREDIT

A Bed of One’s Own

A Home-Grown

Families savor the winter scene during North Hero’s GREAT ICE! This three-day shindig features sled dog rides, lighted night skating, a snow-building competition, a roaring Christmas tree bonfire, a chili cook-off and fireworks over the frozen landscape. Friday, February 14-Sunday, February 16. See greaticevt.org for details.

EXPERT

Week to Week FEB 9

The Music of the Grateful Dead for Kids: The Rock and Roll Playhouse — a family concert series — gets kids moving and grooving to tunes from the classic rock canon. Higher Ground, South Burlington.

TUES

Parent-Child Valentine’s Dance: Moms, dads and youngsters of all ages make memories together during a night of dancing and fun. Capitol Plaza Hotel, Montpelier.

SUN

FEB 11

SAT

FEB 22

Girls’ Engineering Day: In celebration of National Engineering Week, young females get inspired to build a better world, mentored by working women. American Precision Museum, Windsor.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org. 38

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

Calendar 38 Daily Listings 39 Story Times 40 Seasonal Events 41 New Parents 42 Live Performances 43 Playgroups 44 Science & Nature 45 Ongoing Exhibits 46 Classes JUST FOR KIDS Coloring Contest!

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you! k12v-RobbiHandyHolmes0719.indd 1

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Birthday Club ..................................... 52 Coloring Contest Winners .........52 Writing Contest................................53 Kid-Created Art................................ 54 Puzzle Page ........................................ 54

Title _______________________________________

Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by February 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the March issue of Kids VT. Send your highresolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Contest sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town __________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

Cabin Fever 27

Books to psych kids up for summer

37

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

Just for Kids 51 Coloring Contest 52 Birthday Club 53 54 55

Welcome Editor’s Note 5 Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Short Stuff Trending 8

9

Kids in the News Yoga Pose of the Month #InstaKidsVT Parent Participation Try This at Home Kids Say What? Pet Corner

51

Coloring Contest Winners Writing Contest Writing Contest Winners Puzzles Kid-Created Art Puzzle Answers

On the Cover FREE

Columns 11 Kids Beat 12 The Art of 13 Mom Takes Notes 14 Destination Recreation 15 Growing Up Green 16 Mealtime 17 Bookworms 18 Fit Families 19 Pop Culture 55 Use Your Words

CHILDHOOD FRIENDS DELIVER BEDS TO FAMILIES IN NEED

TIPS FOR PACKING LOW-WASTE LUNCHES

FEBRUARY 2020

LIBRARIES LEND MORE THAN JUST BOOKS

STUDENTS REFLECT ON THEIR SCREEN USE

INSIDE

Chillin’

OUT!

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Seth Hibbert of Williston submitted this photo of his 5-year-old son Lewis enjoying the snow at Puddle Jumpers Childcare in Shelburne. Lewis likes to go tobogganing, make snow angels, and throw snowballs at his parents.

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TRENDING A New Jersey town can’t get a real groundhog for their February holiday celebration, so they’ll use a stuffed animal instead. In Vermont, we don’t need a furry creature — real or fake — to break the news. Six more weeks of winter are pretty much assured. Castleton University plans to turn the president’s sixbedroom home — once a venue for university parties — into a childcare center. University president Karen Scolforo will move down the road to a one-bedroom cottage on campus. Doing her part to solve Vermont’s childcare crisis.

A school bus carrying 24 kids from Moretown Elementary and Harwood Union High schools slid partly off an embankment on a recent snowy day, and parents weren’t notified about what had happened until the next day. Yikes! Sweethearts conversation hearts are available for Valentine’s Day once again, after a yearlong hiatus due to the original producer, New England Confectionary Company, going out of business. Good news for sheepish secret admirers everywhere. 8

YOGA POSE OF THE MONTH: HOT COCOA BREATH

KIDS IN THE NEWS

A Stellar Achievement BY ALISON NOVAK

BENEFITS: •

Allows for present moment awareness

Relaxes nervous system by lengthening the exhale

Is calming, centering and fun!

Max and his mom viewing the Northern Lights from the Arctic Circle

E

ight-year-old Max Gurtman, a third grader at Orchard School in South Burlington, was recently named a semifinalist in NASA’s Name the Rover essay contest. K-12 students were tasked with coming up with a name for NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover, a 2,300-pound robot that is able to search for signs of past microbial life, record data about the Red Planet’s climate and geology, Max Gurtman and collect samples to bring back to Earth. Max was one of 155 semifinalists from across the country, selected from more than 28,000 essay submissions. The name he suggested for the Rover, “GRIT,” has two meanings, he said on his entry form. “It means having courage and strength of mind and it also means particles of rock,” he wrote. “I thought this name was perfect because it represented the rover, and Mars and the people who are building it.” In addition to the honor of naming the Rover, the grandprize winner of the contest will receive an invitation to see the spacecraft launch in July from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The winner will be announced in early March. Max’s entry was not among the nine finalists, selected at the end of January. His mom, Kathy Batty, wrote in the parent section of the entry form that she was excited for her son to enter the contest because “it provides kids from our small, Max and family at rural state of Vermont a a science center way to feel connected to in Norway the much bigger world.” Learn more about NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover mission at mars. nasa.gov/mars2020. 

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

STEPS:

EXTEND THE FUN:

1. Bring one hand in front of you, palm facing up. Imagine you have cookies or another favorite treat to smell.

Do a hot chocolate dance to the song “Hot Chocolate” by Tom Hanks from The Polar Express movie or “Hot Cup of Cocoa” by the von Trapp Children.

Make an imaginary treat to have with your cocoa — pretend you are stirring, baking and eating!

2. Make a fist with the other hand. Imagine you are holding a cup of hot cocoa. 3. Breathe in the delicious smells through your nose. 4. Breathe out through your mouth to cool your hot cocoa. 5. Or try this: Inhale to smell your imaginary treats, and hum “Mmmm” as long as you can as you exhale.

#INSTAKIDSVT Thanks for sharing your cute photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture of baby Sylvester exploring his world. Share photos of your family exploring new places this month. HERE’S HOW: Follow @kids_vt  on Instagram. 

Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

Pose description courtesy of Susan Cline Lucey, owner of Evolution Prenatal + Family Yoga Center in Burlington and Essex Junction. For more information about kids and family yoga classes, visit evolutionprenatalandfamily.com.

Tag us on Instagram !


PARENT PARTICIPATION

TRY THIS AT HOME

This month, we asked our Facebook followers to share photos of their kids having fun in the snow. Find a collage of their snapshots below. 2

3

1

6

5 4

Before

Gillian Murphy of South Burlington shared these photos of her fourth grader Eliot’s CARDBOARD CREATION. “Whenever a decentsized box comes to the house, Eliot’s mind starts turning and it’s not long before the scissors come out and he’s digging in the recycling bin for materials,” Murphy After wrote. “He cut a big hole in the back and shoved his head in, cut some eye holes, pulled out some blue cups and tape, and voila!” Eliot plans to save this creation for Halloween and add a shirt that opens up like a big mouth under the nose for people to drop in candy. He would also like to wear it to Church Street someday, says his mom, “just for fun.”

KIDS SAY WHAT?

8 9

7

12 11

“Kids are a lot of work. I think I’ll just get a dog when I grow up.” MAX, AGE 6

10 13

14

15

16

1. Brittany Almassalkhi, 2.Christa Wells, 3. Amanda Cashin, 4. Brittany Olson, 5. Christine DeMello, 6. Jennifer Bogue Peck, 7 and 14. Randi Becker, 8. Josh Compton, 9. Carolyn Catherine, 10. Jessica Clark Rexford, 11. Meredith Breiland, 12. Rigel Stelle, 13. Miranda Provost Johnson, 15. Sandra O’Flaherty Cain, 16. Autumn Bissonnette

PET CORNER Maya Sargent shared this photo of 7-yearold Riley and 6-yearold Chihuahua mix Arnie, whom the family adopted several years ago. “When Arnie first came to us, he was scared of everything ... and cowered at the slightest movement,” wrote Sargent. “Now Arnie gives and receives comfort as he sleeps next to Riley. Arnie and Riley have spent the last few years developing a deep and beautiful friendship.” KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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R2

3R

DY

EA

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AND

SCIENCE OUTDOORS

ARTS

GYMNASTICS EDUCATION

ANIMALS SPORTS

10

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 10 A.M. - 2 P.M. FREE FUN! BURLINGTON HILTON

ASK QUESTIONS MEET CAMP & SCHOOL STAFF See who’s exhibiting at: kidsvt.com/fair PRESENTED BY

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PHOTO: SUSAN TEARE, COURTESY OF QUARTO

BY MARY A NN L IC KT EI G A N D BRE TT A N N S TA N CI U

BOOKS

A Natural Artist

“Beets are basically made to be printed with,” writes East Montpelier artist, naturalist and author Nick Neddo in THE ORGANIC ARTIST FOR KIDS: A DIY GUIDE TO MAKING YOUR OWN ECO-FRIENDLY ART SUPPLIES FROM NATURE. The advice reflects Neddo’s practical approach to creativity. His February 11 release, a children’s companion to his 2015 release, The Organic Artist, combines Neddo’s love of the Vermont wilderness and his passion for art, offering readers easy-to-follow instructions on how to create their own art supplies from natural materials. One lesson shows kids how to make tempera paint from eggs. Neddo suggests using dandelion blossoms or pine needles as brushes. Other projects involve crafting pens from twigs, crayons from knotweed and beeswax, and inks from berries and walnuts. Learn how to mix up a batch of papier-mâché from flour, water and newspaper to make a mask or a handy box for your art supplies. Tie together sticks, pine cones or bits of bark to make a mobile. Glossy photographs of Neddo’s projects and his own artwork instruct and inspire young readers. —BAS Paints made from natural ingredients with stick brushes

Learn more at nickneddo.com.

CONTEST

MUSEUM

Students in kindergarten through 12th grade are invited to submit artwork in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-sponsored contest to design the next junior duck stamp. Any student can enter, though the contest was created as the culmination of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s art- and science-based curriculum that teaches about wetland and waterfowl conservation. After studying waterfowl anatomy and habitat, students are invited to draw or paint a picture of one or more of the waterfowl species on the contest list. At the state level, three first-, second- and third-place winners will be selected in four age groups. The art awarded best of show in each state will go to the NATIONAL JUNIOR DUCK STAMP ART CONTEST, where judges will pick the image for the next stamp. Last year, about 100 Vermonters and 20,000 kids nationwide participated. Junior Duck Stamps cost $5 each and are sold by the U.S. Postal Service, at national wildlife refuges and at duckstamp.com, with revenue supporting the duck stamp program. State contest judging at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science in Quechee is open to the public on March 25, from 9 a.m. until noon. The nature center will offer contest participants and members of their families a reduced admission rate. —MAL Vermont entries to the National Junior Duck Stamp Art must be postmarked by March 15. Find contest rules and more information at fws.gov/birds/education/junior-duckstamp-conservation-program.php.

Science for Tots

COURTESY OF MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

Duck Call

Montshire Museum of Science will open a new permanent exhibit designed for its youngest visitors on February 29. WONDER WOODS — a 600-square-feet, multilevel learning space — is designed to spark interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) while igniting curiosity, instilling confidence and fostering a love of learning in children ages 5 and under. Drawing on the latest research in early childhood development, the whimsical Wonder Woods is designed to meet the needs of three developmental stages: infant, toddler and preschooler. This is the first time the Norwich museum will have an experience designed for infants, said Sherlock Terry, Montshire’s director of exhibits. The infant area will encourage sensory exploration, development of physical skills and interactions with caregivers. Toys, a balancing barre and a mirror will be included, with a glider for nursing nearby. Ball runs and a building station that includes balancing blocks and stylized branches and stumps are designed to appeal to toddlers, while a play structure with a climbing wall, towers, ramps, pulleys and stairs will cater to preschoolers. Other features include a tent-like structure for storytelling and puppet play; an artistic station with magnetic walls and seasonal magnets; and seating, arranged so caregivers can easily watch and interact with their children. The overall aesthetic is inspired by New England’s terrain. “There are a lot of what I would call ‘natural references’ in the space,” Terry said. Two wall-mounted ball runs mimic Vermont and New Hampshire ridgelines, while one on the floor suggests the Connecticut River. Wonder Woods will replace Montshire’s current early childhood exhibition, Andy’s Place, which opened in 1992. Its beloved bear cave will be replicated in the new space. Andy’s Place will be open to visitors of all ages during its final two weeks, from February 29 through March 15. —MAL Learn more at montshire.org.

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ART OF BY T RISH VA N V L I E T

Making Tisanes

H

HOW TO ACHIEVE HYGGE WITH TISANES • Research: Take a book out of the library or do online research to find out about the healing powers of various ingredients. Check out Healing Herbal Teas by Sarah Farr or 20,000 Secrets of Tea by Victoria Zak, or visit teamuse.com or thedailytea. com. Make a “try it” list together. • Visit: Choose a local spot that sells loose-leaf tea (see our list). Buying loose-leaf will enable families to choose a variety of leaves and to make individualized blends. • Plan: Talk about when your first steeping session will be. One of my family’s favorite times is right after school, as it helps us unwind from the day. • Find a vessel: There’s nothing like a special mug for this special time. Let everyone choose a favorite or take a trip to Goodwill to find a “cozy-time mug.” 12

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

• Infuse: This is the actual process of steeping the ingredients of the tisane in water, via an individual strainer or a larger tea press, which works by steeping larger quantities and then retaining the loose tea as you pour the liquid. (A coffee press works just as well, but be sure to keep tea and coffee presses separate in order to preserve flavor.) Incorporating a tea press can be a great addition to the steeping process, as the ingredients can be observed sinking, floating and dancing. • Set the atmosphere: Read together, work on a puzzle, play soft music or maybe just “be.” Whatever your tisane activity includes, be sure to pair it with soft blankets, low lights and the willingness to listen: to your family, yourself and the stillness.

Trish’s daughter Sophie

PHOTOS: TRISH VAN VLIET

ygge, pronounced “hoo-guh,” is a Common Roots, a farm-to-school food Scandinavian lifestyle approach education program, visited Chamberlin that promotes happiness through School in South Burlington to teach sensory experiences. Think soft lighting, students in all grades about hygge and heaps of pillows, comfort food and hot making herbal blends. Common Roots drinks. This word is derived from an Old visits every elementary school class Norse term, hygga, in the South Burlington TISANE CATEGORIES which means “to School District each month comfort.” Hunkering Leaf: mint, lemongrass, lemon and provides lessons, cookdown during the ing experiences and taste balm, rooibos, yerba maté, dark and cold winter French verbena tests for the students. months provides “The goal is that Bark: Slippery elm, families an opthrough yearlong curricucinnamon, black cherry bark portunity to connect Seed/Spice: Cardamom, lum, students are developat a slower pace and ing deep curiosity and caraway, fennel enjoy simple, cozy connection to their food Root: Ginger, echinacea, moments. chicory, turmeric, kava, licorice that will be foundational Incorporating Flower: Lavender, rose, hibiscus, for making educated food tisanes, or herbal choices throughout their chamomile, chrysanthemum “teas,” into your lives,” explained Common Fruit: Raspberry, blueberry, family’s routine is Roots farm-to-school coorapple, peach, lemon one way to embrace dinator Kayli O’Donnell. the hygge lifestyle. Tisanes, pronounced One class at Chamberlin chose to use “ti-zans,” have been an integral part of ginger for upset bellies, lemon balm for the tea world for some 5,000 years but energy and anise hyssop for stuffy noses. are not technically considered teas. As the students waited for their “mediTrue teas, which contain caffeine, are cine” to steep, they discussed how they infusions from the leaves of the Camellia already practiced hygge in their homes. sinensis plant and result in varieties Second grader Aidan Giles noted that his like black, green, white and oolong teas. snake, Viper, “literally hygges every day Tisanes, though, are made from steeping under her heat lamp.” Students cozied plant-based ingredients — like herbs, up on the carpet together and enjoyed leaves, roots, fruit, berries, flowers, bark listening to a classic winter read-aloud, and even sticks — in hot water. The Mitten, by Jan Brett. They took part In December, instructors from in a mindfulness exercise, repeating

WHERE TO SHOP FOR LOOSE-LEAF TEA: “Breathe in, breathe out” as they inhaled the aromas, then cooled off the tisane with their breath. As the students experienced, just this simple practice can result in feeling fully present: watching the steam swirl, feeling the heat emanating from the mug, breathing the steam in and out, and, finally, focusing on the taste of the gently mingled flavors. Said one student, “I just feel so warm inside my heart.” K

Afterschool Winter Tisane (courtesy of Common Roots) • Combine the following ingredients: fresh grated ginger, lemon balm, anise hyssop and hawthorn berries. Add apple peels, if desired. • Steep approximately 3 teaspoons per cup of water for 10-15 minutes, then enjoy.

These ingredients have the following benefits: Fresh ginger: eases nausea, improves blood circulation, soothes inflammation Lemon balm: increases alertness/ cognition, reduces stress/anxiety Anise hyssop: clears congestion, heals burns Hawthorn berries: regulates blood pressure, eases digestion Apple peel: contains vitamins A and C, helps improve vision and build a strong immune system

• Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington • Healthy Living Market & Café, 222 Dorset St., South Burlington • Dobrà Tea, 80 Church St., Burlington • Stone Leaf Teahouse, 111 Maple St., Middlebury • Vermont Liberty Tea, 29 Stowe St., Waterbury • Heart and Soul Apothecary, 57 Atkinson St., Bellows Falls • Grian Herbs Apothecary, 34 Elm St., Montpelier • Spice’n Nice Natural Foods, 223 North St., Bennington • Wilson Herb Farm & Apothecary, Greensboro


MOM TAKES NOTES BY E L I S A J Ä RN E F E LT

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hen my niece was born nine years ago in Helsinki, and I became an aunt for the first time, I was 29 years old and 3,900 miles away in Boston. I’d had my heart broken and was doubting my ability to finish my PhD. The distance between us — both geographic and situational — left me wondering how I could bridge that gap. When my niece is in her late twenties, I thought, would she be dealing with the same kind of self-doubt and heartbreak as I was? Would she come to me and ask what it was like for me when I was her age? Or would the gap between us remain constant? Would she believe that her fiftysomething aunt was incapable of understanding? I started to draw illustrated notes for her to read when she got older, to give her a window into who I was and the issues I faced at specific times in my life. I hoped that, in this way, we could “meet” at a similar age. Now, I am a mother. Every week, I think of something I wish I could share with my daughter, but I encounter the same dilemma as with my niece: a toddler is too young to hear these thoughts. Simultaneously, I am doubtful that my daughter, 20 years from now, will ask for or listen to advice from her middle-aged mother. My solution is the same as with my niece: I start drawing notes. They are my logbook of life and love, from a younger me to an older her. K

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

13


DESTINATION RECREATION B Y V I CKI W IL SO N

Pine Hill Park M

y 9-year-old son, Jack, stood at the Pine Hill Park trail entrance in Rutland studying the sign welcoming us to an interactive trail called the Pine Cone Adventure Forest. A map showed the locations of 12 kids’ play stations, including the Five Giants, a troll bridge and something called a Badge Hunt. “I want to do it all,” Jack said. Well, I thought. This is a good start to a family hike. I’d been hoping to take my family to Pine Hill Park ever since we’d started passing it on our way to ski in Killington. Located at the Giorgetti Athletic Complex, about a mile from downtown Rutland, the trailhead is easy to find, with ample parking. The park is well known, regionally and beyond, for its 17-plus miles of mountain biking trails. With winter in full swing, the idea of fat biking or snowshoeing there tempted me. That Sunday afternoon, though, we’d come to take a laid-back hike on the lightly snow-covered trails after having spent Saturday skiing. “Then let’s go do all the stations,” I suggested to Jack. The first stop in the Adventure Forest was a kid-size rock wall built into a real rock called Elephant Rock. At about 10 feet tall in some places, it must look enormous to a kid, but even in gloves, Jack was able to climb it. Next, we followed painted troll footprints over a narrow, flat, wooden Troll Bridge and stopped at a station called Stick City, where people had propped the sticks provided against trees and each other to build “forts” big enough for my husband and me to duck into. Other stations offered a place to build fairy houses The Tin Man mascot at the and a “mountain” (a trailhead sloping hill with just enough elevation to be a little challenging) that kids could scale using a rope. The Five Giants turned out to be five towering Eastern white pine trees that kids were encouraged to wrap their arms around and measure. The last station, though, was the family favorite. The Badge Hunt called for visitors to 14

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

use a compass to find the locations of five boxes attached to trees. The boxes displayed pictures of several different badges from now-closed historic Rutland summer camps. Since we hadn’t brought a compass, we used the one on my phone. The Pine Cone Adventure Forest trail opened last fall. Andy Paluch, a program director for the Rutland-based Come Alive Outside, an organization that encourages people to be more active and live healthier lives in the outdoors, said the Adventure Forest invites kids to engage with nature. “I feel like all of the stations are things kids naturally do in the woods,” he said. Paluch and his organization created the Pine Cone Adventure Forest along with several other groups: the Rutland Recreation & Parks Department, local families, and the Pine Hill Partnership, a nonprofit organization that oversees the park. A grant from the Vermont Department of Health provided funding. This spirit of community cooperation seems to underpin Pine Hill Park as a whole. The 275 acres of trails are maintained and financially supported by volunteers. Rutland High School students, religious organizations and sports teams put in days and days of work. Local parents and children pitch in on about a week’s worth of community workdays throughout the year to help create new trails, and to clear and maintain established trails — which sometimes entails using a Snowdog machine to groom paths covered in snow. “We’re all volunteers — strictly volunteers — and we do what we can do,” said Shelley Lutz, a founding member and the secretary/treasurer of Pine Hill Partnership. Their work is impressive. The weekend following our family outing, a friend and I went back to the park to do some more vigorous hiking. We grabbed a free trail map at the entrance and made our way through the forest. The bridges we crossed were sturdy and attractive, and the beautiful woods and pond views offered a good excuse to stop and catch

PHOTS: VICKI WILSON

2 Oak Street Extension, Rutland

Vicki’s son Jack trying out the tree-measuring station

your breath. And I began to see why bikers come to Pine Hill Park throughout every season: There are well-kept beginner trails, as well as trails the Pine Hill website calls “Advanced Intermediate with more sustained climbing.” Sassy names like Sore Elbow, Droopy Muffin, Broken Handlebar and Voldemort add to the allure. “I’m pretty proud of what the park has turned into and what we’ve been able to do,” said Lutz, an avid mountain biker. On our way back from our hike, I took my friend on a detour through the Pine Cone Adventure Forest. We peeked in the Badge Hunt boxes and admired the stick forts children had built. When we were done, I pulled out the map and looked at the trails we’d walked. There were still many miles more to explore. “This is great,” she said. “I know,” I answered. “I want to do it all.” K

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO • Pine Hill Park is open for day use only, year-round. Admission is free. • Fat biking, mountain biking, hiking, trail running, nature study, Nordic backcountry skiing and snowshoeing are allowed. Snowshoes are available for rent at the adjacent Giorgetti Athletic Complex. No motorized vehicles. • Check on trail conditions and what’s open before you go at trailhub.org. • Dogs are welcome but must be on leash. • Bring a real compass for the Pine Cone Adventure Forest! • Donations for park maintenance can be made at the Tin Man mascot at the Pine Hill Park trailhead or on the website.

