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SCARSDALE TEACHERS INSTITUTE

SPRING/SUMMER 2010

SERVING THE SCARSDALE AND EDGEMONT COMMUNITIES


STI Spring & Summer Program A LEARNING COMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE

TEACHING STRATEGIES

EQUITY & ACCESS

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

SCHOOL COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT

INTERDEPENDENCE Please visit www.scarsdaleschools.org/sti for the online course calendar 1


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STI Table of Contents

Page 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 12

Principles Responding to Individual Student Needs Incentives for Innovation National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Professional Performance Review Program Teacher as Reader Collaborations with Other Organizations Technology

EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

Title

Beginning

Open To

Credit

HCS & QRS

1

3/2

All

Freeing the Mind: Philosophy and Popular Culture

4/16-17

All

4003

Classrooms Full of Life

5/6

All

1

S4004A

Teacher as Reader: Science – Summer

6/24

SHS

S4004B

Teacher as Reader: Exploring the SocialEmotional Landscape – Summer

6/29

All

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice: Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats

5/14-15

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice: Edward de Bono’s Perception-Broadening Thinking

7/19-20

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE 4000 Explorations in Balanced Literacy

2/3

4001

Women’s Studies: Women in the Arts

4002

4005A

S4005B

2

All

3/12-13

All

1

P. Tomizawa

19

3/19-20

All

1

C. Coffin

20

4/30-5/1

All

1

P. Tomizawa

21

History of Rock and Roll II 1960s-1980s An Author’s Walk Through Historic Brooklyn: Green-Wood Cemetery

5/6

All

1

L. Potter

22

5/14-15

All

1

L. Onofri

23

S4011

A Look into NYC: Morningside Heights

7/26-27

All

1

P. Tomizawa

24

S4012

Facing History and Ourselves Summer Program

8/2-4

5-12

2

M. Ross

25

4010

HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School

*Course has prerequisites for participation; see description for details. #

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE 4006 A Look into NYC: New York at War 4007 Contemporary Galleries and Architecture: Critical Reflections 4008 A Look into NYC: Brooklyn Bridge and the African Burial Ground 4009

Overview

Coordinator

Page

INTERDEPENDENCE 4013 Encore du Français? V

3/4

All*

1

A. Tripodi

26

4014

Multiculturalism Through the Arts: Film

4/8

All

1

P. DiBianco J. Weber

27

4015

Drivers of Change

4/9-10

6-8

1

J. Gilbert M. Lahey

28

4016

Culture in the Curriculum

4/30-5/1

All

1

29

15 B. Jackson M. McDermott

C. Orlandi M. Zeiler

4017

Clay Around the World

5/7-8

All

1

K. Kilcoyne

30

1

N. Pisano

16

4018

6/4-5

All

1

M. Favretti

31

1

M. Grey I. Smith

17

Coffee Communities: Coffee’s Role in Global and Local Gatherings

4019

Dots and Points on the Map: The Congo

4/23-24

All

1

J. Stockton

32

S4020A S4020B S4020C S4020D

Yale Programs in International Educational Resources: Summer Institute 2010

7/6-16

All

3 6 3 6

A. Nee

33

2/10

All

3

S. Whittington

35

3/4

SMS 8

2

J. Gilbert L. Tallevi D. Wixted

37

T. DeBerry M. Stile

13

1

E. Draper

13

1

A. Nee

14

1

R. DiYanni D. Wrobleski

17

4021

All

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1

R. DiYanni C. Renino

18

New Approaches to Teaching East Asian History TEACHING STRATEGIES 4022 Alternative Assessment Projects: Creating New Models for the Middle School

3


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1-8

1

D. Besancon R. Deutsch B. Jackson

38

S4042

38

4023

Using Journal Writing to Enhance Learning in the Mathematics Classroom

4024

Course Cancelled

4025

Differentiation Through Type

3/12-13

All

1

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

39

4026

Stress Management for Teachers

3/5-6

All

1

I. Smith

40

4027

A Closer Look at Singapore Math

TBA

K-8

1

K. de la Garza N. Pavia

41

4028

Expression Poetry Playground: The Craft of Poetry

4/9-10

3-12

1

L. Hicks

41

4029

Using Read Alouds in the K-12 Classroom

4/16-17

All

1

T. DeBerry M. Stile

42

4030

The Art of Quilt Making

4/23-24

All

1

43

4031

Collage and Printmaking

6/11-12

All

1

M. Ball D. Rivellini K. Kilcoyne

4032

Outdoor Education Camp: Best Practices Part IV

4/30-5/1

K-6 Edgemont

1

T. Blank A. Cass

45

S4033

Adventure Learning in the Classroom

8/9-10

All

1

V. Robert J. Turetzky

45

4034

Podcasting Through Central Park

5/21-22

All

1

M. Lahey K. Roemer

46

4035

Kaleidoscopes Across the Curriculum

5/21-22

All

1

T. Durkin J. Stockton

47

4036

Best Practices for Coaches

6/4-5

District teachers who coach

1

M. Menna

48

44

next >>> Interpretive Strategies for Educators: Nature Walks

8/2-5

All

2

R. Clark

53

EQUITY AND ACCESS 4043 Social Thinking

3/2

All

1

J. Turetzky

54

4044

Across the Autism Spectrum

3/5-6

All

1

S. Goodman

55

4045

The ESL Students in the Mainstream Classroom

4/9-10

All

1

J. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea S. Silkowitz

56

4046

Exploring and Integrating Technology for Students with Special Needs

5/6

All

1

K. Curtin C. Kovacs

57

4047

Mean Girls

5/21-22

All

1

J. Turetzky

58

S4048

Teaching Children with ADHD

6/30-7/1

All

1

E. Cohen

59

S4049

Teaching Children with Anxiety Problems

7/21-22

All

1

E. Cohen

59

S4050

Psychiatric Disorders and School Performance

8/4-5

All

1

E. Cohen

60

S4051

Developing Best Educational Practice Through Case Analysis

8/9-12

All

2

E. Cohen

61

S4052

Psychological Assessment Demystified

8/16-17

All

1

E. Cohen

62

All

1

C. Gilliland

63

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT 4053 Touch the River at Beczak 6/4-5 Environmental Education Center 4054A

Challenge Course Workshop I

6/11-12

All

1

B. Foltman R. Keith K. Roemer

64

S4054B

Challenge Course Workshop II

6/28-7/2

All

3

B. Foltman R. Keith K. Roemer

64

S4055

The School of Belonging: A Community of Practice in Action

7/28-30

All

2

M. Grey

65

4037

Transformations: An Arts Convergence

6/11-12

All

1

P. Tomizawa A. Yugovich

49

S4038

Type in the Classroom

6/28-7/1

All

3

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

50

S4039A S4039B S4039C

Lincoln Center Summer Institute

7/5-16

All Returnees All

6 2 3

D. Celentano R. DiYanni J. Weber

50

S4040

Introduction to Mindfulness Education

7/19-22

All

2

I. Smith

51

TECHNOLOGY 4056 Extreme Makeover: School Technology Edition II

3/2

All

1

J. Crisci K. Holvig

66

S4041

Jacob Burns Summer Institute

7/26-30

All

3

P. DiBianco J. Weber

52

4057

Web Tools for Librarians

3/4

Librarians

1

P. DiBianco

67

4058

Take It to the Limit: iMovie for Experts

3/19-20

All*

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

68

4059

Five Trends for the Future

3/12-13

All

1

J. Crisci

4

68

5


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4060A

Using SMART Board in the Classroom: PC Beginner

3/19-20

PC Users

1

D. Vermes

69

4060B

Using SMART Board in the Classroom with a Mac

4/16-17

Mac Users

1

C. Sipe D. Vermes

70

S4060C

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom: PC Advanced

8/30-31

PC/SB users*

1

D. Vermes

71

4061

Using JAVA Applets in the Science Classroom

4/9-10

HS Science

1

B. Bierbauer 72 P. Jablonowski

4062

iWork in the Classroom

4/23-24

All

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

73

4063

Keeping Current with Technology III

5/4

Mac Users

1

L. Fisher

73

4064

5/7-8

Keynote Users

1

S. Scharf P. Tomizawa

74

4065

Keynote for the Intermediate and Advanced User Digital Storybooks to Go

5/7-8

All

1

K. Holvig A. Verboys

75

4066

Soundtrack

5/14-15

All

1

L. Forte P. Tomizawa

76

S4067

Google Sketchup: Creating 3D Models for the Classroom

8/2-3

All

1

P. McKenna

76

4068

Mapping the World with GeoTechnology

6/4-5

All

1

J. Crisci D. Rose

77

S4069

Beyond Google 2.0: Wikis, Social Networking, and New Research Tools

6/28-30

All

2

P. DiBianco

78

S4070

Stop the Presses! Virtual Newsrooms in the Classroom

7/19-22

All

3

P. Tomizawa W. Yang

79

S4071

Video Production Boot Camp

7/26-29

All

3

G. Leong

80

S4072

Summer Data Literacy Workshop

8/9-12

All

2

D. Rose

81

S4073

iWeek: Harnessing the Power of iLife

8/16-19

All

3

J. Crisci K. Holvig A. Verboys

82

All

NC

H. Kaplan

82

All

NC

M. Nowak

83

SPECIAL PROGRAMS – NON CREDIT Knitting 4074 4/6 4075A 4075B

6

Conversational English for Adult Learners

4/6 4/8

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4076

Gentle Yoga

4/8

All

NC

J. Weber

83

4077A

CPR and AED for Adults and Children

4/17

All

Stipend

J. Hoffman

84

4077B

First Aid for Nurses

TBA

Nurses

Stipend

J. Hoffman

85

Summer Programs REFLECTIVE PRACTICE S4004A Teacher as Reader: Science – Summer

6/24

SHS

1

N. Pisano

16

S4004B

Teacher as Reader: Exploring the SocialEmotional Landscape – Summer

6/29

All

1

M. Grey I. Smith

17

S4005B

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice: Edward de Bono’s Perception Broadening Thinking

7/19-20

All

1

R. DiYanni C. Renino

18

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE S4011 A Look into NYC: Morningside Heights

7/26-27

All

1

P. Tomizawa

24

S4012

8/2-4

5-12

2

M. Ross

25

7/6-16

All

3 6 3 6

A. Nee

33

TEACHING STRATEGIES S4033 Adventure Learning in the Classroom

8/9-10

All

1

V. Robert J. Turetzky

45

S4038

Type in the Classroom

6/28-7/1

All

3

L. Tallevi M. Tallevi

50

S4039A S4039B S4039C

Lincoln Center Summer Institute

6/30-7/16

All Returnees All

6 2 3

D. Celentano R. DiYanni J. Weber

50

S4040

Introduction to Mindfulness Education

7/19-22

All

2

I. Smith

51

S4041

Jacob Burns Summer Institute

7/26-30

All

3

P. DiBianco J. Weber

52

S4042

Interpretive Strategies for Educators: Nature Walks

8/2-5

All

2

R. Clark

53

Facing History and Ourselves Summer Program INTERDEPENDENCE S4020A Yale Programs in S4020B International Educational S4020C Resources: Summer S4020D Institute 2010

7


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EQUITY AND ACCESS S4048 Teaching Children with ADHD

6/30-7/1

All

1

E. Cohen

59

S4049

Teaching Children with Anxiety Problems

7/21-22

All

1

E. Cohen

59

S4050

Psychiatric Disorders and School Performance

8/4-5

All

1

E. Cohen

60

S4051

Developing Best Educational Practice Through Case Analysis

8/9-12

All

2

E. Cohen

61

S4052

Psychological Assessment Demystified

8/16-17

All

1

E. Cohen

62

All

3

64

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT S4054B

Challenge Course Workshop II

The School of Belonging: A Community of Practice in Action TECHNOLOGY S4060C Using a SMART Board in the Classroom: PC Advanced Google Sketchup: S4067 Creating 3D Models for the Classroom

7/28-30

All

2

B. Foltman R. Keith K. Roemer M. Grey

8/30-31

PC/SB users*

1

D. Vermes

71

8/2-3

All

1

P. McKenna

76

S4069

Beyond Google 2.0: Wikis, Social Networking, and New Research Tools Stop the Presses! Virtual Newsrooms in the Classroom

6/28-30

All

2

P. DiBianco

78

7/19-22

All

3

P. Tomizawa W. Yang

79

S4071

Video Production Boot Camp

7/26-29

All

3

G. Leong

80

S4072

Summer Data Literacy Workshop

8/9-12

All

2

D. Rose

81

S4073

iWeek: Harnessing the Power of iLife

8/16-19

All

3

J. Crisci K. Holvig A. Verboys

82

S4055

S4070

6/28-7/2

Course Coordinators and Speakers Registration and Credit Information Emergency Closing Information Registration Form/Fee Schedule Organization

8

65

86 89 89 90 91

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Principles The purpose of the Scarsdale Teachers Institute is to offer planned and continuous education to the professional staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont Schools, teachers in other school districts, and community residents. Scarsdale teachers began this program because they believe that the best teachers are alert, open-minded people who continue to learn and to translate their insights into appropriate experiences for their students. Offering a variety of professional experiences in response to the needs of those working with children, the Institute contributes to an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry that stimulates the staff to continue learning. This professional interaction on educational issues benefits the students and the staff of the Scarsdale and Edgemont School Districts. Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers also endorse the principle that cooperation among autonomous groups is fundamental to growth and is essential to progress in education. They view the Institute as a laboratory for this principle. Here various groups of teachers, administrators, and community leaders may work together for a valued purpose. Supported and sponsored by the Scarsdale Teachers Association, the Edgemont Teachers Association, and the Scarsdale and Edgemont Boards of Education, the Institute reaffirms the principles of professional autonomy and professional collaboration inherent in the highest quality of professional development. Thus, through STI organization, administration, and planning, teachers assume a large degree of responsibility for their professional growth. The Scarsdale Teachers Institute also serves as one of the established Teacher Resource and Computer Training Centers of New York State, funded, in part, by a competitive grant from the New York State Department of Education and governed by a Policy Board of teachers, administrators, community residents, and parents. As one of the founding members of the Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network, the Scarsdale Teachers Institute collaborates and cooperates with other teacher centers to provide professional growth opportunities for the entire educational community.

Responding to Individual Student Needs Curriculum and pedagogy must respond to individual learning differences among students. This fundamental principle of teaching and learning, stated in the Scarsdale district goals, also informs teacher practice in the classroom and in STI programs. Courses that specifically address differentiated techniques and strategies of instruction can be found in the Equity and Access section of the catalogue. Courses in all areas are designed to address the varied ways children learn.

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Incentives for Innovation

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Collaborations with Other Organizations

The Scarsdale Teachers Institute Incentives for Innovation Program enables teachers and other educators to design, implement, and assess creative projects aimed at improving learning and teaching. Teachers may collaborate with colleagues, implement a Professional Performance Review Project, design assessment, technology, cooperative learning, or other creative projects. Teachers have the opportunity to develop new teaching strategies, to engage in particular research related to teaching, or to work with other teachers on topics of specific educational interest.

The Scarsdale Teachers Institute enhances its program through selected collaborations with other educational institutions. These relationships provide Scarsdale and Edgemont faculty with resources that enrich opportunities for professional growth.

Requests for proposals are sent to the Scarsdale and Edgemont faculties once each year.

Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts The STI, the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center, and the Teacher Center at Purchase College have collaborated with the Performing Arts Center at Purchase College to offer teachers the opportunity to work with guest artists from the Kennedy Center’s Education Program.

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Teachers who are interested in applying for NBPTS certification may receive scholarships to fund the cost of the application and mentoring to support the process. The STI offers a support seminar for teachers engaged in seeking National Board certification. Additional resources from the National Board will be available. For further information about this seminar call the STI office.

Professional Performance Review Program The expanded Professional Performance Review Program offers opportunities for teachers to design programs for professional growth that reflect their particular interests and goals. STI courses are designed to support the Professional Performance Review Program by furthering inquiry based learning, alternative assessment, standards for evaluation, and student centered classrooms. Almost any STI course may be used as part of the Professional Performance Review.

Teacher as Reader “We need to make reading, which is in its essence a solitary endeavor, a social one as well, to encourage that great thrill of finding kinship in shared experiences of books. We must weave reading back into the very fabric of the culture, and make it a mainstay of community.” Andrew Solomon, “The Closing of the American Book,” NYT, July 10, 2004. The importance of reading literature for adults has gained nationwide attention with the publication of recent studies indicating that pleasure reading among Americans in every group is down. The STI Teacher as Reader courses counter this trend. Participants meet throughout the year to read classic and new literature. In addition to genre, participants examine themes, character development, and all other aspects of literary form. Adults who love reading communicate this enthusiasm to the children in their care. Because of the popularity of this course, the STI offers a number of sections determined by enrollment or interest at individual schools.

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Lower Hudson Teacher Center Network The 21 teacher centers in the Lower Hudson region meet regularly to share resources and develop programs for local educators. Call the STI office for further information.

Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center The STI continues the affiliation with the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center that brings distinguished scholars to the community. Facing History and Ourselves The programs of Facing History have a continuing impact on the Scarsdale schools. Teachers participate in summer institutes as well as yearlong programs. New York Technology Education Network The New York Technology Education Network (NYTEN) provides a forum for technology coordinators to share information and concerns related to the implementation of technology in schools. It is a vehicle for suggestions, support, and strength in the pursuit of excellence in K-12 technology. This network is co-sponsored by the Edith Winthrop Teacher Center of Westchester and the Scarsdale Teachers Institute. New York Institute of Technology Educational Enterprise Zone The Educational Enterprise Zone (EEZ) is a K-12 videoconferencing consortium of providers and receivers that meets regularly at various sites throughout New York City. EEZ offers support to members in designing and implementing videoconferencing units of study. NYSERVS NYSERVS (New York Sharing Educational Resources Through Videoconferencing) is a consortium of seventeen Westchester and Rockland school districts that meets regularly to share videoconferencing resources, equipment, expertise, and instructional practice among school districts, colleges, and other educational support systems. Windward School Windward School provides an instructional program for childen with language-based learning disabilities. Windward Teacher Training Institute (WTTI) offers professional development based on scientifically validated research in child development, learning theory, and pedagogy. Courses, workshops, and lectures address a broad range of developmental and curricular topics appropriate for both mainstream and remedial settings. WTTI serves

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as a resource for educators and professionals in allied disciplines such as speech and language therapists and psychologists, as well as for parents.

REFLECTIVE PRACTICE Explorations in Balanced Literacy #4000

WTTI summer workshops may be considered for STI credit. One credit is offered for every 12 hours of workshops. WTTI’s summer course offerings are available at the Windward Teacher Training Institute link on Windward School’s website: www.windwardny.org. Partial tuition reduction for Edgemont and Scarsdale staff is available. Call the STI for additional information.

The Scarsdale School District has identified Balanced Literacy as an approach to reading and writing instruction that supports the value of classroom best practices developed by teachers. Teachers and administrators have completed a guide to Balanced Literacy—a curriculum philosophy and framework that promotes the instruction of students individually and in small groups. This approach allows for differentiation within the classroom in an authentic and purposeful manner. Research supports this methodology as effective in the assessment, instruction, and advancement of reading skills for all students.

Technology The Scarsdale Teachers Institute offers a full range of beginning to advanced courses for staff and community members. Courses are designed collaboratively by teachers and administrators to meet the district goal of integrating technology into the school curriculum.

This course continues the work begun last term to support teachers as they deepen their knowledge of Balanced Literacy, implement methods, and reflect upon the components outlined in the Scarsdale Balanced Literacy Guide. Participants will engage in study and conversations related to best practices in the Balanced Literacy classroom. The course features modeling and practice of successful learning activities followed by reflection and sharing with colleagues. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned material; attend the Saturday Reunion Day at Teachers College; develop, and share with colleagues, at least two grade-specific lesson plans based on the course content. Course Coordinators: Trent DeBerry, Maria Stile Course Speakers: .Lucy Calkins, Kathleen Tolan, and Sarah Picard Taylor, Teachers College, Columbia University Open to: HCS/QRS Time: W 2/3, 2/24, F 3/12, 3:30-5:30; Sa 3/20, 9-3 Location: HCS staff lounge; Teachers College Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Women’s Studies: Women in the Arts #4001

EHS - Edgemont Junior/Senior High School EWS - Edgewood School FMS - Fox Meadow School GRA - Greenacres School GRV - Greenville School

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HCS - Heathcote School QRS - Quaker Ridge School SHS - Scarsdale High School SMS - Scarsdale Middle School SPS - Seely Place School

Viewing women’s lives through the arts expands student interest and awareness of the struggles and triumphs of women around the world and throughout history. Women as artists, the influence of women on the lives of artists, and the portrayal of women in the arts, is a fascinating and instructive study of gender roles, stereotypes, and prejudice seen through the lens of distinct historical periods. Biography as history is a highly effective strategy to 13


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motivate interest and to develop in students empathy for others. Through literature, art and film, the class will explore the lives of women as artists and as inspiration to the arts. An exploration of women as patrons of the arts, as well as their portrayals in art, music, literature, and film will provide a fascinating dimension to the study of women’s issues through the ages. Works to be read are: Composing a Life by Catherine Bateson, the letters of Madame de Sevigne, and The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery and Alison Anderson. Two museum trips to New York City will focus on art of and by women. Clips from films featuring women as main characters will be viewed including: Iphigenia, Rachel Getting Married, The Hours, Vera Drake. In examining the lives of others, participants will be challenged to see their own lives as works of art. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a classroom application of the course content. Course Coordinator: Elisa Draper Open to: All Time: T 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 3:30-5:30 Location: QRS, rm 207 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Freeing the Mind: Philosophy and Popular Culture #4002 The Scarsdale Education for the Future outlines four general goals for students: “an ability to think and express oneself well; an understanding of the human experience and the natural universe; knowledge of oneself and others; and a disposition to make a positive difference.” The discipline of philosophy is at the heart of each of these goals. Sadly, the study of philosophy is often dismissed as too complex, erudite, and boring. Yet philosophical principles are everywhere, and students and teachers think about them more than they know. Popular culture can illustrate age-old philosophical questions and show teachers and their students new ways of observation, questioning, and argument and broaden the audience for philosophical discourse. Is knowledge possible? Does it come from reason or from experience? What is the ultimate substance of the world? Is it material or ideal? Are human actions free or determined? Does God exist? Why is there evil? Are moral 14

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norms relative or absolute? This course will examine how philosophers grapple with these issues and how their questions permeate popular culture. Participants will use film and television as stimuli for philosophical inquiry in the classroom as they apply the critical and creative thinking that has engaged philosophers over the centuries. Teachers will probe areas of philosophical thinking such as metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. Short readings include works by philosophers including Plato, Descartes, Kant, Nietsze, Lao-Tze, Confucius, and Baudrillard. Participants will relate philosophical themes and some religious viewpoints to clips and sound bites from popular films such as The Matrix, Twilight, Harry Potter, and the Chronicles of Narnia and from television shows such as Lost, Seinfeld, and The Simpsons. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; maintain a journal throughout the course to document reactions to questions; complete a lesson plan or description of how philosophy can be applied in the classroom. Course Coordinator: Ann Marie Nee Open to: All Time: F 4/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/17, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Classrooms Full of Life #4003 Research shows that empathy is the core dynamic for creating an emotionally safe school environment that enables students to focus academically and develop their full human potential. In the award-winning documentary Children Full of Life, fourth grade students in Japan learn lessons about compassion from their teacher who instructs them to write their true inner feelings in letters and share them with the class.  Classrooms full of life and empathy build a sense of community conducive to emotional and social development in children of all ages. In this course, teachers will view and discuss the four part documentary series Children Full of Life. Through journal writing, participants will reflect on the video and its possible application to their own classrooms. They will be encouraged at each session to share their journal entries with the group. These discussions, as well as readings from David Levine’s Teaching Empathy: 15


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A Blueprint for Caring, Compassion, and Community, will serve as a catalyst to think about ways to develop “schools and classrooms of belonging” that are emotionally safe havens for each child’s learning and personal development. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a schoolwide or classroom adaptation of the concept of empathy. Course Coordinators: Bill Jackson, Michael McDermott Open to: All Time: Th 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/17, 3:30-5:30, with two hours of independent work Location: SMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Teacher as Reader — Science #S4004A The journey of a life long reader is a search to gain insight and understanding by reading, talking, and reflecting. By transforming reading into a community event through discussion groups, teachers learn differing perspectives on the same work and gain knowledge of literature, genre, and technique. The commitment to read widely and deeply is an important endeavor for teachers as they model the love of reading and the skills of reading and understanding for their students.  This course is geared toward secondary science teachers, but it is open to all. Participants will meet to discuss readings on science-based themes, and applications to the science classroom will be explored. An article or other short reading will be distributed before the first meeting. Additional readings will be selected from group suggestions. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; keep a journal of readings and reflections. Course Coordinator: Nicole Pisano Open to: SHS Time: Th 6/24, 5-8, with remaining dates to be determined by group. Location: SHS, rm 381 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Teacher as Reader: Exploring the Social-Emotional Landscape­—Summer #S4004B The journey of a life long reader is a search to gain insight and understanding by reading, talking, and reflecting. The commitment to read widely and deeply is an important endeavor for teachers as they model the love and practice of reading for their students. The shared reading experience becomes the foundation of a community where new insights, perspectives, and skills are nurtured. Participants will meet throughout the summer to read and reflect on books that explore the social-emotional landscape of the lives of children and adolescents. Crossing genres, participants will delve into books that capture the essence of the developmental stages and pressures of school-aged children. Each participant will keep a reader’s journal. Participants should read Reviving Ophelia by Mary Pipher for the first class. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; keep a reflective notebook on the literature. Course Coordinators: Monica Grey, Ilene Smith Open to: All Time: Tu 6/29, 3:30-6:30, with remaining dates to be set by group. Location: EHS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice: Edward de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats #4005A Critical thinking is highly valued in schools and beyond—and for good reason. Students need to develop the kinds of thoughtful outlook and questioning attitude that critical thinking promotes. However, students also need to think creatively: to develop the imaginative capacities, the wondering instincts, and hypothetical intelligence that innovative thinking encourages. In order to promote critical and creative thinking in their students, teachers need to explore and to understand their own thinking capacities. Through workshop exercises and discussion based on materials that span the curriculum, participants will discover practical ways to develop the critical and creative potential in themselves and in their students. 17


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There is no doubt that teachers and students benefit from strategies to improve thinking. One proven method is the parallel thinking approach developed by Dr. Edward de Bono, best known as “the six thinking hats,” a method that provides a viable alternative to the binary, adversarial kind of “I’m Right, You’re Wrong!” thinking so prevalent in everyday lives. Parallel thinking is a cognitive tool that can be used by students and teachers, parents, and school administrators. De Bono’s Thinking Hats approach is used in hundreds of corporations worldwide and is now being piloted in schools in the US, China, India, Singapore, and South Africa. The Thinking Hats is an established method to improve thinking and to make thinking more comprehensive, more efficient, more effective, and a lot more fun.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings and assignments; develop a curriculum application of the course content. Course Coordinators: Robert DiYanni, Diane Wrobleski Open to: All Time: F 5/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/15 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Critical and Creative Thinking in Practice: Edward de Bono’s Perception-Broadening Thinking #S4005B Critical thinking is highly valued in schools and beyond—and for good reason. Students need to develop the kinds of thoughtful outlook and questioning attitude that critical thinking promotes. However, students also need to think creatively: to develop the imaginative capacities, the wondering instincts, and hypothetical intelligence that innovative thinking encourages. In order to promote critical and creative thinking in their students, teachers need to explore and to understand their own thinking capacities. Through workshop exercises and discussion based on materials that span the curriculum, participants will discover practical ways to develop the critical and creative potential in themselves and in their students. An individual’s view on the world, one’s perception of it, determines a person’s decision-making and influences personal actions and responses. Perception, in short, is one of the critical keys to thinking and is certainly one of its most important aspects. Broadening perception is, thus, a necessary and crucial way to develop critical and creative thinking capacities. Edward 18

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de Bono’s tools for increasing powers of perception offer “software” for the brain. These tools are used in schools with children as young as four years old and on through high school. They are also used in businesses worldwide. De Bono’s tools are designed to sharpen perception and focus thinking to make it more comprehensive, effective, and efficient. The tools are easy to learn and apply. They can effect an immediate difference in judgments and decision-making, in considering the consequences of an action, and they can strengthen critical and creative thinking capacities. In this course, participants will explore a few of de Bono’s ten perception broadening thinking tools: PMI (plus, minus, interesting); and either C & S (consequences and sequels), OPV (other people’s views). Sessions will be interactive, engaging, and guaranteed to supercharge thinking. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings and assignments; develop a curriculum application of the course content. Course Coordinators: Robert DiYanni, Chris Renino

Open to: All

Time: 7/19-20, 9-3:30 Location: SHS, rm 172

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE A Look into New York City: NY at War #4006

“Fortress America,” the idea of the United States secured by two oceans, invulnerable to foreign invasion, was finally laid to rest on Sept. 11, 2001, with the attack on the World Trade Center. New York City was changed on 9/11 by the tragic loss of life and the resulting concerns over border security, racial profiling, and destruction of the Trade Center area that galvanized the politics and economics of the region and the nation. That memorable day, so recent in memory, is but the latest upheaval visited on New York City by war. Occupied by Britain during the Revolution and rocked by violence and draft riots during the Civil War, warfare has shaped the city’s history. New York City at war is a fascinating topic to explore, one that will engage students in stories of tragedy and resilience, military and defensive strategies, and, in the end, of a city that has endured and thrived in the face of adversities. Friday’s session will present an overview of New York City’s history through 19


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the chronology of the wars that have impacted the city politically, culturally, economically: the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, Korea, Viet Nam, and the war on terror. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s session, led by Art and Susan Zuckerman, will take participants to neighborhoods that recall key moments and people that helped define these conflicts. Teachers in all grades and in all disciplines will be able to gain an understanding of both the direct and indirect effects of war on the city and its residents. Course content complies with New York Standards, and lessons can be created from the tour and related material to enrich curriculum across grade levels. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; create a multimedia project based on course content or develop lessons for use in the classroom. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show, and contributors to the Travel Channel Open to: All Time: F 3/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/13, 9-5 Location: EWS library, NYC Fees: $20 museum fee Credit: One point salary credit or stipend. Course limited to 18 participants.

Contemporary Galleries and Architecture: Critical Reflections #4007 Rich opportunities to develop higher order thinking skills span the curriculum. Educators can use art forms to teach the subjective and objective analytical skills that enable students to appreciate and evaluate individual works of art and architecture. The challenge of encountering and trying to make sense of modern works of art can be daunting, especially for those without an art historical frame of reference, but simple assessment strategies can be learned that transform the experience from one of intimidation to one of appreciation.  Critical and creative thinking strategies used in this class to look at and analyze works of art can easily be transferred to other subject areas. This course will teach educators to draw on art and architecture as a means 20

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to help students develop objective analytical skills and become better critical thinkers. Instruction begins with a slide lecture and conversation focusing on the landscape of contemporary art. Discussion will evoke individual feelings toward or against modern and contemporary art and will guide participants to view and analyze these works objectively. The goal of encountering works of art in this way is to formulate objective assessments and well-informed subjective opinions. The course will conclude with a walking tour of several galleries and architectural projects within the Chelsea gallery district in New York City. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; complete a project based on a classroom application of course content provided by the instructor. Course Coordinator: Chris Coffin Open to: All Time: F 3/19, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/20, 9-5 Location: EHS photography lab; Chelsea gallery district, NYC Fees: TBA Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

A Look into New York City: Brooklyn Bridge and the African Burial Ground #4008 New York City is a teaching resource very close to Scarsdale with unending possibilities for student field trip and fieldwork experiences. When students visit the sites and scenes of the events that have shaped the region, they deepen their understanding of and their interest in history. Two important New York City landmarks, among others, feature prominently in this course to expand and enliven classroom studies. The story of the Brooklyn Bridge is a fascinating account of engineering, personal leadership and courage, and urban development and expansion. After its accidental discovery during an excavation, the African Burial Ground has become the single-most important historic urban archaeological project in the United States. Teachers who have the time and occasion to learn details of these sites will be able to provide an enriched experience in history to their students. Course content complies with New York State Standards, and lessons can be created from the tour and related material to include in curriculum across the grade levels. Teachers at all levels and in all disciplines can benefit from this course. 21


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Friday’s armchair session previews the human stories, engineering feats, cultural icons, and historical significance of the sites to be visited. Participants will examine primary source documents from the period including photos, diaries, and newspapers, all suitable for classroom instruction. Saturday’s session features on-site visits to the Brooklyn Bridge, South Street Seaport, the African Burial Ground, and City Hall. Art and Susan Zuckerman will narrate a walk over the Brooklyn Bridge with the absorbing story of its construction and reference to the actual structures. Other stops will feature the “cathedral of commerce,” built from nickels and dimes; the first station in the New York City subway system; St. Paul’s church where George Washington worshipped; South Street Seaport museums; the African Burial Ground in Lower Manhattan representing the important role and major contribution that enslaved African men, women, and children made to the economy, development, and culture of the city. Teachers will gain knowledge and teaching resources of an area that can be easily integrated into curriculum. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read all assigned materials; create a multimedia project based on course content or develop lessons for use in the classroom. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show, and contributors to the Travel Channel Open to: All Time: F 4/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/1, 9-5 Location: EWS library; NYC Fees: $20 museum fee Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 18 participants.

