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JULY 2017 VOL.24 NO.06

THE

ISSUE Puppy Rescue River Snorkeling Backyard Catio

Raised Farm

4-H members share what they’ve learned about animals — and themselves PAGE 20


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Vermont’s Award-Winning Traveling Youth Circus

30th Anniversary!

2017 Tour Dates July 2 - Opening

July 17 & 18

July 28, 29 & 30

August 10 & 11

World HQ Circus Barn 2 Shows: Sunday 1 & 6 pm Presented by The Circus Barn

Cheshire Fairgrounds 4 Shows: Mon & Tues 1 & 6 pm Presented by Monadnock Waldorf School

The Gore Place 6 Shows: Fri & Sat 2 & 7 pm, Sun 11 am & 4 pm Presented by The Circus Barn

Rockin’ Horse Stables 4 Shows: Thurs & Fri 1 & 6 pm Presented by Kennebunkport Consolidated Schools

Greensboro, VT

Buy in Advance, Don’t Tak e Chance! a If still available, tickets are sold at the door starting 1 hour before show.

The 2017 Big Top Tour Presents

July 5 & 6

Waitsfield, VT

Kenyon’s Field 4 Shows: Wed & Thurs 1 & 6 pm Presented by Waitsfield Children’s Center

July 8 & 9

Essex Junction, VT

Champlain Valley Exposition 4 Shows: Sat & Sun 12 & 5 pm Presented by Champlain Valley Expo

July 11 & 12

Saratoga Springs, NY

Keene, NH

July 20 & 21 Hanover, NH

August 13 & 14 Bartlett, NH

Northampton, MA

Three County Fairgrounds 4 Shows: Tues & Wed 1 & 6 pm Presented by North Star

Fields of Attitash 4 Shows: Sun & Mon 1 & 6 pm Presented by Attitash Mountain Resort

July 23 & 24

August 4 & 5

August 16, 17 & 18

Keyes Memorial Field 4 Shows: Sun & Mon 1 & 6 pm Presented by Flying Gravity Circus

Spencer Peirce Little Farm 4 Shows: Fri 1 & 6 pm, Sat 12:30 & 5:30 pm Presented by Theater in the Open

Montpelier High School 6 Shows: Wed, Thurs, Fri 1 & 6 pm Presented by The Circus Barn

Milford, NH

July 26 & 27

TICKETS AT SMIRKUS.ORG OR CALL 1-877-SMIRKUS (1-877-764-7587)

August 1 & 2

Kennebunkport, ME

Fullington Farm Field 4 Shows: Thurs & Fri 1 & 6 pm Presented by The Circus Barn

Saratoga Casino Hotel 4 Shows: Tues & Wed 1 & 6 pm Marshfield, MA Presented by Waldorf Marshfield Fairgrounds School of Saratoga Springs 3 Shows: Wed 2 & 7 pm, Thurs 11 am Presented by St. Johnsbury, VT Marshfield Education Green Mountain Mall 4 Shows: Fri & Sat 1 & 6 pm Foundation Presented by Catamount Arts

July 14 & 15

Waltham, MA

Newbury, MA

August 7 & 8 Freeport, ME

Freeport Middle School 4 Shows: Mon & Tues 1 & 6 pm Presented by Maine Coast Waldorf School

Montpelier, VT

August 20 - Finale Greensboro, VT

World HQ Circus Barn 2 Shows: Sunday 1 & 6 pm Presented by The Circus Barn

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EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Meredith Coeyman meredith@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet

STAFF QUESTION Theo with a chicken

What’s great about your furry friend?

To Get, or Not to Get, a Pet?

HAZEL — 5 months. Hazel, aka Hazel Basil, loves peanut butter and has a very long tongue.

brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Carolyn Fox, Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Rev. Diane Sullivan, Richele Young CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Sarah Tuff Dunn, Sarah Galbraith, Nicci Micco, Bryan Parmelee, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Jessica Lara Ticktin PHOTOGRAPHERS

James Buck, Oliver Parini, Sam Simon, Matthew Thorsen, Tristan Von Duntz ILLUSTRATOR

Kim Scafuro P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

MEREDITH COEYMAN, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

GINGER — age 3 (pictured with Graham, age 11). She’s an energetic pit bull/Bernese mountain dog/ coonhound mix who loves to nuzzle everyone she meets. She fits right in with our pack.

THE

ISSUE

ROSIE — age 1 (pictured with Henry, almost 6). Rosie’s energy is well-matched to her “brothers’.” She considers herself one of the kids and is always ready to play. BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE

KIDS VT

NICCI MICCO (“Rescue Mission,” page 24) is a writer, editor and yoga teacher who lives in Shelburne with one husband, two sons, one pup and two cats. She has a (questionably) healthy passion for coffee, red lipstick, talking with strangers and browsing online for pets with whom her friends might need to fall in love.

JULY 2017

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ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

KIDSVT.COM

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

F

or the past year, my kids, Mira and Theo, have been asking for a dog — with 10-year-old Mira leading the charge. I’m not entirely opposed to the idea. Research shows that having a pet can boost kids’ social skills and confidence, and lower their anxiety. Plus, almost every family I know owns a dog. That wouldn’t be the case if having one was a total drag, right? But after months of chewing on the idea, I’m still on the fence. My ambivalence probably stems from my own childhood experience. My mom was raised around lots of animals — her dad even started a dog food company! — but my dad is allergic to cats and dogs (see more about pet allergies in Ken Picard’s interview with allergist Dr. Edward Kent Jr. on page 12). Growing up, having a furry pet was pretty much out of the question. My sister and I did convince my parents to get a standard poodle when I was about Mira’s age, but after a week it was clear that we weren’t going to be able to give him the home he deserved, and we had to take him back to the breeder. It was a huge disappointment. My mom and dad let us have consolation-prize pets like newts and parakeets — but those aren’t the kind of creatures you can really bond with. Putting together this month’s July Animal Issue provided me with a lot of food for thought. In “Rescue Mission” on page 24, contributor Nicci Micco writes about her decision to adopt a rescue pup after losing her family’s beloved golden retriever. There’s lots of great info in her piece about things families should consider if they’re thinking of adopting a dog — like not to go just on cuteness alone. Contributing editor Meredith Coeyman, who just got the most adorable dog, writes humorously about the early days of puppy parenting, from crate training to barking to chewing everything in sight (“The Art of Puppy Parenting,” page 13). I’m not going to lie: Her blow-by-blow account of a day in the life of puppy parenting kind of freaked me out. Maybe I’ll just enroll my kids in a 4-H club instead. In “FarmRaised Kids,” we write about the international network of youth organizations that reaches around 6,000 kids in Vermont. Not only does belonging to a 4-H club give kids the chance to get up close and personal with livestock like horses and chickens, it provides opportunities for projects focused on community service, gardening and STEM. Read all about it, and hear from 4-H kids, on page 20. As summer gets into full swing, I’ll also put in another plug for the Daytripper, our new warm-weather fun guide that you can find on local newsstands and on our website, kidsvt.com. It’s filled with so many great ideas for family-friendly outings — many of which are dog-friendly, too.


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JULY 2017 JAMES BUCK

Calendar CALENDAR

A

THE

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JULY

SPONSORED BY:

atey y, M ho

LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL PIRATE PARK Captains of the seas snap photos with Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate and Mermaid Dalni, cruise with Captain Mike over the Seven Seas through games and children’s activities, and clap for costume winners at 1 p.m. Live music, a bouncy house and more make this a memorable day devoted to the young. Saturday, July 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Waterfront Park in Burlington.

Week to Week MON

Color the Kingdom Run: 5K runners and walkers dressed in white get splattered with a rainbow of colors, then enjoy a community block party. 2 p.m. in Craftsbury Village.

SUN

Circuspalooza: Aerial artists pull off fanciful feats under the Big Top while kids take part in carnival games. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Shelburne Museum.

FRISUN

Fizzy Fest: Young scientists search out the secrets behind carbonated beverages and explore a giant pile of foam. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington.

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JULY 16

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KIDS VT

JULY 21-23

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Farm-Raised Kids KIM SCAFURO

Meet some of the thousands of young people in Vermont who learn about livestock — and themselves — through 4-H clubs.

ese & wine Your chaend m ore! place Discounts on Natural, Gluten-Free and Kid-Friendly Foods

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

28 29 30 31 32 34 36 38 40

Daily Listings Summer Music Live Performances Classes Science & Nature Playgroups New Parents Ongoing Exhibits Story Times

ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

Just for Kids JUST FOR KIDS A-Mazing Animals

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page INSID E! Birthday Club Puzzle Answers, P. 43

Belfry the Bat is going crazy trying to find her best buddy, Koko Koala, who is somewhere among all the other animals. Can you help Belfry wing it along the fastest flightpath to her fuzzy friend? If you come to an animal, try another route.

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2500 Williston Rd, S. Burlington, VT • 802-862-5514 2455 Shelburne Rd, Shelburne, VT • 802-985-3302

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Rescue Mission After the death of a beloved family dog, Nicci Micco wasn’t ready to get a new pup — until she found Biden. Welcome Editor’s Note 5

On the Cover 10

Kids Beat

Columns 11 Destination Recreation 12 Checkup 13 The Art of 15 Balancing Act 16 Parent Portrait 17 Habitat 43 Use Your Words

FREE

JULY 2017 VOL.24 NO.06

THE ISSUE Puppy Rescue River Snorkeling Backyard Catio

Raised Farm

Monday-Friday: 9-7 pm Saturday & Sunday 9-6 pm

4-H members share what they’ve learned about animals — and themselves

www.pfwvt.com

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EVNACC • Exp. 11/22/17

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4-H member Neika Haire poses with her favorite horse, Skippy, at the Livery Horse Farm in Hinesburg in this photograph by Oliver Parini.

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Calendar Clues Kids Say What? Trending Parenting Hacks Throwback #InstaKidsVT

River snorkeling exposes kids to the life aquatic.

Animal Maze Contest Winners Writing Contest Coloring Contest Birthday Club

JULY 2017

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

Freshwater Explorers

CENTER PULLOUT

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Staff Question Contributor’s Note

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TRENDING

What pet is right for my family? Thirty years ago, my mother opened the door to my father standing there, holding a bag of dog food in one hand and an old piece of rope in the other. At the end of the rope was a scrawny, year-old Irish setter with a giant wart on her head. My mother immediately let go of the knob and the door slammed shut. She did not want a dog. But my brother and I caught a glimpse and we were thrilled. “IS THAT A DOG?! ARE WE GETTING A DOG?!” Eventually, reluctantly, my mom let both the dog and my father into the house, and so began our long relationship with Molly. She was the worst dog. Don’t get me wrong, we loved her, but she was untrainable. She once escaped from our house and returned several hours later dragging the better part of a deer carcass behind her. She often ran away, and given that we literally fed her ice cream cones and Twinkies, we never understood why until one day my father saw her on the porch of a house several streets away eating a steak

grilled expressly for her by a man who explained that he thought of Molly as his dog, too. We couldn’t compete with steak, and settled for joint custody. Having a family pet can provide fun memories and opportunities for kids to learn how to care for another living creature. It can also be frustrating, gross, expensive and, at times, incredibly difficult. So what kind of pet is right for your family? Best Friends Animal Society, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing no-kill sanctuary and forever homes to animals of all kinds, recommends asking yourself some basic questions: What is your living situation? Do you have any outdoor space? How much time do you have to spend with a pet?

Calendar Clues

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Sunday, July 9: Who Walks in These Woods? Woods?, 1-3 p.m., at the Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington. Sunday, July 16: National Ice Cream Day, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock. Monday, July 24: DreamCycle performed by Cirque Us! Us!,, 7 p.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in Stowe. See the full July calendar listings on page 28.

AUTUMN ANSWERS How much can you afford for expenses like food, vet visits, boarding? Once you’ve established these parameters, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommends you consider what you’re looking for in a pet. Do you want a lap-warmer, like a small dog or a cat? Or maybe you want a pet that’s easier to leave alone and won’t impact your family’s schedule as much, like a fish. It’s important to remember that what realistically works for you might not be what your kids are hoping (read: begging) to get. Despite your little negotiator’s promises, you will be the pet’s primary caregiver. Full stop. It’s not fair to you, the kids, or the pet to bring home a high-needs, steakeating, carcass-dragging Irish setter when all you truly have the time and resources for is a gecko. ! For more on this topic, see "Rescue Mission" on page 24. In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“Mom, you don’t understand

what it’s like growing up in the 20th century!” —MASON, AGE 8

Philadelphia Zoo enlisted ob-gyn Rebekah McCurdy to deliver a mama gorilla’s 5-pound son. You should see that baby’s head of hair!

Vermont doctors dole out free day passes to state parks this summer to promote outdoor exercise. Because climbing a mountain sure beats going to the gym.

Vermont is rated the best state for working moms, according to a recent study from website WalletHub. Now if we could get a little help with the laundry.

Nebraska 8-yearold Mili Hernandez barred from soccer tourney after being mistaken for a boy. “Mili, don’t EVER let anyone tell you that you aren’t perfect just as you are,” tweeted fellow short-haired soccer player and Olympic medalist Abby Wambach.

Tick numbers are on the rise in New England, increasing the chance of Lyme disease. Bedtime tick checks — Every. Single. Night.

Mattel releases a new collection of Ken dolls, with different builds, skin tones and hair styles — including a man bun. We love the “dad bod” version.


PARENTING HACKS This month, parents shared their favorite summer activities with us. Send your parenting hacks and recommendations to ideas@kidsvt.com. We love looking for HEART-SHAPED ROCKS at the beach! —NICOLE CAREY Watching MOVIES ON CHURCH STREET outside of Ben & Jerry’s, and camping in our backyard. —JENNIFER ROBERTS Exploring new hiking spots and nature trails is our favorite part of summer. Our goal this year is to go to as many VERMONT STATE PARKS as we can. We already have three down! —JESSICA HOAGUE

THROWBACK JULY 2016

Swimming at ALBURG DUNES STATE PARK! —MEAGAN GILMORE Burger night at BREAD & BUTTER FARM in Shelburne. —MAEGEN CURLEY

The water slide at MAPLE STREET POOL in Essex Junction! —AMY WILSON LEFEVRE Eating S’MORES around a campfire after a long day of playing outside! —RACHEAL PAQUETTE

THE ISSUE

Natural Connections: Readers Share Sweet Snapshots and Stories of Their Kids and Pets

Thanks for sharing your photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We thought this one was berry beautiful! Share a picture of your family doing something summery this month!

@matryoshkabakery First day

of summer break is very relaxing, sweet and a little humid.

Follow @kids_vt on Instagram. Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

KIDS VT

! "

JULY 2017

HERE’S HOW:

KIDSVT.COM

In last year’s Animal Issue, we asked Vermont families to send us photos that captured the bond between their kids and pets. “Our pitbull, Ginger, has been a sweetheart since the day we adopted her,” wrote Elisa Kiviranna. “But the depth of her kind and gentle nature has really shown itself since our son, Arlo, joined the family.” Read the full story at kidsvt.com/pets.

#INSTAKIDSVT

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B Y A LISO N NOVAK AND BRETT STANC IU

RECREATION

Jump Around

PERFORMING ARTS

Small Town, Big Stage

Rural Greensboro has a new artsy addition. The HIGHLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS — which includes a 225-seat theater, a 100seat performance space, a gallery and a café — celebrated its grand opening in June. The creative Cirque Us! hub, surrounded by Northeast Kingdom farmland and Caspian Lake, will offer kid-oriented programs in addition to performances for adults. On July 22, Cirque Us!, a troupe of Circus Smirkus alumni, presents DreamCycle, a show filled with acrobatics, juggling, tightrope walking and aerial acts. On August 18, Circus Smirkus founder Rob Mermin hosts a Magical Picnic and Workshop, with lunch provided by the on-site, locavore Hardwick Street Café. Geared toward all ages, participants will come away from the afternoon session with a few easy-to-do magic tricks. Look out for more family-friendly programming in coming months. —BS DreamCycle, presented by Cirque Us!, takes place on Saturday, July 22 at 2 & 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for children and $25 for adults. The Magical Picnic and Workshop takes place on Friday, August 18 from 1-3 p.m. Tickets are $20, including lunch. Visit highlandartsvt.org for more information and to purchase tickets.

COMMUNITY

Owners Ron and Jacki Baker

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A Tasty Reward

Reading during the summer months has a sweet payoff for kids in the Manchester area, thanks to Mother Myrick’s Confectionery. Twenty-eight years ago, the makers of Lemon LuLu cake, buttercrunch and specialty chocolates started their FUN SUMMER READING PROGRAM as a way to instill a joy of reading in kids. “As an employer, both my husband and I believe we have a responsibility to give back to the community,” said the shop’s co-owner Jacki Baker. In 1989, the Bakers came up with the idea of a game board where elementary-school kids could record what they’d read during the summer, and come in to the shop for special goodies after they’d completed a certain number of books. Through the years, she’s enlisted art students from the local high school to submit illustrations for the game board, giving a $50 gift certificate to the winning design. In addition to keeping a log of titles they’ve read, kids who participate in the program have the option of doing book-related projects like dioramas and posters, which Baker displays around the shop through the summer months. “Having a candy store, we’re all about celebration,” said Baker, who hopes other Vermont businesses will be encouraged to create similar programs. “This is a natural outgrowth of that.” —AN Pick up a Fun Summer Reading Program game board at Manchester Community Library, Northshire Bookstore or Mother Myrick’s Confectionery at 4367 Main St. in Manchester. The program runs from June 21-September 8. mothermyricks.com

Changes are afoot at the Middlebury entertainment center WHIRLIE’S WORLD. The business — which boasts an arcade, a black-light laser tag area, bouncy houses and concessions — is under new ownership. Jeremy Griffin of Rutland purchased the family entertainment center at the end of May from longtime owners Peter and Naomi Neff, who opened the facility in 2011. The new owner has experience in the bouncy business — he helps his girlfriend Danielle Desrochers run Party OutFitter, a similar center in the Diamond Run Mall that also rents out bounce houses, dunking booths and cotton-candy machines in Vermont and surrounding states. Griffin is in the process of adding a fresh coat of paint, new arcade games and a toddler area to Whirlie’s. He says he’ll be rotating bouncy houses between the Rutland and Middlebury locations to ensure variety. The center will also have extended business hours and regularly scheduled teen nights featuring a DJ. Says Griffin: “The goal is to have the place open as much as possible.” —AN Whirlie’s World is open Tuesday through Sunday. For more information, visit whirliesworld.com.

