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STI Fall & Winter Program A LEARNING COMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE

TEACHING STRATEGIES

EQUITY & ACCESS

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

SCHOOL COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT

INTERDEPENDENCE

1


STI Table of Contents

Principles Responding to Individual Student Needs Collaborations with Other Organizations Mini Grant Program National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Professional Performance Review Program Teacher as Reader Technical Skills

Page 7 7 8 9 9 9 9 9

Overview EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School

*Course has prerequisites for participation; see description for details. #

Title

Beginning

Open To

Credit

Coordinator

Page

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE The Mentor Support Seminar: Edgemont The Mentor Support Seminar: Scarsdale Mentoring Workshop for Senior Options Steering Committee

8/27

Edgemont

2

R. Farrell

10

8/31

Scarsdale

3

D. Wrobleski

10

9/21

SHS

3

A. Liptak

10

3922B

Re-Imagining Senior Year

9/23

EHS

2

A. Nelson D. Schuchat

11

3923

The Child and the Curriculum: II

9/29

Edgewood

2

C. Five

11

3924

Reflective Practice Seminar

10/15

All

2

P. Dempsey H. Rodstein

12

3925A

Let’s Talk Math

10/6

SMS/SHS Math

1

C. Desoe

12

3925B

Let’s Talk World Language

10/6

SMS/SHS World Lang.

1

S. Corten S. Whittington

13

3926A

Exploring Balanced Literacy at Quaker Ridge Explorations in Balanced Literacy at Heathcote

TBA

Quaker Ridge

1

13

TBA

Heathcote

1

P. Hamlet R. Layne T. DeBerry M. Stile

3927

Classic Books into Film

10/20

All

2

D. Golden

14

3928

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice

12/1

All

1

R. DiYanni D. Wrobleski

14

3929

Writing Science Fiction

10/1

All

1

J. Toscano

15

3930

Integrating Positive Psychology in Schools

2/26-27

All

1

I. Smith

3921E 3921S 3922A

3926B

2

14

15


16

3931

Teachers Reading Together: Edgewood

9/29

Edgewood

2

N. O’Rourke C. Schaeffer

3931A

Keeping Current in Literature at Fox Meadow

9/29

Fox Meadow

1

J. Schorr

16

3931B

Keeping Current in Literature at Greenacres

9/29

Greenacres

1

C. Phillips C. Sansone

16

3931C

Teacher as Reader: Heathcote

9/29

Heathcote

2

A. Frantz

17

3931D

Quality Readers of Quaker Ridge

9/22

Quaker Ridge

2

S. Hendler M. Tallevi

17

3931E

Literature Across Boundaries

9/29

All

2

D. Golden

17

3931F

Teacher as Reader: Edgemont

9/30

Edgemont

2

H. Brandon J. Stockton

17

3931G

Teacher as Reader: Science

11/24

SHS

1

N. Pisano

17

3931H

Teacher as Reader: Social Studies

10/27

All

1

K. Krahl L. Tallevi

18

3931J

Women’s Studies: Women in the Arts

9/29

All

2

E. Draper

18

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE 3932

An Author’s Walk Through Historic Brooklyn: Green-Wood Cemetery

10/30-31

All

1

L. Onofri

18

3933

From Independence to Constitution

11/12 & 14

SMS/SHS*

1

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

19

3934

HHREC Distinguished Lecture and Seminar Series

12/3

All

1

N. Ginsberg

19

3935

Whose Language Is It Anyway?

10/6

All

1

S. Mounkhall P. Sheehey

20

3936

A Look into NYC: 42nd Street

11/6-7

All

1

P. Tomizawa

20

3937

Grand Central: A Case Study in Change

10/30-31

All

1

J. Overbey

3938

Cyberspace: What Educators Need to Know to Keep Students Safe

1/29-30

All

1

D. Paradiso

21

21

INTERDEPENDENCE 3939

Earth Links: Toward Awareness and Understanding of Current Events

TBA

All

1

P. DiBianco J. Weber

22

3940

Global Encounters/Cultural Exchange: India and Mexico

9/29

SMS/SHS

2,3

R. DiYanni S. Mounkhall J. Weber

22

3941

Ancient Paths, Modern Voices: Celebrating China

10/21

All

2,3

S. Peppers J. Weber

23

3942

10/2-3

All

1

P. DiBianco

24

3943

The Study of Cultural Generational Conflict Through Film Spanish Heritage Through Art

10/6

All

1

H. Pasternack

24

3944

Multicultural Bookbinding

11/20-21

All

1

N. Closter

24

3


3945

Geometry and Origami

1/8-9

All

1

A. Harrison J. Stockton

25

3946

Encore du Français? V

10/1

All*

1

A. Tripodi

25

3947

Diversity Through Literature

9/17

MS/HS

1

P. DiBianco

3948

Introduction to Beadwork and Decoupage

1/29-30

All

1

C. Desoe E. Ungar

26 26

3949

Dots and Points on the Map: Ecuador

2/5-6

All

1

M. DeAngelis J. Stockton

TEACHING STRATEGIES

27

3950A

Using Literature to Build Community at Greenacres

9/22

Greenacres

1

C. Phillips

27

3950B

Celebrating Children’s Literature

9/29

Quaker Ridge

1

S. Hendler

27

3950C

Greenville Book Club IX

9/23

Greenville

1

B. Horowitz

28

3950D

Keeping Current in Young Adult Literature

10/22

5-9

1

L. Waltzman S. Waskow

28

3950E

Non-Fiction Matters

11/20-21

6-8

1

M. Fox S. Waskow

28

3951

Essentials of Literacy

9/24

1-6 Edgemont

1

M. Ferrara D. Hale

29

3952

LCI at STI

9/24

LCI participants

2

29

3953

Encouraging Curiosity and Questioning: Inquiry Research in the Classroom

10/23-24

Elementary

1

D. Celentano R. DiYanni J. Weber A. Kenney S. Luft

3954A

Reggio Emilia Study Group

10/6

All

2

L. Hicks L. Lamonaca

31

3954B

Inspirations from Reggio Emilia — A Dialogue with Lella Gandini Developing Reading Comprehension in an Online Age

11/6-7

All

1

L. Hicks L. Lamonaca

31

10/13

Scarsdale Elementary

2

S. Luft C. Phillips W. Yang

32

3956

Singapore Math with Ban Har Yeap

10/16-17

K-8

1

K. de la Garza N. Pavia

32

3957A

Lesson Study in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics

10/1

K-8 Scarsdale

2

K. de la Garza W. Jackson N. Pavia

33

3957B

Professional Learning Through Lesson Study at Edgewood

10/20

Edgewood

2

S. Houseknecht W. Jackson J. Kiley

33

3958

Poetry Playground: The Craft of Poetry II

Moved to spring

All

1

L. Hicks

33

3959

The Art of Quilt Making

10/16-17

All

1

M. Ball D. Rivellini

34

3960

Art Through Children’s Picture Books

12/4-5

K-6

1

S. Faranda J. Schorr

34

3955

4

30


If I Had a Hammer: Empowering Children Through Folk Music Math Meets Art

1/8-9

All

1

L. Forte L. Hicks

35

1/22-23

All

1

Eve Eisenstadt

35

Learning Styles in the Classroom Introduction to Inquiry: Comparing Approaches and Process Skills

1/22-23

All

1

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

36

1/29-30

All

1

J. Kiley

36

Stress in Children and Adolescents Picture Books in a Weekend

2/5-6

All

1

J. Walker

37

2/5-6

Scarsdale Elementary

1

Scarsdale Elem. Librarians

37

All Kinds of Minds: A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Learning Witness to Our Times

11/5

All

1

J. Turetzky

37

12/3

All

1

E. Wixted

38

Highlighting Healthy Habits in the Elementary Classroom

12/3

Elementary

1

E. Sciarpelletti

38

Current Practices in PE and Health EQUITY AND ACCESS

TBA

PE, Heath

1,2

G. Blessing

39

3971

The ESL Students in the Mainstream Classroom

12/4-5

All

1

J. O’Shea S. Silkowitz

39

3972

Teaching Games to Differentiate Instruction

1/22-23

K-4, LRC

1

B. Pagel

39

3973

Building Communication Skills Across the Curriculum

2/26-27

All

1

B. Lorie A. Tripodi

40

3974

Race Action Plan

10/2

SHS

1

N. Ginsberg F. Goldberg

40

3975

Differentiated Math Instruction: Teaching to the Middle School Student

10/19

SMS math*

1

S. Walsh

41

3961 3962 3963 3964

3965 3966 3967 3968 3969 3970

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT 3976

School Nurse Study Group

TBA

Nurses

1

M. Donovan J. Hoffman

41

3977

Touch the River at Beczak Environmental Education Center

10/16-17

All

1

C. Gilliland

42

3978

Water for Westchester

11/13-14

All

1

S. Boyar E. Levine

42

TECHNOLOGY 3979

Online Resources for the Elementary Teacher

10/1

Elementary

1

Scarsdale Elem. Librarians

43

3980

Extreme Makeover: School Technology Edition

10/1

All

1

J. Crisci K. Holvig

43

3981

It’s Back! Hyperstudio in the Classroom Keeping Current with Technology Level Two

10/2-3

All

1

43

10/6

Mac Users

1

J. Crisci K. Holvig L. Fisher

3982

44

5


Using SMART Board in the Classroom Using JAVA Applets in the Science and Math Classrooms

10/2-3

All

1

D. Vermes

44

10/23-24

1

B. Bierbauer P. Jablonowski

44

Using the Vernier LabQuest in the Science Classroom SMARTBoard Technology and Keynote in the SMS Science Curriculum Comics in the Curriculum with Comic Life

10/30-31

Secondary Science & Math K-12 Science

1

45

11/6-7

SMS Science

1

I. Szkolar J. Williams J. Gilbert C. Gilliland

11/13-14

All

1

L. Fisher S. Goodman

46

3988

Google Sketchup: Creating 3D Models for the Classroom

11/20-21

All

1

P. McKenna

46

3989

Keynote: Developing Dynamic Presentations Using Graphic Organizers to Support Instruction

12/1

All

1

S. Walsh

47

12/3

Secondary

1

M. Curtin N. Silverman

47

3991

iLife’09 in a Weekend

12/4-5

All

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

47

3992

iThink, Therefore, iMovie’09

1/8-9

All

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

48

3993

Photoshop Jumpstart

2/26-27

All

1

L. Fisher P. Tomizawa

48

3983 3984

3985 3986

3987

3990

45

SPECIAL PROGRAMS – NON CREDIT 3994

Design in Glass Mosaics and Glass Fusing

10/6

All

NC

M. DeAngelis

48

3995 A 3995B

CPR for Professional Rescuers CPR and AED

10/24 11/21

Nurses All

Stipend

J. Hoffman

49

3996A 3996B

Conversational English for Adult Learners

10/20 10/22

All

NC

M. Nowak

49

3997

Knitting

TBA

All

NC

H. Kaplan

50

3998

Stress Management: The Power of Yoga in the Classroom and on the Playing Field

11/6-7

All

NC

G. Blessing

50

Course Coordinators and Speakers Registration and Credit Information Emergency Closing Information Registration Form Organization

6

51 54 54 55 56


Principles The purpose of the Scarsdale Teachers Institute is to offer planned and continuous education to the professional staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont Schools, teachers in other school districts, and community residents. Scarsdale teachers began this program because they believe that the best teachers are alert, openminded people who continue to learn and to translate their insights into appropriate experiences for their students. Offering a variety of professional experiences in response to the needs of those working with children, the Institute contributes to an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry that stimulates the staff to continue learning. This professional interaction on educational issues benefits the students and the staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont School Districts. Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers also endorse the principle that cooperation among autonomous groups is fundamental to growth and is essential to progress in education. They view the Institute as a laboratory for this principle. Here various groups of teachers, administrators, and community leaders may work together for a valued purpose. Supported and sponsored by the Scarsdale Teachers Association, the Edgemont Teachers Association, and the Scarsdale and Edgemont Boards of Education, the Institute reaffirms the principles of professional autonomy and professional collaboration inherent in the highest quality of professional development. Thus, through STI organization, administration, and planning, teachers assume a large degree of responsibility for their professional growth. The Scarsdale Teachers Institute also serves as one of the established Teacher Resource and Computer Training Centers of New York State, funded, in part, by a competitive grant from the New York State Department of Education and governed by a Policy Board of teachers, administrators, community residents, and parents. As one of the founding members of the Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network, the Scarsdale Teachers Institute collaborates and cooperates with other teacher centers to provide professional growth opportunities for the entire educational community.

Responding to Individual Student Needs Curriculum and pedagogy must respond to individual learning differences among students. This fundamental principle of teaching and learning, stated in the Scarsdale district goals, also informs teacher practice in the classroom and in STI programs. Courses that specifically address differentiated techniques and strategies of instruction can be found in the Equity and Access section of the catalogue. Courses in all areas are designed to address the varied ways children learn.

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Collaborations with Other Organizations The Scarsdale Teachers Institute enhances its program through selected collaborations with other educational institutions. These relationships provide Scarsdale and Edgemont faculty with resources that enrich opportunities for professional growth. Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network The 21 teacher centers in the Lower Hudson region meet regularly to share resources and develop programs for local educators. Call the STI office for further information. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts The STI, the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center, and the Teacher Center at Purchase College have collaborated with the Performing Arts Center at Purchase College to offer teachers the opportunity to work with guest artists from the Kennedy Center’s Education Program. Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center The STI continues the affiliation with the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center that brings distinguished scholars to the community. Facing History and Ourselves The programs of Facing History have a continuing impact on the Scarsdale schools. Teachers participate in summer institutes as well as yearlong programs. New York Technology Education Network The New York Technology Education Network (NYTEN) provides a forum for technology coordinators to share information and concerns related to the implementation of technology in schools. It is a vehicle for suggestions, support, and strength in the pursuit of excellence in K-12 technology. This network is co-sponsored by the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center of Westchester and the Scarsdale Teachers Institute. New York Institute of Technology Educational Enterprise Zone The Educational Enterprise Zone (EEZ) is a K-12 videoconferencing consortium of providers and receivers that meets regularly at various sites throughout New York City. EEZ offers support to members in designing and implementing videoconferencing units of study. Windward School Windward School provides an instructional program for childen with language-based learning disabilities. Windward Teacher Training Institute (WTTI) offers professional development based on scientifically validated research in child development, learning theory, and pedagogy. Courses, workshops, and lectures address a broad range of developmental and curricular topics appropriate for both mainstream and remedial settings. WTTI serves as a resource for educators and professionals in allied disciplines such as speech and language therapists and psychologists, as well as for parents. WTTI workshops that meet after school and on weekends may be considered for STI credit. One credit is offered for every 12 hours of workshops, which may equate to two or more WTTI classes. WTTI’s schedule of fall/winter course offerings is listed on the Windward Teacher Training Institute link on Windward School’s website: www.windwardny.org. Partial tuition reduction for Edgemont and Scarsdale staff is available. Call the STI for additional information.

8


National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Teachers who are interested in applying for NBPTS certification may receive scholarships to fund the cost of the application and mentoring to support the process. The STI offers a support seminar for teachers engaged in seeking National Board certification. Additional resources from the National Board will be available. For further information about this seminar call the STI office.

Professional Performance Review Program The expanded Professional Performance Review Program offers opportunities for teachers to design programs for professional growth that reflect their particular interests and goals. STI courses are designed to support the Professional Performance Review Program by furthering inquiry based learning, alternative assessment, standards for evaluation, and student centered classrooms. Almost any STI course may be used as part of the Professional Performance Review.

Teacher as Reader “We need to make reading, which is in its essence a solitary endeavor, a social one as well, to encourage that great thrill of finding kinship in shared experiences of books. We must weave reading back into the very fabric of the culture, and make it a mainstay of community.” Andrew Solomon, “The Closing of the American Book,” NYT, July 10, 2004. The importance of reading literature for adults has gained nationwide attention with the publication of recent studies indicating that pleasure reading among Americans in every group is down. The STI Teacher as Reader courses counter this trend. Participants meet throughout the year to read classic and new literature. In addition to genre, participants examine themes, character development, and all other aspects of literary form. Adults who love reading communicate this enthusiasm to the children in their care. Because of the popularity of this course, the STI offers a number of sections determined by enrollment or interest at individual schools.

Technical Skills The Scarsdale Teachers Institute offers a full range of beginning to advanced courses for staff and community members. Courses are designed collaboratively by teachers and administrators to meet the district goal of integrating technology into the school curriculum.