The History of Rock and Roll II 1960s-1980s #4009 Rock and roll, the sound track of the turbulent ‘60s, has wide appeal among today’s youth. The popularity of rock and roll, and the times that fostered it, offers rich opportunities for curriculum connections across the grades and subject areas. The integration of the music of this era into the academic program expands the common ground of teachers and students, as they become learners together seeking historical perspective on 1960s and its influence on the sounds and rhythms of today. 22

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The course traces the evolution of rock and roll’s first 30 years through immersion in the styles, peoples, and ideas that defined the genre. Special attention will be paid to individual performers and groups who were most influential in the rock and roll movement. As participants listen to the sounds of the era and watch video clips of the performers, they will consider rock and roll’s vital and dynamic relationship with American history and culture. Teachers will explore the historical, economic, political, and societal events that impacted the music of the era and will craft curriculum connections to the history of rock and roll. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; submit a paper about a group or individual, post 1985, whose work illustrates the influence of musical styles described in the course and suggest curriculum connections to the work or artist. Course Coordinator: Lynn Potter Course Speaker: Joseph Faltin, Teacher, Hackley School Open to: All Time: Th 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 6/17, 6/24, 3:30-5:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

An Author’s Walk Through Historic Brooklyn: Green-Wood Cemetery #4010 Cemeteries, especially very old ones, can provide a wealth of information about the past. The Green-Wood Cemetery, founded in 1838, was one of the first garden cemeteries in the country and soon became the second most popular tourist attraction in the United States after Niagara Falls. The US Department of the Interior designated it a National Historic Landmark in 2006. The history of Brooklyn, as well as significant events in NYC, New York State, and American history, can be traced in its elegant monuments and the names of noted people who are interred there. Teachers will enrich their knowledge of history and of the range of information that a cemetery can provide casual visitors as well as historians. Adrienne Onofri, journalist, tour guide, and author of Walking Brooklyn (Wilderness Press, 2007), will lead the course. Friday’s session features a presentation of Green-Wood’s attractions and its design as one of the first rural cemeteries in the country, a trend that transformed burial grounds into 23


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recreational areas of sculpture, stained glass windows, and rolling landscaped settings. On Saturday, a walking tour of the 480-acre site will include Green-Wood’s historic, artistic, and environmental treasures, its gates and ponds, hills and greenery, beautiful statuary, architectural landmarks, and monuments related to the Civil War, the American Revolution, the creation of the Erie Canal, and local Brooklyn history. Throughout the narrative, curriculum applications of the site will be emphasized for all grade levels. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a classroom lesson or project based on course content. Course Coordinator: Lisa Onofri Course Speaker: Adrienne Onofri, tour guide and author of Walking Brooklyn Open to: All Time: F 5/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/15, 8:30-4:30

Morningside Heights, often referred to as the “Acropolis of New York” for the many cultural, educational, and religious institutions that have grown there as testimony to the intellectual drive and values of the city’s people. Nearby Central Park, designed by the famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and the architect Calvert Vaux, looks natural but is almost entirely landscaped. At the less well know northern section of the Park, visitors will find rustic woods, rock formations, streams and ponds, formal gardens, historic military ruins, and remarkable natural bridges. Course content, which is aligned with the New York State Standards, is appropriate for all teaching levels and subject areas. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; create a multi-media project based on course content or develop lessons for use in the classroom. Course Coordinator: Paul Tomizawa

Location: HCS library; Brooklyn

Course Speakers: Art and Susan Zuckerman, hosts of a WVOX show, and contributors to the Travel Channel

Fee: Up to $10 for admission, plus lunch

Open to: All

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Time: 7/26, 9-1, 7/27, 9-5

Course limited to 15 participants.

Location: SHS, rm 170; NYC

A Look into New York City: Morningside Heights/Northern Central Park #S4011 A Look into New York City is a series of STI courses that provides teachers with rich field experiences readily transferrable to classroom practice and student site visits. New York City’s unique neighborhoods are treasure troves of historical, cultural, and architectural information waiting to motivate student interest and learning. The area comprising Morningside Heights and northern Central Park is the focus of this course. Once a shantytown of bone boiling factories where wild pigs roamed free, this area is now a living showpiece of elegant landscape architecture, a transformation illustrative of urban development and change. Teachers can expand their classrooms and enliven textbook learning with knowledge of place resources near to Scarsdale. The course begins in Scarsdale on Friday afternoon with an armchair session previewing the human stories, engineering feats, cultural icons, and history of the places to be visited. Teachers as learners will examine primary source documents, designed for student use in the classroom, including photos, diaries, and newspapers of the period. On Saturday, participants will explore 24

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Fees: $20 museum fee Credit: One point salary credit or stipend. Course limited to 18 participants.

Facing History and Ourselves Summer Program #S4012 Facing History and Ourselves is devoted to teaching the dangers of indifference and the values of civility by helping students confront the complexities of history in ways that promote critical and creative thinking about the challenges we face and the opportunities we have for positive change. –Facing History and Ourselves, Resource Book Social studies and language arts teachers, and all those whose curriculum responds to the impact of current events, can look to the Facing History staff development program for guidance in framing essential questions, modeling pedagogy, and providing significant resources for classroom use. This summer’s FHAO institute will focus on the topic of eugenics and its impact on immigration policy, on the development of racism, and on the justification of ethnic cleansing. 25


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Participants will engage in an examination of the eugenics movement at the turn of the twentieth century as a force in shaping attitudes towards immigrants, minority groups, and persons with limited mental and physical capabilities. Facing history resources and strategies will be used to understand the eugenics movement in historical, economic, and political context. Tracy Garrison-Feinberg, senior program associate in the New York FHAO office, will lead the sessions. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; write a reflective paper or curriculum application based on course content. Course Coordinator: Marge Ross Course Speaker: Tracey Garrison-Feingold, Senior Program Associate, Facing History and Ourselves Open to: 5-12 Time: 8/2-4, 8-4:30 Location: SMS staff lounge Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

INTERDEPENDENCE Encore du Français? V #4013 Scarsdale and Edgemont teachers come into contact with students from all over the world, and both districts place importance on multicultural understandings. Language is an essential element of culture, and the benefits of comprehending the language of another’s culture are immeasurable. The learning of a language in addition to one’s own engenders mutual respect in a diverse society. When teachers are able to demonstrate to their students an attempt to speak in another language, they model a behavior that can translate to improved relationships among people of various cultures. Equally important is the opportunity for teachers to gain insight into the experience of limited proficiency in a language spoken all around them. This course expands the basic knowledge and experience of previous courses, as participants review and deepen their awareness of French language and culture. The aim of the course is to develop a broader ability to communicate in and to understand spoken French. While the primary focus of the course will be aural/oral, reading and written work will be expand grammar study and specific vocabulary units. Culture will continue to be discussed and presented through literature, music, and cuisine. Participants 26

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will be encouraged to consider the experience of limited language proficiency, especially as it applies to students in their classes, as well as the benefits of communicating in a foreign language. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned reading excerpts from Paris to the Moon by Alan Gupta and the Peter Mayle series describing life in Provence; compile a portfolio of work accomplished during the course and write a reaction paper on the topics introduced in the readings. Course Coordinator: Andrea Tripodi Course Speaker: Sarah Whittington, Foreign Language Chair, SMS Open to: Participants of Encore du Français IV or those with a knowledge of French. Time: Th 3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 3:30-5:30 Location: SMS, rm T109 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Multiculturalism Through the Arts: Chinese Culture Through Cinema #4014 To implement the goal of educating for diversity, the Scarsdale Interdependence Institute has been charged with supporting programs for teachers and students that explore cultures other than one’s own, providing a global perspective on current events, and preparing students for the interdependent world in which they will live and work. With the purpose of widening the international focus of the school community, the Interdependence Institute and the STI jointly are sponsoring a program of multiculturalism through the arts in film. This global film series offers outstanding films that explore Chinese culture through the lens of recent movies from the mainland. What happens when an ancient tradition meets a fresh art form? More than two thousand years of history, painting, architecture, opera, and religious thought are reflected in the extraordinary imagery of Chinese films. Poised between their rich cultural heritage and visions of a new China, today’s filmmakers are making use of new technologies to connect their future with their past. Participants will view the films, take part in discussions led by Professor Bill Costanzo, moderator of the Westchester Community College regular Friday Night Film Series, and explore ways to apply the concepts and understandings of the course to all curriculum areas. 27


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Apr 8 China on Foot and on Film With the aid of photographs from Professor Costanzo’s travels, participants will take a tour of China from Beijing and Xi’An to Shanghai and Guilin and then turn to exemplary moments in Chinese films to watch how cultural ideas are expressed through the language of motion pictures. Apr 15 Farewell My Concubine – China, 1993 Both intimate and epic in scale, Chen Kaige’s masterpiece presents a fiftyyear sweep of Chinese history through the lives of two friends who perform opposing roles in the Peking Opera. Apr 22 Raise the Red Lantern – China, 1991 Set in 1920s China, Zhang Yimou’s period melodrama explores the lives of four women married to a powerful landowner. May 6 Shower – China, 1999 Director Zhang Yang presents a warm-hearted comedy about contemporary China. Zhu Xu runs a bathhouse in Beijing with his exuberant, mentally retarded son. Though aging and in physical disrepair like its owner, the place is a vital community center in danger of succumbing to China’s new materialistic economy. Requirements: Attend all performances; read assigned materials; create classroom applications through a unit of study based on the films and discussion that will extend the global studies curriculum.

environment, and urbanization are just three of the conditions that affect global events included in the Drivers of Change curriculum. The Drivers pedagogy calls for the application of critical and creative thinking skills to global issues as it challenges students to analyze problems with no clear solutions, to synthesize research findings into creative solutions, and to identify trends from data. The program is designed to enhance existing curriculum. Drivers of Change comprises 175 focus cards, each card addressing a separate global problem requiring analysis and innovative solutions. During the first session of this course, participants will learn about the history, design, and classroom applications of the program. One of the developers of the program, Craig Covil, will present the rationale behind the focus cards and introduce various related learning activities applicable to a middle school classroom. In the second session, teams of teachers will work collaboratively to explore curriculum connections and develop lessons or projects based on the cards.  Participants will post ideas and responses on the course on Wikispace.  The Drivers of Change program will also be evaluated through the lens of Human Rights and Sustainability at the Middle School; possible curricular extensions to these units will be explored. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a curriculum plan based on Drivers of Change. Course Coordinators: Jennifer Gilbert, Meghan Lahey Course Speaker: Craig Covil, Drivers of Change consultant

Course Coordinators: Phyllis DiBianco, Joan Weber

Open to: 6-8

Course Speaker: Bill Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College

Time: F 4/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/10, 8:30-4:30

Open to: All

Location: SMS, rm F77

Time: Th 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 5/6, 3:30-6:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: SHS, rm 170

Culture in the Curriculum Through Dance and Rhythm #4016

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Drivers of Change #4015 As global citizens of the 21st century, the students at Scarsdale Middle School must be guided to see themselves as part of an interdependent society with influence on both local and world events. Drivers of Change is an innovative curriculum program focusing on specific international issues that cause social, political, and economic unrest and impact the future. Poverty, the 28

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Rhythm is a basic element in all aspects of life from the beat of the human heart to the cadence of a dancer’s movement. Rhythm and dance activities can be successfully integrated into curriculum in all areas to enrich the teaching of skills and content, to develop comfort with movement, to enhance self-esteem, and to promote social interaction. Dance provides a matchless outlet for student expression and a way to understand certain social aspects of culture. Dance mirrors the aesthetic and technical principles that govern the construction and meaning of a culture’s kinetic vocabulary. When dance is an 29


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integral part of their studies, students gain a unique perspective on culture.

to curriculum especially related to Greece, Native America, Asia, and Egypt.

The course will begin with a survey of cultural dances from the Americas, Africa, Europe, and Asia and examine differences and similarities in dance style, music, and costumes. The development of American dance from the early 1900s to present day will be included in this overview. On the second day, guest performers will demonstrate a variety of dances and guide participants in observing and practicing dances from different countries. Class members will discuss the integration of dance into curriculum: how dance can be incorporated to enhance students’ knowledge of a country’s history and culture; the use of dance as an educational tool; and ways in which dance serves as an outlet for societal needs and concerns.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a classroom project based on course content.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; participate in dance sessions; develop a classroom application that will use dance to connect to curriculum.

Course Coordinator: Kimberly Kilcoyne Course Speaker: Cliff Mendelson, Artist Open to: All Time: F 5/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/8, 8:30-4:30 Location: SPS art rm Material fee: $25 for clay and glazes Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Coordinators: Cheryl Drechsel-Orlandi, Melissa Zeiler

Course limited to 15 participants.

Course Speakers: Evelyn and Juan Fontan, Latin Dance Consultants; O’Hara Family, Irish Step Dancing Consultants

Coffee Communities: Coffee’s Role in Global and Local Gatherings #4018

Open to: All Time: F 4/30, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/1, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, gyms C & D; T6 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Clay Around the World #4017 Clay is a universal medium that can be connected in numerous ways to classroom studies. Clay provides a satisfying, tangible activity for students to realize an emotional connection to their artwork and to learn its context in history and cultures around the world. Teachers will gain insight into how multicultural themes can be applied to curriculum K-12 through artistic expression using clay. In this course participants will be introduced to the world of ceramics and the history of clay arts, as well as a general overview into the process of working with clay. Cliff Mendelson, ceramic artist and educator, will lead the two-day workshop. Teachers will learn the technical side of ceramics, kiln firing and non-firing techniques, as well as the application and handling of materials. They will create a number of ceramic pieces using tile making, coiling, slab work and mask making techniques. Emphasis will be placed on connecting clay 30

The global reach of coffee’s popularity embraces a fascinating piece of world history. Coffee has energized laborers struggling through a workday, and it has long been at the nexus of political conversations and “coffee-house plots.” It has also fueled global trade and cultural exchange, and coffee’s social, economic, and political role in world history is an intriguing thread to follow. Through the combined efforts of NYU’s Kevorkian Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Yale’s PIER Center in Latin American Studies, the Peabody Museum, and the STI, participants will examine the impact of coffee as an agricultural product and the environmental and social costs and benefits of its production and trade. The course will begin on Friday at Scarsdale High School with an introduction to the topic that features a film, a speaker, and discussion about the role of coffee in the world today. Fair trade, competition, and environmental and social issues related to the production and sale of coffee will be examined. On Saturday, participants will meet at Yale University, with teachers from Connecticut and New York, for an exploration of the history of coffee and its cultural, political, and economic role in the Middle East and Latin America, and ways in which coffee has, for better or worse, connected the world. The Peabody Museum’s informative exhibit on coffee will be included. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; prepare a

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reflection or lesson plans based on course work.

Course Speaker: Abel Lushiku, Professor, Berkeley College

Course Coordinator: Maggie Favretti

Open to: All Time: F 4/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/24, 8:30-4:30

Course Speakers: Greta Scharnweber, Director, NYU Kevorkian Center, Middle Eastern Studies; Elena Serapiglia, Director, Yale University PIER Center in Latin American Studies; Barbara Petzen, Director, Harvard University Center for Middle Eastern Studies

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Location: EHS art rm Materials fee: $10

Open to: All

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Time: F 6/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/5, 8:30-4:30

Course limited to 15 participants.

