Page 1

NOVEMBER 2017 VOL.24 NO.10

FREE

Laughing Matters A Vermont researcher studies humor in babies BY KEN PICARD PAGE 28

The

Giving

Season Inside COTS’ Family Shelter PAGE 12

Baking at Ronald McDonald House PAGE 17

Reflections on Being Thankful PAGE 47


2017 GIFT GUIDE

give the

arts tickets

l

membership

this year, create memorable experiences for your loved ones! Season Sponsor

l

classes

l

workshops

december 1 Friday

march

Brian McCarthy Quartet

A Christmas Carol 16 Saturday

Robinson Morse’s Sound of Mind

january 12-13 Friday-Saturday

Sandglass Theater Babylon

19 Friday

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM KIDS VT

2

17 Saturday

Altan

19 Monday

Zakir Hussain and Rakesh Chaurasia 30-31 Friday-Saturday

Souleymane Badolo Yimbégré

april 8 Sunday

Dayme Arocena

2-3 Friday-Saturday

may

The Way You Look (at me) Tonight 7 Wednesday

Pilobolus Shadowland

15 Thursday

Dianne Reeves 16 Friday

The Sweet Remains 17 Saturday

TURNmusic

DRS. DRS.PETERSON, PETERSON,RYAN RYAN & & EATON EATON

Hair & Other Stories

Jessica Lang Dance

10 Saturday

ORTHODONTICS

Urban Bush Women

february

Cinderella

21 Wednesday

FOR ALL AGES

9 Friday

17 Tuesday

Claire Cunningham and Jess Curtis

Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile—that feels great, too.

Hamlet

DBR & Marc Bamuthi Joseph Blackbird, Fly

Your child. Your orthodontist.

Second City

2 Saturday

A Celtic Family Christmas

8 Friday Nebraska Theatre Caravan

CAMPS & CLASSES

24 Saturday

28 Wednesday Bedlam Theater

Kinky Boots

10/26/17 5:00 PM

gift certificates

Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy

5-6 Tuesday & Wednesday

Untitled-12 1

l

Manual Cinema ADA/AVA

23-24 Friday-Saturday

Lida Winfield Imaginary

Wild Kratts-Live! 21 Saturday

Thousand Yard Stare

3 Thursday

Machine de Cirque 9 Wednesday

Shh…We Have a Plan 9-10 Wednesday-Thursday

Kaori Seki 11 Friday

Gaelynn Lea 12-13 Saturday- Sunday

Sara Juli

Tense Vagina 14 Monday

Cabaret

16-18 Wednesday-Friday

Backstage in Biscuit Land

19-20 Saturday-Sunday

Soovin Kim & Gloria Chien

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100 k4t-ChamplainOrtho0215.indd 1

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323 1/16/15 10:54 AM

P E R F O R M I N G

A R T S

flynncenter.org or 802-863-5966 Untitled-1 1

10/26/17 10:12 AM


Untitled-7 1

10/24/17 12:35 PM

W I NO OS K I - ST OW E - M A N H AT TA N

WINOOSKI

65 WINOOSKI FALLS WAY - 802.497.0433

STOWE

5 1 2 MOU N TA I N R OA D - 8 0 2 . 2 5 3 . 4 4 6 4

KIDSVT.COM

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY STORE FEATURING: ONE-STOP SHOPPING. GREAT PRICES. BULK FOODS. CASE DISCOUNTS. M O N DAY - SAT U R DAY 8 A M - 8 P M & S U N DAY 8 A M - 7 P M

SAVE ON YOUR FALL NECESSITIES AT

SAV E $ 5 ON A $ 2 5 P U RC H AS E On all regularly-priced items and excluding alcohol.

Untitled-6 1

10/25/17 11:51 AM

Untitled-1 1 k4t-Commodities1017.indd 1

11/30/17

5/19/17 2:28 9/26/17 3:42 PM PM

KIDS VT

PRESENT THIS COUPON

NOVEMBER 2017

M O N DAY - SAT U R DAY 8 A M - 7 P M & S U N DAY 8 A M - 6 P M

3


come

&

enjoy our new

kid’s menu at the great northern

716 PINE STREET, BURLINGTON, VT

Untitled-8 1

10/26/17 1:37 PM

Untitled-8 1

10/25/17 12:44 PM

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

BOLTON VALLEY RESORT 2V

THEGREATNORTHERNVT.COM

4 Untitled-11 1

10/26/17 2:26 PM


STAFF QUESTION

EDITOR’S NOTE

What makes you laugh?

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

FARTS. Always have. Always will.

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com

Baby Alison

COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

Baby Mira

colby@kidsvt.com

DIANE SULLIVAN.

MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

COLBY ROBERTS, COPUBLISHER

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Baby Theo

Meredith Coeyman meredith@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Mira and Theo

brooke@kidsvt.com

CORNY JOKES.

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Rev. Diane Sullivan, Richele Young CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Marshal D. Haneisen, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Grace Per Lee, Mary Ann Lickteig, Ken Picard, Heather PolifkaRivas, Kristen Ravin, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Jessica Lara Ticktin PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh, Matthew Thorsen ILLUSTRATOR

Marc Nadel

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

I

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

My kids making ESOTERIC CLASSICAL MUSIC JOKES — proof they were brought up by nerds. And toddlers, pretty much without exception (now that I’m no longer responsible for any!). KATHERINE ISAACS, PROOFREADER

When I was a kid, my mom would let her hair hang down over her face, and put her glasses on over her hair and pretend she was COUSIN IT as she tickled me. That still makes me laugh to this day! JOHN JAMES, PRODUCTION MANAGER

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE MEREDITH COEYMAN (“Use Your Words,” page 47) is a writer, editor and observer of all things odd and beautiful — including her two kids. When she moved to Vermont over 10 years ago, she picked up a Seven Days and thought: I want to work there. After eight years, she’s thankful for the opportunity to have worked with dedicated, talented people at Seven Days and Kids VT. She’s also thankful that Burlington is so small that she’ll see many of her old colleagues around town. Meanwhile, she’ll be grappling with writer’s block, training her rascal puppy and climbing outside of her 5 comfort zone.

KIDS VT

can’t remember the exact moments my kids, Theo and Mira, laughed for the first time. At 7 and 10 years old, it’s been a while since their first giggle. But I do remember the pure joy I felt when it happened. Clearer in my mind is when my best friend Lexy’s daughter cracked up for the first time. Lexy was visiting with her family a couple of years ago, and her infant daughter, Clio, was lying on the bed having her diaper changed. To distract her, I fake sneezed and made a raspberry sound with my lips. Suddenly, an unmistakable burble of laughter came out of Clio’s mouth. Her parents were over the moon at their daughter’s first laugh, and I felt pretty darn proud to have inspired it. This month, Ken Picard writes about Johnson State College professor Dr. Gina Mireault, who has been studying humor recognition in young babies. Through some clever studies involving nonsensical beeping sounds and a red clown nose, Mireault discovered that babies laugh spontaneously by 5 months old. Read more about her work in “Laughing Matters” on page 28. As we approach the giving season, we’ve devoted space in this issue to highlight organizations that support people in need. “Special Delivery,” on page 32, tells about Lucy’s Love Bus, a Massachusettsbased nonprofit that helps fund therapeutic programs for kids with cancer and other illnesses at several New England hospitals, including the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital. In “Habitat” (page 12), Grace Per Lee writes about a COTS family shelter in Burlington, where adults and children can live temporarily while looking for stable housing. And on page 17, Heather PolifkaRivas shares her family’s experience preparing baked goods at the Ronald McDonald House, which provides shelter for families of hospitalized children. We hope you find these articles informative and that they inspire you to help out in your community. We’re also saying goodbye to contributing editor Meredith Coeyman, who is leaving to pursue other opportunities after eight years of working in various capacities at Seven Days and Kids VT. Meredith has written for Kids VT about topics from C-sections to puppy parenting to, this month, being thankful. But most of her work happens behind the scenes, where she’s tasked with making sure the writing we publish every month is crisp, original, accurate and honest. She’s a skilled editor and writer, a trusted colleague, and a supportive friend. And she’s a sucker for a silly baby video. We’ll miss her a whole lot.

NOVEMBER 2017

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Sweet Sounds

CATHY RESMER, COPUBLISHER

KIDSVT.COM

P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

The YARN-GNAWING ANTICS of my 12-year-old daughter’s two little kittens. BRETT STANCIU, CALENDAR WRITER

Brooke Bousquet

Corey Grenier

DIANE SULLIVAN, DESIGNER & COLORING CONTEST CREATOR


NATURAL MATTRESS

SHOWROOM

10% OFF Mention you saw this ad in Kids VT and receive 10% off any mattress purchase!

Twin mattresses start at $565.00. We have the perfect all natural and flame retardant free mattress for your child, whether just new to the world and needing a crib mattress, transitioning into their first big boy/girl bed or looking for extra comfort in their teen age years. Our certified organic & natural mattresses/futons are made from 100% organic cotton, certified organic wool, and GOLS certified organic rubber. These materials are extremely durable and made from renewable resources. Around one third or more of your child's life is spent in bed, shouldn't that time be spent on a healthier, natural and toxin free mattress?

AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS we know kids and how to outfit them for sports. We have been buying and selling new and used kids sports equipment FOR THE PAST 24 YEARS.

3198 SHELBURNE ROAD, SHELBURNE VT | 151 CHERRY STREET, BURLINGTON MON-SAT 10am-6pm, SUNDAY 11am-5pm | 985-2650

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

HAVE YOUR KIDS OUTGROWN THEIR GEAR OR WANT TO TRY A NEW SPORT?

KIDS VT

We have everything you need for hockey, skating, downhill skiing, snowboarding, xc skiing and snowshoeing.

Ski an Snowb d o Tunin ard g an Servic d e

150 Dorset St. So. Burlington, VT 05403 802-865-3021 • playitagainsportssoburlington.com Open 7 days a week

6 Untitled-49 1

4/25/17 10:43 AM

k2v-playitagainsports1117.indd 1

10/25/17 1:00 PM


NOVEMBER 2017

Laughing Matters

JUST FOR KIDS Talking Turkey

Your Cheese & Wine Place

Writing Contest & Winners ..... 24 Coloring Contest Winners ........ 24 Coloring Contest ............................. 25 Puzzle Page......................................... 26 Birthday Club .................................... 26 Puzzle Answers ............................... 47

BY MARC NADEL

Wattles, the beloved cartoon turkey, never has a cross word for anyone. But he does have a crossword puzzle just for you! ACROSS 1. Mayflower passenger

A Johnson State College professor traces the origins of humor in babies

2. Basic stuffing ingredient 3. What strangers did at the first Thanksgiving dinner 4. See Clue for 6 ACROSS 5. Turkey legs 6. With 4 ACROSS, a red Thanksgiving side dish 7. Tasty tree treat, when roasted KIDSVT.COM

DOWN 8. Wild grain 9. Picnic ________ 10. Decorative squash

NOVEMBER 2017

11. Plymouth ________ 12. How you feel after Thanksgiving dinner 13. Moon and ________ 14. Ear of ________ 15. Apple juice

KIDS VT

16. Sweet potato Find answers on page 47!

We find the deals, you get the savings

23

Just for Kids 23 Turkey Crossword 24 Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

28 25 26

CALENDAR

GIFT BASKETS Cheese, wine, sweets

SPONSORED BY:

NOVEMBER

Gobble Gobble What do gobblers eat for Thanksgiving? Preschoolers and their parents hit the trail to learn more about these wild birds at LET’S TALK TURKEYS, Thursday, November 16, 9-10:30 a.m., at the Green Mountain Audubon Center in Huntington.

Week to Week SAT

KIDSVT.COM

NOV 11

SATSUN

Special Delivery

Welcome Editor’s Note 5

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

36

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

Calendar 36 Daily Listings 37 Thanksgiving Events 38 Live Performances 39 Classes 40 Science & Nature 42 New Parents 44 Story Times 45 Ongoing Exhibits 46 Playgroups

For teachers, care-takers, friends & someone special “NEW NAME AND LOOK, SAME GREAT PRICES AS ALWAYS!”

DISCOUNTS ON NATURAL, GLUTEN-FREE AND KID-FRIENDLY FOODS

On the Cover NOVEMBER 2017 VOL.24 NO.10

FREE

Laughing Matters A Vermont researcher studies humor in babies

BY KEN PICARD PAGE 28

The

Giving

Season Inside COTS’ Family Shelter PAGE 12

Baking at Ronald McDonald House PAGE 17

Reflections on Being Thankful PAGE 47

What’s sweeter than a baby laughing? Read about Johnson State professor Dr. Gina Mireault’s research on the topic on page 28.

1186 Williston Rd., So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 www.cheesetraders.com Open 7 days 10am-7pm

KIDS VT

9

Kids Say What? Calendar Clues Trending Parent Participation Throwback Pet Corner #InstaKidsVT

Zack’s Place Turkey Trot: A scenic 5K walk/run raises funds for a free enrichment center serving community members with special needs. 10 a.m. at Woodstock Elementary School.

NOVEMBER 2017

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Columns 11 Kids Beat 12 Habitat 13 Parent Portrait 14 Checkup 15 Destination Recreation 16 Bookworms 17 The Art of 18 Balancing Act 19 One to Watch 20 Mealtime 21 Fit Families 47 Use Your Words

Waitsfield Ski & Skate Sale: Families get ready for winter by purchasing new and used gear. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Waitsfield Elementary School.

KIDSVT.COM

Lucy’s Love Bus brings integrative therapy to sick children

NOV 23

KIDS VT

32

NOVEMBER 2017

NOV 11-12

THUR

Kids VT Spectacular Spectacular Auditions: Creative kiddos try out for a spot in the December 9 Spectacular Spectacular youth talent show. Preregister at kidsvt.com/vermont/ SpectacularSpectacular/Page for an audition slot between noon and 3 p.m. Higher Ground, South Burlington.

7 k4v-CheeseTraders1117.indd 1

10/23/17 12:22 PM


AUTUMN ANSWERS

S

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

ure, the holidays sometimes involve magical moments of togetherness, but they can also serve up a whole lot of stress. The expenses, travel, cooking, planning, never mind the pressure to create storybook memories — it all adds up. Throw in a drunk uncle, a judgmental sibling, a recent divorce, or the loss of a loved one and the whole season can feel utterly overwhelming. Family drama over the holidays is rarely a surprise. Each family has a story and, growing up, we all learned to play our roles. It makes sense that whenever we’re reunited as adults, we easily fall back into old patterns. The good news is that we can use our past experiences to make future gatherings better. But it takes a little work. Writing for Psychology Today, psychotherapist Linda Esposito recommends that we plan ahead by identifying our stress triggers (sights, sounds, people, places, alcohol), and use this knowledge to make a list of associated coping skills. Can you excuse yourself for some fresh air? Text or call a friend? Take a few deep breaths?

8

What’s the best way to handle the stress of family holiday gatherings?

Lifestyle website Greatist offers a useful list of ways to avoid holiday family stress. Tips like “let it go” (when it comes to bringing up old grievances at the dinner table), and “put the bottle down” (since alcohol reduces our ability to think clearly and make rational choices), can act as anchors that help keep us grounded when we start to feel untethered.

Best-selling author and sociologist Dr. Martha Beck has several excellent strategies for surviving family gatherings. My favorite is the suggestion that we “lose control,” meaning we stop trying to change other people’s behaviors

Calendar Clues

Saturday, November 4: RIVER OF LIGHT LANTERNMAKING WORKSHOP, 10 a.m.-noon & 1-3 p.m., Thatcher Brook Primary School in Waterbury. Saturday, November 18: WONDERS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

Saturday, November 25: SLED DOGS AT 11 a.m., 12:30 p.m. & 2 p.m., ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. ECHO,

or convince them of anything. “If soul-searching has shown you that your mother’s opinions are wrong for you — as are your grandfather’s bigotry, your sister’s new religion and your cousin’s alcoholism — hold that truth in your heart, whether or not your family members validate it,” Beck says. When all else fails, embrace the power of saying no to attending a particular family gathering if the dynamics will simply be too stressful, hurtful or harmful. Adulthood means having the power and freedom to choose how, and with whom, we spend our free time. We can choose to surround ourselves with people who lift us up rather than bring us down. Prioritizing our own well-being over other people’s expectations is a perfectly reasonable, grown-up thing to do. The best part? We don’t owe anyone an explanation. We can just decide what’s best. We’re grown-ups, after all.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“Are there a lot of ladders at high school?”

—OLIVIA, AGE 3

TRENDING Target will open in South Burlington in October 2018. No more pilgrimages to Plattsburgh!

Five-year-old Shon Griffin of Philadelphia, AKA Catman, dresses up as a superhero and feeds homeless street felines. “Justice League should doff their hats to this hero,” remarked one Twitter user.

Boy Scouts announces it will begin welcoming girls into some of its programs. In response, Girl Scouts say Step off. Biennial Vermont History Expo will be discontinued after a steady decline in attendance. “History’s not a big seller,” Hartford Historical Society president Martha Knapp told the Valley News. Retro toys like Teddy Ruxpin and Tickle Me Elmo are hot this holiday season, according to The Toy Insider. Retro? Now we feel old.

Common Sense Media’s new report finds 42 percent of young children now have their own tablet device, up from less than one percent in 2011. How about a walk in the woods?


PET CORNER PARENT PARTICIPATION This month, in honor of Lyric Theatre Company’s upcoming production of “A Christmas Story The Musical,” we asked our Facebook followers to tell us about a sticky situation their kid has gotten into (like the one Flick from “A Christmas Story” finds himself in when he licks the flagpole!). Find some of their funny stories below. And catch “A Christmas Story The Musical” from November 9-12 at the Flynn MainStage in Burlington.