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REFLECTIVE PRACTICE The Mentor Support Seminar: Edgemont......................... #3921E Over the past eight years the Mentor Program has become an integral part of the Edgemont District program. This year the Mentors and new teachers will continue to refine and develop the program. This seminar provides a systematic program of support for teachers new to Edgemont and recognizes and rewards the experience and skill that Mentor teachers bring to new teachers. The program is a rich opportunity for the professional development of expert teachers who are now trained to work with colleagues. This seminar assists the Mentor teacher in defining his/her role and its relationship to the new teacher. Mentor teachers will meet together to identify needs, discuss problems, and seek solutions. Course topics include roles and responsibilities of mentoring, teacher collaboration, and effective communication. Mentor teachers participate in creating this unique program designed specifically to meet the needs of the Edgemont staff. Course Coordinator: Rose Farrell Open to: Instructional staff designated as Mentor teachers Time: 8 sessions beginning Th 8/27 Location: EHS Credit: 2 points salary credit for those teachers eligible for salary credit ; $750 stipend for first-year Mentors not eligible for salary credit; $1,000 stipend for secondyear Mentors not eligible for salary credit

The Mentor Support Seminar: Scarsdale.......................... #3921S Over the past 25 years the Mentor Program has become an integral part of the Scarsdale EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

10

District program. This year the Mentors and new teachers will continue to refine and develop the program. This seminar provides systematic support for teachers new to Scarsdale and recognizes and rewards the experience and skill that Mentor teachers bring to new teachers. The program is a rich opportunity for the professional development of expert teachers who are now trained to work with colleagues. This seminar assists the Mentor teacher in defining his/her role and its relationship to the new teacher. Mentor teachers will meet together to identify needs, discuss problems, and seek solutions. Course topics include roles and responsibilities of mentoring, teacher collaboration, and effective communication. Mentor teachers participate in creating this unique program designed specifically to meet the needs of the Scarsdale staff. Course Speaker: Diane Wrobleski Open to: Instructional staff designated as Mentor teachers Time: M 8/31, W 9/23, 10/28, 12/9, 3/3, 4/14, 3:30-5:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: 3 points salary credit for those teachers eligible for salary credit; $1,000 stipend for first-year Mentors not eligible for salary credit; $1,250 for second-year Mentors plus 2 salary credits or $600 stipend

Mentoring Workshop for Senior Options Steering Committee .........................................#3922A Every year Scarsdale High School’s Senior Options Steering Committee supervises, organizes, reviews, and revises the Senior Options Program. Teaching staff on the Senior Options Steering Committee must reevaluate program policies, forms, and HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School


logistics. The case load of mentors and students changes annually; therefore, the Steering Committee must develop new strategies, train new mentors, and supervise new students. From September to February, participants meet monthly to review the previous year’s program evaluations, to assess the outcomes, to make revisions, and to recommend policy changes, where called for, as directed by committee reflection. From March through June, participants will meet at least twice monthly to introduce the revised program to mentors and students. Steering Committee members also work independently with individual mentors and students on project choices and proposal writing. Spring meetings involve individual caseloads and subcommittee work. Committee members must also read and approve caseload proposals by the end of the third quarter. During the Senior Options experience, meetings focus on problems specific mentors and students may have in preparation for presentations, on critiquing the ongoing work of the program, and on presenting ideas for reevaluation. Course Coordinator: Ann Liptak Open to: SHS Senior Options Steering Committee Time: M 9/21, 10/26, 11/16, 1/25, 2/22, 3/15, 4/26, 5/17, 3:30-6, with remaining date to be set by group

experiences in the last year of high school and to recommend ways to improve them. Many of the proposals are of interest in terms of value for senior year and in the lack of additional expenditures for districts. In the wake of 9/11, this report went largely unread. However, all schools could benefit from re-examining how seniors, particularly second semester seniors, are taught. Edgemont Senior High teachers have requested a course to explore together options to the current organization of the senior year. Participants will begin with an examination of Edgemont’s existing program, what works, what could be improved. They will move on to an analysis of professional literature on senior year, including the report of the National Commission. Participants also plan to contact area school districts to observe what can be learned from programs for improving senior year already in place. As a result of this experience, teachers will be asked to develop a collaborative blueprint for improving the second semester senior year at Edgemont High School. Course Coordinators: Art Nelson, Dan Schuchat Open to: EHS Time: W 9/23, 10/14, 11/4, 12/9, 1/13, 2/24, 3/17, 4/14,5/12, 3:30-6 Location: EHS A-School

Location: SHS, rm 1N7

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Credit: Three credits: one credit or stipend awarded at the end of the first term; two points salary credit or stipend awarded at the end of the second term

The Child and the Curriculum II .......................................... #3923

Re-Imagining Senior Year.. #3922B Senior year is a unique time in every student’s life. Teachers with responsibilities for seniors often find that the second semester of the final high school term presents equally unique challenges as well as opportunities. In June 2000, the U.S. Department of Education created the National Commission on the High School Senior Year. The sponsors charged the Commission to examine students’

New programs in a school signal change for both teachers and their students. In the past few years, teachers at Edgewood have been engaged in professional development for a new program in balanced literacy and, last year, in the pedagogy of the new Singapore math curriculum. Both of these training experiences were necessary to guide teachers in developing the skills and concepts unique to each course of study. This year brings another change: a new schedule. As teachers are immersed in adapting to and learning about new curriculum and schedules, it is important

11


to observe children through the changes. Teachers need the opportunity to discuss with colleagues the impact of change on students and to make recommendations based on their findings.

professional staff members. The group meets once a month; members will develop a set of reflections on their work with students and colleagues. Members also will complete a set of peer observations as the year progresses.

This course will continue last year’s work. Once again, guided by professional literature and discussion with colleagues, participants will carry on the process of conducting class-based research. Each teacher will select students to observe and will follow their progress throughout the year by collecting samples of their work, taking notes during conferences, and listening to their comments. By observing, listening, and questioning students about their learning experiences, teachers are alert to student needs and ways to improve instruction within the structure of a new schedule and new approaches to teaching. Collaboration between teachers will be encouraged. As a community of learners, participants will share their findings and recommendations during course sessions.

Course Coordinators: Patty Dempsey, Howard Rodstein

Course Coordinator: Cora Five Open to: Edgewood Time: Tu 9/29, noon-1, with remaining dates to be determined by group Location: EWS Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Reflective Practice Seminar.. #3924 The intent of this program is to promote positive change in classroom practice by helping teams of practitioners reflect together on the core issues of teaching and learning as well as school culture. The goal is to build a community of learners among colleagues. In this yearlong course participants will: Look collaboratively at concrete examples of teacher and student work; examine and apply various protocols for looking at student and teacher work; observe in classrooms; participate in activities designed to understand the culture of a school. Two trained coaches lead the Reflective Practice Group, composed of 8-12

12

Open to: All Time: Th 10/15, 12/10, 1/21, 2/11, 4/22, 3:30-6 and Th 3/18, 5/20, 3:30-8, with two hours of observation time Location: Varies Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Let’s Talk Math................ #3925A In June 2009, the New York State Department of Education completed the second year in a three-year rollout of its new sequence of math courses and corresponding Regents exams, and the Scarsdale elementary schools completed the first year of the Singapore math program. These changes have implications for math instruction across the curriculum, and secondary teachers will benefit from time and opportunity to discuss with colleagues the impact of curriculum modifications as well as current trends in math education. In addition, teachers need to address the everevolving use of technology in the teaching of math. The importance of longitudinal conversation is vital to preserving the high standards of excellence and achievement in the district. Participants will focus attention on the transition from 8th to 9th grade, the evolving ninth grade program and implications for future math courses, the impact of the elementary’s Singapore math program on secondary math instruction, the use of appropriate materials and technology such as SMARTBoard, and the transition from AP to AT. This course will meet for four twohour sessions. The other four hours of the course will be spent observing math classes in other schools. Course Coordinator: Carol Desoe Open to: SMS-SHS Math


Time: Tu 10/6, 1/5, 3/2, 5/4, 3:30-5:30, with four hours of observation time.

Course Coordinators: Sylvie Corten, Sarah Whittington

Location: SHS, rm 222

Open to: SMS-SHS World Language Department

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

Let’s Talk World Languages ........................................ #3925B The Scarsdale schools goal to “prepare students for an interdependent world” places renewed emphasis on the importance of world language instruction. As personto-person contact across the globe through travel, Internet, email, and texting becomes more commonplace, teachers of world languages need the time and opportunity to consider with colleagues the impact of globalization on language instruction. Thematic units and assessments that shift from linguistic content focus to real-world applications are timely topics in the global community of the 21st century. Through reading and discussing the professional literature, participants will consider multiple measures and perspectives on language instruction and acquisition to help students gain the competence they need to interact with people who speak a variety of languages. This course meets for five two-hour sessions during the school year and requires two hours of classroom observations. The first session features a challenge course exercise to engage participants in group initiatives and problem solving. Additional sessions during the year will include the following topics: ways that students may take an active role in constructing meaning from their personal experiences and expressing them in a world language; approaches that reflect the philosophy and beliefs of educating the whole child; ways to help students gain an understanding of the perspectives of other people, the connection between language and culture. Throughout the course, the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign (ACTF) proficiency guidelines in language skills — ­ speaking, listening, reading, and writing — will be applied.

Time: Tu 10/6, 12/1, 1/5, 3/2, 5/4, 3:305:30 two hours of observation time Location: SMS, rm T109 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

Exploring Balanced Literacy at Quaker Ridge IV............... #3926A The Scarsdale School District has identified Balanced Literacy as an approach to reading and writing instruction that supports the value of classroom best practices developed by teachers. Scarsdale teachers and administrators have completed a guide to Balanced Literacy, a curriculum philosophy and framework that promotes the instruction of students in individual and small group ability levels and allows for differentiation within the classroom in an authentic and purposeful manner. Research supports this methodology as effective in the assessment, instruction, and advancement of skills and comprehension for students within the elementary years of reading acquisition. This yearlong course will support teachers as they deepen their knowledge of Balanced Literacy, implement methods, and reflect upon the components outlined in the guide. Participants will continue the introductory work relating to Balanced Literacy that transpired during the past school year. They will examine methods of assessment through the Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA), and additional informal tools, and will develop strategies to use data in the planning of instruction. Techniques gained from Reader’s Workshop will be reviewed: read alouds, shared reading, guided reading, conferencing, and independent reading. The course features modeling and practice of successful classroom activities followed by reflection and sharing with colleagues.

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Course Coordinators: Penny Hamlet, Robyn Lane

Classic Books into Film....... #3927

Open to: Quaker Ridge Time: TBA

What elements are common to classic books and motion pictures? The transformation of great literature into film creates images of characters, settings, and dialogue. By including the film version of a work of literature under study in curriculum, teachers encourage critical thinking and analysis as well as attention to creative modes of interpreting an author’s intent and meaning. A comparison of both genres offers a window on the creative process of writers and, similarly, the creative team behind the lens. Teachers, and their students, will learn to study both novels and film with critical skill as they compare and contrast written and visual formats.

Location: QRS Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Explorations in Balanced Literacy at Heathcote.................... #3926B The Scarsdale School District has identified Balanced Literacy as an approach to reading and writing instruction that supports the value of classroom best practices developed by teachers. Teachers and administrators have developed and completed a guide to Balanced Literacy — a curriculum philosophy and framework that promotes the instruction of students individually and in small groups. This approach allows for differentiation within the classroom in an authentic and purposeful manner. Research supports this methodology as effective in the assessment, instruction, and advancement of reading skills for all students. This course will support teachers as they deepen their knowledge of Balanced Literacy, implement methods, and reflect upon the components outlined in the Scarsdale Balanced Literacy Guide. Participants will engage in study and conversations related to best practices in Balanced Literacy classroom. The course features modeling and practice of successful classroom activities followed by reflection and sharing with colleagues. Course Coordinators: Trent DeBerry, Maria Stile Course Speakers: Lucy Calkins, Kathleen Tolan, and Sarah Picard Taylor, Teachers College, Columbia University Open to: HCS Time: TBA Location: HCS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Participants will analyze the great works of literature through both original texts and cinema as they explore the elements that make a classic book or film. Biographic monograms and critical essays about authors, books, and movies will add depth of interpretation to both genres. Instruction and discussion will model the use of literature and film interpretations into curriculum. The first and second books and films of the course will be Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy and The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck. Course Coordinator: Dorothy Golden Open to: All Time: Tu 10/20, 11/17, 1/19, 2/9, 3/16, 4/13, 5/11, 6/8, 3:30-6:30 Location: SMS, rm P190 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice.............................. #3928 Critical thinking is highly valued in schools and beyond — and for good reason. Students need to develop the kinds of thoughtful outlook and questioning attitude that critical thinking promotes. Students also need to think creatively: to develop the imaginative capacities, the wondering instincts, and hypothetical intelligence that


innovative thinking encourages. In order to promote critical and creative thinking in their students, teachers need to explore and to understand their own thinking capacities. Through workshop exercises and discussion based on materials that span the curriculum, participants will discover practical ways to develop the critical and creative potential in themselves and in their students. In this course, participants will explore and experience critical and creative thinking across the curriculum. Materials from different academic disciplines, including art, music, film, the social and natural sciences, literature, and ethics will be examined. Participants will consider various kinds of visual images and verbal texts, along with numeral and quantitative questions and problems, all opportunities for critical and creative thinking that can be used with students. The course, which will be run as a workshop with considerable interaction, extends the approach of recent Superintendent’s Conference Day keynote talks and of prior STI courses on critical and creative thinking. William Costanzo, author of Great Films and How to Teach Them and coordinator of STI’s Multiculturalism Through the Arts: Film, is a course speaker. There are no pre-requisites. Course Coordinators: Robert DiYanni, Diane Wrobleski Course Speaker: William Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College Open to: All Time: Tu 12/1, 8, 1/5, 12, 19, 2/2, 3:30-5:30. Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Thinking and Writing Science Fiction................................ #3929 Training to problem solve in critical, imaginative, and creative ways is a hallmark of 21st century education. Based on the rate of modern development, students may very well graduate into a world markedly different from their school days. Science fiction thinking and writing inspires “what if” questions of possible future events: what

if time-travel became a reality? humans could clone themselves? scientists discovered a source of unlimited free energy? a global nuclear war broke out? humans colonized Mars? an artificial intelligence became selfaware? intelligent robotic advancements allowed people to live forever? Science fiction stimulates critical thinking and sparks creative thoughts in the students who may very well live their adult lives when the questions raised above are no longer in the realm of science fiction. This course offers teachers a way to engage students in imaginative open-ended discussions by exploring intriguing “what if” questions. In the first session, participants will study the seminal works of great science fiction writers like Asimov, Clarke, Card, Haldman, Le Guin, Niven, Pohl, and others. Themes that arise in their stories will be examined and discussed. In the following sessions participants will begin a science fiction story of their own focusing on the use of the imagination to explore openended questions that could be applied to the courses they teach. In these writing workshops, participants will write, edit, and revise their work. During the sixth session, participants will share their work. Classroom applications and connections to 21st century thinking skills will be highlighted throughout the course. Course Coordinator: Jose Toscano Open to: All Time: Th 10/1, 15, 22, 29, 11/5, 12, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm T104 & B 134 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Integrating Positive Psychology in Schools.............................. #3930 Teachers know that positive emotions, qualities, and attitudes promote both academic achievement in individuals and a healthy social and emotional school climate for all students and staff. Positive Psychology, the scientific study of strengths that enable individuals and communities to thrive, has been influencing educational and medical practice for more than a decade.

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When educators have the opportunity to explore Positive Psychology with colleagues, they gain knowledge of the pedagogy that can be integrated into classroom practice and the school environment. Methods applied from the field of Positive Psychology can guide students to flourish, to take appropriate risks, and to develop resiliency in the face of challenges. Course content focuses on research and strategies for classroom practice from the field of Positive Psychology. Patricia Jennings, Research Associate at the Prevention Research Center, Penn State University, will lead the course. Sessions feature a combination of lectures, individual and small group exercises, discussions of the literature, and individual reflections and presentations. Topics to be explored include: cultivating positive student development; encouraging optimism and resilience in children; motivating confident attitudes; setting constructive goals; preventing school-based bullying; establishing class environments that affirm student growth. Participates will develop multiple ways in their own practice in which to incorporate Positive Psychology as a strategy in their classrooms and in their schools. Course Coordinator: Ilene Smith Course Speaker: Patricia Jennings, The Garrison Institute, Research Associate, Prevention Research Center at Penn State University. Open to: All Time: F 2/26, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/27, 8:30-4:30.

to read widely and deeply is an important endeavor for teachers as they model the love of reading and the skills of reading and understanding for their students.  Participants will read assigned books and come prepared to discuss aspects of literary form such as character development, theme, plot, and more. They will gain insight into point of view by listening to their colleagues’ responses to each book.  Participants will enhance their own reading skills and learn techniques for leading discussion groups with students. The first book participants will read is The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski. Course Coordinators: Nancy O’Rourke, Carol Schaeffer Open to: Edgewood Time: Tu 9/29, 10/27, 11/24, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/25, 6/15, 3:30-6 Location: EWS LRC Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Keeping Current in Literature for Fox Meadow Teachers..... #3931A The first book that will be read by the group is The Whistling Season by Ivan Doig. Course Coordinator: Jan Schorr Open to: Fox Meadow

Location: EHS library

Time: Tu 9/29, 10/27, 11/24, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/25, 6/15, noon-1, with two dates to be set by group

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: FMS library

Teachers Reading Together: Edgewood.......................... #3931

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

The journey of a life long reader is a search to gain insight and understanding by reading, talking, and reflecting. By transforming reading into a community event through discussion groups, teachers learn differing perspectives on the same work and gain knowledge of literature, genre, and technique. The commitment

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Keeping Current in Literature for Greenacres Teachers......... #3931B For the first session, participants should bring a book read over the summer to share with the group. Course Coordinators: Carole Phillips, Cindy Sansone


Open to: Greenacres

Open to: All

Dates: Tu 9/29, noon-1 with remaining dates to be set by group Location: GRA library

Time: Tu 9/29, 10/27, 11/24, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/25, 6/15, 3:30-6

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend.