SPORTS

Girl Power The COLCHESTER THUNDER, a Little League team comprised of a dozen 7- and 8-year-old girls, took the baseball field by storm this spring, finishing their regular season with a 9-1 record against the four all-boys teams in their town’s A-Minor league. In previous years, the girls who had opted to play baseball in Colchester were put on teams that were primarily made up of boys, which “socially wasn’t a good experience for them,” explained one of the Thunder’s four coaches and a team parent, Pat McBride. “The girls were just minimized based on the ratios on the teams.” He realized other parents of baseball-playing girls felt similarly, so they floated the idea of an all-girls team to the Colchester Youth Baseball and Softball League in the off-season. When sign-up time came around, the numbers worked out in their favor — 12 first- and second-grade girls signed up for the league, the perfect number for a team. Spectators and competing teams initially didn’t give the Thunder’s all-female status much thought, said McBride, but as the season progressed and the girls kept winning, “people started to notice that there was something about this group,” he said. “Less the gender and more just how much fun they were having.” This summer, the team will meet to practice together and figure out whether they’ll try to recreate their winning formula next baseball season. —AN


Horses at pasture

DESTINATION RECREATION B Y SARA H T U F F D U NN THE

UVM Morgan Horse Farm

ISSUE PHOTOS COURTESY OF SARAH TUFF DUNN

74 Battell Drive, Weybridge

I

t was one of those June mornings where you forget the frigid Vermont winter — blue skies, lawn mowers buzzing, crisp air — as my elementaryschool-aged children, Dillon and Harper, buckled themselves into our Toyota Tacoma. I was nervous, though. It was my first time driving the new truck, and my husband, Carlton, had warned me to be very careful. (He had already hopped on his bike to make the 25-mile journey from our Shelburne home to Weybridge.) Relief. We arrived at the UVM Morgan Horse Farm intact. “I only see one horse,” said Harper, 8, before noticing a statue of an imposing mare we later learned was named Figure. “OK, I only see two horses, and one of them is metal,” he quipped. As we neared the entrance, where Carlton waited in his bike clothes, Harper spied an assemblage of horse bones arranged on a wall. “All right, Mom, now I see three horses — and one is a skeleton.” Make no bones about it, though: The 215-acre UVM Morgan Horse Farm — which the U.S. government gifted to the University of Vermont in 1951 — has more than 40 Morgan horses, making a family day trip to Weybridge, and neighboring Middlebury, a worthwhile jaunt on a summer’s day. Our exploration began at the gift shop, where we shelled out $14 total for admission, and 10-year-old Dillon ogled the horsey knickknacks. A

Ribbons inside the barn

Dillon with a statue of Figure

seven-minute movie followed, during which we learned that 80 percent of today’s worldwide Morgan horse population (some 75,000 of the trotters) can be traced back to Weybridge. It all began in 1789, when a schoolteacher in Springfield, Mass., received a colt named Figure as payout on a debt — and what a payday it was. Figure turned out to be the Michael Jordan of his time; his ability to outrun, outjump and outdo all other equines earned him an impressive reputation. Figure and his offspring also displayed their prowess in other ways. One Morgan horse, named Black Hawk, impregnated more than 1700 females. (Later we blushed during the breeding part of the tour that ditches euphemisms in favor of straight talk about teasing, mounting and the like.) For now, we happily pranced behind our guide, Heather, as she clicked off the movie and showed us around the

lush property. In the spacious stables, we learned the difference between mares, stallions, geldings, colts, fillies and foals. The farm names and organizes its animals alphabetically. We laughed as Abington guffawed loudly in a manner that indicated his routine had been interrupted, then let ourselves outside to take a look at Zephyr, a bay colt born in April. Believe it or not, anyone can pay $2 for a raffle ticket to win this $30,000 prize horse. The drawing takes place on October 31 — talk about a payday. We heeded Heather’s advice against sticking our fingers through the fence, lest Zephyr mistake them for carrots. Then we wandered among the black locust trees, listening to the

goldfinches and wishing we had brought some bread and cheese to spread out on one of the shaded picnic tables. Instead, we bid adieu to the farm and rumbled over the Pulp Mill Covered Bridge, originally built in 1883 and rebuilt in 2012 after the ravages of Tropical Storm Irene, for lunch at Noonie’s Deli in Middlebury. “That was about two or three times more interesting than I thought it would be,” said Carlton, in between bites of tuna melt. Sweet-toothed Harper didn’t even need his meringue fix at nearby Otter Creek Bakery to give us back some sugar. “No, Dad,” he said. “That was about a million times more interesting!” ! Find more information at uvm.edu/ morgan. The property is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through October 31, with tours available on the hour from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

In “Destination Recreation,” local parents review family-friendly attractions. Got a spot you think we should feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

2095 Pomfret Rd., South Pomfret, VT (802) 457-3500 | info@artistreevt.org

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CHECKUP WIT H DR. EDWARD KENT JR. • IN T ERVIEW C OMPI LED AND CONDENS ED B Y KEN PICAR D

Skunks

How can parents treat their child’s pet allergies?

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THE

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elcoming a furry friend into the family often comes with great benefits. Pets can provide love and companionship, help reduce anxiety, teach responsibility and even get kids outside more. But for some children, snuggling up to a dog or cat causes unpleasant allergic reactions. Dr. Edward Kent Jr., an allergist-immunologist with Timber Lane Allergy & Asthma Associates in South Burlington, debunks allergy myths and explains the treatments available to animalloving families.

KVT: Are dog and cat allergies the most common types? EK: They are, because those are the most common pets we encounter. But any furred, warm-blooded animal, including rabbits, gerbils, hamsters and horses, are capable of triggering an allergic response.

ISSUE

KVT: Can children outgrow a pet allergy? EK: They may become less symptomatic over time. That’s because the immune system learns to put on the brakes and induce a tolerance to the exposure. But the pathway is still there. If an allergy is going to be “outgrown” this usually takes many years to occur.

KIDS VT: Why are some people allergic to animals? KVT: If a child is allergic to cats, EDWARD KENT: An allergy is an does that mean all cats or just undesired immunologic response. certain breeds? It develops over time, and once that EK: All cats share a few common inflammatory response is in place proteins that trigger the allergic you run into trouble. Breathing response. If you are allergic to these in pollen, dust mites and animal proteins then you would be allergic dander — tiny bits of hair or skin to all cats. However, a mammal is a shed by an animal — is not supposed complex organism with many differto trigger the immune system. But ent proteins. There might be 10 or 20 if you have an allergic proteins in the dander predilection, then your alone. Also the home in body considers them which they live may have to be noxious invaders accumulated different and your body makes degrees of dander. allergic antibodies against them. The KVT: When breeders substances that trigger claim that certain an allergic response breeds are hypoalDR. EDWARD KENT JR. tend to be proteins in lergenic, what does that the animal’s dander, mean? saliva and urine. Depending on what EK: There is no evidence to support organ system is involved, you might a hypoallergenic breed. The idea be bothered by itchy eyes, a runny is that if an animal does not shed nose, congestion, sinus fullness or fur it’s less allergenic. For example, asthma symptoms. poodles and other hair dogs don’t shed. And they probably contaminate KVT: Do allergic reactions vary the house less than breeds that shed from patient to patient? fur. But the allergen is in the skin, EK: They vary based on the indiand all breeds shed skin. vidual patient’s sensitivity, but also with the intensity of the exposure, KVT: So does the breed matter the nature of the exposure and the when it comes to allergies? chronicity of the exposure, meanEK: Allergic reactions are not ing whether you only come across predictable from breed to breed. the cat when you visit relatives on One dog of a breed may cause more Thanksgiving, or whether you live trouble for someone than another with the cat. dog of the same breed. So you can’t

There is no evidence to support a hypoallergenic breed.

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say that any one breed is certain to be better than another. There is no evidence that people will do better with a hair dog than a fur dog. In fact, it’s been shown that people who are allergic to dogs have just as much trouble with dogs with fur as with dogs with hair. KVT: Should kids who are allergic to pets avoid houses with them, or preemptively take medication? EK: The decision on how to approach this is complicated. Is it a pet that the child already has an emotional attachment to? If you can have your symptoms controlled by just taking an antihistamine every now and then, this may be fine. Or, if you don’t have pets yourself but you go to friends’ houses who do, and you can take an antihistamine and be comfortable, then that may be an option. But if you have asthma and trouble breathing around animals, then the ante’s been upped. KVT: What about allergy shots? EK: It all depends on the kind of symptoms you have. There are allergy shots you can get for cats and dogs that can be effective at reducing symptoms. They may not completely eliminate those symptoms, but they could reduce them significantly and this could be a way to help someone who has unavoidable exposure to cats and dogs. KVT: How often do those shots need to be taken? EK: You have to present the allergen protein to the immune system so that it can be broken down and lead to an induction of tolerance. So you give progressively increasing doses over the course of several months on a weekly basis. Once you’ve achieved the dose that has been associated with inducing a tolerance, you can then extend the interval to monthly. And then it’s monthly for about three to five years. That’s how long it takes to induce a tolerance that will be persistent. Avoiding the exposure if possible is usually preferable. ! Got health- and wellness-related questions? Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.


THE

10:06 a.m.

ISSUE

Puppy Parenting

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he day we got the puppy is a blur. When I awoke that morning, I had no idea that by evening I would own something that might poop in my shoe. Nor did I foresee that at 3 a.m. the next day I would be sitting on my bedroom floor with a tiny pup in my lap wondering what I had actually done. This story is not packed with solid puppy-rearing advice. But it is an honest account of a day in the life of a super softhearted, usually responsible person who made a somewhat rash decision — and now must raise a puppy.

puppy is adorable! Just look at her, grooming herself, licking … her bum. Then my eye. I curse. 10:45 a.m. Open laptop and begin working. Remember advice: “Puppy follows your schedule, not the other way around.” Puppy whines at door, starts chewing a book. Bring her out to pee, then she rolls on a dead worm. Back to work. Shove peanut butter into chew toy to buy seven minutes of peace. Wrangle permanent marker

6:45 a.m. High-pitched yipping. Puppy must exit crate immediately. Half asleep, I stumble over and release a wild creature determined to climb up my body and lick off my face. Beg puppy to hold her pee. Make it to front lawn. Inside to feed puppy. Beg children to ignore puppy and get ready for school. Remove shoe from puppy’s mouth, put it on child’s foot. Put puppy in pen, where she barks like we’re running a puppy mill in our sunroom. Race to school. 8:29 a.m. At dog park — without coffee. Nobody there, so let puppy try big-dog section. Dogs arrive and play with her, i.e., roll her like a barrel while she yips for dear life. I carry her to empty small-dog section. She lies in the sun. We could do this in my backyard — with coffee. Puppy friend arrives! They wrestle and bite each other’s faces. I feel the sun on my arms and realize that I totally made the right call getting a puppy.

3:18 p.m.

3:44 p.m. from puppy. Car alarm: puppy barks. Phone rings: puppy barks. Despite trainer explaining that words mean nothing to dogs, I implore her to stop. She holds eye contact, so I’m pretty sure the trainer is wrong about this particular puppy. A stranger suggested that I shake a plastic bottle filled with pennies at her to get her to stop barking. Puppy watches, perplexed, as I fill a bottle with pennies.

4:34 p.m. Making dinner. Use cut-up hotdog to get puppy to drop son’s Lego creation. Must finish dinner. Put puppy in crate, where she falls asleep. Kids decide it’s time to wake puppy up in the middle of dinner. Ask if they can feed her chicken. Ask if they can feed her carrots. Leave table to find list of foods deadly to puppies. Dinner gets cold.

11:00 p.m. Wake puppy up to pee. Carry her down the stairs while she yawns, squeaks and licks my face in a way I don’t mind. Decide this puppy can stay another day. !

13

6:49 p.m. Evening walk during which puppy wants to run. I decide it’s time to pick up jogging again and so We’re doing this! I’m one of those

7:48 p.m. Puppy bolts upstairs, pauses in doorway of kid 1’s room like she’s spotted the chocolate waterfall in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Puppy is about to destroy all the things. Put puppy in crate so kids can brush teeth, put on pajamas, argue, set up an obstacle course and read a book. Kids in beds, puppy out of crate to pee. Kid 1 kisses puppy goodnight. Puppy jumps into kid 2’s bed, digs at the covers, then collapses at his feet. With puppy, kid 2 can finally fall asleep without a parent in the room.

KIDS VT

3:18 p.m. Kid 1 storms through the door, lets the dog out of the pen, lays down on the floor while hyper puppy scratches her face. Kid laughs, then cries. I ask her to take the puppy outside to pee. She does, but gets

3:44 p.m. Back inside, kid 2 lays with puppy and strokes her ears. Kid whispers in puppy’s ear: “I still can’t believe we have a puppy … the cutest puppy in the whole world.”

“jogging with my dog” people! Puppy zigzags, leash instantly wraps around my legs, I narrowly escape a sidewalk face plant. Would kids be scarred if we returned puppy?

JULY 2017

2:33 p.m. Plop puppy into her spa/ pen: ice water, chew stick, peanut butter toy, plush bed. Puppy barks. I shake bottle of pennies at her. She cocks her head to the side and barks louder. Leave to pick up kids.

distracted by a bug and drops the leash. I run outside and grab it before puppy bolts into road.

KIDSVT.COM

10:06 a.m. Time for a “walk.” Exit front door with leash in same hand as coffee cup. Puppy bolts, coffee explodes. Puppy expels a poop that includes a coffee bean. I’m surprised it’s not a Lego. Puppy chases a leaf. And eats a mosquito. And sniffs every single blade of grass. I confess to puppy that I’m not really a dog person. She seems OK with it. Puppy is suddenly terrified by a lawn mower. Trainer said to normalize scary by acting cheerful. I blurt: “Lawn mowers are AWESOME!” in a too-loud voice and force a demented chuckle. Puppy turns feral, attempts to chew off leash. This means she’s tired, so we sit down on someone’s lawn. Relax. Really, this

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MEREDITH COEYMAN

THE ART OF B Y ME RE DI T H COEY MAN


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KIDSVT.COM

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MATTHEW THORSEN

BALANCING ACT

BY J E SSI CA LARA TI CKT I N

Mieko Ozeki & Josh Blumberg An interfaith couple on intentional parenting, commuting and the benefits of raising an only child

B

urlington couple Josh and Mieko met in 2001 when they were teaching fellows at a residential high school in Estes Park, Colorado, and they have been together ever since. Though they come from different cultural backgrounds — Josh is Jewish and Mieko is Japanese and Chinese — they have a lot in common. They are both only children who grew up in cities — she in New York City, and he in Baltimore. They share a love of rock climbing and hiking, and value community. Their strong communication skills, and their mutual desire to reflect upon and improve their lives, serve them well as they navigate the challenges of parenting a toddler.

together?” Saturday night is much easier! Josh: The timing with both of us working is just crazy. I tried a couple of times, but I have to zip home at lunch, then leave work early to get it done, and it’s just not reasonable. There is no good way to do it with both parents working. But I want her to grow up with that [Shabbat dinner] tradition. That’s a goal of mine to work on for the next year.

In “Balancing Act,” we ask Vermont parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

15

On intentional parenting: Mieko: Intention. This is a word that

On the benefits of raising an only child: Josh: We are both only children, and I think there was a certain lack of chaos we both grew up with, so both of us are content having one kid. The nice thing about that, if we do it right, is that it gives us the ability to take her everywhere and do more things with her. !

JULY 2017

On finding some flexibility between their jobs: Josh: The challenge of Vermont is that it’s a small marketplace and invariably people no longer stay at their jobs for 30 years. Mieko changed jobs last year and liked the mission of the place [Yestermorrow], but it’s an hour commute. It’s worked out really well having her telecommute two days a week because I can plan certain things on those days to balance me out — like if I want to do something in the evening I will plan for it on those days. It’s a strain, but I think it’s really hard to get by on one salary anymore with the cost of living. I don’t think we always thrive, but we always get by.

came up for us before we had Naomi. Both of our parents waited to have us at a later age [in their 30s] as they focused on their careers and relationships. They were intentional in their parenting. My mom always told me that she and my dad talked through having me, and how they were going to care for a child. My mom took five years off to stay at home with me. After years of working with young people at a school in Colorado and organizations in both Massachusetts and Vermont, I think we both observed the impact of intentional and unintentional parenting.

KIDS VT

We are both only children, and I think there was a certain lack of chaos we both grew up with, so both of us are content having one kid.

Josh: Now with Mieko’s job an hour away and Naomi at daycare in town, I didn’t want my only access to be by bike, and that wasn’t going to fly in the winter so well. So we bought the second car. Mieko: It was hard, especially being into sustainability — a second car?! But we got a deal on a hybrid.

KIDSVT.COM

On developing a spiritual tradition: Mieko: I am agnostic and Josh is On keeping in shape Jewish. We celebrate the Jewish and limiting their holidays. For the most part, for Josh I carbon footprint: think it’s the community aspect more Josh: I got a used bike trailer so I than the religious aspects. I am more can bike with Naomi and drop her off into observing that with him, and for at daycare, and then I keep going to Naomi it’s to give her a sense of being Champlain College, and come back to part of that community. pick her up after I finish work. I am Josh: I think people need that origin. not hard-core enough to go through They become really the winter, and even uncentered if they in the summer I don’t have somewill probably do it thing, whatever three to four days a that something is. week, and one day a I think it’s human week I’ll need to run nature to need that errands. But it’s such spiritual grounda nice way to keep ing. I see people myself in shape. And who desperately Naomi loves it — she sought stuff out gets really upset if because they didn’t we have to get in the JOSH BLUMBERG grow up with it, car, which is actually and that’s definitely really good motivasomething I want tion for me. to provide Naomi. I’d like to have some Mieko: When I was pregnant, I would of those Jewish traditions be part of walk to work every day — from my our home, like Friday night Shabbat house in the New North End to the dinner. top of the hill at the University of Mieko: Putting a challah [bread] Vermont, where I worked at the time. together is nearly impossible on It was exactly four miles. I listened to Friday evening! We like cooking and books on tape and I think it made my I used to bake bread and now it’s like, pregnancy a lot easier. We got by with “When are going to put a challah one car for six years!

DAD: Josh Blumberg, 42, Director of Academic Technology at Champlain College MOM: Mieko Ozeki, 37, Program Director at Yestermorrow Design/Build School DAUGHTER: Naomi, 21 months


PARENT PORTRAIT

PHOTO BY SA M SI MO N • I NT E RVI E W BY ERI NN SI M ON

Amy, Isabella, Natalie & Oscar the Dog What does Oscar like to do? Natalie, 3: He takes our socks … and he tries to get them from us! Isabella, 5: We try to get them from his mouth but he just plays tug-of-war with them!

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KIDS VT

JULY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

How does Oscar fit into family life? Amy, 37: He loves to go on errands with us. Whenever we’re leaving the house he comes right to the door. When the girls haven’t seen him they’ll say, “I can’t wait to see Oscar!”