For more information, visit pinehillpark.org and comealiveoutside. com. Both organizations can also be found on Facebook.


GROWING UP GREEN BY M E RE D I T H B AY -T YAC K

Prep School

Tips for packing low-waste lunches for kids — and adults

PLAN AND SHOP

bags that can be reused, then eventually composted. • Look for less and better packaging. When packaging is inevitable, I find the largest package. Individual wrappers add up in the trash quickly. A large tub of yogurt can be portioned out at home. There’s still plastic waste, but the packaging-to-product ratio is lower. Choose products in recyclable or reusable packaging. When all else fails, write to the makers of your favorite products and ask them to make their manufacturing and packaging more eco-friendly. • Make from scratch. Challenge yourself to make your favorite lunch products and snacks at home. You might be surprised by how quick and easy it is to make apple chips, muffins, crackers, tortillas and more. Once you have confidence in the kitchen, shoot for the stars. Make your own bread, jam, yogurt or whatever you find intriguing. If a recipe or technique is too intensive, make it less frequently or give yourself a break and buy the premade, packaged version.

I have yet to master traditional meal planning, but before grocery shopping I always scan my fridge, freezer and pantry. I make a list of what I have, the meals and snacks I need for the coming days, and what I need to buy. Check your spices TOOLS OF THE TRADE and condiment staples, too. Not planning leads to overbuying, and then wasted If you’re trying to reduce your lunchtime food — and money! I write my list in the waste, invest in reusable containers and order I’ll walk around the store to help ditch the single-use plastic bags. Go all avoid random, unnecessary purchases in and buy a stainless steel bento box, I might make if I’m a Japanese-style lunch wandering around. I container with multiple also try to follow these compartments, or take baby RESOURCES FOR LOW-WASTE guidelines: steps by buying a selection LUNCHES of durable, reusable plastic • Buy unpackaged. containers. • SaveTheFood.com, I am grateful to If you’re like me and • ZeroWasteChef.com live in Vermont, trying to avoid plastic due where local food is to its energy-intensive • It’s Not About the Broccoli: Three Habits plentiful and high production and potential to Teach Your Kids for quality. Our farmers toxins like BPA, look for a Lifetime of Healthy markets, CSAs and other materials. Stainless Eating, by Dina Rose supermarkets offer steel is my favorite for a wide variety of lunches because it’s unpackaged food. indestructible and easy Sometimes I’ll tweak my recipe in to clean, even if you accidentally leave order to buy in-season, local or plasticyour kid’s lunch in a hot car over the free. Cut-up fruit and vegetables are weekend. Downsides are that stainless a slam dunk for kids’ lunches. There can’t be put in a microwave and you are several stores I frequent that have can’t see what’s inside without opening excellent bulk sections, where I can it. Silicone and fabric bags can hold buy everything from granola and rice to snacks. Wood, bamboo and composite dried fruit and olive oil. I bring my own containers are also available. Instead of containers and cloth bags. If I forget single-use squeeze packs of applesauce, or need more, I use the provided paper make your own applesauce — or buy a

MEREDITH BAY-TYACK

M

y 3-year-old and 5-year-old go to preschool Monday through Friday, so packing lunches is a frequent occurrence in my home, one that sometimes feels like a grind. (“Wait, my kids have to eat lunch every day?” I find myself joking.) In addition to catering to their food preferences and needs (one of my kids is dairy-free), I aim to limit the amount of packaging and food waste packed lunches create. It’s not always easy, but I’ve picked up some tips along the way. Below, find ways I make the process of preparing lunch more straightforward, while also reducing trash. One important thing to note: All families have different budgets, time pressures and goals. We all do what works best for our families in the season of life we’re in. While I try to avoid as much waste as I can, I do occasionally pick up highly packaged convenience foods. We do what we can!

A low-waste lunch packed in a stainless steel PlanetBox

large container of it — and portion it into reusable pouches. For stainless steel products, I like bento boxes from PlanetBox and containers from LunchBots and U-Konserve. Vermont-made Bee’s Wrap is a good alternative to plastic cling wrap, and Squeasy Gear silicone snack pouches are easy to fill and clean. Pack reusable utensils and a fabric napkin, and choose a washable, durable lunch box. If you have access to a fridge, avoid insulation and go for a simple canvas bag. If you need ice, freeze water in a metal flask or pick up a reusable ice pack.

AVOID FOOD WASTE Reducing food waste with kids isn’t straightforward, but there are habits that can help dramatically cut back on how much food gets tossed. • Rethink leftovers. Keep a specific shelf or bin in the fridge for takeout or home-cooked leftovers that need to be eaten quickly. Keep a smoothie jar there, too, to store odds and ends like halfeaten fruit that can be blended up later. • Properly prep and store. Research the foods your family eats regularly and find out how to prep and store for maximum freshness without using plastic wrap. For example, after washing greens, wrap in a damp cloth. Store carrots submerged in water in a jar in the fridge, and put herbs and uncut greens in a jar of water in the fridge or on a counter. Some fruit can

be washed and cut days in advance, while some needs to be left unwashed until you’re ready to eat it. When in doubt, freeze it! If you have food that’s about to go bad, research to see if it can be frozen. You might be surprised what can be saved that way. Straightsided glass jars and silicone bags are my favorite ways to store food in the freezer. • Pack smaller portions, especially of new things. If you’re frustrated with how much your kids leave behind, pack a variety of items in smaller amounts. • Unpack the moment you get home. Our kids have days when they eat everything in their lunch box and days when they barely touch their food. We try to pack a mix of foods, including some items that can be saved for the future if they’re not eaten that day. What we can’t save, we compost. We store our compost in the freezer year-round to avoid the odor, and we drop it off at our closest Chittenden Solid Waste District facility every few weeks. There are many options for composting at home, too. Green Mountain Compost and the Vermont Community Garden Network have classes and resources if you need support. K For more low-waste-living tips, follow Bay-Tyack at @MeredithTested on Instagram. KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

15


PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

MEALTIME BY A S T RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

French Onion Soup Re-create this restaurant favorite to home

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hat’s better on a cold winter night than a steaming bowl of French onion soup? With roots in ancient Rome, the dish became popular in the United States in the 1960s thanks to Julia Child. With rich, luxurious flavors created from simple ingredients, this restaurant favorite is worth making at home. The only difficult part is the long, careful process of caramelizing the onions. You want the natural sugars in the onions to brown and sweeten, but you don’t want the onions to burn. It is a tricky balancing act that creates something truly magical. I used a mixture of sweet and yellow onions, with a couple of shallots thrown in to add depth of flavor. While the onions were caramelizing, I jazzed up a store-bought beef broth by simmering it with parsley and mirepoix — a mixture of carrots, onions and celery. Ingredients for French onion soup

This makes store-bought broth taste more like homemade. If you want to make a vegetarian soup, use vegetable broth instead of the traditional beef. Once the onions are caramelized, it’s a simple matter of deglazing the pan with dry white wine (you could also use water with a little apple cider vinegar, but using wine is the traditional method, and the alcohol cooks off ), then simmering the onions in the broth. Finish the soup with a crispy piece of toasted French bread and lots of melted cheese. (The traditional cheese is Gruyère, but I used a mixture of French Comté and a cheddar/Gruyère blend. You could also use Swiss.) Stick in a spoon and scoop out a piece of bread with a bit of broth — and, of course, that ooey-gooey cheese — and you can enjoy this restaurant classic without ever leaving home. K

INGREDIENTS (serves four) • 4 pounds onions (a mixture of yellow and sweet) • 2 shallots • 3 tablespoons butter • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 teaspoons salt • 6 cups beef broth • 1 cup mirepoix (equal parts celery, carrot and onion, finely chopped) • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

• 1/2 cup dry white wine • 1 bay leaf • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce • 3 sprigs fresh thyme • 1 French baguette • 1 clove garlic • 2 cups shredded Swiss, Gruyère, or Comté cheese, or a mixture

DIRECTIONS 1. Peel the onions, cut in half and slice into thin half-moons. Peel and thinly slice the shallots. 2. In a large, heavy Dutch oven (at least 5 quarts), melt the butter and olive oil. Add the onions and shallots. It will look like there are too many for the pot, but as long as you can stir a bit, your pot is big enough; they will cook down a lot. Sprinkle with salt. 3. Cook onions over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until they are soft and lightly caramelized, but not burnt. This will take anywhere from 40 minutes to an hour. Don’t rush it. 4. While the onions are caramelizing, put the broth in a large saucepan, along with the mirepoix and parsley. Simmer until the onions are done. 5. When the onions are nicely caramelized, sprinkle with flour and stir to coat. Add the wine to deglaze the pan, scraping up any bits stuck to the pan with a wooden spoon.

16

• 3 tablespoons flour

Using a sieve to strain out the mirepoix and parsley, pour the broth into the pan with the onions. Add the bay leaf, Worcestershire sauce and thyme, and simmer for at least 15 minutes. The longer you can let it simmer, the better — in fact, you can even make this soup a day or two ahead of time, and top with cheese and toast right before serving. 6. While the soup is simmering, slice the baguette into rounds and brush lightly with olive oil. Rub each piece with the clove of garlic, then broil until toasted, about two to three minutes. 7. To serve the soup, ladle into broiler-safe bowls or crocks. Top each bowl with a bit of cheese, then a slice or two of bread (enough to cover most of the bowl), toasted side down. Add remaining cheese and broil until cheese is bubbly, about two to three minutes. 8. Serve hot, being careful not to burn your mouth on all that melted cheese.


BOOKWORMS B Y BRE TT A N N S TA N CI U

Beyond Books

From lawn games to cake pans, Vermont libraries loan unconventional items that enrich patrons’ lives

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The small size of our state allows librarians to share ideas and resources. In 1991, librarians in Chittenden County created the Homecard Program. Any resident with a library card at a participating library may borrow books and items from any other participating library. The resident’s hometown card must be in good standing (so return those overdue books or ante up for the lost ones). Borrowed material must be returned to its original library, and some restrictions apply. Bixby Memorial Free Library in Vergennes, for example, does not lend its museum and park passes to Homecard holders. The program now includes more than two dozen libraries in Addison, Lamoille, Grand Isle, Franklin and Chittenden counties. Find the list of participating libraries at brownelllibrary.org/find/homecard, or check with your local library for details.

COURTESY OF ST. ALBANS FREE LIBRARY

COURTESY OF JERICHO TOWN LIBRARY

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ish you owned a telescope so you could spend a winter evening checking out the starry skies? A sewing machine to stitch up a child’s Halloween costume? Hula hoops for a 6-year-old’s birthday bash? Before you buy these items, ask if you can borrow them from your local library. Vincent Livoti, the Vermont Department of Libraries’ special populations consultant and director of the ABLE (Audio, Braille, Largeprint and Ebooks) Library, notes that libraries “serve the Jericho Town Library’s seed interests and needs of our catalog whole diverse community, and those needs often extend beyond books and story time to nontraditional items.” Winooski Memorial Library offers Numerous libraries in the Green garden tools and a tree pruner, seedMountain State have enthusiastically saving screens to dry seeds harvested embraced this beyond-the-bookshelf from the garden, and a light therapy lending concept. The Jericho Town lamp to help lift users’ moods in the Library maintains a “Library of Things,” dark days of winter. a unique collection that includes a St. Albans Free Library patrons are food dehydrator, a canning kit, board able to explore the natural world with and outdoor yard games, a sewing binoculars, a telescope and a micromachine, and a juggling kit. Patrons and scope — and borrow a GoPro camera Homecard holders (see sidebar) can to record their adventures. St. Albans’ borrow nontraditional items for three collection also includes health-oriented weeks and renew them three times, gear, including a fitness starter kit with unless someone else has requested dumbbells, a kettlebell set and workout them. Its seed library, housed in a DVD, and a meditation kit that includes wooden card catalog and stocked with a Tibetan singing bowl. Patrons can test contributions from local gardeners, can out a blood pressure monitor before be accessed by any visitor free of charge purchasing their own, or borrow a — no library card required. Dutch oven to simmer soups. Parents Libraries are “community hubs that embarking on a long car ride can take offer access to new skills, tools and a out the library’s portable DVD player, sense of belonging,” said Jericho library along with DVDs. director Lisa Buckton. Many items in Burlington’s Fletcher Free Library the “Library of Things” — including the houses a sizable collection of items — pressure canner, puzzles and games — from giant versions of dominoes and have been donated by patrons who hope Connect 4 to a bubble wand. Families others will benefit from their use. can also sign out novelty cake pans, Snowshoes are a popular item at the including a Harry Potter set; a snow Lincoln Library. In warmer months, brick maker; a garment steamer; power the library lends out tennis rackets. tools; and a bicycle pump. Librarian Wendy McIntosh says the Quechee Library lends out a glass rackets are used on the town’s court, punch bowl and cups. The set was but she’s also spied games on the library donated to the library a number of lawn. Activity packs are Lincoln’s years ago by an elderly neighbor who newest acquisition — one contains also shoveled the library walkway and wooden trains, and a second includes an offered her homegrown raspberries American Girl doll and clothing. These and garden produce to the staff. In items can be checked out for one week. addition to a cache of e-readers, the

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A telescope patrons can borrow

library loans a set of dinner and dessert plates to accompany that punch bowl, plus folding tables and chairs. Most libraries also have free admission cards to Vermont state parks and historic sites, and some offer free or discounted museum passes. Pierson Library in Shelburne, for example, loans passes to the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in Vergennes, the Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington and the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, N.Y. At the Castleton Free Library, patrons can borrow a fleet of five bicycles for adults and children, with helmets and locks. The bikes are due back by closing on the next day the library is open. Library goers can also sign out Frisbees to fling on the disc golf course at neighboring Castleton University — when they need a break from the books, that is. K Jennifer Johnson, library advancement assistant at the Vermont Department of Libraries, contributed to this column.

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HEATHER FITZGERALD

FIT FAMILIES B Y H E AT H E R F I TZ GE RA L D

Seeing the Forest for the Trees Finding patterns across the landscape

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f you’re looking for a way to become more aware of nature, one simple thing can completely change the way you see the world: Look for patterns in the trees. Vegetation patterns repeat across the landscape wherever specific environmental conditions occur; ecologists call these “natural communities.” Many factors — including the type of bedrock, the amount of moisture, and the grade and direction of slopes (north- or southfacing, for example) — contribute to the different environmental conditions at a particular site. Natural communities are made up of all of the species found in a particular set of conditions, from the tallest tree to the smallest herb, but the trees alone can tell you a lot. If you and your family hike or ski, a great place to spot obvious natural communities is in the mountains. The bottoms of mountains usually have hardwood (deciduous) forests on their slopes, like maple, birch and beech. As you go above 2,500 feet, they transition to conifers (evergreens), such as spruce and fir. If the mountain is tall enough, eventually the conifers get really short, then disappear altogether. You will likely be able to scroll through some photographic memories of your time on a mountain and agree that these are patterns you have seen. The lines 18

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

between these communities are relatively sharp and easy to notice. These changes occur, in part, because as you go up a mountain it gets colder, wetter and windier, favoring conifers. On a few of Vermont’s tallest mountains — Mount Mansfield, Camel’s Hump, and Mount Abraham — it becomes too cold, wet and windy at the top even for conifers. There are patterns to see everywhere, not just on mountains. One striking pattern to keep an eye out for at lower elevations is groves of hemlock trees. Because their needles are so dense, the floor of a hemlock forest is quite dark, and very little can grow there, other than baby hemlocks. So other species of trees and the herbs and shrubs that make up the understory are absent. When you notice that you’re in a stand of solid hemlocks, look to see if you’re in a shady ravine, or use a compass app on your phone to see if you’re on a north- or east-facing slope. These are cooler and shadier than south- and west-facing slopes, and hemlocks do well in these conditions. On south- and west-facing slopes, you are likely to find more oaks and hickories. If you start looking for patterns such as these and find yourself hooked, consider purchasing Wetland, Woodland, Wildland: A Guide to the

LIBBY DAVIDSON

Heather’s son Jesse skiing in a montane spruce-fir forest at Bolton Valley

Natural Communities found that management of Vermont. Chelsea practices contributed Green Publishing to their presence, as issued an updated well. If you see a lot of second edition of white pines growing tothe field guide last gether, you can look for An illustration of a montane spruce-fir November. It’s written other signs of pasture, forest from Wetland, Woodland, Wildland for adults, but even such as barbed wire. fairly young kids can flip through the Animal behavior, too, can shape book looking at the drawings by Vermont landscape patterns. For example, many artist Libby Davidson. They capture abandoned beaver ponds are ringed the feeling of each community so well with conifers. Beavers prefer to eat that when you see the illustration of the hardwood saplings, such as aspen and community you are in, you will immebirch, and avoid tannin-rich hemlocks diately recognize it. The guide explains and pines. When beavers harvest all of which conditions likely formed each the small hardwoods and move on in community, which species of animals search of tastier lands, the conifers they and plants you might find there, and good leave behind grow into a forest that will places to visit various examples of each surround the pond for years to come. community. If you and your family start looking for One caveat for novice natural commu- patterns, you won’t see them all at once, nity buffs: Not every patch of vegetation so remember to temper your expectayou see is a natural community. Forests tions. The simple act of looking will make need time — decades, in fact — to mature. your experience richer. Says Franklin/ And some patterns you may notice are Grand Isle County forester Nancy Patch the result of human activity, not the (paraphrasing Senegalese conservationphysical environments. ist Baba Dioum): “You only see what you For example, if you see a grove of know, you only love what you see and you white pines, chances are you’re looking only protect what you love.” K at an abandoned pasture. That’s because when agricultural fields were abandoned, Heather Fitzgerald teaches field ecolwhite pines moved in. Vermont geograogy and environmental science at the pher Jane Dorney ( janedorney.com) has Community College of Vermont and the interviewed longtime dairy farmers and University of Vermont.