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Teacher as Reader: Heathcote ........................................ #3931C For the first session, participants should bring a book read over the summer to share with the group. Course Coordinator: Amber Frantz Open to: Heathcote Time: Tu 9/29, 10/27, 11/24, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/25, 6/15, 3:30-6

Location: SMS, rm P190

Teacher As Reader: Edgemont ........................................ #3931F A short story will be read and discussed at the first session. Course Coordinators: Heather Brandon, Jeannette Stockton Open to: Edgemont

Location: HCS library

Time: W 9/30, 10/21, 11/18, 12/16, 1/27 , 3/24, 4/21, 5/19, 3:30-6:30

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Location: EHS faculty lounge

Quality Readers of Quaker Ridge ........................................ #3931D

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Possible texts to be read during the year will be John Adams by David McCullough, In My Brother’s Image by Eugene Pogany, Handle With Care by Jodi Picoult, Schooled by Anisha Lakhani, Holidays on Ice by David Sedaris, Shanghai Girls by Lisa See.

Teacher as Reader: Science ........................................ #3931G

Course Coordinators: Susan Hendler, Marie Tallevi Open to: Quaker Ridge Time: Tu & W, 9/22-23, 10/20-21, 11/1718, 12/15-16, 1/19-20, 2/23-24, 3/23-24, 4/20-21, 5/18-19, 6/8-9, lunchtime; 11/30 & 6/14, 3:30-5:30.

Course limited to 25 participants.

At the first session, participants will meet and suggest readings selections for the other meetings and discuss classroom applications. Course Coordinator: Nicole Pisano Open to: SHS Time: Tu 11/24, 1/26, 3/23, 4/27, 3:30-6:30 Location: SHS science conference room Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: QRS faculty lounge Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

An Examination of Literature Across Boundaries............ #3931E The first book participants will read is Hotel de Dream by Edmund White. Course Coordinator: Dorothy Golden

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Teacher as Reader: Social Studies ........................................ #3931H The course will begin with The PostAmerican World by Fareed Zakaria. Course Coordinators: Kate Krahl, Lauren Tallevi Open to: All Time: Tu, 10/27, 12/15, 1/26, 2/23, 4/27, 5/25, 3:30-5:30 Location: SHS, rm 3N5 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Women’s Studies: Women in the Arts.................................. #3931J Viewing women’s lives through the arts extends student interest and awareness of the struggles and triumphs of women around the world and throughout history. Women as artists, the influence of women on the lives of artists, and the portrayal of women in the arts, is a fascinating and instructive study of gender roles, stereotypes, and prejudice seen through the lens of distinct historical periods. Biography as history is a highly effective strategy to motivate interest and to develop in students empathy for others. Through literature, art and film, the class will explore the lives of women as artists and inspiration to the arts. In examining the lives of others, participants will be challenged to see their own lives as works of art. An exploration of women as patrons of the arts, as well as their portrayals in art, music, literature, and film will provide a fascinating dimension to the study of women’s issues through the ages. Works to be read are: Composing a Life by Catherine Bateson, the letters of Madame de Sevigne, and The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery and Alison Anderson. Two museum trips to New York City will focus on art of and by women. Clips from films featuring women as main characters will be viewed including: Iphigenia, Rachel Getting Married, The Hours, Vera Drake. There is potential option to view Sarah Ruhl’s new play, In the Next Room, that begins a limited run at the Shubert Theater in November.

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Course Coordinator: Elisa Draper Open to: All Time: Tu 9/29, 10/27, 11/24, 1/26, 2/23, 3/23, 4/27, 5/25, 3:30-6:30 Location: QRS, rm 207 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Content Knowledge An Author’s Walk Through Historic Brooklyn: Green-Wood Cemetery .......................................... #3932 Cemeteries, especially very old ones, can provide a wealth of information about the past. The Green-Wood Cemetery, one of the first rural cemeteries in the country, was founded in 1838, and the US Department of the Interior designated it a National Historic Landmark in 2006. The history of Brooklyn, from early Dutch settlers to the present, can be traced in its elegant monuments and the names of noted people who are interred there: Harry Ward Beecher, DeWitt Clinton, Alice Roosevelt, Leonard Bernstein, Charles Ebbets, the owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers who built Ebbets Field, and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Teachers will enrich their knowledge of history and of the range of information that a cemetery can provide interested visitors and historians. Adrienne Onofri, journalist, tour guide and author of Walking Brooklyn (Wilderness Press, 2007), will lead the course. In a classroom session on Friday, participants will learn why Green-Wood is one of the most famous cemeteries in the country and a tourist destination. On Saturday, a walking tour of the 480-acre site will feature GreenWood’s historic, artistic, and environmental treasures, its gates and ponds, hills and greenery, beautiful statuary, architectural landmarks, and monuments related to the Civil War, the American Revolution, the creation of the Erie Canal and local Brooklyn history. Throughout the narrative, curriculum applications of the site will be emphasized for all grade levels. Course Coordinator: Lisa Onofri Course Speaker: Adrienne Onofri, tour


guide and author of Walking Brooklyn

Location: SMS library and Philadelphia

Open to: All Time: F 10/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/31, 8:304:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: HCS library and Brooklyn Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants

From Independence to Constitution....................... #3933 Walking in the footsteps of history provides sensory learning that expands the textbook and the four walls of a classroom. When the walk is made by a cast of middle and high school social studies teachers and their related team members, the walk becomes a powerful collaborative learning experience. From Independence to Constitution is designed to deepen teacher knowledge and appreciation for the ideas and ideals of the American Revolution and the Constitution through a visit to Philadelphia. When teachers become researchers of the people and events that have changed history, when they sense the weight of the historical site, they enrich their own understanding of history and that of their students. In advance of the Philadelphia excursion, participants will meet at the Scarsdale Middle School to research individually assigned topics. These topics range from Carpenter’s Hall, where the First Continental Congress met, to Independence Hall, where both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed. Based on their research of specific topics, participants will prepare podcasts for their sites to be played by group members as they tour. During the actual walk of the historic trail, teachers will create photo-journals documenting their experience for sharing with students. Course Coordinator: Len Tallevi, Marie Tallevi Open to: SMS/SHS Soc. Stud. and team members Time: Th 11/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/14, 8:30-4:30

Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center Distinguished Lecture and Seminar Series.. #3934 The continuing affiliation between the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center and the Scarsdale Teachers Institute offers the faculty and the community an exceptional opportunity to examine the contemporary relevance of the Holocaust as it illuminates such issues as bigotry, racism, and human rights violations. The lecture and seminar series presents leading scholars and experienced educators on a variety of Holocaust-related topics directly applicable to the Social Studies and English curriculum and mandated by New York State. Participants in these programs are also invited to make use of the many other services for teachers offered by the Westchester Holocaust Education Center. The 2009-2010 program consists of two components: 1. A Distinguished Lecture Series 2. Focus Seminar Th 12/3, 7:30 Lecture: The Experience of an American Pediatrician in Darfur: A Hands-on Eyewitness to the First Genocide of the 21st Century Presenter: Dr. Jerry Erlich, Doctors Without Borders Reid Castle, Manhattanville College January, TBA, 7:30 Lecture: Westchester County Human Rights Commission Presenter: Dolores S. Brathwaite, Executive Director, Westchester County Human Rights Commission Reid Castle, Manhattanville College Th 3/4, 4-6:30 Seminar: The Nuremberg Code and BioEthics Presenter: Mary Johnson, Senior Programming Associate, Facing History and Ourselves Reid Castle, Manhattanville College

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M 3/22, 7:30 Lecture: IBM and the Holocaust Presenter: Dr. Edwin Black, New York Times and international investigative author SUNY Purchase Th 4/15, 7:30 Lecture: The HHREC’s Annual Yom Hashoah Commemoration Presenter: Dr. Michael Berenbaum, Director of Sigi Ziering Institute at the University of Judaism Reid Castle, Manhattanville College Course Coordinator: Neil Ginsberg Open to: All Time: 7:30 for lecture series, 4-6:30 for seminars Location: Reid Castle, Manhattanville College and SUNY Purchase Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Whose Language Is It Anyway? .......................................... #3935 Educators swim through an ocean of words. Language is not just the means of communication and the medium of thoughts; it is the lens through which the world is seen; it is the act by which the world is called into being. And yet, language is rarely an object of reflection by its users. Teachers, denizens in a societal institution that values language in its richness, will benefit from taking part in the contemporary debates involving language usage, in considering why people seem reluctant to say clearly what they mean, and in looking at ways to use language more potently. These topics will be of use to teachers as they guide their students’ own language choices. This is a course about language. It will begin with words themselves and issues often described as “semantics.” It will examine buzz words, euphemisms, neologisms, puns; it will investigate the discourse of texting, tweeting, talk radio, and Comedy Central; it will look at how teachers and students, among others, create their own language worlds. Next, sentences. Participants will consider grammar, looking at the debates between those who wish to dictate how

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to use language and those who wish to describe how it is used. What are the rules? Who makes them? At what point do the rules become prejudices and prejudices, fetishes? Finally, participants will read some short texts — a student handbook, a PowerPoint presentation, a children’s story, a piece of classic literature — and look at how the language in these texts constructs meaning and why the act of interpretation is such a complex one. Participants will spend six weeks with Jon Stewart and Monty Python, Strunk and White, Richard Feynman, and Cinderella. What could be better? Course Coordinators: Steve Mounkhall, Paul Sheehey Course Speaker: Karine Schaefer, Teacher, Bronxville High School Open to: All Time: Tu 10/6, 13, 20, 11/3, 10, 17, 3:30-5:30 Location: SHS rm 205 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

A Look into New York City: 42nd Street................................. #3936 From west side to east side, 42nd Street, a location immortalized in both a movie and play of the same name, is a visual splendor of architectural style. Many of Manhattan’s most famous landmarks including the Chrysler Building, Grand Central Terminal, and the New York Public Library line its sidewalks. Forty-second Street also crosses Times Square, an area with a history as colorful and fascinating as any neighborhood in the five boroughs. Forty-second Street as a case study in urban history and development provides teachers and their students extensive background to New York City’s moniker, Capital of the World, global hub of finance, the arts, and multiculturalism. Participants will explore 42nd Street through lecture, multi-media presentations, discussion, and touring. They will trace the growth of New York City through one of its most famous and infamous neighborhoods, the fascinating and colorful Times Square


theater district. The stories of the people, moguls, and architects behind Times Square, the Chrysler Building, Tudor City, the Waldorf Astoria, Grand Central Terminal, and more will add to an appreciation of the history and transition of a very special urban development area. Through their work with tour guides Art and Susan Zuckerman, course participants will be engaged in thoughtful planning of curriculum that reflects the content of this course. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel Open to: All Time: F 11/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/7, 8:30-4:30. Location: EWS library and NYC Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Grand Central: A Case Study in Change............................... #3937 New York State History Standards mandate the teaching of multiple perspectives on historical events. The course examines the impact of a political decision-making process that transformed the Grand Central neighborhood with consequences for the city and the nation. Teachers will research primary source documents as they track the monumental shifts that occurred over the last century in transportation, technology, sociology, science, art, architecture, and economics in the Grand Central area and beyond. Through multimedia resources including documentary film, photographs, books, primary source documents, Internet resources, a guided walking tour, and discussion, participants will examine the Grand Central story as a study in change over the last century. Instruction will model the case-study approach to facilitate integration of an event into enriching and meaningful lessons for students in technology, science, math, art, architecture, sociology, and economics. Highlighted in the walking tour will be Grand Central

Terminal, the Chrysler, Lincoln, and Daily News buildings, and the East 42nd Street area. Course Coordinator: James Overbey Course Speaker: Carol Duncan, Social Studies Consultant Open to: All Time: F 10/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/31, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm B129, Grand Central Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 18 participants.

Cyberspace: What Educators Need to Know to Keep Students Safe .......................................... #3938 Today’s students grow up with technology. Educators know that technology skills impact the way students learn, and that technological and Internet competencies are a requirement for future success in college and the workplace. Social networking, a fairly recent development in the realm of Internet communication, has had an explosive impact on global youth culture. According to the latest research conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, more than half of all American teenagers network online. Teenagers are using the Internet to form and maintain friendships and to share information about themselves and others in both positive and negative ways. Cyber bullying, in which negative information about individuals can be transmitted instantaneously to numerous receivers, is devastating to its young victims. Teens need to understand the risks that they face online, and educators need to be informed of the culture of youth networking to guide their students to make the right choices. Participants will explore the wide world of technology that engages much of student life beyond the school. Course content includes a presentation by Ken Holvig on the use of technology, digital literacy, social networking, identity protection, and

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cyber bullying and sexting, the most recent phenomena of concern to parents and teachers. Through readings, discussions, case studies, and modeling, the course will prepare teachers to engage their students in discussions on the timeliest of cyber issues and the choices they present to today’s youth. Participants will learn curriculum strategies for all grade levels. District policies will be examined as well as the legal obligations of the school and the teacher to respond to problems that arise from Internet activities. Course Coordinator: Deena Paradiso Course Speaker: Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: F 1/29, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/30, 8:30-4:30. Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

INTERDEPENDENCE Scarsdale graduates will live in a society and a world where economics, politics, social issues, science, and ecological concerns increasingly transcend traditional borders.  In this interdependent environment, education will be the most important tool and will determine the ability to understand, compete and contribute.      Scarsdale Public Schools Strategic Plan Michael McGill, Superintendent

Earth Links:  Toward Awareness and Understanding of Current Issues................................. #3939 The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this yearlong seminar series. The Scarsdale District Interdependence Committee was formed to further the Strategic Plan’s goal of supporting existing activities and encouraging the creation of new programs that foster multicultural awareness in the schools. Teachers and administrators on the Committee developed several initiatives including a lecture series on issues, both national and

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international, that impact the global and local communities.  Speakers and topics will explore cultural and current forces that bind us together as well as pull us apart. The goal of the course is to enhance individual and collective awareness of current issues with global consequences that impact society. Participants will meet initially to consider the aims and practices of incorporating national and international newsworthy events into the curriculum, to examine activities in the schools that serve as avenues to advance an understanding of cultures, and to look for additional ways to bring multiple perspectives to bear in the classroom. Throughout the year, participants will attend lectures and participate in discussions on topics of national and global interdependence. Speakers will provide timely interpretations of events that are shaping the century; participants will meet to discuss their reactions and reflections on the lectures.     Course Coordinators: Phyllis DiBianco, Joan Weber Open to:  All  Time: TBA Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Global Encounters/Cultural Exchange............................ #3940 The Global Encounters Cultural Exchange, sponsored by Carnegie Hall, supports musical and educational partnerships between educators in the New York metropolitan area and educators abroad in Mexico and India. The goal of the professional development workshops is to support integration of music from another culture into the classroom environment and to facilitate intercultural dialogue between teachers and students. This dialogue is predicated on an understanding of the intricacies of trust building, curriculum development, and creative collaboration. The Global Encounters program provides teachers with the tools necessary to engage their educational partners in meaningful cultural and musical work. In this course, participants will explore the


rationale and common practices of cultural exchange work, decide on personal goals related to their partnerships, and plan a yearlong schedule of activities with their partners related to the overall program goals. Workshop topics will include: how to prepare students to engage in culturally sensitive discussions; how to successfully integrate music in the classroom; how to foster meaningful online exchange between students; how to incorporate this program into pre-existing semester syllabi. Participants will reflect on and share their own practices as educators and look for growth areas in their development. Through video-conferencing, on-line communication, concert experiences, and workshops, both at Carnegie Hall and in the Scarsdale Schools, teachers will connect their classrooms to the world with this yearlong cultural exchange program.

interdependent world and to promote knowledge of a new global dynamic; China is a major power in this new global dynamic. While its economy is often in the headlines, Chinese cultural influences on the world community are extensive and expanding. Experiencing its art and artistry, past and present, will illuminate and deepen an understanding of China. The course is designed to extend and enhance two of the Scarsdale district’s goals: to inspire a love of learning and to enable students to become participants in an interdependent world.