Location: SHS, rm 170; Macmillan Center, Yale University

Yale Programs in International Educational Resources: Summer Institute 2010 #S4020 A, B, C, D

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Dots and Points on the Map: The Congo #4019 The integration of the arts into the academic curriculum, a mandate of state and national arts standards, encourages students to exercise imaginative thinking as they consider design elements in their own creations and in those of other peoples and cultures around the world. Exploration of classic art forms such as dance, music, mask-making, and games inspires an appreciation of global creativity within a hands-on, multisensory teaching model that is highly motivating and accessible to students with different learning styles. In addition, art opens windows on historical realities of life and provides an understanding of multicultural perspectives. Abel Lushiku, a teacher who lived much of his life in Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, before immigrating to the United States, brings a unique and personal viewpoint to the course. An exploration of the art of the Congo, a rich study in its own right, can also expose realities of the region’s geography, history, tradition, and political transitions. Participants will discover a musical and craft sensibility in the creations and designs of the Congolese people that echoes throughout their history, reverberating in art forms that inform daily life, recording and celebrating its beauties and difficulties throughout the centuries. A focus of the course is the integration of the arts into all areas of curriculum. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings and work; create an art project using course content. Course Coordinator: Jeannette Stockton

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Yale University’s Programs in International Educational Resources (PIER) provides intensive interdisciplinary professional development experiences that draw upon Yale ’s extensive resources in international and world regional issues. Each institute includes lectures and seminars by leading scholars and experts from Yale and other institutions; films; workshops; field trips and site visits; hands-on cultural activities; teaching resource and strategy sessions; and sessions on technological resources for teaching about these world areas. STI participants can choose from one of four area studies programs – Ecuador: A Land of Diversity, The Teaching of Africa, Ethnicity and Social Change in Silk Road Regions of Western China, Immigration, and Ethnicity, and Religion in Europe – to gain an understanding of the latest scholarship in these regions and to work with colleagues from around the nation. Ecuador: A Land of Diversity: July 6-9 (3 credits) – Ecuador is a land of stunning environmental and cultural diversity. This course will provide a general overview of Ecuador including important current events, Ecuadorian geography, politics, histories, and economics. Experts on various topics relating to Ecuador will share their expertise during this dynamic, intensive, interdisciplinary week. Apart from learning about the natural diversity found in the Amazon rainforest, the Andean highlands, the Pacific coast, and the Galápagos Islands, a particular focus will be the cultural richness of Ecuador, from the plight of indigenous peoples to interactions with other Latin American nations and the United States. The concentration of Ecuadorian migrants in the United States is highest in the NY-NJ area, and this course will help teachers understand this fast-growing segment of our population. A non-refundable registration fee for the New Haven program is $150, and includes all texts, materials, and refreshments. 33


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The New Haven portion of this institute will be complemented by a noncredit, optional field study to Ecuador July 11-22, 2010, which will include orientation tours, site visits to museums, meetings with various cultural groups, and lectures from Ecuadoran scholars; cost $1350 plus airfare. Contact Ann Marie Nee for more information. The Teaching of Africa: July 6-16, including Saturday and Sunday (6 credits) – This course is designed to help college and K-12 faculty to develop enlightening curricula, to transform other professionals’ perspectives about the African continent, and to enable participants to identify and access unique resources about Africa. The program includes a variety of learning formats designed to enhance the overall experience, and to challenge participants to expand their own learning and teaching styles. Participants attend lectures and films and receive instruction about how to use interdisciplinary teaching methods for the study of Africa. Several activities and artistic projects are complemented by a full-day trip to sites in New York City. A non-refundable registration fee for the New Haven program is $350 and includes all texts, materials, and refreshments. Participants are required to complete a project in the form of lesson plans for K-12 educators to be developed into a publishable resource notebook for loan to other educators from the PIER Center and the PIER Website. Please note that the African studies program requires participation in evening events until 9:30 pm each day. It is recommended that participants stay in the New Haven area: housing in the Yale summer dormitory is available at $70/night. For the African program only, there are also mandatory follow-up sessions during the school year. Ethnicity and Social Change in Silk Road Regions of Western China: July 6-July 9 (3 credits) - Most of the economic boom China has experienced in recent years has focused on eastern China and its dynamic cities of Shanghai and Beijing. However, the migration powering this manufacturing miracle has come from China’s vast western lands. This multi-disciplinary course will examine the complex historical background and recent changes in China’s western frontier. Through lectures, group activities, film viewings, and readings, participants will gain an appreciation for modern-day social, political, economic, religious, and environmental conditions. A nonrefundable registration fee for the New Haven program is $150, and includes all texts, materials, and refreshments. The New Haven portion of this institute will be complemented by a noncredit, optional field study to western China (Qinghai, Gansu, and Sichuan 34

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Provinces) July 10-30; cost $2500 including airfare. Please contact Ann Marie Nee for more information. Immigration, Ethnicity, and Religion in Europe: July 6-July 12 (including Saturday and Sunday) 6 credits - This interdisciplinary seminar will examine the political, cultural, economic, and social consequences of immigration in an increasingly secular Europe that is struggling to both maintain its various national identities and to become a more unified economic and cultural space. Comparisons with immigration to other regions including America will be covered. These six days will include discussions with scholars from Yale and other area universities, cultural performances, and a day visiting related cultural sites in New York City. This course requires evening performances and film viewings. A non-refundable registration fee for the New Haven program is $150, and includes all texts, materials, and refreshments. The New Haven portion of this institute will be complemented by a noncredit, optional field study to Berlin and London from July 13-30; cost $4000 including airfare. Contact Ann Marie Nee for more information. Apply at www.yale.edu/macmillan/pier/institutes.htm. Application deadline is June 1. Deadline for optional field trips is April 1. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create a relevant curriculum unit based on course content. Course Coordinator: Ann Marie Nee Open to: All Time/Location: Ecuador, July 6-9; Africa, July 6-16, including Sa, July 10 & Su, July 11; China, July 6-9; Europe, July 6-12, including Sa, July 10 & Su, July 11 Credit: Ecuador: 3 points salary credit or stipend Africa, 6 points salary credit or stipend China, 3 points salary credit or stipend Europe, 6 points salary credit or stipend

New Approaches to Teaching East Asian History #4021 Students of the 21st century are expected to develop a knowledge of the interdependent world that will inform their understanding of the rapidly 35


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changing planet on which they live. To prepare students for the global arena, teachers must deepen their awareness of rising world cultures as seen through the lens of history and geography. China, Japan, and Korea play a major role in world affairs, and their political, social, and economic ebb and flow, as well as their impact on the environment, have a profound influence on nations and peoples beyond their borders. Teachers need to be familiar with the latest research, theory, and resources that place these cultures in a contemporary context and with interdisciplinary approaches to foreign relations that address the complexity of the world’s linkages. This course will deepen teacher understanding of the geography, history, culture, and contemporary issues of China, Japan, and Korea as identified in the New York State Social Studies Curriculum. Topics include the geography of Asia, Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, the early Chinese Empires of Qin and Han, the Tang Dynasty and the Silk Road, early and Medieval Japan, Japan under Tokugawa, nomadic empires, Sun and Yuan dynasties, Asia and the West, and Asia’s Pacific wars. Participants will probe major themes underlying Eastern cultures and explore relevant instructional strategies and online materials for the classroom. The use of technology and Web resources will be emphasized throughout the course. The introductory and closing sessions will be held in Scarsdale. Two sessions will take place at the American Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Thirteen online sessions will require roughly two and one half hours of work per session. Each session is to be completed weekly. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete required readings and online assignments; create a curriculum plan based on course content. Course Coordinator: Sarah Whittington Course Speaker: Karen Kane, Associate Director Asia for Educators, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University Open to: All

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TEACHING STRATEGIES Alternative Assessment Projects: Creating New Models for the Middle School #4022 The eighth grade is a milestone achievement in the lives of students. A memorable and meaningful experience that encourages reflection upon the learning they have achieved as well as consideration of what the future may hold promises to be of great value to these young people. The Scarsdale Middle School eighth grade teachers propose to create and develop a project-based alternative assessment program as a vehicle for students to demonstrate the skills they have learned and the mastery of content that they have achieved in their Middle School careers. These assessments would be interdisciplinary in nature and draw upon their students’ abilities to problem solve, think critically and creatively, research in a cross-disciplinary manner, demonstrate their knowledge of content, and present their findings to others. Grade 8 teachers would work with their own academic team as well as with teachers from other houses to establish common project criteria for evaluation. Participants in the course will explore existing models of project-based, interdisciplinary work, including the fifth grade Capstone assignment, with a view toward creating end of year assessments as alternatives to grade 8 final exams. During sessions teachers will work collaboratively in teams to identify and apply skills and content requirements to a project of student selection and design. Teachers will explore a variety of resources that students would be required to use. Working together, they will develop a project timeline and rubrics to accompany their assessment. Teachers from all four houses as well as CHOICE will share their final assessments with the group in order to receive feedback and ensure a commonality of expectations. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; submit an assessment project including description, timeline, and evaluation rubric.

Required Text: East Asia - A New History by Rhoads Murphey

Course Coordinators: Jennifer Gilbert, Len Tallevi, David Wixted

Time: W 2/10, 3:30-5:30 and 13 weekly online readings and postings; two sessions in Scarsdale; two sessions at AMNH, MMA Location: AMNH, MMA; SMS, rm T109

Open to: SMS 8 Time: Th 3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 3:30-5:30, with remaining dates to be set by group.

Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

Location: SMS, rm F77

Course limited to 25 participants.

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

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Using Journal Writing to Enhance Learning in the Mathematics Classroom #4023 Research confirms that the integration of writing exercises with math instruction leads to better student learning of math concepts and heightened math communication skills. Japanese teachers commonly incorporate writing into mathematics lessons through the use of journals. In journals, students are able reflect on their learning, and teachers are able to assess student knowledge and grasp of new concepts. Journal writing and portfolios can provide a richer and more complete appraisal of mathematical understanding by individual students. Teachers of mathematics will benefit from an exploration of the value of writing in math. In this course, teachers will learn a pedagogy that uses student writing effectively in math lessons. They will examine successful applications of journal writing to demonstrate student understanding of math concepts and processes. Participants will assess journal entries for student knowledge and for the areas where students need additional help or instruction. Class sessions include teacher collaboration in looking at student work, planning lessons that include math journals and portfolios, implementing journal writing in their classrooms, sharing results, and reflecting on methods to improve the process. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop and implement a portfolio assessment that includes student journal writing. Course Coordinators: David Besancon, Robyn Deutsch, Bill Jackson Open to: 1-8 Time: Th 3/4, 3/18, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 3:30-5:30, with two hours of independent work Location: SHS, rm 172 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Introduction to Science Inquiry: Part II #4024 Children are natural scientists. They ask questions, they develop their own theories, they test them out. Effective science instruction in the schools builds on the natural curiosity that children have about their worlds. One of the most powerful ways for students to learn science is through questions grounded in the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own inquisitiveness about the environment. The evolution of scientific knowledge through the grades is significantly enhanced 38

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when ideas are anchored to inquiry learning experiences. Active investigation into the natural world will nurture student interest and develop positive attitudes toward science that will last a lifetime. This hands-on workshop introduces teachers to techniques that stimulate curiosity, elicit student questions, and lead to scientific investigations. Participants will engage in open-ended inquiry and develop their understanding of science process skills. During the final phase of the workshop, participants will examine their practice and apply process skills that enhance curriculum. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; write an inquiry lesson or apply inquiry-based strategies to existing curriculum. Course Coordinator: Jennifer Kiley Open to: All Time: Course cancelled Location: SHS, rm 172 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Differentiation Through Type # 4025 An ongoing pursuit for the Scarsdale school community is the question of how best to respond to studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; individual learning differences. The districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent work with Carol Ann Tomlinson in the field of differentiation has deepened and enriched faculty knowledge and understanding of the issue. An additional resource on differentiation with which many staff members are familiar is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and teachers are interested in applying their knowledge of Myers-Briggs to classroom planning and practice. This course demonstrates how to use psychological Type as a natural part of the curriculum planning process to accommodate learning styles and to differentiate instruction for all students. Participants will review the tenets of Type, examine Type-based lessons that differentiate instruction, and use these models to develop lessons that accommodate the individual learning needs of their students. Participants will have the option to take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Those with a firm understanding of their Type will be directed to new activities that provide advanced knowledge of methods for applying Type in the classroom. With the basics of Type understood, participants will examine model lessons that have 39


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been created to accommodate Type differences. Participants will then create lessons they will use to differentiate instruction in their own classrooms. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create and critique lessons that demonstrate differentiation through Type. Course Coordinators: Len Tallevi, Marie Tallevi Open to: All Time: F 3/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/13, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Stress Management for Teachers #4026 Stress and burnout are occupational hazards of all the helping professions, including teaching. The ability to recognize and remedy stressful conditions at the earliest stages is essential to enhancing a teacher’s effective classroom practice. Teachers need guidance and support in developing effective coping strategies and practical remedies to manage today’s accelerated pace and escalating demands. Sessions will provide a forum for teachers at all grade levels to explore ways of maintaining their personal and professional vitality. Activities will help teachers to cultivate and practice specific coping strategies for stress reduction in order to have the energy necessary to remain passionate and effective in their work. Classes will combine didactic and experimental components and will focus directly on issues of relevance to teaching and class management. The course will also provide a supportive, non-threatening network in which to flourish. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; create and share a written plan for reducing stress in individual professional lives. Course Coordinator: Ilene Smith Open to: All Time: F 3/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/6, 8:30-4:30 Location: EHS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

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A Closer Look at Singapore Math with Ban Har Yeap #4027 Scarsdale has recently adopted the Singapore math program for students in kindergarten through fifth grades. Teachers of these grades have requested additional support to supplement the professional development provided by the District, as they learn the methodology, pedagogy, and structure of this new program. The course is a response to these requests, and teachers of elementary math will gain a deeper and broader understanding of Singapore math as they work with Ban Har Yeap, author of the Singapore Primary Math textbooks. Ban Har Yeap will guide teachers in an examination of three aspects of teaching Singapore math at the elementary grades: basic skills and concepts, consolidation, and problem solving. Dr. Yeap will also model strategies that effectively engage learners in math instruction. Participants will probe the unique features of Singapore Math with an emphasis on visuals, systematic topic development, variations in exercises, and challenging problems. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop lessons using the Singapore text and information learned in the course. Course Coordinators: Kathy de la Garza, Nancy Pavia Course Speaker: Ban Har Yeap, author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks Open to: K-8 Time: TBA Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Expression Poetry Playground: The Craft of Poetry #4028 The teaching of writing demands the control of two crafts: teaching and writing. Teachers who have not wrestled with writing cannot effectively teach the writer’s craft. There is a process to learn. That’s the way it is with craft, whether it be teaching or writing. There is a road, a journey to travel. ­ —Donald Graves Writing is an inroad to understanding and to living. Poetry is a natural interdisciplinary form of writing that incorporates intuitive knowledge, observation, learned knowledge and imagination. Through language play and the exploration of a myriad of poetic forms, teachers will grow their understanding of how poetry is written and taught. Reflection on their own 41


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poetic explorations will help teachers appreciate the individual elements of the creative process while adding to their repertoire of professional practices.

study into classroom practice. Instructors will model appropriate reading behaviors and strategies applicable to all grade levels.

Phil Smith’s Expression Poetry Playground is an exploration of the craft of poetry. In this weekend course, participants will explore the intricate, complex, and creative process of writing poetry and deepen their understanding of the craft. Teachers will engage in creative exercises and imaginative projects; they will play with language in new, interesting, and revealing ways. The very nature of poetry can teach teachers and, in turn, their students to become comfortable with this kind of emotional literacy. Phil Smith’s approach to teaching poetry, as has been his approach to the teaching of expression art, is to demystify the process and make it attainable to all.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; craft at least two grade specific lesson plans utilizing Read Alouds based on the course content to be implemented in the classroom and shared with colleagues.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; design a unit of poetry based on course content and instruction. Course Coordinator: Lindsey Hicks

Course Coordinators: Trent DeBerry, Maria Stile Course Speakers: Kathleen Tolan, Deputy Director of Reading at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project; Sarah Picard Taylor, Staff Developer, Teachers College Open to: All Time: F 4/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/17, 8:30-4:30 Location: HCS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Speaker: Phil Smith, Poet

The Art of Quilt Making #4030

Open to: 3-12 Time: F 4/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/10, 8:30-4:30

Quilts have played a significant part in the nation’s history and have deep roots in cultures around the world. They have served two roles throughout time: one functional and the other as an expression of art through unique design and colorful pattern. Today, many teachers use quilt making in their teaching as a way to synthesize learning and to assess student understanding of broad concepts. The technique of making a quilt is as meaningful as the students’ work that is being displayed. Quilts serve as an effective assessment tool of student learning for all areas of study and all grade levels.

Location: HCS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Using Read Alouds in the K-12 Classroom #4029 Reading is essential to learning, and reading aloud can be an effective classroom strategy to develop student comprehension, critical thinking, vocabulary, and listening skills. Elementary teachers are familiar with Read Alouds, part of the Reader’s Workshop, an activity that supports Balanced Literacy instruction in the classroom. Teachers of all grade levels, K-12, and subject areas will benefit from an approach to planned, oral reading as a springboard into deep conversations in the classroom. Two staff developers from Columbia University Teachers College will lead the course: Kathleen Tolan and Sarah Picard Taylor. The Teachers College Reading Project strongly advocates the Read Aloud model at all grade levels and subject areas to enhance auditory comprehension, vocabulary development, listening, and thinking skills. The course will focus on the integration of planned oral reading selections related to a theme or topic of 42

Participants learn to assemble a quilt to display and to assess their students’ work. By examining samples, participants will understand the history of quilt making and the origins of their colorful and unique designs.  The changing methods of quilt making technology will be examined in a hands-on activity with quilt making supplies.  The course will proceed with step-bystep instructions leading to the completion of individual quilts and ideas for classroom use with all abilities and age groups. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; complete 36-patch quilt that reflects curriculum.

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Course Coordinators: Maureen Ball, Dawn Rivellini

Course limited to 15 participants.

Open to: All

Outdoor Education Camp Best Practices Part IV #4032

Time: F 4/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/24, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm T112 Materials Fee: $25 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

Collage and Printmaking #4031 Teachers continually strive to enhance their practice with new ideas and teaching strategies to engage students in course content. By integrating the arts into curriculum, teachers provide students satisfying, tactile activities that enrich learning through a process of personal creation and design with selected materials. The techniques of printing and collage are easily learned and readily transferable to any academic area and to all age groups. When teachers infuse the arts of collage and printing making into course content, students will make strong and rich connections to their learning. Participants will focus on the works of Romare Bearden, Andy Warhol, and Vincent Van Gogh. They will be introduced to the art of oversized photographs, collage, repetition of design, printmaking, and various approaches to carving. Individuals will be able to apply their own creative expression to oversized photographic collages that can easily be integrated into classroom studies and curriculum. Teachers will be taught a number of carving techniques from potato and Styrofoam carving to block print carving, all of which can be used in a classroom setting. Requirements: Attend all sessions; participate in activities; create a collage using course content; plan a classroom/curriculum application.