As a parent, what’s the best thing about having Oscar? Amy: The girls have such a great bond with him. Isabella often asks to help feed him and walk him. I feel like he’s taught them to have real compassion. And a real, true love of animals.

Want to be featured in an upcoming Parent Portrait? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

THE

ISSUE


HABITAT

THE

B Y B RYAN PARMELEE

The Catio

Shogun in action

Diane and Matthew in the catio with Shogun, Buddy and Lamar

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See more photos online at kidsvt.com

KIDS VT

17

“Habitat” celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you’d like us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

JULY 2017

Buddy relaxing on a perch

Lamar checking out the stray dinner guest

chain-link fence comprises the center of the catio. Similar kennels can be purchased from most pet or hardware stores. The rest of the structure is made from an impressive array of repurposed or readily available materials creatively assembled to make the kennel “cat-proof.” To prevent the cats from climbing out, the couple laid a large mesh sheet and tarp over its top, which is supported in the center by a large tree branch from the yard. Lengths of 1x2-inch lumber run from the perimeter of the kennel to the central branch for extra support and resemble a rustic patio umbrella. Zip ties and rope secure the tarp cover to the top of the kennel. The interior of the catio is filled with additional tree branches and repurposed wood and furniture. The materials have been cleverly arranged to create multilevel ramps and shelves for exploring. Many of the tree branches are wrapped in rope, providing the pets with plenty of scratching posts. On a sunny June afternoon all three of the couples’ cats — Shogun, Lamar and Esteban Buddy Christmas Pickle — could be seen frolicking throughout the catio. Not only does the creative dwelling bring the feline-loving couple some much-needed peace of mind, said Thorsen, “It also gives the cats a chance to escape from us.” !

KIDSVT.COM

iane Sullivan and Matthew Thorsen are well aware of the challenges presented by owning cats with an insatiable desire to explore the outdoors. “When cats go outside, you not only have to worry about them getting injured, eaten or eating something poisonous,” explained Sullivan, art director for Seven Days and creator of the Kids VT animal-centric coloring contest. “You have to worry about them killing a bunch of birds, too.” After suffering a few pet tragedies while living near a busy intersection in Burlington, the couple brainstormed a nifty solution that allows their cats to wander outside but keeps both the felines and local wildlife safe from harm. “I started building the catio as soon as we moved into our house in Essex,” said Thorsen, staff photographer for both Seven Days and Kids VT. “The catio” he speaks of is an enclosed outdoor structure connected to the couple’s basement window by an aboveground tunnel, which allows the cats to venture into the backyard without roaming wild. The couple crafted the tunnel from milk crates with their bottoms removed, lined up side by side and wrapped in canvas, with cat doors at both ends. A 10x10-foot outdoor dog kennel that looks like a taller-than-average

PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

ISSUE


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ISSUE

PHOTOS: TRISTAN VON DUNTZ

Freshwater Explorers

THE

Students look at rainbow and brook trout

BY SARAH GALBRAITH

River snorkeling exposes kids to the life aquatic

I

his job sends him snorkeling all around the world. “I can tell you,” he said, “there are a lot of rivers that are not like that.” He explained that Vermonters are lucky to have the Forest Service that “takes beautiful care of the land, which means that we have this beautiful river we can go and snorkel in.” When he asks who else is responsible for keeping rivers clean, the kids respond in unison, and without hesitation: “Us!” !

KIDS VT

19

DO IT YOURSELF! With a mask and snorkel, families can explore rivers and lakes on their own. A few safety tips: Pay attention to water depth and temperature, watch for strong currents, and look downriver for dangerous obstructions like boulders or downed trees.

JULY 2017

shouted to her friends, A shallow section of the White River in Rochester “Look, a big trout!” This section of the White River was damaged after Tropical Storm Irene in 2011. The Vermont Agency of Transportation dredged the area for rocks and gravel to rebuild roads and eroded hillsides, which disrupted the shape and flow of the river and killed vegetation along one side. U.S. Forest Service staff To return the river help kids collect water bugs to its natural healthy state, the U.S. Forest Service restored the waterway’s twists and turns and installed mesh along its sides to hold the banks together until vegetation could regrow. They laid down gigantic tree stumps, partially submerged in the water, to provide a habitat for fish and birds and act teachers, dressed casually in nylon as a natural buffer against any future shorts, sandals and a baseball cap. storm damage. Their work provided Kids chimed in: “It has living things in a prime location for this education it.” “It’s not polluted.” “It’s clear.” program. Later, another instructor, still in “What does it mean for water to be his wetsuit, said, “This is a pretty healthy?” asked one of the NorthBay healthy river.” He should know, since

KIDSVT.COM

n a shallow section of the White River, surrounded by wildflower fields and the Green Mountain National Forest, elementary school students peered into the water, searching for aquatic creatures. Some kicked at gravel at the bottom of the river, hoping to rouse specimens; others scooped up bugs downstream. The kids darted back and forth from the water to a nearby table, where they emptied their nets and separated the critters into ice cube trays filled with river water. Using printed identification keys, they learned that they had caught stoneflies, caddisflies and mayflies — all of which indicate a healthy body of water. In early June, third through twelfth graders from schools in central Vermont participated in the inaugural Freshwater Snorkeling Education Program. Conducted by the U.S. Forest Service in Vermont, the program is designed to help kids understand aquatic life and habitats, and how they are impacted by human actions. In a deeper section upriver, another group prepared to go underwater. Donning masks, snorkels and wet suits, they followed instructors from NorthBay Adventure — a Marylandbased environmental education group — into the water to check out the rainbow and brook trout below. One girl popped up from the water and


Farm-Raised

20

BY ALISON NOVAK AND CATHY RESMER

F

ounded more than a century ago, 4-H is the country’s largest youth development organization. Through its clubs, camps, competitions and clinics, the program reaches nearly six million kids ages 5 to 19 in the U.S. — including around 6,000 in Vermont, according to the state’s program director Sarah Kleinman. Attend a county fair or visit a local farm and you’ll likely spot the 4-H emblem — a green clover with a bold “H” on each of its leaves representing Head, Heart, Hands and Health. The program was started as a way of passing along agricultural knowledge. Though today’s club members can choose from a menu of projects that includes engineering, community service and performing arts, 4-H still retains its ag roots. In Vermont, 4-H clubs are overseen by the University of Vermont Extension. Club members here rely on around 500 adult volunteers and 150 older youth helpers for guidance, but the kids themselves run the clubs and decide which projects to pursue. There’s no “instructor” in the traditional sense — in 4-H, participants learn by doing. If there are any teachers, you might say they’re the farm animals. Livestock projects remain a staple of the 4-H experience. In many cases, the kids are learning about the animals through their relationships with them. 4-H’ers might learn to assess an animal’s vital signs and groom it, explained Rose Garritano, a 4-H educator for Chittenden County. Participants can also “show” their animals in competitions that test kids’ knowledge, handling and presentation skills. 4-H doesn’t provide its members with animals, though often kids can lease them for a small fee. Kids VT visited two of Vermont’s 125 4-H clubs to hear about the program from the kids themselves.

THE

ISSUE

Neika Haire with Skippy

OLIVER PARINI

KIDS VT

JULY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Kids

4-H members share what they’ve learned about animals — and themselves


OLIVER PARINI

In the Barn With the Midnight Riders

-AN

What are the horse shows like? You get there and put your horse in your stall and take care of them and brush them so they look really nice. There’s one judge who will tell you what to do — to walk or trot or canter — and then you all line up and they announce your places. There are different classes: there’s pleasure, which is like how pleasurable your horse is and how nice they are, and there’s equitation, which is how you look on your horse and how you’re riding. Can you talk about the relationship you’ve built with other 4-H members? It’s a really close group of friends and we’re very welcoming. It’s kind of like a family.

Vivie Babbott, 13, Hinesburg

since then. As she talked animatedly about working with obstinate horses, it became clear she enjoys a good challenge. The camaraderie she’s developed with 4-H members of all ages is also one of the things she’s enjoyed. “It’s all about learning, having fun and building relationships you wouldn’t really expect,” she explained. What are some of your favorite 4-H activities? I like the interactive games — learning by doing — so, like, learning how to braid a horse’s mane by grooming the horse and braiding it yourself. If we were to learn about vaccinations of the horse, I want to see the vet do it instead of just hearing about it because you learn on a different level when you’re doing it.

Do you spend a lot of time with the horses over the summer? I ride my horse four times a week, and I also help out with camps all day. I don’t really want to be out on the boat tubing. This is my summer. This is my home. It’s where I prefer to be and where I’m comfortable.

Neika Haire, 11, Charlotte Neika participates in 4-H with her older sister, Ella. During the summer months, she helps out at Livery’s riding camps, walking younger kids around in the ring. Sometimes they’re scared, she said, “but usually they’re just really excited to ride a horse.” What are some of the things you’ve enjoyed in your three years in 4-H? I really enjoy doing community work and doing volunteering. We’ve done community meals and Green Up Day, and it’s really fun to do it with friends and interact with different people we haven’t met before. Do you feel like you really get to know horses’ personalities when you ride them? Yeah, like some of them are really shy and some are really forward. I usually ride Skippy because he is really good at shows and has been to lots of horse shows. Moxie, he isn’t as good with ground work — that means like walking around with your horse. He likes to bite sometimes. But we’re breaking FARM-RAISED KIDS, P. 22 »

21

Tell me about some of the horses you’ve worked with and what they’ve taught you. I worked for about two and a half years with a large horse. Her name’s Star. She was in the field for like 17 years and I took her out of the field. She was a brat. The second year I was leasing her I brought her to horse shows. She was kind of crazy. We got kicked out because she would buck and take off. I still love that horse a lot. She’s a stubborn horse but she taught me more than a horse that did everything I asked would. I’ve moved on to a different horse who has challenges of his own. His name is Mack. He’s been to a lot of homes where he hasn’t been treated properly, so he’s still trying to overcome some of those fears. At one point you couldn’t tie him to a fence because he thought someone was going to hurt him. Horses are amazing and they teach you a lot more than just riding. With Star it was patience. That’s a life skill everyone needs to know. You’re going to work

with difficult people no matter if you want to or not. As a rider, she taught me how to stay on. With Mack, one of his things is he likes to go really, really fast and be uncontrollable so that obviously made me really strong, but it also taught me patience and that not everything comes overnight.

KIDS VT

Athletic and well-spoken, Vivie has been riding horses since she was 6 years old. She joined 4-H at age 8, and has been participating on and off

Vivie Babbott with Mack

JULY 2017

The rising high school freshman, who says she spends “pretty much every day during the summer” at the barn, comes from a family of horse riders. In her five years of 4-H membership, Phoebe says her proudest accomplishment was being named weekend champion at a horse show in Addison County — an honor that came with a huge trophy she displays in her room.

What are some of the things you’ve learned about horses? We did one project where we learned about Potomac Horse Fever. We learned about all the symptoms and how you can treat it and how you can prevent it. It’s basically like a fever that horses can get from drinking water with a parasite in it. We learned about how to keep your water clean and prevent the little bugs from getting into your barn. After we learned about that, we all made sure we were scrubbing our buckets and turning the lights off in the barn at night.

KIDSVT.COM

Phoebe Mason, 14, Hinesburg

Do you have a favorite horse? Yeah, my favorite horse is Merlin. He’s really calm and he’s kind of just like a big teddy bear. He loves to snuggle and he’s super sweet.

OLIVER PARINI

Kim Johansen has been a 4-H leader for 25 years. She and her husband, Scott, purchased an old cow farm in Hinesburg and converted it to what is now the Livery Horse Farm when their daughter, Gabrielle, was 2 years old. In addition to teaching private lessons and running horseback riding camps, Johansen currently leads a 4-H club of around 14 members along with Gabrielle, now 27. The group’s focus is on both horses and community service; they call themselves the Midnight Riders. On a sunny Saturday in June, pony- and pigtailed girls sporting riding britches and T-shirts milled around Johansen’s weathered red barn, tending to some of the 19 horses that reside there. The stable houses a wide variety of equines, explained the flaxen-haired Johansen, from animals she’s rescued to “upper-end show Phoebe Mason on Merlin horses.” The girls brushed and braided the horses’ coarse hair, weaving small yellow flowers into the mane of a 21-year-old pony named Peaches who, by Johansen’s estimation, has taught thousands of kids to ride over the years. The girls then tacked up some of the horses in preparation for an energetic group drill they were practicing for an upcoming horse show — and spent a few minutes talking with a reporter.


Farm-Raised Kids

CONTINUED FROM P. 21

Olivia Osekoski, 11, Hinesburg

Olivia Osekoski on Peaches

Olivia, who’s entering middle school next year, had seen posters around town advertising 4-H, but wasn’t sure exactly what it was until her friend told her she should try it. She’s been doing the program for under a year and said she really enjoys it.

Have you had any mishaps while riding? I once fell off of a mini pony. These two younger kids were riding bigger horses and so they got really close to me and he got a bit spooked and he halted and I just fell off forward. When you fall off a horse, it’s kind of like, Oh, I just fell off! and sometimes it just hits you emotionally, I guess. I didn’t hurt myself at all. I just got sad.

Are there certain horses you like to ride? Right now I’m riding Peaches because I’m showing her next weekend, and Flower is also really nice. I like Peaches because she can keep her trot going and she’s really sweet. A lot of the little kids ride her so she’s really calm and doesn’t buck as much. And Flower can’t keep her trot as long but she’s really calm as well. I like more calm horses. It keeps me calmer on the horse.

JAMES BUCK

OLIVER PARINI

the habit. You just have to kind of stop them, yank them and show them it’s not okay. Sometimes you can tap their nose a bit. It doesn’t really hurt them but it shows them. Most horses do [learn quickly] but Moxie’s a different story.

Zach Lovejoy with his yet-to-be-named duck

Pursuing Poultry With High Hopes

How do you prepare for horse shows? This is my first show coming up but I’ve been to my friend’s show. You have to braid the horse, clean it off, make sure its whole body is clean. I have to clean off my boots. There’s a lot of work you have to do for the shows. Are you looking forward to the show? I’m a little nervous, but I’m looking forward to it. I’m doing one day out of the two days. I have seven events on Saturday. I don’t know all of them, but one of them is trail. The trail course, it’s like an obstacle course. Usually there’s a mailbox and a gate you have to open. It’s pretty cool.

JULY 2017 KIDS VT

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JAMES BUCK

KIDSVT.COM

Miranda Gallagher with Fawn

The High Hopes 4-H club meets once a week on a 75-acre farm in Fairfax, owned by group leader Amanda Gifford and her husband, Paul Baumier. The couple shares the property with their seven horses, seven cats, a turtle, and 85 ducks and chickens. The property also serves as the campus of Avalon Triumvirate Academy, Gifford and Baumier’s small, independent school for kids in grades 4-12. Gifford founded High Hopes 23 years ago when she and Baumier lived in Colchester. They’ve moved twice since then — once to Swanton, and then to Fairfax in 2003. Both of their grown children participated in the 4-H program. Today Gifford estimates there are 15 to 20 kids in their club, depending on the time of year and sports schedules. High Hopes kids can take part in riding projects with the horses and they handle many of the birds — though not all of them, notes project leader Mary Ellen Tourville, whose kids, Ali and Joe, are part of the club. “We don’t really want to make relationships with the meat birds,” she said quietly during a poultry project meeting one weeknight in June. That’s not to say that the kids don’t talk about death. Dealing with an animal’s demise is one of the inevitable life lessons kids learn through 4-H. “I can’t tell you how many of everyone’s best friends are buried here,” Gifford observed. Most of the lessons are less dramatic. “I’m looking for kids to learn the life skills, not necessarily the poultry skills,” Gifford offered. “I want

them to learn public speaking, time management.” The learning process can also be comical. At that poultry project meeting, 10 kids gathered in a circle, while the adults looked on. Some 4-Hers held chicks or ducklings, others had full-size hens. “Awww, you pooped on me!” complained one girl. Another girl struggled to get her chicken into its crate; it broke free, and a group of kids and adults scrambled to corral it. Quipped Gifford: “It takes a village to catch a chicken.”

-CR

Zach Lovejoy, 14, Georgia The genial, self-possessed teen is the High Hopes club president. His 3 1/2 -week-old Ancona duckling is a new one; his first duck, a Rouen named Mrs. Quackers that he leased from Gifford for three years, went missing recently — a likely victim of predators. He hasn’t named the new duck yet; it squawked loudly while Zach talked to a reporter. He lovingly stroked her head to calm her. “She’s just a little nervous,” he said. Why did you get involved in 4-H? I started going four or five years ago. A lot of it was that it was a good way to get into hobbies, like cooking, drama, animals. What do you do as club president? I write the agendas for the business meetings and keep the club intact during the meetings. I’ve learned a lot about leadership and working as a team with other people. CONTINUED AFTER “JUST FOR KIDS” SECTION


JUST FOR KIDS A-Mazing Animals

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page IN S ID E ! Birthday Club Puzzle Answers, P. 43

Belfry the Bat is going crazy trying to find her best buddy, Koko Koala, who is somewhere among all the other animals. Can you help Belfry wing it along the fastest flight path to her fuzzy friend? If you are blocked by an animal, try another route.


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

One of the best parts of summer is jumping into cool water on a steamy day! Write a poem or paragraph about swimming. Where is your favorite place to swim? What do you like to do in the pool, lake or stream? How do you feel when you’re underwater? Attach an extra piece of paper if you need more space to write.

COLORING CONTEST WINNERS This month’s gorilla generated an imaginative array of artwork. Ten-year-old Ruby’s ape was X-rayed in the doctor’s office, revealing a whale in the beast’s belly. Darien, 4, made a vibrant masterpiece with oil pastels, coloring her monkey in bright yellow, crimson and navy blue. Sophia, 7, fashioned a forest around her mighty mammal, with tall trees and blue mountains, and decorated her creature’s pelt with stripes and curly-cues. Savor your summer break, young artists, but don’t forget to send us your coloringcontest entries by mid-month.

HONORABLE MENTIONS SWEET SUSIE

Capitolia Santamore, 9, Craftsbury

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“Gorilla Love” Eleanor Hammond, 5

5& under

SHOREHAM

TRUE COLORS

Jaxon Dailey, 5, Wells THE SPOTTED SLOTH

Jennifer Blanshine, 9, Charlotte GOOD VIBES

Marshall Moffatt, 11, Enosberg Falls GREAT APE

Catherine St. Marthe, 4, Essex Junction We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is July 15.