POP CULTURE B Y KE E GA N A L BA UGH

Connect More, Fight Less

The challenges of maintaining a healthy relationship with your partner after kids

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stood at the kitchen sink, slowly washing and drying the pile of dishes in front of me. Our toddler was finally asleep, and the nightly ritual of getting everything ready for the following day could commence. Prior to the birth of our daughter, my partner, Stephanie, and I ended most days snuggling on the couch, enjoying a drink while watching television. But by the time I stood at the sink, 18 months into parenthood, evenings like that were few and far between. Stephanie entered the kitchen as I continued my chore. “Hey, the next time you trim your beard in the bathroom, could you try and do a better job of cleaning up?” she said. “There are tiny little hairs everywhere, and I just cleaned the bathroom the other day.” I could feel my temperature rise as my defensiveness kicked in. “Sorry. I cleaned a lot of it up. It’s hard to get all of them,” I told her. Believing this was a criticism on how much I helped around the house, I felt the need to make it clear that I did my share. “You know, it would be really helpful if you could help out with cooking more next week. I feel like I’ve been doing it a lot,” I added. “I was talking about the bathroom. This has nothing to do with cooking meals. Why are you bringing that up now?” Stephanie questioned. “When am I supposed to bring it up?” I asked. “I’m feeling stressed and just sharing what I’m thinking.” By this point, I had stopped doing the dishes, and we began a 20-minute detour into relational conflict. One that would inevitably leave us both stewing in a cocktail of emotions including anger, shame, guilt, frustration and resentment. One that would prevent us from talking to each other for nearly 24 hours. One that was becoming all too familiar. It’s the sort of conflict that becomes quite common in marriages after children enter the picture.

According to psychologist John Gottman, who is renowned for his work in marriage stability and divorce prediction, “67 percent of married couples experienced a precipitous decline in relationship satisfaction in the first three years of the baby’s life.” The combination of exhaustion, lack of free time, increased social isolation and less financial flexibility all contribute to a troubling reality for parents. To be fair, research also shows that most relationships experience a decline in satisfaction during the first few years of marriage, even in the absence of kids. But a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology by Brian Doss and others indicates that this decline in marital satisfaction is “nearly twice as steep for couples who have children than for childless couples.” So if you catch yourself thinking, “My partner and I used to be happier,” chances are, you’re right. Bottom line: Maintaining a healthy, positive relationship with your partner after having kids isn’t easy. And that is normal. That doesn’t mean you should consider every conflict “normal” and just succumb to the belief that parents are destined to have unhappy marriages. But creating a happy and healthy relationship with your partner requires commitment, prioritization and effort. The work yields a pretty good payoff, though. Researchers from the American Psychological Association say that happy couples live longer, healthier lives. And parents’ relationship quality affects a child’s behavior and development, according to research published in the Journal of Marriage and Family. In January 2018, shortly after the dishes incident, Stephanie and I recognized that we wanted help and started going to therapy for individual and joint sessions, which turned out to be one of the best decisions of our lives. Two years later, we’re still seeing the same therapist on a weekly basis. At the end of every session, our therapist asks, “So what are you taking home with you today?” The following advice has helped the most:

• Take care of yourself. Exercise, eat well and sleep when you can. Even if just one of you is well rested, your joint capacity for resolving conflicts increases tremendously. • Hug more. It’s easy and creates an instant physical and emotional connection. According to our therapist, couples should hug at least twice daily and each hug should last as long as it takes for both bodies to feel completely relaxed and comforted. • Be intentional about scheduling time together. Date nights are important, but quality time can also just mean just sitting side by side on the couch. • Make time regularly to connect. This includes intentionally checking in with each other every night and sending text messages to each other throughout the day. Smartphone apps like Marco Polo make it possible to have a “face-to-face” conversation while you’re both at work. • Create a plan for when someone is triggered. In our marriage, we try to use language like, “Hey, I’m feeling triggered and can’t talk about this right now. Can we pause this topic and commit to revisiting it tonight before bed?” Once emotions start to escalate, rational conversations are nearly impossible. Giving each other space and revisiting touchy topics later can make a big difference. These certainly aren’t all of the answers, but they’ve helped our marriage. Over the past two years, Stephanie and I have made huge strides in how we communicate with one another, but the work is certainly ongoing and requires commitment, honesty and patience from both of us. That, and cleaning up the bathroom after I trim my beard. No one should have to squeeze toothpaste from a tube covered in whiskers. K Keegan Albaugh is founder of Dad Guild, a nonprofit support network for new fathers. He is the Fatherhood program coordinator at Janet S. Munt Family Room parent-child center in Burlington.

It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

One to Watch

Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? or she could cause?Tell Tellus usmore! more!He They could be befeatured featuredasasOne OnetotoWatch Watchininan an upcoming issue of Kids VT. Visit kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

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A Bed of One’s Own Longtime friends deliver a good night’s sleep to children in need BY ALISON NOVAK • PHOTOS BY GLENN RUSSELL

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t 8:30 a.m. on the Saturday before Christmas, the temperature hovers in the single digits. It’s the kind of morning that lends itself to sleeping in, or at least lingering under the covers a little longer than usual. But Bob Brosseau is already up and at ’em — loading a trailer hitched to his red Dodge Ram pickup truck with bed frames, mattresses, sheets, blankets and pillows. For the next few hours, Brosseau and his team will be winding through Fairfax, Milton, Burlington and Winooski, delivering beds to nine children who have been sleeping on mattresses or blankets on the floor, or on couches. This day is a special one for the team. At their last stop, they will deliver their 100th bed. Building beds for kids in need is the latest venture for a trio of sixty-something men: Brosseau of Jericho, Dan Parot of South Burlington and Mike Lemieux of Colchester. The three grew up together in Winooski in the 1950s and ’60s — in the days when “parents kicked you out of the house, and you didn’t come home until 5,” laughs Brosseau, 64. Brosseau and Parot have known each other since they were kids. Both attended St. Francis Xavier School and logged many hours at each other’s houses, playing wiffle ball and football in the backyard, and biking to North Beach. The woman that Brosseau took to his prom later became Parot’s wife. Lemieux moved to Winooski in high school and served as best man in Parot’s wedding. The three men took their young families on group camping trips, and their kids became friends, too. In more recent years, they’ve helped each other do volunteer projects for their workplaces and churches. Last summer, they launched the first Vermont chapter of Sleep in Heavenly 20

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Volunteers use a mallet to make holes in wood that will eventually become a bed

Peace, a national nonprofit that builds and delivers beds to kids ages 3 to 17. Brosseau was inspired to start the chapter after watching the Facebookbased web series “Returning the Favor,” in which host Mike Rowe travels across the country spotlighting people who give back to their communities. A 2018 episode featured Luke Mickelson, the Idaho man who started Sleep in Heavenly Peace in 2012. After building a bunk bed for a child at his church, Mickelson realized there were other kids in his community who also needed beds. The organization delivered 11 beds in its first year and now boasts 183 chapters in 44 states and three countries. Sleep in Heavenly Peace — with its motto: “No kid sleeps on the floor in our town!” — estimates that 2 to 3 percent of American children don’t have their own beds, based on information

Headboards are branded with the Sleep in Heavenly Peace logo


A finished bed

history of the organization and how to use software programs to track donations, expenses, bed requests and deliveries. They also got hands-on experience in a bed-building workshop. In June, they launched the Chittenden County chapter of From left: Childhood friends Dan Parot, Mike Lemieux and Bob Brosseau Sleep in Heavenly Peace. With BOB BROSSEAU a $5,000 donation from Phish’s WaterWheel Foundation — drummer Jon Fishman used to bowl with collected by chapter members across the Brosseau — and a 50 percent discount at country. Lowe’s, the men purchased tools: chop Last February, while having dinner at Parot’s home, Brosseau showed him the saws, drill presses, sanders, drill kits and ratchet guns. They’ve shelled out some episode of “Returning the Favor.” The of their own money on the initiative. two men were “both sitting on the couch Brosseau bought the trailer for his truck crying,” Brosseau remembers. Parot, so he could make deliveries in the snow who had been a volunteer firefighter and and rain, and he and Parot paid their worked for the South Burlington Public way to Idaho. They also rely on a fleet Works Department and a local motel of volunteers, many of whom are family before retiring, was looking for a new members or friends they’ve known for project. And the letters “S” and “P” in the decades. Employees from companies, Sleep in Heavenly Peace logo felt like a including Mascoma Bank and Myers sign from his son Shannon Parot, who Container Service, have constructed beds died of Crohn’s disease in 2007. Brosseau as a way to give back to their community, sent the episode to Lemieux, who also and Brosseau has also hosted holiday and signed on to help. New Year’s volunteer building sessions “Whenever one of us comes up with A barn behind Brosseau’s house, an idea, the others are willing to jump which once housed his mobile home, is in and lend a hand,” says Brosseau of his the chapter’s headquarters. Volunteers longtime pals, noting that he couldn’t gather there about twice a month to cut, have undertaken the project without sand, drill, fasten, stain and brand the them. organization’s logo onto bed frames, Brosseau and Parot attended a training in Idaho in the spring where A BED OF ONE’S OWN, P. 22 » they learned more about the mission and

Whenever one of us comes up with an idea, the others are willing to jump in and lend a hand.

Volunteers prepare to dunk a headboard in a vat of homemade wood stain

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which can be quickly assembled into single or bunk beds when they arrive at families’ homes. A “Wall of Heroes” sign hanging in the barn displays a board for each of the building sessions, signed by the participants. When Brosseau puts out requests for new bedding on Facebook, he often comes home the next day to find packages on his doorstep. Individuals or companies who want to help can volunteer during weekend building events, or donate money — $1,800 covers construction of 10 beds; $3,500 funds 20 beds. Parot has recruited a handful of South Burlington businesses to set up clear boxes, with miniature bunk beds inside of them, to collect patrons’ spare change at the cash register. Brosseau wasn’t sure when he started how many area kids needed beds. But through word of mouth, an active Facebook page, and connecting with social service agencies like the Howard Center and the Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity, requests have been growing steadily. Their first delivery was three beds to siblings in Franklin County, ages 5, 7 and 16, whose excited reaction, says Brosseau, “made our hearts melt and made us say, Yes, this is what we want to do.” Crystal, the mother of those siblings, explained that a friend had filled out a bed request for her family. “It was such a load off our shoulders,” she wrote in an email, noting that one of her four children has autism, and her husband works “crazy hours” to make ends meet. “We are that family who donates and helps families out when we can, but this time we were the ones who needed a little help,” she said. When the men came to deliver the bed “they were so kind and friendly. No judgment, just amazing people looking to help families out.” Since then, Brosseau and his friends have delivered dozens more beds, primarily in Chittenden County, but as far afield as Rutland when they are able. They have a backlog of more than 80 bed orders that they’re working to fill, with an average wait time of 30 to 60 days. The Saturday before Christmas, the men deliver nine beds to five different households. The team — Brosseau; Parot; Lemieux; Parot’s adult daughter,

Bob Brosseau

Volunteers sand wood boards before building begins

Stephanie; and another friend, Michael Barrett — make quick work at each location. Brosseau keeps a binder with delivery information in his truck and acts as the “advance man,” knocking on the door to make sure families are at home and ready to receive their beds. Then the group brings in tool bags, headboards, footboards, siderails, slats, rolled-up mattresses, bedding and pillows. Wearing Santa hats blinking with light-up Christmas tree decorations, they are jovial and efficient, with an unspoken understanding common among people who’ve known each other for decades.


We are that family who donates and helps families out when we can, but this time we needed a little help. CRYSTAL, FRANKLIN COUNTY MOM

After assembling two single beds in a home in Milton, one of the men announces, “Your beds are ready for you, kids. Come in!” And a young boy and girl scurry upstairs and jump onto the same bed, covered with a jungleanimal-themed comforter, laughing. At an apartment in Burlington, where they’re delivering a bunk bed and a single bed to a family that used to be homeless, they invite an eager 13-year-old boy to operate their drill. And in a house in Winooski not far from Brosseau’s childhood home, the men commemorate their 100th bed delivery — this one for a teenage girl who

had been sleeping at her aunt’s house or on the couch — with a silver balloon and a group photo. As the group leaves, the girl’s mother thanks them, adding, “She’s going to be surprised when she comes home.” Social worker Gabrielle Clow, who works with students in the Winooski School District, has filled out several bed referrals for families this school year. The online application takes just minutes, she says, and Brosseau has been quick to respond to both her and families letting them know the status of the request. In her line of work, she says, problems related to mental health, poverty and homelessness often feel so complex that they’re not easy to solve. But Sleep in Heavenly Peace offers a service that can quickly lead to a concrete, positive change. “It’s such a nice feeling to say, ‘Oh, your little one needs a bed? I can work that out for you,’” Clow explains. A good night’s sleep is critical for kids to be able to learn, she adds, and having their own bed gives kids a “self-esteem boost” and “something to be proud of.” While delivering beds, the three men have encountered kids who are sleeping on piles of clothes on the floor, or on moldy, stained mattresses. “We all think we’re ‘peaches and cream’ around here,” says Parot. “You just don’t realize how bad people have it.” Currently, Brosseau spends several hours each night after work fielding requests for beds and researching fundraising and outreach ideas. On weekends, he’s either building beds or delivering them. When he calls to tell people they’re on the wait list for a bed, “I always apologize,” he says. “I get sad because it feels like we didn’t fulfill our promise.” When asked why he’s so devoted to the organization, Brosseau’s answer is simple: “If someone needs help and I can help them, why not?” K Learn more about Sleep in Heavenly Peace at shpbeds.org. Find the Vermont chapter on Facebook by searching “Sleep In Heavenly Peace - VT, Chittenden”

Hannah Bogard CAMP DIRECTOR, YWCA VERMONT CAMP HOCHELAGA

Reach Local Families! We started advertising in Kids VT to share our summer camp programs, scholarship opportunities and benefits of outdoor, screen-free experiences with our immediate community. We have consistently seen growth in camp enrollment from our local community. Our records indicate that more than 30 percent of our new camp families noted Kids VT as the mechanism through which they found and chose Camp Hochelaga. Kaitlin, our Kids VT account executive, is amazing. She answers our questions promptly and always gives us genuine advice about how and where to center our marketing funds. As a nonprofit operating on a tight budget, we appreciate that Kaitlin always makes sure that our marketing investments give us the biggest possible community impact and exposure. I would absolutely recommend Kids VT to other businesses. We have seen endless engagement from local families as a result of advertising campaigns.

REGISTER FOR THE CAMP & SCHOOL FAIR! SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 • 10 A.M.-2 P.M. CONTACT KAITLIN MONTGOMERY AT 985-5482 OR KAITLIN@KIDSVT.COM 2v-kvttesti-HannahBogard20.indd 1

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Left to Their Own Devices Middle schoolers create art that reflects their feelings and knowledge about screens COMPILED BY ALISON NOVAK

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hen it comes to voicing opinions about teens and screen time, adults are often the ones doing the talking. But how do young people feel about social media, texting and video games? How do they think technology affects their lives and the lives of those around them? At Winooski Middle School, seventh- and eighth-grade students recently embarked on a unit of study that spanned subject areas to examine how screen time impacts the adolescent brain. In language arts and social studies classes, they read scientific articles and opinion pieces on the subject. In science, they learned about brain development. And in math, they collected and displayed data about their own screen use. As a final project, students created a piece of art in the surrealist style that reflected what they had learned from the unit. Winooski Middle School art teacher Emily Jacobs chose to focus on surrealism so that students were able to show their ideas “symbolically in a fantastical or bizarre way” and would not be confined by the limits of realism. “The content in their artwork shows great reflection and depth of thought, and shares a powerful range of messages,” Jacobs said. The student art is being exhibited at Scout & Co. coffee shop in Winooski until March 1. Some students have expressed that having their work hung in a public place makes them feel like professional artists, said Jacobs. Here, find eight works from the exhibit, accompanied by an explanation of what each student learned during the unit, in their own words. K

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"Falling" by Hawa Mayange, 8th grade Cellphones and computers have transformed life, and we are now exposing our brains to an environment and asking them to do things that they weren’t necessarily evolved to do. Now that I understand how serious the negative impacts on brain development can be, I still use my phone most of the time to text friends and watch movies, but I try to be more aware of my screen time. The intention of my artwork is to communicate the risks of using our phones too much, to the point where we miss out on what’s going on around us. My drawing is about a person that used their phone too much and then out of nowhere, she finds herself in this dark place.

"Plugged-In" by Logan Erwin, 8th grade The most surprising thing that I learned is that we are truly almost always plugged into some kind of screen, because they’re everywhere now. Even though I have recently learned much about the effects screen time has on our brain, my habits haven’t changed, because I’m still on my phone all the time. My artwork is intended to communicate that we are almost always plugged into our phones and almost constantly looking at screens.


"Numb" by Auishma Pradhan, 7th grade

"Expectation vs. Reality" by MaeRee Jan, 7th grade

"#Consumed" by Thera Neilson, 8th grade

"Lost in Code" by Hailey Nebelski, 8th grade

In science class and social studies, we have been researching the impact of screen time on our brains. We have learned that the more a person uses screens, the more addicted they become to their devices. The effect on the brain is similar to that of a drug. In my artwork, I put apps with lots of notifications, because social media can be especially addicting, and I experience relentless notifications on those apps. A lot of people spend their whole day texting and messaging on apps, and stay up late into the night using their devices. The girl in the picture is expressionless and feels numb, because all of the communication from the apps feels inauthentic and empty. She doesn’t feel the closeness of real-life, face-to-face interaction because of all the hours she spends on her phone.

Technology can change your life for worse, or for better. Screen time can be consuming and addicting when a person starts to live their life more online than off. However, for LGBTQ youth in particular, social media has provided a connection to a community that they lack in real life. In this way, screen time provides a window to encouragement, acceptance, affirmation and self-actualization; a place where they can be who they really are and showcase their true identity. My work of art is intended to show the importance of the positive impacts of screen use for LGBTQ youth, as well as the potential for technology to be overly consuming.

When I learned about the adolescent brain, I was surprised by the fact that screens are actually highly addictive. The brain releases a chemical when you are doing something enjoyable — like when you are on a screen — and after a while, your brain wants more and more. As a result of the addictive quality of screens, people are too focused on the internet. They tune out the real world and tune in to this trendy, new online world. My artwork depicts how scary and dangerous that addiction can be, especially for a developing mind. If all a person cares about is the number of likes they get on a picture, then how can they appreciate real things? I hope everyone will work on being more aware of how they use the internet because it’s much more important to enjoy the real world than a photo online.

My artwork represents the duality of the positive and negative sides of the digital world. On one hand, the internet can morph into a person’s reality and take them away from the wonders of the real world outside. However, the digital world can also be a much-needed escape for those trapped in terrible situations in their actual reality, giving them the opportunity to laugh, feel like they belong and meet others who can change their lives for the better. The digital realm can also shine light on creativity and talents that people would never recognize if not for the internet. My drawing shows a girl walking into a forest of apps — her creative escape — but also illustrates her decreased focus on and connection to reality, with the faded trees and pitch-black sky.

"Short Circuit" by John Kadariya, 7th grade The most important thing I learned was that we spend so much time on screens that we do not know how much time flies by. My artwork is intended to show all the screens short-circuiting and frying the brain The boy in the picture has forgotten that he did other things other than him being on a screen. I want people to know that too much time on screens is not good for you.

"The World We're Missing Around Us" by Elizabeth Perotte, 7th grade The assignment we had was to show how technology affects us. I made my art with 31 different colored pencils and a normal pencil, and it took the time span of a week and a half. The phone is placed in the center of the drawing because, for most teenagers, their cellphone is the center of their world. The teenagers can’t see the world around them because they’re getting sucked into their phone by all of the apps, social media and video games. They can’t see the trees, the ocean, the mountains or the stars around them.

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SUMMER CAMPS Flynn summer camps spark discovery, collaboration, and joy. We make it possible for all kids, ages 4-19, to participate in the arts.