The Sixth Grade Outdoor Education Camp is an integral part of the Edgemont elementary curriculum. The Camp develops life-long attitudes, knowledge, and skills including respect for the environment, orienteering and topographical map reading, landform identification, forest ecology, meteorology, first aid, and much more. On-going comprehensive teacher training is required to maintain the conceptual and experiential richness of this field event. Veteran teachers of the Camp need the time and opportunity to share their knowledge with colleagues new to this teaching model and to demonstrate skills learned in previous STI courses. Over many years conducting the Outdoor Education Camp, participating teachers have learned effective techniques to integrate a wealth of outdoor education knowledge into curriculum. In this weekend course, participants trained in the Camp philosophy and goals will demonstrate their areas of expertise. Teachers new to the Camp will learn from experienced colleagues methods that work to integrate group dynamics, team building, and decision-making into academic fields of study. These skills build self-confidence and resiliency in students, and they become opportunities for learners of all abilities to excel outside the traditional curriculum. The course will culminate with the creation of an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Environmental Handbook,â&#x20AC;? a valuable resource for new and veteran staff members when preparing to lead activities. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; develop a curriculum project using course content. Course Coordinators: Tom Blank, Alan Cass Open to: K-6 Edgemont Time: F 4/30, 3:30-7:30pm; Sa 5/1, 8:30-4:30 Location: SPS

Course Coordinator: Kimberly Kilcoyne

Materials fee: $10

Open to: All Time: F 6/11, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/12, 8:30-4:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Location: SPS art rm Materials fee: $20 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Adventure Learning in the Classroom #S4033 Inclusive classrooms are settings where trust, respect, fun, and constructive risk-taking are the norms. When teachers incorporate adventure learning as 45


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an approach to teaching they can effectively infuse curriculum with challenge and activity at any grade level. Children learn best by doing, and adventure learning is a student-centered pedagogy in which students are energetically involved in their own education and growth. An activity-based learning environment enriches curriculum with ideas and exercises that are highly motivating and engaging for children of all ages. The course is based on the principles of Adventure in the Classroom, a pedagogical approach emphasizing: experiential learning; student commitment to challenging academic and personal goals; and the integration of character education into the curriculum. Excerpts from Laurie Frank’s work, Journey Toward the Caring Classroom, will provide participants knowledge of the research, theory, and practice examples at the heart of adventure learning. Teachers will become skilled at activities that are highly motivating for students and that develop social and emotional competencies such as trust, respect, and constructive risk taking. Teaching to multiple learning styles is an important part of the course.

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before and after an authentic experience creates opportunities for students to reflect on their learning and provides a means for teachers to assess student understanding. This course will focus on integrating podcasts and blogs into a learning tour of Central Park. During the first session, participants will learn how to use Garage Band to create podcasts. Sample podcasts will serve as a model. Participants will be introduced to the history of Central Park through links and clips from a course Wikispace and will complete research on a landmark in the South End of the park. Participants will then create an original podcast, using Garage Band, describing the history and relevant details of a site in the South End of Central Park. Blog responses will be posted by participants on the Wikispace. The second session of the course will consist of a walking tour, guided by the podcasts, of the South End of Central Park. Participants will blog about the podcasting and walking tour experiences on the Wikispace.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; engage in activities; create and implement a classroom exercise based on course material.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create an original podcast using Garage Band describing the history and relevant details of a site in the South End of Central Park; write and post a pre and post visit blog response on the course Wikispace.

Course Coordinators: Vivian Robert, Jennifer Turetzky

Course Coordinators: Meghan Lahey, Kevin Roemer

Open to: All Time: 8/9-10, 9-3:30

Open to: All Time: F 5/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/22, 8:30-4:30

Location: HCS staff lounge

Location: SMS, rm P183; Central Park

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Podcasting Through Central Park #4034

Course limited to 18 participants

Today, more than ever, teachers must seek new ways to make curriculum real, relevant, and connected to student learning and skill development. According to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, “Today, we live in a technology and media-driven environment, marked by access to an abundance of information, rapid changes in technology tools and the ability to collaborate and make individual contributions on an unprecedented scale.” Incorporating technology, such as podcasts, blogging, and Wikispaces into site visits will help students develop their information, media, and technology skills while enriching and deepening the learning experience. Creating podcasts enables teachers to establish a clear focus, ask critical questions for students to consider and suggest creative ways for students to respond to a visited site. Blogging 46

Kaleidoscopes Across the Curriculum #4035 The National Standards for Arts Education direct teachers to make connections between the visual arts and other academic subjects, while the New York State Standards in Math, Science, and Technology promote the understanding and application of math and science in real-world settings and the historical development of scientific ideas. The kaleidoscope, an instrument of art and science, can be used as a classroom resource to integrate subject areas. The kaleidoscope’s application to the disciplines of art, math, science, and even history furthers educational standards in multiple areas and motivates student interest by encouraging hands-on learning and critical thinking skills through creation and investigation of this enticing instrument. 47


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An art and science teacher combine forces, both optical and artistic, to introduce the kaleidoscope, a multi-faceted optical toy/tool with great adaptability and application across the curriculum. The history, science, math, and art of kaleidoscopic form will be explored. Participants will learn how reflection and angles join together as they build a basic kaleidoscope, a pendant teleidoscope, and other easy adaptations to this fascinating optic device. The word kaleidoscope translates as â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see a beautiful form,â&#x20AC;? and participants will generate their own beautiful forms in multiple scopes as they learn the science involved to create this art object. Projects will be geared to classroom use in all K-12 areas.

Course Coordinator: Mike Menna

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete art projects using course content; develop a curriculum connection based on course content.

Art offers an opportunity to create and to express, to challenge assumptions, and to rethink long held ideas. This course calls upon teachers to produce original artwork and then re-imagine and transform it. Teachers will develop confidence in their ability to flex creative muscles through visual and technology arts media while applying the concepts of color, design, and balance and, ultimately, finding new ways to promote their studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; love of learning.

Course Coordinators: Tracy Durkin, Jeannette Stockton Open to: All Time: F 5/21,3:30-7:30; Sa 5/22, 8:30-4:30 Location: EHS, rm E-9 Materials fee: $10 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Best Practices for Coaches #4036 District coaches need the opportunity to meet with colleagues across grade levels to explore and to share successful coaching practices. This course provides participants the time and setting to examine and discuss teambuilding strategies, group decision-making skills, gender issues, problem solving techniques, communication, and leadership skills. In this weekend course, coaches will concentrate on identifying a variety of best coaching methods, strategies, and philosophies. Included will be a ropes section to engage participants in group decision-making, trust building, and collaboration. The sessions will also address gender issues in coaching, respect, trust, and problem solving skills. A handbook of best coaching practices will be compiled. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; contribute to best coaching manual. 48

Course Speakers: Barney Foltman, Robert Keith, Kevin Roemer Open to: District teachers who coach Time: F 6/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/5, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS gym Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Transformations: An Arts Convergence #4037

Art can be a transformational experience for both artist and audience, while inspiring a joy of learning. In this course, teachers will examine the concept of transformation through the creation of poster-sized paintings and threedimensional expressions. By layering various technology and visual arts media, participants will transform one form of art into another. Artwork will be designed in the computer lab using widely available technology resources such as Microsoft Word, digital cameras, and scanners, but projects will be created in an arts studio environment. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a classroom application of course content. Course Coordinators: Paul Tomizawa, Alice Yugovich Open to: All Time: F 6/11, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/12, 8:30-4:30 Location: HCS art rm; computer lab Materials fee: $10 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 12 participants.

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Type in the Classroom: Using Learning Styles Through the Myers-Briggs to Improve Instruction #S4038 In order to promote 21st century skills and learning, as well as more traditional approaches, teachers need to recognize how students learn and apply individual differences to the learning process. An awareness of Type is an invaluable resource for teachers in creating a classroom environment that supports and enhances childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learning preferences and strengths. This course guides teachers in applying Type analysis as a natural part of the lesson planning process. All participants will take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. They will review the characteristics associated with introverts/extroverts, sensors/intuitives, thinkers/feelers, and judgers/ perceivers. Participants will learn how the dominant auxiliary, tertiary, and inferior functions relate to learning. Models for developing lessons will be introduced, and successful applications of the MBTI for high school students and the MMTIC for elementary and middle school students will be shared. Participants will present and critique lessons developed according to Type in a workshop atmosphere. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; participate in activities and discussions; create and critique lessons that will be shared with the group. Course Coordinators: Len Tallevi, Marie Tallevi Open to: All Time: 6/28-7/1, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS library Fee: $10 for MBTI test Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Lincoln Center Summer Institute # S4039A, B, C What should education in the arts look like for elementary, middle, and high school students? What could arts and aesthetic education become in the Scarsdale and Edgemont schools? This intensive summer workshop provides opportunities for participants to experience the arts of music, dance, theater, and visual arts directly through involvement with each discipline under 50

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the guidance of professional teaching artists. The workshop is experiential and interactive, with participants collaborating with one another under the direction of the Lincoln Center artists and course coordinators. The course is required for those wishing to participate during the 2010-2011 school year with the Lincoln Center visiting artists, as they work closely with classroom teachers to implement the LCI pedagogy with regard to selected works of music, dance, theater, and visual arts. Participants will attend performances of dance, music, and theater, at Lincoln Center, and they will visit a city museum. They will then create forms of dance, music, art, and drama under the guidance of the LCI teaching artists. Additionally, participants will met in Scarsdale to reflect on the Lincoln Center pedagogy, to review literature on aesthetic education, and to plan with colleagues the Lincoln Center experience for students. For those who participated in the LCI summer workshop last summer, there will be an opportunity for a three-day workshop, dates to be determined within the span of June 30 to July 16. Details of the program for returnees will be published as soon as the Lincoln Center Institute makes them available. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; participate actively in discussion and activities; keep a journal of workshop activities and ideas; write a paper about the LCI summer workshop experience. Course Coordinators: Diane Celentano, Robert DiYanni, Joan Weber Open to: All Time: 6/30-7/16, 9-4:30 Location: Lincoln Center and SHS, rm 170 Credit: Three or six points salary credit or stipend for new participants Two points salary credit or stipend for returnees

Introduction to Mindfulness Education #4040 The use of mindfulness as an approach to learning in the classroom is of growing interest. In her books, Mindfulness and The Power of Learning, Harvardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ellen Langer identified five characteristics of the mindful state that enhance student performance. They are: openness to novelty, alertness to distinction, sensitivity to different contexts, orientation to the present, and 51


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self-regulation. Several research studies have shown that in classrooms that use mindfulness as a core ingredient, students are more adaptable to new situations, are more creative, and have better social skills. A mindful learning environment enables students to apply the concepts of “focused attention” and “focused intention” to their present and future learning. Mindfulness Education is designed to empower children to focus their attention in school, adopt positive health behaviors, engage in healthy lifestyles, and develop satisfying relationships. Mindfulness manages the person in a process which quiets the mind, builds inner resiliency, and helps the individual meet challenges and stresses in their daily lives. Using a myriad of techniques, teachers will explore both the theory and practice of mindfulness education. Teaching strategies include lecture presentations by the instructor and guest speakers, small group work, and review/discussion of several mindfulness programs. Participants will explore a variety of applications in the classroom and learn how to apply mindfulness in all areas of their lives. Upon completion of the course, participants will present a lesson or unit that includes two of the key mindfulness principles. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; design a unit that includes at least two of the basic ME principles and a reflective writing activity.

of students equipped to analyze, assess, and communicate using the visual and aural media of the 21st century. The Institute programs guide teachers in media literacy and teach them to empower students to be active viewers, critical thinkers, engaged world citizens, and inspired creators. Through lecture, instruction, demonstration, and screenings, this year’s Institute, Documentary as a Teaching Tool, will devote an entire week to the fascinating study of non fiction. The course will explore the relative terms of truth and realism through a study of the documentary form and its evolution over time. Filmmakers including the Lumiere Brothers, Errol Morris, Werner Herzog, Gillo Pontecorvo, Alex Gibney, and other transcendent artists will be used as case studies on teaching rhetoric, argument, and history in the classroom. Specific content areas will be addressed with curriculum connections made to the New York State Learning Standards. Lesson planning, conception, and design will inspire immediate application in the classroom. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; write a reflective paper or curriculum application based on course content. Course Coordinators: Phyllis DiBianco, Joan Weber Course Speakers: TBA

Course Coordinator: Ilene Smith

Open to: All Time: 7/26-30, 9-3

Course Speakers: Dr. Laurence Edwards, Psychologist; Dr. Bena Kallick, Educational Consultant; Laurie Mandelbaum, Yoga Instructor

Location: Jacob Burns Film Center

Open to: All Time: 7/19-22, 9-3:30

Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

Location: SHS, rm 170

Interpretive Strategies for Educators: Nature Walks #S4042

Fees: $15 museum fee, $6 tea ceremony, lunch (optional) Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Jacob Burns Film Center Summer Institute: Documentary as a Teaching Tool #S4041 The Jacob Burns Film Center sponsors an annual Summer Teachers Institute in support of its commitment to the professional development of educators. Teacher training at the Center is essential to the mission of raising a generation 52

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Course limited to 30 participants.

Education, by its very nature, is a multidisciplinary venture. For example, prose, poetry, and art can express the general themes of natural science or any other discipline. Interpretive, or nature, walks promote good teaching, energize existing approaches, and inspire new ones. Interpretive walks generate the observations, dialogue, and discoveries about relationships and meaning in nature that are at the very heart of critical and creative thinking. While planning and conducting interpretive walks, teachers help students practice leadership skills, as they reflect on their observations and explain and visualize them. 53


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Teachers will learn techniques to incorporate nature walks into art, English, math, social studies, world language, and science curriculum. Interpretive nature walks will be modeled, with an emphasis on developing skills of observation and identification, posing questions, and connecting discoveries to a broader context. A myriad of presentation strategies will incorporate art, prose, or poetry to express the discoveries of the nature walks. These strategies encourage students to express their discoveries in more dynamic modes than traditional lab reports, and they entertain endless possibilities for expressing scientific information. Participants will prepare and deliver a single interpretive nature walk based on a theme to be used as a blueprint for future incorporation into their curriculum. Participants will be required to read The Last Child in the Woods: Saving our Children from Nature Deficit Disorder by Richard Louv. Trips to Rockefeller State Park and Scarsdale High School woods are planned. Walks include themes based on historical perspectives, pond study, biodiversity, and natural habitats. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop an interpretive walk based on a curriculum theme for use in the classroom with the guidance of the instructor.

respond to the people around them. However, many of the young have great difficulty with this process. Students will benefit when teachers deepen their understanding of social thinking and have access to the resources to address the needs of students with social thinking deficits. A growing number of students are being diagnosed with conditions such as Asperger’s Syndrome, Learning Disabilities, PDD, ADHD, and others. While the names vary, deficits in the area of social thinking are common to all these diagnoses. In addition, many students, not considered to have identifiable learning problems, can present with several of the same social challenges. Course participants will learn the theoretical basis of social thinking and explore ways to help children develop this essential type of cognition. The writings of Michelle Garcia Winner will inform course content and discussions as well as suggest a framework for developing lessons that teach social thinking to children. Participants will share classroom experiences resulting from the application of course content to practice. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop lessons that teach social thinking.

Course Coordinator: Richard Clark Open to: All Time: 8/2-5, 9-3:30

Course Coordinator: Jennifer Turetzky

Location: SHS, rm 170

Location: HCS staff lounge

Materials needed: Art book, watercolors, journal, Last Child in the Woods, by Richard Louv

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

EQUITY AND ACCESS Social Thinking #4043 Michelle Garcia Winner, author of numerous books and articles on social thinking, writes, “Successful social thinkers consider the points of view, emotions, thoughts, beliefs, prior knowledge and intentions of others.” The ability to view the world from the perspective of others, also understood as perspective taking, is an important developmental achievement for the young. At best, it is a normal and intuitive process, an evolving ability to integrate information from home and school, and to participate in the classroom community. Most children develop communication skills as they grow up by observing and acquiring social information and learning how to 54

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Open to: All Time: Tu 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 3:30-5:30

Across the Autism Spectrum #4044 According to the Autism Society of America, autism is defined as “a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and is the result of a neurological disorder that affects the normal functioning of the brain, impacting development in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Both children and adults with autism typically show difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interaction and leisure activities.” With one in one hundred fifty children being diagnosed with autism, more and more teachers are faced with meeting the academic, social, and behavioral needs of children who present with characteristics of autism. An overview of autism, its identifying characteristics, and strategies that can be used in the classroom will support teachers in responding to the challenges of this special group of learners. 55


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Amanda Doll, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, will provide background information on the history of autism, discuss current research and practice, and review terminology that has become commonplace in the last few years. Through discussion and collaboration, teachers will learn a variety of strategies and ideas for addressing the varied needs of students in their classroom who demonstrate characteristics of autism with or without a formal diagnosis. Participants will become acquainted with the learning and social/behavioral difficulties that are characteristic of children on the autism spectrum. They will also gain knowledge of the most effective behavioral supports for learners with sensory and self-regulation differences.

Course Coordinators: Jacqueline O’Shea, Susan Silkowitz

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a case study based on classroom experience and course content.

In the summer of 2009, a committee composed of Edgemont special education teachers and related services staff met to explore ways in which technology can support instruction of special needs students and of diverse learners, in general. One of that committee’s recommendations was to continue and deepen the study of this topic through an STI course in which participants would investigate a wide range of technology tools that could support instruction of students with special needs.