A couple of weeks ago, my daughter was in her craft room. At one point she needed help with some glitter glue pens. I helped her and then left. A bit later she yelled out saying she needed help cleaning up some glitter. I thought it was glitter glue, so probably not too much of a mess. Since I was cooking something, I yelled back to her to try using a wipe to clean it up. It was

quiet for a while longer, then she comes out to the kitchen and says “Mom, can you help me clean up this glitter?” I looked at her and the first thing I noticed were her feet, which were totally purple and green and sparkly! I started to try to wipe them off, then noticed that there was glitter up her legs, all over her arms and on her clothes. It turns out I had jars of glitter that I had forgotten about. There was basically a blanket of glitter everywhere.

Larissa Lynn Liddle shared this cute photo of her daughter, Zöe, with pet rabbit, Bugs. Zöe loves to feed Bugs treats and sit in front of the cage talking to him and showing him her toys, Liddle says.

Last week, my 5-year-old son wandered out of the ABCmouse app and into the eBay app, where he managed to order 400 wheelbarrows at $117 a piece. We found out 24 hours later when the seller sent us the $47,000 invoice. Thankfully, we were able to cancel the order, but every time I hear the beep of a truck backing up, I can’t help but look out the window to make sure it’s not a flatbed full of wheelbarrows.

My daughter loves Silly Putty! Well, not long ago she left it in a window out of the container. Let’s just say 90-degree weather, Silly Putty, and a cat’s fur don’t work well together! We ended up having to nicely hold down said cat while my husband cut the Silly Putty from his fur. Needless to say, no more Silly Putty in our house! —REBECCA POQUETTE

—CARRIE FOSTER HUNGERFORD

—KIMBERLY RICHARDS MEILLEUR

THROWBACK NOVEMBER 2016

HERE’S HOW: Follow @kids_vt on Instagram. Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

KIDS VT

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/localgifts.

 

NOVEMBER 2017

Last November, we highlighted products from Vermont-based companies that would make great gifts for the kids in your life. From cozy hats and neck warmers to cardboard pinball machines, check out the article for some holiday shopping inspiration.

Thanks for sharing your family photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this joyful photo showing a young Vermonter enjoying @amber_nekvt Riley: “When I’m bive autumn’s bounty. (five), I’m going to live in a leaf house.” Share a picture of your kids doing something fun this month.

KIDSVT.COM

Keep It Local: Support Vermont Businesses With These 10 Holiday Gift Ideas

#INSTAKIDSVT

9


Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning

Core Academics • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music Spanish • PE • Project based learning• Individual Learning Goals

Join us for our Fall Open House on Sunday, November 5th @ 3 pm

Nutcracker

The

presented by VERMONT BALLET THEATER

Experience the Magic with the Whole Family

Visit our website vtdayschool.org for more information. Email: info@vtdayschool.org. Phone: 802-495-5150 6701 Shelburne Road, Shelburne k4t-VTDaySchool1017.indd 1

9/19/17 1:38 PM

PRESENTS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16th, 2017 2 & 7pm NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17th, 2017 1 & 6pm THE FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS BURLINGTON, VERMONT

November 25th • 10Am, 12pM & 2pM November 26th • 10aM & 12pM

TICKETS START AT $21 802-86FLYNN WWW.FLYNNTIX.ORG

riDes lEave From maiN stReet laNding iN buRlingtOn. enJoy tHe riDe froM buRlingTon tO chArlotTe anD bacK agaIn, singIng cArols, readIng hOlidaY stoRies And eNjoyiNg a Treat or tWo! guEst aPpearAnces from sanTa, frOsty thE snOwman and moRe. alL proCeeds from jiNgle belL exPress go tO the locaL roNald mcdoNald hoUse chAritiEs of buRlingTon pRograMs.

KIDS VT

moRe inFormaTion About Rmhc can Be foUnd oN our websiTe: wWw.Rmhcvt.oRg

21 CARMICHAEL ST ESSEX JCT, VT 05452 802-878-2941 INFO@VBTS.ORG WWW.VBTS.ORG

SPONSORED BY

10 k4t-RMHC1017.indd 1

9/18/17 11:23 AM

Untitled-9 1

10/26/17 1:39 PM


B Y A L I S ON N OVAK

BOOKS

EDUCATION

Amazing Maisie Grace

Local farmers-turned-authors John and Jennifer Churchman have penned a third picture book featuring the animals on their small farm in Essex. Released last month, A FARM FOR MAISIE introduces young readers to sheepdog puppy Maisie Grace, who finds herself in over her fluffy black-and-white head when she arrives at Moonrise Farm on a snowy day. Laddie, an older dog, patiently introduces Maisie to the animals and their special jobs around the farm — from the sheep whose wool is spun into yarn to the chickens, ducks and turkeys who lay eggs. Ultimately, Maisie finds a job of her own. The sweet book contains the same original style of fine-art photo illustrations as the Churchmans’ two previous books, The SheepOver and Brave Little Finn.. And fans of Maisie and Laddie can see the playful pups up close and personal at local book signings this month. A Farm for Maisie: Little, Brown & Company, $17.99, ages 4-8. The Churchmans will read from the book on November 4 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at Galaxy Bookshop in Hardwick; November 17-19 at the Vermont Hand Crafters Craft Vermont art show in Burlington; November 25 at 10:30 a.m. at Next Chapter Bookstore in Barre, at noon at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier and from 2-3 p.m. at the Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne. Learn more about the Churchmans’ work at sweetpeafriends.com.

Grade A Every fall, the Vermont Agency of Education selects an exemplary educator to receive the title of VERMONT TEACHER OF THE YEAR. In October, the honor Linda went to Linda Cloutier-Namdar, a CloutierNamdar ninth-grade English teacher at Essex High School. Her tenure will begin in January. Cloutier-Namdar, whom Essex Westford School District superintendent Beth Cobb calls a “superhero,” serves as a mentor to fellow teachers, is a Flynn Center for the Performing Arts teacher leader and a member of the nonprofit Vermont Writing Collaborative. Two other teachers — Sara Doncaster, music director at Lake Region Union High School in Barton, and Karen Greene, English teacher at Middlebury Union High School — were also honored. The award is “recognition of all those dedicated teachers who come to work every day with the hope and determination to make a difference in the lives of the children and young people in their care,” said Cloutier-Namdar. “I look forward to the opportunity to meet and learn from fellow professionals in Vermont and beyond in the year ahead.” To learn more about the Teacher of the Year program, visit education.vermont.gov/about-us/awards/ teacher-of-the-year.

SHOPPING

as a “fun and whimsical baby and children’s boutique.” The shop has a bright and modern feel, said Smith, and will stock unique items including clothes from Zutano, Milkbarn and Masala Kids; GroVia cloth diapers; Moba baby baskets and Comotomo bottles. Parking is plentiful — an important consideration when lugging around young children — and a small play area will provide a place for tots to keep busy while their parents shop.

KIDS VT

Bear & Moosh is located at 41 IDX Drive in South Burlington. Hours are Monday, noon-7 p.m. and Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. facebook.com/bearandmoosh

NOVEMBER 2017

Shannon Smith took inspiration from her two youngest daughters’ nicknames in choosing a moniker for her new children’s store, BEAR & MOOSH. The business — featuring clothing, toys and accessories for babies and children up to age 6 — recently opened in South Burlington, next door to Talbots. It’s the next chapter for Smith, a mom of three who formerly co-owned eco-friendly Burlington boutique The Green Life, which closed earlier this year. At that store, Smith explained, the natural mattresses and baby items were bestsellers. When they went their separate ways, her former business partner opened The Natural Mattress Store in Shelburne, and Smith decided to create what she describes

KIDSVT.COM

Playful Style

11


HABITAT BY GRA CE P E R L E E

PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

COTS Family Shelter

HOW COTS HELPS FAMILIES

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

I

12

n June of this year, James and his wife Sara* found themselves without a home. The couple had a 1-year-old baby, and Sara was seven months pregnant. Fortunately, they found a room at the Main Street Family Shelter — one of two family shelters operated by the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS), a Burlingtonbased nonprofit. Tucked between two large buildings on the outskirts of downtown Burlington, the imposing, 200-year-old brick building hosts up to 10 families at a time. Upon arrival, each family is given a single room with several beds. Bathrooms are shared, along with a kitchen, dining area, playroom and living room. The walls are brightly painted, and families complete daily chores to help keep the house clean. Like in many homes, the kitchen is the hub. Each family shops for and prepares their own

LEND A HAND Make a donation to COTS in someone’s name, as a gift or put it on your own holiday wish list. Donate one of the items on the family shelter’s wish lists. Items in high demand include: baby wipes, powdered infant formula, laundry detergent, new socks in all sizes and new toiletries in full and trial sizes. Learn more about COTS at cotsonline.org. meals, keeping their groceries in locked cabinets and refrigerators off the main room. Often there will be three or four families cooking all at once, and many times they’ll sit and dine together. Kids gather to play on the living room floor or across the

hall in the playroom, where dolls and books sit neatly on shelves. “There are some real bonds that form here,” said Mike, who staffs the house during the day. “Families may stay here as long as six months, and some of the friendships that develop are very strong.” So how is James and Sara’s family doing, four months after moving into the shelter? They’re now a family of four. And, more than halfway through their allotted stay, they’re still looking for permanent housing. “We’re doing what we can,” James said. “COTS will help you get on housing wait lists, but those are long lists. If you come in and aren’t working, they’ll help you find a job … Even when you leave, they’ll still offer you assistance. But you have to work for it. And we are.” K *Names have been changed to respect the privacy of COTS clients.

The nonprofit’s services are designed to help families recover from homelessness in a meaningful, permanent way. According to the COTS website, “Children raised with housing instability are often at the greatest risk of becoming homeless themselves … We aim to effectively intervene now to stabilize parents and children, help them build new skills, and stop homelessness from happening in the future.” • Three evenings a week, volunteers from local colleges spend time with the children, reading with them, playing make-believe and offering homework help. “The kids just love them,” said COTS staffer Mike. “And it’s a welcome bit of respite for the parents, too.” • COTS helps families find quality, affordable childcare. Matching children with open spots in daycares, preschools, and afterschool and summer camp care frees up parents for work while helping to ensure that the children get access to similar educational opportunities as their peers. • In partnership with community volunteers, COTS also offers support around educational opportunities, budgeting skills and workforce development training.


PARENT PORTRAIT P H OTO B Y S A M S I M ON • I N T ER VIEW B Y ER IN N SIM O N

Charles & Charlotte

KIDSVT.COM

Charles Zanauskas, 66, with daughter Charlotte, 1

NOVEMBER 2017

What is it like parenting a young child later in life? You know, at this stage in life, she’s changed my life completely for the better. I grew up in the ’50s. And life is different now. For kids, it’s all about electronics. I wish she could see a lifestyle like I had when I was young.

Want to be featured in an upcoming Parent Portrait? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT

You have adult kids. How is it different the second time around? I’m more overprotective now! Of course, there’s still diapers, and the crankiness and the terrible twos. But I think she’s a wonderful baby. She’s a joy.

13


CHECKUP WI T H D R. D AV I D L I S L E • I N T ER VIEW C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

What should parents know about sport specialization? I

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

t can be exciting when a child displays a special aptitude for a sport. Whether it’s gymnastics, baseball, hockey or figure skating, tomorrow’s elite athletes are often identified at a very early age. In response, some parents encourage them to pursue a year-round schedule of intense training and competition — a practice referred to as sport specialization. But these rigors can have negative physical and emotional consequences. In 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics reported that increased emphasis on sport specialization has led to a rise in overuse injuries, overtraining and, ultimately, burnout. What are the risks when kids concentrate on one sport? How much training is too much? And, at what age is specialization most advisable? Dr. David Lisle, an orthopedic sports medicine physician at the University of Vermont Medical Center, shares his perspective on the topic, including what causes burnout and how to avoid common sports-related injuries.

14

KIDS VT: How often do you see young athletes experiencing ailments associated with sport specialization? DAVID LISLE: Well, it’s a little unique in Vermont because we like our sports, but there’s not one sport that’s dominant here the way football, baseball and tennis are down South, where they’re played all year round. Our athletic seasons are shorter and spaced out, so kids naturally diversify. Do we see some overuse injuries? Of course. We are seeing an increase in year-round club sports and travel teams. We also see kids who are specializing

too soon and then burn out. But it’s not quite as common, and the burnout often happens later, in high school or college. KVT: What’s the definition of overtraining? DL: There are two concepts — overreaching and overtraining. Overreaching is when training is very intense and athletes note decreased performance and sometimes psychological problems, such as depression and anxiety. This all improves with rest. Overtraining syndrome is more extreme than overreaching. This is training that is so intense, leading to a longer period of psychological and physiologic changes resulting in prolonged negative sports performance.

It’s critical for all athletes to have an off-season to let their body recuperate, not just physically but also psychologically. DR. DAVID LISLE KVT: Is burnout a clinical term? DL: Yes. The term burnout is generally defined as leaving a sport that was once enjoyable because it’s no longer fun or an important part of your life. There are different theories as to why it happens, but it’s typically due to the stress of competition. Intense competition over many years may cause enough stress to

create burnout to the point where people aren’t interested in doing that sport anymore. KVT: So burnout has both a physical and emotional component? DL: Absolutely. In fact, it’s probably more an emotional component. You can suffer an injury that causes you to leave a sport, but that’s not burnout. Burnout is more of a psychological transition where you’re no longer enjoying an activity the way you once did. It’s usually due to being in a repetitive, stressful, intense, competitive atmosphere. But I should point out that the majority of young athletes don’t leave a sport due to burnout. It’s usually about time conflicts or changing interests. KVT: At what age is it advisable for kids to begin specializing in an athletic activity? DL: It’s typically felt that before the early teens — and there’s no hard and fast age, because the onset of puberty varies — specialization is not a good idea. Most young athletes are specializing around sophomore or junior year of high school. Any sooner than that has a much higher risk of burnout and much higher risk of overuse injury. Also, early sports specialization does not guarantee future elite-level performance. Nothing has proven that if you get your child into a sport early and focus on only that sport that your child will succeed at the highest level. That being said, there are some sports that you will not be good at unless you start early and

specialize. They’re called the technical or early entry sports: figure skating, gymnastics, diving and some would throw swimming in there, too. If you start late or don’t commit to those sports early on, you won’t succeed at the higher levels. Unfortunately, that’s just the way it is. And we do see a lot of overuse injuries from those sports, such as gymnasts with wrist pain or back problems. KVT: Are there benefits to athletes participating in multiple sports? DL: Yes. Sport diversification does help athletes because of what’s called skill transfer. Some sports can help you get better at others. Say you play soccer in the fall, and in the winter you alpine ski race. In soccer, there’s a lot of footwork and balance. Those soccer skills will help in other sports that require similar skills. And you’ll also reduce the risk of overuse injuries. KVT: What advice do you give to young patients who are striving to become elite athletes? DL: It’s critical for all athletes to have an off-season to let their bodies recuperate, not just physically but also psychologically. We don’t have, say, that epidemic of pitchers’ elbow injuries like they do in the South because of the year-round training. Fortunately, the four seasons in Vermont help us see more diversified athletes. But a lot of our athletes are still overscheduled and compete in three or four sports a year and don’t really have an off-season. 


COURTESY OF ALISON NOVAK

DESTINATION RECREATION BY A L I S ON N OVAK

“Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert” Shelburne Museum, 6000 Shelburne Rd.

G

Detail of “Boxed Donuts” by Peter Anton

an object that could, all at once, be an analogue for my childhood experience … much of which was filled with confusion and distortion.” That got my mind churning, but I didn’t try to explain it to my kids. To them, the photos simply showed drippy ice cream bars like the ones they had in Central Park last summer. There are other works in the gallery that viewers will interpret differently depending on their age and life experience, said Bauer, highlighting what she calls the “dichotomy between what an older viewer and a younger viewer might see.” That’s the beauty of the exhibit. The subject matter is familiar and exciting for kids and also interesting for adults. And that’s pretty sweet.  In “Destination Recreation,” local parents review family-friendly attractions. Got a spot you think we should feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT

“Ring Pop” by Desire Obtain Cherish

Larger-than-life representations of normally small objects — from a 10-foot-wide photorealist oil painting of tangled black and red licorice to jumbo resin sculptures of Ring Pops to a jumbo box of glossy donuts — made the exhibit especially enticing to my kids. Assistant curator Carolyn Bauer confirmed its allure — she said she’s observed many children who can’t resist touching the work (against museum rules, I’m afraid). Sometimes young visitors’ behavior goes even beyond that. “We’ve never had an exhibit before where we’re keeping a tally of how many licks the art gets,” Bauer said — about two to three per day. The art’s exaggerated proportions can be unsettling for some viewers, Bauer said. She suggests asking kids, “Why do you think the artist made this so big?” as a way to start a conversation about the work. For me, the most moving piece was Michael Massaia’s photographs of melting SpongeBob, Sonic the Hedgehog and Batman ice cream pops. They appeared disfigured and had a haunting effect. In the accompanying write-up, Massaia says, “I was searching for

NOVEMBER 2017

“Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert” runs through February 18 on the first-floor gallery of the Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education at Shelburne Museum. The museum’s fall season hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, through December 30. Admission for Vermont residents is $14 for adults and $7 for children ages 5-17. Kids can participate in Webby’s Art Studio sessions on candy sculpture on November 4, and on gumball machine ornaments on December 16, both from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

fashionista, gravitated toward high heels decorated like ornate cakes with faux icing, meringue, sprinkles and cherries from Orlando-based artist Chris Campbell of Shoe Bakery. “Which one would you want to wear?” she asked me, and we spent a few minutes debating the merits of each pair. My constantly-in-motion 7-yearold son, riding an art-induced sugar high, made a beeline for the corner of the gallery, where Christopher Boffoli’s large photographs of mini figures jackhammering Blow Pops, ice climbing rock-candy cliffs and snow-blowing powdered donut sugar captured his attention. He was even more enthralled by an adjacent video screen that looped animated versions of some of the photographs.