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AND SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 10 A.M. - 2 P.M. BURLINGTON HILTON

Cabin Fever

Books to psych kids up for summer

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t’s February, and that puts us smack-dab in the middle of winter. We eat breakfast in the dark, walk the dog in the dark, eat dinner in the dark, burrow into bed, then do it all over again. It’s hunker down, layer up, shovel the walk, wipe your nose and watch your step season. With temps in the teens and August six months away, summer camp is a hazy mirage. Do we really go outside in bare feet? Swelter in wooden bunks packed six to a cabin and listen to loons call across the lake at night? Though you have to wait to actually go to camp, we know how to get you there now. Pick up Lions & Liars by Kate Beasley and tag along with 10-yearold Frederick as he finds himself at Camp Omigoshee, sharing a cabin with Nosebleed, Ant Bite, Specs and the Professor. Or get lost in Hope Larson’s graphic novel Chiggers and root for Abby as she goes back to the same camp she’s gone to for years but finds everything different. These are among books recommended by Vermont booksellers and librarians. Dive in and be transported. You’ll be swatting at mosquitos, hearing a crackling campfire and plopping a droopy, toasted marshmallow onto a graham cracker just before it falls from the stick. After all, books are the original virtual reality, so read on. Oh — and check the corner of your mouth. No, the other one. You’ve got a little chocolate smeared — riiight ... there. K

Camp Hochelaga in South Hero

BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG

Bad Kitty Camp Daze by Nick Bruel Bad Kitty finds herself at Uncle Murray’s Camp for Stressed-Out Dogs. What could possibly go wrong? Dorothy Alling Memorial Library’s youth services librarian Jess George recommends this chapter book, part of the Bad Kitty series, for kids ages 7 to 10. Away by Emil Sher, illustrated by Qin Leng “This lovely picture book talks about some of the fears associated with going away to camp,” said Christy Richardson, a bookseller at Phoenix Books in Burlington. And it’s told entirely through the sticky notes that Skip and her mom leave for each other as camp approaches. “I’m not going. Not EVER!” Skip writes early in the book. But, said Richardson, “it all ends up being a super fun adventure.” Ages 4 to 8.

A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever, written and illustrated by Marla Frazee James and Eamon go to nature day camp and spend nights on a blow-up mattress at Eamon’s grandparents’ house in this wry, even-fun-forparents, Caldecott Honorwinning book recommended by Richardson. “My son, Jasper, went to Camp Abnaki for the first time this past summer, and we read A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever to show him what to expect and get him pumped up about the experience,” she said. “He absolutely loved his time there.” Ages 6 to 9.

Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol Librarian George was one of three people to recommend this book, calling it “a relatable and funny graphic novel dealing with the hardships of making friends at camp.” Kirkus Reviews offered this introduction: “Convinced that she will never fit in with the American girls in her class because her family is ‘too poor,’ ‘too Russian,’ and ‘too different,’ 9-yearold Vera jumps at the opportunity to attend Russian summer camp … However, Russian camp in the Connecticut woods is not at all what she had expected…” Ages 8 to 14.

CABIN FEVER, P. 29 » KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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CABIN FEVER CONTINUED FROM P. 29

To Night Owl From Dogfish by Holly Goldberg Sloan and Meg Wolitzer Kirkus Reviews called this book a modern makeover of The Parent Trap. Richardson said it’s “about two 12-yearold girls whose dads fall in love and are sent away against their will to summer camp in hopes that they will become besties. All of them end up on a very unpredictable summer adventure!” Ages 10 to 13.

Camp by Kayla Miller Hiata Corduan, owner of Bridgeside Books in Waterbury, recommends this graphic novel about best friends Olive and Willow, who share a cabin at Acorn Lake. But Willow finds it hard to adjust to camp and clings to Olive, which strains the girls’ friendship. Ages 8 to 12.

Lions & Liars by Kate Beasley Frederick is suddenly popular, thanks to a case of mistaken identity in this chapter book recommended by Jane Knight, children’s buyer at Montpelier’s Bear Pond Books. Lions & Liars, she said, “is a super funny identity-swapping caper that speaks to finding your true self.” Ages 8 to 11. Chiggers by Hope Larson Magical realism mingles with summer camp rituals in this graphic novel for tweens that Richardson calls “a classic coming-of-age story.” Tucked between the black-and-white drawings are surprise lessons, including directions for a card game and illustrated instructions for making a friendship bracelet. Ages 10 to 14.

Nerd Camp by Elissa Brent Weissman Gabe is excited to spend six weeks at the Summer Center for Gifted Enrichment, but he worries what his new stepbrother, the supercool Zack, will think about him. After all, SCGE can also stand for Smart Camp for Geeks and Eggheads. Ages 9 to 12.

Runaway Ralph by Beverly Cleary Fed up with his family, the tiny protagonist hits the road and heads to Happy Acres Camp in this classic that George called a “great read-aloud from The Mouse and the Motorcycle series.” Ages 8 to 12.

Summer According to Humphrey by Betty G. Birney Birney has written a series about the hamster who lives in Room 26, Mrs. Brisbane’s classroom. “Where does the class pet go when school is out? Summer camp, of course!” said librarian George, who recommends the book. Ages 8 to 12.

WH E R E M E MORI E S AR E MADE

Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash In this graphic memoir set at an all-girls camp, Thrash recounts the summer of her first love. “It's funny, devastating, relatable and honest,” Phoenix Books’ Richardson said. Ages 13 and up. Sleepaway Girls by Jen Calonita Librarian George likes this “young adult take on summer camps complete with crushes and drama.” Ages 12 and up.

CAMP DATES SESSION 1 June 22-July 3 - Essex Jct SESSION 2 July 6- July 17 - Burlington SESSION 3 July 20 July 31 - Essex Jct SESSION 4 Aug 3- Aug14 - Essex Jct

2020 SUMMER CAMPS

Partnering individuals with and without special needs, ages 7 through adults for a summer day camp experience. IEP designed programming.

Sail, paddle, & more starting June 15th! Scholarships Available

partnersinadventure.org

COMMUNITYSAILINGCENTER.ORG

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Spy Camp by Stuart Gibbs Dorothy Alling Memorial Library student assistant Adam Zuchowski recommended this one, a follow-up to Gibbs’ Spy School. Middle schooler Ben Ripley has his sights set on a career in the CIA and spends his summer at a rustic wilderness camp that’s been infiltrated by an enemy spy organization. Ages 8 to 12.

The Summer Camp Survival Guide: Cool Games, Camp Classics and How to Capture the Flag by Chris Pallatto and Ron DeFazio, illustrated by Ethan Long George recommends this guide for kids who are worried or anxious about going to camp. Bonus: The book includes tear-out postcards, as well as pages to collect addresses and autographs. Ages 7 to 12.

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10 River Rd, Jericho

Outdoor Summer Adventure Camp Kids ages 3-9

    

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Weekly Themes: Lego • Music Building & Construction • Art Spanish Immersion & MORE!



For more information www.saxonhillschool.org summercamp@saxonhillschool.org 802-899-2400

Join Us!

 

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June 8th - Aug 14th

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L E A R N   C R E A T E   P L AY

Sculptural Lantern Making, Building a Toboggan and More! Project-based class: Learn to use a laser cu er, adobe illustrator, work in the Jewelry studio or a full wood shop! SEARSLANEBURLINGTONVT  - - •GENERATORVTCOM EDUCATION@GENERATORVTCOM

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11/21/19 11:56 AM

New Village Farm Camps April Vacation Camp

Farm & Garden Ages 5-11 CIT & Crew

11/21/19 2:31 PM

A unique learning for children who share For kids who areexperience wild about animals! For kids who are wild about animals! one thing in common: their love for animals

Animal Animal (agesAdventures 7-9) (ages 7-9) Kids Adventures Ages 5-6: $250

Kids Ages 10-12: $390

Afternoons only still available!

Afternoons only still available! Week 1: Monday-Friday July 13-17 � July 20-24 July 6-10 • 8:30AM - 12:30PM July 13-17 � July 20-24 Summer Safari (ages 10-12)

Week 2: Monday-Friday Full-day camp: A few slots available Summer (ages July 13-17 •Safari 8:30AM-12:30PM July10-12) 27– July 31� Aug 3-7 � Aug.10-14

Full-day camp: A fewRegister: slots available (802) 862-0135 x 12 Kids Ages visit�chittendenhumane.org. 7-9: $390 July 27– July 31� AugOr3-7 Aug.10-14 Week 3: Monday-Friday Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 July 20-24 • 8:30AM3PM Or visit chittendenhumane.org. Week 4: Monday-Friday July 27-31 • 8:30AM-3PM

Ages 12+

Week 5: Monday-Friday August 3-7 • 8:30AM-3PM Week 6: Monday-Friday August 10-14 • 8:30AM-3PM Before & after care hours are

Animalavailable. Welfare Scholarships funded by Warriors: $250 Redducs Foundation

Before & after care hours are Monday-Wednesday available. August 17-19 • 9AM-3PM Scholarships funded by

This elevated learning experience is for 13-15 Redducs Foundation year olds who are motivated to understand and be active in the world of animal welfare. *This is not your average animal lover’s program! Students will be involved in hands on learning and exploration.

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Night Eagle NIGHT EAGLE Wilderness Adventures WILDERNESS ADVENTURES

www.NewVillageFarm.com Shelburne, VT

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A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲ ▲

Our Winter camps are out-of-this-world with outer-space themed Vacation Camps Feb 18, 19 & 20

An underworld adventure awaits for Spring Vacation April 14, 15, & 16

Week long summer camps in theatre, music, art, and movement running from June through August

Register online at

www.artistreevt.org

2095 POMFRET RD. SOUTH POMFRET, VT

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Call for a full brochure:

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

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Vermont Ballet Theater School Center for Dance presents Celebration of Dance 2020 2019

Classes Classes Camps &&Camps

Our annual showcase of talent from ages 4 through pre-professional will dance their way onto the Flynn Main Stage in Burlington for 2 two exciting performances, exciting performances,

• Week-long ballet themed camps for ages 3-9; Cinderella, Beauty,camps Nutcracker and3-9; more! • Week-longSleeping ballet themed for ages Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Nutcracker and more! • Week-long ballet Mini-Intensive for ages 12-18, forMusical the serious dancer looking to stay • All That Jazz Theater Camp, plus STORM in shape various Intensive summer-long Dance Co.forSummer with intensives Kate Stevens

Saturday, 23 Saturday MayMay 25, 2019 at 1:00 & 6:30 pm. For show & ticket information visit www.vbts.org.

2020 2019 SUMMER

• Weekly ballet classes for young dancers - adults - beginner - advanced • All That Jazz Musical Camp, STORM Ongoing yoga and fiTheater tness classes forplus adults Dance Co. Summer Intensive with Kate Stevens

VBT Summer Intensive 2020 2019 Auditions Sat. March 7th 9th for ages 8 & up. Visit website or call for details! This summer come dance with the best at VBTS! For schedule and enrollment information, visit us at WWW.VBTS.ORG, or call 878-2941, or email INFO@VBTS.ORG k4t-VBTS0220.indd k4t-VBTS0219.indd 1

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Learn to flip, fly, juggle, and clown! Join us at our overnight camp in Greensboro, Vermont

RUN AWAY TO CIRCUS SMIRKUS CAMP June 13–14

Smirkling Camp Age 5–11

June 20

Intro to Smirkus Age 5–11

June 21–26

All Around Circus Camp Age 8–16

June 28–July 10

All Around Circus Camp Age 8–16

July 12–24

Intermediate Camp Age 12–18

SIGN UP AT

SMIRKUS.ORG

July 26–August 14 Advanced Camp Age 12–18 September 11–13

Fall Family Weekend All Ages

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Seeking Imagineers

SPRING & SUMMER 2020 Minecraft • LEGO • Robotics • Magic of Science • Dinosaurs •and more!

Register at echovt.org

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filmmaking ・ acting ・ music ・ dance ・ photography

Shelburne Museum Summer Camps 2020 CIRCUS CAMP June 22–26; ages 8–14

LIFE IN 1795 June 29–July 3; ages 8–11

OWL COTTAGE ACADEMY creative arts camps for teens N e w Yo r k | L o s A n g e l e s | Ve r m o n t

July 6–31; ages 4–6 Sign up for individual weeks or a month of camp!

QUILT CAMP August 3–7; ages 8–14

MAKERS GONNA MAKE (maker camp) August 10–14; ages 7–11

SOCAPA

socapa.org

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WE KNOW CAMPS

Register today for a summer of fun! CAMP ABNAKI

CAMP ABNAKI DAY

CAMP IGNITE

Age: For boys in grades 1 - 10

Age: For boys in grades K - 4

Age: For girls ages 8-14

Location: North Hero, VT

Location: North Hero, VT

Location: Burlington

Hours: One & two-week sessions

Hours: 9:00am – 4:30 pm

Hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Boys overnight camp on the shores of Lake Champlain where campers build skills, a sense of values, and a positive attitude.

Boys day camp. Lunch and one snack included. Bus provided with pick ups in Chittenden and Grand Isle counties.

A camp to Inspire Girls in Nature, Technology, and the Environment on the shores of Lake Champlain in Burlington.

CAMP PROPEL

CAMP KODA

Age: For kids in grades 3 - 8

IMAGINE YOUR STORY

Location: Burlington

Age: For kids in grade K - 6

Location: 4 area communities

Hours: 8:00am – 5:00pm

Location: Fletcher Free Library

Hours: 7:30am – 6:00pm

This sports-focused camp will teach leadership and teamwork through activities like soccer, basketball, baseball, and archery.

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When: June 15 -19, 8:30am – 5:00pm Campers will participate in fairytale-themed activities and the library’s summer challenge.

Age: For kids in grade K - 6

Full-day, coed summer day camp with 3 and 5 day options in Essex, Georgia, Underhill, and Waterbury.

For more information about Y summer camps, and to register today, visit:

gbymca.org/camp The Y’s Community Partner

1/23/20 12:07 PM


Summer Art Camps

YOU’RE GONNA

Starting June 15 for ages 6-18

2020 KIDS SUMMER ART PROGRAM July 6-10 • July 13-17 July 20-24 • July 27-31

OVER THIS CAMP! Waterskiing | Tubing | Sailing

GYMNASTICS! 1 to 9 week sessions Counselor/Camper ratio of 1:5 Located on beautiful Lake Champlain

SCREEN PRINTING P: RENEE GREENLEE

Learn more and register at burlingtoncityarts.org/camp or call us at 802.865.7166.

Full and partial scholarships available. Apply online at burlingtoncityarts.org.

A GIFT YOUR CHILD WILL TREASURE ANY TIME OF THE YEAR!

802.899.3479 DunkleysGymCamp@gmail.com

405 Pine Street, Burlington

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www.dunkleysgymnasticscamp.com

Projects include: Driftwood Art, Gelatin Leaf Prints, Block-printed Koinobori Fish, Pop-Up Books, Graphic Novels, Mechanical Sculptures, Drawing, Painting, Ceramic Animal Planters, Wood Cruiser Skateboards, Water-Balloon Trebuchet, Propeller Cars, Clay Wheel Throwing, Rube Goldberg Machine, and much more!

Sign-up Today! Limited Spaces available (802) 985-3648 shelburnecraftschool.org

1/23/20 10:42 AM

   

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A sleep-away camp teaching conservation and outdoor skills in week-long sessions for boys & girls ages 12-14

STEM PROGRAMS

Motorized LEGO brick creations, EV3 programming, stop motion animation, and Minecraft!

AGES

Burlington, Essex Junction, South Burlington, and Winooski

learn more and register at

     

4-13 www.LetGoYourMind.com

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"I can't say enough about how much I love this camp. My son attended for the first time this year and he absolutely loved his time there. He learned new skills and improved on others. There were so many activities, he could not pick a definite favorite. And he raved about the food. The best part of it is that he thoroughly enjoyed himself and made some great new friends." - 2018 Parent Untitled-13 1

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2020

n i a t n u o M Camp s d i K

SUMMER CAMPS

Jun e July 22-26 Aug 13-17 & . 10 -14 27-31, &2 4-2 8

BV Skate Camp 0- 24 2 & 0 -1 Jul y 6 17-20 & 7 Aug . 3

n i a t n u o BV Mike Camp B July 6-10 & 20Aug. 24, 3-7 & 17-20 MTB

www.BoltonValley.com/summer-camp 34

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802.434.3444 1/20/20 11:21 AM


Talent Development

Institute

NORTHERN VERMONT UNIVERSITY June 21-26 &/or June 28July 3, 2020

ADVENTURE CAMP

Serving advanced and gifted students entering grades 4-9 for 22 years!

802-658-9941 LUCY@TDIVERMONT.ORG k16-TDI0219.indd 1

Common Ground Center

at C om m on G r ou n d C e n te r

July 13-17, 2020 D a ily b us trans p o rtatio n from So uth B urlingto n

www.cgcvt.org

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1/22/20 11:14 AM

EXPLORE. LEARN. CREATE.

Experience nature, art, and adventure on our 130-acre lakeshore campus and beyond. Earn high school credit, make friends, and grow.

1 Rock Point Road, Burlington • 802-863-1104 rockpointschool.org/summer-session k8h-RockPointSchool0220.indd 1

1/22/20 3:39 PM

Camp does not just provide a child with a fun experience; it can be life changing. Lessons learned… Independence gained… Responsibility embraced… Confidence developed. All among loving friends, supportive staff, and beautiful nature.

The way summer camp should be...

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2020

WINDSURFING

CAMP

WND&WVS IS OFFERING WEEKLY HALF-DAY WINDSURFING CAMPS FROM JUN 22 – AUG 21 AT OUR BURLINGTON SURF CLUB LOCATION. THE CAMP RUNS FROM 8:45 AM TO 1:45 PM, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY. VISIT WNDNWVS.COM/PLAY OR CALL 802 540-2529 FOR MORE INFO.

Contact: JESS Camp Registrar and Admin Assistant info@pokomac.com | 518-963-7656

Located in New York’s Adirondack Mountains For 116 years - owned and operated by one family k8h-PokOMacCready0220.indd 1

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Digital Forensics & Cybersecurity Pre-College Summer Academy July 12–25, 2020 Learn how to solve & prevent crimes through Digital Forensics & Cybersecurity In this 14-day residential academy, high school students work alongside experts in the fields of digital forensics and cybersecurity in Champlain College’s Leahy Center forensics lab. They dive into industry best practices, ethical hacking, information security, crime solving and prevention.

Register today: champlain.edu/digitalforensics2020 Untitled-99 1

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WNDNWVS.COM

802.540.2529

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JUNE 22- AUGUST 21 ADVENTURE CAMP A weekly themed Science / Discovery Camp packed full of fun and activities. This camp is offered for ages 3-7 and includes snacks and hot meals.

GYMNASTICS CAMP For ages 6-12, Vermont’s largest gymnastics facility offers weekly instructional camps for everyone from children just wanting to get started to those already on competitive teams. Fun and games during the week culminate each week with a choreographed, themed show for parents at pick up.

NINJA WARRIOR CAMP Come spend a week in Vermont’s best and largest Ninja Training Center, combined with outdoor fun, activities and of course an end of week competition. Weekly schedule may include age 7+ or age 10+ restrictions. Aftercare Available 3:30-5:30pm. Food and extra snacks may always be purchased from the Regal Bistro. Regal Gym is a fully air-conditioned facility.

2 CORPORATE DRIVE • ESSEX • 655-3300 • REGALGYM.COM 36

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There's never been a better time to

BE A GOOD CITIZEN! T

he Good Citizen Challenge is a free and fun civics activity open to all Vermont K-12 students. Players earn points by demonstrating their interest in being good citizens of their communities, their state, their country and their world.

Tatum Kirtlink of Montpelier with her poster encouraging adults to vote

Complete the Challenge by racking up more than 251 points — the number of towns in Vermont. Those who finish will receive a Good Citizen medal and other prizes and will be invited to meet with elected officials who will recognize their achievements. Sign up now to finish the Challenge by the deadline, March 6!

HERE'S A S SECOND GO NAPSHOT OF THE OD CITIZEN CHALLENGE BY THE NUM , BERS: 767 players tak

ing the Chall

enge

in 81 Vermon

22 players h

t towns

ave finished ...

so far

The first 100 to finish get a Good C itizen T-shir t!

PLAY TODAY AT GOODCITIZENVT.COM Powered by:

In partnership with:

With support from:

Dan & Jenna Sonneborn The Evslin Family Foundation

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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CALENDAR FEBRUARY

SPONSORED BY:

Families savor the winter scene during North Hero’s GREAT ICE! This three-day shindig features sled dog rides, lighted night skating, a snow-building competition, a roaring Christmas tree bonfire, a chili cook-off and fireworks over the frozen landscape. Friday, February 14-Sunday, February 16. See greaticevt.org for details.

Week to Week FEB 9

The Music of the Grateful Dead for Kids: The Rock and Roll Playhouse — a family concert series — gets kids moving and grooving to tunes from the classic rock canon. Higher Ground, South Burlington.

TUES

Parent-Child Valentine’s Dance: Moms, dads and youngsters of all ages make memories together during a night of dancing and fun. Capitol Plaza Hotel, Montpelier.

SUN

FEB 11

SAT

FEB 22

Girls’ Engineering Day: In celebration of National Engineering Week, young women get inspired to build a better world, mentored by working women. American Precision Museum, Windsor.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org. 38

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

COURTESY OF THE ISLANDER

Frozen Fun!