Course Coordinator: Susan Goodman Course Speaker: Amanda Doll, Behavior Analyst, EDM., BCBA Open to: All Time: F 3/5, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/6, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

The ESL Student in the Mainstream Classroom #4045 The Scarsdale and Edgemont communities include many students from other countries who, upon enrolling, are placed in classes with native English speakers. Mainstream classroom and content area teachers on all grade levels will benefit from instructional strategies that accelerate the integration of the ESL students into the general classroom environment. Teachers will explore the experience of ESL students in the mainstream classroom and learn strategies that can transform these students from passive to active learners. Participants will consider the cultural differences that influence learning, practical approaches for differentiating instruction, and questions related to assessment and grading the English language learner. In a collaborative setting, teachers will gain knowledge of strategies to meet the needs of ESL students and of effective practices that will enhance their sense of belonging in the mainstream classroom. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned reading; develop lesson plan modifications based on course content. 56

Open to: All Time: F 4/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/10, 8:30-4:30 Location: EHS, rm D8 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend.

Exploring and Integrating Technology for Students with Special Needs #4046

This course will follow the format of a work-study group. Participants will explore the appropriateness of specific technologies for special needs students that may include text-to-speech, reading, writing, and math supports, and/ or progress monitoring programs. Through hands-on use of applications and demonstrations, participants will gain an understanding of various products’ strengths and weaknesses, and how they can be used to enhance and differentiate instruction. Guest speakers will include lecturers presenting best practices in the use of these tools. Participants will also discuss and plan for the integration of these resources in the curriculum. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; write a twoor three-page review of one tool or practice explored in the class including a discussion of how the technology will be integrated into instruction. Course Coordinators: Kerry Curtin, Christine Kovacs Open to: All Time: Th 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 6/3, 3:30-6:30 Location: EHS, rm A11 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Mean Girls #4047

Teaching Children with ADHD #S4048

The term “mean girl” entered the language from a movie title and has become synonymous with the bullying behaviors of young girls that include cliques and, more recently, cyber bullying. This conduct, evident in boys as well as girls, is often referred to as relational aggression, and parents and teachers have expressed concerns for its impact in school and its opposition to the “Circle of Friends” ideals. Through targeted strategies, the sharing of classroom best practices, and access to professional resources, teachers can guide students to develop empathy, engage in healthy conflict resolution, explore feelings, and promote a positive change in peer relationships where needed.

ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorder in childhood, significantly impacts academic performance. Over the past ten years, interventions predicated upon research in the areas of neuroanatomy, pharmacology, education, and behavior management have advanced the educator’s ability to teach and work with these students. Teachers must understand the underlying interconnected processes and develop skills to deal with specific interfering ADHD symptoms in order to meet the needs of these children. This course is an implementation of the Scarsdale District Strategic Plan to promote knowledge among faculty and staff to support their efforts to teach individual learners.

Participants will explore the subject of the “mean girl” phenomena in the schools: the behaviors the term captures and the impact of those behaviors on classroom community. Resources and instruction will provide effective strategies to create a caring classroom community that is supportive of all learners. The works of Diane Senn (Bullying in the Girls’ World), Julia Taylor (The Girl’s Guide to Friends), Kaye Randall (Mean Girls: 101 1/2 Creative Strategies for Working with Relational Aggression) and Rachel Simmons (Odd Girl Out) offer an examination of social emotional development and the importance of community, with particular attention to female students. Readings will inform the discussions as well as suggest a framework for developing lessons that teach essential social skills. Participants will share their classroom experiences, adapt a strategy from the course to professional practice, and write a reflection on an activity applied to the classroom as a result of the course.

Course content includes both a review of the implications of research and clinical information that informs best practice models in educating students with ADHD. Participants will also be guided through steps teachers can take to maximize ADHD students’ abilities and minimize characteristics that hinder them at school. Participants will learn the connection between manifestations of underlying ADHD processes and how best to ameliorate their impact in the classroom.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create and implement a classroom activity based on course material and write a reflection.

Location: SHS, rm 170

Course Coordinator: Jennifer Turetzky Open to: All Time: F 5/21, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/22, 8:30-4:30 Location: HCS staff lounge Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create a vignette that describes the behavioral presentation of a student with ADHD. Course Coordinator: Elliot Cohen Open to: All Time: 6/30-7/1, 9-3:30

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Teaching Children with Anxiety Problems #S4049 Students experiencing elevated anxiety are at significant risk for academic and social difficulties. In order to maximize the performance of these vulnerable students, teachers must understand the nature of the anxious child and develop appropriate methods and teaching skills. Educators need opportunities to learn from the research the serious impact of anxiety disorders on development and performance as well as effective strategies for coping with anxiety and associated problems. This course is an implementation of the Scarsdale District 59


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Strategic Plan to promote knowledge among faculty and staff in support of their efforts to teach individual learners. Course instruction and discussion will focus on the relationship between anxiety problems and school performance from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Teachers will learn to recognize behaviors with roots in anxiety and to develop a more informed understanding of children with anxiety disorders and anxious temperament. Classroom manifestations and best practice models of school intervention will be reviewed. Teachers will also have opportunities to discuss specific cases from their own practice. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; outline a classroom intervention plan for a student with anxiety problems. Course Coordinator: Elliot Cohen

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difficulties including lack of effort, attitudinal problems, and disruptiveness will be reviewed. Participants will learn to identify students experiencing social/emotional problems, classroom interventions that work, strategies that foster growth, and effective referral and consultation skills. The course will include lecture, discussion, and workshop approaches. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings and participate in discussions; create a vignette that describes the behavioral presentation of a student with a psychiatric disorder or outline a behavior intervention plan for a student with behavioral difficulties. Course Coordinator: Elliot Cohen Open to: All Time: 8/4-5, 9-3:30

Open to: All Time: 7/21-7/22, 9-3:30

Location: SHS, rm 172

Location: SHS, rm 172

Course limited to 15 participants.

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Developing Best Educational Practice Through Case Analysis #S4051

Course limited to 15 participants.

Psychiatric Disorders and School Performance #S4050 Socioemotional function and school performance are closely linked. Students who experience psychiatric challenges are at significant risk for academic and social difficulties in school. Teachers, and their students, will benefit from a forum in which teachers deepen their understanding of the emotional disorders of childhood and their impact on school performance. Furthermore, teachers need the time and opportunity to share effective strategies that address psychological difficulties and foster the emotional and academic development of students. This course is an implementation of the Scarsdale District Strategic Plan to promote knowledge among faculty and staff in support of their efforts to teach individual learners. Course instruction focuses on the relationship between behavioral/emotional disorders and school performance. Additionally, participants will examine normal variations in behavior as well as problematic development. The influence of a range of psychiatric disorders on school performance will be discussed: affective disorders, anxiety disorders, adjustment disorders, and personality disorders. Classroom manifestations of social/emotional 60

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Students with learning and behavioral differences often pose challenges in the classroom. When professionals examine individual case histories, they are able to apply educational and psychological research and theory to develop a deeper understanding of their students. In addition, collaborative strategizing with colleagues can be quite useful in maximizing the learning and performance of the target student as well as classmates. Educators need the time and opportunity to review, develop, and share best practice strategies within the framework of case material and relevant literature and resources. Course concepts and activities feature a review of teaching methods including innovative approaches to maximize student engagement in learning and to build teacher-student connections. Participants will use a case study approach to analyze the needs of individual students and develop educational and psychological techniques to enhance learning and performance. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop an individual case analysis applying course resources and methodology.

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Course Coordinator: Elliot Cohen

SCHOOL, COMMUNITY, ENVIRONMENT

Open to: All Time: 8/9-12, 9-3:30

Touch the River at Beczak Environmental Education Center #4053

Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Psychological Assessment Demystified #S4052 Teachers are essential participants in planning the education of children with special needs. In this role, teachers are often called upon to consider the implications, and, at times, to interpret the findings of psychoeducational assessments. These assessments are a central piece of Section 504 hearings and CSE meetings attended by regular and special education teachers. In addition, parents may informally present findings and recommendations of private evaluations and ask teachers to make adjustments to their child’s program based on various testing results. All too often, psychoeducational assessments are not well understood. Teachers need guidance and support to demystify and to understand psychological and educational tests in order to be responsive to the aptitudes and needs of individual learners, a much-valued Scarsdale Strategic Plan goal. Psychological and educational assessment measures are the focus of the course. Cognition, memory, executive function, emotional and academic tests will be presented and reviewed. Issues related to validity and reliability will be discussed, as well as the role of clinical judgment in the interpretation of more objective measures. At the end of the course, teachers will have knowledge and confidence when reading standard measures, scores, interpretations, and implications of test reports. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings and participate in discussions; write a brief interpretive summary of a student’s functioning based upon test scores. Course Coordinator: Elliot Cohen Open to: All Time: 8/16-17, 9-3:30 Location: SHS, rm 170 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

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As it has throughout history, the Hudson River continues to play a significant role in the geology, ecology, economy, and cultural heritage of New York State. The river has gone through many transformations, from the pristine wilderness of Henry Hudson’s days and before, through the ecological degradation of the 1900’s, to the careful monitoring, protection, and restoration efforts ongoing today. Since 1989, the Beczak Environmental Education Center has helped children and adults explore the natural wonders of the Hudson River through a “hands-on, minds-on” philosophy. The Center, a local resource for schools in Westchester County, provides planned interaction with the natural environment designed to promote environmental awareness and informed stewardship of the Hudson River, the Saw Mill River, and the Bronx River. Participants will engage in a variety of interdisciplinary workshops offered at the Beczak Environmental Education Center to be led by the center’s education staff. Most of the activities will take place outdoors in and around the Hudson River as participants explore the ecology and chemistry of the river and its physical characteristics and cultural heritage. Creative art projects inspired by the beauty of the river and its surroundings are a part of the experience. Teachers will find in the Beczak Center and its educational staff a welcoming possibility as they plan nearby field trips for students. Other educational facilities available along the Yonkers waterfront, including the Science Barge, will be explored. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; complete a project with a classroom/curriculum application. Course Coordinator: Cristine Gilliland Course Speakers: Educational Staff of Beczak Environmental Education Center Open to: All Time: F 6/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/5, 8:30-4:30 Location: Beczak Environmental Education Center, 36 Alexander St.,. Yonkers, NY Materials fee: $10 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 25 participants.

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Challenge Course Workshop I #4054A Challenge Course Workshop I creates a setting for participants to develop essential skills that enhance personal leadership, effective teamwork, and decision-making. Through challenging group and individual experiences, teachers deepen their capacities for problem solving and working with others as they complete a succession of tasks. When teachers take on the role of learners in the face of demanding activities, they can better empathize with the challenges their own students face. Participants will test their problem-solving strategies and communication skills through a series of experiences designed to foster effective teamwork. They will examine realistic goal-setting and collaborative decision-making. They will observe different leadership styles and identify their own management skills. Participants will experience growth related activities in the area of physical, social, and emotional risk-taking. Strategies that create a classroom environment fostering self-esteem will be emphasized. Requirements: Complete the weekend course at Scarsdale Middle School; select a â&#x20AC;&#x153;challenge by choiceâ&#x20AC;? alternative based on readiness for specific physical challenges; keep a journal reflecting on personal experiences and observations gained from participation in activities and prepare a presentation for the group based on journal reflections. Course Coordinators: Barney Foltman, Robert Keith, Kevin Roemer Open to: All Time: F 6/11, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/12, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, gyms A & B Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Challenge Course II #S4054B Challenge Course participants overcome their own limits as they cooperate with colleagues to complete a challenging program of physical activities. In the process, teachers put themselves in the place of learners often faced with daunting classroom tasks. Through the experiential learning at the heart of the Challenge Course process, participants enhance their own problemsolving and decision-making skills, learn the importance of debriefing sessions after lessons, and develop effective questioning techniques that guide student reflection on learning. When individuals, teachers and students alike, stretch 64

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beyond their perceived strengths and weaknesses, they enhance self-esteem, an important goal of the Challenge Course workshops. While working with their colleagues in a more physically and emotionally demanding setting, Challenge Course Workshop II participants will expand their comfort zones beyond the Challenge Course I experience. This course will utilize both low ropes elements and high ropes climbing activities to provide teachers first hand practice in the challenges and stressors faced by students striving to achieve new heights or simply to survive in the classroom. Debriefing activities will provide teachers opportunities to share experiences and to network with each other on best practices and strategies to foster empathy and self-esteem in the classroom environment. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; keep a personal reflections journal and develop a lesson plan from the course content. Course Coordinators: Barney Foltman, Robert Keith, Kevin Roemer Open to: All Time: 6/28-7/2, 8:30-4 Location: Bedford Training Center Facilities Fee: $55 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

The School of Belonging: A Community of Practice in Action #4055 In this age of standards, high-stakes testing, curriculum stressors, and societal pressures on students and educators, classroom time is precious. When only academic performance is measured and evaluated, it can seem overwhelming to take time out of the school day to meet studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; social and emotional needs. But when those needs are met, students feel excited about the discoveries each new day will bring; achievement soars; behaviors such as bullying, name calling, and teasing diminish; and the classroom functions more efficiently and effectively. This course will focus upon the most effective ways for meeting the critical social and emotional needs of students. The School of Belonging is a professional development process that focuses on social and emotional culture building with teachers and learning specialists, guidance and psychological services staff, and building administrators. The program is devoted to creating a Community of Practice. A Community of Practice refers to the process of social learning that occurs and shared sociocultural practices that emerge and evolve when people who have common 65


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goals interact as they strive toward those goals. David A. Levine, author, musician and educator, will facilitate an exploration of the most effective ways to engage students by implementing diverse teaching methods while creating an emotionally safe classroom and school, free from bullying and other low level forms of aggressive behaviors. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; develop a plan for infusing social and emotional learning into the classroom setting.

Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create an extreme makeover curriculum project employing the technologies taught in the course. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci, Ken Holvig Open to: All Time: Tu 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 3:30-5:30 Location: SMS, rm C159

Course Coordinator: Monica Grey

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Course Speaker:.David A. Levine, author, Teaching Empathy, School of Belonging Plan Book

Web Tools for Librarians #4057

Open to: All Time: 7/28-30, 9-3:30 Location: EHS library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

TECHNOLOGY Extreme Makeover: School Technology Edition II #4056 The 21st century teacher must respond to the demands of today’s learners by keeping current with technology and updating curriculum presentations to reflect student preferences. These digital native learners prefer gathering information quickly from multiple multimedia sources; interacting and networking simultaneously with many others; learning “just-in-time.” Digitallearners value what is relevant and instantly useful. Their teachers need support and guidance to enhance curriculum with the sophisticated technology skills that students in this digital age expect. This course will serve a dual purpose supporting previous as well as first-time “Extreme” participants who will study the nature of digital native learners to develop strategies for delivering content appropriately. Instruction and discussion will explore technology applications suitable for curriculum integration. Participants will be introduced to Schoolwires, Scarsdale’s new content management system, Google applications, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and the most recent presentation software. Instructors will demonstrate specific examples of extreme curriculum makeovers utilizing many of these technologies and will guide participants to re-tool curriculum units or lessons using the technologies presented in the class. 66

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The students and staff of the Edgemont and Scarsdale schools utilize the Web for a vast array of research and reading resources, and it is critical to provide access through a user-friendly Web interface. The school librarians need to collaborate to design and build attractive, information-rich, Internet tools for student, teacher, and parent use that address the continuum of K-12 information fluency skills. The librarians will update the library Web sites with design and content that takes students, staff, and community members to engaging, curriculumrelated, reliable resources. Participants will work together to create interactive sites using the most current Web tools to align information fluency skills with grade level and subject area research. Librarians will share strategies for developing library instruction that integrates subscription databases, print resources, and new literacy tools for fostering creative and critical thinking activities for students. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; update Web resources for the school libraries. Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco Open to: Librarians Time: Th 3/4, 3:30-6, with remaining dates to be determined by group Location: SHS library Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

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Take It to the Limit: iMovie for Experts #4058 As new technologies emerge and amaze, teachers need opportunities to stay current with updates to familiar programs. iMovie ‘09 adds powerful, yet easy-to-use new features for creating movies quickly, or adding refinements and special effects to projects. Teachers who are familiar with previous versions of iMovie will develop their skills in the use of the new iMovie ’09 application for digital video editing. Experienced iMovie users will learn the functions and capabilities of innovative features of iLife ’09. Updates to iMovie, iPhoto, and iDVD enhance the editing process in new and exciting ways. Among the additional innovative programs integrated into the instruction are Apple’s Live Type 2, Adobe Photoshop for graphic manipulation, GarageBand for creating sound tracks, iDVD for developing custom DVD projects and iWeb for deploying video on the Web. iMovie users will enhance their knowledge as they involve students in creative digital projects that organize and communicate ideas and events to others. Prerequisite: iWeek, iLife in a Weekend, or iThink, Therefore, iMovie Requirements: Attend both sessions; read assigned materials; prepare a 4-7 minute video based on a curriculum unit. Additionally, participants will present their production and accompanying materials (storyboard, script, etc.) to the class. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All with iMovie experience Time: F 3/19, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/20, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Five Trends for the Future: Are You Ready? #4059 What new types of knowledge will young people need in order to thrive in the 21st century? How can schools prepare students in response to changing expectations of them? Many education, government, and corporate enterprises have created reports that outline lists of skills students must master to be prepared for the workplace they will enter. While the skills 68