Course Coordinators: Robert DiYanni, Stephen Mounkhall, Joan Weber

W, 10/21, 7:30 Presentation: Quanzhou Marionette Theater Carnegie Hall, NYC

Open to: SMS, SHS Time: See below for dates and times Participants must attend all workshops and morning concerts Cultural Exchange Music of Mexico

Cultural Exchange Music of India

Mexico Concerts Tu 1/26, 10:15 W, 5/5, 10:15

India Concerts Th 12/8, 9 W, 4/14, 9

Professional Development Tu 10/27, 4 Tu 9/29, 4 Sa 10/31, noon Sa 10/3, 9 Th 1/28, 4 Tu 12/15, 4 M 3/8, 4 Th 2/4, 4 Fifth Workshop in May, date TBD, as part of The Weill Fellows Program Location: Carnegie Hall, New York City Credit: Two or three points salary credit or stipend

Ancient Paths, Modern Voices: Celebrating China............... #3941 Scarsdale’s Interdependence Institute was created to prepare students for an

Ancient Paths, Modern Voices is a festival sponsored by Carnegie Hall, which pays tribute to China’s diverse and vibrant culture and its influence on the world. Carnegie Hall is partnering with other cultural institutions for this exceptional program. This course will offer 4 venues.

Sa 10/24, 7:30 Presentation: Shen Wei Dance Arts Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Avenue Sa 10/31 Metropolitan Museum of Art, Special Exhibition: Silk and Bamboo: Music and Art of China Tu 11/10, 8 Presentation: Shanghai Philharmonic, Long Yu, Music Director and Conductor, Lang Lang, Piano Carnegie Hall, NYC These experiences will provide opportunities for teachers to integrate an exploration of China into their programs across the grades, and to provide venues for field studies to extend and enhance a multi-disciplinary approach to curriculum. Course Coordinators: Sue Peppers, Joan Weber Course Speakers: Members of the artistic and program planning divisions of Carnegie Hall; Robert DiYanni, Director of Arts

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and Aesthetic Education, Scarsdale; Eve Eisenstadt, Coordinator of Fine and Practical Arts, Scarsdale

Spanish Heritage Through Art .......................................... #3943

Open to: All Time: see above schedule

Spanish painters have had a powerful influence on western art. An examination of their canvases reveals distinctive technique, use of color, and subject matter portraying the customs and daily life of times past. Enlivened by historical, geographical, and cultural diversity within Spain, Spanish art is a rich source of study and inspiration, and an integral part of the multi-cultural heritage of this country and its students. Spanish art has numerous curriculum possibilities across the grades.

Location: New York City Credit: Two or three salary credits or stipend

The Study of Cultural and Generational Conflict Through Film.................................... #3942 Media is a powerful cultural force in the lives of students. The group known as Generation M, for Media, is composed of 8-18 year olds who, according to current research, spend an increasing amount of time interacting with and learning about the world through visual media. The study of film lends itself to close analysis of media as a form of communication while examining cultural issues raised by the content. Teachers will view international films that examine the conflict and tensions occurring between the political and economic borders of the European Union and the developing world, looking specifically at the consequences on community, family, and occupational levels. The mixing of eastern and western economies has brought together people of different religions and moral systems creating clashes between diverse populations now living in close proximity. Classroom study of conflicts portrayed by film characters and attempts at resolution can be a useful tool in raising awareness and understanding of global as well as personal cultural issues. Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco Course Speaker: Anita DiBianco, Film and Video Artist Open to: All Time: F 10/2, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/3, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Beginning in the 17th century with artists such as Velazquez, this course will move through the art of Goya, Picasso, Dali, Miro, Tapies and others who continue to create art evocative of a culture that is a part of the diverse North American society. Older painters will be presented for ways in which they illustrated Spanish customs of their time, as well as for their contributions to visual representation. The works of Picasso and other contemporary artists will show the development of new techniques in painting or new forms of perception exemplified by Dali. Lists of New York City galleries and museums featuring Spanish collections of art will be made available to course participants, and the course will end with an optional trip to one of those institutions. Course Coordinator: Helen Pasternack Course Speaker: Lynne Mayocole, Professor, Westchester Community College Open to: All Time: Tu 10/6, 13, 20, 11/3, 10, 17, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 1N5 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Multicultural Bookbinding #3944 Making books as part of a curriculum unit engages students in creating, designing, and planning their own learning. Teachers can add bookmaking to their repertoire in any subject to increase student enthusiasm for projects. Books provide a deeply personal


activity that individualizes content in the joy of original expression for a child. Combining the art of book-making with academic areas enriches curriculum, develops a child’s capacity for artistic representation, acknowledges wide interpretative scope for children with varying learning differences and styles, and results in learning. Participants will create six to seven minibooks each unique and suitable for classroom use. The mini-books may also be used as a design prototype to make larger size books. Bookbinding basics such as use of the bone folder, adhesives, board covering, and three-hole sewing will be taught, and both hard and soft cover books will be made. Individuals will apply their own creative expression in the decorating phase, and will engage in discussion regarding the many ways these books can be used.

In this course, an art and math teacher combine geometric and artistic forces to guide participants through the educational uses of origami. The history, science, math, and art of origami apply across the curriculum. Elementary teachers will find origami to be an excellent technique to integrate cultural awareness, social studies, art, and math. Upper level teachers will learn origami’s relationship to geometry including angle bisectors and perpendiculars, the Pythagorean theorem, symmetry, and transformation. Participants will learn how angles converge as simple bases develop into complex and artistic polyhedrons. Projects will be geared to direct classroom usage in diverse K-12 subject areas. Course Coordinators: Alisa Harrison, Jeannette Stockton

Course Coordinator: Nancy Closter

Open to: All Time: F 1/8, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/9, 8:30-4:30

Course Speakers: Mary Dee Merrell, Artist; Karin Reetz, Artist

Location: EHS, rm E9

Open to: All Time: F 11/20, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/21, 8:304:30 Location: GRA art room Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 22 participants.

Geometry and Origami....... #3945 The National Standards for Arts Education directs teachers to connect the visual arts with other academic subjects, the New York Math and Science Standards supports problem-solving through hands-on activities, and the New York Social Studies Standards advocates the use of a variety of intellectual skills to teach students about world cultures. The study and construction of origami, the Japanese art of folding squares of paper into representational shapes, meets all these standards. It is an excellent subject to include in curriculum. The creation of origami shapes motivates student interest in a unique cultural art form that uses geometrical concepts in its design elements.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Encore du Français? V........ #3946 Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers come into contact with students from all over the world, and both districts place importance on multicultural understandings. Language is an essential element of culture, and the benefits of comprehending the language of another’s culture are immeasurable. The learning of a language in addition to one’s own engenders mutual respect in a diverse society. When teachers are able to demonstrate to their students an attempt to speak in another language, they model a behavior that can translate to improved relationships among people of various cultures. Equally important is the opportunity for teachers to gain insight into the experience of limited proficiency in a language spoken all around them. This course expands the basic knowledge and experience of previous courses, as participants review and deepen their awareness of French language and culture.

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The aim of the course is to develop a broader ability to communicate in and to understand spoken French. While the primary focus of the course will be aural/oral, reading and written work will be expand grammar study and specific vocabulary units. Culture will continue to be discussed and presented through literature, music, and cuisine. Participants will be encouraged to consider the experience of limited language proficiency, especially as it applies to students in their classes, as well as the benefits of communicating in a foreign language. Course Coordinator: Andrea Tripodi Course Speaker: Sarah Whittington, Foreign Language Chair, Scarsdale Middle School Open to: Participants of Encore du Français IV or those with a knowledge of French. Time: Th 10/1,15, 22, 29, 11/5, 12, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm T109 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Exploring Cultural Diversity Through Literature............. #3947 Teachers in a global community must understand the diverse customs and traditions of their students and colleagues. What better way is there to relate to others than through reading the stories that embed cultural perspective into the lives of real people? This course will foster a deeper appreciation of the racial, ethnic, and cultural groups within the school community, the nation, and the world. Through the reading of selected works of literature and group discussion, participants will learn about the daily lives and perspectives that exist within different ethnic, socio-economic, and cultural groups. Teachers will develop classroom activities that promote interest, respect, and understanding of the global community based upon the readings. The first book we will read is Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett and the second book is White Tiger by Aravind Adiga.

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Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco Date: Th 9/17, 11/5, 1/7, 3/4, 5/13, 3:305:30 with one date to be determined by group Location: SHS library Open to: MS/HS Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Introduction to Beadwork and Decoupage......................... #3948 The infusion of artistic elements and design choices into curriculum challenges students to think creatively, to look at the ordinary in extraordinary ways. Daniel Pink, author of A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age, explains: “The scales are tipping away from what it used to take for people to get ahead — logical, linear, left-brain, and spreadsheet-type abilities — in favor of abilities like artistry, empathy and big-picture thinking, which are becoming more valuable. Left brain skills are still absolutely necessary in our complex world. They’re just not sufficient anymore.” This course promotes the integration of right-brain artistic activities into a predominantly left-brain environment through the application of the ancient arts of decoupage and beadwork to classroom learning. Throughout history, cultures across the globe have used a variety of materials to transform everyday objects into artistic pieces admired for beauty as well as function. Beadwork has been used universally to enhance and decorate costumes. The origins of decoupage have been traced from East Siberian tomb art, to China, and, through trade routes, to Venice and France. Inspired by examples from various cultures around the world both historic and contemporary, participants will create two projects for use in the classroom to stimulate artistic self-expression in students. The compositional Rule of Thirds, based on proportion and measurement, will be applied in the design phase. Learning the math component of design will help students add visual enrichment to presentations and


assignments while engaging the imagination.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Coordinator: Carol Desoe, Elizabeth Ungar

Course limited to 15 participants.

Open to: All

TEACHING STRATEGIES

Time: F 1/29, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/30, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 250

Using Literature to Build Community at Greenacres.. #3950A

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Reading good books together strengthens the common bonds that form a school community. When Greenacres teachers, children, and parents read the same selections chosen from a wide range of children’s authors, themes pertinent to personal behavior and responsibility can be discussed at school and at home. Teachers at every grade level come together in this way to reinforce values and an awareness of issues that concern the Greenacres community.

Course limited to 25 participants.

Dots and Points on the Map: Ecuador.............................. #3949 The integration of the arts and music into the academic curriculum meets educational standards in many areas and motivates student interest through hands-on learning and critical thinking skills. In the process of replicating indigenous art forms, students gain knowledge and awareness of the history, geography, and culture of a people. Engagement with art projects provides a window on life and culture through a multisensory teaching model that enriches both the arts and the social studies.  Participants will create and play Ecuadoran musical instruments as they learn of the musical and craft sensibilities that echo through Ecuadoran life, both ancient and modern. Clay ocarinas (wind instruments), quenas (vertical flutes), rondador (panpipes), and palo de lluvia (rainsticks) are instruments crafted by the people to create music and to imitate the sounds of nature that surround them. In an examination of the shapes, materials, decorations, and sounds produced by these items, participants will learn a great deal of the history, geography, and cultural traditions of Ecuador. They will also learn a unique approach to reach students with different learning styles. Course Coordinators: Maria DeAngelis, Jeannette Stockton Open to: All Time: F 2/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/6, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 215

Each month participants will read and discuss a new children’s book. Participants will create activities, appropriate to the grade levels, designed to encourage discussion of the themes in the book. Responses to the literature will be shared through the building in a variety of ways: individual response bulletin boards, display of class projects, cross-class and/or cross-grade discussion, and more. Course Coordinator: Carole Phillips Open to: Greenacres Time: Tu 9/22, noon-1, with remaining dates to be determined by group Location: GRA library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Celebrating Children’s Literature ........................................ #3950B This course introduces teachers to the top children’s literature from 2008-2009. The primary goal is that teachers read the best literature and discuss with colleagues their application in the classroom. Participants also learn authors’ techniques and preferred genres. Books are selected primarily from Caldecott and Newberry winners and the

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American Library Association. The class will meet monthly. During each session, participants are introduced to two or three of the top children’s books from 2009. Each participant chooses one book to focus on in a session and possibly use that book with students as preparation for discussion. Books include short stories, picture books, poetry, and other forms. Participants read aloud and discuss ways to use the books in their classrooms. Books being considered include: Stinky by Eleanor Davis, One Boy by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, Just in Case: A Trickster Tale and Spanish Alphabet Book by Yuyi Morales. Course Coordinator: Susan Hendler Open to: Quaker Ridge Time: Tu 9/29, 10/6, 11/3, 12/1, 8, 1/5, 2/3, 3/2, 4/6, 5/4, 6/1 lunchtime, 6/14, 3:30-5:30 Location: QRS faculty lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Greenville Book Club: Part X ........................................ #3950C Teachers need opportunities to share and learn from each other the ever-growing variety of children’s books and authors available to them. Books with common themes provide a stimulus for colleagues on a faculty to engage in discussions of pertinent school issues reflected in picture books chosen for this activity. Participants will work with each book selection to plan and create grade activities and opportunities for cross grade conversation. At each session, background about the author/illustrator will be provided. Participants will discuss themes, work in groups to create activities, plan for class presentations, share ideas with colleagues, and reflect on the prior selection. Course Coordinator: Barbara Horowitz Course Speaker: Stephanie Feingold, Teacher, Greenville, retired Open to: Greenville

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Time: W 9/23, 11/4, 1/6, 3/3, 5/5, 3:255:45 Location: GRV library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Keeping Current with Young Adult Literature......................... #3950D Teachers need to stay current with high quality fiction that holds strong appeal for young readers. With the knowledge of trends and themes in age-appropriate literature, teachers can inspire enthusiasm for reading. With enhanced awareness of new titles, participants can be confident in recommending appropriate literature for young adults. Book discussions will focus on literary elements, themes, and publishing trends in young adult literature. An annotated list of current well-reviewed titles will be provided for each session. Participants will be required to read two titles from each list. Relevant reading materials, activities, and speakers will be offered from time to time to supplement discussion. Course Coordinators: Liz Waltzman, Sharon Waskow Open to: 5-9 Time: Th 10/22, 12/3, 2/4, 3/11, 3:30-6:30 Location: SMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 24 participants.

Non-Fiction Matters......... #3950E Students increasingly turn to the Web for the ease, if not reliability, of information available to them. This trend challenges teachers to counter the Web as the sole source of data by providing up-to-date, reliable, and valuable sources for students engaged in the research process. Many fascinating and appealing titles are added to the library’s non-fiction collection yearly, titles that offer unique perspectives and current information on a wide variety of topics. Of importance to students and teachers is the editorial reliability process


that non-fiction undergoes in contrast to many sources found on the Web. Teachers in every discipline who become familiar with current non-fiction will grow professionally and will be able to recommend good titles of print resources to students. Participants will review quality non-fiction titles in a range of disciplines. They will be become familiar with reviews of books in their subject areas and will be encouraged to adapt suggestions for the inclusion of non-fiction books in their classrooms. Each session will consider a subset of this genre, among them biographies, non-fiction picture books, and exceptional titles in social studies, science, world languages, and literature. Trends in current non-fiction publication including the use of graphics, design and layout, and the characteristics that make a book appealing to a middle school reader will be discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on the role of trade books in teaching and how to encourage students to include these works in addition to Web sources. Course Coordinators: Peggy Fox, Sharon Waskow Open to: 6-8 Time: F 11/20, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/21, 8:304:30

of strategy instruction and veterans can re-invigorate their reading programs. By exploring the work of Ellin Keene, participants will gain knowledge of current research as they apply six specific cognitive strategies to literacy teaching and learning. The first half of this course will enhance understanding of the cognitive strategies that readers use to identify words and read fluently. The second half will focus on cognitive systems used by readers to “get the gist,” to comprehend deeply, and to probe ideas. Dr. Keene’s Surface Structure Systems include the grapho-phonic, lexical, and syntactic, which allow readers to identify words and read fluently. Her Deep Structure Systems include the semantic, schematic, and pragmatic, which allow readers to comprehend. Though these systems are used simultaneously by readers, and should be instructed simultaneously, each specific system will be studied individually and in depth. Classroom applications will be discussed, and participants will share their methodology for incorporating the six cognitive strategies into the literacy curriculum. Course Coordinators: Marisa Ferrara, Denise Hale

Location: SMS library

Open to: 1-6 Edgemont Time: Th 9/24, 10/1, 22, 11/5, 19, 12/10, 1/7, 21, 3/4, 18, 4/15, 29, 3:30-4:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: GRV library

Course limited to 20 participants.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Essentials of Literacy.......... #3951

LCI at STI............................ #3952

To be literate means to be accomplished in the acts of reading, writing, and speaking. Developing proficiency in these essential skills begins early and is a lifelong pursuit. Teachers of literacy in the elementary grades need the time to explore and discuss with colleagues current research and effective teaching strategies for students of all ability levels. By studying the literacy instruction research and methodology of Ellin Keene, author of Assessing Comprehension Thinking Strategies and To Understand: New Horizons in Reading Comprehension, novice teachers will gain an understanding