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

1 Saturday

2 Sunday

ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: Locally produced crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

ADDISON Family Play: Moms, dads and children have fun with free court time and use of equipment. Ages 18 and under with adult. Middlebury Indoor Tennis, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 388-3733. FREE

CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, handmade crafts, meat and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of Vermont wares. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: Little ones and caregivers drop in and get messy with multiple materials to spark imagination. Ages 18 months to 5 years with caregiver. Radiate Art Space, Richmond, 10-11:30 a.m., $5 per child; $8 max per family; $40 for a 10-visit punch card. Info, 324-9938.

CHITTENDEN ‘Kids VT’ Camp & School Fair: Parents and campers-to-be get personal attention and detailed information as representatives from dozens of camps and schools from Vermont and beyond present their programs. Hilton Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 864-5684. FREE Art Lab: Inventive kiddos explore multiple materials. Recommended for ages 6 and under, but all are welcome. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Playshop: Families with small ones immerse in play-based learning designed to promote school readiness, with stories, songs and rotating activity centers. Ages 5 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon, preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Read to a Dog: Emerging readers hone their literary skills in half-hour sessions with pups. Ages 4-10. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., preregister. Info, 985-5124. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Clay Creatures: Aspiring artists form animal pendants, inspired by the new exhibition Creature Comfort: Animals in the House. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. RUTLAND Benefit Dinner and Silent Auction: Rutland County Pony Club and Horsemasters hosts a supper, speakers and silent auction for a supportive community. Dinner served at 6 p.m. Grace Congregational Church, Rutland, 5 p.m., $5-15; preregister. Info, 345-9257.

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14 per child. Info, 655-3300. Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment provides tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under with caregivers. Greater Burlington YMCA, 9:30 a.m.-noon, $5-8. Info, 862-8134. Jewish Story Hour: Educator and children’s entertainer Saragail Benjamin leads little ones in play, song, dance and stories while young families connect with each other and their heritage. Ages 1-7 with caregivers. Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 10 a.m. Info, 862-5125. FREE

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY Barre Children’s Story Hour: Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550. Burlington Stories with Megan: Fletcher Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. Essex Storytime with Jasmine: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. Huntington Story Time & Playgroup: Huntington Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-4583. Hyde Park Story Time: Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628. Northfield Children’s Story Time: Brown Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621. Richmond Baby Laptime: Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Colchester Toddler Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. Craftsbury Story Time: Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683. East Barre Story Time: East Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118. Hinesburg Youngster Story Time: Carpenter-Carse Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. Jeffersonville Storytime: Varnum Memorial Library, 9:3010:30 a.m. Info, 644-2117. Lyndonville Story Time: Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475. Milton Infant Story Time: Milton Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: KelloggHubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-4665.

Vermont Winter Farmers Market: More than 50 vendors peddle produce, fresh salad greens, apples and cider, artisan cheeses, homemade breads, and other local products. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727.

St. Albans Movement & Music Story Hour: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and crafts change hands at an indoor off-season celebration of locavorism. Barr Hill Distillery, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 223-2958.

Waterbury Baby & Toddler Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

Jaquith Library Open House & Book Sale: The community beats cabin fever at the local library with music, refreshments, kid-friendly activities and a used book sale. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

Woodstock Baby Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Woodstock Preschool Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

TUESDAY Alburgh Playgroup/Storytime: Alburgh Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

WEDNESDAY Barnes & Noble Storytime: Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

Barre Children’s Story Hour: See Monday.

Essex Babies and Books: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair; $5 each additional child. Info, 457-3500.

Stowe Story Times for 2-3Year-Olds: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

Waterbury Preschool Story Time: The Children’s Room, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 244-5605.

Morristown Preschool Story Time: Morristown Centennial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-3853. Sheldon Play Cafe: Sheldon Public Library, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 933-2524. Williston Story Time: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

3 Monday CHITTENDEN Cross Connections: Mothers of little ones ages preschool and younger socialize over breakfast and hear ideas about motherhood. Childcare provided. Christ Memorial Church, Williston, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $5; free for first-time visitors. Info, 878-7107. Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE MONDAY 3, P. 40 »

Highgate Story Time: Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

Waterbury Preschool Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 11:30 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

Hyde Park Story Time: See Monday, 10 a.m.

Westford Story Time: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Jericho Story Hour: Jericho Town Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686. Lyndonville Story Time: See Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. Marshfield Story Time & Playgroup: Jaquith Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581. Milton Rhythm & Movement Toddler Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. Norwich Word Play Story Time: Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. Quechee Story Time: Quechee Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232. Randolph Preschool Story Time: Kimball Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 728-5073. Swanton Storytime: Swanton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-7656. Warren Preschool Storytime: Warren Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-3913. THURSDAY Charlotte Storytime Hour: Philo Ridge Farm, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 539-2912. Hinesburg Youngster Movement and Music: Carpenter-Carse Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-2878. Jeffersonville Storytime and Crafts: Varnum Memorial Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 644-2117. Northfield Children’s Story Time: See Monday. Rutland Story Time: Rutland Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860. Shelburne Musical Story Time: Pierson Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 985-5124. St. Albans Story Hour: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

Williston Toddler Time: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FRIDAY Craftsbury Story Time: See Tuesday. Enosburg Read & Play Fridays: Enosburgh Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328. Essex Musical Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. Georgia Preschool Story Time: Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643. Killington Storytime: Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765. Lincoln Story Time: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665. Milton Preschool Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 893-4644. Randolph Toddler Story Time: Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073. Richmond Preschool Storytime: Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. St. Johnsbury Acorn Club Story Time: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291. Stowe Baby & Toddler Story Time: Stowe Free Library, 10:3011:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. SATURDAY Enosburg Story Hour: Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. Essex Saturday Storytime: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. Highgate Story Time: See Wednesday. Milton Drop-In Saturday Storytime: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. Next Chapter Bookstore Story Time: Next Chapter Bookstore, Barre, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114. KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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FEBRUARY 3 Monday (cont.)

Seasonal Events Colchester Winter Carnival: A talent show kicks off three days of indoor and outdoor fun, sponsored by the Colchester Parks and Recreation Department. Other activities include performances, a chili cook-off, inflatables, arts and crafts, and a free Sunday open skate at Leddy Park. See colchestervt. gov/663/Winter-Carnival for details. Colchester High School, FRIDAY, JAN. 31, 6 P.M., THROUGH SUNDAY, FEB. 2, $7; free for children under 3; some additional fees. Info, 264-5500. Penguin Plunge: Stouthearted swimmers in creative costumes dunk themselves in Lake Champlain to raise funds for Special Olympics Vermont. Waterfront Park, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 11 A.M.-2 P.M., free to watch. Info, 861-0278. Winter Faire at Orchard Valley: Families fête the snowy season with candle-dipping, wet felting, Valentine’s cards, origami and a bonfire. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., free admission; fees for activities; food available for purchase. Info, 456-7400. Winter Renaissance Faire: In this two-day shindig, medieval and Viking demonstrations of life on the battlefields, singers, musicians, acrobats, dancers — and artisan and craft vendors, too — enchant visitors of all ages. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 10 A.M.-6 P.M. AND SUNDAY, FEB. 2, 10 A.M.-6 P.M., $15; free for children

under age 6 with purchase of adult ticket. Info, 778-9178. Ice on Fire Winter Festival: The community pays tribute to winter with a puppet processional parade, games, storytelling and performances. Bring a mug for free chili and hot cider; costumes, shakers, rattles, bells and drums encouraged. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, SUNDAY, FEB. 2, 2-5 P.M. Info, 223-1242. FREE

‘Brrrlington’ Winter Bash: This winter shindig just for kids includes indoor and outdoor activities, including crafts, live animals, games with Big Blue Trunk, music and dancing. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, NOON-3 P.M. Info, 540-1058. FREE Full Moon Family Snowshoe: Hot chocolate fuels walkers for a sparkling stroll beneath lunar light. Snowshoes provided. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 6:30-8:30 P.M., $10; free for members; preregister. Info, 229-6206. Winter Carnival & Nordic Ski Race: Cross country skiers of all ages have a fling with races from 1-10K, with festivities including an obstacle course, sledding and snow sculpting. Mountain River School, Morristown, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., $10-50 for race; free for carnival admission; food available for purchase; proceeds benefit the Mountain River School assistance fund. Info, 888-2244.

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Homeschool Meetup: Home-learning families link up and relax with legos. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-2:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Great Ice!: Fireworks, public skating, a roaring Christmas tree bonfire, a chili cook-off and an Over N’ Back Trek make the snow-covered landscape a little more fun. Visit greaticevt. org for detailed schedule. North Hero, FRIDAY, FEB. 14 THROUGH SUNDAY, FEB. 16, various prices; most events are free. Info, 378-5115. Snowmobile Festival: New and old winter machines amaze a curious crowd. Vermont State Fairgrounds, Rutland, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., free admission. Info, 345-9257. FREE Go Play Day & Teddy Bear Carry: Outdoor and indoor winter family fun includes ice skating, a figure-skating show, a teddy bear carry obstacle course, hot food and drinks. Bring a sled. Giorgetti Arena, Rutland, SUNDAY, FEB. 16, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., snowshoes and ice skates available. Info, 773-1853. FREE Middlebury Winterfest: Families beat cabin fever blues with skating, horse and wagon rides, a snow sculpture contest, sledding, hot cocoa, music, games, kids’ activities, and much more. College Park, Middlebury, SUNDAY, FEB. 16, 11 A.M.-3 P.M. Info, 345-1366. FREE

Teen Space: Adolescents enjoy games, music, snacks and a different activity each week. Ages 12-17. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FRANKLIN Messy Mondays: Kids dig deep into imaginative projects. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

4 Tuesday CALEDONIA Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents plan upcoming programs. Ages 12-18. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5:30 p.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE

WASHINGTON Crafty Tuesdays: Students stop by after school for assorted crafts. See waterburypubliclibrary. com for details and to sign up. Waterbury Public Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Young At Art: Little ones in play clothes drop in and ignite their imagination through dance, paint and more. Ages 5 and under. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10-11 a.m., $5; $20 for a 5-visit punch card. Info, 457-3500.

5 Wednesday CALEDONIA Collage Workshop for Children: Small ones engage in art and stories, snacks and sharing time. Ages 2-5, with adult caregiver. Old Firehouse at GRACE, Hardwick, 10-11:30 a.m., $10; preregister. Info, 472-6857. FREE Hardwick Chess Club: Strategy lovers join local game enthusiast Paul Fixx to sharpen their skills. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 2:45-5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN Burlington Kids’ Chess Club: Strategy lovers of all abilities face off against opponents. Ages 6 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Mater Christi School Open House: Prospective parents of boys and girls in preschool through eighth grade check out classrooms and chat with teachers and staff at this private school open to all faiths and beliefs. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 8:30-11 a.m., preregister. Info, 658-3992. FREE

St. Albans Winter Carnival: The community dons snowsuits for festivities including horse-drawn wagon rides, family activities and games, a Human Dog Sled Contest, a Duct Tape Derby, and much more fun. Hard’ack Recreation Area, St. Albans, SUNDAY, FEB. 16, 11 A.M., food available for purchase. Info, 524-1500. FREE

CHITTENDEN Crafternoon: Small ones snuggle in for a seasonal story, snacks and hands-on creativity. Ages 6-11. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 2-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Center Street Night Sledding: Bundled-up families have a blast when Center Street is blocked off as a sledding hill. Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum opens its doors with free admission and fun children’s activities. Sledding tubes sponsored by Killington Resort. Downtown Rutland, TUESDAY, FEB. 18, 6-8 P.M. Info, 774-1372. FREE

Lego Club: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Wonder Wednesdays: Eager kids experiment, collaborate and explore their curiosity through specific projects. Best for ages 6 and up. Call or check online for details. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Spanish through Latin American songs and games. Ages 1-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Yoga for Kids: Young yogis stretch to the sky with professional instructor Melissa from Evolution Yoga. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11:15-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE

FRANKLIN Homeschool Chess Club: Home-educated students engage in strategy games and socializing. All abilities welcome. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Lake Elmore Polar Splash: Community members “freeze for a reason” in this fundraiser for Jenna’s House. Elmore State Park, Lake Elmore, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 11 A.M., free for spectators. Info, 535-4737. Snow Sculpture Contest: Families watch teams compete in snow carving, with a pile of the white stuff for kid fun. Games, live music and a chili cook-off keep folks toasty. Main Street Park, Rutland, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, NOON. Info, 775-5686. FREE Wintervale: Families have a blast with outdoor recreation and winter fun. Free ski, snowshoe and fat bike rentals for the whole family, kids’ activities and games — plus a roaring bonfire — round out the fun. Intervale Center, Burlington, SUNDAY, FEB. 23, 11 A.M.-2 P.M., local food and hot drink available for purchase. Info, 660-0440. FREE ‘Cool’ Snow Sculptures: Inspired by the National Park’s sculptures, families fashion their own snowy creations and refuel with light refreshments. Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 10 A.M.-NOON, preregistration recommended. Info, 457-3368. FREE

Game Day: Game aficionados of all ages bond over boards. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Tunes on Tuesdays: Youngsters make merry with movement and tunes. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

LAMOILLE Anime & Manga Club: Teens take time together to plan activities around a popular series. Ages 12-18. Morristown Centennial Library, Morrisville, 3 p.m. Info, 888-3853. FREE Free Family Art Workshops: Youngsters drop in for all or part of the morning and make masterpieces with many materials, presented by Grass Roots Art & Community Effort (GRACE). Coffee and snacks provided. Caregiver required. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 472-6857. FREE

Read to a Dog: Pet lovers peruse books with a registered therapy pooch named Lola. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE

LAMOILLE Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents engage in an active role in their local library. Ages 12-18. Morristown Centennial Library, Morrisville, 3 p.m. Info, 888-3853. FREE WASHINGTON Pop-Up Cards: Local crafter Ellen Bressler shares simple techniques for three-dimensional Valentine’s Day masterpieces. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

Walk-Through Wednesday at Orchard Valley: Parents interested in an alternative grade-school education for their children tour classrooms and ask questions. For adults. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 8:30-10:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 456-7400. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Wednesday Maker Series: Imaginative kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 6-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Young At Art: See February 4.

6 Thursday CHITTENDEN Bilingual Spanish Story Time: Library patrons of all ages soak up stories in two languages. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:15 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Red Clover Story Time: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile and art activities. Best for ages 5-10. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See February 3, 10:30 a.m. LAMOILLE Big & Messy — Art Space: Petite artists drop in and get creative with multiple materials in this child-led morning. River Arts, Morrisville, 10 a.m.-noon, suggested donation, $5. Info, 888-1261.

Burlington Babytime: Infants through slow walkers have a ball with books, rhymes, songs and socializing. Ages 18 months and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their imagination with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 3 p.m. Info, 285-6505. Teen Volunteers Valentine Craft: Adolescents have fun making holiday treats to take to Martha’s Kitchen. St. Albans Free Library, 6-8 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE WASHINGTON Cybersecurity Conversation for Families: Kris Rowley — a digital information security specialist, a professor at Norwich University and former Chief Information Security Officer for the State of Vermont — shares info with adults about parental controls, cyberbullying, social networking, mobile phones and more. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 456-7400. FREE MOPS/MomsNext: Mothers of preschoolers and school-age children mingle with other mamas for themed discussions. Childcare and children’s crafts provided, sponsored by the Waterbury Mission Church. Thatcher Brook Primary School, Waterbury, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Info, 272-5262. FREE

7 Friday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Campaign Mode: Experienced players embark on a fast-paced pastime. Game begins at 6:30 p.m. Come early to work on characters. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. Preschool Yoga: Small ones sing, stretch and relax. Ages 2-5. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Reading Buddies: Middle school mentors take time to read with youngsters. Bring a favorite book or choose one from the library. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:45-4:45 p.m., preregister. Info, 878-6956. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. RUTLAND Model & Art Show: Rutland County Pony Club and Wind Riders 4-H Club host an evening of children’s dioramas, models and artwork on public display. Doors open at 5 p.m.; judging begins at 6 p.m. Rutland High School, 6-8 p.m., refreshments available for purchase. Info,

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: Junior constructionists play with plastic cubes and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683.

8 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See February 1.

SATURDAY 8, P. 42 »

New Parents

Essex Lego Club: Small builders have a blast with plastic blocks. Grades K-5. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Ukulele Joe: Musical ones join Joe to sing and play. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

345-9257. FREE

Evolution Prenatal Yoga Burlington: Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 10:15-11:30 A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15 A.M. AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M., $17 per class; $120-140

for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga Essex: Mothersto-be build strength, stamina and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, Essex Junction, TUESDAYS, 6 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15 P.M. AND SATURDAYS, 8:15 A.M., $17 per class; $120-140 for 10-class pass.

Info, 899-0339.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Burlington: New mamas tote their pre-crawling kids to an alllevels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, NOON, TUESDAYS, 10 A.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45 A.M. AND FRIDAYS, NOON-1 P.M., $17; $120-140 for a 10-class pass. Info,

899-0339.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga Essex: New mamas tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga, Essex Junction, MONDAYS, 10:45 A.M., WEDNESDAYS, 10:45 A.M. AND SATURDAYS, 9:45 A.M., $17; $120-140 for a 10-class pass;

childcare for ages 6 months-6 years available. Info, 899-0339.

Bosom Buddies: New and expectant mothers, babies, and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE Bosom Buddies Too: Nursing mamas of toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE Mom and Baby Yoga: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $11. Info, 223-5302.

Prenatal Yoga: Moms-to-be stretch and bend. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 6-7:15 P.M., $16 per drop-in class. Info, 778 -0300. Burlington Early Months Infant Massage: This mother-infant group includes baby massage and postpartum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. FREE

Middlebury La Leche League Meeting and Playgroup: Families with infants and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10 A.M. Info, 359-0609. FREE Essex La Leche League: Moms bring their bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M. Info, 899-5490. FREE Hyde Park Baby Chat: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. Morrisville Baby Chat: Parents with babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

Burlington La Leche League: New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE La Leche League of the Northeast Kingdom: Expectant, novice and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.

Info, 720-272-8841. FREE

Mama’s Circle Barre: This supportive gathering brings moms of new babies and toddlers together to foster friendship through unique-but-shared experiences. Imagine Yoga, Barre, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:3011:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

Breastfeeding Café: Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 236-4136. FREE

Breastfeeding Families Group: Nursing moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

La Leche League Of Central Vermont: Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

Nursing Beyond a Year: In a supportive setting, mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding children approaching one year old and beyond. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE Babywearers of Central Vermont: Brand-new mamas and papas check out infant carriers, get advice and spend some socializing time with other new parents. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, FOURTH MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:45-7:15 P.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE How to Breastfeed Prenatal Class: Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M., preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

Johnson Baby Chat: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE Mommy Group: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info, 349-9084. FREE

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8 Saturday (cont.) CALEDONIA Dancing Hearts Valentines Workshop: Local artist Sharon Kenney Biddle leads artists of all ages and abilities during this drop-in morning to create colorful cards for cherished people. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.noon. Info, 748-2600. FREE CHITTENDEN Board Games at the Library: Sponsored by the Pierson Library, host Oliver Dienz takes over the town hall’s tabletops with board challenges for all ages and abilities. Snacks served, too. Children under age 11 must be accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Town Hall, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts, and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 656-4636. Family Contradance: Movers and groovers swing to music by the Woodbury Strings Mega Jam Band, with instruction by the Mad Robin Callers. No experience necessary. The Schoolhouse Learning Center, South Burlington, 3-4:30 p.m., by donation for adults; free for children. Info, 223-8945. Family Movie Night: Caregivers and kiddos snuggle in with blankets and pillows from home, while relaxing with a flick, snacks and drinks. Greater Burlington YMCA, 5-8 p.m., $10-20 per family; preregister. Info, 652-8134. Family Playshop: See February 1. Read to a Dog: See February 1. Stuffie Sleepover: Small ones tote their stuffies to a pajama storytime on Saturday, then stop in Sunday to see a slideshow of the animals’ nocturnal adventures. Ages 3 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5-5:45 p.m., preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE RUTLAND Vermont Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently used clothing and toys, sizes newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 384-7447. Sing, Say, Dance and Play: Families explore singing, creative movement, instrumental exploration, stories and lots of fun. Ages 3-7. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10-10:45 a.m., $10. Info, 457-3500. NEW HAMPSHIRE We Heart Art: Folks of all ages create Valentine’s Day cards, crafts and gifts with free materials and refreshments. Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, 10 a.m.-noon, preregistration recommended. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222. FREE

9 Sunday ADDISON Family Play: See February 2.

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CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See February 2. Family Gym: See February 2.