Theo checks out giant lollipops by conceptual artist Desire Obtain Cherish

KIDSVT.COM

GET THE GOODIES

Shoes by Chris Campbell

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM

oogle “baby eating ice cream for the first time” and you’ll encounter YouTube videos of wide-eyed little ones wagging their tongues in glee. They’re visual proof of kids’ early affinity for sweets. But it doesn’t always last — from sugar crashes to stomach problems to painful dental procedures, adults’ associations with sugar aren’t always so satisfying. This made visiting “Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert” with my kids last month a thought-provoking experience. On display at Shelburne Museum through February 18, the multimedia exhibit features confection-themed art from 12 contemporary artists from the United States and Europe, with a smaller section showcasing work from seven Vermont artists. Enter the first-floor gallery of the museum’s Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, and a panel explains that the exhibit “investigates the varying responses and relationships that sugar — in all its forms — provokes and inspires.” But my kids were too stimulated by the colorful, shiny objects on display to stop and savor the signs. Ten-year-old Mira, a budding

15


BOOKWORMS B Y BRE TT S TA N CI U

Black Marker Magic

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

Liniers signs books at Mater Christi School

Kids VT: How do you like living and working in Vermont? Ricardo Liniers Siri: Vermont has sunk its hooks into me. My family’s experience here has been a bubble of beauty. I love the Center for Cartoon Studies. What took me 20 years to learn by myself can take students here two years instead — learning history and technique, but also the business and agent parts. KVT: What inspired you to create children’s books? RLS: I love books. I think they are the best. As much fun as reading is, it’s way more fun to come up with a story. The most fun is coming up with a character. I really love drawing. The thing about making books is that you get to lend your brain to someone else, and they get to see how your brain works. Also, when you raise kids, you can’t find the pause button. I wonder about my daughters — How can you

COURTESY OF TOON BOOKS

16

hen Ricardo Liniers Siri was a boy in Buenos Aires, he loved to read comics. Inspired by a friend’s drawings, young Ricardo began experimenting with his own illustrations and was soon hooked. Now a renowned cartoonist, the Argentinian is professionally known by his middle name, Liniers. Since 2016, he’s been a fellow at White River Junction’s Center for Cartoon Studies and lives in Norwich with his wife and three daughters, ages 3, 7 and 9. Last month, Liniers spent the morning with kindergarten through third grade students at Mater Christi School in Burlington. Wearing a Harry Potter Gryffindor beanie, jeans and hiking boots, he shared his latest book, Good Night, Planet, the third in a series of stories for young readers published by New York City-based Toon Books. The story follows a little girl, based on his youngest daughter, and her stuffed rabbit, Planet, as they experience an imaginative nighttime adventure. Surrounded by an attentive audience, Liniers demonstrated on a large tablet how he draws his comic strip, “Macanudo,” published in Argentina’s daily newspaper, La Nación. At the end of the presentation, a young boy asked how he could become a cartoonist. “That’s a very important question,” Liniers said seriously. “Tell your parents you will need a book without these things.” The artist proceeded to draw lines. “You will need a black marker. Make squares for your comic strip and then you are on your way. Start drawing.”

COURTESY OF MATER CHRISTI SCHOOL

KIDSVT.COM

W

stay this way? You’re so perfect. So The Big Wet Balloon and Good Night, Planet are my way of keeping that place for my children. KVT: You’ve been drawing your popular strip “Macanudo” in La Nación for about 15 years. Can you tell me more about that? RLS: I got my strip in 2002, and the “big picture” media stories were full of horror, in the United States and in Argentina. We had five presidents in a week. So macanudo means “It’s fine”

or “It’s all right.” My strip is a kind of optimistic resistance, a tiny story. The big picture continues to be terrible, but my friends and family are just amazing. I step outside, and the leaves on the trees are red. That’s amazing. So is the smell of mowing the lawn. When you sharpen a pencil, that smell is also amazing.  Liniers’s children’s books, Good Night, Planet, The Big Wet Balloon and Written and Drawn by Henrietta are available at local bookstores.


THE ART OF BY HE AT H E R P OL I F KA - RI VA S PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

Heather with son Henry and husband Karl

Family Volunteering W

Henry

A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY

Last November, we wrote about 20 ways families can give back during this time of year. Find that article online at kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT

For more family volunteer opportunities, visit your local United Way website and click on the “Get Involved” tab. You can filter your search to include just family-friendly opportunities.

NOVEMBER 2017

Looking to volunteer with your family at Ronald McDonald House? In addition to baking or cooking in their kitchen, families — with additional training — can serve as weekend relief volunteers, spending a Friday or Saturday night covering the house. RMH is also currently recruiting volunteers to assist with their Jingle Bell Express roundtrip train ride from Burlington to Charlotte on November 25 and 26. A great option for families with teenage kids, volunteers help with various tasks, including taking tickets, serving on the train as car elves and helping with crowd control. Visit rmhcvt.org for more information.

KIDSVT.COM

Ruby

go into the playroom?” I replied with a curt, “No, we are here to help, not play.” I made eye contact with my husband, who was working to melt butter with Henry. We both rolled our eyes. What did we get ourselves into? Nevertheless, we forged ahead. As the brown butter pumpkin oatmeal cookies came out of the oven, I moderated my expectations. I became less militant about making sure my kids were actively baking and noticed we all had a lot more fun with this change of perspective. As a child, I didn’t fully appreciate the values of empathy and compassion overnight. How could I expect my children to from just one volunteer session? I’m hopeful that, going forward, our family can continue to work with a local organization like Ronald McDonald House, and that this ongoing participation will inspire Henry and Ruby to volunteer as they grow up. Who knows, maybe they’ll even acknowledge their mother was right before they turn 40. K

hen I was growing up in upstate New York, my parents dragged me along to various volunteer activities, from serving pies at the local rescue squad’s annual fundraiser to handing out blankets at a shelter after a flood hit our small town. I never really had a choice in the matter and I wasn’t always an enthusiastic participant. It sometimes made me feel uncomfortable and took away from time with my friends. Now that I’m older and wiser (read: over 40), I can say without cringing that my parents were right. The experiences they exposed me to helped foster my compassion and desire to help others as an adult. My 5-year-old daughter, Ruby, is wonderfully caring and sweet with her friends. However, she hasn’t yet figured out how to turn her toy-sharing tendencies into contributing to the greater world. But Henry, my 9-year-old, has recently exhibited an interest in giving back to others. This past summer, he and a gaggle of neighborhood kids ran a lemonade stand to raise money for the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf and the Humane Society of Chittenden County. They made more than 80 dollars to support those organizations. Who knew selling really watered-down lemonade could be so lucrative? I wanted to keep that lemonadestand momentum going, so I decided to find another place where my family

could volunteer. A quick Google search for “volunteering opportunities in Vermont” yields an abundance of results. The challenge is finding a place where kids and adults can volunteer together. Some organizations have a minimum age requirement for participating. Enter the Ronald McDonald House of Burlington. The beautiful brick “house that love built” (upon seeing it, my kids called it a mansion) has been operating at 16 South Winooski Avenue since 1984. Before visiting, I didn’t know much about it, except that it helped families of sick children. My daughter knew even less, and wondered if there would be Happy Meals available. After some online research and correspondence with volunteer and guest relations coordinator Deanna Cameron, I learned that the Ronald McDonald House offers families a place to stay while their children receive necessary hospital treatment. It’s one of more than 350 similar facilities around the world run by Ronald McDonald House Charities, a nonprofit that counts McDonald’s as its largest corporate partner. Guest rooms and common areas are stocked with amenities that families would normally find in their own homes — from a basket of toiletries in the bathroom to bookshelves filled with board games. Volunteers prepare dinner every night and baked goods every day so families can focus on their child’s care. We are a family that loves to cook, so baking yummy treats sounded right up our alley. Cameron encouraged us to bake whatever we wished in the large, fully equipped kitchen. Since we needed to prepare enough dessert for 15 people, we decided to make cookies, a pie and a sweet quick bread. With full grocery bags and recipes in hand, the four of us drove downtown. Upon ringing the doorbell, we were cheerfully greeted by Lizzie, another volunteer, who was working to answer phones and run the front office. Most guests were either sleeping or at the hospital visiting their children, and the space felt quiet and peaceful. We got to work measuring flour and mixing eggs and sugar. I was excited to see my children participating enthusiastically. But within 10 minutes, Ruby, usually my most eager helper said, “I’m bored; can I

17


BALANCING ACT BY J E S S I CA L A RA TI C K T IN

Family Focus

A Burlington couple on eating together, working with refugees and being thankful

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

t’s an unseasonably warm fall evening as I ascend the front steps of Pablo and Alisha’s cozy two-story home in the Five Sisters neighborhood of Burlington’s South End. With small lots and houses nestled together, this neighborhood is known for its close-knit community and family-friendly culture — two things the pair appreciates. During our conversation, Pablo points to a wall in the living room devoted to photos of parents, grandparents and even great-grandparents; a reminder, he says, of the importance of family and history in their lives. As an interracial couple — he’s from an Indian-Canadian Hindu family and she grew up in a white Catholic family in the Northeast Kingdom — they’ve found common ground in the progressive, diverse city of Burlington and in their love of working with immigrants and refugees.

18

On being thankful: Alisha: Because we do similar work with refugees, we have a lot to talk about. And I think because of that work, at mealtime there is a deliberate effort, at least on my part, to make this consistent. What are we thankful for? every single night — not just Thanksgiving month. I encounter so many situations that make me want to come home and say how thankful I am for my family. Pablo: And you say that a lot. You actually say that every night. Alisha: Then Pablo says, “Let’s eat! The food is getting cold!” Pablo: Because I am the cook! On the joys and challenges of having flexible jobs: Pablo: Both of us have flexibility in our jobs, and that can be fantastic. For example we were gone this whole past spring — I was on sabbatical and Alisha was working one day a week remotely, but she took a lot of time off. We traveled a lot — Kentucky, Tennessee; we were in Vancouver for two months, and then Arizona for a couple of weeks. So we are able to do

MATTHEW THORSEN

I

DAD: Pablo Bose, 45, associate professor of geography and director of global and regional studies, University of Vermont MOM: Alisha Laramee, 43, program specialist, New Farms for New Americans with the Association for Africans Living in Vermont DAUGHTER: Lily, 5 stuff like that. But for a person like me, it’s also really hard to have a lot of unstructured time. I have the kind of job that, if I let it, can just be all the time. I have gotten used to being fully here when Lily and Alisha are awake, and then I work almost every night after they go to bed. That’s been going on since she was born. Alisha: That’s been going on since before she was born. You always work! On unplugging: Pablo: When I am with [Lily] and Alisha, I like to be with you so I have put some barriers on time, and not working, which wasn’t always the case in the past. You are much better at this. When you are with Lily, you generally don’t … well, you do … but you like to think you don’t! Alisha: The fact is that it is 2017. I do check text messages and sometimes emails, but generally I am pretty adamantly opposed to doing that while I am with her. And I role model that to the best of my abilities. It’s challenging with jobs to say, I’m off. Pablo: I have been lucky in that

respect. My department is all women who have families and are awesome and they have actually done a really good job in this. I had a chair who said, “I don’t answer emails after 5 o’clock.” On eating al fresco: Pablo: I’ve never said this to you before, but one of the things I love most about our life is that we eat meals together. I love the fact that we have dinner together every night and we eat either at the dinner table or outside, until it’s too mosquito-y or too cold. People walk by and say stuff to us all the time. Alisha: “How do we get reservations?” [laughter] Pablo: It’s really nice. On the lack of childless date nights: Pablo: A lot of times I think your family in particular, and my family too, actually, will be like, “Why don’t you guys want to go out just the two of you?” Partly, it’s our schedules, but we really like spending time with Lily. We would like to go out for dinner — with Lily. All three of us. Alisha: I don’t feel like we’re missing out by not having some couple time or special dates. Neither of us really likes going out — besides going out

to dinner as a family. Pablo doesn’t really drink so it’s not like, Oh, let’s go to the bar and have a drink. Pablo: It’s harder sometimes to have conversations over dinner. Lily sleeps in more and we have had some really nice early-morning conversations. On being aware of cultural norms: Alisha: Especially when Lily was little, I would ask a lot of [refugee] moms [I work with] about the way things are in other places, and right away they said, “No cribs.” They thought that was the strangest thing, to separate your baby from you. And going into people’s homes and seeing they still had kids in their beds until they were 8 or 9 years old. Then you have these internal conversations about the cultural norms — and you just do what’s right for you in the end. And then you think you are doing what’s right for you, but then you just realize you are doing it because it’s the way the culture works. So we never used a crib! K In “Balancing Act,” we ask Vermont parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@ kidsvt.com.


ONE TO WATCH BY M A RY A N N L I CKT E I G

Stage Flight

Visit our website for our

2017 Class Schedule

A seventh grader soars in the theater

O

All Ages…All Levels Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps!

Call or email to hold a spot in our summer camps! Classes offered in Colchester & Middlebury

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 celtikutie@aol.com www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

k8v-McFadden0217.indd 1

1/26/17 12:00 PM

“One to Watch” shines a light on a young Vermonter who is going places. Know a local child or teen who’s recently done something amazing? Nominate him or her at kidsvt.com/onetowatch.

KIDS VT

The Christmas Revels: A Nordic Celebration of the Winter Solstice takes place Thursday through Sunday, December 14-17, in Spaulding Auditorium at the Hopkins Center for the Arts. To purchase tickets, visit hop. dartmouth.edu/Online/ christmas-revels-2017.

Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School!

NOVEMBER 2017

INFO

Fredland acknowledged. “And so, during the auditions, I was really looking for someone that exuded both flexibility and confidence, that took direction well, you know? And Maeve really shined.” Everyone who tried out for the show participated in the choral audition. Maeve chose to go through optional acting and dance auditions as well. “I threw a style of dance at her that I am absolutely certain she had never done before,” Fredland said. “And just watching her engage in the process of 20 minutes, starting at ground zero and moving to, ‘Oh, yeah, I think I can get this in my body’ — it really was a great thing to witness.” Maeve won the lead — “No, way!” she said when her mom told her — and her life became its own tightly choreographed dance when rehearsals started in September. For now, they are on Mondays and Thursdays. She boards the school bus at 7:15 a.m. on Monday, attends school until 3 p.m., goes to soccer practice from 3 to 5 p.m., takes a 30-minute drive to Norwich for Revels dance rehearsal, then another short drive to Hanover for chorus rehearsal. She gets home around 10 p.m. Thursday’s schedule gets her home by 9 p.m. “I’m going to get all of the [school] work that I can get done in the car on the ride to Revels and after, on the ride home,” Maeve said. She plans to tackle her online algebra class homework on the weekends. She also helps out at Strafford Village Farm, founded by her parents, BJ Miller and Shannon Varley. They work full-time jobs off of the farm, so Maeve and her 10-year-old brother, Luke, help feed and water pigs, cattle and sheep. During the spring lambing season, Maeve spent hours in the barn with the ewes. “If you stay there long enough, and you stay still enough,” she said, “you can see them give birth, and that’s pretty cool.” Maeve has her feet planted on the farm, her eyes on the stage and a solid backup plan. Name: Maeve Miller “I want to be an actress,” she Age: 12 said. “But if that doesn’t work Town: Strafford out, I want to be a teacher.” 

KIDSVT.COM

f all the roles Maeve Miller has played in her life — farm hand, actor, babysitter, musician, soccer player — one is her favorite. “I love being on stage,” the Strafford 12-year-old said. She started acting lessons at age 5 and landed roles in children’s community theater. Now she sings and acts in school productions at the Newton School, where she’s in seventh grade. “I like the feeling of butterflies in my stomach,” she said. Most people don’t, this reporter pointed out, because it means they’re nervous. “It does,” she said. “But it’s also a new opportunity because if you mess up, there’s a lot of improvising you’ll need to do, and it’s just fun to improvise and make stuff up as you go, too.” Two directors who have worked with Maeve described her as someone who shines. Renowned classical pianist Annemieke McLane directs the United Church of Strafford youth choir, of which Maeve is a member. “She shines on stage; that’s how it is,” McLane said. Nearly 5,000 people will see for themselves when Maeve stars in The Christmas Revels: A Nordic Celebration of the Winter Solstice at Hopkins Center for the Arts in Hanover, N.H., next month. The show, a 43-year-old Upper Valley tradition, is one of 10 Revels Christmas shows staged across the country. Cowritten by Revels North artistic director Nils Fredland, the story follows a young girl who goes in search of her Nordic heritage. It will feature six guest professional performers, seven specialty dancers, and 73 local singers, dancers and actors ages 7 to 70-something. The six performances are expected to sell out. Maeve’s character, “the girl,” will be on stage for 80 percent of the show. “It’s a lot to put on the shoulders of a young person,”

19 Untitled-2 1

10/25/17 3:04 PM


MEALTIME B Y A S T RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

Roasted Vegetable Minestrone Soup INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • •

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

W

hen the leaves change color and a chill is in the air, my thoughts turn to making soup. And I don’t think anyone does soup as well as the Italians. Take minestrone, for example. While perusing my Italian cookbooks and the internet, I learned that this cornerstone of Italian cuisine is essentially a kitchen-sink soup. You can make it with whatever collection of vegetables you have on hand. Often, it includes rice or a small pasta like orzo or tubular ditalini. I decided to try my hand at a minestrone, but opted to leave out the carbs and focus on the veggies. First, I roasted leeks, carrots, potatoes, tomatoes and garlic in the oven to bring out their flavors. I also used a secret Italian ingredient — the rind of a block of Parmesan cheese. Simmering the rind in the soup creates a depth of flavor that is hard to get from a store-bought broth. I also added some premade pesto, which is typical in the Genoa region of Italy. This nutritious soup is a great way to get your daily dose of vegetables, even when the summer’s bounty is far behind us. Make a big pot at the beginning of the week and enjoy it for days. Or serve it to guests, accompanied by a loaf of crusty bread. As the Italians say, Mangia! 