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identified often represent solid educational practice for any time period, they fail to address the real and unique changes that are transforming teaching and learning in the nation’s classrooms. A course is needed to delineate skills that today’s students must master and the pedagogy that schools must develop and embed in curriculum. Cutting edge tools from Google, as well as other Web 2.0 programs, have revolutionized the use of technology in the classroom, resulting in a change in practice that identifies the distinctive character of education in this century. Five major trends in technology emerge from current research on teaching and learning in the nation’s schools. Each session of the course will examine one of these five major trends: Audience, Connections, Personalization, Place, and Power. Using an original model called The Framework for the Future, participants will examine the Five Trends through demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on computer experiences. Participants will present a plan for enhancing their instructional program using the Frameworks for the Future model. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create a presentation that incorporates one or more of the trends into curriculum. Course Coordinator: Jerry Crisci Open to: All Time: F 3/12, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/13, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom: PC Beginner #4060A SMART Boards, interactive whiteboards connected to computers and data projectors, are being installed in many classrooms. Once a computer image is projected onto its surface, the SMART Board can be used as a computer operated by hand-touch on the white board. Teachers need training to achieve a working knowledge of the numerous ways to integrate SMART Board into daily lessons. This technology can add a whole new dimension to teaching and learning experiences. PC users new to SMART Boards, will learn its benefits and drawbacks, how to work with the SMART Notebook software, and how to interact 69


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with other commonly used applications. The sessions will combine lecture and presentations by the instructor and workshop time for participants to familiarize themselves with the technology and the software. Participants will be expected to develop SMART Board lessons applicable to their grade level/ subject area, and to demonstrate what they have learned and how they will use class content in their teaching. This course is geared towards beginners to the SMART Board who are using a PC. Requirements: Attend all sessions; develop a SMART Notebook lesson; develop a curriculum application of SMART Board technology. Course Coordinator: Doug Vermes Open to: PC users new to SMART Board Time: F 3/19, 3:30-7:30; Sa 3/20, 8:30-4:30 Location: SHS, rm 352 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom with a Mac #4060B SMART Boards, interactive whiteboards connected to computers and data projectors, are being installed in many classrooms. Once a computer image is projected onto the SMART Board it can be manipulated by hand-touch on the white board. This protection technology can add a whole new dimension to teaching and learning experiences. Teachers need training to achieve a working knowledge of the numerous ways to integrate SMART Board into daily lessons. Moreover, the Mac version of the SMART Board software has many functional differences from the PC version, and Mac users need special training in this technology. Mac users will learn how to use a SMART Board, the benefits and drawbacks of SMART Boards, how to work with the SMART Notebook software, and how to interact with other commonly used applications. The sessions will combine lecture and presentations by the instructor and workshop time for participants to familiarize themselves with the technology and the software. Participants will be expected to develop SMART Board lessons applicable to their grade level/subject area, and to demonstrate what they have learned and how they will use class content in their teaching. This course is geared towards beginners to the SMART Board who are using a Mac. 70

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Requirements: Attend all sessions; develop a SMART Notebook lesson; develop a curriculum application of SMART Board technology. Course Coordinators: Chris Sipe, Doug Vermes Open to: Mac users Time: F 4/16, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/17, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

Using a SMART Board in the Classroom: PC Advanced #S4060C SMART Boards, interactive whiteboards connected to computers and data projectors, are being installed in many classrooms. Once a computer image is projected onto its surface, the SMART Board can be used as a computer operated by hand-touch on the white board. Teachers who have a basic understanding of the SMART Board need training to achieve a higher level of mastery with the numerous ways to make more effective use of a SMART Board. This technology can add a whole new dimension to teaching and learning experiences. Participants will build on their previous knowledge to learn new strategies for using the SMART Board and to explore the available tools in the SMART Board Gallery and Lesson Activity Toolkit. The sessions will combine lecture and presentations by the instructor and workshop time for participants to familiarize themselves with the technology and the software. Participants will be expected to develop SMART Board lessons applicable to their grade level/ subject area and to demonstrate what they have learned and how they will use class content in their teaching. This course is geared towards PC users who have already mastered the basics of using a SMART Board. Requirements: Attend all sessions; develop a SMART Notebook lesson; develop a curriculum application of SMART Board technology.

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Course Coordinator: Doug Vermes Open to: Experienced PC and SMART Board users Time: 8/30-31, 9-3:30 Location: SHS, rm 352 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 20 participants.

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iWork in the Classroom # 4062 Traditional use of computers in the classroom includes word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, and presentations. Apple’s iWork ’09 is a newly updated suite of software that includes Keynote for presentations, Pages for desktop publishing, and Numbers, Apple’s spreadsheet program. Curriculum applications for the use of the iWork suite in classroom practice spans all grades and subject areas.

Using JAVA Applets in the Science Classroom # 4061 The use of JAVA Applets facilitates the teaching of science concepts that are difficult to convey using traditional equipment.  New Web sites employing the use of these Applets proliferate on the Internet.  These sites allow teachers and their students to alter variables in simulated experiments and then form conclusions about the relationships being studied.  Science teachers will enhance laboratory experiments when they apply the use of Applets to complex concepts.

In this course, participants will learn the basics of the three iWork applications and explore the curriculum possibilities of each. Online tutorials will support direct instruction and serve as an on-going resource for participants. Exemplars will be offered and participants will design and create a detailed curriculum lesson to meet the specific needs of their students using one or all of the iWork suite applications.

Participants will observe applications of JAVA Applets that are appropriate for classroom demonstrations, homework assignments, and laboratory experiences. They will work with model lessons to learn how best to use various kinds of Applets.  The teachers will also explore the Internet, finding and cataloguing Applets appropriate for their disciplines.  A comprehensive catalogue of Applets will be developed for sharing within the schools.  This catalogue will list the Web sites of the Applets and include brief descriptions of contents, grade levels, and suggestions for use.  Finally, each teacher will create lessons based on these Applets.   Requirements:  Attend all sessions; create lessons based on the JAVA Applets Web sites; demonstrate competence in using JAVA Applets.  

Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys

Coordinators: Barbara Bierbauer, Pat Jablonowski                        Open To: HS science   Time: F 4/9, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/10, 8:30-4:30   Location: SHS, rm 350   Credits: One point salary credit or stipend

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Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; design a curriculum project utilizing the iWork suite. Open to: All Time: F 4/23, 3:30-7:30; Sa 4/24, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Keeping Current with Technology III #4063 Using information, media, and technology, often in combination, are paramount among the skills students need in the 21st century. To be current in the classroom, teachers must be familiar with computer technology operations, from basic to advanced, and many teachers have expressed the need for a course that addresses the fundamentals of the technology available to them in the classroom. An understanding of computer technology is essential to achieving competence with the continuum of 21st century technology skills and applications. Keeping Current with Technology III is recommended for those who attended Sessions I or II and anyone who wants to gain an understanding of the essential functions of the Macintosh computer and its integration 73


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into the school-wide network. This is a customized course where the needs of the participants will dictate the level of instruction. Through demonstration and guided practice this six-session course will provide teachers with the answers to their technology questions and enhance and advance their skills. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; complete a project with a classroom/curriculum application.

demonstrating competence with advanced Keynote features.

Course Coordinator: Linda Fisher

Course limited to 15 participants.

Course Speaker: Kathy Basso, Computer Consultant Open to: MAC users Time: T 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 3:30-5:30

Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Keynote for the Intermediate and Advance User #4064 With SMART Boards and projectors in more and more classrooms, increasing numbers of teachers use slideshows as aids to their lessons. These can enhance student learning by adding images and video to any topic. However, many teachers, having developed their skills at putting together introductory presentations, are ready to move to a more advanced level. Technically creative and sophisticated presentations are more likely to capture students’ attention. Students who are inundated with stimuli from television and the Internet are a demanding audience when it comes to multimedia presentations. Thus, a course that focuses on the advanced features of Keynote benefits today’s teachers. Keynote has evolved into a sophisticated presentation program that allows users to showcase not only text and graphics, but also audio, video, and animation. This course, for more experienced users of the program, focuses on manipulating images, sound, and video to produce stunning slideshows. Participants will master advanced features of Keynote and other helpful programs available through the district computers or over the Internet. With the skills they cultivate, participants will create their own presentations related to curriculum topics. Requirements: Attend all sessions; participate in class; complete a project 74

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Course Coordinators: Steve Scharf, Paul Tomizawa Open to: Experienced users of Keynote Time: F 5/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/8, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm P183 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Digital Storybooks to Go #4065 Teachers continually look for ways to expand their knowledge of computers and technology into curricular areas unimagined just a few years ago. Book publishing is an example. The tools necessary to publish a professional quality book with digitally enhanced photographs are just a few mouse clicks away. The classroom applications for digital storybooks span the grades, and teachers and their students will be able to present their work in creative and enduring book forms. Participants will create digital multimedia storybooks for use in both the classroom and library by learning to combine scanned images, video, and PowerPoint slides into a single integrated project. During the first session of this weekend course, participants will be introduced to the new iPhoto ‘09 and Adobe Photoshop and will practice the features of these applications that are necessary to complete the storybook project. Also, participants will be introduced to Blurb and My Publisher, two additional online book-publishing sites. During the second session, participants will design, develop, and publish a book, complete with photos, based on a unit of study from their curriculum. Requirements: Attend all sessions; design and publish a curriculum-oriented book. Course Coordinators: Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Dates: F 5/7, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/8, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Open to: All Materials fee: (Optional) $30.00 for professionally bound and published book Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

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Soundtrack #4066 Making music is a joyful experience, and new developments in technology can transform computer users into composers of complex musical pieces with the relative ease of clicking a mouse. Musicians and non-musicians alike can share in the process of creating music through the use of the Midi keyboard and Garageband software. When teachers experience the satisfaction of thinking creatively in the arts as they integrate music into curriculum, they are better able to transfer the act of discovery to their students. Course participants will spend a weekend discovering their suppressed talents while composing original music. Fundamental music concepts will be introduced through an electronic piano, the Midi keyboard, that simultaneously transforms sounds played on the keyboard into music notations in Garageband. Through the weekend, participants will repeat this process as a means of learning how music is structured and layered to create melody, harmony, and rhythm. Participants will compose original soundtracks to literature, video pieces, and, perhaps, moments in their classrooms. No prior musical knowledge is required. Requirements: Attend all sessions; create original music compositions for performance to the class; develop a classroom application of course content.

application, they will bring a whole new technological dimension to students across the grades. Nontraditional teaching resources meet the needs of students with a range of abilities and learning styles. In this course, participants will learn to use the Sketchup computer aided design program. Instruction and discussions will explore several related topics: architectural projects throughout the grade levels, the mathematical tools incorporated into Sketchup, and the creation of both large and smallscale models. The first part of the course will be devoted to learning Sketchup tools and choosing a project to model that can be integrated into curriculum. The next session will provide ample time for individuals to create their own models and share them with the group. Participants will be asked to create one model that could be used in the classroom. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create a 3D computer model of a building or object to be used in curriculum. Course Coordinator: Peter McKenna Open to: All Time: 8/2-3, 9-3:30 Location: FMS computer lab; library

Course Coordinators: Lisa Forte, Paul Tomizawa

Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Open to: All Time: F 5/14, 3:30-7:30; Sa 5/15, 8:30-4:30

Course limited to 15 participants.

Location: EWS computer lab Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Google Sketchup: Creating 3D Models for the Classroom #S4067 The study of architecture is both an art and a science with numerous curriculum applications throughout the grades. Using Google Sketchup technology in history, students are able to create 3D models that enliven the subject by designing colonial era houses or landmarked New York City buildings. The creation of 3-D models stimulates student imagination while requiring problem solving and the ability to measure angles and planes. As teachers gain competence with this exciting and innovative Google 76

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Mapping the World with GeoTechnology #4068 GeoTechnology refers to a variety of mapping applications that can enhance learning at all grade levels and in all disciplines. When teachers integrate geographic knowledge into the curriculum, students are able to visualize and communicate data in new and engaging ways. GeoTechnology can deepen student knowledge of complex international problems and develop the critical thinking required for an understanding of the interdependent world, a core goal of the Scarsdale schools. The importance of mapping technology has been summarized by ESRI, a forerunner and leader in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) field: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The technology leverages this geographic insight to address social, economic, business, and environmental concerns at local, regional, national, and global scales.â&#x20AC;? (ESRI: Geography Matters) Course content features recent advances in GeoTechnology including Google Maps, Google Earth, and several other mapping technologies for plotting 77


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selected data on interactive maps that can show change over time. Teachers will learn how these resources can help students find information with a geographic connection in all fields of study and add images and other content to base maps. Guided instruction will enable participants to locate and show data that enhances the study of literature, history, economics, and science. The course provides teachers with the time to develop activities for students that support geography-related goals and skills across many academic disciplines. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; design a curriculum project incorporating online mapping technology that includes teaching materials and assessment rubrics for student work. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci, Doug Rose Open to: All Time: F 6/4, 3:30-7:30; Sa 6/5, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm B135 Credit: One point salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Beyond Google 2.0: Wikis, Social Networking, and New Research Tools #S4069 Students and staff of the Scarsdale schools have access to a vast array of subscription print and multimedia databases and new interactive Web resources that enhance classroom instruction. Different Internet resources require different access strategies, and teachers need instruction for developing the skills to explore and utilize them in classroom lessons and student assignments. Teachers also need the time and opportunity to develop interdisciplinary activities by working with colleagues in other departments and grade levels. In this three-day hands-on course, teachers will master advanced search techniques for locating and utilizing information in subscription databases and will explore current interactive Web tools. Participants will learn the strategies and skills necessary to delve deeply into the resources of Scarsdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online databases, focusing on those that relate to individual subject areas as well as interdisciplinary resources such as ARTstor. Teachers will combine image, video, audio, and text files for use in the classroom, create Wikis, and use collaborative online networking tools. This class will provide a laboratory 78

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for teachers, working in the library with members of their own and other departments and grades, to design teaching materials and interdisciplinary student activities that incorporate the use of interactive Web resources. Requirements: Attend all sessions; develop original teaching materials or student activities applying the resources of the course to classroom practice. Course Coordinator: Phyllis DiBianco Open to: All Time: 6/28-30, 8:30-4 Location: SHS library Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend Course limited to 15 participants.

Stop the Presses! Virtual Newsroom in the Classroom #S4070 Digital communication technology is changing the way information is viewed and absorbed. Trends in the news media show that more information is available to the public than ever before, information now delivered through a variety of channels new to the 21st century. Newspapers and broadcast stations have Web sites, blogs, videos, and social networking sites expanding conventional modes of communication. The varied ways of analyzing information require traditional reading and writing skills as well as new online literacy skills, strategies, and dispositions. Teachers need to know, and students need to be taught, how to adapt and utilize these tools. Students must understand current issues if they are to become informed, critical thinkers in the 21st century global community and users of its ever-expanding technologies. This course will engage participants in the study of journalism, media literacy, and online reading/writing comprehension to help teachers integrate media literacy and online reading/writing comprehension and strategies into instruction. Teachers will produce a news program for which they will study and report on issues, trends, and ideas related to a curriculum area, community events, or current events. They will use Wikis, blogs, Web design, podcasts, and other technologies to develop an understanding of these resources and how students can use them in the classroom. Working in teams, participants will learn to use digital communication technology in the service of the young people they teach. 79


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Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned projects and activities; participate in group and online discussions.

Course Speaker: Matt Beals, Video Consultant

Course Coordinators: Paul Tomizawa, William Yang

Time: 7/26-29, 8:30-4:30

Open to: All Time: 7/19-22, 8:30-4:30

Location: SHS, rm 350

Location: SMS, rm B135

Course limited to 15 participants.

Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

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Open to: All

Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

Summer Data Literacy Workshop #S4072

Course limited to 15 participants.