The Lincoln Center Institute is devoted to embedding aesthetic education in elementary, middle, and high school curricula through developing meaningful aesthetic education for all students. LCI offers a coherently structured program that involves teaching artists working in close partnership with classroom teachers during an intensive summer workshop and through follow-up activities throughout the school year. This course will be part of a long-term series of conversations about the arts and aesthetic education designed to keep the conversation going among LCI summer

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participants. An ancillary goal is to empower teacher teams in each building to encourage other Edgemont and Scarsdale teachers to participate in the LCI aesthetic education initiative in the near future and to continue integrating aesthetic education in the arts into their curriculum. The Arts and Aesthetic Education initiative, of which this course is a part, aims to sustain and intensify discussions of arts and aesthetic education across schools and across grades. This intensive course provides for a continuation of the Lincoln Center Institute for Aesthetic Education experience, its philosophy of aesthetic education, its capacities for aesthetic learning, and its practices for introducing and integrating aesthetic education into the curriculum. As Dana Gioia, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts recently noted, “Art is an irreplaceable way of understanding and expressing the world…. it addresses us in the fullness of our being…. Art awakens, enlarges, refines and restores our humanity.” In pursuing this rich experience of the arts, this course provides an opportunity for faculty to continue the work they have already begun with the Lincoln Center Institute during the summer workshops, to share their experiences and ideas about aesthetic education, and to participate in expanding the LCI initiative among Scarsdale faculty and students. The course activities will include reading and discussion of texts in aesthetic education, arts activities involving direct experience of works of art, and strategies for implementing aesthetic education into each teacher’s curriculum. Course Coordinators: Diane Celentano, Robert DiYanni, Joan Weber Course Speaker: Maxine Greene, William F. Russell Professor of Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, emerita Open to: Participants of Lincoln Center Summer Institute Time: Th 9/24, 10/8, 11/19, 12/17, 1/28, 2/25, 3/25, 4/29, 5/27, 6/10, 3:30-5:30, with four additional hours to be determined Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

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Encouraging Curiosity and Questioning: Inquiry Research in the Classroom.................... #3953 The fifth grade Capstone project is based on an inquiry research process known as the Big 6. The Super 3 is a similar, age-appropriate research model for younger students. The Big 6 and Super 3 teach students problemsolving through steps: defining a task, locating and using information effectively, organizing data from multiple sources, and evaluating the result and the process. This approach empowers students with the skills and strategies necessary for deep thinking and meaningful learning in all subject areas. It also encourages a love of learning, because the research begins with questions that matter to young people. Participants will learn to incorporate the stages of the Big 6 and Super 3 research processes into curriculum in the elementary grades to solve both real world and curriculum-based tasks. In addition, teachers will explore how they can harness a primary student’s natural wonder and create a classroom environment where questions students care about are developed as the foundation for the research process. Teachers will have time to discuss and to plan the inclusion of inquiry research in their classrooms. By incorporating the Super 3 and the Big 6 into instruction, teachers will build a foundation upon which inquiry research skills can be scaffolded across the elementary grades in a shared research process. Course Coordinators: Amy Kenney, Sue Luft Open to: Elementary Time: F 10/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/24, 8:304:30 Location: FMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

REGGIO EMILIA In 1945, after living for two decades under fascism, the citizens of Reggio Emilia, Italy, saw the need to invent an approach to teaching and learning based on humanism and equity. Drawing on European and American progressive education pedagogy,


psychologies of Piaget and Vygotsky, and Italian regional traditions of participatory democracy, the citizens of Reggio Emilia formed a city-parent-teacher partnership and developed an innovative and dynamic education model. In Reggio Emilia, children’s intellectual and social emotional growth is fostered through a focus on exploration, expressive communication, and collaboration. The Reggio Emilia experience, a model for schools around the world, provides teachers with new ways to think about and explore the nature of the child as learner, the role of the teacher, and curriculum development. The following two courses further professional development in the pedagogy of Reggio Emilia.

The Reggio Emilia Study Group ........................................ #3954A This yearlong study group is designed as an ongoing, collaborative support group in which teachers work on projects and share their experiences inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to teaching and learning. Teachers will study the components of the Reggio approach and its relevance to American teachers. Discussions and work will focus on the essential components of education in Reggio Emilia: the child as protagonist, the child as collaborator, the child as communicator, the environment as the third teacher, the teacher as partner, nurturer, and guide, the teacher as researcher, documentation as communication, the parent as partner, and organization as foundational. Readings, videos, discussions, shares, and visits to other New York area Reggio study groups will allow teachers to grow their experience with this social-constructivist approach to learning. The study group, modeled on the St. Louis Reggio collaborative, will reach out to other regional Reggio study groups and create opportunities for exchange and research on the topic of “a new culture of childhood that places real value on the potential and creativity of children.” (Guidici, Rinaldi &Krechevsky, 2001).

Open to: All Time: Tu 10/6, 11/3, 12/1, 1/5, 2/2, 3/2, 4/6, 5/4, 6/1, 3:30-6, with four hours of independent study Location: HCS library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

Inspirations from Reggio Emilia — A Dialogue with Lella Gandini ........................................ #3954B In this weekend course, Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers will have the unique opportunity to enter into dialogue with Lella Gandini, an educator whose deep knowledge and vision of children and learning have had a profound influence on early childhood education in the United States. Lella Gandini, the United States Liaison for the Dissemination of the Reggio Program, will review the history of the municipal schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, and examine its underlying pedagogy, a constructivist approach applicable to learners of all ages. This approach, built upon “the defense and promotion of the rights of children,” the use of authentic materials, an emphasis on creativity, the environment as teacher, and teachers as learners is consistent with the district goals of love of learning and interdependence. In whole group discussions and small break out sessions, Lella will share reflections and interpretations. Participants will explore the fundamentals of constructivist pedagogy with a specific focus on inquiry learning and documentation. Readings, stories, discussions, and hands-on experiences will allow teachers to deepen their understanding of inquiry learning as well as expand their repertoire of strategies to further inquiry learning in their classrooms.

Course Coordinators: Lindsey Hicks, Lorella Lamonaca

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Course Coordinators: Lindsey Hicks, Lorella Lamonaca

Course Coordinators: Sue Luft, Carole Phillips, William Yang

Course Speaker: Lella Gandini, United States Liaison for the Dissemination of the Reggio Emilia Program

Course Speaker: Lisa Zawilinski, Staff Developer, University of Connecticut

Open to: All Time: F 11/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/7, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Developing Reading Comprehension in an Online Age .......................................... #3955 Within the last 30 years, technology has transformed culture. Electronic media, particularly the Internet, pervades society, and generations of students are growing up in a world where access to online text and media permeates home and school. Teachers will enhance their practice by learning and applying the “new literacies,� those reading comprehension and learning skills required by the Internet and other emerging information and communication technologies. The new literacies can be readily integrated into inquiry research in the Capstone Project, grades 1-5, as well as the balanced literacy approach. The examination and incorporation of a new literacies perspective provides another avenue for teachers to support student learning in the age of technology. Lisa Zawilinski, a staff developer and a member of the New Literacies Research Team at the University of Connecticut, will guide an examination of the new literacies perspective in the classroom. Participants will also explore Action Research methodology to gather data on the impact of a new literacies approach in content. During the course, collaborative teams will explore ways in which instruction can improve the development of critical literacies and online reading comprehension. Librarians, computer teachers, and classroom teachers will consider the best method of collaborating on research that integrates the new literacies as well as effective methods to incorporate this approach across the grades.

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Open to: Elementary Scarsdale Time: Tu 10/13, 11/10, 12/8, 1/12, 2/9, 3/9, 4/13, 5/11, 6/8, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group Location: GRA library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

A Closer Look at Singapore Math with Ban Har Yeap.............. #3956 Scarsdale has recently adopted the Singapore math program for students in kindergarten through fifth grades. Teachers of these grades have requested additional support to supplement the professional development provided by the District, as they learn the methodology, pedagogy, and structure of this new program. The course is a response to these requests, and teachers of elementary math will gain a deeper and broader understanding of Singapore math as they work with Ban Har Yeap, author of the Singapore Primary Math textbooks. Ban Har Yeap will guide teachers in an examination of three aspects of teaching Singapore math at the elementary grades: basic skills and concepts, consolidation, and problem solving. Dr. Yeap will also model strategies that effectively engage learners in math instruction. Participants will probe the unique features of Singapore Math with an emphasis on visuals, systematic topic development, variations in exercises, and challenging problems. Course Coordinators: Kathy de la Garza, Nancy Pavia Course Speaker: Ban Har Yeap, author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks Open to: K-8 Time: F 10/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/17, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend


Lesson Study in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics ........................................ #3957A Lesson Study, a professional development process that originated in Japan, is recognized by the National Staff Development Council as a powerful design for building professional learning communities. In Lesson Study, teachers systematically engage with one another in an examination of their instructional methods, content, curriculum, and student learning and understanding in order to improve classroom teaching and learning. Richard Du Four, writing in Educational Leadership 2004, notes: “The big ideas of a professional learning community are to focus on learning rather than teaching, to work collaboratively and hold yourself accountable for results.” This course will focus on student learning in elementary and middle school mathematics while enriching teacher understanding and practice of content and pedagogy. Collaborative teams of 3-4 members will research, plan, teach, observe, and reflect on an actual classroom mathematics lesson. Following the presentation of each lesson, group members will reflect on the lesson and consider methods to refine instruction with the goal of making each lesson more effective.

design for building professional learning communities. In Lesson Study, teachers systematically engage with one another in an examination of their instructional methods, content, curriculum, and student learning and understanding in order to improve classroom teaching and learning. Richard Du Four, writing in Educational Leadership 2004, notes: “The big ideas of a professional learning community are to focus on learning rather than teaching, to work collaboratively and hold yourself accountable for results.” In this building based course, Edgewood teachers will take an in-depth look at Lesson Study and work in teams to plan research lessons in a variety of subject areas around a common pedagogical theme related to the Strategic Plan. Collaborative teams of 3-4 members will research, plan, teach, observe, and reflect on an actual classroom lesson. Following the presentations of each lesson, group members will reflect on the lesson and consider methods to refine instruction with the goal of making each lesson more effective. Course Coordinators: Scott Houseknecht, Bill Jackson, Jen Kiley, Open to: Edgewood Faculty Time: Tu 10/20, 11/17, 1/19, 2/11, 3/16, 4/20, 5/18; M 12/14; Th, 3/11, 4/15, 3:305:30, with four hours of independent study

Course Coordinators: Kathy De La Garza, Bill Jackson, Nancy Pavia

Location: EWS Library

Open to: K-8 Scarsdale Time: Th 10/1, 15, 22, 29, 11/5, 12, 12/3, 10, 3:30-6, with four hours of independent study

Poetry Playground: The Craft of Poetry II............................. #3958

Location: SHS, rm 172 Credits: Two points salary credit or stipend

Professional Learning Through Lesson Study at Edgewood ........................................ #3957B Lesson Study, a professional development process that originated in Japan, is recognized by the National Staff Development Council as a powerful

Credits: Two point salary credit or stipend

The teaching of writing demands the control of two crafts: teaching and writing. Teachers who have not wrestled with writing cannot effectively teach the writer’s craft. There is a process to learn. That’s the way it is with craft, whether it be teaching or writing. There is a road, a journey to travel. Donald Graves Phil Smith’s Expression Poetry Playground is an exploration of the craft of poetry, a natural interdisciplinary form of writing

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that incorporates observation, intuitive knowledge, learned knowledge, and imagination. Through language play and the exploration of a myriad of poetic forms, teachers will deepen their understanding of how poetry is written and taught. Reflection on their own poetic explorations will help teachers appreciate the individual elements of the creative process in students while adding to their repertoire of professional practices.

to display and to assess their students’ work.  By examining samples, participants will understand the history of quilt making and the origins of their colorful and unique designs.  The changing methods of quilt making technology will be examined in a hands-on activity with quilt making supplies.  The course will proceed with step-by-step instructions leading to the completion of individual quilts and ideas for classroom use of all abilities and age groups.

In this weekend course, participants will explore the intricate, complex, and creative process of writing poetry and grow their understanding of the craft. Phil Smith’s approach to teaching poetry, as has been his approach to the teaching of expression art, is to demystify the process and make it accessible to all. Teachers will engage in creative exercises and projects to help flex their imagination muscles and play with language in new, interesting, and revealing ways that are readily transferable to classroom teaching at all grade levels and to students of all abilities.

Course Coordinators: Maureen Ball, Dawn Rivellini

Course Coordinator: Lindsey Hicks Course Speaker: Phil Smith, Poet Open to: All Time: Moved to spring Location: HCS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

The Art of Quilt Making...... #3959 Quilts have played a significant part in the nation’s history and have deep roots in cultures around the world. They have served two roles throughout time: one functional and the other as an expression of art through unique design and colorful pattern. Today, many teachers use quilt making in their teaching as a way to synthesize learning and to assess student understanding of broad concepts. The technique of making a quilt is as meaningful as the students’ work that is being displayed. Quilts serve as an effective assessment tool of student learning for all areas of study and all grade levels.   Participants learn to assemble a quilt

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Open to: All Time: F 10/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/17, 8:304:30 Location: SMS, rm P112 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Teaching Art Through Children’s Picture Books..................... #3960 Teachers know the value of infusing art into curriculum and are always looking for innovative ways to stimulate the imaginations of their students. By reinforcing the teaching of artistic styles and methods that children learn in the art room, classroom teachers can reach the inner artist in every child. Picture books, used regularly to teach about literary elements, are also a rich source of illustrations that support the mood or theme of a storybook. The mind and style of the illustrator can inspire children to design images that visualize and deepen meaning in their own classroom and personal writing. Through an exploration of the illustrations in children’s picture books, elementary teachers will gain new skills for incorporating art in the classroom. The works of several picture book illustrators will be used to showcase a variety of art styles, techniques, and materials. Participants will gain knowledge of printmaking, collage, mixed media, and more. The works of several author/ illustrators, familiar to classroom teachers, will be used to exemplify the power of art to enhance understanding of the written word.


Course Coordinators: Sara Faranda, Jan Schorr Open to: Elementary Time: F 12/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/5, 8:30-4:30. Location: FMS art room Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants

many opportunities for children’s social action provided by Pete Seeger’s Clearwater project and his soon to be launched environmental/sustainability camp in Beacon, New York. Course Coordinators: Lisa Forte, Lindsey Hicks Open to: All Time: F 1/8, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/9, 8:30-4:30

If I Had a Hammer: Empowering Children Through Folk Music .......................................... #3961

Location: EWS music room

My main power as a musician is to put songs on people’s lips, not just in their ear. People are connected to each other in meaningful ways, and by learning to sing together, by uniting hearts and voices, we can achieve peace. Pete Seeger

Math Meets Art.................. #3962

Folk songs embody the language and stories of different cultures and provide a vivid picture of history. American folk music has given voice to the social movements of the last fifty years. From the early union movement — Which Side Are you On? — to the civil rights movement — We Shall Overcome — and the peace movement — Where Have All the Flowers Gone?, folk music has been the expression of social justice, resistance, and humanity. The songs of Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, The Weavers, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, and many others remain the anthems for the labor, civil rights, and peace movements. Through documentary, readings, discussion, and song, participants will gain an awareness of the background and music of Pete Seeger and an understanding of his music as the expression of the heart and soul of the social movements of the twentieth century: labor, Civil Rights, and the peace movements. Through a variety of musical activities, participants will learn how to integrate folk songs meaningfully in the classroom. Folk songs are a source of excitement and creativity for children, and as Pete Seeger says, “We must think globally and sing locally.” Participants will learn about the

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Math meets art in many places. Art can provide an exciting and effective means to help students comprehend mathematical concepts, and math can be an inspiration for creative endeavors in the art classroom. Students learn in various modes, and math in art expands teaching methodology to reach learners challenged by more traditional approaches. Students and teachers will benefit from examining math concepts through the visual arts in an interdisciplinary approach combining both art and math. Many artists such as Sol Lewitt, Susan Happersett, and OULIPO artists effectively apply mathematical approaches to creativity. This hands-on workshop will promote a better understanding of math in art and art in math. The course leader is Esther K. Smith, author of How to Make Books, Magic Books and Paper Toys, and the forthcoming The Paper Bride. Utilizing simple mathematical precepts, participants will explore and create such mathematical objects as moebius strips, flexigons, and thaumatropes. The construction of book forms and paper toys will be used to illustrate mathematical concepts such as Fibonacci numbers in projects that can be applied across the grades. An art appreciation/history component provides additional material for classroom inspiration.

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Course Coordinator: Eve Eisenstadt

Time: F 1/22, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/23, 8:30-4:30

Course Speaker: Esther K. Smith, Author, How to Make Books, Magic Books and Paper Toys, exhibitor at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, MoMA, the Whitney, and the National Gallery of Art.