• • • • • • •

flavors to meld.

DANISH WOOLEN DELIGHT DanishWool.com

Importing Organic Woolens from Europe for entire family … babies, kids, mom & dad Enter Code VTKids17 for $25 off orders of $60+ (free shipping within VT)

Danishwool.com Swiss-made HOCOSA long-underwear in 100% merino wool or 70/30% wool/silk blend.

LANACare organic wool nursing pads

KIDS VT

20

1 onion 1 well-scrubbed leek PHOTOS: 2 carrots ANDY BRUMBAUGH 2 yellow potatoes (or 6 small baby potatoes) 2 small turnips 2 small tomatoes DIRECTIONS 2 cloves garlic 1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. 5 tablespoons olive oil Chop up the vegetables, except 2 teaspoons salt for the celery and canned 2 teaspoons pepper tomatoes, and place on a large roasting sheet lined with tinfoil. 2 stalks celery Add the fresh garlic, drizzle 1 28-ounce can diced with 3 tablespoons olive oil, and tomatoes season with salt and pepper. 1 28-ounce can crushed Roast the vegetables for 25-30 tomatoes minutes, or until soft. 1 can cannellini beans 2. When the vegetables are almost (drained and rinsed) done roasting, dice the celery. On the stove top, heat a large 6 cups vegetable broth soup pot to medium heat. Add 2 1 bay leaf tablespoons olive oil and sauté 1 1/2 teaspoons dried the celery until it is soft, about 5 thyme minutes. fresh grated Parmesan 3. Add the roasted vegetables to cheese (save the rind the pot, along with the cans of for the soup) tomatoes, beans, bay leaf, thyme, 3 tablespoons pesto broth and Parmesan rind. Simmer for at least 30 minutes to allow the 1 cup frozen peas

ART, THEATRE, MUSIC + MOVEMENT Classes for Preschoolers, Homeschoolers, Afterschool, Teens, & Adults!

www.artistreevt.org

and baby apparel.

KbT, GOTS, IVN Certifications PO Box 124, Westford VT 05494 k8h-DanishWoolenMill0917.indd 1

info@danishwool.com

2095 Pomfret Rd., South Pomfret, VT (802) 457-3500 | info@artistreevt.org

802-878-6089 8/16/17 3:03 PM

Untitled-4 1

9/27/17 10:30 AM


Bopping With Baby B

I was so wrapped up in memorizing the routines that I forgot about the toddler strapped to my body.

GroovaRoo dance class

Instrutor Kadina Malicbegovic

THE BEAT GOES ON GroovaRoo Vermont dance classes will be offered for free at 10 a.m. every Friday from January 5 through February 23 at the Fletcher Free Library (235 College St., Burlington). Babes can range from 6 weeks old to toddlers, and participants should bring water and wear comfy clothes and shoes. For more information, visit littleartsyfaces.com or email Kadina Malicbegovic at littleartsyfaces@ hotmail.com. Kristen with daughter Virginia after class

KIDSVT.COM NOVEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

first classes, “the first person that showed up was a dad with his son. He rocked it!”). After going over some basic steps, it was time to boogie. We learned two routines in the 75-minute lesson. The first was set to Ciara’s 2004 club banger, “One, Two Step,” and the second to hip-hop artist Kid Ink’s “Body Language.” GroovaRoo choreography is based on soul line dancing — think popular group dances such as the electric slide and the cupid shuffle. Since no previous experience is required, Malicbegovic broke down each pattern step-by-step, teaching one eight- or 16-count segment at a time until the group was dancing in unison. I was so wrapped up in memorizing the routines that I forgot about the considerable weight of a 22-pound toddler strapped to my body. Along with providing an active experience and the opportunity to meet other caregivers, GroovaRoo promotes bonding between babies and grown-ups. The close contact and rhythmic movement proved soothing during a few of Virginia’s fussy moments, and she got the giggles during a move that involved kissing her on the forehead. Some babies even fell asleep while their parents got their groove on. Despite having experience on the dance floor pre-baby, I wasn’t so sure I could keep up with choreographed moves. But the repetitive nature of line dance, coupled with Malicbegovic’s upbeat smiles and high fives, set me at ease. By the end of class, I had found my footing in a variety of techniques including the walk and snap, cha-cha, slide, sailor step and lock step — all with Virginia nestled safely against my chest. K

efore attending a GroovaRoo Vermont dance class in October, I hadn’t let loose to a Ciara song since my college dance-party days. This time, rather than getting rowdy with my girlfriends, I had the pleasure of cutting a rug while wearing my 1-year-old daughter, Virginia, on my chest. GroovaRoo Dance is a babywearing dance program cofounded by California-based couple Amber and Meeshi Anjali, a babywearing educator and dance teacher, respectively. Their classes, which are taught around the globe, aim to build interactive family dance communities. While learning choreography, parents and caregivers are encouraged to carry their kiddos on their chests, facing inward for a heart-to-heart connection, and to wrap their arms around the baby to show support and affection. Bob Marley’s “One Love” set a tender tone as certified instructor Kadina Malicbegovic walked adults through some safety tips and a gentle warm-up. An artist, who owns face and body painting business Little Artsy Faces and other creative enterprises, Malicbegovic was cognizant of the fatigue that can accompany early parenthood. She highlighted the importance of hydration and made it clear that breaks were A-OK. Located in Burlington’s North End Studios, the small, mirrored dance space was just right for an intimate class of four adult-baby pairs utilizing the required two-shoulder carriers. (New to babywearing? No worries. Extra carriers are available in class.) Fellow movers included two moms with their tots and Malicbegovic’s partner, Drew Leiphart, carrying their son Julian Ali. (Malicbegovic told me over email that in one of her

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KRISTEN RAVIN

FIT FAMILIES BY KRI S T E N RAV I N

21


•••••••••••• ••• •• ••••••• •••••• •••••• ••••• ••••• •• ••••••••• •••••• •••••••••• ••••• •••• • ••• ••••• •••••• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • shelburnemuseum.org • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• •• December 2 & 3 • • • • • • • •• • • • • • 11 a.m.– 4 p.m. • •• • • • • • • • •• • • •• • • • • ••• • • • • •

Deck the Halls!

STORE SALE • LIVE MUSIC • DAILY ART ACTIVITIES • WAGON RIDES • FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!

Untitled-10 1

10/26/17 1:52 PM

VERMONT

SWIM

PRIVATE & GROUP LESSONS UVM Indoor Pool Session starts January 20 Registration opens December 1

SCHOOL GO.UVM.EDU/VTSWIMSCHOOL

rs...

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

calenda r u o y k Mar TM

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATION OPENS FEBRUARY 1!

LIFE COMES AT GIRLS FAST. HELP THEM FIND THEIR PACE.

GO.UVM.EDU/SUMMERCAMP

You don’t need to be a runner or have previous coaching experience... just a passion to change the lives of young girls. Learn more about empowering girls in your community at gotrvt.org/coaching.

TM

802.656.4483 UVM.EDU/RECREATION

22 K3V-GOTR1117.indd 1

10/27/17 10:25 AM

Untitled-1 1

10/25/17 10:34 AM


JUST FOR KIDS Talking Turkey

Writing Contest & Winners...... 24 Coloring Contest Winners......... 24 Coloring Contest.............................. 25 Puzzle Page.......................................... 26 Birthday Club..................................... 26 Puzzle Answers................................ 47

BY MARC NADEL

Wattles, the beloved cartoon turkey, never has a cross word for anyone. But he does have a crossword puzzle just for you! ACROSS 1. Mayflower passenger 2. Basic stuffing ingredient 3. What strangers did at the first Thanksgiving dinner 4. See Clue for 6 ACROSS 5. Turkey legs

6. With 4 ACROSS, a red Thanksgiving side dish 7. Tasty tree treat, when roasted

8. Wild grain 9. Picnic ________

KIDSVT.COM

DOWN

10. Decorative squash 12. How you feel after Thanksgiving dinner 13. Moon and ________ 14. Ear of ________

NOVEMBER 2017

11. Plymouth ________

15. Apple juice Find answers on page 47!

KIDS VT

16. Sweet potato

23


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

Thanksgiving, celebrated this year on November 23, means lots of yummy food to eat. Write about your perfect Thanksgiving meal. Describe all the dishes that would be served, how the table would be decorated and who would be there. Attach an extra piece of paper if you need more space to write — and feel free to include a picture of the Thanksgiving table!

Magic and mystery inspired this month’s marvelous, Halloween-themed artwork. A laughing witch whizzed through the air on a broomstick over a sea of pumpkins in 9-yearold Gwendolyn’s masterpiece. Colin, 4, jazzed up his kitty with a sparkly gold and green robot costume. Six-year-old Alexander surrounded his feline with an airborne coterie of ghosts and bats, and stuffed his jack-o-lantern bucket with tasty treats. Great job, junior artists. Mail us your masterpieces again this month!

HONORABLE MENTIONS MR. MEOWS-A-LOT

Jayden Nappi-Thompson, 9, Swanton

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“No Halloween Costume” 5 Olivia Storm Challenger, 5und& STOWE

er

TRICK-OR-TREATING ON THE MOON

Paige Eloise Black, 6, Waterbury RAINBOW KITTY

Quinn Linnea, 11, Cornwall PURRFECT HALLOWEEN

Kaydence White, 11, Bristol ROBOT CAT

Darion Sinkevich, 4, Addison BANDIT IN A BOX

John Wallstrom, 8, East Montpelier We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the December/January double issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is November 15.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

24

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

, I was Last year for Halloween lton mi Ha ler uy Sch eth Elizab al sic mu y wa from the Broad king to tal ber em rem I n. lto Hami tume my friends about my cos t bes my t sn’ wa It st. gu in Au it was costume just because ut the abo re mo s wa It . pretty tching ma een tw experience. Be e fittings tum cos ds, en fri my with my s wa t tha s, and all that sas e. tum cos te favori

NIGHTTIME TRICKS

Ammi Allen, 5, Winooski COSTUMED KITTY-CAT

Taryn Barrett, 4, Danville

“Halloween Hullabaloo” Otis Taylor, 7

6 to 8

MONTPELIER

Theodore Longo, 3, Colchester

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to write about their favorite Halloween costume. Below, find the winning entries. Cassidy and Riley each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

HINESBURG

Quinlan Furlong, 7, Rutland

THEO GETS TREATS

WRITING WINNERS Cassidy S. Bouchard, 11

CANDY CATASTROPHE

Riley Barrett, 6 DANVILLE

When I was 3 years old, I was a skeleton for Halloween. I liked to dance to Skeleton Bones. I love Halloween.

STARRY NIGHT STROLL

Rylee Preston, 7, Tupper Lake, NY SUGAR BOT

Izzy Gill, 9, Montpelier

TOP TITLES “BAD GUY LOOKING FOR THE CANDY”

Emmett Tursini, 3, Cambridge “SPACE CAT’S BIG HALLOWEEN ADVENTURE”

Evan Fortune, 6, Georgia “TYE DYE TABBY CAT”

Marshal Moffatt, 11, Enosburg Falls

“Trick or Treating” Aidia Hunter, 9 BOLTON

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by November 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the December/January double issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM NOVEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

25


Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

Congratulations

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Riddle Search — LET’S EAT Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: Where do ghosts buy their food?

CHOW DAIRY DESSERT DISH

KIDS VT

FAST FOOD FEAST FISH FROZEN FOOD

26 FRUIT

GRAINS MEAT PASTA SANDWICH SOUP STEW

Riddle Answer:

SWEETS TAKEOUT TOAST WHEAT

ANSWERS P. 47

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

AILA lives in Jericho and turns 7 on November 24. The creative first grader loves to dance ballet and jazz, play the violin, conduct kitchen experiments, search for fairies and explore the outdoors.

SHILOH lives in East Calais and turns 11 on November 28. He enjoys playing soccer, seeing live music, skiing, playing drums and reading books from James Patterson’s “I Funny” series. In the fall, he loves to jump in piles of leaves. Untitled-8 1

Logan, Aila and Shiloh win $10 gift cards to Spare Time.

SPARE TIME COLCHESTER • 215 LOWER MOUNTAIN VIEW DRIVE • 802-655-2720 • WWW.SPARETIMECOLCHESTER.COM

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

LOGAN lives in Jericho and turns 6 on November 16. He’s a great reader who likes Pokémon, playing with toy cars and crafting with Perler beads. He really enjoys school and learning to speak Spanish.

Join the Club!

No cash value. Can only be redeemed by Birthday Child’s Parent. Must present Golden Ticket at Birthday Party Check-in Before the start of Birthday Party. One Golden Ticket per birthday party. Book your birthday party and enjoy by: June 30, 2018

and RIVER lives in Georgia 8. She er turns 10 on Novemb y music, pla g, loves to dance, sin ends, fri r he th wi t and hang ou west ne r He . ies pp pu d family an . passion is gymnastics d to River wins a $50 gift car er. est lch Co Spare Time in

to these November Birthday Club winners!

Present this Golden Ticket at the start of your party

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

BIRTHDAY CHILD IS FREE!

Jumble

10/24/17 12:39 PM


2 017 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

CASTING CALL!

VERMONT’S RISING STARS

Auditions held Saturday, November 11, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage. Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act.

SPONSORED BY:


Laughing

A Johnson State College professor traces the origins of humor in babies

Matters

R

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

esearchers have known for years that newborns begin to smile spontaneously at about 6 weeks old, and start laughing at around 4 months. But until recently, the more complex question of when and how infants learn to recognize something as funny remained an unexplored area of academic inquiry. That is, until Dr. Gina Mireault, a developmental psychologist and

28

BY KEN PICARD

professor at Johnson State College, decided to research the topic. A few years ago, she began looking for the earliest emergence of humor recognition in babies to see whether it’s learned or innate behavior. Working with colleagues from the University of Vermont, the University of New Hampshire and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Mireault and her team of student researchers at Johnson State enlisted the help of dozens of new parents and their babies from across Vermont to try to answer those questions. Their findings, which were published online in September in the British Journal of Developmental Psychology, reveal that infants react to humorous situations earlier than was previously assumed. “Long before they speak or crawl or walk, infants laugh,” writes Mireault. Her research found that babies exhibit physiological signs of humor recognition as early as 4 months old and are independently capable of recognizing humor by 5 months. Interestingly, those discoveries were made using little more than a video camera and a red clown nose. A short video of one of the study’s 53 tiny test subjects reveals how those experiments were conducted. “Janie,” a 6-month-old baby girl, sits in a pink high chair at her kitchen table. To her left sits her mother, to her right, an experimenter whom Janie has never met before. (Neither mother nor child are

identified in the video to protect the family’s privacy.) The researcher, an undergraduate psychology student from JSC, begins the experiment by putting a red clown nose on her face, then rhythmically pressing it, each time making a highpitched “beep!” with her mouth. For the first round of nose touches and beeps, Janie’s mother had been instructed beforehand to laugh audibly and point at the researcher. The infant, who initially looks puzzled by the stranger’s odd behavior, looks back and forth between the researcher and her mom, seemingly unsure how to react. Then, after 10 beeps, the baby chuckles hesitantly, mouth agape, still looking at her mother and the stranger as though she’s searching for cues. After 45 seconds, the researcher stops. Next, she begins the second round of nose-touching and beeping, only this time Janie’s mom has been instructed to watch the researcher with an emotionless face. In this round, Janie watches the nose touches and beeps more intently than before. Then, after four or five beeps, she begins smiling spontaneously, again looking at her mom and the researcher. The big reveal comes when Janie, who is fixated on the beeping red nose, smiles independently and lets out a loud guffaw, then looks at her mom, who is still watching straight-faced. Janie immediately stops smiling, as though her mom’s flat affect silently instructed her to do the same. The clip — an excerpt of a longer video — lasts just 78 seconds. The excerpt doesn’t include a second


PHOTOS: DREAMSTIME

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

LAUGHING MATTERS, P. 30 »

KIDSVT.COM

Long before they speak or crawl or walk, infants laugh.

were outfitted with heart monitors to determine whether they had a physiological response to humor stimuli. The results, Mireault said, were intriguing. Although the 4-montholds didn’t laugh at the humorous events when their parents’ faces were neutral, she reported, their heart rate decreased measurably. Mireault called this finding “fascinating for lots of reasons.” First, it told her that the 4-montholds were able to detect the humorous event as distinct from other, normal events. Second, a decelerated heart rate is typically associated with pleasurable emotions such as joy. In this case, Mireault drew from prior research done by Dr. Stephen Porges, a research professor at the UNC School of Medicine, who asserts that a decreased heart rate preps the body for an imminent emotional response. Mireault theorizes that the infants’ decelerated heart rate enables them to maintain their attention on

“absurd” event — the researcher own laughter became the most salient wearing a book or cup as a hat while factor in the child’s humor response. saying the word “zoop!” Nor does Still, Mireault wanted to press the it include a control event, in which question further: Are 6-month-olds the experimenter does something simply picking up cues from others? ordinary — narrates playing with a To find out, Mireault repeated the ball or drinks from a cup — that’s not experiment with 5-month-olds. At the intended to elicit laughter. time, she assumed the younger babies “I was certain that there’s no way wouldn’t find the nonsensical nose these babies were going to laugh beeping funny on their own. unless their parents were laughing. “Again,” she said, “I was wrong.” But we found just the opposite,” Indeed, the 5-month-olds Mireault explained in a phone interlaughed spontaneously just as the view with Kids VT. 6-month-olds “When the parents did. So Mireault were neutral, the lowered the age of infants cracked her subjects even up at these events. further and tried it And they didn’t do with 4-month-olds. it with the ordinary Again, she assumed DR. GINA MIREAULT event. They only did “there’s no way” it with the humorinfants that young ous event.” could indepenIf the parents laughed, Mireault dently recognize humor. continued, the babies laughed even This time, however, Mireault harder and were more likely to look added another component to the exto their parents for confirmation. In periments. Thanks to some additional those situations, she says, the parents’ grant money, all the 4-month-olds

the event and thus “primes them” to experience it as a joyful emotion — in this case, humor. By 5 months old, babies are laughing spontaneously at the nonsensical nose beeps — and their heart rate similarly decelerates, which she confirmed with follow-up studies using heart monitors. “I love the process of discovery, that ‘Eureka!’ moment,” Mireault said. “Whenever it happens, it’s like Christmas morning.” A developmental psychologist, Mireault first became curious about the origins of humor about two decades ago, when her own kids were young. (They’re now in their 20s.) At the time, she was conducting research at “the other end of the emotional spectrum” — specifically, studying how children cope with the grief of losing a parent. Mireault recalled a moment while riding in the car with her then-3year-old son. Mother and child often played a simile game in which she’d say something like, “I’m hotter than a turkey in the oven.” Then her son would offer a reply like, “I’m hotter than a penny on the sidewalk.” At the time, she and her husband had a running inside joke. Mireault, who didn’t start drinking coffee until her 30s, only drank the sugary coffee-like drinks dispensed from convenience-store machines, which her husband jokingly referred to as “mocha lattes.” One day while playing the word game, Mireault recalls her son offering this unprovoked simile: “I’m hotter than a mocha latte.”