Live Performances

Stuffie Sleepover: See February 8, noon-1 p.m. FRANKLIN Pop-Up Valentine Card Workshop: Crafty ones get creative with the Museum’s materials and guidance from trustees Liz Markowski and Danielle Rougeau. Ages 7 and up. Sheldon Public Library, 1-2:30 p.m., $10; preregister. Info, 388-2117. WASHINGTON Dance, Sing and Jump Around: Families delight in a lively afternoon of dances and singing games with instruction and live traditional music. Ages 3-8 with caregivers. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 3-4:30 p.m., suggested donation $5 per adult; free for children; no one turned away. Info, 223-1509. Plainfield Farmers Market: Local crafts and agricultural products satisfy savvy shoppers. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 476-8360.

10 Monday CHITTENDEN Cross Connections Open Gym: Little ones explore a full-sized gym while caregivers chat. Ages 5 and under. NETS Center Campus, Williston, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 878-7107. FREE Teen Space: See February 3. Williston Preschool Music: See February 3. FRANKLIN Messy Mondays: See February 3. LAMOILLE Free Family Art Workshops: Youngsters drop in for all or part of the morning and make masterpieces with many materials, presented by Grass Roots Art & Community Effort (GRACE). Coffee and snacks provided. Caregiver required. River Arts, Morrisville, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 472-6857. FREE

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 3.

11 Tuesday CALEDONIA Free Family Art Workshops: Youngsters drop in for all or part of the morning and make masterpieces with many materials. Coffee and snacks provided. Caregiver required. Old Firehouse at GRACE, Hardwick, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 472-6857. FREE

CHITTENDEN Spanish Musical Kids: See February 4. Teen Writers Club: Adolescents participate in collaborative and independent games to stretch their imagination, encourage creativity and connect with other teens in a supportive, stress-free environment. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Williston Movie: Youngsters soak up a familyfriendly flick while snacking on popcorn. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN Tunes on Tuesdays: See February 4.

Young Tradition Vermont: Teen players, singers and dancers showcase their repertoire of traditional dance and music for an admiring audience. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 7-9 P.M., $8-15. Info, 533-9075. Nick Jr Live!: Dora and her PAW cohosts, Marshall and Rubble, team up with their friends to get the audience on their feet and sing, dance, clap, cheer and move to the music. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, TUESDAY, FEB. 4, 6 P.M. AND WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5, 6 P.M., $22.50107.25; tickets required for ages 1 and up. Info, 863-5966. Che Malambo: This Argentine company excites the audience with fancy footwork and rhythmic stomping, drumming and singing. All ages. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5, 7 P.M., $25-58. Info, 760-4634. Musical Storytelling for All Ages in Randolph: Scrag Mountain Music performs an original musical rendition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “Thumbelina,” composed by co-Artistic Director Evan Premo and featuring the woodwind family. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 6 P.M., donations accepted; preregistration encouraged as space is limited. Info, 377-3161. FREE DBR: Families get jamming on this Free Family Saturday with violinist/composer Daniel Bernard Roumain — DBR. Flynn Center Lobby, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 10 A.M., preregistration recommended. Info, 863-5966. FREE Mister Chris and Friends in Concert: Vermont PBS and ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain team up to get kids engaged with interactive activities and a sensoryfriendly concert at noon, featuring the star of the popular Vermont PBS music series. Doors open at 11 a.m.; show begins at noon. Pentangle Arts, Woodstock, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 11 A.M.-1 P.M., $5. Info, 457-3981. Musical Storytelling for All Ages in Burlington: Scrag Mountain Music performs an original musical rendition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “Thumbelina,” composed by co-Artistic Director Evan Premo and featuring the woodwind family. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 10 A.M., donations accepted; preregistration encouraged as space is limited. Info, 377-3161. Musical Storytelling for All Ages in Montpelier: Scrag Mountain Music performs an original musical rendition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “Thumbelina,” composed by co-Artistic Director Evan Premo and featuring the woodwind family. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 4 P.M., donations accepted; preregistration encouraged as space is limited. Info, 377-3161. The Music of the Grateful Dead for Kids: The Rock and Roll Playhouse — a family concert series — gets kids moving and grooving to tunes from the classic rock canon. Doors open at 2:30 p.m.; concert begins at 3 p.m. Higher Ground, South Burlington, SUNDAY, FEB. 9, 2:30-4 P.M., $15; free for children under age 1. Info, 652-0777.

Musical Storytelling for All Ages in Waitsfield: Scrag Mountain Music performs an original musical rendition of Hans Christian Andersen’s tale “Thumbelina,” composed by co-Artistic Director Evan Premo and featuring the woodwind family. Valley Players Theater, Waitsfield, SUNDAY, FEB. 9, 4 P.M., donations accepted; preregistration encouraged as space is limited. Info, 377-3161. ‘Rainbow Fish’: As part of the Student Matinee Series, Mermaid Theater of Nova Scotia enchants young theater-goers with three tales of the most beautiful fish in the sea. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, THURSDAY, FEB. 13, 9:30 A.M. & NOON, $8.50. Info, 652-4548, ext. 0. Dance Showcase: A bevy of graceful groups — including Cult of Yes from Montreal, Di’Ahna Restry of Boston, Nepali Heritage Dancers with Neeru Cvakoti, Ballet Vermont and many more — delight the audience in a benefit performance for Vermont Family Network and Puppets in Education. Black Box, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 7 P.M., $25-28. Info, 863-5966. Essex Has Talent: Young performers ages 5-18 strut their stuff while the crowd cheers. Essex High School, Essex Junction, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 7 P.M., $5-7; free for children under age 6; proceeds benefit Aunt Dot’s Place and Hope Lodge. Info, 878-1375. Vermont Youth Orchestra Winter Concert: Young musicians wow the audience with pieces including Mario Gaetano’s Two Designs, Franz Liszt’s Les Préludes and the first movement of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in C Minor. Senior Soloist Nathan Wu performs the first movement of Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto, Op. 14. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, SUNDAY, FEB. 16, 3 P.M., $5-20. Info, 863-5966. VSO: Star Wars & Beyond: Guest conductor Troy Peters and the Vermont Symphony Orchestra take the audience on a journey through musical favorites from Jurassic Park, E.T., the Indiana Jones series and more. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 7:30 P.M., $18-55. Info, 863-5966. Bread & Puppet: The Diagonal Life Circus: Vermont’s famous papier mâché puppets get the audience clapping in appreciation for their enormous size and political story. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, SUNDAY, FEB. 23, 3 P.M., $10. Info, 533-9075. ‘The Little Prince’: Original dance-theater created by campers ages 9 and up enchant the audience with a rendition of Antoine de SaintExupéry’s beloved book, featuring a lost child who falls in love with a flower. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, FRIDAY, FEB. 28, 5:30 P.M. AND SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 11 A.M., $5. Info, 229-0492.

HopStop Family Show: Kids’ Dance Party: Children and caregivers shake and boogie with DJ — and dad —Sean/Livemixkings. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H., SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 11 A.M. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE

Marko the Master Magician: Mysterious feats make the audience laugh in this all-ages performance. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 10 A.M., $5. Info, 457-3500.


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WASHINGTON Parent-Child Valentines Dance: Moms, dads and kids of all ages enjoy a night of dancing, refreshments and fun. Capitol Plaza Hotel, Montpelier, 6:30-8:30 p.m., $20-25 per couple; $5-7 each additional guest; preregister. Info, 225-8699. WINDSOR Young At Art: See February 4.

Ukulele Joe: See February 6.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. WASHINGTON Wednesday Maker Series: See February 5.

12 Wednesday CALEDONIA Collage Workshop for Children: See February 5. CHITTENDEN Burlington Kids’ Chess Club: See February 5.

WINDSOR Young At Art: See February 4.

13 Thursday

Wonder Wednesdays: See February 5.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Babytime: See February 6.

Yoga for Kids: See February 5.

Essex Lego Club: See February 6.

FRANKLIN St. Albans’ Homeschool Program: Selfdirected learners check out the library’s educational kits to create an interactive game using a story, time limit and puzzle activities with a specific theme. Ages 6 and up. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m., preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Milton PJ Story Time: Small tots in jammies snuggle in for stories, songs and crafts. Ages 2-7. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:15 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

UnSchool at Audubon: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from forest flora to wilderness skills. Ages 6-12. Parent attendance optional. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., $25-30; preregister. Info, 434-3068. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 6.

14 Friday Happy Valentine’s Day! CHITTENDEN Drop-In Healthy Valentine’s Day Snacks for Kids: Hungry tykes have fun fashioning kabobs from heart-shaped fruit, while parents partake of coffee. City Market/Onion River Co-op (Burlington South End), 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 540-6400. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: Family Night: New and returning players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills and a Dungeon Master. Game begins at 6:30 p.m. Novice players should arrive at 5:30 p.m. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

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Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 7.

FRIDAY 14, P. 44 »

Playgroups Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. MONDAY Audubon Nature Playgroup: Audubon Vermont, Huntington, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3068.

Brookfield Playgroup: First Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Burlington Crawlers, Waddlers and Toddlers: Janet S. Munt Parent-Child Center, 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

Burlington Fathers and Children Together: Janet S. Munt Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

Jericho Playgroup: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 760-8623.

Northern Vermont University ‘Aquatics’ Playgroup: Northern Vermont University, Johnson Campus, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

Milton Playgroup: Milton Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457. Morrisville Playgroup: River Arts, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

Winooski Playtime: Winooski Family Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

Open Gym: Central VT Gymnastics Academy, Waterbury, 10 a.m.-noon, $7-10. Info, 882-8324.

WEDNESDAY Barre Playgroup: Aldrich Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 115.

TUESDAY Bradford Playgroup: Grace United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Cambridge Community Center Playgroup: Cambridge Community Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 644-5028.

Bristol Playgroup: Bristol Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 388-3171.

Fairfield Playgroup: Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945. Mama’s Circle: Good Beginnings, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 595-7953.

Northfield Playgroup: United Church of Northfield, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. Purple Crayon Play Group: ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m., donations accepted. Info, 457-3500. Richmond Playgroup with Stories and Songs: Richmond Free Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 434-3036. South Royalton Playgroup: United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264. St. Johnsbury Toddler Time: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-1391. Waterbury Music & Movement: The Children’s Room, 10:3011:15 a.m. Info, 244-5605. THURSDAY Dads and Kids Playgroup: Family Center of Washington County, Montpelier, 5-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292. Johnson Playgroup: United Church of Johnson, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229. Middlebury Playgroup: The Congregational Church of Middlebury, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 388-3171. Milton Playgroup: See Monday. Montpelier Playgroup: St. Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. Randolph Playgroup: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Shelburne Open Play: Shelburne Field House, 9-11 a.m., $10 per child; $5 each additional child; $20 per family. Info, 985-4410. Underhill Playgroup: Underhill I.D. Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4680.

Don’t wait, book a party today! Jungle Party

Waitsfield Playgroup: Big Picture Theater, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

• Admission for 10 Children • Private Party Room – 2 hours • A pair of grippy socks for each guest

Williston Playtime: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

Unlimited Play Time

Winooski Playtime: See Tuesday. FRIDAY Cambridge Elementary: Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. Ferrisburgh Open Gym: Ferrisburgh Central School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 877-3463. Open Gym: See Monday. Rutland Playgroup: Rutland Free Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

$249

EACH ADDITIONAL CHILD

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Juice boxes, plates, cups, utensils & napkins We provide a party room assistant to help. You bring the cake, camera & kids!

Funky Monkey Everything in the Plus Jungle Special $325 2 Large Pizzas EACH ADDITIONAL Soft Serve Ice Cream

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Waterbury Playgroup: Thatcher Brook Primary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

Monkey Do! T-Shirt or Stuffed Monkey for MIM

Winooski Playgroup and Storytime: O’Brien Community Center, 9:30-11:45 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

Most Important Monkey – Birthday Kid

SATURDAY Montpelier Saturday Playgroup: Family Center of Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292, ext. 190.

NOW OPEN! 64 Harvest Lane Williston, VT 05495 MonkeyDoPlaygrounds.com

802.872.7522 KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020 Untitled-69 1 k6v-MonekyDo0220.indd 1

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CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

14 Friday (cont.) Music & Story Havdalah — Tu B’Shvat: Saragail Benjamin leads little ones in singing, dancing, storytelling, celebration — capped with a potluck. Ages 1-7 with caregiver. Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Info, 862-5125. FREE

Music with Raph: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:3010:15 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Reading Buddies: See February 7. Teen Advisory Board: Teens pursue art projects together. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Science & Nature Fairbanks Museum Opening Celebration: The Museum and Planetarium swing their doors open to the public after a deep winter cleaning, with gallery tours and light refreshments for all. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 3-5 P.M. Info, 748-2372. FREE

Great Backyard Bird Count: Avian admirers of all abilities and ages put their eyes to work and engage in activities to sharpen their birding skills. Vermont Institute of Natural Science, Quechee, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $14.50-16.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000.

Horse-Drawn Rides: Giddy-up! Families have open-air fun sailing over farm fields. Firstcome, first-served; rides leave every half hour. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, 11 A.M.-2 P.M., $8-10; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8442.

Great Backyard Bird Count Open Museum: Ornithologists-in-training visit the museum’s feeding station, explore exhibits and learn more about this big bird count, an annual four-day event. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., regular museum admission, $3.50-7; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 434-2167.

Playdate! Winter on the Farm: Little ones drop in and have a hoot with indoor educational activities and a visit from a live owl between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Ages 2-5, accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 9:30 A.M.-1:30 P.M., $5-7 per child; free for adults; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Tricky Tracks: A Family Tracking Program: Families learn about the winter travels of feathered and furry friends, then have fun making their own prints. All ages. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, SATURDAY, FEB. 1, 9:3011:30 A.M., $12/14 per child/adult pair; $4 each additional child. Info, 434-3068. Winter at the Farm: Families holler hello to the Jersey herd, draft-horse teams, sheep and oxen on their wanders through an operating dairy farm, then warm up inside the farmhouse with hot spiced cider and cookies. Horsedrawn sleigh rides, if weather permits. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. AND FEB. 15-29, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-16;

free for kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Books & Beyond: Science for Preschoolers: Children’s literature and hands-on activities combine for fun science learning and exploration. Ages 3-5 with a parent or caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30-11:15 & 11:30 A.M.-12:15 P.M., regular museum admission,

$13-16; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Science & Stories: Preschoolers rally ’round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11-11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $11.50-17; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Craftsbury Full Moon Snowshoe: Lunar lovers trek along snowy trails, then relish a bonfire and hot cider, courtesy of WonderArts and the Craftsbury Rec Committee. All ages. Craftsbury Academy, Craftsbury Common, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 5:30-7 P.M., RSVP; snowshoes available by prearrangement. Info, 533-9370. FREE

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KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

How Now Winter Cow?: Curious kiddos check out the cows and sheep to see where these farm animals go and what they do during the chilly Vermont winter. Ages 5 and up, with adult caregiver. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 10 A.M.-NOON, $3/4-6/7 per child/adult pair; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Igloo Build: Bundled-up families learn to construct insulated, sturdy snow dwellings during this long-running Montshire tradition with igloo-building expert Dr. Bert Yankielun. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, FEB. 15, 10:30 A.M.-2 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Pioneers in Engineering: Curious families reimagine early Americans’ days and, in their practical spirit, get hands-on designing and building a miniature house from LEGOs, a bridge from toothpicks and marshmallows, a water wheel from a soda bottle, or chairs made of newspapers. Ages 5 and up. American Precision Museum, Windsor, SUNDAY, FEB. 16, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Info, 674-5781. FREE Fairbanks Homeschool Day: Students expand their science scholastic horizons in the museum’s galleries and other venues with a variety of programs. Contact the Museum for specific topics, age levels and locations. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, FRIDAY, FEB. 21, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., $8; or $50 for 9 Friday classes. Info, 748-2372. Circuit Circus: Students on school break soak up electrifying science shows and hands-on activities to spark scientific discovery. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, FEB. 22-MARCH 3, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $14-17; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

Tot Shabbat: Families with young children enjoy a musical Sabbath evening, with play, song and movement. Ages 1-7. Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 5:30-6:15 p.m. Info, 862-5125. FREE Valentine Cookie Craft Party: Children craft a holiday-themed house of sweets. Ages 6 and up. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4:15 p.m., preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See February 3, 10:30 a.m. Cold Comfort: Winter Wildlife Adaptations: Expert Ed Sharron leads an indoor discussion about how animals meet their basic winter needs for food, water and shelter, then eager naturalists strap on snowshoes and investigate different habitats. Ages 5 and up. MarshBillings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 10 A.M.-NOON, preregister. Info, 457-3368, ext. 226. FREE Forester for a Day: Kids don hard hats as they observe a woodsman fell a tree, then take to the woodshop for hands-on fun. Ages 5 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 10 A.M.-NOON, $3/4-6/7 per child/adult pair; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Girls’ Engineering Day: Girls and young women get inspired for a future in designing, engineering and creating a better world, mentored by working women. American Precision Museum, Windsor, SATURDAY, FEB. 22, 1-4 P.M., donations accepted; preregistration encouraged. Info, 674-5781. Stories From Space: Science educator Mike Ressler zooms small ones through the solar system with stories and a space-based craft. For toddlers through age 5. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SUNDAY, FEB. 23, 10-11 A.M., regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under age 5. Info, 748-2372. Bird-Monitoring Walk: Eagle-eyed participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Bring binoculars. Ages 10 and up. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, LAST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 8-9 A.M., preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE Playdate! Farm & Food Fun: Little explorers meet up with friends for indoor activities at a leisurely pace and an encounter with a live owl from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch or snack. Ages 2-5. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 9:30 A.M.-1:30 P.M., $5-7 per child; free for adults; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Wonder Woods: The Museum unveils its new permanent exhibit, a multilevel play structure inspired by the area’s natural beauty, designed for infants through preschoolers, with a storytelling nook, crawling space and caregiver comfort. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

LAMOILLE Morrisville Music and Movement: Small ones drop in, sing and swing to favorites and classics, play instruments and learn basic rhythm and vocal dynamics. For infants through preschoolers. River Arts, Morrisville, 11 a.m.-noon, suggested donation, $5. Info, 888-1261. RUTLAND Valentine’s Kids’ Night Out: While parents enjoy a night off, youngsters rock out with a dance party, arts and crafts, games, and a movie. Ages 5-12. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 5-9 p.m., $10 per child; $20 per family. Info, 773-1822. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 7.

15 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. CHITTENDEN Bilingual Spanish Story Time: See February 6, 10-10:45 a.m. Carnevale Mask Making Event: Families make a mask with members of the Vermont Italian Cultural Society in celebration of the art and traditions of this Italian festival. Children under age 11 must be accompanied by an adult. Pierson Library, Shelburne, noon-2:30 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Champlain College Winter Open House: Prospective students check out the college’s unique Upside-Down Curriculum and Career Collaborative. Ages 15 and up. Champlain College, Burlington, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 625-0201. FREE ‘Charlotte’s Bones’ & World Whale Day: Author Erin Rounds shares her picture book about Vermont’s state fossil — an ancient beluga whale — with an admiring audience, followed by an art activity. All ages. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 872-7111. FREE Dad Guild: This group gets fathers of young children reading together, having fun with creative play and forming new friendships. All are welcome. Ages 5 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Essex Family Book Club: Kids and parents chat about The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate, complete with snacks and a literary activity. Grades K-5 with caregiver. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, noon-1 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Family Playshop: See February 1. Hinesburg Saturday Story Time: Stories, songs and games amuse youngsters, followed by free play and snacks. Ages 5 and under, with caregivers. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Read to a Dog: See February 1. Saturday Matinee: A crowd cozies in for a PG-rated flick with free snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3:45 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Voicing Art Poetry Reading: Inspired by the current art exhibit “The Pleasures of Being a Ghost: Burlington” by Justin Hoekstra at Flynndog Gallery, young writers share work publicly. Ages 21 and younger. Nomad Coffee, Burlington, 2-3 p.m., food and drink available for purchase. Info, 832-928-8837.


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Webby’s Art Studio: Playing with Paint: Petite Picassos play with unusual materials and tools and make landscape masterpieces, inspired by the Museum’s artwork. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. RUTLAND Center Street Story Walk: Families find maps and scavenger hunt info at Phoenix Books, then check out the pages of Jan Brett’s The Snowy Nap in windows around town. Finishers receive a free entry to Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum. Downtown Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 773-9380. FREE Community Skate Night: Mission City Church hosts an evening of free twirling on slick ice, hot chocolate and socializing. All ages. Giorgetti Arena, Rutland, 5-8 p.m., some free skate rentals available. Info, 772-7645. FREE Vermont Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: See February 1.

16 Sunday ADDISON Family Play: See February 2. CHITTENDEN Art Play Day: See February 2. Essex Open Gym: See February 2. Family Gym: See February 2.