Name ________________________________

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Email ________________________________

Madeline Knudson, 7, Winooski

Town ________________________________

INCREDIBLE IVAN

Phone ________________________________

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to write a poem about their dad in honor of Father’s Day. Below, find the winning entries. Sawyer and Sage each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

WINOOSKI

KEVIN Kind to me and others Everyday he plays games with me Very loving I love to give him hugs Not an ordinary guy

Ana Corriveau, 4, Underhill STAR LIGHT, STAR BRIGHT

Trudi Holzman, 8, Essex Junction

“The Rainbow Monkey” Rosalie Martel, 7 COLCHESTER

6 to 8

GRINNING GORILLA

Josie Chauvin, 9, Ferrisburgh

WRITING WINNERS

Sage Norsworthy, 10

DINNERTIME

Age __________________________________

JAMMIN’ IN THE JUNGLE

Sawyer Willard, 7

BARNET

I like helping Papa with sugaring, And I like chopping with Papa. I like playing soccer. And I like walking in the woods with Papa. I like to check if the tap lines fell or if a squirrel chewed a hole in the tap lines. I love you!

Vivian Zhang, 7, St. Albans MICKEY MOUSE

Max Barron, 4, Winooski SUNNY SMILE

Acadia Kessler, 7, Warren

TOP TITLES “THE GORILLA WHO WASHED IN THE RAINBOW RIVER”

Eda Josinsky, 4, North Hero “WANDER ON, LITTLE MAN”

Lindsey Adelle Johnson, 8, Georgia “POKADOT DIMENSION”

Laurie-Anne Fournier, 10, Montpelier

“Summer Bliss” Kape Clements, 11 JAY

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by July 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the August issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________________ Age ______________ Town __________________________ Email _____________________________________________ Phone _____________________________________________


JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

Birthday Club

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

ster and MEI-LING lives in Colche loves turns 12 on July 26. She rs and soccer, hockey, Star Wa l and the ma ani the th (bo penguins lly happy hockey team). She is rea won the the Pittsburgh Penguins year. this in aga p Cu y nle Sta ay-party Mei-Ling gets a birthd e 2.0. package to the FunZon

MASON lives

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

in Burlington and turns 5 on July 9. He’s a funny and energetic boy who enjoys being outdoors and playing golf with his dad. He loves going into his sister’s room, and anything Transformers-related.

Print your answer here:

RONIN

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Riddle Search — BARBECUE SUPPLIES Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: What do spiders eat at summer cookouts?

BENCH BRUSH BUG SPRAY CAN OPENER CHARCOAL DISH FORK GRILL KNIFE LIGHTER

Sponsored by

MUG PLATTER SKEWER SPATULA TABLE TONGS TRASH BAG

lives in Ferrisburgh and turns 9 on July 14. He is an avid basketball and football fan who enjoys spending time with his family and best friend, Ryker. He loves teaching people fun facts about sports and famous athletes.

MAXWELL

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 43

lives in Morrisville and turns 4 on July 15. He likes to read and create things like books, art and robots. He enjoys watching the sunset and learning about insects and squid. He really wants to be a scientist when he grows up!

Congratulations to these July Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Mason, Ronin and Maxwell get FunZone 2.0 gift cards.


Farm-Raised Kids CONTINUED FROM P. 22

What are some of the challenges you’ve faced? Sometimes I’m a little bit late on writing the agendas. It was kind of hard, losing Mrs. Quackers. You kind of form an attachment. I used to come here every Wednesday for horseback riding. I would spend so much time with her. It was kind of cool to go back to school and say, “I have a pet duck.” But, you know, you get through it. You move on.

Miranda Gallagher, 10, Fairfax In 2016, Miranda was the Vermont winner of the national Healthy Lunchtime Challenge; last summer, she and her mom went to lunch at the White House and met Michelle Obama. Her winning recipe was a chicken salad wrap with mapleglazed veggies. This summer, instead of serving chicken, she’s preparing to show her Americana hen at the fair. What’s your chicken’s name? Fawn, like the deer — as you can see on her feathers are little cloven footprints. Have you shown her at the fair before? This is my first year showing. No experience. At all. Whatsoever.

Sam Hurteau with Fluff

Invite us over! ✱ HABITAT

Habitat celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Do you have a creative space? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com 6h-habitat0317.indd 1

2/23/17 5:26 PM

Sam Hurteau, 9, Georgia Sam is one of three Hurteau siblings in the High Hopes club; his brothers Porter and Toby are also members. Sam was one of the smaller kids at the poultry project meeting, but he spoke confidently about handling chickens — his family has 10 of them, including Sam’s Rhode Island Red, named Fluff, which he hopes to show for the first time this summer. What do you like about 4-H? I do baking. I think that’s really fun. And I like just handling all the animals. They kind of keep me company. Are you nervous about showing your chicken at the fair? Yeah, a little bit. I really don’t want our chickens to jump around a lot. We keep on handling them as much as we can.

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU, EVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

How do you handle a chicken? You stroke it the way the feathers are going, otherwise they get ruffled. Just picking it up, it always calms down a lot just because it has someone — some company. !

If you’re a family of four with a household income up to $3793/month, or your child is covered by Dr. Dynasaur then WIC is for you. Income guidelines vary based on family size.

Sign up for WIC today! Call 8OO-649-4357 or visit healthvermont.gov/wic Untitled-7 1

23

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

KIDS VT

Find out more about 4-H in Vermont at uvm.edu/extension/youth.

WIC provides healthy food, nutrition education, and personalized support to pregnant women, moms and their babies, and kids up to five years old. Come meet with our nutritionists and peer counselors – they’re ready to listen and share information.

JULY 2017

What have you learned through 4-H? Showmanship and incubation of chickens, parts of the chicken, baking, general cooking.

Why do you like animals so much? Because they’re colorful, fuzzy, feathery, scaly. And they’re really good listeners.

KIDSVT.COM

Why do you want to show your chicken? One reason I don’t want to do it is I really don’t want to have to study every single part of the bird. I do want to do it, because I really want to know if she has all the exact traits of an Americana.

Cooking chicken? No, no! I would never do that in front of my chicken.

JAMES BUCK

What was it like, showing Mrs. Quackers at the Champlain Valley Fair? It was a lot of fun. We went early with the birds; we got the birds cleaned up and settled, then we got to walk around a little. We got dressed up — white button-up shirt with dress pants. It was kind of cool because we were all fancy, and it felt like you were important.

Proud of your project?

4/27/17 11:37 AM


ILLUSTRATIONS BY KIM SCAFURO

THE

Rescue Mission

ISSUE

We were afraid to fall for another dog — until the universe sent us Biden BY NICCI MICCO

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JULY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

W

hen you’re 8 and 10.” This was the mantra my husband, Jon, and I recited when our boys, Kai and Julian — then 6 and 8 — started asking for a new dog. We’d just lost Dempsey, our 11-year-old golden retriever, to cancer. We weren’t ready. Not then. Not six months later. Not even a year later. Emotions aside, logistics were problematic. When we’d adopted Demps, I was a freelancer working from home. We had one cat and lots of outdoor parties. Now we were managing two office jobs, two cats and two kids. We lived out of laundry baskets, never quite able to put away our clean clothes. We lost library books. Jon and I were aligned: no new dog. Then, about a year ago, our neighbors fostered a dog. Their friend ran a dogrescue group that relied on volunteers to take in and care for homeless animals until they found their “forever families.” The dog’s name was Roxy. She was 3 years old, brown and beautiful, with short legs and floppy ears that seemed to defy gravity. She was good with kids and liked me a lot. After an evening of heavy petting, I could imagine loving another dog. “Let’s adopt her,” I blurted out.

Jon was anti-Roxy: “No way. She barks at me.” “Let’s foster.” “No. The boys will get attached.” I moved on. Then Jon started wishing for a dog. Without one, hikes were less fun; runs seemed incomplete. Julian upped the ante by sharing his school project that stated: “If I had 100 dollars, I’d buy a dog” (and 100 dogs, with 10K). I told the boys if they wanted a dog, they should start making their beds. We repeated our “8 and 10” mantra less often. Jon and I started discussing adoption. Having heard about the dog-overpopulation problem, primarily in the South — animals dumped in the trash, found wandering as strays, killed because there wasn’t enough room in shelters — we were both committed to getting a dog from a Humane Society or rescue group. I advocated for a young-ish dog (they “needed us” more, housebreaking would be easier); Jon pushed for a baby (safer with kids and cats, our boys should get to raise a puppy). A big, fluffy golden retriever was out; we didn’t think we could handle a pup that looked too much like Dempsey. We’d known and loved retrievers, shepherds and Rottweilers, but really our requirements were simple: good

with kids, good with dogs, good with cats. Oh, and “people eyes.” I started searching online, casually — until a litter of puppies, named for Thanksgiving dishes (it was November), appeared on the Humane Society of Chittenden County’s website. They looked half Rottie, half human. From what I’d heard, adopting a dog in Vermont was like landing an apartment in New York City. You needed to show up, fast, with references and a check. I emailed Jon: Can you go see these guys today? He could not. Gah. When we called the next day, only one dog was left. By the time Jon made it to the Humane Society, “Casserole,” too, was gone. But the experience left us wanting a dog. Really wanting a dog. We were getting a dog. I downloaded the Petfinder app to my phone and refreshed hourly. I expanded filters, contemplating road trips to New Hampshire and Maine. I launched searches in Pennsylvania and Ohio, reasoning we could pick up a pup while visiting my parents for Thanksgiving. I completed rescue-group applications. Made doginquiry calls during the 11-hour drive to my parents’ house, never mind that they had a 3-month-old golden retriever and would be RESCUE MISSION, P. 26 »


READY TO RESCUE? When you’re looking to adopt a pet, it’s easy to get swept up in the HEART of it all. Do yourself, and your potential pet, a favor and HEAD through this checklist first. • Consider your lifestyle. A dog requires regular exercise, training and socialization. Do you have time? If not, consider a cat or other small animal. The Humane Society of Chittenden County (HSCC) also rehomes rabbits, ferrets, chinchillas, guinea pigs, mice — even hedgehogs, says Triana Verdery, HSCC customer care assistant. Homeward Bound, Addison County’s Humane Society, also helps birds find new homes. Whatever you choose, think about what you’re getting into. • Create a list of nonnegotiables (e.g., good with kids). Don’t settle for less. If you know exactly what you want (a specific breed or “a

two-year-old brown girl dog”), Verdery suggests using Petfinder.com, an online adoption resource. • Connect and ask questions. Every rescue group works differently. Ask about policies and process. Adopting from the HSCC, which has a firstcome, first-served policy, can be quick: meet the animals, apply, talk with a staff member to ensure a good fit, get approved, head home with your pet (sometimes on the same day). Working with a volunteer-staffed rescue group may take a few weeks. To keep your adoption approval moving smoothly, answer all application questions honestly and give your references

a heads-up. Wait a week to follow up. Once you’re approved and are pet-picking, ask lots of questions about temperament and needs. Avoid making judgments based just on appearance. • Consider fostering first. Fostering-to-adopt can allow for introductions to other pets and an opportunity to experience what life will be like with a new family member. Not all rescues offer it, so ask. • Involve the whole family. Meeting animals together helps ensure everyone is in love with the new addition, says Verdery. Enlisting the whole family in training and socialization helps create consistent routines and a smooth transition.

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2017 KIDS VT

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Our requirements were simple: good with kids, good with dogs, good with cats. Oh, and “people eyes.”


kesher olam Give your kids a legendary kesher olam kesher olam JewishDay Camp experience! New one-week program for kids (ages 4-10)! Monday -Friday, July 24-28 from 9-3 at Beth Jacob & Harrison Ave. Preserve, Montpelier Kesher Olam Camp will offer lots of play, crafts and sports based on Hebrew, Israel and Jewish cultural themes. Cost to parents is only $200 (second child is $180) – thanks to a generous grant from the Gendler Grapevine.

For more information: learning@bethjacobvt.org

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6/22/17 3:52 PM

SWING INTO SUMMER SALE

95 No. Brownell Rd., Williston 802-652-0100 rainbowvermont@yahoo.com www.rainbowplay.com

$100 OFF any Play System (Bring in this coupon to receive this offer) Expires 8/31/17

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5/23/17 12:57 PM

The Vermont Cub Project Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

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KIDSVT.COM

Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today! Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

Say you saw it in

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Rescue Mission CONTINUED FROM P. 24

hosting my brother’s 4-year-old beagle. I’d totally lost my mind. The universe took note and, during this stretch of unhinged behavior, did not grant us a dog. A week later, I received an email from Brigitte Thompson, founder of VT Dog Rescue in Hinesburg, responding to my application. She wanted to help but our vet reference revealed our cats weren’t current with their vaccinations. The note prompted two realizations. First, that I needed to slow things down and evaluate our ability to care for another being. Second, that I wanted to work with Brigitte — she was thorough and thoughtful. After getting our cats up to date and exchanging emails with Brigitte, we were approved. We agreed a puppy would be best and that we should wait until spring. It was mid-December; soon, we’d be snowboarding every Saturday. We’d start looking again in March. This decision was enough to stop my online animal stalking. Still, I always opened VT Dog Rescue’s email alerts. Which is how, in February, I fell in love with Yoda after seeing his headshot. He had “people eyes” and fluffy ears that reminded me of Roxy’s. “Picking a pet just because it’s cute is one of the biggest mistakes,” says Thompson. But we kept asking questions. Yoda seemed good with dogs and cats, and he was a lover who followed his foster mom around. He’d be in Vermont on March 4 — our last day of snowboarding. The universe wanted us to adopt this dog. And so it happened. We picked him up at the Hinesburg Police Station, where we could stay warm waiting for the dozen and a half pups en route from Alabama. An hour after expected, a large truck toting an even larger trailer rolled in. A young woman and friendly man in overalls (turns out, she was the vet who cared for the dogs; he was her father) hopped out and started passing out pups: babies swaddled in bath towels, older dogs on leashes. I took hold of Yoda, wrapped in pink, and hugged him to my chest. He was smelly and shivering. As instructed, we hustled him to our car. He whimpered the whole way home. Within his first five minutes inside, he peed in three places, dropped a deuce under our dining room table and crashed into a cart, breaking a glass. Puppy-proofing

Local Resources to Get You Started Dogs, cats and other small animals: • Humane Society of Chittenden County: chittendenhumane.org • Homeward Bound: homewardboundanimals.org Just pups: • VT Dog Rescue: vtdogrescue.com • All Breed Rescue: allbreedrescuevt.com • Random Rescue: randomrescue.org

fail. We bathed him, then sat on the floor with the boys and got to know this sweet being. All felt right. Brigitte had suggested that we first sign on as a foster family, giving us a week to ensure a good fit. By the next morning, based on Yoda’s mellow behavior with the kids and cats, we were committed. We sent in the adoption forms and decided to rename him: Yo Biden, after our favorite vice president. I’ve mostly repressed the sleepless nights and pee puddles of those first weeks. A few months in, I marvel that we landed this perfect pup. He’s chill, totally kid-tolerant and smart. Originally described as “a fluffy shepherd mix,” he looks more boxer/retriever/houndish. He has webbed toes like a golden; recently, his ears and tail have fluffed up. I’m convinced he’s partDempsey — just the right amount. We’ve been able to manage schedules. Julian and I carved out time for a five-week puppy class and are continuing to work on training. Twice a week, a woman in our neighborhood picks up Biden and takes him for off-leash adventures with four other puppies. On Wednesdays, Biden and I run with my friend, Michelle, and her dog. Twice a week, I walk him during my lunch break. Occasionally, Jon takes him to work. I’d argue the changes we’ve made to accommodate our dog are good for Jon and me. No doubt, Biden’s presence has been good for the kids. When I asked the boys what Biden has given them, I expected to hear about hiking and tennis balls. “Love,” Jules responded immediately. “And trust,” Kai chimed in. And there you have it. !


Julie Richards Photography

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A

CALENDAR

JULY

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LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL PIRATE PARK Captains of the seas snap photos with Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate and Mermaid Dalni, cruise with Captain Mike over the Seven Seas through games and children’s activities, and clap for costume winners at 1 p.m. Live music, a bouncy house and more make this a memorable day devoted to the young. Saturday, July 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Waterfront Park in Burlington.

Week to Week MON

Color the Kingdom Run: 5K runners and walkers dressed in white get splattered with a rainbow of colors, then enjoy a community block party. 2 p.m. in Craftsbury Village.

SUN

Circuspalooza: Aerial artists pull off fanciful feats under the Big Top while kids take part in carnival games. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Shelburne Museum.

FRISUN

Fizzy Fest: Young scientists search out the secrets behind carbonated beverages and explore a giant pile of foam. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington.

JULY 3

JULY 21-23

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SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

1 Saturday

Greensboro Fourth of July: “The Funky Fourth of July” features a fun-filled parade at 10 a.m. and fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Greensboro, Info, 533-2911. FREE

ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies, eggs and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9-12:30 a.m.

WASHINGTON

Capital City Farmers Market: Veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at a celebration of locally grown food. Downtown Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 223-2958.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. St. Johnsbury Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088.

CHITTENDEN

Burlington Farmers Market: Growers and artisans offer fresh and ready-to-eat foods, crafts, and more in a bustling marketplace. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Ages 3-7. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $15. Info, 899-0339. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn doit-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon. Preregister at workshops.homedepot. com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Saturday Drama Club: Junior thespians create a character, spin a story and put on a performance, all in three hours. Ages 6-12. Old North End Community Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15. Info, 355-1461. Sensory-Friendly ‘Despicable Me 3’: This special showing keeps the sound down, the lights on, and viewers free to move and talk. Doors open at 9:15 a.m. Essex Cinemas, Essex Junction, 10 a.m. $6.75. Shelburne Farmers Market: Musical entertainment adds merriment to this exchange of local fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, maple syrup and more. Shelburne Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 482-4279. Strawbee Saturdays: Budding builders bust out connecting straws to explore unique shapes and structures. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

FRANKLIN

Bakersfield Independence Day Celebration: The community comes out for old-fashioned fun with a parade at noon, followed by a chicken barbecue, a horseshoe tournament, live music, an air show at 7 p.m. and a fireworks grand finale at dusk. All ages. Route 36 and Route 108, Bakersfield, 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Food available for sale. Info, 827-6145. FREE

GRAND ISLE

Champlain Island Farmers Market: Growers, specialty food businesses and artisans sell their high-quality wares. St. Joseph Church, Grand Isle, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 372-1883.