29


Young Rembrandts After school Art Enrichment Drawing Classes for K-6

Laughing Matters CONTINUED FROM P.29

Young Rembrandts teaches drawing skills using a see-touch-do method that all children can succeed with, learn from and love! Students Can Expect - A new exciting lesson every week - Improved core art skills - To have fun! Parents Can Expect - Increased attention to detail - Improved fine motor skills

W nderfeet Kids’ Museum

To learn more or to find a class in your area, link to:

YOUNGREMBRANDTS.COM

a Rutland Creative Economy Initiative

No afterschool drawing classes at your school or in your community? Find out how easy it is to bring our awardwinning, educational, kid-friendly focused program to your location. Contact your local program director, Michelle Kessler at 802.363.7522 or michelle.kessler@youngrembrandts.com

8/25/17 11:43 AM

KIDSVT.COM

10/26/17 Untitled-2 10:26 AM 1

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU, EVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

NOVEMBER 2017

Untitled-2 1

If you’re a family of four with a household income up to $3793/month, or your child is covered by Dr. Dynasaur then WIC is for you. Income guidelines vary based on family size.

WIC provides healthy food, nutrition education, and personalized support to pregnant women, moms and their babies, and kids up to five years old. Come meet with our nutritionists and peer counselors – they’re ready to listen and share information.

KIDS VT

Sign up for WIC today! Call 8OO-649-4357 or visit healthvermont.gov/wic

30

This institution is an equal opportunity provider. Untitled-7 1

4/27/17 11:37 AM

“It really shocked me, first, that he could say ‘mocha latte,’ but also, that he’d picked up that this was an inside joke and he knew it would make me laugh,” Mireault recalled. “That’s a pretty sophisticated skill … and it planted a seed for me.” It would be years before that seed grew and bore fruit. At that time, she noted, humor wasn’t considered a legitimate area of academic research. Instead, psychology focused almost exclusively on negative emotions and pathologies — depression, anxiety, phobias, trauma — and largely ignored positive emotions such as humor, joy, happiness and awe. “If I were in grad school and said I wanted to study humor, people just would not have taken me seriously,” Mireault recalled. “It had no credibility in the field.” Fast forward 10 years. In 2007, Mireault took a one-year sabbatical, during which she changed her research focus to the origins of humor. Intrigued by her son’s mocha latte remark, she wondered: How early do children figure out

what is funny and extract humor from their experiences? What was known at that point? “Not much,” Mireault said. In fact, she could find only one earlychildhood researcher who’d even studied the question: Vasu Reddy, a professor of developmental and cultural psychology at the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom. But Reddy’s test subjects had been at least 8 months old. Mireault decided she wanted to start younger. She quickly discovered yet another reason why there wasn’t more psychological research done previously on little babies: It’s laborious work. Because they’re nonverbal, experiments are inevitably


The Vermont Cub Project

I love the process of discovery, that ‘Eureka!’ moment. Whenever it happens, it’s like Christmas morning.

Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today! Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

Untitled-14 1

6/22/17 2:00 PM

FAMILY FUN TIME AT THE YMCA! • Daily Open Swim and twiceweekly Family Gym. • Member discounts on Swim Lessons, Family Events, Birthday Parties, etc. Free member child care while you workout.

www.gbymca.org Untitled-6 1

Proud of your project?

10/26/17 12:11 PM

KIDSVT.COM NOVEMBER 2017

time and labor intensive, requiring Brook University, Rainville said extensive training of research he is pursuing a research career assistants. in psychology largely due to Student researcher Brady Mireault’s influence. Rainville can attest to that. He Mireault has since moved on joined Mireault’s research lab from her infant humor studies as a freshman in May 2014, and to other areas of early childhood worked with her on several infant development. In a study not yet studies throughout his four years published, for example, she looked at Johnson State. All told, Rainville at the differences between babies’ estimates that he conducted about “verbal engagement” if they’re four dozen transported in home visits with strollers versus Vermonters, backpacks. who’d been Studying infants recruited with between 7 and help from 11 months old, the Vermont a critical time Genetics for language Network. All development, the babies lived Mireault within 50 miles measured the DR. GINA MIREAULT of Johnson, frequency and and the duration of experiments were done in their infant and parent vocalizations, own homes, both to boost the which were harvested from their recruitment of volunteers and respective GoPro camera audio to ensure the babies were in a feeds. familiar environment. For obvious reasons, backpacks “It usually took us about differ from strollers in that the 30 minutes, and then we’d baby is closer to the adult and, as be on our way,” Rainville Mireault points out, the experience recalled. That was assuming, is more shared, not just physically of course, that the babies and aurally but also kinesthetically. weren’t napping, eating, “You can feel their physical enbathing or cranky at the time gagement when they see something of his arrival. and their little limbs start thrash“I was a little worried ing,” Mireault said. “That was a at first, having to work really fun study.” with infants,” Rainville Though the results of that admitted. “I didn’t know experiment confirmed her predichow they’d react to the tion — “the backpacks won,” different experiments. she said, in terms of stimulating But it all went really vocalizations — her research is well.” rarely predictable. Now a graduate “Science always sends you back psychology student to the drawing board,” she said. “It and research assistant always questions what you think at Long Island’s Stony you already know.” K

Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

✱ HABITAT

Habitat celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Do you have a creative space? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com 6h-habitat0317.indd 1

2/23/17 5:26 PM

KIDS VT

Invite us over!

31


PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE LABONTE FAMILY

Special Delivery Lucy’s Love Bus brings integrative therapy to sick children

O

BY MARSHAL D. HANEISEN

ne day in June of 2016, Nicole LaBonte For Spencer, funding from Lucy’s Love Bus noticed that her 4-year-old son, Spencer, helped him attend a summer program through seemed lethargic. When dad Jamie the Colchester Parks and Recreation Department LaBonte picked his son up from daycare because it offered swimming. “He had missed out on the next day, he noticed that the capillaries in the so much as far as socialization with peer-age kids,” whites of Spencer’s eyes had burst. Nicole called the Fortune said. “Being able to go to camp was a huge pediatrician and insisted he be seen that day. benefit to him.” After an examination and several hours in the Nicole agrees. “For the weeks of summer camp, emergency room, Spencer he got to be a 5-year-old,” she was diagnosed with acute said. “To this day, he still talks lymphoblastic leukemia, a about camp. It was scary at type of cancer. first, it kicked his butt, but he “We were exhausted,” was happy. Him going to that said Nicole. “He was sedated program was more than I could for 12 days, and almost give him at home.” died twice. I was working Lucy’s Love Bus also helped overnight shifts while he build a network of support for was in the PICU, and my Spencer; he currently attends an husband was working days. afterschool program with some MASSAGE THERAPIST We barely saw our daughter, of the camp counselors, and ANNETTE MARGOT BROWNE Annaleigh. It was a very hopes to return to camp next difficult time.” summer. And there was a long Spencer undergoes monthly road ahead. Spencer experienced multiple chemotherapy, and his treatment will continue until complications and spent nearly eight 2019. The LaBontes won’t know if he is in remission months in the hospital that first year. until May of 2020, but in the meantime, Nicole and Then the LaBontes heard about a Jamie want to make sure he gets to be a kid. nonprofit organization that would help to “We don’t want him to live in fear of it. We try to lighten their load. Lucy’s Love Bus helps do everything we can to give him the best opportunito fund integrative therapies like massage, ties,” Nicole said. “It is hard to give up your reins of acupuncture, tai chi, music therapy and control when your child is sick. It was really hard specialized camp programs for kids being the first day at camp. But, he looked at me and said, treated for cancer and other illnesses. ‘Mom, I am OK.’” Adam Fortune, a pediatric hematology/ THE BUS GETS ROLLING oncology social worker at the University In 2003, Beecher Grogan’s 8-year-old daughter, of Vermont Children’s Hospital, connected Lucy, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. them to the organization. She received treatment at Tufts Medical Center’s “I always mention Lucy’s Love Bus to Floating Hospital for Children in Boston. Thanks families,” said Fortune. “I find that families to donations from family, friends and community that access the services tend to feel better members, Lucy benefited from a range of integrative about being in the hospital … They also offer therapies including art and music therapy, massage, opportunities that families might have not and therapeutic horseback riding. been able to access without their support.”

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Having someone come into their room, offering something that is therapeutic but nonmedical, can be comforting.

32

Spencer LaBonte and family


PHOTOS COURTESY OF

Lucy Grogan

BEECHER GROGAN

Beecher Grogan visiting Lucy’s Love Bus patient Hailey Giguere

KIDS VT

SPECIAL DELIVERY, P. 34 »

NOVEMBER 2017

Children receive a range of therapeutic services through Lucy’s Love Bus

died, in 2006. As for the name, Lucy chose it “because she wanted her program to deliver love, comfort and quality of life to children with cancer,” Grogan said. Grogan took three years to grieve before actively pursuing the Love Bus mission. During that time, she put the $2,000 that remained from the money family and friends had raised for Lucy’s therapies, along with leftover funeral-cost donations, into savings. While Grogan struggled with her loss, she saw that Lucy’s friends were also struggling. “I went to a New Year’s Eve party at [Lucy’s] best friend’s house. I was downstairs with the parents and very uncomfortable. People didn’t know how to behave around me. So I went up to where the kids were and squeezed between two of her friends,” Grogan said. “We talked about Lucy’s Love Bus, and I asked the kids, ‘What should we do? Do they want to help?’ They all said yes. They were the original Love Squad.” In 2010, with the help of a local business, three moms and 15 of Lucy’s teenage friends, Lucy’s Love Bus organized a grassroots music festival in Amesbury, Mass., where the organization is based. They tie-dyed

KIDSVT.COM

One day, Lucy asked Grogan why other kids in the hospital weren’t participating in these activities, too. When her mom explained that they weren’t covered by the hospital or insurance, Lucy was surprised. She believed every kid should have access to therapies that helped her deal with the physical pain of treatment and the emotional pain of losing so many friends to cancer — 22 by the time she was 11 years old. That’s when the wheels started turning on the Lucy’s Love Bus project. Grogan explained that many of the families they met were raising money for a cure for cancer. “But one day Lucy said to me, ‘What about us? A cure is not going to help us.’” Knowing that for many kids the cure would come too late, Lucy’s concern was the quality of life and comfort of her fellow cancer patients; that they had a chance “to run around and to be reminded of what it is like to be a happy, healthy kid, even for a short period of time,” said Grogan. Mother and daughter started to shape the program’s mission about six weeks before Lucy

33


Your local children’s resale boutique, buying and selling your favorite brands at preferred prices.

Special Delivery

CONTINUED FROM P. 33

bohobabyvt@gmail.com 802-764-3023 • www.bohobabyvt.com Visit us in our NEW LOCATION at THE BARNS AT LANG FARM! 43 Upper Main St Suite 101, Essex Jct, VT 05452 find us on facebook & instagram

Genlty-loved clothing & paraphernalia for little free thinkers k12h-BohoBaby1117.indd 1

10/23/17 12:17 PM

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA WARRIOR Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

FREESTYLE, PARKOUR AND NINJA WARRIOR TRAINING! Visit us at the Kids VT Camp Fair in February!

Beecher Grogan with daughter Lucy

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454 k6h-GMTC1017.indd 1

9/25/17 5:56 PM

Jamie Two Coats Toyshop

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

20% off any ONE item in store with this ad

THE VERMONT CONNECTION

Wee-Mail!

k6h-JamieTwoCoats-1115.indd 11 k6h-JamieTwoCoats1117.indd

10/26/17 10/14/15 10:14 2:24 PM AM

Find information about local events and parenting resources every Thursday in the Kids VT Wee-Mail. Visit kidsvt.com/wee-mail to subscribe today.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Located in the ❤ of Shelburne Village Monday-Saturday 10-6 Sunday 11-5 802-985-3221

shirts, released thousands of monarch butterflies, and raised $57,000 for the organization. That same year, someone donated a 1970 Volkswagen bus. Volunteers raised money to renovate and decorate it, and the promotional Lucy’s Love Bus that appears in parades, expos and fundraising events was born. Soon after its inception, the organization began funding integrative therapies such as massage, acupuncture, yoga, horseback-riding therapy, swimming and music therapy for pediatric oncology patients in hospitals throughout New England.

Wee-Mail sponsored by:

34 12h-Wee-Mail1117.indd 1

10/26/17 2:49 PM

Lucy’s Love Bus has local ties: Cofounder Beecher Grogan is a Burlington native who attended the University of Vermont. Over the past two years, the organization has provided more than 160 patients at the UVM Children’s Hospital with services like massage, yoga and music therapy. Annette Margot Browne is a certified pediatric massage therapist who limits her massage practice to

Lucy’s Love Bus patients at UVM Children’s Hospital. She started in 2011, when a pediatric oncology social worker referred one of her 10-year-old PICU patients to Browne. “I was privileged to offer this very courageous and spunky character massage on that day, and then ... until the time she passed away,” Browne said. Massage for pediatric patients is very different from a spa massage, Browne said, explaining that many of the children have multiple health issues. Kids sometimes have IV poles and lines for medication or fluid, and can’t get out of bed. People entering the room might have to wear hospital gowns and surgical gloves. Browne tailors her approach for each patient and works with the entire care team to understand each child’s special needs. The massage is gentle, sometimes just focusing on the hands and feet. “Often the children and families I see are facing a difficult time during their hospital stay, either emotionally or physically,” she said. “Having someone come into their room, offering something that is therapeutic but nonmedical, can be comforting.”


S AV I N G F O R CO L L E G E S AV I N G F O R CO L L E G E S AV I N G F O R CO L L E G E

With every decision I think, What would Lucy, at age 12, want?

A gift for the kids. A gift for the kids. A Vermont tax credit for you. A gift for the kids. A Vermont tax credit for you.

LUCY’S LOVE BUS FOUNDER BEECHER GROGAN

A Vermont tax credit for you.

Give the gift of future education with GiveVermont the gift of future education with the 529 college savingswith plan. Give the gift of future education the Vermont 529 college savings plan. the Vermont 529 college savings plan.

EXPANDING THE JOURNEY

Open or add to an account at: Openor oradd addto to an an account account at: Open at: vheip.org/529gift

vheip.org/529gift vheip.org/529gift 1-800-637-5860 1-800-637-5860 1-800-637-5860

Administeredbyby Administered Administered by

VHEIP is is sponsored AssistanceCorporation, Corporation,a apublic public nonVHEIP sponsoredby bythe theVermont Vermont Student Student Assistance nonprofit establishedby bythe theVermont Vermont Legislature Legislature in and profit established in 1965 1965to tohelp helpVermont Vermontstudents students and VHEIP is sponsored by the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a public nonfamilies save,plan, plan,and andpay payfor forcollege. college. Before investing families save, investingplease pleaseread readthe thedisclosure disclosure profit established by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermont students and booklet carefully(available (availableonline online at at www.vheip.org www.vheip.org or booklet carefully orby bycalling calling800-637-5860). 800-637-5860). families save, plan, and pay for college. Before investing please read the disclosure booklet carefully (available online at www.vheip.org or by calling 800-637-5860). Untitled-12 1

10/24/17 1:16 PM

KIDS VT

To learn more about Lucy’s Love Bus or donate to the organization, visit lucyslovebus.org.

Give a gift by December 31 Give gift December Give 31 to getaaagift VT by taxDecember credit for31 2017! toget get aa VT VT tax tax credit to credit for for2017! 2017!