Location: SMS library

Open to: All Time: F 1/22, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/23, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm T117 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Learning Styles in the Classroom .......................................... #3963 In recent years, educational research and programming have emphasized the accommodation of individual student differences in the classroom. Materials, methods, and management systems have proliferated rapidly. While strategies have been developed that provide alternative learning opportunities for children and adults, the technologies needed to assess and classify children have been slower in coming. The Murphy-Meisgeier Type Indicator for Children (MMTIC) was developed out of this need. Type Theory provides the knowledge and skills for recognizing why and how learning and teaching style differences occur, what they mean, and how educators can more effectively deal with these differences. Just as every teacher has a preferred style of teaching, every student has a preferred style of learning. In this course, participants will explore ways to improve student learning through the use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Before teachers can apply the MBTI to classroom use, they must learn about their type and see how type relates to the classroom. The workshop will develop activities designed to accommodate differences in teaching and learning styles in order to maximize student success. Course Coordinators: Len Tallevi, Marie Tallevi Open to: All

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Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Introduction to Inquiry: Comparing Approaches and Process Skills...................... #3964 From the earliest grades, students learn best when engaged in the active construction of ideas and explanations. The content of the course, Comparing Approaches and Process Skills, is derived from the San Francisco Exploratorium Fundamentals of Curriculum, a staff development program designed to expand teacher knowledge and pedagogy in the application of inquiry-based teaching in the science classroom. Teaching science as inquiry enhances student understanding of science concepts and the effective application of science process skills. The course begins with the Comparing Approaches workshop. Participants will discover that various approaches to hands-on science have distinguishable characteristics and support different objectives for learning. Successful science teaching requires the use of a variety of methods with matching content, process, and personalized learning goals. In the Process Skills workshop, the second part of the course, participants will identify the competencies needed to carry out inquiry. As a result of both workshops, participants will gain: a more complete and accurate understanding of the process skills of science and the central role these skills play in the learning of science concepts; the ability to identify developmental levels with which children approach process skills; the methodology to redesigning science activities in ways that will meet the learning needs of children of differing ability and developmental levels. Course Coordinator: Jennifer Kiley Open to: All Time: F 1/29, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/30, 8:30-4:30. Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend


Stress in Children and Adolescents ...........................................#3965 Growing evidence from research affirms that today’s youths are a highly stressed group. Multiple social and situational determinants account for the tensions students experience. At each developmental stage a shifting balance occurs between stressful life events that heighten vulnerability and the protective factors that enhance youth resilience. As long as the balance between stressful life events and protective factors is favorable, successful adaptation is possible. Stress affects the functioning of children and adolescents at home, with their peers, as well as in school. Teachers need to be aware of the stresses faced by 21st century students and knowledgeable about strategies to increase youth coping skills. The goal of this course is to encourage the development of coping strategies in participants and in students. Participants will be guided through a clinical exploration of stress in school-age children: psychological origins; environmental factors; physiological and psychological responses; related influences including developmental stage, gender, and culture. Participants will look at the pressures in their own lives and the methods they rely on to cope. Staff will exchange concerns and issues that they have experienced with students and suggestions for individual and classroom activities that promote stress reduction including role plays, movie clips, songs, and poetry. Increased knowledge and sensitivity gained from course content will help teachers to identify and intervene more effectively with students who are experiencing stress. Course Coordinator: Jennifer Walker Open to: All Time: F 2/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 26, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Picture Books in a Weekend.. #3966 Children’s literature is a constantly changing field, and teachers need to stay current and informed about the newest and most

notable picture books available. Teachers also need time to discuss and collaborate with colleagues. This course will explore literature as participants examine new picture books and develop ways to integrate them into their current language arts programs.  This course explores picture books published in the last three years. District librarians will highlight various titles by comparing and contrasting literary quality, artwork, pertinent themes, expressive language, curriculum connections, readability levels, and more. Participants will read and discuss a wide variety of picture books, keep readers’ journals to record personal responses to the material, and plan how each title may be used with students. Participants will also learn about various awards for the picture book genre, including the Caldecott Medal, and discuss the important criteria that award committees consider when choosing the “best” picture book published. As part of the course, a noted author/illustrator will be a guest speaker, who will share a personal journey of writing and illustrating books for children and provide a valuable perspective on creating and publishing. Course Coordinators: Scarsdale Elementary Librarians Open to: Scarsdale Elementary Time: F 2/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/6, 8:30-4:30 Location: QRS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

All Kinds of Minds Study Group: A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Learning............................ # 3967 Teachers continuously strive to design appropriate learning experiences in response to the wide range of student differences they encounter in every classroom. Recent research findings that link brain development with classroom learning make it possible to identify specific brain activities that are related to learning and mental productivity. These brain activities can be described in terms of eight functions often

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called “neurodevelopmental� functions or constructs: attention, memory, language, higher order cognition, social cognition, temporal-sequential ordering, spatial ordering, and neuromotor functions. Within the mainstream classroom, a wide range of normal variation in the development of these functions exists. Teachers with an awareness of these functions are better able to recognize and attend to learning differences among students. The works of Dr. Mel Levine will inform an examination of student learning and provide a link to brain development with classroom learning. The goal of the course is to enable teachers to recognize, understand, and manage common classroom challenges in reading, writing, math, attention, organization, and study skills in order to identify student strengths and affinities and to build resiliency in learners. Participants will use readings and engage in discussions as they apply the neurodevelopmental framework to the wide range of learners who comprise a classroom.

are important to them. Emphasis will be placed on making strong visual images and developing a photo essay. In this course, participants will learn to become better photographers. This process will encompass everything from preparation and research to the actual photography. They will learn the techniques necessary to create strong visual images, to edit their photographs, and to create dramatic photo essays. Students will be directed to take photographs, and will return to each session with a group of photographs that will be critiqued by the teacher and the members of the group. In addition, discussions will examine the business of photography; the changing digital world; magazine work and publishing; and the sale of stock photographs. Students will create a portfolio of their work. Course Prerequisite: Must have digital camera, access to computer with Photoshop and be able to bring in 8x10 prints of the assignments.

Course Coordinator: Jennifer Turetzky

Course Coordinator: Emma Wixted

Open to: All Time: Th 11/5, 1/7, 2/4, 3/4, 5/6, 6/3, 3:30-5:30

Course Speaker: Richard Falco, photographer

Location: HCS library

Open to: All Time: Th 12/3, 10, 1/7, 14, 21, 2/4, 3:305:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: SMS, rm C159

Witness To Our Times: Images that Affect People.............. #3968

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

A strong grounding in media literacy is an essential skill that students need now and in the future. When students become photographers they are asked to look closely at the word around them. Learning to utilize the skills of a photojournalist, students not only become more perceptive of their world, they are better able to interact, engage, and understand the importance of the visual media in their daily lives. Participants in this course will learn how to create well-crafted photographs and to develop a strong visual voice that can serve as a means to generate awareness of a topic. This course will help the participant to develop the skills and insights necessary to document events that

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Highlighting Healthy Habits in the Elementary Classroom........ #3969 Research shows that students who receive information linking their health to appropriate decision-making, follow sound eating patterns, participate in physical activity, manage stress effectively, and refuse to participate in any form of substance abuse are much more successful in developing healthy habits that can last a lifetime. Children learn about health and wellness primarily from their parents and the home environment, but they also spend a significant amount of time in the classroom. Many topics in health are timely and readily transferable to the school curriculum. The overall well being of children can be


enhanced when teachers infuse health education lessons into curriculum. Each of the six course sessions will feature a different health-related topic: general health and wellness, personal safety, nutrition and physical activity, stress management, awareness of tobacco and substance abuse issues, and media literacy for children. The sessions will include the use of various instructional models for teaching decision-making to elementary students, and there will be opportunities to make interdisciplinary connections as well. In addition, classroom teachers will learn methods of instruction that are most successful with the sensitive topics included in a health education curriculum. Course Coordinator: Emelie Sciarpelletti Open to: Elementary Time: T 12/3, 10, 1/7, 14, 21, 2/4, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 374 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Current Practices in Health and Physical Education.............. #3970 Through participation in the Southern Westchester BOCES Health Physical Education Consortium, K-12 Health and Physical Education teachers have access to high quality professional development experiences. A variety of regional presentations and workshops on a number of timely topics feature local, state, and national presenters. These workshops focus on the current trends and practices spanning the K-12 curricula in Health and Physical Education. Participants will attend two in-house sessions to examine current trends in health and physical education curricula and their impact on programs. Teachers will also share and review successful strategies that they have implemented in their classes. Participants will select programs from the BOCES list of Seminars and Lectures throughout the year. Course Coordinator: George Blessing Open to: PE and Health

Time: TBA Location: BOCES Credit: One or two points salary credit or stipend

EQUITY AND ACCESS The ESL Student in the Mainstream Classroom....... #3971 The Scarsdale and Edgemont communities attract large numbers of students from other countries who, upon enrolling, are placed in classes side by side with native English speakers. This course will provide mainstream classroom and content area teachers on all grade levels with instructional strategies that will accelerate the integration of the ESL students into the general classroom environment. In this course teachers will develop practical curriculum materials for use with their ESL students. Participants will develop an understanding of the stages of second language acquisition as the ESL student develops from passive to active learner in the classroom, examine the cultural differences that influence learning, learn effective approaches to differentiating instruction for the English language learner, and address questions related to assessment and grading. Participants will work on lesson plans that effectively involve the second language learner in classroom instruction. Course Coordinators: Jacqueline O’Shea, Susan Silkowitz Open to: All Time: F 12/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/5, 8:30-4:30. Location: EHS, rm D8 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend.

Creating Games to Differentiate Instruction.......................... #3972 Children must learn a variety of skills in the early grades, and many students need the repetition of skills and concepts before they can achieve mastery. Games and activities help children learn by providing repetition

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and review in a wonderfully effective manner. Games appeal to every ability level and can be integrated into reading, writing, and mathematics. Children are active learners, and games engage them in learning. This course provides teachers the strategies that facilitate differentiating instruction, an important district goal. Teachers in grades K-4 will learn to create games and activities that can be used immediately in their classrooms to reinforce curriculum. An integral part of the course will be the discussion of multiple intelligences and differentiation of instruction. Teachers will examine their individual curricular areas in the primary grades to develop 8-10 games/ activities as their final projects. Participants should bring reference materials for the concepts they would like to develop.

will examine issues of language processing within the classroom setting. Topics to be addressed are: theories of normal language development including Piaget’s developmental theory; theories of language acquisition; case study presentations; methods of detecting learning disabilities in the classroom; evaluation of language impairment; accommodation of languagebased disabilities. A viewing of the F.A.T. City video will vividly dramatize the classroom experience from the perspective of a learning disabled child. Participants will have ample opportunity for discussion, sharing of knowledge, and development of lessons and strategies to help children with language-based disabilities to reach their potential as learners. Course Coordinators: Beverley Lorie, Andrea Tripodi

Open to: K-4 and LRC

Open to: All Time: F 2/26, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/27, 8:30-4:30

Time: F 1/22, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/23, 8:30-4:30

Location: SHS, rm 170

Location: EWS library

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Materials: Teachers should bring scissors.

Race Action Plan................ #3974

Course Coordinator: Bevin Pagel

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 17 participants.

Building Communication Skills Across the Curriculum........ #3973 Educators in Scarsdale and Edgemont frequently encounter children classified by the Committee on Special Education as learning disabled by virtue of a languagebased learning disability or speech/language impairment. Teachers want to know more about these disabilities and their impact on a child’s functioning and learning in the classroom. Teachers and related service providers must be aware of the nature of these deficits, their potential effects, ways to recognize when a child is struggling because of these difficulties, and what can be done to enable children with language processing disorders to be productive, successful, and self-assured learners. During this weekend course participants

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Today’s high school students have been identified by some pundits as a generation of young people who have transcended race. Whether accurate observation or wishful thinking, the issue of race relations persists in this generation, as it has throughout American history, under particular scrutiny in the last presidential election. Recently, Scarsdale’s Equity and Access Committee has explored perceptions of race relations and school policy in Scarsdale, and polled students, teachers, and the community on the topic. Pursuing the same inquiry, a group of Scarsdale High School teachers gathered informally to discuss the impact of race and racial perspectives in the classroom and the High School and have formed into a study group to meet regularly, to read, to discuss racial relations and perceptions and their impact on curriculum and school policy. The Scarsdale High School study group on race relations provides a vehicle for heightening awareness of racial issues through discussion, reading, and multimedia resources. Participants will examine


the impact of race and racial perspectives in classroom life, in the community, and in the nation. Participants will explore their own backgrounds and take an introspective look at how biography shapes personal attitudes toward race and ethnicity. Topics will include affirmative action, the Obama candidacy, the O. J. Simpson trial, and the way in which Americans choose their neighborhoods as well as their presidential candidates. Speakers and readings include Shelby Steele, Marcus Mabry, and Tim Wise. Participants can anticipate the involvement of the Jacob Burns Center and the Facing History project. Course Coordinators: Neil Ginsberg, Fred Goldberg Open to: SHS Time: F 10/2, 2-3:30, with remaining dates to be determined by group Location: SHS, rm 281

and experience of outside consultants to extend the group’s perspective to the work of other leading math departments elsewhere in the country. At the end of the sessions, the group will provide feedback and formulate recommendations relating to math content and curriculum as it impacts instruction at all grade levels at the Middle School. The course could provide the impetus for the drafting of a district-specific resource in math. Course Coordinator: Steve Walsh Open to: SMS math and support staff Time: M 10/19, 4:30-6:30, with remaining dates to be determined by group Location: SMS, rm B131 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

School Nurse Study Group.. #3976

Differentiated Math Instruction: Teaching to the Middle School Student.............................. #3975

Teachers, parents, and students often look to district nurses for advice on health issues that arise in the news or in the schools. Medical information is constantly being updated, and the school nurses need the time and opportunity to meet with colleagues to discuss the latest findings in their field. Book club participation provides the school nurses a venue to read, listen, and share new medical information that will enhance health office practice.

Middle School math teachers, and their students, will benefit from an ongoing forum dedicated to discussing, sharing, and evaluating best practices on differentiation. Over the past years, Scarsdale math teachers have participated in workshops, seminars, and the District symposium on differentiated instruction. Building on these experiences, math teachers will gain additional instructional strategies and support to establish the differentiated classroom through group work, to predetermine student readiness, and to enhance presentation of content and assessment. The course will meet monthly. At each session, teachers will identify and report on new and revised classroom practices, teaching strategies, and materials they have added to their repertoire of differentiated instruction. In subsequent sessions, participants will present evaluations of the changes and enhancements they have incorporated into practice in actual classroom work. The course will draw on the expertise

Participants will choose books and articles on topics that are relevant school health office concerns. Through reading, participation in discussion, and sharing daily-based practice information, school nurses will become better-informed advocates and resources for their students and families. Course Coordinators: Joyce Hoffman, Marcia Koff Open to: Nurses Time: TBA Location: TBA Credit: Stipend

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Touch the River at Beczak Environmental Education Center .......................................... #3977 As it has throughout history, the Hudson River continues to play a significant role in the geology, ecology, economy, and cultural heritage of New York State. The river has gone through many transformations, from the pristine wilderness of Henry Hudson’s days and before, through the ecological degradation of the 1900’s, to the careful monitoring, protection, and restoration efforts ongoing today. Since 1989, the Beczak Environmental Education Center has helped children and adults explore the natural wonders of the Hudson River through a “hands-on, minds-on” philosophy. The Center, a local resource for schools in Westchester County, provides planned interaction with the natural environment designed to promote environmental awareness and informed stewardship of the Hudson River, the Saw Mill River, and the Bronx River. Participants will engage in a variety of interdisciplinary workshops offered at the Beczak Environmental Education Center to be led by the center’s education staff. Most of the activities will take place outdoors in and around the Hudson River as participants explore the ecology and chemistry of the river and its physical characteristics and cultural heritage. Creative art projects inspired by the beauty of the river and its surroundings are a part of the experience. Teachers will find in the Beczak Center and its educational staff a welcoming possibility as they plan nearby field trips for students. Other educational facilities available along the Yonkers waterfront, including the Science Barge, will be explored. Course Coordinator: Cristine Gilliland Course Speakers: Educational Staff of Beczak Environmental Education Center Open to: All Time: F 10/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/17, 8:304:30 Location: Beczak Environmental Education Center, 36 Alexander St.,Yonkers, NY

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Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

Water for Westchester....... #3978 New York City and Westchester have been receiving clean water from the Croton reservoir system for over one hundred years. Nine million individuals consume approximately 1.4 billion gallons of clean water per day and over 500 billion gallons per year from this remarkable system, a unique feat of engineering. The story of the construction and development of the network that supplies New York City and environs with water reveals a fascinating intersection of science, politics, and the environment with vital policy implications for today. Teachers and their students will find important lessons in this history. Political foresight and technological brilliance united in the engineering of a public reservoir system that has served and continues to serve New York and Westchester County. Through readings and discussion, participants will deepen their knowledge and awareness of Westchester’s water supply and the system through which it travels. On Saturday, the class will tour the Croton Watershed area and learn of the ecology, evolution, and development of the Croton Reservoir system from a local historian. In addition, the impact of individual and community actions to sustain a clean water supply for the future will be explored, and the chemistry of water will be examined as it relates to the maintenance of this complex water system. Throughout the course, classroom applications and curriculum integration will be emphasized. Course Coordinators: Steve Boyer, Elise Levine Course Speaker: TBA Open to: All Time: F 11/13, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/14, 8:304:30 Location: SHS, rm 391 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend


TECHNOLOGY Online Resources for the Elementary Teacher........... #3979 The world of online resources is a constantly evolving trove of information for teachers and students. As new resources become available, users must know and respond to changed formats with more complex searching techniques. To keep abreast of these changes in research processes, teachers need the time and opportunity to learn, with colleagues, new materials and methods and their curriculum applications. In a series of four, three-hour sessions, librarians will present new online resources appropriate for elementary learners. Teachers will work with their colleagues to explore the most recent online educational sites, the means to access them, and the support materials available for specific curricula. Teachers will gain familiarity with the changing world of online resources as they update and enrich curriculum materials and enhance student learning. Students with differing abilities and learning styles will benefit from a variety of teaching resources available online. Participants are requested to bring a laptop, PC or Mac, to the course. Course Coordinators: Scarsdale Elementary Librarians

multiple multimedia sources; interacting and networking simultaneously with many others; learning “just-in-time.” Digitallearners value what is relevant and instantly useful. Their teachers need support and guidance to enhance curriculum with the sophisticated technology skills that students in this digital age expect. In this course, participants will study the nature of digital native learners and will develop strategies for delivering content appropriately. Instruction and discussion will explore technology applications suitable for curriculum integration. Participants will be introduced to Schoolwires, Scarsdale’s new content management system, Google applications, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and the most recent presentation software. Instructors will demonstrate specific examples of extreme curriculum makeovers utilizing many of these technologies and guiding participants to re-tool curriculum units or lessons using the technologies presented in the class. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci, Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: Th 10/1, 15, 22, 29, 11/5, 12, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Open to: K-6 Time: Th 10/1, 15, 29, 11/12, 3:30-6:30

It’s Back! Hyperstudio in the Classroom.......................... #3981

Location: EWS library

Hyperstudio is back! This powerful and user-friendly application can be a tool for educators to create multimedia projects for presentations, student-learning modules, electronic portfolios, and quizzes and tests that grade themselves! Teachers and students alike who mix and mash, who make movies instead of just watching them, who blog and tweet instead of just reading or watching the news, who make podcasts instead of just listening to the radio will find Hyperstudio easy to learn and to integrate into classroom practice. Through demonstration and guided practice, participants will learn to use Hyperstudio,

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

Extreme Makeover: School Technology Edition............. #3980 The 21st century teacher must respond to the demands of today’s learners by keeping current with technology and updating curriculum presentations to reflect student preferences. These digital native learners prefer gathering information quickly from

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recently updated by its original creator Roger Wagner. The new version is both true to the original design and updated with podcasting, webcams, and more. An alternative to Powerpoint or Keynote, Hyperstudio provides many possibilities for interactivity, artistic design, animation, and non-sequential learning. This weekend experience will accommodate beginners or experienced users alike. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci, Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: F 10/2, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/3, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Keeping Current with Technology: Level Two........................... #3982 Using information, media, and technology, often in combination, are paramount among the skills students need in the 21st century. To be current in the classroom, teachers must be familiar with computer technology operations, from basic to advanced, and many teachers have expressed the need for a course that addresses the fundamentals of the technology available to them in the classroom. An understanding of computer technology is essential to achieving competence with the continuum of 21st century technology skills and applications. Keeping Current with Technology Level Two is recommended for those who attended Level One and anyone who wants to gain an understanding of the essential functions of the Macintosh computer and its integration into the school-wide network. This is a customized course where the needs of the participants will dictate the level of instruction. Through demonstration and guided practice, this six-session course will provide teachers the answers to their technology questions, and enhance and advance their skills. Course Coordinator: Linda Fisher Course Speaker: Kathy Basso, Computer Consultant

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Open to: MAC users Time: Tu 10/6, 13, 20, 11/3, 10, 17, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom.......................... #3983 SMART Boards, interactive whiteboards connected to computers and data projectors, are being installed in many classrooms. Once a computer image is projected onto its surface, the SMART Board can be used as a computer operated by hand-touch on the white board. Teachers need training to achieve a working knowledge of the numerous ways to integrate SMART Board into daily lessons. This technology can add a whole new dimension to teaching and learning experiences. Participants will learn how to use a SMART Board, the benefits and drawbacks of SMART Boards, how to work with the SMART Notebook software, and how to interact with other commonly used applications. The sessions will combine lecture and presentations by the instructor and workshop time for participants to familiarize themselves with the technology and the software. Participants will be expected to develop SMART Board lessons applicable to their grade level/subject area, and to demonstrate what they have learned and how they will use class content in their teaching. Course Coordinator: Doug Vermes Open to: All Time: F 10/2, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/3, 8:30-4:30..... Location: SHS, rm 352 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Using JAVA Applets in the Science and Math Classrooms......... #3984 The use of JAVA Applets facilitates the teaching of science and math concepts that are difficult to convey using traditional


equipment. Over the past few years, many new Web sites employing the use of these Applets have sprung up all over the Internet. These sites allow students to alter variables in simulated experiments and then form conclusions about the relationships being studied. These sites do not take the place of real laboratory experiments. Rather, they reinforce concepts and allow the study of concepts that are difficult, if not impossible, to show in a high school lab. Participants will observe applications of JAVA Applets that are appropriate for classroom demonstrations, homework assignments, and laboratory experiences. They will work with model lessons to learn how best to use various kinds of Applets. The teachers will also explore the Internet, finding and cataloguing Applets appropriate for their disciplines. A comprehensive catalogue of Applets will be developed for sharing within the schools. This catalogue will list the Web sites of the Applets and include brief descriptions of contents, grade levels, and suggestions for use. Finally, each teacher will create lessons based on these Applets.

the data analysis in real time. In this course, participants will further explore the use of LabQuest and LoggerPro data analysis software to enhance laboratory explorations, and automate data collection and data analysis as well as develop unique and visually powerful teacher demonstrations. Again, Walter Rohr will lead the workshop and provide his expert and extensive experience with the use of the LabQuest in the classroom. Participants will share experiences using LabQuest in the classroom, methods for sharing data and data analysis, and integrating visual components helpful in enhancing student learning. Participants will learn to videotape an experiment or demonstration and link that visual information to the data collection and analysis information provided by the LabQuest tool. The use of video with the LabQuest can be especially effective when working with students who may not be ready to perform an experiment on their own while collecting the necessary data. Course Coordinators: Ihor Szkolar, Jim Williams

Course Coordinators: Barbara Bierbauer, Pat Jablonowski

Course Speaker: Walter Rohr, Vernier Consultant

Open To: Secondary Science & Math Time: F 10/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/24, 8:304:30

Open to: K-12 science Time: F 10/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 10/31, 8:304:30

Location: SHS, rm 352

Location: SHS, rm 387

Credits: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Integrating Video Clips with Vernier LabQuest.............. #3985

SMARTBoard Technology and Keynote in the Scarsdale Middle School Science Curriculum.. #3986

This course is designed to introduce new users to the operation and application of the Vernier LabQuest tool. Additionally, experienced users will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the LabQuest in order to integrate video and graphics with the experimental data to enhance the learning experience. This technique allows students to observe the event while the data collection and analysis is taking place. The integration and combination of these two sources of information provide students with the ability to associate the experiment with

Permanently mounted data projection devices have been installed in the Middle School science labs, and science department members learned the essentials of their use in a recent STI course. SMARTBoard with Keynote has proved to be a valuable classroom tool to enhance lab demonstrations and lessons, and science teachers are now eager to develop their skills beyond the basics. Teachers will benefit from learning the advanced features of the technology, collaborating with colleagues

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on curriculum applications, and sharing lessons that incorporate additional projection technologies into science presentations. Instructors will demonstrate and guide participants in the use of the advanced features of SMARTnotebook and Keynote. Websites such as United Streaming will enable teachers to project videoclips that animate and enliven scientific procedures and processes. Through discussions, hands on training, and collaboration, participants will develop their expertise and design lessons incorporating the latest features of the projection technologies available in the science labs. Department members will work together to compile lessons that use SMARTBoard with Keynote, and they will catalogue relevant interactive Web sites.

and develops organizational and critical thinking skills. Making comics is writing! During the first session of this weekend course, participants will see an overview of comic styles. The program Comic Life will be introduced and tips and tricks for using Photoshop will be presented. During the second session participants will develop, design, and create high quality, curriculumbased, digital comics using multiple sources of primary and secondary information as well as images from art and photographic archives. Course Coordinators: Linda Fisher, Steve Goodman Open to: All Time: F 11/13, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/14, 8:304:30

Course Coordinators: Jennifer Gilbert, Cristine Gilliland

Location: SMS, rm C159

Course Speaker: Doug Vermes, Teacher, Scarsdale High School

Course limited to 15 participants.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Open to: SMS Science Time: F 11/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/7, 8:30-4:30

Google Sketchup: Creating 3D Models for the Classroom.. #3988

Location: SMS, rm F77

The study of architecture is both an art and a science with numerous curriculum applications throughout the grades. Using Google Sketchup technology in history, students are able to create 3D models that enliven the subject by designing colonial era houses or landmarked New York City buildings. The creation of 3-D models stimulates student imagination while requiring problem solving and the ability to measure angles and planes. As teachers gain competence with this exciting and innovative Google application, they will bring a whole new technological dimension to students across the grades. Nontraditional teaching resources meet the needs of students with a range of abilities and learning styles.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Comics in the Curriculum with Comic Life.......................... #3987 The combination of comics and technology has great potential for teaching and learning. Students often are interested and engaged in the comics medium as readers and may have a fair level of visual literacy and sophistication. Learning to create comics uses a variety of skill sets to extract information, communicate ideas and emotions, and interpret both words and images. The Comic Life computer program facilitates the creation of comics. Teachers can employ this technology tool in many different contexts as an alternative learning strategy that students find fun and exhilarating. Participants will use the Comic Life program to make comics. The process of creating comics takes advantage of the natural tendency to spin stories in words and pictures

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In this course, participants will learn to use the Sketchup computer aided design program. Instruction and discussions will explore several related topics: architectural projects throughout the grade levels, the mathematical tools incorporated into Sketchup, and the creation of both large and small-scale models. The first part of the course will be devoted to learning Sketchup


tools and choosing a project to model that can be integrated into curriculum. The next session will provide ample time for individuals to create their own models and share them with the group. Participants will be asked to create one model that could be used in the classroom. Course Coordinator: Peter McKenna Open to: All Time: F 11/20, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/21, 8:304:30 Location: FMS computer lab and library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Keynote: Developing Dynamic Presentations..................... #3989 Keynote is a presentation application that can be used by teachers and students to incorporate images and graphics into stunning slide shows. Knowledge of Keynote will help teachers to present information in a visually engaging manner and provide students another vehicle for showcasing projects. Keynote helps students to organize information and to add visual context to what they hear and see. It also encourages individual artistic expression and supports a variety of learning styles. In six sessions, participants will be introduced to Keynote’s basic functions and features. Model examples from classroom use will be shown to illustrate the enrichment that Keynote presentations can provide in any subject area. Participants will be asked to design and create a Keynote lesson or educational presentation that incorporates pictures, clipart, Web sites, video clips, and background voice or music. Participants will share their work with colleagues at the concluding session of the course. Course Coordinator: Steve Walsh Open to: All Time: Tu 12/1, 8, 1/5, 12, 19, 2/2, 3:305:30 Location: SMS, rm B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Using Graphic Organizers to Support Instruction............ #3990 The use of graphic organizers in the classroom helps students to understand and retain key facts and concepts. By arranging information into various patterns and relationships, students interact with, synthesize, and internalize learning. Technology can facilitate the process, and software such as Inspiration can guide students to create mind maps, outlines, and other types of interactive models. In learning to enhance curriculum using graphic organizers, teachers also support the learning styles of students at all levels of ability. In each session, participants will receive hands-on instruction in the use of graphic organizer software, including Inspiration, Gliffy, Mindomo.com, and others. They will also review examples of best practices and sample projects. Over the duration of the course, participants will develop applications of the software for their own curriculum that leverage these tools as supports to learning. Course Coordinators: Michael Curtin, Norm Silverman Open to: Secondary Time: Th 12/3, 10, 1/7, 13, 21, 2/4, 3:305:30 Location: EHS, rm D13 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

iLife ‘09 in a Weekend....... #3991 Media-rich learning is the ideal way for teachers to connect with today’s students. Apple’s award-winning iLife software suite provides all the tools they need to create media-rich projects such as historical documentaries, poetry photo books, foreign language podcasts, science project websites, and more. This course will introduce iLife’s powerful tools to facilitate project-based learning. Participants will learn to create dynamic lessons aligned with local, state, and national standards. During the first session of this weekend course, participants will be introduced to iPhoto, iMovie, iTunes, iDVD, GarageBand and iWeb, powerful resources for

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education. Teachers will explore the potential of these applications and will develop strategies for integrating one or more of them into a curriculum-based lesson plan. During the second session, participants will design, develop, and share a curriculum-based lesson plan using iLife’s 21st century tools. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All Dates: F 12/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 12/5, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

iThink, Therefore, iMovie ‘09! .......................................... #3992 iMovie ’09 is a completely redesigned version of Apple’s popular video editing program. Beginners and experienced users alike will find this program a versatile tool. Novices to iMovie will appreciate the ease of features like “drag-and-drop” that facilitate the addition of video and audio clips to a project. iMovie veterans will note the new dynamic themes with titles, transitions, and credits, including an “Indiana Jones” style animated travel map that identifies shoot locations. iMovie’s accessibility and ease of application enable teachers at all levels of video editing expertise to apply the latest technology in the classroom. In addition, with knowledge of iMovie 09, participants will be able to make use of advanced tools readily available in their schools. Participants will learn to use the iMovie ‘09 to enhance classroom lessons and to facilitate project-based learning. Teachers and students can create high-quality video presentations to illustrate abstract concepts or documentaries that highlight the relevance of social issues. Compelling projects combine digital video, photos, and music, and voice narration. Even beginners will be able to use iMovie’s new “green screen” feature. There’s no limit to what participants can learn and teach their students to produce. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All

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Time: F 1/8, 3:30-7:30; Sa 1/9, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Photoshop Jumpstart......... #3993 Knowledge of Photoshop furthers the integration of technology in all curriculum areas. Photoshop provides teachers ways to produce effective images for print, multimedia, and Web design. Participants will start to master Photoshop’s powerful arsenal of tools and features and begin creating exciting images for presentations and projects.  Photoshop Jumpstart provides a working knowledge of Adobe Photoshop CS4. Participants will learn a wide spectrum of shortcuts, tips, and tricks, while concentrating on the essentials of becoming confident users of this multifaceted imageediting program. The goal of the course is to develop in participants the skills necessary to create appealing images which may be used with other presentations such as PowerPoint, Keynote, slideshows, Web pages, podcasts and movies. With knowledge of Photoshop, teachers can guide students in the use of images for computer curriculum projects.  Course Coordinator: Linda Fisher, Paul Tomizawa Open to: All Time: F 2/26, 3:30-7:30; Sa 2/27, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS – NON CREDIT Design in Glass Mosaics and Glass Fusing................................ #3994 The study and creation of warm glass and glass tessarae have roots in ancient Byzantine, Egyptian, and Roman art. Art historians document that objects of beauty were created


for personal adornment as well as interior and exterior design in the homes and public spaces of ancient times. Learning how to manipulate glass for one’s own designs offers an opportunity to develop innate creativity while crafting personal objects of beauty and function. This class is an introduction to the art of mosaic tesserae, the using of glass as mosaic medium. Kiln-fired glass will be introduced as another way of creating flat panels. For students who completed the Warm Glass course, more advanced techniques of design and composition will be introduced in a double step process. Projects will include cold cut glass mosaic panel(s) and fused glass panels, a ‘coldforming’ process of cutting, shaping, and arranging glass. Course Coordinator: Maria DeAngelis Open to: All Time: T 10/6, 13, 20, 27, 11/3, 10, 3:305:30 Location: SHS, rm 215 Credit: Non-credit

CPR for Professional Rescuers ........................................ #3995A This course is consistent with the Guidelines 2000 for Emergency Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. If participants wish, the use of the Automatic External Defibrillator can be taught. CPR for Professional Rescuers will be given as a new certification, nine to twelve hours, depending on the amount of time needed for completion. Recertification requires seven to nine hours, depending on participant proficiency with new skills and familiarity with CPR. Course Coordinator: Joyce Hoffman Open to: Nurses Time: Sa 10/24, 8:30-4:30 Location: QRS, rm16 Credit: Stipend

Materials Fees: $12 for book (send check made out to American Red Cross to Joyce Hoffman);$15 for new card (check made out to the American Red Cross after completing course)

CPR and First Aid in the Workplace........................ #3995B Whether in the classroom, in the halls, on the playground or the athletic field, students and adults face the potential of injury at school. The first three minutes after an injury occurs are the most critical. This is the time before the school nurse, doctor, EMT or other trained person arrives. Teachers and parents seek opportunities to inform themselves of new first aid and CPR techniques in order to understand how to react in an emergency and when to get help. Certification or recertification can be satisfied with this course. Course Coordinator: Joyce Hoffman Course Speaker: Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant Time: Sa 11/21, 8:30-4:30 Location: QRS, rm 16 Open to: All Credit: $250 stipend for Scarsdale staff Course limited to 12 participants.