RUTLAND

ORLEANS

‘Vermont’s Own’ 40th Army Band Concert:

Patriotic tunes and contemporary American favorites make for an inspiring musical evening. Battery Park, Burlington, Monday, July 3, 7 p.m. with fireworks. Smugglers’ Notch Resort, Tuesday, July 4, 8 p.m. with fireworks. Bombardier Park, Milton, Friday, July 7, 7 p.m. Info, 338-3482. FREE

City Hall Park Concert Series: Each week,

lunchtime musical performances from folk to rock and bluegrass to country entertain al fresco diners. Burlington City Hall Park, Wednesdays, noon-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE

Battery Park Concert Series: Listeners gaze

out at Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks while swaying to summer tunes. New this year, Back Road BBQ’s food truck satisfies the hungry crowd with locally sourced dinner fare. Battery Park, Burlington, Thursdays, 6 p.m. Info, 223-2396. FREE

Brown Bag Concert Series: Community members spread out their picnic dinners and blankets while listening to regional musicians. Food and wine available for sale. Woodstock Village Green, Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. Donations accepted. Info, 457-3981. Snow Farm Vineyard Summer Concert Series: Weather permitting, crowds gather

for a weekly rotation of classical, jazz, swing, bluegrass and rock. Food and drink available to purchase from various vendors. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, Thursdays, picnicking begins at 5 p.m.; music starts at 6:30 p.m. Info, 372-9463. FREE

Summer Concert Series: Picnickers settle down for the evening with a family-friendly band. Old Schoolhouse Common Gazebo, Marshfield, Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

Music in the Meadow: Sunset over the

mountains burnishes the backdrop for an outdoor concert with ample picnicking space. Gates open two hours before performance. Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, Sunday, July 9, 7:30-10 p.m.; Sunday, July 16, 7-9 p.m.; and Sunday, July 23, 7-9 p.m. $12-32. Info, 253-5720.

Castleton Summer Concert Series: Listeners enjoy a live performance under open skies. Castleton State College, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Info, 468-6039. FREE

NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: History buffs celebrate America by seeing reenactments and listening to patriotic music on the grounds where soldiers served to secure independence. Fort Ticonderoga, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $10-23; free for children under 5. Info, 518-585-2821.

2 Sunday CHITTENDEN

Concert on the Green: Music lovers revel in

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7 to 12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m. $8-14. Info, 655-3300.

Craftsbury Chamber Players Mini-Concert:

Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m. $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.

an open-air evening. Gates open at 6 p.m. for picnicking. Shelburne Museum, Wednesday, July 12, and Sunday, July 23, 7 p.m. $45-55; free for children under 13. Info, 877-987-6487.

World-class musicians present classical works from the baroque to the contemporary era in this special series for children and their families. Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, Wednesdays, 4 p.m. Hardwick Town House, Thursday, July 13, and Thursday, July 20, 2 p.m. East Craftsbury Presbyterian Church, Thursday, July 27, 2 p.m. Info, 800-639-3443. FREE

Anh Le: This vibrant new voice serenades the audience with melodious pop songs particularly geared toward teens and young adults. A postconcert talk and refreshments follow. ArtisTree/ Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, Friday, July 14, 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 457-3500. Owl’s Head Music Night: Berry pickers groove

to local bands while gathering nature’s little treasures and enjoy a picnic dinner from home. Owl’s Head Blueberry Farm, Richmond, Tuesdays, fields open at 5 p.m.; music begins at 6 p.m. Two-quart minimum blueberry purchase for entry. Info, 434-3387.

Winooski Farmers Market: Local produce, farm goods, artisan crafts, kids’ activities and tunes come together on the banks of the Winooski River. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

LAMOILLE

Stowe Farmers Market: Live music and agricultural and craft vendors make for a bustling atmosphere. Stowe Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 279-3444.

NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 1.

3 Monday

Milton Music in the Park: Families settle down

Christine Malcolm Band: This country singer warms the audience with down-home songs. Ages 5 and up. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, Saturday, July 22, 8 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 760-4634.

CHITTENDEN

Tom Rush: This singer-songwriter serenades the audience in an outdoor venue, with children’s activities at 3 p.m. arranged by Artistree. Suicide Six Ski Area, Pomfret, Saturday, July 8, 3-8 p.m. $10-50; free for children under 6; food and drink available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the Woodstock Ski Runners. Info, 888-338-2745.

Opera North Celebrating America’s Songbook: The country’s musical diversity

A World of Stories: Little listeners enjoy stories, songs and rhymes. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

with a picnic basket and lawn chairs while listening to live bands. Bombardier Park, Milton, Friday, July 7; Wednesday, July 12; and Tuesday, July 25, 7 p.m. Info, 893-4111. FREE

Leavitt Amp Concert Series at Dog Mountain:

The Okee Dokee Brothers: Mister Chris &

Friends warm up the crowd for this Grammywinning duo whose Americana folk music is inspired by outdoor family adventures. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, Wednesday, July 26, 4:30-7:30 p.m. $15; food available for purchase. Info, 985-9200.

Burlington Independence Day Celebration: Live bands and festival activities set the scene for spectacular fireworks over Lake Champlain at 9:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington, 5:30-10 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE

Community Garden: Junior green thumbs tend the teaching garden’s veggies. Grades 1-5. Milton Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Lego Club: Inventive kiddos press together plasticpiece creations. Ages 5 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 1-2 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

3 MONDAY, P.30

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Produced by Catamount Arts, these family- and canine-friendly Sundays at Dog Mountain include four-legged agility exhibitions and musical preperformances beginning at 2 p.m., food truck vendors, games and activities, with the main stage shows from 4-7 p.m. The Stephen Huneck Art Gallery opens at 10 a.m. Dog Mountain, St Johnsbury, Sundays, 2- 7 p.m. Food and drink available for purchase. Info, 800-449-2580. FREE

delights the audience with familiar favorites by Cole Porter, George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein, with a sampling of the opera’s season, including Puccini, Offenbach and others. Ages 8 and up. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, Sunday, July 23, 5 p.m. $25. Info, 533-9075.

A Circle of Parents: Moms and dads come together to strengthen parenting skills and socialize. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m. preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE

KIDS VT

Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: Locavores load up on garden-fresh produce, Vermont-made crafts, baked goods and more. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Summer Music

Waitsfield Farmers Market: Saturday shoppers search out handmade crafts and local produce, meat and maple products while enjoying lunch fare and live music at this grassy outdoor venue. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

JULY 2017

Rutland Farmers Market: Local vendors peddle farm-fresh produce and fruits, handcrafted breads, artisan cheese and more at this outdoor emporium. Downtown Rutland, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727.

Okee Dokee Brothers

KIDSVT.COM

Brandon Independence Day Celebration: The fun kicks off Friday at Estabrook Park with a food fest and street dance. Saturday festivities are held at Park Village this year, due to downtown construction, with karaoke, family games, a 1 p.m. parade and live music, topped off with fireworks at dusk. Estabrook Field Park, Brandon, 10 a.m. Most events are free. Info, 247-4258.

Kung Fu: Athletes of all ages and abilities develop sound mind and body skills through traditional instruction. Ages 7 and up. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Info, 505-1688.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR JULY 3 Monday (cont.) Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE Rock the Dock: Queen City sailors host a good food and good music benefit for the CSC McConnell Scholarship Fund, with prime lakeside seating for the Burlington fireworks. Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center, Burlington, 6:30-11 p.m. $25-75. Info, 864-2499. Summer Story Time: Books and crafts stimulate small ones. Ages 3-6. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Webby’s Art Studio: Travel Transformation: Artists of all ages design and build an imaginative way to get around. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Williston Fourth of July: Williston fêtes the national holiday over two days, with a 5K Firecracker Fun Run Monday at 6 p.m., a library book sale and an ice cream social. A 10 a.m. festival parade launches Tuesday, followed by music and activities, and it all ends with a bang at dusk. Williston Green, 4 p.m. Fees for some activities. Info, 876-1160. FREE

FRANKLIN

STEM Family Nights: Moms, dads and kiddos test their science, technology, engineering and math skills at cool and collaborative projects. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE Summer Gardening: Green thumbs enjoy earthy and educational activities. Ages 3-12; children under 9 must be accompanied by a parent. Snacks and lunch provided. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9-11:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE

RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

Live Performances

‘Honk! Jr.’: Local youth perform in this Hans

Christen Andersen story of Ugly, who looks different from his darling brothers and sisters but discovers he has his own place in the world. FlynnSpace, Burlington, Saturday, July 1, 1 & 4 p.m. $13-17. Info, 863-5966.

‘Mad at Nothing, Or: A Hatter’s Guide to Wonderland’: Vermont Youth Dancers delight

the audience with an energetic twist on this classic Lewis Carroll tale, with original choreography and popular music. Mount Mansfield Union High School, Jericho, Saturday, July 1, 2 p.m. $8-10. Info, 448-0893.

Circus Smirkus Big Top Tour: High-flying

feats into the wild blue yonder abound when Smirkus Troupers ages 10 to 18 dazzle crowds as jugglers, high-larious clowns and airborne aerialists. The Circus Barn, Greensboro, Sunday, July 2, 1 & 6 p.m. $16-22; free for children under 2. Kenyon’s Field, Waitsfield, Wednesday, July 5, and Thursday, July 6, 1 & 6 p.m. $16-23; free for children under 2. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, Saturday, July 8, and Sunday, July 9, noon & 5 p.m. $19-22; free for children under 2. Green Mountain Mall, St Johnsbury, Friday, July 14, and Saturday, July 15, 1 & 6 p.m. $16-20; free for children under 2. Info, 877-764-7587.

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Farm to Ballet

Farm to Ballet: Arts and agriculture come

together in this dance performance celebrating Vermont agriculture. Moonrise Farm, Essex Junction, Saturday, July 15, 6:30 p.m. $15; free for children under 13. Heartwood Farm, Albany, Sunday, July 16, 6 p.m. $15; free for children under 13; proceeds benefit Rural Vermont. Golden Well Farm & Apiaries, New Haven, Saturday, July 22, 6 p.m. $15; free for children under 13. Shelburne Farms, Sunday, July 23, 6 p.m. $15; free for children under 13.

Circuspalooza: Aerial artists pull off fanciful

feats under the big top while kids take part in carnival games and activities galore. Shelburne Museum, Sunday, July 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular museum admission, $7-24; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Cirque Us: DreamCycle: High-flying aerialists, jugglers and acrobats amaze the audience in this imaginative circus. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, Saturday, July 22, 2 & 7 p.m. $10-25. Info, 533-9075. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, Monday, July 24, 7 p.m. $25-30. Info, 760-4634.

‘The Drowsy Chaperone’: Northern Stage Youth present the story of a nameless ‘Man in a Chair’ who imaginatively turns his one-room flat into a mansion filled with colorful characters, chockfull with show tunes and lavish production numbers. Preview July 26, 27 & 28 at 7:30 p.m. Northern Stage, White River Junction, Fri. July 28, 7:30 p.m. Sat. July 29, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun. July 30, 2 p.m. $15-25. Info, 296-7000.

ORLEANS

Color the Kingdom Run: In this noncompetitive 5K, runners and walkers dressed in white get splattered with a rainbow of nontoxic colors, then enjoy a community block party. Craftsbury Village, 2 p.m. $10-20; $40 per family; free for children under 7; proceeds benefit Northeast Kingdom arts- and nature-based educational programming. Info, 586-2200.

WASHINGTON

5 Wednesday ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. Danville Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088.

Kids Buti Yoga: Young yogis stretch into a blend of traditional moves and creative dance and music activities. Ages 6-14; younger children welcome with parental supervision. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 4-5 p.m. $10. Info, 505-1688.

CHITTENDEN

Montpelier Independence Day: The Statehouse lawn hosts opening ceremonies for the 2017 Family Olympics with friendly games promoting teamwork and self-confidence. The Montpelier Mile footrace at 6 p.m., followed by a parade, live music, loads of craft and food vendors — and fireworks — finishes the evening with a flourish. Downtown Montpelier, 3 p.m. Food available for sale. Info, 223-9604. FREE

Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

NEW YORK Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 1.

4 Tuesday Independence Day CHITTENDEN

Colchester Fourth of July Celebration: AllAmerican revelry includes a fun run at 8:15 a.m., a parade at 11 a.m. and live music, topped off with fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Colchester, $5 for fun run. Info, 264-5500. FREE Milton Independence Day Celebration: The crowd comes out for an 11 a.m. parade, a chicken barbecue, an evening outdoor concert and a finale of fireworks at dusk. Bombardier Park, Milton, Info, 373-5960. FREE

Tuesday Night Trail Running: Athletes of all ages and abilities choose between 2.5K and 5K courses or a short “Cubs” option — with a 10K held on the second Tuesday of each month — during this fun evening race. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6 p.m. $4-12; free for children under 9. Info, 879-6001. Williston Fourth of July: See July 3, 9 a.m.

LAMOILLE

Stowe Fourth of July Celebration: An old-fashioned shindig starts at 10 a.m. with marching music in the Moscow parade. Face painting, music, clowns and food in the village follow from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The fun picks up at Mayo Farm at 6 p.m., with fireworks at dusk. Various locations, Stowe, Info, 253-7321. FREE

WASHINGTON

Cabot Fourth of July: A Main Street parade at 11 a.m. leads to an afternoon of fun in the sun, including field games, a chicken barbecue and a dunk tank. Cabot Recreation Field. Food available for sale. Info, 563-3338. FREE

WINDSOR

Art in the Park: Fledgling creators head outside to paint, sculpt, draw and imagine a take-home project. Ages 5 and up. Wheeler Homestead and Garden Park, South Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Family Game Day: Families rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Free meal provided for youths ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players put their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing story line. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Reading Buddies: Little bookworms pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE Solar Ovens and Truffula Trees: Audubon Vermont’s Debbie Archer shares Dr. Seuss’s classic tale The Lorax, then teaches young conversationalists how to build a sun-powered oven for s’mores roasting. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Preregister. Info, 434-3068. FREE Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: Pedalers wend their way along the trails in a non-intimidating atmosphere. This fun event includes a 2.5K “Cadets” race, a short “Cubs” loop, and 5K to 20K options. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6 p.m. $4-12; free for kids under 9. Info, 879-6001. Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with professional instructors. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Young Athletes: In this eight-week program, young athletes with and without intellectual challenges are introduced to the Special Olympics before eligibility at age 8. Parent must accompany child. Ages 2-7. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Preregister. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN

Magician Tom Joyce: This one-man show makes the audience marvel merrily. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 2 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE Summer Gardening: See July 3.

‘An Old Vermont Fourth’: Traditional music, flag making, hand-cranked ice cream and a reading of the Declaration of Independence combine for a patriotic celebration. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

GRAND ISLE

NEW YORK

‘14 Carrots’: Puppetree puts on a performance about Aunt Swilly, the rabbit babysitter, as part of the library’s summer reading program. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 1-2 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Ticonderoga Independence Day Weekend Celebration: See July 1.

Champlain Island Farmers Market: Growers, specialty food businesses and artisans sell their homemade wares. St. Rose of Lima Parish, South Hero, 3-6 p.m. Info, 372-1883.

RUTLAND

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1, 3-6 p.m.


Classes

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA SUMMER CAMPS!

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. ORANGE

Randolph Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE

ORLEANS

Kingdom Community Wind Tours: Green Mountain Power gives curious community members the chance to experience an operating wind farm up close and learn how wind power generates electricity during this 90-minute visit to the turbines. Kingdom Community Wind Farm, Lowell, 10 a.m. Preregister. Info, 888-8354672. FREE The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: Children ages 18 and under receive nutritious, locally sourced meals at no cost from this mobilelearning kitchen. Barton Public Library, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info, 334-2044. FREE

WASHINGTON

Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 7-11. Waterbury Public Library, 1:30-3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE Marshfield Story and Activity Time: Little ones listen to a story, then dig into diverse weekly activities, including gardening, music or creative building. Ages 7 and under. Followed by a free lunch. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10 a.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE Teen Yoga: Adolescents take advantage of yoga’s empowerment while strengthening their bodies, minds and imaginations. Ages 13-19. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 4-5 p.m. $10 suggested donation; preregister. Info, 505-1688.

WINDSOR

Fiber Arts Studio: Yarns, threads, fabrics and roving come to life in youngsters’ hands as they learn to stitch, felt and weave. Ages 5-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 1-3 p.m. $15 drop-in. Info, 457-3500. Woodstock Market on the Green: Fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local meats and cheeses, cut flowers, and seasonal fruits and berries represent the best of the growing season. There’s live music, too. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Info, 457-3555. FREE

6 Thursday CALEDONIA

CHITTENDEN

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Festival Foolery & Circus Arts Camp:

Inspired by the fun and surprising street theater of Burlington’s annual Festival of Fools, this camp explores the circus arts of clowning, foolery and more. Share your skills and learn new ones as we partner with Burlington City Arts to create our own mini-festival culminating in a showing for our families and caregivers on the final day. Jul. 31-Aug. 4, ages 8-10. In partnership with FlynnArts. $350/child. vermontfestivaloffools.com

The School of Foolery: Circus arts drop-in class with world-class performers. Aug. 5 & 6, 10 a.m.-noon. Contois Auditorium, 149 Church St., Burlington. Free. vermontfestivaloffools. com Kids Rock the Park: Foolish fun for the whole family during Festival of Fools. Aug. 6, 2-6 p.m. City Hall Park, Burlington. Free. vermontfestivaloffools.com

Jericho Farmers Market: Local vendors offer heirloom tomatoes, fresh greens, fragrant herbs, wildflowers and more at this familyfriendly market made merry with live music. Mills Riverside Park, Jericho, 3-6:30 p.m. Info, 343-9778. Lego Library: Creative kids make a storyboard, build a Lego set, pose a character and snap a photo. Ages 5 and up. South Burlington Community Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

Milton Farmers Market: Farmers, foodies and crafters come together to celebrate the bounty of the growing season. Hannaford Supermarket, Milton, 3:30-7 p.m. Info, 893-1009. Pool Noodle Fun: Kids design their own colorful Styrofoam race tracks, then compete for a personal-best finish time. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Preschool Music: See July 3, 10:30 a.m.

KIDS VT

Colchester Lego Club: Mini makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking blocks. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

JULY 2017

Building Bridges: Aspiring architects explore the principals of engineering, bridge design and bettering our world through creative construction projects. Ages 8 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Preregistration preferred. Info, 863-7216. FREE

nation rests on the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids’ BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, selfconfidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance, and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them thorough out life. Remember, you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website, vermontbjj.com; or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

KIDSVT.COM

Hardwick Lego Club: Young architects construct collaboratively with colorful blocks. All ages. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-4 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: The future of our

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CALENDAR JULY 6 Thursday (cont.) Summervale: Slow Food Vermont tastings, live music, kids’ crafts and food-focused activities varying by week promise locavore fun in the sun. No pets. Burlington Intervale Center, 5:30-8 p.m. Food and drink available for purchase. Info, 660-0440. FREE

Tinker Time: Imaginative kiddos take apart household items with tools. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN

Comic Book Workshop: Eric Cram from the Center for Cartoon Studies shows youngsters the special powers of color and heroes, and then aspiring artists create their own comic books. Ages 7 and up. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Family Fort Night: Pajama-clad kiddos and parents soak up stories while snuggling in homemade nests. Bring blankets and flashlights. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 6 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE Solar Oven S’Mores: Sweets lovers construct a sun-fueled oven, then put it to the test. Ages 6 and up; siblings welcome to savor the results. Fairfax Community Library, 2-3:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Weekly Trail Runs: Athletes of all ages and abilities break a sweat at their own pace in a 5K race, 3K walk/run or 1K kids’ run. Hard’ack, St. Albans, 6 p.m. $4-6; kids 1K is free. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266.