18 Tuesday CALEDONIA History Fair: Homeschooling students ages 8-14 share their projects about past events or historical people. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE CHITTENDEN Game Café: Youngsters pursue board games while munching snacks. Grades 3 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: See February 4. Tuesday Movie: Viewers relax with a familyfriendly flick. Popcorn and drinks provided. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:45-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE FRANKLIN Tunes on Tuesdays: See February 4. LAMOILLE Free Family Art Workshops: See February 4. RUTLAND Tennis, Pickleball & Basketball: Folks of all ages enjoy lifetime sports on indoor tennis and basketball courts. Vermont Sport & Fitness Club, Rutland, 1-3 p.m. Info, 775-9916. FREE WASHINGTON Crafty Tuesdays: See February 4.

19 Wednesday CALEDONIA Collage Workshop for Children: See February 5. Hardwick Chess Club: See February 5. CHITTENDEN Burlington Kids’ Chess Club: See February 5.

Ongoing

Exhibits

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 RETURN OF THE BUTTERFLIES: A pavilion of flying creatures enchants visitors who learn about these winged beauties’ lifecycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Regular museum admission, $14-17; free for children under 3. February 8 through September 7. MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 ELEMENTS OF GLASS: In partnership with Simon Pearce and their artisans, this exhibit interprets in glass the elements of water, fire and wood through drawings, videos and touchable samples which illuminate the process behind designing and creating glass pieces. Regular museum admission, $13-16; free for children under 2. Through March. SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 CREATURE COMFORT: ANIMALS IN THE HOUSE: This temporary exhibit explores

how humans’ admiration of animals appears artistically in our domestic lives, through an assortment of paintings, carvings, ceramics and rugs. Regular winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under age 5. Through August 23.

Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around award-winning books. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-4. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

LAMOILLE Big & Messy — Art Space: See February 7.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Sick Science: Inquisitive kids study the science behind snow slime, elephant toothpaste and exploding ivory soap. Rutland Free Library, 11 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE WASHINGTON Wednesday Maker Series: See February 5.

20 Thursday CHITTENDEN Burlington Babytime: See February 6. Dorothy’s List Book Discussion: Little literati make merry chatter around The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Essex Lego Club: See February 6. Read to a Cat: Feline fanciers sign up for literacy sessions with a furry friend. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m., preregister for a reading slot. Info, 878-4918. FREE Ukulele Joe: See February 6. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 6. RUTLAND Curling for Kids: Volunteers from the Rutland Rocks Curling Club walk curious folks through this sport’s basic skills and team positions, followed by a chance to test out skills. Giorgetti Arena, Rutland, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., preregister. Info, 282-2678. FREE Human Foosball: The community bundles up for a giant foosball game. Kids rule from 2-4 p.m. Center Street Marketplace Park, Rutland, 2-4 p.m. Info, 440-525-6076. FREE WASHINGTON AB2: Books Come to Life: This Active BodyActive Brain class, led by literacy professional Rachel O’Donald, combines reading, music and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 11:30 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE MOPS/MomsNext: See February 6.

21 Friday

Yoga for Kids: See February 5.

CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Campaign Mode: See February 7.

LAMOILLE Teen Advisory Board: See February 5.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 7.

Wonder Wednesdays: See February 5.

RUTLAND Cornhole Mini-Tournament and Indoor Play: A curious community checks out tournaments and free play boards. Rutland Recreation Community Center, 6-8 p.m. Info, 775-1853. FREE PJs at the Paramount: Kiddos in sleepywear snuggle in to see Small Foot on the big screen. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 10 a.m. Info, 888252-8932. FREE

Play Time for Little Ones: Little ones build with blocks and make community connections. Ages 5 and under. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Reading Buddies: See February 7. Tween Night Out: Youngsters ages 7-12 enjoy crafts, games and new friends. Greater Burlington YMCA, 6-8 p.m., $10-20; preregister. Info, 652-8134.

Ukelele Jam Session: Music lovers learn a song, then strum together. Six ukuleles available to borrow; preregister to borrow an instrument, or bring your own. All ages. Morristown Centennial Library, Morrisville, 3:15 p.m. Info, 888-3853. FREE

RUTLAND Family Fun: Kids with cabin fever take their teddies to get doctored up, create crafts, eat pizza and more. All ages. Leahy Community Health Education Center, Rutland, 4:30-7 p.m. Info, 747-3643. FREE ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 7.

22 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. CHITTENDEN Board Games at the Library: See February 8. Family Playshop: See February 1. Fancy Nancy Tea Party: Crafts and sweet treats await elegantly dressed small ones. Ages 3-7. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m., preregistration required. Info, 893-4644. FREE Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 9 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Read to a Dog: See February 1. Webby’s Art Studio: Animal Books: Petite artists put together a pop-up book. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. FRANKLIN St. Albans Baby Story Time: Wee ones and parents meet each other over nursery rhymes, songs and simple stories. Ages 2 and under. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

RUTLAND Little Ones and Loved Ones Winter Dance: Youngsters and their special loved ones dance away the evening with tunes by DJ Brett Myhre. All ages. The Palms, Rutland, 4-6 p.m., $15-25; preregister. Info, 282-2678. Vermont Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See February 8.

23 Sunday ADDISON Family Play: See February 2. CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See February 2. Family Gym: See February 2. Harry Potter Party: Muggles, wizards and witches are amused by a spellbinding afternoon of magical activities and snacks. Costumes encouraged. Ages 8 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, noon-2 p.m., preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Williston Preschool Music: See February 3, 10:30 a.m. SUNDAY 23, P. 46 » KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020 45


CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

23 Sunday (cont.) South Burlington Community Read-A-Thon: Families and friends of all ages celebrate literacy by reading aloud together, with free books, snacks, prizes and a performance by Jon Gailmor. South Burlington Public Library, 1-3:30 p.m. Info, 846-4140. FREE ORLEANS Collectors’ Fair: The Orleans County Historical Society and the Old Stone House Museum host this annual packrat fest for curious folks, including buttons, toys, whirlygigs, antiques, decoys, stamps, postcards, clocks, arrowheads, books and more. Newport Municipal Building Gym, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., lunch available for purchase to benefit The Old Stone House Museum. Info, 754-2022.

24 Monday CHITTENDEN Milton Legos at the Library: Builders fashion architecturally sound constructions while savoring snacks. Milton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Teen Space: See February 3. Williston Preschool Music: See February 3. FRANKLIN Messy Mondays: See February 3. Movie Matinee: Beach Party!: Small ones sail the seas to a tropical paradise with an animated adventure movie, and soak up island crafts and fruity treats. Bring your own beach towel. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Free Family Art Workshops: See February 10, 10 a.m.-noon. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 3.

25 Tuesday CALEDONIA Free Family Art Workshops: See February 11. CHITTENDEN Drawing and Painting Birds: Local wildlife photographers and artists lead a workshop for eager young artists who are avian lovers. Ages 5-10. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1:30-2:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE Drop-In Lego Club: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. Children ages 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE February Break Movie: Kids have fun viewing a PG-rated flick with friends and refreshments. All ages; children must be accompanied by an adult. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 1 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Library Elementary Event Planners: Junior helpers plan library projects. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Snowflake Quilling: Inquisitive kiddos learn a paper craft. Ages 8-12. Milton Public Library, 2-3 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: See February 4. FRANKLIN Tunes on Tuesdays: See February 4.

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WASHINGTON Lego Family Free Build: Dads, moms and youngsters drop in for fun with the library’s abundance of plastic blocks. Ages 5 and up. Waterbury Public Library, 12:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Vegetarian dinner and childcare included. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested but not required. Info, 612-718-0229. FREE

26 Wednesday CALEDONIA Collage Workshop for Children: See February 5. CHITTENDEN Crafternoon: Artsy kiddos dig into imaginative projects. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Red Clover Book Discussion: Little ones listen to The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson, followed by chatting and crafting. Milton Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE FRANKLIN Magician & Comedian: Ed Pop: This familyfriendly entertainer asks the audience of all ages to participate in an eye-popping, balloonsculpting and side-splitting show. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE LAMOILLE Game Day: Students on school break stop by the library to spend the afternoon in board, card or active pastimes. Borrow one from the library or bring your own. Morristown Centennial Library, Morrisville, 2 p.m. Info, 888-3853. FREE WASHINGTON Create Your Own Craft: Family Drop-In: Families stop in and make masterpieces with the library’s many materials. Ages 5 and up. Waterbury Public Library, 12:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

27 Thursday CHITTENDEN Drive-In Movie Night: Fledgling auto owners decorate box cars, “drive” into the library’s theater and delight in a flick. Ages 4-10. Milton Public Library, 6-7:45 p.m., preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Essex Lego Club: See February 6. Kids Keeping the Beat: Percussion Workshop: Mini musicians bang out a beat while Robin and Terry strum on banjos. Bring an instrument from home or metal pots and pans, wooden spoons, colanders, chopsticks and more. Ages 4-8. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Imaginative youngsters stop in the craft room and create a snowflake to take home and check out its growing crystals. St. Albans Free Library, 1-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 6.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. WASHINGTON Keva Family Free Build: Families stop in and spark their imagination with an abundance of wooden blocks. Ages 5 and up. Waterbury Public Library, 12:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

28 Friday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Family Night: See February 14. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 7. Music with Raph: See February 14. Teen Night: Adolescents hang out for an evening in a safe space and have a blast with music, basketball, dodgeball, swimming, arts and crafts, food, and new friends. Ages 13-18. Greater Burlington YMCA, 6-8 p.m., $20; $10 for members; preregister. Info, 652-8134. Williston Preschool Music: See February 3, 10:30 a.m. FRANKLIN St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects drop in and check out the library’s collection of plastic blocks all day. St. Albans Free Library, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Info, 524-1507. ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 7.

29 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. CHITTENDEN Family Movie: Kids and their grownups snuggle in for a flick on the big screen. Snacks provided. Milton Public Library, 1-4 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Read to a Dog: See February 1. Webby’s Art Studio: Quilt Block: Crafty kiddos design a quilt square using block printing techniques, inspired by the Museum’s collection. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., regular winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346. FRANKLIN Leap Day Party: Frog-themed games, crafts and snacks make for a merry morning. Fairfax Community Library, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Vermont Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: See February 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 

Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@ kidsvt.com. WHOLE HEALTH NUTRITION: Kids in the

Kitchen Series. 302 Mountain View Dr., Suite 101, Colchester. Classes are Wed., Feb. 19, Mar. 18, Apr. 15, May 20, Jun. 17, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Registration is required! Please call us at 999-9207 or email us at rd@ wholehealthnutritionvt.com to register. Ages 6-10. *All classes are billed to insurance with no remainder due from participants. This class is a fun, stress-free environment, where your kids will learn cooking techniques and be exposed to new foods to help reduce mealtime angst and make eating enjoyable.

MEDIA FACTORY: Action Filmmaking: Green

Screen & Special Effects with FlynnCamps. Gin Ferrera, 651-9692, bit.ly/btvmediafactory. Feb. 24-28, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., extended day available. Fee: $350. Register at flynncenter. org/education/take-a-class/summer-programs. html. Delve into the world of filmmaking special effects while making your own mini-blockbuster! Students build skills in cinematography, editing, green screen production, and in-camera tricks while working on their own original short film projects with the Flynn and the Media Factory, using professional media tools and resources.

BCA STUDIOS

John Flanagan, 865-7166, jflanagan@ burlingtoncityarts.org, 405 Pine St., burlingtoncityarts.org FAMILY CLAY OPTION 1: Fri., Feb. 7, 5-6:30 p.m. All ages. Instructors: Kate McKernan, Kim DeMaria & Sheilagh Smith. $10/participant; $9/BCA members. Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece.  FAMILY CARD MAKING: Sun., Feb. 9, 10 am-noon.

Ages 6 and up. Instructor: Kate McKernan. $10/ participant; $9/BCA members. Join us in BCA’s print studio using our inks and tools to create handmade cards to share with those you love. This is a great class to make art as a family while not making a mess at home. All supplies are provided; no experience needed. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to make their own work.


BCA Studios Summer Camps To learn more or register, please contact education director Melissa Steady at msteady@burlingtoncityarts.org or 8657524, burlingtoncityarts.org/summer-artcamps-bca-studios FAMILY CLAY OPTION 2: Fri., Feb. 14, 5-6:30 p.m. All ages. Instructors: Kate McKernan, Kim DeMaria & Sheilagh Smith. $10/ participant; $9/BCA members. Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. FAMILY CLAY OPTION 3: Fri., Feb. 21, 5-6:30 p.m.

All ages. Instructors: Kate McKernan, Kim DeMaria & Sheilagh Smith. $10/participant; $9/BCA members. Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece.

FAMILY CLAY OPTION 4: Fri., Feb. 28, 5-6:30 p.m.

All ages. Instructors: Kate McKernan, Kim DeMaria & Sheilagh Smith. $10/participant; $9/BCA members. Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece.

VT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU ACADEMY

55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Julio Fernandez, 598-2839. julio@bjjusa.com; vermontbjj.com BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our

nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, selfconfidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school, call, visit our website or email to register your son or daughter!

CONCENTRIC ARTS PARENT-CHILD ARTS CLASSES. The Wishbone

Collective, #4 West Center St., Winooski, Laurel Waters, 373-6714, laurelcfulton@ gmail.com, facebook.com/laurelwatersart. Sunday mornings, 10 a.m.-noon. Ages 4-10. $15 each or $50/4 classes. Preregistration required. New in 2020! Concentric Arts is a unique parent-child art program designed and developed by local artist Laurel Waters, where parents get to witness their child thoroughly involved in rich fine art mediums each month, with warm-up activities, looser group collaborative processes, and still life setups for immersive focused work. Every week there will be a new setup to explore that relates back to an aspect of the color wheel, but a consistent medium with which the child can deepen her familiarity and relationship with week to week. Each month a new medium will begin. By June, your child will be familiar with five art mediums and how they all connect back into to the color wheel in a variety of ways. Snacks and warm drinks will be offered. As a general background, here are the underlying guidelines for the Concentric Arts process developed by Laurel: (philosophically for parents, kids already know this stuff!) 1) You start where you are and reach toward opening (like a dot becoming a wider circle). 2) When you recognize a narrowing tighter focus, you attempt softening through breath/relaxation and natural awareness (like a frozen “dot” spiraling out again into a moving circle). 3) The finished product’s “worth” is cherished for its intrinsic relationship, presence or connection that the child felt and shared while creating it, and NOT, on the other hand, a superficially imposed (or abstract) visual expectation for the piece. 4) When we act out of this awareness as our goal, especially as parents in support, we are kind of like this blue planet setting the stage for the sun (our child) to rise upon us. Or the child is the planet and her open seeking consciousness is the sun. Either way, this process sets up a relationship dynamic to explore and expand upon, celebrating the simple gifts of unobstructed presence. All the surprising color it brings, at the overlapping intersections, this is the art we will celebrate between us.

WEEK 1: JUNE 15-19 MINI WORLDS: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 10. Shrink down and create small, wonderful worlds. Campers are encouraged to explore a variety of craft media and create tiny, intricate terrariums, doll houses, fairy worlds, and more. *PAIR this with Jewelry or Painting for a full-day experience. POTTERY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures, and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Jewelry or Painting for a full-day experience. JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Paper

beads, glass beads, clay beads and more! Learn how to make jewelry with all different kinds of materials. Campers learn how to attach clasps, use beading tools, and make their own beads and pendants. By the end of the week, campers have earrings, necklaces, bracelets and more to share or keep. *PAIR this with Mini Worlds or Pottery for a full-day experience.

PAINTING: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 10. This camp is specifically designed for young artists with a passion for all things painting. Students work in BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with professional media such as acrylic and watercolor in a variety of sizes and subject matter. Through collaborative and individual projects based on their interests, students develop new techniques while having fun. *PAIR this with Mini Worlds or Pottery for a full-day experience. DARKROOM PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience. FINE METAL JEWELRY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants, and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines and more! *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo or Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience. POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo or Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software, and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines, and more! *PAIR this with Screen Print for a full-day experience. SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos, and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit, and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Digital Photo for a full-day experience.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 1: 3-5 p.m. Ages

6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, which features sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

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BCA Summer Camps (cont.) WEEK 2: JUNE 22-26 POTTERY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures, and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Cartoons or Jewelry for a full-day experience. CARTOONS: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 10. Learn how to draw cartoon characters that you create or that you love from books and movies. Campers look at a variety of illustrators and cartooning styles for inspiration and discover how to develop a character, giving them the expressions to make them come alive. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience. JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Paper

beads, glass beads, clay beads, and more! Learn how to make jewelry with all different kinds of materials. Campers learn how to attach clasps, use beading tools, and make their own beads and pendants. By the end of the week, campers have earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and more to share or keep. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

PAINTING: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 10. This camp is specifically designed for young artists with a passion for all things painting. Students work in BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with professional media such as acrylic and watercolor in a variety of sizes and subject matter. Through collaborative and individual projects based on their interests, students develop new techniques while having fun. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel or Screen Print for a full-day experience. DIGITAL PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6.

Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines and more! *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel or Screen Print for a full-day experience. POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Painting or Digital Photo for a full-day experience.

SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos, and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Painting or Digital Photo for a full-day experience.

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DARKROOM PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14.

Limit: 6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR this with Digital Photo for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines and more! *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo for a full-day experience. AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 2: 3-5 p.m. Ages

6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

FINE METAL JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11.

Limit: 6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos, and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

FINE METAL JEWELRY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14.

Limit: 6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with DIY T-Shirts for a full-day experience.

DIY T-SHIRTS: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6.

WEEK 3: JULY 6-10 PRINTMAKING: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Learn all about printmaking as a way to make exciting new art. In BCA’s professional print studio, students learn different techniques such as carving stamps and monoprinting using professional tools and our printing press. Students create a variety of one-of-a-kind prints on tote bags, cards, and posters they will be excited to show off. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience. STUFFIES: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 8. Make

a stuffed animal or creature of your choice! Campers learn basic sewing techniques and use simple patterns to cut and create their own stuffies out of various sewing materials, including cottons, rickrack, yarns, ribbons, buttons, puffy fabric paints and more. By the end of the week, campers have a new handmade toy and skills they can be proud of. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience. POTTERY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Printmaking or Stuffies for a full-day experience. POTTERY WHEEL: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 12.

This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

Create one of a kind T-shirts using a variety of construction methods such as appliqué, embroidery, fabric dyeing, and printmaking, alteration, and upcycling of old clothes. Students learn basic hand sewing techniques and take turns on the sewing machine. All materials are provided, but campers are also invited to bring in old T-shirts that they want to reinvent. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience.

PHOTOGRAPHY INSTITUTE: 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Ages

14-18. Limit: 12. Immerse yourself in the photographic process and develop your artistic vision in this dynamic one-week program! Students use both the traditional darkroom and the digital lab to create a portfolio of quality images. Instruction in film and digital shooting methods, darkroom printing, image processing in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, group photo shoots, large-format printing, and more are covered throughout the week. Experience in photography is not required to participate. Bring your camera or use one of ours.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 3: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

WEEK 4: JULY 13-17 MINI WORLDS: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 10. Shrink down and create small, wonderful worlds. Campers are encouraged to explore a variety of craft media and create tiny, intricate terrariums, doll houses, fairy worlds and more. *PAIR this with Jewelry for a full-day experience.

JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Paper

beads, glass beads, clay beads and more! Learn how to make jewelry with all different kinds of materials. Campers learn how to attach clasps, use beading tools, and make their own beads and pendants. By the end of the week, campers have earrings, necklaces, bracelets and more to share or keep. *PAIR this with Mini Worlds for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines and more! *PAIR this with Painting or Screen Print for a full-day experience. POTTERY WHEEL: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 12.

This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Painting or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

PAINTING: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 10. This camp is specifically designed for young artists with a passion for all things painting. Students work in BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with professional media such as acrylic and watercolor in a variety of sizes and subject matter. Through collaborative and individual projects based on their interests, students develop new techniques while having fun. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience. SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos, and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

DARKROOM PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14.

Limit: 6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR with Digital Illustration for a full-day experience.

FINE METAL JEWELRY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14.

Limit: 6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR with Digital Illustration for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital illustration! Students learn how to create digital drawings, designs and their own avatar using tablets and Adobe Creative Suite. *PAIR with Darkroom Photo or Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience.


POTTERY INSTITUTE: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 14-18.