NOVEMBER 2017

original members of the Love Squad, have already finished college. But Grogan is committed to the longevity of Lucy’s Love Bus. In 2014, the organization began partnering with schools to educate children and teens about childhood cancer, build empathy and share their mission. Participating schools are assigned a child who is sick — dubbed a Butterfly Buddy — and work to raise money to support that child’s care. To date, 37 schools in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine have participated in the school program, and together have raised $27,000. People often think that working with children who have cancer would be depressing, Grogan said. But she finds it inspiring. Lucy’s legacy drives her passion. “Lucy taught me how to find the silver lining in the most awful of circumstances. She taught me what children need when they are sick, suffering and frightened,” Grogan said. “I work with some of the world’s bravest children and families … These are the children who Lucy loved the most.” K

KIDSVT.COM

When social workers told Grogan that parents of children with other conditions sometimes felt that “the cancer kids get everything,” she saw it as a call to action. “With every decision I think, What would Lucy, at age 12, want?” Grogan said. “Lucy was clear in her mission. She wanted to help all the kids.” So several years ago, Lucy’s Love Bus launched a supplementary program called The Healing Room at UVM Children’s Hospital, as well as at the Floating Hospital in Boston and Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital in Portland, Maine, to expand the availability of integrative therapies to kids being treated for illnesses other than cancer. The Healing Room is not an actual room; it refers to creating room for healing. Through funding from Lucy’s Love Bus, practitioners visit hospitals and provide therapies such as bedside massage, meditation and music therapy. If it is a quiet day, they sometimes offer therapies to patients’ family members as well. It’s been 11 years since Lucy passed away. Her childhood friends, some of whom were

Students with even a small amount of savings are Students with even a small amount of savings are three times more likely to go on to college or training Students with even a small amount of savings are three times more likely to go on to college or training after high school. 529 three times moreVermont’s likely to gostate-sponsored on to college or training after high school. Vermont’s state-sponsored 529 college savings program makes it easy to get 529 started. after high school. Vermont’s state-sponsored college easy to get started. You cansavings open anprogram accountmakes with just $25to orget contribute college savings program makes itit easy started. You can account with just $25 $25 orcontribute contribute any toan a friend’s family’s account. Plus, the Youamount canopen open an accountor with just or any amount to a friend’s or family’s account. Plus, the Vermont Higher plan is thethe only any amount to aEducation friend’s orInvestment family’s account. Plus, Vermont Higher Education Investment plan theonly only Vermont Higher Education Investment the college savings plan that qualifies for aplan 10%isis Vermont college plan qualifies foraa10% 10%Vermont Vermont collegesavings savings plan that qualifies for income tax credit on that annual contributions. incometax taxcredit credit on on annual annual contributions. income contributions.

35


CALENDAR

SPONSORED BY:

NOVEMBER

Gobble Gobble What do gobblers eat for Thanksgiving? Preschoolers and their parents hit the trail to learn more about these wild birds at LET’S TALK TURKEYS, Thursday, November 16, 9-10:30 a.m., at the Green Mountain Audubon Center in Huntington.

Week to Week SAT

KIDSVT.COM

NOV 11

SATSUN

THUR NOV 23

Waitsfield Ski & Skate Sale: Families get ready for winter by purchasing new and used gear. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at Waitsfield Elementary School. Zack’s Place Turkey Trot: A scenic 5K walk/run raises funds for a free enrichment center serving community members with special needs. 10 a.m. at Woodstock Elementary School.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

NOV 11-12

Kids VT Spectacular Spectacular Auditions: Creative kiddos try out for a spot in the December 9 Spectacular Spectacular youth talent show. Preregister at kidsvt.com/vermont/ SpectacularSpectacular/Page for an audition slot between noon and 3 p.m. Higher Ground, South Burlington.

36

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

1 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Dia de los Muertos: Crafty youngsters create paper skulls in celebration of this Mexican holiday and savor snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Game Day: Grown-ups and youngsters rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Free meals available for ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players put their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences students coach elementary-age kids in reading, math and science. Grades 1-6. Some assistance available for other grades in certain subjects with inquiry. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregister online. Info, 878-6956. FREE Reading Buddies: Little literati pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE Studio Ghibli: ‘Spirited Away’: This dubbed fantasy film features a courageous young girl, who calls upon secret creatures and sorcery to save her parents. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m., $12.50. Info, 864- 5610.

Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with a professional instructor. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect investigations to wilderness skills. Ages 6-8. Parent attendance optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Babytime: Infants through pre-walkers have a ball with books, rhymes, songs and socializing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

MILTON COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER: The community shares a

ZACK’S PLACE TURKEY TROT: This scenic

seeking fresh air choose from a 10K or 3K race on rural roads, with medals for age-group winners and home-baked treats for sale. A 100-yard Tot Trot is geared toward the littlest athletes. Registration opens at 8:30 a.m.; race begins at 10 a.m. Westford School, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 10 A.M., $12 for preregistration; $15 on race day. Info, 879-5726. TURKEY SKATE: Kids of all ages work up

an appetite by whizzing and whirling on ice. Stowe Arena, THURSDAY, NOV. 23, 10 A.M.-NOON., $3-5; $5 skate rental. Info, 253-3054.

Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Second Thursdays feature Spanish music with Constancia Gomez. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE

TURKEY TROT: A quarter-mile kids’ race starts the fun at 10:45 a.m., just before the 5K jaunt. Registration opens at 10 a.m. UVM Gutterson Field House, Burlington, THURSDAY, NOV. 23, 11 A.M., suggested donation $5; $10 per family; or non-perishable items for the Chittenden Food Shelf.

WESTFORD TURKEY TROT: Families

Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FREE

eat for Thanksgiving? Preschoolers and their parents hit the trail to learn more about these wild birds. Ages 3-5 with adult. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 9-10:30 A.M., $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

traditional hot turkey meal together. Milton Middle School, THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 4:30-7 P.M., donations appreciated. Info, 893-3210. FREE

Hinesburg Lego Club: Imaginative kids get creative with colorful blocks. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE

FRANKLIN Fairfax PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while listening to stories. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420.

Thanksgiving Events

LET’S TALK TURKEYS: What do gobblers

Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

5K walk/run raises funds for a free enrichment center serving community members with special needs. Live music, hot chocolate and coffee add to the holiday festivities. Woodstock Elementary School, THURSDAY, NOV. 23, 10 A.M., $30-35. Info, 457-5868. THANKSGIVING WEEKEND: This working farm showcases Turkey Day traditions from 1890, including holiday food activities and wagon rides towed by a team of draft horses. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, NOV. 24-26, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. TURKEYS & TURKEY VULTURES: Avian admirers give thanks for these wild feathered friends, take note of their similarities and differences and visit with a live vulture. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Regular museum admission, $13-15; free for kids under 4. Info, 359-5000.

St. Albans Circle of Parents for Foster & Adoptive Families: Parents share childrearing stories to strengthen skills and build strong families. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 524-1700. FREE WASHINGTON Kids Cartooning Club: In this six-week program, aspiring artists get going with a mini-lesson, then free draw their own creations. Ages 8-12. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:30-11:15 a.m., $12 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

3 Friday CHITTENDEN Baby Yoga: Mamas and papas stretch themselves and their wee ones, strengthening general health and gross motor skills. Ages 1 and under. Jericho Town Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregistration required. Info, 899-4686. FREE Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.

KIDS VT

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: Busy kiddos create with plastic blocks, inspired by a weekly theme. Ages 6 and up; children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Follows the school calendar. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: Wee ones explore selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $5. Info, 457-3500.

CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: Fledgling architects construct collaboratively with colorful blocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

Colchester Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking toys. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

NOVEMBER 2017

Music & Movement With Ellie: Toddlers and preschoolers jump around to jolly tunes. Ages 5 and under. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

WASHINGTON Walk-Through Wednesday at Orchard Valley: Parents checking out an alternative eduction for their children tour classrooms for grades 1-8, a mixed-age kindergarten and the Farm & Forest program. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 8:30-10:30 a.m.; preregister by noon on the preceding day. Info, 456-7400. FREE

2 Thursday

Coding Club: Young hacks tackle complex computer questions. Grades 4 and up. Charlotte Public Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE

KIDSVT.COM

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: Expectant mamas work out together, preparing for labor with cardio, strength, stretching and breathing. Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 288-1141. FREE

ORLEANS Day of the Dead Celebration: Community members make merry at this Mexican holiday with games, crafts, face painting and a traditional treat of tamales and tacos. Attendees welcome to bring images of lost loved ones (including pets) for the ancestral shrine. WonderArts Vermont, Greensboro, 5-7 p.m. Info, 533-2200. FREE

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual Town Hall with Lieutenant Governor Zuckerman: Politically-minded people attend an online town hall-style meeting and ask questions of Vermont’s lieutenant governor, with particular input from school-age children. Various locations, 1-2 p.m. Info, 299-9642. FREE

Wednesday Story Time: Little listeners lap up timeless tales and new adventures. Ages 6 and under. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 872-7111. FREE

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE

3 FRIDAY, P.38

37


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR NOVEMBER 3 Friday (cont.) Family Wheel Drop-In: Parents and kids form clay sculptures with assistance from staff and try out the pottery wheel. All ages. BCA Studios, Burlington, 5-7 p.m., $9-10 per participant; $5 additional for each piece fired and glazed. Info, 865-7157. Harry Potter Trivia: Potter fans team together and answer tough questions to take home cool prizes, while consuming Hogwarts-themed snacks. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:30 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4:30-6 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Music with Raf: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Music With Robert: Families sing along with a local legend. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents mark National Peanut Butter Lovers’ Month, brainstorm library projects and play Truth or Dare. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE FRANKLIN Movie Matinee: Dim the lights and pass the popcorn for a playful flick. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

ORLEANS Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

38

WASHINGTON Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Vegetarian dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m., RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE WINDSOR Branch Out Teen Night: Teens have time together while tackling a gallery scavenger hunt and art activities. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 6-9:45 p.m. Info, 457-3500. FREE

4 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: Locally-produced crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, handmade crafts, meat and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of Vermont wares. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. FREE CHITTENDEN Bonfire Night Story Time: Families celebrate this British holiday with stories and a sparkler craft. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Cookies With Cookie: Story Time at Phoenix in Essex: Visiting with her rescue dog, Vermont author Lynda Graham-Barber shares her new picture book with youngsters and serves up sweets. Ages 6 and under. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 872-7111. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $15. Info, 899-0339. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon.; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Move, Make & Learn: A Taste of Waldorf: Prospective families check out the Waldorf curriculum, tour the campus and classrooms and get questions answered. Grades 1-8. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 10 a.m.-noon., RSVP. Info, 985-2827.

Live Performances

‘MISS NELSON IS MISSING’: Theatreworks

USA amuses the audience with a song-and-dance version of Henry Allard’s classic story about a softhearted teacher replaced by a stern substitute. Grades K-5. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, SUNDAY, NOV. 5, 3 P.M., $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422.

MAY ERLEWINE: This well-known

Midwest singer-songwriter celebrates the release of her 10th album, Mother Lion, featuring melodic and uplifting original songs. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8, 7:30 P.M., $20; preregister; tickets limited. Info, 985-9200.

‘A CHRISTMAS STORY THE MUSICAL’: The

Lyric Theatre starts off the holiday season with singing and dancing set in the 1940s Midwest, when a boy tries to convince his parents to let him have a Red Ryder BB gun. With a large cast, including 13 youth and teens, this local production enchants the audience with classic stories by Jean Shepard. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, THURSDAY,

NOV. 9, 7:30 P.M., FRIDAY, NOV. 10, 7:30 P.M., SATURDAY, NOV. 11, 2 & 7:30 P.M., AND SUNDAY, NOV. 12, 2 & 6:30 P.M., $24-42. Info,

863-5966.

Saturday Drama Club: Junior thespians create a character, spin a story and put on a performance, all in three hours. Ages 7-11. Old North End Community Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $15. Info, 355-1461. Vermont Children’s Theater on Ice Open House: Young skaters learn about team figure skating, socialize, savor ice cream sundaes and check out costumes. Participants must be able to skate backward. Leddy Park Arena, Burlington, 3 p.m. FREE Williston Craft Show: Over 100 artists and speciality vendors showcase their handmade holiday wares, with a children’s crafting corner. Williston Central School, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 871-6001. FREE FRANKLIN Little Explorer Nature Adventure Program: Eager naturalists-in-training search out the secrets of the world with Kurt Valenta and his hands-on nature approach, in various community sites during the school year. Ages 3-10 with parent participation. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9:15 a.m.; preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE RUTLAND Cookies with Cookie: Story Time at Phoenix in Rutland: Visiting with her rescue dog, Vermont author Lynda Graham-Barber shares her new picture book with youngsters and serves up sweets. Phoenix Books, Rutland, 3-4 p.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE

‘A BETTER PLACE, A TWIST ON OLIVER’:

Vermont Youth Dancers, including elementary through high school students, enchant an audience of all ages with Charles Dickens’ classic tale of a young orphan in search of her forever family. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 3-5 P.M., $18-22. Info, 899-4976.

Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

‘A GIFT FAR GREATER’: Music aficionados applaud the Montpelier Chamber Orchestra Fall Concert, including a performance of Amahl and the Night Visitors, a one-act opera. Montpelier City Hall, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 7 P.M. AND SUNDAY, NOV. 19, 4 P.M., reservations recommended. HOPSTOP: JASON TARDY, JUGGLER: This one-man show tosses it all in the air — toilet plungers, yoga balls, ladders, even himself — with some audience participation, too. Ages 3 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 11 A.M. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE ACROBATS & WARRIORS OF TIANJIN, CHINA:

More than 50 artists mesmerize fans with high-flying acrobatics, illusions, martial arts, juggling, contortion tricks and feats of balance. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, FRIDAY, NOV. 24, 3 & 7 P.M., $20-55; free children’s ticket with each adult ticket. Info, 760-4634. ‘THE NUTCRACKER’: Professionals

from the Albany Berkshire Ballet and local dance students visit the Land of Sweets and conquer the Mouse King in this beloved holiday classic. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, SATURDAY, NOV.

25, 3 & 7 P.M AND SUNDAY, NOV. 26, 1 P.M..

$19-42.50. Info, 863-5966.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than fifty vendors peddle produce, from fresh salad greens to apples and cider, alongside artisan cheese, homemade bread and other local products. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727. WASHINGTON Kung Fu: Athletes of all ages and abilities develop sound mind and body skills through traditional instruction. Ages 7 and up. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $10 suggested donation. Info, 505-1688. Mountainfilm on Tour: Film lovers feast on diverse documentaries curated from the Mountainfilm festival held every year in Telluride, Colorado, while a presenter provides program insights. Doors open at 6 p.m.; show runs from 7-10 p.m. Ages 9 and up. Big Picture Theater, Waitsfield, 6 p.m., $12-20; $50 per family of four. Info, 496-3372. River of Light Lantern-Making Workshop: Families craft magical willow-and-tissuepaper lights in preparation for Waterbury’s River of Light Community Lantern Procession. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Thatcher Brook Primary School, Waterbury, 10 a.m.-noon & 1-3 p.m.; preregistration required. FREE


New American Thanksgiving: Completing the Cycles of Life: Author and storyteller Michael Caduto entertains an audience of all ages with dramatic characters and animal voices, inviting participation in songs, chants and dance from the Native peoples of North America. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, 2-3 p.m. Info, 457-2295. FREE Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 384-7447.

5 Sunday CHITTENDEN Burlington Rising: Learn the Secrets of Challah Braiding: Experienced bakers share with curious chefs their culinary secrets of this traditional Jewish bread prepared to honor the Sabbath and holidays. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14. Info, 655-3300. Family Gym: See November 3. Kids African Dance Class: Simbo Camara from Guinea guides youngsters through merry movements accompanied by live percussion. Ages 5-12. Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m., $12. Info, 859-1802.

Sunday Concert: The acoustic trio DaddyLonglegs mesmerizes the audience with a musical afternoon of folk songs, Celtic, old-timey melodies and more. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Info, 899-5433. FREE

5 SUNDAY, P.40

more comfortable pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring your body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Sundays, 10:15 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Saturdays, 11:30 am; Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 10 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Fridays, noon (postnatal core).  Drop-ins welcome; $15/class, $130/10 class pass, or $75/monthly unlimited. Location: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington.  Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339

EVOKIDS SATURDAY DROP-IN YOGA AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER:  Drop into our

kids yoga class for ages 3-7 for some fun yoga poses, games and mindfulness activities. 11:45 a.m.12:30 p.m. $15/class, $65/5 class pass. Location:  Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington.  Info: 899-0339, evolutionprenatalandfamily.com

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation depends on the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes selfesteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@ bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

SPONSORED BY:

Nov. 11th, 9 am – 5 pm Nov. 12th, 10 am – 2 pm Waitsfield Elementary School Find new and used winter gear for skiers and riders of all ages. Consignment drop-off: Nov. 10, 4–7pm Waitsfield Elementary School (WES) Pre-register at WES: FIND US Nov. 6–10, 7:45am-3pm 802-496-3643 www.waitsfieldschool.org

Untitled-16 1

W

I TW A H

LL

U YO

9/28/17 11:54 AM

? R E

V O ISC

D

140+Hands-On Exhibits Daily Activities Featured Exhibitions David Goudy Science Park Nature Trails Live Animals This winter, come see the exhibition Playing Around: Engineering and Toys

KIDS VT

West African Song Class: Music lovers raise their voices with Seny Daffe from Guinea and learn authentic melodies of West African tribes. Ages 5-12. Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler, Burlington, 3-4 p.m., $12. Info, 859-1802.

PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Have a

NOVEMBER 2017

Vermont Day School Open House: Prospective parents mingle with teachers and check out educational options for grades K-8. Ages 5 and up. Vermont Day School, Shelburne, 3-6 p.m.; preregister. Info, 985-5150. FREE

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by November 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

KIDSVT.COM

Kids African Drum Class: Guinea-based Chimie Bangoura gets young musicians banging the beat of West African rhythms. Ages 5-12. Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler, Burlington, 1:45-2:45 p.m., $12. Info, 859-1802.

Classes

PTA ield itsf Wa

WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon., $20 per parentchild pair; $5 per additional family member. Info, 457-3500.