Wagon-Ride Wednesdays:

Science & Nature

Raptors in Residence: The mysteries surrounding birds of prey are revealed as visitors come face-to-face with live feathered creatures. All ages. Shelburne Farms, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 1-1:30 p.m. Regular museum admission, $5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686. Tour the Cosmos: This 50-minute

live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Saturdays and Sundays, 1:30 p.m. $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

Discovery Sundays: Families

have fun with hands-on science experiments and investigations using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. All ages. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission, $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228.

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Science Loves Art: Curious

thinkers of all ages combine the natural and artistic worlds with hands-on, creative experiments exploring light, color and sound. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

Horse-drawn rides deliver delight to the whole family. Admission includes all farm programs and activities. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Butterfly & Bug Walk: Naturalists

LAMOILLE

Stowe Free Library Book Sale: This renowned library fundraiser features 25 categories of books and is restocked daily. Stowe Free Library, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $1-12 per book. Info, 253-6145.

RUTLAND

Fair Haven Farmers Market: Fresh produce, meat, greens and locally made maple products swell shoppers’ totes. Fair Haven Park, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. Summer STEM: As part of the library’s summer reading program, emerging literati explore different science, technology, engineering and mathematics concepts. Ages 3-8. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

ORLEANS

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: Children ages 18 and under receive nutritious, locally sourced meals at no cost from this mobile-learning kitchen. Gardner Memorial Park, Newport, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info, 334-2044. FREE

Banding and Birding:

Naturalists-in-training drop in and get a lesson in tagging wild, feathered creatures, learning skills including netting and data collection. Weather dependent. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Thursday, July 13, and Friday, July 28, 7-10 a.m. Donations accepted. Info, 434-3068.

of all ages explore fields and forest while learning about small flying creatures. Binoculars, a magnifying glass, an insect net and a picnic lunch are suggested. Call to confirm if raining. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Saturday, July 8, 10 a.m.-noon. Donations accepted. Info, 434-2167.

Bird Banding Demonstration:

FREE

Forest Fairy Hunt: Milkweed pods

Who Walks These Woods: Expert

tracker Mike Kessler leads an inquisitive trek into our landscape. Ages 7 and up. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Sunday, July 9, 1-3 p.m. Regular museum admission $3.50-7; free for children under 3; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

Audubon Nature Playgroup:

Little ones and their caregivers trek through the woods, meadows, and beaver and peeper ponds while meeting new friends. Ages birth to 5. Open to Richmond, Huntington, and Hinesburg residents. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Mondays, 9:30-11 a.m. Preregister. Info, 434-3068. FREE

Summer Campfire: Families

have fun around flickering flames and meet a special winged guest. Ages 5 and up. Shelburne Farms, Monday, July 10, 6:30-8 p.m. $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Nestlings Find Nature:

Preschoolers discover how songbirds grow, using imaginative play, books, crafts and nature walks and activities. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Tuesday, July 11, and Tuesday, July 25, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Regular museum admission $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

Avian admirers catch, measure and band a variety of songbirds, studying their survival success. Come anytime. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Saturday, July 15, 6:30-11 a.m. Donations accepted. Info, 229-6206. FREE

become bathtubs and beds, and acorns caps become dinnerware in this respectful and engaging woods adventure with a special visit from the Fairy Grandmother. Wearing wings is encouraged. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, Saturday, July 15, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000.

Garden Tea Party at the Inn:

Pinkies up! Tea time follows a treasure hunt and exploration of the picturesque gardens. Ages 4 and up. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, July 15, 1-3 p.m. $20-22 includes one adult and one child; $6-7 each additional child; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Moth Night: Multitudes of

emeralds, loopers, underwings and more visit the light station for a marvelous nighttime show, celebrating National Moth Week. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Wednesday, July 19, 8:30-11 p.m. $5; free for members; preregister. Info, 229-6206.

Bats in the Barn: Nocturnal fliers steal the show with a colorful slide show and an evening flight from the Farm Barn. Ages 7 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, Friday, July 21, 7:30-9 p.m. $5-7; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Fizzy Fest: In this hands-on,

messy festival, young scientists search out the secrets behind carbonated beverages, explore experiments that bubble and ooze, and investigate the extremely popular giant pile of foam. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Friday, July 21, through Sunday, July 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

Butterfly Feeder & Bee Hotel Workshop: Author Dr. Jacqueline

Soule shares her savvy about encouraging pollinators into the garden. Children ages 4 and up should be accompanied by an adult. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Saturday, July 22, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $20-35. Info, 229-6206.

Fledglings Figure It Out: Each month, junior avian admirers tackle a new bird puzzle while exploring the wild world. Ages 5-10; siblings welcome. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Sunday, July 23, 2-3 p.m. Regular museum admission $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167. Hay Day: Fledgling farmers

learn about 19th-century haying techniques while enjoying horsedrawn wagon rides, rope-making demonstrations and penny-in-thehaystack games. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Sunday, July 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Feathery Friends: Young

naturalists take flight on an avian adventure where they build a nest, guard their eggs and learn to fly. All ages with adult companion. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Friday, July 28, 8:30-10 a.m. Info, 434-3068. FREE

Bird-Monitoring Walk:

Eagle-eyed participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Please bring your own binoculars. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, Saturday, July 29, 7:30-9 a.m. Donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE

WINDSOR

Arts and Crafts Studio: Petite Picassos imaginatively explore different mediums, including pencil, pastel, fiber arts, beading and collage. Ages 5-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 1-3 p.m. $15 drop-in. Info, 457-3500.

7 Friday ADDISON

Pajama Storytime Fridays: Small ones in nightwear snuggle in for a story. Geared toward ages 5 and under. Ollie’s Other Place, Middlebury, 5-6 p.m. Info, 382-8558. FREE

CALEDONIA

Hardwick Farmers Market: Local produce, plants, artisan cheese, syrup and more fill shoppers’ market baskets. Diverse dinner delectables available. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 3-6 p.m.

CHITTENDEN

Adventures With the Bookworms: Young readers rally around the Bookmobile for stories, nature crafts and games in the garden. Ages 3-6. Wheeler Homestead and Garden Park, South Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: Foodie families enjoy an eclectic array of local grub and live music during this hip block party. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m. Cost for food. Info, 540-0406. Baby Yoga: Mamas and papas stretch themselves and their wee ones, strengthening general health and gross motor skills. Ages 1 and under. Jericho Town Library, 3-4 p.m. Preregistration required. Info, 899-4686. FREE Burger Night: Picnickers bring a blanket or chair to this local feast of grilled fare and festive music. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Free admission; cost of food and drink. Weather dependent; visit breadandbutterfarm.com for latest information. Info, 985-9200. Compost Critters: Bernie the Bacterium, Fran the Fungus and real-live compost critters help little ones learn the whys and whats of composting while getting their hands dirty. Ages 5-10. Jericho Town Library, 1:15 p.m. Preregister. Info, 899-4686. FREE Essex Summer Story Time: Budding bibliophiles enjoy picture book stories, songs and puppets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Gym: See July 2. Family Music Time: Moms, dads and kids have fun with a rousing sing-along. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 863-3403. FREE

Friday Free for All: Investigating everything from rocks to bugs, juniors explore the world. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE Hula Hooping & Juggling: Aspiring circus members take tossing lessons and horse around with hoops. Ages 3 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Knitting for Kids: Yarn lovers of all skill levels learn with knitter Maggie Loftus. Grades 2-6. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6955. FREE

Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Pizza Fridays: Hungry kiddos consume a nutritious lunch courtesy of Our Community Cares Camp. Jericho Town Library, 12:30 p.m. Preregistration required. Info, 434-6006. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

You see a horse with your eyes ...

Richmond Farmers Market: Vendors peddle handheld pies, dinner delectables, homemade pickles, just-picked produce and much more at this lively showcase of locavorism. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Info, 391-0806.

ESSEX

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 6. Pavilion Park, Island Pond, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info, 334-2044. FREE

FRANKLIN

Serenity Hoops: Charlene Candiloro from Serenity Circles shares the happiness of HulaHooping and giant bubbles. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 1 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE

LAMOILLE

Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: Floating orbs transport people through the sky at a balloon-launch fest with plenty of entertainment and eats. Festival and kids’ tent opens at 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa, 4 p.m. Free to view the 6:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday morning launches; $10 admission to festival events; free for children under 12; $10 tethered rides; $275 hot-air balloon rides. Info, 253-7355, ext. 5538.

RUTLAND

Magic: The Gathering: Novice and experienced players team up for card challenges. Ages 8 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

ORLEANS

Lego Club: Youngsters build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

WASHINGTON Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: Cinema lovers bring blankets and chairs to watch a flick under the stars. Showtime begins at dusk. Ben & Jerry’s Factory, Waterbury, Info, 882-2047.

But you feel a horse with your soul See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Fisher Brothers Farm Summer Movie Night: Rain or shine, a flick amuses families at this berry farm at 6:30 p.m. Bring a blanket or chair. Fisher Brothers Farm, Shelburne, 5:30-9 p.m. Food available from a local vendor for purchase. Info, 401-486-5920. FREE Saturday Drama Club: See July 1. Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 1. Strawbee Saturdays: See July 1.

FRANKLIN

Weather Report: Mini meteorologists make measuring instruments and learn about the climate. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

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Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 1. Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: See July 7.

RUTLAND

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1.

ORLEANS

Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 1.

WASHINGTON

Capital City Farmers Market: See July 1. Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Kung Fu: See July 1. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 1.

Foodways Fridays: Guests tour the heirloom garden, then watch as veggies make their way into historic recipes prepared in the 1890 farmhouse kitchen. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

9 Sunday ADDISON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: Musicloving families delight in daily concerts all week long, including noontime “brown bag” familyfriendly jam sessions. Festivities begin Sunday at 7 p.m., and evening performances fill the night air Monday through Friday. A Vermont Jazz Ensemble street dance closes the festival on Saturday, July 15, starting at 7 p.m. Middlebury Green. Donations welcome. Info, 462-3555. FREE

CHITTENDEN

Essex Open Gym: See July 2. Family Gym: See July 2. Winooski Farmers Market: See July 2.

8 Saturday Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 1.

Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: See July 7. 6:30 a.m.

10 Monday

Follow the twists and turns of this jungle adventure as Mowgli is interrupted by Kaa the Snake, almost stampeded by Colonel Hathi the Elephant, gets advice from Baloo the Bear, is kidnapped by monkeys, and, finally, rescued by Bagheera. Adapted from the beloved animated film, The Jungle Book is a song-filled celebration of friendships, fun and exciting adventures, and show-stopping Disney tunes, including “The Bare Necessities,” “Trust In Me,” and “I Wan’na Be Like You.” The Jungle Book is sure to be a crowd-pleaser for all ages.

ADDISON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9. July 15.

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 1. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See July 1.

$10 per ticket

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August 4 at 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. August 5 at 10 a.m. August 6 at 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

KIDS VT

Big Blue Trunk: Active youngsters of all ages get going with imaginative games. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 879-0313. FREE

Stowe Farmers Market: See July 2.

JULY 2017

CHITTENDEN

LAMOILLE

The jungle is jumpin’ with a jazzy beat in this exciting Disney classic. Join Mowgli, Baloo, King Louie and the gang as they swing their way through madcap escapades and thwart the ferocious tiger, Shere Khan.

KIDSVT.COM

ADDISON

THE CHILDREN’S THEATER AT SAINT MICHAEL’S PLAYHOUSE

LAMOILLE

Family Story Time: Librarian and storyteller Molly Pease leads little ones in stories, crafts, music and more. Bridgeside Books, Waterbury, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 244-1441. FREE

WINDSOR

4/20/17 10:42 AM

GRAND ISLE

FREE

Mother Up! Central Vermont: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on local, state and national levels, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m. RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE

PO Box 278 Sharon, VT 05065 802-763-3280 highhorses.org


CALENDAR JULY 10 Monday (cont.) CHITTENDEN

‘Punch’s Predicament’: In this contemporary twist on classical hand puppetry with a two-person orchestra, the world’s oldest clown, Mr. Punch, finds himself living in a trash heap and needing the help of smart children and their parents to learn a few things. Jericho Town Library, 2 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE A World of Stories: See July 3. Chess Club: Teen players teach novices new strategies. All ages, but children 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE CLiF Summer Readers Story and Book Giveaway: Presenters from the Children’s Literacy Foundation share their love of reading and writing with young bibliophiles. All children choose two brand-new books to take home. Winooski Memorial Library, 1:30 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Community Garden: See July 3. Keva Building Challenge: Junior constructionists tackle a goal to build the tallest tower or strongest bridge with small wooden planks. Ages 4 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Lego Club: See July 3.

Stories On The Screen: Cinema lovers relish refreshments and relax with a family-friendly flick. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE Summer Story Time: See July 3. Webby’s Art Studio: Print the Rainbow: Art fans of all ages fashion unique patterns and designs using printing techniques. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

FRANKLIN

Preschool Music: See July 3. Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE

ADDISON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9.

CHITTENDEN

‘Hoopoe Show’: Chris “Hoopoe” Yerlig mixes pantomime comedy, movement illusions, sleightof-hand magic tricks and balloon wizardry in this audience-involved vaudeville show. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Live Owl Program: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum entertains and educates with feathered friends. Ages 10 and under must have an adult caregiver. Highgate Sports Arena, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

‘Midsummer Night’s Dream’: Young thespians take over the lawn and enchant the audience with this magical Shakespearean play. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Magic Tree House Adventure Club: Book lovers learn geography and history through imaginative stories. Ages 6 and up. Highgate Public Library, 2 p.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

Lego Club: Budding builders bust out plastic-block creations in the weekly Lego challenge. Free meal provided to youths age 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE

STEM Family Nights: See July 3.

Movie Madness: Film lovers get a thrill out of games, crafts, snacks and activities themed to the movie of the week. Costumes encouraged. Ages 10-14. South Burlington Community Library, 2-4 p.m. Info, 652-7080.

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See July 3.

WASHINGTON

Lego Mindstorms Robotics: Engineering-minded kiddos put together and program a robot. Ages 10 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6-7:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE

11 Tuesday

Kids Buti Yoga: See July 3.

WINDSOR

Creative Arts Nature Studio: Young artists explore, develop and hone skills both inside and outside the studio, in a mixture of mediums. Ages 5-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 1-3 p.m. $15 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Story Hour at Adam’s Berry Farm: Little listeners partake in plenty of stories, gardening and summer activities. Adam’s Organic Berry Farm, Charlotte, 9:30 a.m. Info, 578-9093. FREE Teeny Tiny Explorers: The Bookmobile busts out stories, bubbles and games in the garden for wee bibliophiles. Ages 2 and under. Wheeler Homestead and Garden Park, South Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

Playgroups Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal get-togethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. Monday

Wednesday

ADDISON SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Quarry Hill School, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 989-7769.

ADDISON SUMMER PLAYGROUP: See Monday.

CHARLOTTE SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Charlotte Central School Early Education Program, 9:30 a.m. OPEN GYM: Central VT Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m. $7. Info, 882-8324.

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Tuesday BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24. BURLINGTON DADS’ NIGHT: VNA Family Room, 4-7 p.m. Info, 860-4420. EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339.

BURLINGTON SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Ethan Allen Park, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 578-6471. FREE

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP: Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 557-8493.

MILTON SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Bombardier Park, July 13, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457. OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218. RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

Tinkering Tuesdays: Small scientists experiment with STEM-type projects. Ages 8 and up. Lunch served afterward for everyone ages 18 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Info, 865-7216. FREE Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 4. Vermont Wildlife: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum staff and live snakes, birds, a rabbit and a turtle entertain and educate eager naturalists about local animal lore. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN

Build a Marble Run: Creative ones of all ages put their engineering skills and excitement together and make a maze. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE Builders in Nature: Beavers: Naturalist Mr. K. leads little listeners in learning about these strongtoothed mammals. Highgate Public Library, 11:30 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

FAIRFIELD SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

WILLISTON PLAY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

SHELBURNE SUMMER PLAYGROUP: Shelburne Community School, 9:30 a.m.

OPEN GYM: See Monday.

Fairfax Family Game Night: Families take over the library’s tabletops for a lively evening. Fairfax Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: Players of all skill levels team up for card playing. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505.

Saturday

FREE

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP: United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

Thursday ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 527-5426.

Friday

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m. $10, or free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m.

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

ORLEANS

Michael Caduto: This performer and author shares stories, songs and dance from traditional cultures around the world, introducing the audience to native instruments and humorous animal and human characters. Craftsbury Public Library, 5-6 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

WASHINGTON Burlington Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: Cinema lovers bring blankets and chairs to watch a flick under the stars. Showtime begins at dusk. Ben & Jerry’s Factory, Waterbury, Info, 882-2040. FREE Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Club: Bookworms in grades 4 to 7 gab about The Evil Wizard Smallbone by Delia Sherman. Waterbury Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

WINDSOR

Clay Studio: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 5-12. ArtisTree/ Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 1-3 p.m. $15 drop-in. Info, 457-3500. Time-Travel Tuesdays: History buffs of all ages learn what daily life was like in 1890 by helping prepare seasonal meals, churn butter and wash laundry the old-fashioned way. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

12 Wednesday ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1. Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 5.

CHITTENDEN

Art in the Park: See July 5. Backyard Birds Story Time: Small avian aficionados soak up stories about feathered lore, then craft a hummingbird feeder to take home. Ages 8 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Bookmark Stitch-In: The Embroiderers’ Guild of America entertains interested crafters of all ages with their intricate skill, and everyone takes home a bookmark. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-6956. FREE Booktivity: Based on the summer reading theme, imaginative kiddos get crafty each Wednesday with a hands-on project. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 878-0313. FREE Building Challenges: Budding builders use their brains to bust out boats, bridges and tall towers using straws, marshmallows, pasta and foil. Ages 6-10. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Colchester Dungeons & Dragons Night: Players don invented personas and use cleverness and luck to overcome challenges, defeat enemies and save the day. Beginners welcome. Ages 9-13. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Family Game Day: See July 5. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See July 5. Leddy Park Beach Bites: Families relax during a lakeside afternoon complete with kids’ activities, food trucks and entertainment. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE Post-It Art: Junior artists work in cooperative teams to create a wall mosaic. Ages 8 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 5. Yoga for Kids: See July 5.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 5.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See July 6.

Family Gym: See July 2.

WASHINGTON

St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Family Music Time: See July 7.

Maker Program: See July 5. Marshfield Story and Activity Time: See July 5.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Teen Yoga: See July 5.