Limit: 10. Join us for this week-long wheel throwing course, specifically designed for teens with a passion for art. In our professional ceramics studio, students learn to use a potter’s wheel and hand building methods to create sculptural and functional pottery in clay. Clay preparation, centering, forming, trimming, glazing and firing techniques are also introduced. Class size is kept small to ensure that individual vision and projects can be developed and encouraged. No experience necessary.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 4: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

WEEK 5: JULY 20-24 POTTERY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR with Costumes or Printmaking for a full-day experience. COSTUMES: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Create one-of-a-kind costumes that only you can dream up! Using simple design, craft and sewing techniques, campers plan and construct a costume of their choice, along with fun accessories. Basic materials are provided. Please bring at least two ideas of what you want to dress up as, and any material or old clothes to help create your costume. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

PRINTMAKING: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Learn all about printmaking as a way to make exciting new art. In BCA’s professional print studio, students learn different techniques such as carving stamps and monoprinting using professional tools and our printing press. Students create a variety of one-of-a-kind prints on tote bags, cards and posters they will be excited to show off. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

FINE METAL JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14.

FINE METAL JEWELRY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

DRAWING & PAINTING INSTITUTE: 8-11 a.m. Ages

Limit: 6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Digital Photo for a full-day experience. 14-18. Limit: 10. Join us for a week-long visual arts course, specifically designed for teens with a passion for art. Students spend the day at BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with different drawing and painting techniques such as acrylic, charcoal, figure drawing, perspective and abstraction. Students develop a deeper understanding of professional 2-D artistic techniques and leave with paintings and drawings to add to their art portfolio. Individual projects are encouraged in this small class based on students’ interests.

6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

SCREEN PRINT: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Take

your favorite drawings, photos and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

DARKROOM PHOTO: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11.

Limit: 6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines, and more! *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 5: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

WEEK 6: JULY 27-31 POTTERY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Stuffies for a full-day experience.

BCA SUMMER CAMPS, P. 50 »

PJ Outlet Sale $5 Kids PJs $10 Adult PJs

Available only at the Vermont Teddy Bear Retail Store …while supplies last!

Shop today! Open Daily 10am - 4pm 6655 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne, VT 05482 | 802.985.1319 k6h-VTTeddyBear0220 1

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BCA Summer Camps (cont.) STUFFIES: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 8. Make

a stuffed animal or creature of your choice! Campers learn basic sewing techniques and use simple patterns to cut and create their own stuffies out of various sewing materials, including cottons, rickrack, yarns, ribbons, buttons, puffy fabric paints and more. By the end of the week, campers have a new handmade toy and skills they can be proud of. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

PAINTING: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 10. This

camp is specifically designed for young artists with a passion for all things painting. Students work in BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with professional media such as acrylic and watercolor in a variety of sizes and subject matter. Through collaborative and individual projects based on their interests, students develop new techniques while having fun. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry for a full-day experience.

PHOTOGRAPHY & SCREEN PRINTING INSTITUTE:

Noon-3 p.m. Ages 14-18. Limit: 8. Immerse yourself in a variety of digital photography and screen printing processes and expand your creative vision in this dynamic one-week program. Students go on guided photo walks, learning digital shooting methods. Then, using the digital lab and print studio, students transform their photographic images into a variety of prints on both paper and alternative media such as T-shirts, posters, bags and more. Experience in photography/screen printing is not required to participate. Bring your camera or use one of ours.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 6: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, which features sketchbook time, visits to Pine Street hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

DIY T-SHIRTS: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6.

Create one of a kind T-shirts using a variety of construction methods such as appliqué, embroidery, fabric dyeing, and printmaking, alteration, and upcycling of old clothes. Students learn basic hand sewing techniques and take turns on the sewing machine. All materials are provided, but campers are also invited to bring in old T-shirts that they want to reinvent. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters, and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Digital Photo or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

FINE METAL JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Beads and other craft techniques are also added to enhance your wearable art. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Painting for a full-day experience.

DARKROOM PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14.

SCREEN PRINT: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14. Limit:

12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo for a full-day experience.

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters, and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating, and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups, and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Screen Print for a full-day experience. SCHOOL OF FOOLERY: Location: BCA Center and

Festival of Fools stage. Noon-3 p.m. Ages 8-14. Limit: 10. Drop-off & pickup: BCA Center, 135 Church St. Learn and explore the fundamentals of circus artistry and physical comedy while embracing the power of play! Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Instructors have performed in Cirque du Soleil, starred on Broadway and Sesame Street, and have taught at the legendary Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College. The camp culminates on Fri., Jul. 31, with a 3 p.m. performance on the top block of Church St. This camp is located at the BCA Center, 135 Church St. You can also pair this camp with one of our morning camps at the BCA Studios, 405 Pine St. for a full-day experience. For campers also signed up for a morning studio camp, BCA staff provides a lunch break and then walks kids over to the BCA Center for the School of Foolery camp. Pickup is at 3 p.m. at the BCA Center, 135 Church St.

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Limit: 6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR this with Fine Metal Jewelry Institute or Pottery Wheel for a full-day experience.

POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit:

WEEK 7: AUGUST 3-7 SPECIALTY FULL DAY CAMP: ARTVENTURE with BCA & Burlington Parks, Recreation & Waterfront: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 20. Drop-off: BCA Studios at 405 Pine St., Burlington. Pickup: Old North End Community Center at 20 Allen St., Burlington. Join our full-day Artventure camp! Campers spend the morning in BCA’s art studios with professional teaching artists exploring a variety of art projects including painting, printmaking and craft. In the afternoon, campers join Parks, Recreation & Waterfront staff for a variety of fun activities and field trips including swimming at North Beach, bowling, berry picking, and more. This special partner camp is led by teaching artists from BCA and staff from Burlington Parks, Recreation & Waterfront. Bring a peanut-free and tree nut-free bagged lunch. Drop-off is at the BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., and pick-up is at the ONE Community Center at 20 Allen St. *Please register at burlingtoncityarts.org or call BCA at 865-7166. DIGITAL PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington and are instructed in our Digital Lab, learning camera controls, image editing software and color printing techniques to make prints, small books/zines and more! *PAIR this with DIY T-Shirts or Screen Print for a full-day experience. POTTERY WHEEL: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 12.

This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with DIY T-Shirts or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

FINE METAL JEWELRY INSTITUTE: Noon-3 p.m.

Ages 14-18. Limit: 6. This week-long fine metals course, specifically designed for teens with a passion for art, uses professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Individual projects are encouraged in this small class based on students’ interests. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. *PAIR this with Darkroom Photo for a full-day experience.

AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 7: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine St. hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!

WEEK 8: AUGUST 10-14 POTTERY: 8-11 a.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 12. Join us for a week of working with clay in the BCA ceramics studio. Create bowls, cups, sculptures and more through wheel throwing and hand building techniques. Learn surface design and decorating tips to make your pieces amazing. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Cartoons or Jewelry for a full-day experience. CARTOONS: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 10. Learn how to draw cartoon characters that you create or that you love from books and movies. Campers look at a variety of illustrators and cartooning styles for inspiration and discover how to develop a character, giving them the expressions to make them come alive. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

JEWELRY: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 6-8. Limit: 6. Paper

beads, glass beads, clay beads and more! Learn how to make jewelry with all different kinds of materials. Campers learn how to attach clasps, use beading tools, and make their own beads and pendants. By the end of the week, campers have earrings, necklaces, bracelets and more to share or keep. *PAIR this with Pottery for a full-day experience.

PAINTING: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit: 10. This camp is specifically designed for young artists with a passion for all things painting. Students work in BCA’s painting studio, experimenting with professional media such as acrylic and watercolor in a variety of sizes and subject matter. Through collaborative and individual projects based on their interests, students develop new techniques while having fun. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel or Screen Print for a full-day experience. DARKROOM PHOTO: 8-11 a.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Experience the magic of a traditional photographic darkroom! In this camp, students will go on guided photo shoots in the South End of Burlington with a manual 35mm SLR film camera and learn how to print their own photographs in our black and white darkroom. *PAIR this with Pottery Wheel or Screen Print for a full-day experience.

POTTERY WHEEL: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

12. This camp is all about the ever-popular pottery wheel. Kids never get bored with learning new throwing, decorating and glazing techniques as they make bowls, cups and more. All items created are dishwasher safe and lead free. No experience necessary. *PAIR this with Painting or Darkroom Photo for a full-day experience.

SCREEN PRINT: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 9-11. Limit:

6. Take your favorite drawings, photos and designs and print them onto T-shirts, bags, posters and more. Working in BCA’s professional print studio, students learn to apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. At the end of the week, students have an array of printed items to wear or share. BCA provides one T-shirt and poster paper. Students are encouraged to bring other surfaces to print on as well. *PAIR this with Painting or Darkroom Photo for a full-day experience.

DIGITAL PHOTO & SCREEN PRINTING: 8-11 a.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital photography and screen printing! Go on guided photo shoots, learn how to print your photographs in our digital lab, and transform your images into silkscreened posters, T-shirts, bags and more. *PAIR this with Digital Illustration for a full-day experience. DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION: Noon-3 p.m. Ages 12-14. Limit: 6. Learn the basics of digital illustration! Students learn how to create digital drawings, designs and their own avatar using tablets and Adobe Creative Suite. *PAIR this with Digital Illustration for a full-day experience. AFTERCARE ART CLUB WEEK 8: 3-5 p.m. Ages 6-11. Limit: 15. Need a longer camp day? Join our Aftercare Art Club from 3-5 p.m. for an extended camp experience, featuring sketchbook time, visits to Pine St. hot spots, and other artful and edible activities. More time to explore and make!


JUST FOR KIDS Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by February 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the March issue of Kids VT. Send your highresolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Birthday Club ..................................... 52 Coloring Contest Winners .........52 Writing Contest & Winners......53 Kid-Created Art................................ 54 Puzzle Page ........................................ 54

Title _______________________________________ Contest sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town __________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

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JUST FOR KIDS

Birthday Club

COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

Congratulations

to these February Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club

“ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE”

Shiloh Skaka, 10, Burlington

Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Junction TALIYAH lives in Essex 27. She’s ary bru Fe on and turns 9 others and full of life and love for and be a rld hopes to travel the wo llecting co es lov e humanitarian. Sh open to e lik uld wo antiques and y. da e on y ker ba her own passes and Taliyah wins four day ECHO to ts four 3D movie ticke Champlain ke La for er Leahy Cent in Burlington.

Our mailbox was overrun with a bounty of bunnies this month. Nine-year-old Everett’s turquoise and gold rabbit, with a rosy sunset backdrop, brightened our day. Clara, 5, decorated her furry friend with rainbow swirls. Olive, 8, surrounded her long-eared hare with a classic winter scene, complete with falling snow, an emerald pine tree and a purple sled. Congratulations to all who entered. Send us your awesome work again this month!

“TOO FAST!!!”

Joan Toolan, 8, Barre Town

“Beautiful Big Bunny” Bea McDonald, 5

5& under

SOUTH BURLINGTON

“WOODS BUNNY”

Brer Basson, 5, Middlebury “RUDOLPH”

Blakely, Holland and Henry each win four ECHO day passes.

Evie Stiles, 3, Middlesex “SNOWBOARDING BUNNY”

Andrew Lee, 8, Winooski “INTERSTELLAR BUNNY”

Teagan Flinner, 9, Ripton “ICE QUEEN”

Amelia Stacey, 7, Berlin

BLAKELY lives in Shelburne and turns 8 on February 12. She’s a compassionate and loving girl who loves gymnastics, fishing, baking, soccer and her new kitten, Snuggles.

“BUNNY RABBIT SNOW”

Max Duquette, 5, Barre “MR. HOPS”

Myra Haselton, 6, Bristol “WINTER BOAT RIDE”

Ellie Goodfriend, 10, Elmore “SPOTTED BUNNY”

HOLLAND lives in Ferrisburgh and turns 11 on February 16. She’s a sweet girl and a good friend who loves riding her horse, Indy, and showing her at the fair. She is an avid reader who has read the Harry Potter series multiple times.

“Candy Cane Land” Quinn O’Brien, 8

6 to 8

EAST MONTPELIER

Savi Baker, 9, Warren

TOP TITLES “BUNNY WUNNY IN A SLED”

Eloise Farley, 5, Wolcott

“DOTS, STRIPES, SQUIGGLES”

Sofia Hemingway, 6, Shelburne “SURF LAKE CHAMPLAIN”

Patrick Donegan, 10, Charlotte

HENRY lives in Richmond and turns 7 on February 26. He’s a funny, caring, silly and outgoing boy. He loves hiking, swimming, building with Legos, reading and playing the piano.

“Snow Bunny” Anastasia Begagayeva, 9 GRANITEVILLE

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9 to 12


Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

This month, we want to see your writing and drawing talents! Use the panels below to create an original comic about Valentine’s Day.

WRITING CONTEST WINNERS TREE VS. SNOW FORT In our December/ January issue, we asked kids to create a comic about building something out of snow. Bellamy and Ella each win a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop.

Title:________________________________________

Bellamy Crehan, 10 BURLINGTON

SNOW FRIEND

EllaThomas, 11 PLAINFIELD

Name __________________________________

Town __________________________________

Age ____________________________________

Email __________________________________ Phone __________________________________

We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and comic strips in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is February 15. Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

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JUST FOR KIDS

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Kid-Created Art

Riddle Search — MANY WAYS TO EAT Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: How does a train eat? CHOMP CHOW DOWN DIG IN DINE FEAST UPON FEED ON GOBBLE GULP HAVE A MEAL HAVE A SNACK MUNCH NIBBLE NOSH PIG OUT SWALLOW TAKE IN TASTE

“COPPER FOX,” PEN, GEL PEN AND MARKERS, BY KATHERINE MORAN, 14

Riddle Answer:

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

Katherine is a homeschooled student living in Starksboro. She spends a lot of time outdoors and enjoys camping and hiking in the woods. Katherine takes inspiration for her art from forest creatures but prefers to draw from her imagination rather than focusing on realism. She has filled dozens of sketchbooks with her fantasy creatures. Her favorite materials are graphite, pen-and-ink, alcohol-based illustration markers and watercolor. She usually prefers to go by her nickname, Meas.

“THE CURIOUS FOX,” CHARCOAL ON TONED PAPER, BY OLIVER CRAINICH, 10

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

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KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

Print your answer here:

ANSWERS P. 55

Oliver lives in Burlington. He is 10 years old and is in fourth grade at Edmunds Elementary School. He enjoys his art class, skiing and playing tennis. He also loves his dogs, Bella and Fiona. To learn more about art classes at the Davis Studio, visit davisstudiovt.com.


USE YOUR WORDS B Y A M Y D OY L E KE L L E R

Sustainable and Attainable

Amy (center) with her mom and sister in 1984, harvesting strawberries in Nova Scotia

The government gave 100,000 households green bins for composting, blue bins for recycling and access to free weekly pickup service — and a new way of life was born. Instead of taking our recycling to the Girl Guide troop (Canada’s version of the Girl Scouts), who collected it on Saturdays as an environmental initiative, our cans and bottles were picked up curbside! For my 10-year-old self, whose chore it had been to cart recycling five blocks on those Saturdays, I preferred the short walk down the driveway. When the law was passed, people welcomed this new system, and far less waste was sent to the landfill. Fast-forward several decades, and the trash system in Nova Scotia is very streamlined (albeit a bit extreme by American standards). Every household, college dorm and office has three bins — black for trash, green for compost and blue for recycling. Cardboard must be broken down and tied together, then stacked with other paper products by the bins. Weekly pickup of recycling, compost and trash is free. All trash bags must be clear. (OK, technically you’re allowed one small black “privacy bag” the size of a standard shopping bag, but that’s it!) While there are laws in place prohibiting organics and recyclables from going to a landfill, there are no fines for disobeying the law. Instead, the

punishment is fueled by peer pressure. Would you want your neighbors to see coffee grounds in your trash bag? The shame! And it has worked. Within a year of banning black trash bags in 2015, 30 percent less garbage went to the landfill. As an adult, my own composting journey has been an interesting one. I took a long hiatus from the practice in my twenties after a particularly traumatic incident. I was living in Halifax at the time and got home after being away for several days to find a bag of trash on the back deck that my roommates were apparently blind to. What I didn’t know was that a roommate had tossed organics into the trash bag and left it to slow-cook in the sun for five days; leaking out onto the deck, it had an entire ecosystem of gross things living underneath it. Annoyed, I hoisted it over my shoulder. As a result, I was immediately covered with maggots. They spilled over my head, through my hair and all over my back. I screamed, swatted and flailed. In response, one of my roommates grabbed a jerry can and doused the deck of maggots with gasoline, then lit it on fire. I managed to leap onto the lawn so I wouldn’t go up in flames. After that, I was unable to “deal” with trash and composting until I moved to Vermont 13 years ago. Over time and through gardening, I became desensitized to bugs, and I have since let go of my crippling fear of maggots. It’s a good thing, too, because I encounter them often in our compost bin, and no, I don’t reach for a jerry can. Thinking back to gardening with my mom, I feel so lucky that I can now share that activity with my two small children. They love to dig in the dirt, plant seeds, watch it all grow, and finally harvest all of the wonderful fruits and veggies of our labor. Our garden is abundant, in large part because we nourish our soil with compost. At 3 and 6 years of age, my children know instinctively that the apple core is tossed in a different bin than the cans or bottles or trash, which makes me proud and a bit nostalgic. When Vermont’s new composting law goes into effect this summer, be prepared, friends. You may encounter maggots and fruit flies, and you will need to figure out a system that works for your household. It won’t always be easy, but I believe that this change will teach both adults and children to be more responsible for and respectful of the Earth. Years ago, a small province in Canada set out on a path toward sustainable living, and now it’s their way of life. I believe our state can do the same. K

Planning a kids event? List it for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your March event by February 15th online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@ kidsvt.com

CALENDAR

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

SEE PAGE 54 FOR PUZZLES

RIDDLE SEARCH: It goes chew chew.

government was faced with a problem: The landfills were reaching capacity. Instead of building a new landfill or incinerator, the government decided to double down on waste reduction by passing a law banning all organic and recyclable materials from landfills. Before adopting new laws, Nova Scotia introduced an $8 million pilot program, which my family took part in. Since we had been recycling and composting for years, this new program didn’t really change our routines, but it made them simpler and more regimented.

JUMBLE:

T

his July, it will be law in Vermont that food scraps can’t be thrown in the trash. For some, that might feel like an impossibly difficult adjustment to daily life, but I’ve never known anything else. I grew up in the 1980s in Nova Scotia, a beautiful coastal province on the east coast of Canada. Since I can remember, my family always composted and recycled. My parents were raised in rural Nova Scotia in the 1940s and ’50s, where living sustainably was a way of life. My mother’s father was a fisherman and smokehouse owner, and her mother was a homemaker. Dinner in those days was whatever had come off the docks that day. My grandmother made most things, from jam to clothing, by hand. My father, one of 13 children, was born and raised in an Irish-Catholic household in Cape Breton. My grandfather, a coal miner, rarely saw the light of day. Seeking a brighter future, my father left Cape Breton in 1969 on a Triumph 650, bound for bigger and better things. Taking residence with a Greek family in Halifax, he went to college to earn his engineering degree. When they married, my parents bought a plot of land and built a home, then along came my sister and me. Growing up, we had a large garden that provided us with carrots, peas, green beans and my favorite, tomatoes. My mom would blanch and bag the veggies and put them in the deep freezer for the cold months to come. As a child, it was my job to carry out the veggie scraps. We had three contained compost piles next to our vegetable garden — a “fresh” pile for new layers of browns (like leaves, paper and hay) and greens (like veggie peels, fruit scraps and eggshells); a second pile that was still “cooking,” or decomposing; and a third pile that had turned to soil, which we would shovel onto the garden beds in spring. I have summertime memories of digging up carrots and finding lobster claws and mussel shells, and rummaging through the freezer for a popsicle only to find a solid frozen brick of vegetable scraps and eggshells. Yup, my dad would — and still does — freeze food scraps in the summer before throwing them onto the pile, which he says achieves the perfect “baking” temperature for decomposition. (I’m not sure if the science actually backs him up.) Though my family managed our trash and waste well, not everyone in our province did. By the 1990s, the Nova Scotia

MOM. PLAY. SHED. ROAD. What type of dog likes to take a bath? — A “SHAMPOODLE”

A Nova Scotia-born mom on composting before it was cool

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2020

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Profile for Kids VT

Kids VT — February 2020  

Childhood Friends Deliver Beds to Families in Need; Tips for Making Low-Waste Lunches; Libraries Loan More Than Just Books; Students Reflect...

Kids VT — February 2020  

Childhood Friends Deliver Beds to Families in Need; Tips for Making Low-Waste Lunches; Libraries Loan More Than Just Books; Students Reflect...

Profile for kidsvt
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