WWW.MONTSHIRE.ORG 802.649.2200

Untitled-3 1

39 10/26/17 Untitled-7 10:28 AM KidsVT Ad -1Outline.indd 1

10/26/2017 10/26/17 12:34:14 1:36 PMPM


Science & Nature NATURE’S FOOTPATH: A COMMUNITY WALKING PROGRAM: Woods lovers of all

abilities enjoy an informative wander. Wear hiking boots; pack water and a snack. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1, 8:30-11 A.M., $5. Info, 253-6138. SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO: Preschoolers rally ‘round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 10:30 A.M. AND WEDNESDAY, NOV. 29, 10:30 A.M. THROUGH NOV. 8. Regular museum

admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. A DAY FOR TOYS!: Kids of all ages take

apart, create and hack toys, investigating the science and engineering of childhood objects in conjunction with the museum’s temporary exhibit examining playthings. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 11 A.M.-3 P.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. KINDRED SPIRITS: NATIVE WAYS AND GIVING NATURE THANKS: Families explore

traditions of living in balance, through a harvest adventure highlighting the interdependence of all living things and exploring gratitude, as taught by Native cultures found throughout North America. Grafton Ponds Nordic Center, SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 10-11:30 A.M., By donation; RSVP. Info, 843-2111. MOONLIT WAGON RIDES: Giddyup! Visitors

take a rolling tour under the night sky, then head back to the farm’s Education Center for light snacks and activities. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 5:15, 6, 6:45 & 7:30 P.M., $7-10; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

NOVEMBER WEEKENDS: As the season winds down, the livestock barns, 1890 farmhouse and exhibits keep their doors open, with daily activities and programs. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 10

40

MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATIONS AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM: Curious families

discover the mysteries of hidden worlds using hand lenses and microscopes. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SUNDAY, NOV. 5, 11-11:30 A.M. AND FRIDAY, NOV. 24, 11-11:30 A.M. Regular museum

admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

BOOKS AND BEYOND! SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Children’s literature and

hands-on science activities engage eager youngsters. Ages 3-5 with caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, MONDAY, NOV. 6, 10:15 & 11:30 A.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. NATIONAL STEM/STEAM DAY: Curious children of all ages investigate science, technology, engineering, art and math in this all-day event, through activities including making a jigsaw puzzle, coding with minibots, learning about marine life in the Champlain Sea Tank and exploring exhibits with scavenger hunts. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Regular museum admission, $11.5014.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. SCIENCE MUSEUM DAY AT ECHO: This

all-day event celebrates the wonder, excitement and educational experiences of science museums, with activities for all ages, including coding minibots in the new Innovation Playground Makerspace, marine biology exploration in the Champlain Sea Tank, pint-sized experiments for wee ones and scavenger hunts in all exhibits. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, FRIDAY, NOV. 10, 10 A.M.-5 P.M. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

scientists explore a range of topics, from extracting DNA to making batteries. Ages 9 and up. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SUNDAY, NOV. 5, 3-3:45 P.M., SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 3-3:45 P.M. AND FRIDAY, NOV. 24, 3-3:45 P.M. Regular museum

admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

NOV. 11, 11-11:30 A.M. AND SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 11-11:30 A.M. Regular museum

admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. SKULLS AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM:

Naturalists of all ages study New England wildlife through skeletal remains. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SUNDAY, NOV. 12, 11-11:30 A.M. AND SUNDAY, NOV. 26, 11-11:30 A.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. MONTSHIRE MAKERS: Middle school

inventors use their imagination and the museum’s materials to create cool projects, with different monthly themes. Grades 6-9. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, FRIDAY, NOV. 17, 6:30-8 P.M., $8-15; preregistration encouraged. Info, 649-2200. HOOPSTER GLIDERS AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM: Creativity soars as kids design

and build a flying contraption from folded paper. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 11-11:30 A.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. STICK-SEASON BIRD MONITORING WALK:

Birders of all experience levels figure out who’s sticking around in the woods for the winter. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 8-10 A.M., donations appreciated. Info, 434-3068. WONDERS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM: Author David A. Aguilar shares his book about Pluto and searching for the mysterious Planet 9, followed by a 2 p.m. talk, Q&A and signing. Seating limited for talk. Ages 5 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 1:30-3:30 P.M. Info, 748-2372. FREE COLOR MIXING AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM:

Curious families experiment with blending primary colors into brand-new hues. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SUNDAY, NOV. 19, 11-11:30 A.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

glasses to investigate symmetry and turn shapes into complex and captivating patterns. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SUNDAY, NOV. 19, 3-3:30 P.M. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

LAB COAT INVESTIGATIONS: Young

and fly their own aircraft. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY,

MIRROR, MIRROR AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM: Inquisitive ones use looking

A.M.-4 P.M. AND FRIDAY, NOV. 10, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. THROUGH NOV. 19. Regular museum

TOUR THE COSMOS: This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 1:30 P.M., $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

STRAW ROCKETS AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM: Fanciers of flight fashion

BIRD-MONITORING WALK: Eagle-eyed FOSSILS AT THE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM:

Intrepid ancient history buffs check out the museum’s collection of fossils and use clues to uncover their origins. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich,

SATURDAY, NOV. 11, 3-3:30 P.M. AND SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 3-3:30 P.M. Regular

museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

HAWKS, OWLS & FALCONS: Avian aficio-

nados drop in and meet live raptors. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, NOV. 11, 10 A.M.-1 P.M., $5-6; preregistration encouraged. Info, 985-8686.

participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Please bring your own binoculars. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 8-9 A.M., donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE

SLED DOGS AT ECHO: This hardworking, gentle and loyal breed shows their stuff. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 11 A.M., 12:30 & 2 P.M. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

CALENDAR NOVEMBER 5 Sunday (cont.) WASHINGTON Earthwalk Community Day Harvest Celebration: Outdoor enthusiasts of all ages enjoy nature games, fireside crafts, skills and stories, and savor hearty soup and earth-oven baked bread. EarthWalk Vermont, Plainfield, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 454-8500. FREE

6 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Essentials of Waldorf Education: Led by Abigail Diehl-Noble, Lake Champlain’s high school English literature teacher, this evening explores the vision and philosophy between Waldorf education and childhood development. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 7-8:30 p.m., RSVP. Info, 985-2827, ext. 212. Go Club: Game lovers get into the action of this 4,000-year-old strategy pastime. Best for grades 1 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Lego Robotics: Mark Sherwin of SciTech4Kids teaches eager engineers simple programming and how to make a robot with Lego Mindstorms. Grades 3-5. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3-4:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Milton Circle of Parents: Moms and dads come together to strengthen parenting skills and socialize, with a focus on guardianship. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Pajama Story Time: Flannel-clad wee ones tote their stuffed toys for tales. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 2, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE WASHINGTON Capoeira: Families train together in this Afro-Brazilian martial art which combines dance, acrobatics and music. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 4:30-5:30 p.m., $10. Info, 244-8134. Kids Yoga: Young yogis stretch for strength and flexibility, building focus and self-esteem. Ages 5-12. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 3:30-4:15 p.m., $10. Info, 244-8134. Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: Little explorers and their caregivers discover the sights and sounds of the forest and field, while learning how the natural environment can be used as an adventurous classroom. Dress in outdoor clothing. Ages 5 and under. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon, donations welcome. Info, 229-6206.


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

7 Tuesday

8 Wednesday

CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: Young artists involve their imaginations with recycled materials. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

CHITTENDEN Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick Falling Over Sideways by Jordan Sonnenblick. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660.

Family Game Day: See November 1.

FREE

Library Elementary Event Planners: Young library helpers plan activities and partake of an early Thanksgiving celebration, including a pie-eating contest. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 4:30-6 p.m. Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Winooski Lego Club: Budding builders bust out plastic-block creations with the weekly Lego challenge. Free meals available for ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: Gamers of all abilities team up for card playing. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE

Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around their favorite pick of the year. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See November 1. Lake Champlain Waldorf High School Visiting Morning: Parents and their prospective high school students take a tour of the campus, experience a sampling of classes and meet teachers. Lake Champlain Waldorf High School, Shelburne, 8:30-10 a.m., RSVP. Info, 495-0834, ext. 102.

CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from forests and trees to wildlife tracking. Ages 9-12. Parent attendance is optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Babytime: See November 2. Colchester Lego Club: See November 2. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Little literati chat about DCF pick The Wild Robot by Peter Brown. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Homeschool Project Day: Out-of-classroom students partake of projects together. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See November 1. Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Read to a Dog: Pet-lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Wednesday Story Time: See November 1. Yoga for Kids: See November 1. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See November 1.

FREE

Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See November 2. Spanish Storytime: Wee ones and caregivers cozy in for stories, songs and games en Español. Ages 5 and under. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 2. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 2.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1.

Special Playgroup With Mr. K.: Special guest Mr. K. from Exordium Adventures leads little ones on a scavenger hunt for shapes. Ages 5 and under. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

WASHINGTON Kids Cartooning Club: See November 2.

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See November 1.

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual College Fair: Prospective college students and their parents chat with admission reps from the comfort of their computer screen. See http://www.snowyowltutoring.com for specific school and program info. Various Locations. Info, 299-9642. FREE

RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists of all skill levels partner up for playing. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

FREE

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See November 1. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See November 1.

9 Thursday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 2.

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See November 2.

10 Friday CHITTENDEN Family Gym: See November 3. Family Painted Pottery: Parents and kids pick up brushes together in an imaginative evening. Ages 5 and up. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person. Info, 425-2700. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 3.

ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 4. CHITTENDEN EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See November 4. Family Game Afternoon: Pierson Library takes over the town hall tabletops with board challenges for all ages and abilities. Shelburne Town Hall, 1:30-4 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Holiday ArtFest: The Milton Artists’ Guild starts off the giving season with a selection of local crafts, including jewelry, paintings, photography and more. Festive live music and good eats add to the fun. MAG Art Center & Gallery, Milton, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Free admission. Kids VT Spectacular Spectacular Auditions: Creative kiddos try out for a spot in the December 9th Spectacular Spectacular youth talent show. Ages 5-13; preregister on the website to receive a time slot between noon-3 p.m. Higher Ground, South Burlington. FREE Meet the Grinch: Seuss-lovers enjoy a photo-opt with the meanest and greenest character. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 872-7111. FREE Movies at the Library: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday Drama Club: See November 4. Workshop: Holiday in Clay: Amateur artists fabricate a festive snowflake lantern. Shelburne Craft School, 10 a.m.-noon., $10; preregister. Info, 985-3648. FRANKLIN Leaf Art: Mr. K from Exordium entertains novice naturalists in this drop-in science and art program. Ages 2 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m.; preregistration encouraged. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4.

11 SATURDAY, P.42

KIDS VT

WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: Junior builders bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4, 3-6 p.m.

St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

11 Saturday

NOVEMBER 2017

Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Sewing Club: Aspiring seamstresses make accessory holders in a two-part class. Ages 8 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

ORLEANS Lego Club: See November 3.

KIDSVT.COM

Mommy and Me Tumble Time: While moms work out for 30 minutes, little ones are entertained, then everyone joins in for child-centered exercise. No charge for class; childcare is $3. Raw Strength and Fitness, St. Albans, 9:30-10:30 a.m., $3. Info, 288-1141.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1.

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Hinesburg Lego Club: See November 2.

Lake Champlain Waldorf School Visiting Morning: Parents interested in an alternative education for their children in grades 1-8 visit the Turtle Lane Campus classes, followed by conversation and questions. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 8:30-10 a.m., RSVP. Info, 985-2827, ext. 212.

One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

41


New Parents BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE: This mother-infant group

includes baby massage and post-partum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-

to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 10:15-11:45 A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30-1:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M., AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M.12:30 P.M. THROUGH NOV. 16, $15 or $130

for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

MIDDLEBURY LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING AND PLAYGROUP: Families with infants

very small ones support each other, with assistance from staff. Birth Journeys, Burlington, FIRST AND THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M., suggested donation $3. Info, 233-7909. BOSOM BUDDIES: New and expectant

mothers, babies and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin,

MONTH, 10 A.M. FREE

toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE

Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, MONDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M, AND SATURDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M. THROUGH NOV. 16, $15. Info, 829-0211.

Info, 371-4415. FREE

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of

PRENATAL YOGA: Expectant mamas ease

pregnancy through breath work, poses and preparation for labor and delivery, in a safe and supportive atmosphere. Iyengar Yoga Center of Vermont, Burlington, TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:15 P.M., $20. Info, 379-7389.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: Nursing

ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their

mamas (and soon-to-be mothers!) make the most of La Leche League support while socializing with other moms and wee ones. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 457-2295. FREE

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M.

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents with

bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST

FREE

EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: Moms

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

NEW PARENTS PLAYGROUP: Families with

FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M.

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA:

KIDS VT

mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, WEDNESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $15. Info, 223-5302.

42

HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS,

12:15-1:30 P.M., TUESDAYS, 11 A.M.-12:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45-11:55 A.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M., AND FRIDAYS NOON-1 P.M. THROUGH NOV. 16, $15; $130 for a 10-class

pass. Info, 899-0339.

HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH,

8-9:30 A.M. AND FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M.; preregister. Info,

371-4415. FREE

babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M.

Info, 888-5229.

PREGNANCY, BIRTH AND POSTPARTUM SUPPORT FOR MOMS: Mamas-to-be learn

self-care, stress-reducing movement and breath exercises, how to cope with pain and increase strength, stability and wellbeing during all the stages of pregnancy and new motherhood. The WellSpace, Barre, SUNDAY, NOV. 12, 6-8 P.M.; preregister. Info, 595-7953. FREE BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M., Free. Info, 985-8228. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and

experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE BECOMING A FAMILY: NEW PARENT PREPARATION CLASS: Expecting moms and

dads, supportive people and those considering parenthood socialize, develop postpartum strategies and get savvy about resources for raising small ones. Birth Journeys, Burlington, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15, 6-8 P.M., $25; preregister. Info, 448-0698.

BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing

moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 888-3470. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 999-7143. FREE CENTRAL VERMONT NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: Mothers discuss the joys and

challenges of breastfeeding, including nighttime parenting, weaning, healthy eating habits and setting limits, in a supportive setting. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 999-7143. FREE PLAN AND DELIVER: CHILDBIRTH ESSENTIALS: This interactive mother of

all childbirth classes focuses on holistic care for late pregnancy, labor and immediate postpartum. Material covered includes making empowered decisions, what happens immediately after birth, practicing tools and techniques for labor, and both home and hospital birth plans. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, SATURDAY, NOV. 18, 6-8 P.M.; preregister. Info, 595-7953. FREE TODDLER LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING:

Moms who are nursing beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, THIRD MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1:30-2:30 P.M. Info, 388-0363. FREE BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse their

babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11:30 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 349-3825.

FREE

MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info, 349-9084. FREE JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

CALENDAR NOVEMBER 11 Saturday (cont.) WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Kung Fu: See November 4. Waitsfield Ski and Skate Sale: Families gear up for winter sports. Consignment preregistration weekdays, beginning Monday, November 6, 7:45 a.m.-3 p.m.; drop-off Friday, November 10, 4-7 p.m. Waitsfield Elementary School, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Proceeds benefit the Waitsfield Elementary School PTA. Info, 496-3643.

12 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 5. Family Gym: See November 3. Holiday ArtFest: See November 11, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. WASHINGTON Waitsfield Ski and Skate Sale: See November 11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

13 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See November 6. Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Go Club: See November 6. Lego Robotics: See November 6. Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE Stories with Megan: See November 6. Thanksgiving Crafternoon: Clever crafters of all ages create pine-cone turkeys and chat about thankfulness. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See November 2, 11 a.m. FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Artsy kiddos get imaginative with the library’s materials. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 6. WASHINGTON Capoeira: See November 6. Kids Yoga: See November 6. Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See November 6.


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

14 Tuesday

16 Thursday

CHITTENDEN Crafternoon: Maker-minded kiddos create cool Thanksgiving-themed projects. Ages 3 and up; children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 2:15-3:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE Creative Tuesdays: See November 7. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 4:30-6 p.m. Spanish Musical Kids: See November 7. STEAM Tuesdays: Eager youngsters engage with inventive science, technology, engineering, art and math projects. Check online for specific program details. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See November 1. Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

15 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages and experience levels. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Family Game Day: See November 1. Geographic Information Systems Day: Inquisitive explorers engage with a local geographer. Grade K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a familyfriendly flick while feasting on free popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Colchester Lego Club: See November 2. Read to a Dog: See November 9.

Family Movie Night: Film lovers of all ages view a short documentary about Vermont farm kids, then meet some local young farmers and listen to stories of their experiences while enjoying refreshments. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 5 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Family Wheel Drop-In: See November 3. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 3.

Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See November 2.

Wednesday Story Time: See November 1.

Ukulele Kids: Musical ones join Joe to sing and play to traditional children’s songs. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Williston Preschool Music: See November 2.

Music with Raf: See November 3. Music With Robert: See November 3.

RUTLAND Fun With Poetry!: Petite verse lovers memorize a popular poem or one of their own, recite it aloud and receive a prize. Brandon Free Public Library, 3:30 p.m. Info, 247-8230. FREE

FRANKLIN Family STEAM Night: Moms, dads and kids team up for activities around science, technology, engineering, art and/or math, with a theme this month of robots. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Killington Lego Club: See November 1.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 2.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4, 3-6 p.m.

Read to a Dog: Little bibliophiles select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420. FREE

ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 4.

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See November 1.

WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 7.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 765337-2778. FREE Hinesburg Lego Club: See November 2.

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See November 7.

WASHINGTON Maker Program: See November 7.

CHITTENDEN Family Gym: See November 3.

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See November 1. Yoga for Kids: See November 1.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1.

CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 2.

One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1.

Winooski Lego Club: See November 7.

Mommy and Me Tumble Time: See November 7.

17 Friday

Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1.

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See November 1. WASHINGTON Kids’ Movies: Cinema-lovers of all ages take in a short flick before community dinner is served. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE Movie Night: An off-the-beaten-track flick fascinates viewers. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

WASHINGTON Books Come to Life: This Active Body-Active Brain class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See November 2.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See November 1.

ORLEANS Lego Club: See November 3.

18 Saturday

CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: See November 4, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. CHITTENDEN American Girl Tea Party: Young ladies in fancy dress enjoy an afternoon of crafts, games and refreshments, with or without dolls. Ages 8-12 with adult caregiver. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

All Natural, Local Turkeys $2.99 lb *see store for details

t s ou k ck u Che aceboo m/ on cFebook.coisions fa rov ralp natu

329 Harvest Lane, Williston, VT k8h-NaturalProvisions1117.indd 1

www.NaturalProvisions.com

Based on the song “The Flying Pirate Circus”

For more information, visit RockinRonTheFriendlyPirate.com

05495 802-876-1400 10/25/17 11:10 AM

k8h-rockinron1117.indd 1

10/24/17 12:25 PM

KIDS VT

Vermont Family Owned & Operated

AVAILABLE THIS FALL a book from Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate!