WINDSOR

RUTLAND

Fiber Arts Studio: See July 5.

Young Athletes: See July 5. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

FRANKLIN

100 Toothpick Challenge: Budding builders bust out a bag of marshmallows and a box of 100 tiny wooden pieces to create tall towers. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Building Fun: Little ones ages 5 and under engage in different construction projects each week. Must be accompanied by an adult caregiver. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE Edible Architecture: STEM challenge or lunch? Youngsters build yummy creations. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE Summer Gardening: See July 3.

Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 5.

ADDISON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9.

CALEDONIA

Hardwick Lego Club: See July 6.

Arts and Crafts Studio: See July 6.

CHITTENDEN

Building Bridges: See July 6. Colchester Lego Club: See July 6. Jericho Farmers Market: See July 6. Lego Library: See July 6. Milton Farmers Market: See July 6.

Preschool Music: See July 3. 10:30 a.m.

Vermont Wildlife: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum entertains and educates the audience with local wildlife lore. Ages 5-13. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 1-2 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

ORANGE

Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See July 5.

ORLEANS

Kingdom Community Wind Tours: See July 5.

Books Come to Life: This active class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Ages 3-6. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

WINDSOR

RUTLAND

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1. 3-6 p.m.

ORLEANS

WASHINGTON

Operation: Post-It Forward: Teens write and then hide positive Post-it notes in the library’s books and the greater community. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Escape the Room: Library lovers work together to learn a way out of a locked room as part of the summer reading program. Ages 11-17. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 6-7 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Fair Haven Farmers Market: See July 6. The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 6.

13 Thursday

GRAND ISLE

Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 5.

Weekly Trail Runs: See July 6.

Summervale: See July 6. Tom Joyce’s Magic Show: This one-man show makes the audience marvel merrily. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11 a.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Vegetable Clock: Clever kids create timepieces from food and learn about electricity and circuits. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN

Drop-In Maker Space: Imaginative youngsters check out different materials each week and experiment with circuits, lights, motors, beads, origami and more. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 827-3945.

14 Friday ADDISON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9. Pajama Storytime Fridays: See July 7.

CALEDONIA

Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 7. Marko the Magician: Mystery and magic make for a merry morning for all ages. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

CHITTENDEN

Adventures with the Bookworms: See July 7. ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See July 7. Bastille Day: In celebration of the storming of this famous French prison in 1789, the library organizes “peasants versus royalty” dodgeball and an obstacle course with a story, too. Maple Street Park, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Burger Night: See July 7. Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Friday Free for All: See July 7. Furry Four-Legged Friends: Small lovers of cats and dogs soak up a pet-inspired storytime, then decorate bandanas to take home or donate to the local animal shelter. Ages 5-10. Jericho Town Library, 1:15 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 7. Knitting for Kids: See July 7. Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Pizza Fridays: See July 7. Richmond Farmers Market: See July 7. Songs & Stories With Matthew: Musician Matthew Witten kicks off the morning with tunes and tales. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Summer Cinema Series: Film lovers have fun with an outdoor flick while savoring a picnic dinner or fare from a food truck. Movie begins at dusk. North Beach, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE Wild Things: Nature Educator: Fledgling naturalists partake in a pollinator program and learn how to build a backyard habitat for these creatures. Ages 5-12. Winooski Memorial Library, noon. Info, 655-6424. FREE

ESSEX

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 7.

LAMOILLE

Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and games. Grades K-6. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m. $15 per child. Info, 253-6138.

RUTLAND

Magic: The Gathering: See July 7.

ORLEANS

Lego Club: See July 7. 14 FRIDAY, P.36

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CALENDAR JULY 14 Friday (cont.)

Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 1. Strawbee Saturdays: See July 1.

WASHINGTON

FRANKLIN

Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: See July 7. Family Story Time: See July 7. The Beaver: Superb Engineer of Nature: Mr. K. educates eager young naturalists with an assortment of artifacts and stories. Ages 5 and up. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

WINDSOR

Foodways Fridays: See July 7.

Open House And Health Fair: Community members get a behind-the-scenes view of the local rescue squad with station and ambulance tours, equipment demos, a live mock crash with the fire department, and a Red Cross Blood Drive. Fairfax Rescue, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 849-2773. FREE

LAMOILLE

WASHINGTON

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 9.

Do Good Fest: Food trucks, kids’ activities and a village showcasing local nonprofits make for a family-friendly celebration. Live music begins at 4 p.m. with Guster headlining. National Life Group, Montpelier, 3 p.m. $20 parking fee benefits Cancer Patient Fund.

Capital City Farmers Market: See July 1.

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 1.

CHITTENDEN

Essex Open Gym: See July 2.

RUTLAND

ADDISON

CALEDONIA

CHITTENDEN

‘Mirror, Mirror, Show Me the Fairest World of All!’: Summer Encore stitches together a story with villains from fairy and folk tales from around the world who have a change of heart and work together to unite the world. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Winooski Farmers Market: See July 2.

Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 1.

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

CHITTENDEN

Peacham Community Picnic: Live music and kids’ activities make for a social afternoon. Bring your picnic blanket. Peacham Town Hall, noon-3 p.m. Food available for purchase. Info, 227-3132. FREE

Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 1.

ORLEANS

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 1.

Kung Fu: See July 1.

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See July 1.

Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 1.

17 Monday

CALEDONIA

Family Gym: See July 2.

GRAND ISLE

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1.

15 Saturday

16 Sunday

Stowe Farmers Market: See July 2.

A World of Stories: See July 3. Chess Club: See July 10. Community Garden: See July 3. Lego Club: See July 3. Lego Mindstorms Robotics: See July 10. Preschool Music: See July 3.

WINDSOR

National Ice Cream Day: Got a sweet tooth? Visitors learn the story and science of “the great American dessert” by hand-cranking their own frozen treats in four flavors. Horse-drawn wagon rides and a game of historic baseball are the cherry on top. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Stories On The Screen: See July 10. Summer Story Time: See July 3. Webby’s Art Studio: Ferocious Animals: Art fans have fun drawing delightfully silly pop-up creatures. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

FRANKLIN

Build It BIG: Kid constructionists create largerthan-life structures with a giant tinker toy set. Ages 4 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Saturday Drama Club: See July 1.

Magic Tree House Adventure Club: See July 10. STEM Family Nights: See July 3.

New Parents Evolution Prenatal Yoga:

Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Sundays, 10-11:30 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45-7 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15-5:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45-7 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m.; and Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $15, or $130 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: Women prepare for birth

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through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, Mondays, 12:15-1:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 12:151:15 p.m.; Thursdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 829-0211.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: Moms tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Sundays, 12:15-1:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; Thursdays, 10:45-11:55 a.m.; and Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m. and noon-1 p.m. $15; $130 for a 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

Prenatal Yoga: Expectant mamas

ease pregnancy through breath work, poses, and preparation for labor and delivery in a safe and supportive atmosphere. Iyengar Yoga Center of Vermont, Burlington, Tuesdays, 4:15-5:15 p.m. $20. Info, 379-7389.

Middlebury La Leche League Meeting and Playgroup: Families

with infants and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, Wednesday, July 5, 10 a.m. FREE

Mom and Baby Yoga: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 223-5302. Essex La Leche League: Moms

bring their little ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, Thursday, July 6, 6:30-8 p.m. FREE

How to Breastfeed Prenatal Class: Expectant mamas and

their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, Thursday, July 6, and Thursday, July 27, 8-9:30 a.m., 4:30-6 p.m. Preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

Bosom Buddies: New and

Breastfeeding Café:

expectant mothers, babies and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, Monday, July 10, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 371-4415. FREE

Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, Tuesday, July 18, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 349-3825.

Bosom Buddies Too: Nursing

Breastfeeding Families Group:

mamas of toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, Tuesday, July 11, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 371-4415. FREE

Burlington La Leche League:

New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Tuesday, July 11, 10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. FREE

La Leche League of the Northeast Kingdom: Expectant, novice

and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, Tuesday, July 11, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE

Prenatal Yoga: Mamas-to-be use breathing, posture and meditation to ease pregnancy, delivery and recovery. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, Tuesdays, 7-8:15 p.m. $10 suggested donation; free for studio members; preregistration encouraged. Info, 505-1688. Toddler La Leche League Meeting: Moms who are nursing beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, Monday, July 17, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 388-0363. FREE

FREE

Nursing moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, Wednesday, July 19, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 888-3470. FREE

La Leche League Of Central Vermont: Breastfeeding mamas

swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, Thursday, July 20, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE

Central Vermont Nursing Beyond a Year: Mothers discuss

the joys and challenges of breastfeeding, including nighttime parenting, weaning, healthy eating habits and setting limits, in a supportive setting. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, Friday, July 21, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE

Mommy Group: Breastfeeding

peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center, Wednesday, July 26, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 349-9084. FREE

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See July 3.

WASHINGTON

Jubal Harp: Judi Byron brings her “little harp” for a morning of singing with a hands-on chance to check out this unusual instrument. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE Kids Buti Yoga: See July 3.

WINDSOR

Creative Arts Nature Studio: See July 10.

18 Tuesday CHITTENDEN

Aerial Dance for Kids: Using fabric, dance artist and teacher Nicole Dagesse instructs young performers in flying, hanging, climbing and spinning. Ages 7-11. North End Studio, Burlington, 3:15-4:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 413-695-0659. Aerial Dance for Tweens and Teens: Using fabric, dance artist and teacher Nicole Dagesse instructs teen performers in flying, hanging, climbing and spinning. Ages 11-16. North End Studio, Burlington, 4:30-5:45 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 413-695-0659. LCATV Young Producers Workshop: Up-andcoming directors learn to use video equipment, then put together a program. Ages 7-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2-3:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Lego Club: See July 11. Lunch Without Borders: Young children munch on a bag meal from home and savor the library’s dessert while listening to teens read aloud stories from different cultures. Grades K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon-1 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Movie Madness: See July 11. Preschool Music: See July 11. Spanish Musical Kids: See July 11. Story Hour at Adam’s Berry Farm: See July 11. Teeny Tiny Explorers: See July 11. Tinkering Tuesdays: See July 11. Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 4.


! R E M M U S K THIN

SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM FRANKLIN

Build a Fidget Spinner: Crafty ones create a popular toy for themselves. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE Let’s Learn About Bees: Naturalist Mr. K. gets little ones buzzing about why these beautiful bitty creatures are beneficial. Highgate Public Library, 11:30 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See July 11.

FRANKLIN

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

ORLEANS

GRAND ISLE

Lego Robotics: Educator Dolan Patrick and young builders explore engineering, physics and design while creating animatronic objects using NXT Lego Robotics kits. Ages 8 and up. Craftsbury Public Library, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

WASHINGTON Burlington Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: See July 11.

WINDSOR

Clay Studio: See July 11. Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 11.

NEW YORK

Plattsburgh Preschool Story Hour: Aspiring art connoisseurs and their caregivers listen to a picture book, look at original works and create a project to take home. Ages 3-5. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, 10 a.m. Preregistration appreciated. Info, 518-564-2474. FREE

19 Wednesday ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

Building Fun: See July 12.

CHITTENDEN

Art in the Park: See July 5. Booktivity: See July 12. Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Cleo the Therapy Dog: See July 5, 10 a.m. Compost Critters: Rhonda Mace from Chittenden Solid Waste District helps little ones learn about the bugs, microbes and worms who churn out this black gold. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

Family Game Day: See July 5. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See July 5. Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

FREE

RUTLAND ‘Mirror, Mirror, Show Me the Fairest World of All!’: See July 17. Ages 5-13. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 1-2 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1, 3-6 p.m.

ORANGE

Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See July 5.

ORLEANS

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 5.

WASHINGTON

Just-For-Fun Movies: A wholesome flick fascinates viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE Maker Program: See July 5. Marshfield Story and Activity Time: See July 5. Teen Yoga: See July 5.

Yoga for Kids: See July 5. Young Athletes: See July 5.

Join us for a stress-free, kid-free, weekend with land and waterfront activities, FUN workshops that focus on self-care, empowerment, movement, building connections, and discovering new interests.Women ages 21+. Keynote speaker, Debby Irving, to kick off the weekend on Friday.

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!

(802) 862-7520

WINDSOR

www.ywcavt.org

Over 140 Hands-On Exhibits Daily Activities Featured Exhibitions David Goudy Science Park Nature Trails Live Animals

WWW.MONTSHIRE.ORG 802.649.2200

Fiber Arts Studio: See July 5. Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 5. k8-YWCA0717.indd 1

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20 Thursday CALEDONIA

Hardwick Lego Club: See July 6. ShoeFly Trail Running & Walking Series: Fleetfooted families enjoy fitness together in a 5K, 10K or 1-mile walk/run. Entry includes admission to select Thursday races on the Kingdom Trails through August and on the second Tuesday of each month at 5 p.m. at the PRKR Trails in Littleton, N.H. Ages 3 and up. Kingdom Trails Yurt, East Burke, 5-7:30 p.m. $45; free for children ages 10 and under; preregister. Info, 703-598-1934. Simon Brooks, Storyteller: Listeners of all ages soak up stories about good rulers, bad decisions, silly animals and the wonderful smell of baking bread. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10:30 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE Untitled-4 1

CHITTENDEN

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‘You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown’: The Very Merry Theatre amuses the audience with tales from this classic “Peanuts” comic strip. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Autism Support Group: Led by a professional, this monthly parent group provides a supportive space, including snacks and smiles. For adults. Stern Center for Language and Learning, Williston, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 878-2332. FREE Building Bridges: See July 6. Cardboard Box Parade: Youngsters dressed in decorated cardboard boxes meet at the top of College Street for a mirthful march led by Brazilian drummers Sambatucada! to City Hall Park for festivities and refreshments. Burlington City Hall Park, 1-3 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE

preschool •-•6th grade holistic approach ••

financial aid available

Colchester Lego Club: See July 6.

••

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KIDS VT

Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 5.

AUG. 25TH –27TH CAMP HOCHELAGA SOUTH HERO, VT

JULY 2017

Teddy Bear Sleepover: Little ones drop off stuffed animals during the day, then teens photograph the furry friends and take notes while savoring a cold snack. Teens grades 6 and up attend from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Info, 878-6956. FREE

R E t V a Wh CO S I D

KIDSVT.COM

Summer Pajama Storytime: Tykes in nightwear nestle in for bedtime tales and treats. Ages 18 months to 5 years. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660.

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Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 5.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 5.

IF YOU LOVE YOUR MOM, SEND HER TO SUMMER CAMP!

1/6/17 1:50 PM


Accepting new patients!

CALENDAR JULY Hovering Toward the Future: Smart builders slide in and make a forward-looking vehicle. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Preschool Music: See July 3. 10:30 a.m.

ESSEX

Soaring Towers: Using only craft sticks, clothespins and clips, junior constructionists tackle the tallest tower building challenge. Ages 7 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE

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802-989-7669 • www.DoctorPerch.com 5 Park Street, Middlebury

Kids Pirate Festival5/25/17

k12v-riversidehealth0617.indd 1

3:26 PM

Saturday & Sunday August 19 & 20

Family Story Time: See July 7.

Ukulele Kids: Musical ones try out instruments and dance to traditional children’s songs. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

WINDSOR

FRANKLIN

Drop-In Maker Space: See July 13.

Weekly Trail Runs: See July 6.

Arts and Crafts Studio: See July 6.

21 Friday ADDISON

Pajama Storytime Fridays: See July 7.

CALEDONIA

Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 7.

CHITTENDEN

Adventures with the Bookworms: See July 7. ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See July 7. Burger Night: See July 7. Essex Summer Story Time: See July 7.

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2017 KIDS VT

38

Foodways Fridays: See July 7.

22 Saturday ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 1.

CHITTENDEN

Bounty of Vermont: Shoppers fête local entrepreneurs with free samples and giveaways. Lantman’s Market, Hinesburg, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 482-2361. FREE

Dance With Ashley: Mini movers learn grooves with a special guest. All ages. Winooski Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 655-6424. FREE

WINDSOR

Say you saw it in

Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: See July 7.

Summer STEM: See July 6. The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 6.

6/22/17 2:03 PM

WASHINGTON

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 1.

ORLEANS

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Lego Club: See July 7.

RUTLAND

Fair Haven Farmers Market: See July 6.

www.lcmm.org

Magic: The Gathering: See July 7.

Summervale: See July 6.

PJ Story Hour: Tykes in nightwear snuggle in for nursery rhymes, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

(802) 475-2022

RUTLAND ORLEANS

Glow in the Dark STEM: Junior makers get imaginative with lighted sticks and a building challenge. Ages 8 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

See www.lcmm.org for tour dates

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 7.

Stepping on Positivity: Random acts of kindness meet guerilla positivity as teens take sidewalk chalk outside the library and into the greater Burlington community, drawing illustrations and writing inspiring quotations. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See July 6.

Explore a shipwreck without getting wet!

Richmond Farmers Market: See July 7.

Milton Farmers Market: See July 6.

Lego Library: See July 6.

Dr. Matthew Perchemlides

Pizza Fridays: See July 7. Tot Yoga: Teeny-tiny yogis stretch, wiggle, move and groove while singing and sharing stories. Ages 2-3. Jericho Town Library, 3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Jericho Farmers Market: See July 6.

Specialized Natural Health Care of Vermont

Knitting for Kids: See July 7.

Family Gym: See July 2. Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a family-friendly film while feasting on free popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Fantastic Physics: Educator Rebecca Rupp and curious kids experiment with hands-on activities including combining balloons and electricity, building a catapult and firing a rocket. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Friday Free for All: See July 7. I Spy an Opie: Through assorted stuffed animals, including Opie the opossum, fledgling naturalists learn about native and orphaned wildlife and how kids can make a difference. Ages 3 and up. Jericho Town Library, 1:15 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 7.

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See July 1. Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get creative with an art activity. All ages. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE Fisher Brothers Farm Summer Movie Night: See July 8. Harry Potter Alliance: Potter fans rally together in Voldemort Can’t Stop the Rock. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Launch Party for ‘The Wild Bunch’: Jan Gangsei celebrates the publication of her newest release, a tale of three friends braving a wilderness quest, with a reading and signing. Geared toward ages 9-13. The Flying Pig Bookstore, Shelburne, 10:30 a.m. RSVPs welcomed. Info, 985-3999. FREE

Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 ‘BUTTERFLIES, LIVE!’: A pavilion of flying creatures enchants visitors who learn about these winged beauties’ life cycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Through September 4.

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM, ST. JOHNSBURY Info, 748-2372 ‘BUTTERFLY TENT’: This living exhibit features fluttering painted ladies, monarchs, red admirals and more, including info about the life stages of these winged beauties and tips for creating a home butterfly garden. Through September. ‘OBSERVATION BEEHIVE’: Buzzing pollinators and their mighty queen occupy the museum’s rose garden. This new warmweather exhibit will close in the fall. ‘WE ARE THE INSECTS’: The traveling live exhibit from Montréal’s Insectarium features a batch of beetles, tarantulas, scorpions, cockroaches, stick insects and more in cases for up-close viewing. Through September 20.