Conversational English for Adult Language Learners.... #3996 A & B The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this class for adults whose first language is not English. Participants practice and refine spoken English and improve communication skills in a variety of settings. Through a series of fun exercises, discussions, and games, participants improve their listening skills, gain pronunciation awareness, train new muscle patterns for producing speech, and learn to monitor their speech. Topics vary based on participants’ suggestions and include speaking with

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school personnel, asking and giving directions, and using the telephone. Course Coordinator: Meredythe Nowak Time: Section A - Tu 10/20, 27, 11/10, 17, 24, 12/1, 8, 15, 1/5, 12, 19, noon-1 Section B: Th 10/22, 29, 11/5, 12, 19, 12/3, 10, 17, 1/7, 14, noon-1 Location: QRS Fee: None Course limited to 10 participants

Knitting.............................. #3997 During the past decade, the popularity of knitting as a hobby has expanded as people of all ages discover the satisfaction that comes from this historic art form. This trend, led by celebrities across the globe, has led to a flurry of patterns and designer yarns marketed to a younger and trendier generation of knitters than ever before. Participants will create a project or projects of their choice based on each individual level of expertise. Knitters at all levels of accomplishment, from beginner to advanced, will find instruction to develop their skills. Participants will be eligible to receive a discount on supplies from Sticks and Strings in Scarsdale. Course Coordinator: Heidi Kaplan Course Speaker: Laura Paul, professional knitting instructor, Sticks and Strings Open to: All Time: TBA Location: SMS Credit: Non-credit

power of yoga to improve concentration, motivation, and academic achievement. Studies published by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine of The National Institutes of Health report that yoga is shown to increase flexibility, strength, stamina, and focus, all essential developments for improved physical performance. Yoga and meditation release a host of biochemical responses, which physiologically and psychologically calm the mind and body reducing stress. Increasingly around the country, teachers of general education and physical education, and athletic coaches, are including yoga in their strategies and techniques. As the stress level of students continues to escalate, teachers and parents eagerly seek the means to reduce it. Yoga is a simple and effective practice to teach young people to cope with the stresses they encounter in the classroom and on the playing field. Course participants will learn the principles and practices of yoga in the classroom to enable students to think creatively with improved clarity of mind. Through exercises demonstrated in the class, teachers will develop skill at specific poses known to improve health and flexibility that will facilitate in their students an integration of physical, emotional, and cognitive experiences. The essential mind-body connection via breathing will be established. Teachers will be trained in balance, agility, and endurance in physical performance with an end result of increased self-esteem and confidence for students, reduced stress, and development of healthy life habits. Teachers will examine the research and consider the methods to integrate yoga into classroom practice in all subject areas. Course Coordinator: George Blessing Course Speaker: Dr. Lois Rogalski, Certified Yoga Instructor

Stress Management: The Power of Yoga in the Classroom and on the Playing Field....................... #3998

Open to: All Time: F 11/6, 3:30-7:30; Sa 11/7, 8:30-4:40.

Research validates what teachers and parents always knew: academic performance is negatively impacted by stress. Research reported by Meg M. Breslin (2006) and Howard Gardner (1983,1991) attests to the

Credit: Non-credit

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Location: SHS multipurpose room


Course Coordinators and Speakers

Page

Maureen Ball, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 34 Kathy Basso, Computer Aide, Scarsdale Middle School ......................................... 44 Barbara Bierbauer, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ............................................... 45 George Blessing, Physical Education Coordinator, Scarsdale ................................. 39, 50 Steve Boyar, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.......................................................... 42 Heather Brandon, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School ........................................ 17 Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant............................................................................ 49 Lucy Calkins, Teachers College, Columbia University............................................ 14 Diane Celentano, Dance/Lincoln Center Coordinator, Scarsdale............................ 30 Nancy Closter, Teacher, Greenacres....................................................................... 25 Sylvie Corten, World Language Chair, Scarsdale High School................................. 13 Bill Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College..................................... 15 Gerald Crisci, Director of Instructional and Administrative Computing, Scarsdale......................................................................................... 43, 44 Michael Curtin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Edgemont.............................. 47 Maria DeAngelis, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.................................................. 27, 49 Trent DeBerry, Teacher, Heathcote......................................................................... 14 Katherine de la Garza, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale..................... 32, 33 Patty Dempsey, Teacher, Quaker Ridge.................................................................. 12 Carol Desoe, Math Chair, Scarsdale High School.................................................... 12, 27 Anita DiBianco, Film and Video Artist .................................................................... 24 Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School ............................................ 22, 24, 26 Robert DiYanni, Director of Arts and Aesthetic Education, Scarsdale .................15, 23, 30 Elisa Draper, Teacher, Quaker Ridge....................................................................... 18 Carol Duncan, Social Studies Consultant................................................................. 21 Eve Eisenstadt, Coordinator of Fine and Practical Arts, Scarsdale............................ 36 Richard Falco, Photographer .................................................................................. 38 Sara Faranda, Teacher, Fox Meadow ..................................................................... 35 Rose Farrell, Teacher, Greenville ........................................................................... 10 Stephanie Feingold, Teacher, Greenville, retired .................................................... 28 Marisa Ferrara, Teacher, Greenville ........................................................................ 29 Linda Fisher, Arts Chair, Scarsdale Middle School.......................................... 44, 46, 48 Cora Five, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................................ 12 Lisa Forte, Head Elementary General/Vocal Music Teacher, Scarsdale.................... 35 Peggy Fox, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School......................................................... 29 Amber Frantz, Teacher, Heathcote.......................................................................... 17 Lella Gandini, United States Liaison for the Dissemination of the Reggio Emilia Program....................................................................................... 32 Jennifer Gilbert, Science Chair, Scarsdale Middle School...................................... 46 Cristine Gilliland, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................. 42, 46 Neil Ginsberg, Teacher, Scarsdale High School...................................................... 20, 41 Fred Goldberg, Assistant Principal, Scarsdale High School..................................... 41 Dorothy Golden, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School .............................................. 14 Steve Goodman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 46 Maxine Greene, William F. Russell Professor of Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, emerita............................................... 20 Denise Hale, Teacher, Greenville............................................................................ 29 Alisa Harrison, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................................. 25 Susan Hendler, Teacher, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 17, 28 Lindsey Hicks, Teacher, Heathcote............................................................. 31, 32, 34,35 Penny Hamlet, Teacher in Charge, Quaker Ridge.................................................... 14 Joyce Hoffman, Nurse, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 41, 49

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Ken Holvig, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................... 22, 43, 44, 48 Barbara Horowitz, Librarian, Greenville................................................................ 28 Scott Houseknecht, Principal, Edgewood ............................................................. 33 Pat Jablonowski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................. 45 Bill Jackson, Elementary Math Teacher, Scarsdale................................................. 33 Patricia Jennings, The Garrison Institute at Penn State University........................ 16 Heidi Kaplan, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 50 Amy Kenney, Social Studies Helping Teacher, Scarsdale....................................... 30 Jennifer Kiley, Science Helping Teacher, Scarsdale............................................... 33, 36 Marcia Koff, Nurse, Scarsdale Middle School........................................................ 41 Kate Krahl, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.......................................................... 18 Lorella Lamonaca, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................. 31, 32 Robyn Lane, Principal, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 14 Elise Levine, Teacher, Scarsdale High School........................................................ 42 Ann Liptak, Senior Options Coordinator, Scarsdale High School........................... 11 Beverley Lorie, Speech Pathologist, Scarsdale Middle School................................ 40 Sue Luft, Teacher, Fox Meadow........................................................................... 30, 32 Lynne Mayocole, Professor, Westchester Community College ............................. 24 Peter McKenna, Teacher, Fox Meadow................................................................. 47 Mary Dee Merrell, Art Consultant......................................................................... 25 Steve Mounkhall, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................ 20, 23 Art Nelson, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................ 11 Meredythe Nowak, Teacher, Greenacres, Heathcote, Quaker Ridge...................... 50 Adrienne Onofri, Author. ..................................................................................... 18 Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote............................................................................ 18 Nancy O’Rourke, Teacher, Edgewood................................................................... 16 Jacqueline O’Shea, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School..................................... 39 James Overbey, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 21 Bevin Pagel, Teacher, Edgewood.......................................................................... 40 Deena Paradiso, House Counselor, Scarsdale Middle School................................ 22 Helen Pasternack, Teacher, Edgewood.................................................................. 24 Laura Paul, Professional knitting instructor, Sticks and Strings............................... 50 Nancy Pavia, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale................................... 32, 33 Sue Peppers, Assistant Principal, Scarsdale High School........................................ 23 Carole Phillips, Librarian, Greenacres............................................................... 16, 27, 32 Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ...................................................... 17 Karin Reetz, Art Consultant................................................................................... 25 Dawn Rivellini, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 34 Howard Rodstein, Teacher in Charge, Scarsdale Alternative Schoool.................... 12 Dr. Lois Rogalski, Certified Yoga Instructor.......................................................... 50 Walter Rohr, Vernier Consultant........................................................................... 45 Cindy Sansone, Teacher-in-Charge, Greenacres.................................................... 16 Karine Schaefer, Teacher, Bronxville High School................................................. 20 Carol Schaeffer, Teacher, Edgewood..................................................................... 16 Jan Schorr, Librarian, Fox Meadow....................................................................... 16, 35 Dan Schuchat, Social Studies Chair, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School......................... 11 Emelie Sciarpelletti, Health Coordinator, Scarsdale .............................................. 39 Paul Sheehey, Teacher, Scarsdale High School...................................................... 20 Susan Silkowitz, Teacher, Seely Place................................................................... 39 Norm Silverman, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School........................................ 47 Esther K. Smith, Author......................................................................................... 36 Ilene Smith, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................. 16 Phil Smith, Poet and artist .................................................................................... 34 Maria Stile, Principal, Heathcote........................................................................... 14

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Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................... 17, 25, 27 Ihor Szkolar, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.......................................................... 45 Lauren Tallevi, Teacher, Scarsdale High School...................................................... 18 Len Tallevi, Social Studies Chair, Scarsdale Middle School...................................... 19, 36 Marie Tallevi, Teacher, Quaker Ridge.............................................................. 17, 19, 36 Sarah Picard Taylor, Teachers College, Columbia University................................... 14 Kathleen Tolan, Teachers College, Columbia University......................................... 14 Paul Tomizawa, Teacher, Edgewood...................................................................... 21, 48 Jose Toscano, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 15 Andrea Tripodi, Psychologist, Scarsdale Middle School ........................................ 26, 40 Jennifer Turetzky, Psychologist, Heathcote............................................................. 38 Elizabeth Ungar, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................... 27 Andy Verboys, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 48 Doug Vermes, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ...................................................... 44, 46 Jennifer Walker, Psychologist, Scarsdale High School............................................ 37 Steve Walsh, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School .................................................... 41, 47 Liz Waltzman, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School................................................. 28 Sharon Waskow, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School ............................................ 28, 29 Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel and Administrative Services, Scarsdale ........................................................................................ 22, 23, 30 Sarah Whittington, World Language Chair, Scarsdale Middle School..................... 13, 26 Jim Williams, Teacher, Scarsdale High School....................................................... 45 Emma Wixted, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 38 Diane Wrobleski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.................................................. 10 William Yang, Teacher, Greenacres ....................................................................... 32 Ban Har Yeap, Author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks ................................. 32 Lisa Zawilinski, Staff Developer, University of Connecticut.................................... 32 Art and Susan Zuckerman, Hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel.............................................................................................. 21

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Registration and Credit Information  You must register prior to the start of a course; registration ensures your place in a course. Please note that some courses have limited enrollment; register early to obtain your first choice. You may obtain a registration form from the STI office or online. You may also register by phone at the STI office, 721-2580.

How

to

Register

•Online: www.scarsdaleschools.org/sti. •At the STI Office: Scarsdale High School, room 102 •By phone: 721-2580 •By mail: send completed form to the STI, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583.

Non-Credit Courses

Courses in this catalogue labeled “non-credit” are those for which the Institute will not request Board of Education support.

Salary Study Credit, Stipends

for

Courses

According to the STA contract, the Board of Education has agreed to approve, at the recommendation of the Accreditation Committee, courses for salary credit or a stipend and has set aside a sum of money to pay the instructional expenses of these courses. The Board approves a course for credit according to the following procedure. If a course furthers the educational goals of the District, the Institute Director submits it to the Accreditation Committee for review and recommendation and then to the Superintendent and Board of Education for approval. Assignments of salary credit will usually be announced before the course begins. Some courses will carry salary credit for teachers eligible for additional credits or a stipend for teachers at MA+75 or above. These teachers may obtain a maximum of eight credits per year for Institute courses. Upon application and approval, the eight-credit maximum noted above may be waived for STI courses where the STI Accreditation Committee determined such courses meet District goals. Two of these eight (8) credits may be taken in summer STI courses and may be applied to either the previous school year’s allotment or the upcoming school year’s allotment. In order to obtain salary credit or a stipend for an approved course, a teacher will be responsible for completing the course requirements within ninety days of completion of the course.

Emergency Closing In the event that the Scarsdale or Edgemont Schools are closed for the day or are closed during the day, STI courses for that day are cancelled. Course coordinators will arrange make-up times.

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Payment Policy

Registration Form

Please return entire page to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Receipt of this registration form with payment secures your place in a course. The STI office will notify you if a course is not running. If you have any questions, please call 721-2580.

Cancellation Policy

No refunds will be issued for courses unless participant gives two-day notice to STI office. Scarsdale, Edgemont, and other Westchester residents are welcome to enroll in STI courses listed as “programs open to all.� Name _________________________________________________________________________ School _____________________________ Grade(s) _______________Tel. ext. ____________ Home Address _________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________ Home Phone ______________________________

Cell Phone _________________________________

Email Address Course #

Course Title

1.___________

_______________________________________________

2.___________

_______________________________________________

3.___________

_______________________________________________

4.___________

_______________________________________________

Please send this form to STI and keep a copy to remind yourself of upcoming courses for which you have registered.

Register beforehand!

Your timely registration assures your place in a course and can make the difference between a course running or being cancelled!

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STI Policy Board 2009-2010

Susan Taylor, Director Kenneth Holvig, Assistant to the Director, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School, Policy Board Chair Christine Cecere, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School William Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College Gerald Crisci, Director of Instructional and Administrative Computing, Scarsdale Michael Curtin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Edgemont Michaeline Curtis, Board of Education, Edgemont John Dean, Teacher, Greenacres Linda Fisher, Art Department Chair, Scarsdale Middle School Kathleen Fox, Teacher, Seely Place Mary Beth Gose, Board of Education, Scarsdale Susan Groner, Resident, Scarsdale Elizabeth Gruber, Scarsdale Parent-Teacher Council Penny Hamlet, Teacher in Charge, Quaker Ridge Marc Heller, Principal, Greenville Gwen Johnson, Teacher, Scarsdale High School John Klemme, Principal, Scarsdale High School Lorella Lamonaca, Teacher, Edgewood Michael McDermott, Principal, Scarsdale Middle School Trudy Moses, President, Scarsdale Teachers Association, Treasurer Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Nancy Rodgers, Teacher, Fox Meadow Lynne Shain, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Scarsdale Paul Solomon, President, Edgemont Teachers Association Vivian Sonnenborn, Teacher, Greenville Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School Sharon Waskow, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel & Administrative Services, Scarsdale Emma Wixted, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Diane Wrobleski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Gerry Young, Principal, Greenacres Fran Garafolo, STI Secretary

Policy Board Standing Committees

ACCREDITATION MINI GRANT John Dean Mary Beth Gose Phyllis DiBianco Ken Holvig Linda Fisher Gwen Johnson Mike McDermott Vivian Sonnenborn Lynne Shain Susan Taylor Vivian Sonnenborn Joan Weber Susan Taylor Gerry Young Joan Weber Past Directors of the STI  Judith Schwartz 1980-2002 Doris Breslow 1979-1980  Ralph Ricci 1975-1979 Werner Feig 1972-1975 Doris Breslow 1969-1972, founder

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STI Fall/Winter '09-'10 Catalog