NOVEMBER 2017

It’s Turkey Time…

VITAMIN DISCOUNT PROGRAM • DAILY 10% SENIOR 60+ DISCOUNT

FRESH PRODUCE • VT MEATS • NATURAL BABY FOODS

• BULK FOODS • VT CHEESES • GLUTEN-FREE FOODS • BAKERY ON PREMISES • DELI • VEGAN •

KIDSVT.COM

18 SATURDAY, P.44

43


CALENDAR NOVEMBER

Story Times

18 Saturday (cont.)

Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: Aldrich Public Library,

10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

FRANKLIN STORY TIME: Haston

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505. HYDE PARK STORY TIME:

Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library,

10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

SHELBURNE STORY TIME:

Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: St. Albans

Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3-YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free

Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-4205. WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Waterbury

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

NOVEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME: Norman Williams

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

TUESDAY ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: See Monday. CHARLOTTE K-1 STORYTIME:

Charlotte Public Library, 2:15-3:15 p.m. Info, 425-3864. COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

KIDS VT

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

44

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118.

QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Georgia Public Library,

ESSEX JUNCTION BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Brownell

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME:

11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583.

RICHMOND STORY TIME:

KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

Library, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

10 a.m. Info, 524-4643.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

Richmond Free Library, 10 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

FAIRFAX STORY HOUR: Fairfax

STORY & YOGA TIME WITH ANGEL: Norman Williams

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

HIGHGATE STORY TIME:

SWANTON STORYTIME:

10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

Community Library, 9:3010:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse

Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

Public Library, 10:30 a.m.noon. Info, 457-2295.

Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Warren Public

MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Milton Public Library,

10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

THURSDAY

Library, 11 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence

SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA: Barnes &

Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

WILLISTON STORY TIME:

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

WEDNESDAY BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIME:

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Monday. HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday. NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday. RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland

Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

SHELBURNE MUSICAL STORYTIME: Pierson Library,

10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

ST. ALBANS MOVEMENT & MUSIC STORY HOUR: See Monday.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

WESTFORD STORY TIME:

HIGHGATE STORY TIME: See

Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Tuesday.

FRIDAY

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

BRANDON STORY TIME:

Monday. 10 a.m.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday. 10:30 a.m.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith Public

Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

MILTON RHYTHM & MOVEMENT TODDLER STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME: Norwich Public Library,

10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184.

Brandon Free Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 247-8230.

CHARLOTTE PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Charlotte Public

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 425-3864. CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh

Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328. ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

Farm Craft: Past & Present: Families spin wool, dip candles and make butter while comparing life on the farm in the 19th century versus today. Ages 5 and up. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-noon., $10-12 per adult-child pair; $5-6 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

RICHMOND EARLY BIRD MATH STORYTIME: Richmond Free

MILTON INFANT STORY TIME:

MONTPELIER STORY TIME:

Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get hands-on with an art activity. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE

Harry Potter Club: Wizardry and witchcraft experts dig into discussion and trivia. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 595-2582.

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See November 4.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172.

Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001. ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME: St.

Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free

Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

SWANTON STORYTIME: See

Wednesday.

WINOOSKI STORY TIME:

Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

SATURDAY COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham

Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

SATURDAY STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS: Phoenix

Books, 11 a.m. Info, 448-3350.

Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: See November 4. Saturday Drama Club: See November 4. Saturday Story Time: Bibliophiles soak up picture book stories, songs and puppets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books and songs en español entertain niños. Snack and playtime included. Ages 5 and under. Non-Spanish speakers welcome. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Vermont Lake Monsters Family Fun Fest: Champ and the Lake Monsters meet families in a merrymaking morning of activities. Ages 13 and under. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 655-4200. FREE FRANKLIN Thanksgiving Storytime and Craft: Holiday tales and handcrafts help celebrate turkey day. St. Albans Free Library, 11 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4. WASHINGTON Capital City Thanksgiving Farmers Market: More than 50 farmers, food producers and craftspeople offer root veggies, savory baked goods, maple syrup and much more at this off-season celebration of locavorism. Montpelier High School, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 223-2958. Kung Fu: See November 4. Orchard Valley Holiday Market: This Waldorf-inspired bazaar features fine crafts, books, local products and lunch fare. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Info, 456-7400. FREE


Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 Innovation Playground: In this exhibit embracing lifelong play as a tool for technological, social and artistic invention, visitors of all ages unleash their imaginations by building with giant blue blocks, exploring virtual galaxies in a cardboard spaceship and experimenting in a fully-equipped maker space. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through January 15. HELEN DAY ART CENTER, STOWE Info, 253-8358 Selfies: Artwork from emerging and well-known artists, including the late Andy Warhol, investigate the idea of self-portraits through the lens of photography, painting and other media. Donations accepted. Through November 11. FREE MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 Playing Around: Engineering and Toys: Curious explorers of all ages dig into scientific concepts through playing. Activities include an inside examination of classic childhood toys such as Jack-in-the-box, Hokey Pokey Elmo, and Etch-A-Sketch‚ and creative building with Big Blue Blocks and Tinker Toys. Through March 25. The Light Around Us: Inquisitive visitors learn about light through experimenting with lenses and mirrors, changing the color of everyday objects, separating white light into colors, discovering what lies beyond the visible spectrum and more. Through May 2.

Family Gym: See November 3.

20 Monday CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Players of all ages pursue a game of strategy. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Colchester Preschool Music: See November 6. Go Club: See November 6. STEM Workshop: Imaginative young inventors create air cannons. Ages 10-12. Milton Public Library, 2-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Stories with Megan: See November 6. Williston Preschool Music: See November 2, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 6. WASHINGTON Capoeira: See November 6. Kids Yoga: See November 6. Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See November 6.

21 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: See November 7. Making Fidget Spinners: Junior crafters construct their own spinning toy. Ages 8-11. Milton Public Library, 2 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See November 1. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See November 1. Thanksgiving Crafts: Clever kiddos celebrate the holiday with handmade creativity. Ages 5-7. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Young Writers & Storytellers: See November 8. FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See November 1. Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1. RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See November 1.

RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4.

26 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 5. Family Gym: See November 3. Jingle Bell Express: See November 25, 10 a.m. & noon. FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 25, Dec. 3.

27 Monday

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4, 3-6 p.m.

CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See November 6.

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See November 1.

Crafts for Kids: See November 13.

23 Thursday Happy Thanksgiving!

24 Friday

Go Club: See November 6. Knitting for Kids: Yarn lovers of all skill levels learn with needles or looms. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 878-6955. FREE Pajama Story Time: Little ones in PJs nestle in for stories and snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Stories with Megan: See November 6.

Family Paint Night: Moms, dads and kids take pleasure in painting together with themed suggestions. Ages 5 and up with participating parent. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25; preregister. Info, 425-2700.

Studio Ghibli: ‘Howl’s Moving Castle’: Using subtitles, this animated flick, written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, features teenager Sophie who unwittingly finds herself wrapped up in the wizard Howl’s castle and fighting a war threatening her world. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m., $12.50. Info, 660-9300.

Winooski Lego Club: See November 7.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See November 3.

Williston Preschool Music: See November 2, 11 a.m.

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See November 7.

ORLEANS Lego Club: See November 3.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 25, Dec. 3.

One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 4:30-6 p.m. Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Small ones stretch and relax. Ages 3-5. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Mommy and Me Tumble Time: See November 7. Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1. WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 7.

22 Wednesday CALEDONIA Kindness Rocks Hardwick: Avid artists of all ages drop in and paint rocks with positive messages, then hide these sweet sayings around town. Materials provided; participants welcome to bring their own rocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 472-5948. FREE

CHITTENDEN Family Gym: See November 3.

25 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See November 4. CHITTENDEN Harry Potter Alliance: Fantasy fans rally together in Voldemort Can’t Stop the Rock. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Jingle Bell Express: All aboard! Holiday revelers take to the rails for a roundtrip train ride from Burlington to Charlotte, complete with a goodie bag from local businesses and sing-a-long visits from Santa, Frosty and friends. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 10 a.m., noon & 2 p.m., $25; free for children under 3 who sit on an adult’s lap; proceeds benefit the Ronald McDonald House; preregister. Info, 862-4943.

Lab Girls: Young women empower themselves by exploring science through hands-on experiments. Grades 4-8. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See November 6. WASHINGTON Capoeira: See November 6. Kids Yoga: See November 6. Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See November 6.

KIDS VT

WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See November 4.

CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See November 5.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: A Friday night gala, caroling, holiday stories, live music and an auction are part of this week-long holiday extravaganza. See festivaloftreesvt.com for event details. St. Albans City Hall, -Dec. 3., Various fees for select events; proceeds benefit the St. Albans Community Arts.

NOVEMBER 2017

Winter Clothing Drive: Community members exchange good-quality clothing at no cost. Donations accepted the previous week at the Jaquith Library. Old Schoolhouse Common, Marshfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

19 Sunday

KIDSVT.COM

SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert: This mixed media exhibit serves up a feast for the eyes, exploring our insatiable desire for sugary stuff through paintings, prints, sculptures and more. $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Through February 18.

SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

45


SUBMIT YOUR DECEMBER & JANUARY EVENTS FOR PRINT BY NOVEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR NOVEMBER 28 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Burlington Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included without fee. Howard Center, Burlington, Last Tuesday, 5-6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Creative Tuesdays: See November 7. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1, 4:30-6 p.m. Spanish Musical Kids: See November 7. STEAM Tuesdays: See November 14. Winooski Lego Club: See November 7.

Holiday PJ Story Hour: Teaming up with the Festival of Trees, the library invites small ones in nightwear for seasonal stories, songs, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See November 7. Mommy and Me Tumble Time: See November 7. Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See November 7. WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See November 7.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 25.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. AUDUBON NATURE PLAYGROUP:

Green Mountain Audubon Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 434-3068.

BURLINGTON CRAWLERS AND TODDLERS: Janet S. Munt

Parent-Child Center, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

KIDS VT

NOVEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

CAMBRIDGE PLAYGROUP:

46

29 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See November 1. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See November 1. One-on-One Tutoring: See November 1. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See November 1.

NORTHFIELD PLAYGROUP:

SOUTH BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See Tuesday.

PURPLE CRAYON PLAY GROUP:

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

United Church of Northfield, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:30-11:30 a.m., donations accepted. Info, 457-3500. RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

Wednesday.

Trinity Episcopal Church, 9:45 a.m.

Maple Street Recreation Center, 9-11 a.m. Info, 878-1375.

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution

THURSDAY

HINESBURG PRESCHOOL PLAYGROUP: Hinesburg

Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339. SOUTH BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: Ascension

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: The Janet S. Munt

WINOOSKI BABY PLAYTIME:

Community Center, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422. WEDNESDAY

Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m., $7. Info, 882-8324.

BARRE BABY PLAYGROUP:

TUESDAY

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

BURLINGTON FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S.

Munt Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

STEM Club: Sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Aldrich Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 476-7550. Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 316-2918.

ESSEX BABY PLAYGROUP:

Sunset Studio, 10-11 a.m. Info, 878-1375.

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP: Bent

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See November 1. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See November 1.

Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946. HUNTINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Huntington Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

30 Thursday CALEDONIA Hardwick Lego Club: See November 2. CHITTENDEN Babytime: See November 2. Read to a Dog: See November 9. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See November 2. Ukulele Kids: See November 16. Williston Preschool Music: See November 2.

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland

Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See November 2.

See Tuesday.

HINESBURG BABY TIME: United

Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

JOHNSON PLAYGROUP: United

Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

MILTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP: St. Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218.

HINESBURG FAMILY PLAYTIME:

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See November 4, 3-6 p.m.

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 25, Dec. 3.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See November 1.

OPEN GYM: See Monday.

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First

Fit Moms: See November 1.

Family Room, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP: See FAIRFAX PLAYGROUP: United Church of Fairfax, third Friday of every month, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 524-6554.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

O’Brien Community Center, 9-9:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: See

SHELBURNE PLAYGROUP:

MILTON PLAYGROUP: Milton Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457.

OPEN GYM: Central VT

FRANKLIN Festival of Trees: See November 25, Dec. 3.

Tuesday. FRIDAY

Lutheran Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 489-0410.

MORRISVILLE PLAYGROUP:

WILLISTON PLAYGROUP:

Richmond Free Library, 8:4510:15 p.m. Info, 899-4415.

Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

River Arts, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

Yoga for Kids: See November 1.

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See November 1.

Playgroups

MONDAY

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Studio Ghibli: ‘Howl’s Moving Castle’: This dubbed animated version, written and directed by Hayao Miyazaki, features teenager Sophie who unwittingly finds herself wrapped up in the wizard Howl’s castle and fighting a war threatening her world. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m., $12.50. Info, 864-5610.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

ORLEANS Family Meal and Movie Night: Families flock together for a flick and a free and filling meal. Four Seasons of Early Learning, Greensboro Bend, 5:30-8 p.m. Info, 551-206-4701. FREE

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See November 2.

WILLISTON PLAYGROUP: Allen Brook School, third Friday of every month, 9:30-11 a.m.

Fall Homeschoolers’ Day: The Science of Toys: Home learners explore and experiment with a variety of hands-on activities in conjunction with the museum’s temporary exhibit about the inside story of toys. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. 

SATURDAY FAIRFAX OPEN TOT GYM: BFA Fairfax, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 524-6554. MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m., $10; free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m.


USE YOUR WORDS B Y M E RE D I T H COE Y M A N

Thanks Again A mom realizes that gratitude is a ride, not a destination

Planning a kids event? Submit your info by November 15 online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR

SEE P. 23 FOR PUZZLES

KIDS VT

RIDDLE ANSWER:

SIX. HALL. SOFT. HELP.

JUMBLES

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

The oyster wouldn’t share its pearl because it was —SHELLFISH

Am I raising grateful kids? I thought, as anger bubbled up and erupted: “This is a great bike. You are lucky to have it!”

what am I thankful for? Do I see all that surrounds me? There’s so much. I’m grateful that my body is strong and healthy. That I can feel the crisp pluck of pulling an apple from the tree, then collapse inside the taste of it. That I can dig my nose into my daughter’s hair and smell fresh air and the ocean. I’m thankful when I hear water roiling in a kettle when my windows are layered with ice. I’m thankful for the smell of my mother’s chicken soup, and her unrelenting patience. For the notes my husband leaves for me; for my family and my friends that are like family. And I’m especially grateful that I’m repeating this question to myself. Because if I didn’t, I might have missed when my daughter asked her grandmother if she could help with anything in the kitchen. Or when she thanked me for carrying her backpack. I might have overlooked the time my son asked his sister if she was OK after a fall, or when he stuck up for a kid who was being bullied. Or when he thanked me for making his favorite meal. And I might have been too wracked with worry to remember when he and I were biking and he told me that he loved how we did this thing together, just him and me. And that when we rode through the quiet of falling leaves he said, just loud enough, “It’s so beautiful here.” 

NOVEMBER 2017

to give profuse thanks for every bike, full plate or warm bed. It’s like asking them to be grateful for their thumbs. It’s not that they’re not grateful for them; they’ve just always been around. Still, news of tragedies, displacement and suffering traverses the globe so quickly, my brain struggles to process it all. Against this backdrop, I look at my kids and wonder if they see all that they have. The evening after our ride I asked my son over dinner: “What are you thankful for?” It wasn’t a topic new to our table, but this time he could sense it was a prompt. As silence ensued, a voice inside my head said: You cannot pull gratitude out of him. It doesn’t work that way. “Um.” He looked pained. “I’m sorry, I just can’t think of anything.” He’s never been good on the spot. I felt desperate for asking; I knew he was more than his reply. “Wait, nature?” he asked. Was that an acceptable answer? It was misguided to expect my child to articulate all he’s thankful for. My fear that he doesn’t see all that surrounds him left me flailing, and I put too much weight on his answer. In the days that followed, I realized how the time I spent worrying if my children are grateful is itself a luxury. So instead I turned to question myself: As a parent, as a person,

KIDSVT.COM

t’s a warm mid-October afternoon, and I’ve just unloaded mountain bikes from the van in preparation for a fall ride. First, the trusty tank of a bike I got in college, then my son’s smaller ride. I remember scoring it at a thrift store, having it tuned up and excitedly presenting it to him. What a lucky kid, I thought. To have a bike— “I want a new bike!” my 8-yearold stated, jarring me into the present. I looked at him. His blond hair catching slices of sun. His clothes fitting exact specifications: not too short, long, loose or tight. His belly full and his scratches covered in fresh Band-Aids. His wanting more. Am I raising grateful kids? I thought, as anger bubbled up and erupted: “This is a great bike. You are lucky to have it!” His body deflated. My tone conveyed that he’d done something wrong, but he wasn’t sure what. It’s not his fault. It’s easy to fall into the abyss of wanting. As a kid I pored through toy catalogs circling what I wanted, which was basically everything. As an adult I untangle wants and needs and repeat enough — a privilege in itself. I regretted berating him because I know that gratitude can’t be dictated. It is cultivated through practice, by listening and persevering. I shouldn’t expect my kids

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: At a ghost-ery store.

I

47 27


sudden whims +NEFCU

CAREFREE ROADTRIPS START WITH NEFCU. Every day is a journey. Enjoy the ride with savvy financial tools, tips, and services -like low-interest, local auto loans. Apply at nefcu.com or ask for NEFCU financing at area auto dealers.

800-400-8790 · nefcu.com

NMLS #446767

Local, affordable, and on your side™.

+NEFCU.Car_VTKids10x11.5.indd Untitled-7 1 1

10/24/17 12:42 10/25/17 10:47 PM AM

Kids VT — November 2017  

A Vermont Researcher Studies Humor in Babies; Inside COTS Family Shelter; Baking at Ronald McDonald House; Reflections on Being Thankful