HELEN DAY ART CENTER, STOWE Info, 253-8358 ‘EXPOSED’: National and local outdoor sculpture of all sizes spreads through the town of Stowe. Through October 21.

JERICHO TOWN LIBRARY Info, 899-4686 ‘STORY WALK’: Readers of all ages combine a walk around the library grounds with a page-by-page picture book on display.

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 ‘MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS’: The stories, ideas and science behind the creation of musical instruments mesmerize visitors. Through displays, videos and hands-on STEM opportunities, music lovers make and play a variety of instruments. Through September 4.

PHOENIX BOOKS RUTLAND Info, 855-8078 ‘FIND WALDO’: Sharp-eyed readers search out this famous children’s book character, who visits more than two dozen local businesses in July. Spot him and get entered in a grand-prize drawing. Through July 30.

Saturday Drama Club: See July 1. Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 1. Strawbee Saturdays: See July 1. Wild Things! Nature Program: Junior naturalists make micro gardens for bees, butterflies and birds with educator Kristen Littlefield. Ages 5 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

GRAND ISLE

Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 1.

RUTLAND

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1.

ORANGE

Fairy House Festival With Tracy Kane: Wee ones wearing whimsical wings meet the author of the Fairy House books, marvel at the Homestead’s miniature village and make a tiny dwelling. Ages 4 and up. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford Village, 1-3 p.m. $5-10; preregister by July 17. Info, 765-4288.

ORLEANS

Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 1. Kingdom Community Wind Tours: See July 5.

WASHINGTON

Capital City Farmers Market: See July 1. Kung Fu: See July 1. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 1.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

23 Sunday CHITTENDEN

Essex Open Gym: See July 2. Family Gym: See July 2. Winooski Farmers Market: See July 2.

LAMOILLE

Stowe Farmers Market: See July 2.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Teeny Tiny Explorers: See July 11.

It’s our 3rd annual

Selfie Contest!

Tinkering Tuesdays: See July 11.

24 Monday CHITTENDEN

A World of Stories: See July 3. Community Garden: See July 3. Escape Room for Kids: As a part of the summer reading program, young readers team up to Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library. Ages 7-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 1 & 3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Lego Club: See July 3. Pajama Story Time: Little ones in PJs nestle in for stories and snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Preschool Music: See July 3. Stories On The Screen: See July 10. Summer Story Time: See July 3. Webby’s Art Studio: Watercolor Silhouette: Inspired by the museum’s exhibits, artists of all ages work at their own watercoloring. Daily, through July 30. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

FRANKLIN

Magic Tree House Adventure Club: See July 10. STEM Family Nights: See July 3. Summer Gardening: See July 3.

Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 4.

FRANKLIN

Build a Boat: Small sailors experiment with how to structure a seaworthy vessel. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 3 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See July 11.

Enter Now Until Labor Day!

Southern Vermont Natural History Museum Presentation: Curious young naturalists learn about challenges facing local wildlife with artifacts including furs and skulls, plus live critters. All ages. Bent Northrop Memorial Library, Fairfield, 1 p.m. Info, 827-3945. FREE Summer Gardening: See July 3.

ORLEANS

‘The Mighty Lalouche’: Performed by Vasillos Gletos, this tabletop puppet show brings to life a Red Clover book about a mailman who boxes his way to fame and glory. An art project follows. Craftsbury Public Library, 4-5 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

WASHINGTON Burlington Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: See July 11.

WINDSOR

ORTHODONTICS

DRS. PETERSON, EATON DRS. PETERSON, RYAN RYAN &&EATON

RUTLAND

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See July 3.

WASHINGTON

Kids Buti Yoga: See July 3.

WINDSOR

Creative Arts Nature Studio: See July 10.

25 Tuesday CHITTENDEN

Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. Childcare and dinner provided. All welcome. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Aerial Dance for Tweens and Teens: See July 18. Lego Club: See July 11. Movie Madness: See July 11.

Preschool Music: See July 11.

Best Hashtag wins a bluetooth speaker

3. Attach a creative hashtag!

ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323

k4t-ChamplainOrtho0717.indd 1

Clay Studio: See July 11.

6/16/17 3:30 PM

Time-Travel Tuesdays: See July 11.

WE WALK

26 Wednesday ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

BECAUSE IT and SHOULDN’T Braces for Children Adults HURT TO BE A CHILD

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 5.

CHITTENDEN

Burlington Williston St. Albans 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 www.champlainortho.net

Art in the Park: See July 5. Bats Amazing!: Eager young naturalists learn basic bat anatomy, habits, what to do when spotting these winged creatures and why these critters matter to our environment. Ages 3 and up. Jericho Town Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Register Online! www.pcavt.org

Booktivity: See July 12. Duct Tape Construction: Crafty kiddos create a silver wallet for their library card and cash. Ages 7 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:301:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Family Game Day: See July 5. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See July 5. Leddy Park Beach Bites: See July 12. Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 5. Yoga for Kids: See July 5. Young Athletes: See July 5. Young Writers & Storytellers: See July 12.

FRANKLIN

Building Fun: See July 12.

2017 WALK FOR CHILDREN

Register online at www.pcavt.org or 1-800-CHILDREN Saturday, August 19 at the State House in Montpelier WALK or 5K RUN in Montpelier! Saturday, September 16 on the First Unitarian Universalist Church lawn in Burlington Spider-Man and distinctive likeness(es) thereof are trademarks of Marvel Characters Inc. and are used with permission. © 2008 Marvel Characters, Inc. All rights reserved. www.marvel.com.

Spanish Musical Kids: See July 11.

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Check-in at 8:00 a.m. WALK at 10:00 a.m.

26 WEDNESDAY, P.40

KIDS VT

Saturday, September 16 at the Howe Center in Rutland

Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: See July 11. Story Hour at Adam’s Berry Farm: See July 11.

Most Likes wins a $50 Amazon gift card

JULY 2017

Page to Stage: Kids read a story, write a script, rehearse, and perform for family and friends at 4:15 p.m. Grades 1-5. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

2. Post your selfie to our FB page or tag Champlainortho to your Instagram selfie

KIDSVT.COM

Aerial Dance for Kids: See July 18.

Grand prize wins a GoPro

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net

LAMOILLE

Cirque Me Workshop: Young thespians run away with the circus for a few hours and learn tricks of the trade, including acrobatics, tumbling, aerial trapeze, juggling and clowning, of course. Ages 8 and up. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 3-5 p.m. $15; preregister.

1. Like Champlain Orthodontics on Facebook or follow us on Instagram

6/21/17 8:41 AM


CALENDAR JULY STEM Fixes Fairytales: This hands-on program encourages youngsters to think outside the box and use simple machines to solve some classic literature problems. Ages 5 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

ORANGE

Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See July 5.

ORLEANS

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 5.

Summer Gardening: See July 3.

WASHINGTON

GRAND ISLE

Marshfield Story and Activity Time: See July 5.

Maker Program: See July 5.

Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 5.

RUTLAND

Book Discussion: Teens come together to talk about The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner. Ages 11-17. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 6-7 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Teen Yoga: See July 5.

WINDSOR

Fiber Arts Studio: See July 5. Woodstock Market on the Green: See July 5.

The Great British Cupcake Off: Teen bakers tackle a tiny baking project. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Colchester Lego Club: See July 6.

Ukulele Kids: See July 20.

Jericho Farmers Market: See July 6.

FRANKLIN

LCATV Young Producers Workshop: Aspiring filmmakers create their own television program, complete a themed project and produce a take-home DVD. Ages 8-9. Milton Public Library, 1-2:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Lego Celebration: Lovers of snap-together plastic blocks partake in a building-themed morning and a movie. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 652-7080. FREE Lego Library: See July 6.

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1. 3-6 p.m. Songs and Stories: The singing duo Taradiddle teams up with the library’s summer reading program for an amusing afternoon. Ages 5-13. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 1-2 p.m. Info, 422-9765.

Code a Better World: Amateur coders improve their computer savvy. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

27 Thursday

Milton Farmers Market: See July 6.

CALEDONIA

Origami: Fledging paper folders have fun fashioning a fox, a heart, a star box and a penguin. Ages 7 and up. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Preregister. Info, 879-0313. FREE

CHITTENDEN

Preschool Music: See July 3. 10:30 a.m.

Hardwick Lego Club: See July 6. Building Bridges: See July 6.

Summervale: See July 6.

Drop-In Maker Space: See July 13. Franklin Lego Thursdays: See July 6. St. Albans Library Legos: See July 13, 3-5 p.m. Weekly Trail Runs: See July 6.

RUTLAND

Fair Haven Farmers Market: See July 6. Summer STEM: See July 6.

ORLEANS

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 6.

WINDSOR

Arts and Crafts Studio: See July 6.

28 Friday ADDISON

Pajama Storytime Fridays: See July 7.

Story Times

CALEDONIA

Hardwick Farmers Market: See July 7.

Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. Monday ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. FRANKLIN STORY TIME: Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505. HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628. NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621. RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME: Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. SHELBURNE STORY TIME: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124. ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 253-6145. WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-4205. WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

40

KIDS VT

JULY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Tuesday ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077. COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420. HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475. MONTPELIER STORY TIME: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338. WILLISTON SUMMER STORY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

Wednesday BARNES & NOBLE MORNING STORY TIME: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001. HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See Monday. 10 a.m. LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See Tuesday. 10:30 a.m. NORWICH WORDPLAY STORY TIME: Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232. RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 728-5073. RICHMOND STORY TIME: Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. STOWE STORY TIME FOR 3-5YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. SWANTON STORYTIME: Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORY & ENRICHMENT HOUR: Warren Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 595-2582.

Thursday BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665. MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See Tuesday. RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday.

SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA: Barnes & Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001.

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: See Monday.

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free Library, 10:1511:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

SWANTON STORYTIME: See Wednesday. 10 a.m.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WINOOSKI STORY TIME: Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Saturday

Friday CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See Tuesday. ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328. ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313. GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643. HARDWICK STORY HOUR AT THE FARMERS’ MARKET: Atkins Field, 3-4 p.m. Info, 472-5849. FREE HUNTINGTON STORY TIME: Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583. KILLINGTON STORYTIME: Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

BARRE STORY TIME: Next Chapter Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114. COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660. ENOSBURG STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. FREE FRANKLIN WALK-IN STORY HOUR: Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505. MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. WEEKEND STORYTIME: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

CHITTENDEN

Adventures with the Bookworms: See July 7. ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See July 7. Burger Night: See July 7. Drop-In Maker Lab: Curious kids experiment with LittleBits electronics kits, 3D pens and other supples. Ages 8 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: See July 14. Essex Summer Story Time: See July 7. Family Build & Ice Cream Social: Young and old savor a serving of the cold, sweet stuff, then create a structure using donated items for the food shelf. Ages 5-10 with caregivers. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Preregister; bring a nonperishable item for the Colchester Food Shelf. Info, 264-5660. Family Gym: See July 2. Friday Free for All: See July 7. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See July 7. Knitting for Kids: See July 7. Live-Action Role Play: See July 14. Pizza Fridays: See July 7. Richmond Farmers Market: See July 7. Who Makes the World a Better Place? We do!: Through stories, drawing and costume-creation, kiddos consider how to change their world for better, in their own way. Ages 5-10. Jericho Town Library, 1:15 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

ESSEX

The Lunchbox Summer Meal Program: See July 7.

RUTLAND

Magic: The Gathering: See July 7.

ORLEANS

Lego Club: See July 7.

WASHINGTON Ben & Jerry’s Summer Outdoor Movie Festival: See July 7. Birds of Prey: The Southern Vermont Natural History Museum arrives with live raptors for a riveting and fact-filled morning. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE Family Story Time: See July 7.

WINDSOR

Foodways Fridays: See July 7.


SUBMIT YOUR AUGUST EVENTS FOR PRINT BY JULY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

Green Mountain Conservation Camp

29 Saturday

This Summer Let Nature Nurture...

ADDISON

Middlebury Farmers Market: See July 1.

CALEDONIA

Caledonia Farmers Market: See July 1.

CHITTENDEN

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 1. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See July 1. ‘Hamilton’ Sing-Along: Hamilton aficionados find their kin through music, prizes and photo-bombing. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 865-7216. FREE Lake Champlain Maritime Festival Pirate Park: Captains of the seas snap photos with Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate and Mermaid Dalni, cruise with Captain Mike over the Seven Seas through games and activities, and clap for costume winners at 1 p.m. Live music, a bouncy house and more make this a memorable waterfront day devoted to the young. Waterfront Park, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 482-3313.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Family Gym: See July 2. Winooski Farmers Market: See July 2.

LAMOILLE

Stowe Farmers Market: See July 2.

31 Monday CHITTENDEN

A World of Stories: See July 3. Community Garden: See July 3.

Shelburne Farmers Market: See July 1.

Harry Potter Day: Potter fans visit Diagon Alley to prepare for school, get sorted into houses, and start classes at Hogwarts in wizardry and witchcraft. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Strawbee Saturdays: See July 1.

Lego Club: See July 3.

FRANKLIN

Preschool Music: See July 3.

Saturday Drama Club: See July 1.

Fairfax Mini Renaissance Faire: This familyoriented festival features sword fighting, blacksmithing and chain-mail demonstrations, a catapult-making station for kids, live music, food, games galore, and more. Fairfax Elementary/ Middle School, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

GRAND ISLE

Champlain Island Farmers Market: See July 1.

RUTLAND

Rutland Farmers Market: See July 1.

ORLEANS

Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See July 1.

WASHINGTON

Capital City Farmers Market: See July 1.

Stories On The Screen: See July 10. Summer Story Time: See July 3. The Luneaus Basketball Family: Ilze Luneau dribbles, juggles and spins, asking the audience to join in the fun, music and dance. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: Puppet Play: Amateur puppeteers create and perform a story with finger creations. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

FRANKLIN

STEM Family Nights: See July 3.

RUTLAND

Kung Fu: See July 1.

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See July 3.

Waitsfield Farmers Market: See July 1.

WASHINGTON

Kids Buti Yoga: See July 3.

30 Sunday CHITTENDEN

Canoeing, fishing, archery, campfires and s’mores. What a great way to spend a week this summer. Discover Vermont’s wildlife and master outdoor skills. Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department offers one-week sessions for girls and boys, ages 12 to 14. Sessions run from June through August at two beautiful lake-side locations.

WINDSOR

Creative Arts Nature Studio: See July 10. !

Essex Open Gym: See July 2.

1/25/17 10:18 AM

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Join us!

Vermont PBS Kids’ Day with the Lake Monsters

Sunday, July 16th 5:05 PM

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JULY 2017

Centennial Field, Burlington, VT

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He tore it apart. From my bed on the second floor I could hear Yogi searching desperately all night. Was he looking for food? A familiar scent? Something to play with? Fellow skunks?

We provided Yogi with food and shelter, but he did not reciprocate with the affection we so desired. Day after day I tried to approach Yogi when I got home from school. Sometimes I brought my best friend to see if we could pick him up. His pointy little nose and beady eyes looked alternately scared and sad. He stomped his feet at us and tried to bite our outstretched hands. Clearly, he did not want to be our pet. In a recent New York Times article about her parents’ giant tortoise, novelist Hanya Yanagihara describes pet ownership as “an act of assumed, albeit unacknowledged, reciprocity”

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“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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JULY 2017

— that of food and shelter in return for the animal’s unconditional love. In other words, we have expectations of our pets. Specifically, “loyalty and dedication, and we want these things to be expressed in a way that we can understand.” We provided Yogi with food and shelter, but he did not reciprocate with the affection we so desired. The day my parents returned Yogi to the farm, Tamara and I were devastated. She went on a long bike ride to pedal away her pain. Looking back, I understand our sadness as a kind of unrequited love. Decades later I have the satisfaction of owning a pet that can reciprocate in a way I understand. We recently got a puppy, Finch, and I am struck by how she innately knows what my four children want. She nips and wrestles with my 2-year-old the way she would another puppy; she sleeps all night with my 10-year-old who suffers from nightmares; she goes for long walks with my 12-yearold who loves the silent companionship; and she gently and loyally plays fetch with my 7-year-old who has always been cautious around dogs. In return, we give her food, shelter and lots of kisses. Recently I asked my dad what happened when he returned Yogi to the farm. He said the farmer exclaimed “Yogi! Yogi!” as he picked up the skunk and kissed him. As for Yogi, my dad said he seemed happy to be back. I wondered why it didn’t work out for us. Was it a poor match? Perhaps we didn’t try hard enough. Or maybe Yogi’s heart was broken, and he was longing for his original home. Whatever the reason, we never got to snuggle our skunk, never mind walk him down the street. But my friends were still incredulous when I showed them the black and white hairs I kept in a special treasure box. I’d take them out and feel the coarse strands, proof that — though never truly a pet — I did once own a skunk. !

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cried for weeks when my childhood cat, Sheba, died. She was a force to be reckoned with. If you tried to move her from our royal blue armchair, she would hiss. Yet she would also curl herself into the hollow of my legs in the middle of the night, her soft body emanating warmth that soothed my fears. I assumed that when she died we would get a kitten. But my mother informed me and my three sisters that we would never have another furry pet; medical testing confirmed she was allergic not only to cats but dogs as well. For us this was tragic news. It hit me and my older sister, Tamara, especially hard. Instead of giving up and just getting a goldfish, Tamara got creative. Surely there must be other appealing pets besides cats and dogs. She was determined to have something different. She found what she was looking for while searching the newspaper’s classified ads — a farmer in southern Québec was getting rid of a skunk. Tamara imagined us walking down the street with our pet skunk on a leash; the image was seared into her brain. She reasoned with our parents that while a skunk seemed like the antithesis of a sweet household pet, once it is de-scented — a process where a vet surgically removes the glands that secrete a foul-smelling liquid — it is an adorable, cuddly animal. Or so we hoped. Surprisingly, my mother conceded. My father drove from our home in Montréal to the farm to pick up our skunk, Yogi. I was beyond excited to meet this new family member. A skunk! What would all the kids at school say? Yogi, it turned out, was not that excited to meet us. It would be putting it mildly to say he arrived in a foul mood. He had been de-scented, but all his instincts were intact. When we approached him, he would back up, stamp his two little front paws and lift his tail high in warning. For the first few days we couldn’t even get near him. My parents did not want him roaming the house, so we set up a cozy closed-off area in the basement.

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WHY. LONG. TREE. WORM.

Our relationship with an unusual pet wasn’t meant to be

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Kids VT — July 2017  

The Animal Issue: Farm Raised Kids; Puppy Rescue; River Snorkeling; Backyard Catio

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