Video Production Boot Camp #S4071 Teachers are integrating video into classroom practice with increasing frequency. The video format has proved to be an effective tool for teaching and learning as well as a means to motivate students with different learning styles. Teachers who are familiar with video techniques want to expand their knowledge to the next level of enhancement: the creative and technical aspects of video production and editing. By participating in the stages of preproduction, production, and post-production on their own videos, teachers will discover additional ways in which video production can be used to enhance any subject area. Scott Beals, a video consultant, will lead the course beginning with a review of video vocabulary, the basic technical aspects of video cameras, and the roles necessary for a video project. Participants will then be ready for the pre-production phase of selecting a script and breaking it down into all the necessary components by creating storyboards, shot-lists, prop-lists, location scouting, and shooting schedules. During the production stage, the teachers will become a full running video crew, rotating positions and bringing their scripts to life with actors and video equipment. In the post-production phase, participants will learn the basics of Adobe Premiere and edit their own videos. A final screening of multiple edits of the same story will reveal the power of video and the ways in which the video maker can influence the viewer through short angles, composition, and editing. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned materials; complete a short video that has been produced and edited using the techniques demonstrated in the course. Course Coordinator: Greg Leong

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Data literacy is the ability to ask and answer meaningful questions by collecting, analyzing and making sense of the data encountered in real life (Inspiration Software). National science and math standards as well as the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Technology Plan and District goals have long identified data analysis and problem solving as essential skills for students to learn. The capacity to think critically and creatively is deepened when students know the appropriate tools and techniques required to gather, analyze, and interpret data. Teachers at all levels and academic disciplines will enhance instruction and student learning when they master the technology needed to access, assess, manipulate, summarize, and present data. In this course, participants will learn to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources (National Educational Technology Standards), and to process data and present results. Teachers with little previous experience will master the basic tools for data analysis and problem solving: spreadsheets and databases. They will also be taught how to access sources of data and data analysis tools on the Internet. In addition to Microsoft Excel and FileMaker Pro, participants will become skilled at the use of charts, tables, and other visual representations of data in presentations and print documents. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; create a curriculum application of course content that includes an assessment rubric. Course Coordinator: Doug Rose Open to: All Time: 8/9-12, 9-3:30 Location: SMS rm B135 Credit: Two points salary credit or stipend

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iWeek: Harnessing the Power of iLife #S4073 Apple’s iLife ‘09 software provides users a means for expressing themselves through professional-quality projects of all kinds: movies, photo essays, presentations, podcasts, Web sites, written reports, data analyses, and more. Best of all, these applications work together seamlessly, so educators can use them in concert to build a curriculum that fosters creativity in the classroom. The potential for developing instructional strategies using the various elements of the digital hub has become central to technology-supported instruction. Participants will learn how the digital hub relates to the use of technology in the curriculum. Exemplars will be provided for iApps: iMovie, iPhoto, iDVD, iTunes, GarageBand, and iWeb. Also, training will be provided for the iWork suite: Keynote, Pages, and Numbers. Each participant will create an instructional activity using at least one element of the digital hub and develop an assessment strategy for the activity. At the conclusion of the course, teachers should understand the basics of each application and be able to produce curriculum-based technology activities drawing on elements of the digital hub. Instructors will differentiate instruction to accommodate all skill levels. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read assigned material; create an instructional activity and assessment strategy using at least one element of the digital hub. Course Coordinators: Jerry Crisci,Ken Holvig, Andy Verboys Open to: All Time: 8/16-19, 8:30-4:30 Location: SMS, rm C159 Credit: Three points salary credit or stipend

SPECIAL NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS Knitting #4074 During the past decade, the popularity of knitting as a hobby has expanded as people of all ages discover the satisfaction that comes from this historic art form. This trend, led by celebrities across the globe, has led to a flurry of patterns and designer yarns marketed to a younger and trendier generation of knitters than ever before. 82

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Participants will create a project or projects of their choice based on each individual level of expertise. Knitters at all levels of accomplishment, from beginner to advanced, will find instruction to develop their skills. Participants will be eligible to receive a discount on supplies from Sticks and Strings in Scarsdale. Course Coordinator: Heidi Kaplan Course Speaker: Laura Paul, professional knitting instructor, Sticks and Strings Open to: All Time: 4/6, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4, 5/18, 5/25, 3:30-5:30 Location: SMS, TBA Credit: Non-credit

Conversational English for Adult Language Learners #4075 A & B The Scarsdale Teachers Institute in collaboration with the Interdependence Institute offers this class for adults whose first language is not English. Participants practice and refine spoken English and improve communication skills in a variety of settings. Through a series of fun exercises, discussions, and games, participants improve their listening skills, gain pronunciation awareness, train new muscle patterns for producing speech, and learn to monitor their speech. Topics vary based on participants’ suggestions and include speaking with school personnel, asking and giving directions, and using the telephone. Requirements: Attend each class; bring a mirror to class; participate in discussions and activities. Course Coordinator: Meredythe Nowak Time: Section A; Tu 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, noon1; Section B; Th 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 5/20, 5/27, 6/3 6/10, noon-1 Location: QRS Fee: No fee Course limited to 10 participants

Gentle Yoga #4076 Yoga practice increases strength, flexibility, and balance. Each session will 83


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include a series of Yoga postures beginning with a centering, gradually increasing intensity, a gentle stretch, and relaxation to close. Students will also have instruction in viniyoga, a therapeutic style of yoga practice. This yoga can help with conditions such as carpal tunnel and other various stress related conditions. Course Coordinator: Joan Weber Course Speaker: Patricia Meehan, certified yoga and viniyoga instructor Open to: All Time: Th 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29, 5/6, 5/13, 4-4:45 Location: SHS, teachers cafe Credit: Non credit

CPR and AED for Adults and Children #4077A Whether in the classroom, in the halls, on the playground or the athletic field, students and adults face the potential of injury at school. The first three minutes after an injury occurs are the most critical. This is the time before the school nurse, doctor, EMT or other trained person arrives. Teachers and parents seek opportunities to inform themselves of new first aid and CPR techniques in order to understand how to react in an emergency and when to get help. Certification or recertification can be satisfied with this course. Requirements: Attend all sessions; read required textbooks.

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First Aid for Nurses #4077B In order to provide the best care for students, school nurses need the opportunity to refresh and renew their knowledge and to keep up with developments in emergency treatment. Nurses must be aware of the latest first aid techniques to respond appropriately to health situations they may face in the classroom and the schoolyard. Video, discussion, reading materials, and lectures will provide current information on emergency care. Participants will practice on each other and on models to reinforce first aide techniques. Guest lecturers who are specialists in emergency care will share their expertise. Course topics include: bleeding emergencies, bone and muscle injuries, brain and spinal cord injuries, eye, and ear injuries. Participants must pass an exam at the end of each segment with a score of at least 80% in order to be certified. Requirements: Attend all sessions; complete assigned readings; participate in practice sessions, pass exams. Course Coordinator: Joyce Hoffman Course Speakers: TBA Open to: Nurses Time: TBA Location: QRS multipurpose room Fee: Cost of books and certification Credit: One point salary credit or stipend

Course Coordinator: Joyce Hoffman Course Speaker: Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant Time: Sa 4/17, 8:30-4:30 Location: QRS, rm 16 Open to: All Credit: $250 stipend for Scarsdale staff Course limited to 12 participants.

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Course Coordinators and Speakers

Page

Maureen Ball, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 44 Kathy Basso, Computer Aide, Scarsdale Middle School ......................................... 74 Matt Beals, Video Consultant................................................................................. 81 David Besancon, Teacher, Fox Meadow................................................................. 38 Barbara Bierbauer, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................. 72 Tom Blank, Teacher, Greenville............................................................................. 45 Bob Caldwell, Safety Consultant............................................................................ 84 Lucy Calkins, Teachers College, Columbia University............................................ 13 Alan Cass, Teacher, Seely...................................................................................... 45 Diane Celentano, Dance/Lincoln Center Coordinator, Scarsdale............................ 51 Richard Clark, Teacher, Scarsdale High School....................................................... 54 Chris Coffin, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School................................................ 21 Elliot Cohen, Psychologist, Scarsdale Middle School.................................... 59, 60, 61, 62 Bill Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College..................................... 28 Craig Covil, Drivers of Change consultant.............................................................. 29 Gerald Crisci, Director of Instructional and Administrative Computing, Scarsdale............................................................................... 67, 69, 78, 82 Kerry Curtin, Teacher, Seely Place.......................................................................... 57 Trent DeBerry, Teacher, Heathcote........................................................................ 13, 43 Katherine de la Garza, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale..................... 41 Robyn Deutsch, Teacher, Fox Meadow.................................................................. 38 Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School ...................................... 28, 53, 67, 79 Robert DiYanni, Director of Arts and Aesthetic Education, Scarsdale ................ 18, 19, 51 Amanda Doll, Behavior Analyst, EDM., BCBA........................................................ 56 Elisa Draper, Teacher, Quaker Ridge....................................................................... 14 Cheryl Drechsel-Orlandi, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................... 30 Tracy Durkin, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................................... 48 Laurence Edwards, Psychologist............................................................................. 52 Joseph Faltin, Teacher, Hackley School.................................................................. 23 Maggie Favretti, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.................................................... 32 Linda Fisher, Arts Chair, Scarsdale Middle School................................................. 74 Barney Foltman, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 49, 65 Evelyn and Juan Fontan, Latin Dance Consultants................................................. 30 Lisa Forte, Teacher, Edgewood.......................................................................... 76 Tracey Garrison-Feingold, Senior Program Associate, Facing History and Ourselves 26 Jennifer Gilbert, Science Chair, Scarsdale Middle School...................................... 29, 37 Cristine Gilliland, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................. 63 Susan Goodman, Teacher in Charge, Special Education, Scarsdale......................... 56 Monica Grey, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School.............................................. 17, 66 Lindsey Hicks, Teacher, Heathcote........................................................................ 42 Joyce Hoffman, Nurse, Quaker Ridge................................................................... 84, 85 Ken Holvig, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............ 67, 68, 73, 75, 82 Pat Jablonowski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School.................................................... 72 Bill Jackson, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale...................................... 16, 38 Bena Kallick, Educational Consultant...................................................................... 52 Karen Kane, Associate Director Asia for Educators, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University.......................................................................................... 36 Heidi Kaplan, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 83 Robert Keith, Physical Education Chair, Scarsdale Middle School........................... 49, 65 Kimberly Kilcoyne, Teacher, Seely Place............................................................... 31, 44

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Jennifer Kiley, Elementary Science Helping Teacher, Scarsdale............................. 39 Christine Kovacs, Teacher, Seely Place................................................................. 57 Meghan Lahey, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School............................................... 29, 47 Greg Leong, Teacher, Scarsdale High School........................................................ 80 David Levine, Author, Teaching Empathy............................................................. 66 Abel Lushiku, Professor, Berkeley College............................................................ 33 Laurie Mandelbaum, Yoga Instructor.................................................................... 52 Michael McDermott, Principal, Scarsdale Middle School...................................... 16 Peter McKenna, Teacher, Fox Meadow ................................................................ 77 Patricia Meehan, Certified yoga and viniyoga instructor....................................... 83 Cliff Mendelson, Artist......................................................................................... 31 Mike Menna, Athletic Director, Scarsdale High School......................................... 49 Ann Marie Nee, Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................... 15, 35 Meredythe Nowak, Teacher, Greenacres, Heathcote, Quaker Ridge...................... 83 O’Hara Family, Irish Step Dancing Consultants..................................................... 30 Adrienne Onofri, Author, Educator........................................................................ 24 Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote............................................................................ 24 Jacqueline O’Shea, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School..................................... 57 Laura Paul, Professional knitting instructor, Sticks and Strings............................... 83 Nancy Pavia, Elementary Math Helping Teacher, Scarsdale................................... 41 Barbara Petzen, Director, Harvard University Center for Middle Eastern Studies... 32 Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ...................................................... 16 Lynn Potter, Teacher, Scarsdale High School......................................................... 23 Chris Renino, English Chair, Scarsdale High School.............................................. 19 Dawn Rivellini, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................ 44 Vivian Robert, Teacher, Heathcote........................................................................ 46 Kevin Roemer, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.........................................47, 48, 64, 65 Doug Rose, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School..................................................... 78, 81 Marge Ross, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................... 26 Steve Scharf, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School................................................... 75 Greta Scharnweber, Director of the Outreach Program of the Hagop .Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies at NYU.......................................... 32 Elena Serapiglia, Yale PIER Center on Latin American and Iberian Studies........... 32 Susan Silkowitz, Teacher, Seely Place .................................................................. 57 Chris Sipe, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School....................................................... 71 Ilene Smith, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School............................................. 17, 40, 52 Phil Smith, Poet and artist ................................................................................... 42 Maria Stile, Principal, Heathcote........................................................................... 13, 43 Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School..................................... 32, 48 Len Tallevi, Social Studies Chair, Scarsdale Middle School................................. 37, 40, 50 Marie Tallevi, Teacher, Quaker Ridge..................................................................... 40, 50 Sarah Picard Taylor, Teachers College, Columbia University................................... 13, 43 Kathleen Tolan, Teachers College, Columbia University......................................... 13, 43 Paul Tomizawa, Teacher, Edgewood................................................ 20, 22, 25, 49, 76, 80 Andrea Tripodi, Psychologist, Scarsdale Middle School ....................................... 27 Jennifer Turetzky, Psychologist, Heathcote........................................................ 46, 55, 58 Andy Verboys, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School........................................ 68, 73, 75, 81 Doug Vermes, Teacher, Scarsdale High School ................................................. 70, 71, 72 Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel and Administrative Services, Scarsdale ................................................................................... 28, 51, 53, 84 Sarah Whittington, World Language Coordinator, K-8, Scarsdale......................... 27, 36 David Wixted, English Chair, Scarsdale Middle School.......................................... 37

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Diane Wrobleski,Teacher, Scarsdale High School................................................... 18 William Yang, Teacher, Greenacres ....................................................................... 80 Ban Har Yeap, Author of Singapore Primary Math textbooks ................................. 40 Alice Yugovich, Teacher, Heathcote....................................................................... 49 Melissa Zeiler, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School.................................................. 30 Art and Susan Zuckerman, Hosts of a WVOX show and contributors to the Travel Channel.......................................................................................... 20, 22, 25

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Registration and Credit Information  You must register prior to the start of a course; registration and tuition payment ensure your place in a course. Please note that some courses have limited enrollment; register early to obtain your first choice. You may obtain a registration form from the STI office or online. You may also register by phone at the STI office, 721-2580. Checks should be made payable to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute.

How

to

Register

•Online: www.scarsdaleschools.org/sti. Receipt of payment secures your place in a course. If you register online, you must send a check to the STI office within 48 hours to guarantee your registration. •At the STI Office: Scarsdale High School, room 102 •By phone: 721-2580 Receipt of payment secures your place in a course. If you register by phone, you must send a check to the STI office within 48 hours to guarantee your registration. •By mail: send completed form and your check made payable to Scarsdale Teachers Institute to the STI, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583.

Non-Credit Courses

Courses in this catalogue labeled “non-credit” are those for which the Institute will not request Board of Education support. These courses will be supported solely by teachers’ tuition fees.

Salary Study Credit, Stipends

for

Courses

According to the STA contract, the Board of Education has agreed to approve, at the recommendation of the Accreditation Committee, courses for salary credit or a stipend and has set aside a sum of money to pay the instructional expenses of these courses. The Board approves a course for credit according to the following procedure. If a course furthers the educational goals of the District, the Institute Director submits it to the Accreditation Committee for review and recommendation and then to the Superintendent and Board of Education for approval. Assignments of salary credit will usually be announced before the course begins. Some courses will carry salary credit for teachers eligible for additional credits or a stipend for teachers at MA+75 or above. These teachers may obtain a maximum of eight credits per year for Institute courses. Upon application and approval, the eight-credit maximum noted above may be waived for STI courses where the STI Accreditation Committee determined such courses meet District goals. Two of these eight (8) credits may be taken in summer STI courses and may be applied to either the previous school year’s allotment or the upcoming school year’s allotment. In order to obtain salary credit or a stipend for an approved course, a teacher will be responsible for completing the course requirements within ninety days of completion of the course.

Emergency Closing In the event that the Scarsdale or Edgemont Schools are closed for the day or are closed during the day, STI courses for that day are cancelled. Course coordinators will arrange make-up times.

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Payment Policy

STI Policy Board 2009-2010

Registration Form

Please return entire page to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute, 2 Brewster Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Receipt of this registration form with payment secures your place in a course. The STI office will notify you if a course is not running. If you have any questions, please call 721-2580. Payment must be made before the course begins. No credit or stipend will be awarded without full payment. Please make checks payable to the Scarsdale Teachers Institute. Check must accompany registration form.

Cancellation Policy

No refunds will be issued for courses unless participant gives two-day notice to STI office. Scarsdale, Edgemont, and other Westchester residents are welcome to enroll in STI courses listed as “programs open to all.” Name _________________________________________________________________________ School _____________________________ Grade(s) _______________Tel. ext. ____________ Home Address _________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________ Home Phone ______________________________

Cell Phone _________________________________

Email Address Course #

Course Title

1.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

2.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

3.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

4.___________

_______________________________________________ _____________

Amount Enclosed

Amount

$______________________

Please send this form to STI and keep a copy to remind yourself of upcoming courses for which you have registered.

Register beforehand!

Your timely registration assures your place in a course and can make the difference between a course running or being cancelled! Fee Schedule: $75 per credit for Scarsdale and Edgemont faculty and residents $45 per credit for Scarsdale and Edgemont non-teaching staff, retired teachers, and senior citizens $85 per credit for non-residents

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Susan Taylor, Director Kenneth Holvig, Assistant to the Director, Head Computer Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Phyllis DiBianco, Librarian, Scarsdale High School, Policy Board Chair Trudy Moses, President, Scarsdale Teachers Association, Treasurer John Dean, Teacher, Greenacres, Secretary Valerie Abrahams, Resident, Scarsdale Jennifer Allen, Interim Principal, Greenville Christine Cecere, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School William Costanzo, Professor, Westchester Community College Gerald Crisci, Director of Technology, Scarsdale Michael Curtin, Instructional Technology Specialist, Edgemont Michaeline Curtis, Board of Education, Edgemont Linda Fisher, Art Department Chair, Scarsdale Middle School Kathleen Fox, Teacher, Seely Place Mary Beth Gose, Board of Education, Scarsdale Elizabeth Gruber, Scarsdale Parent Teacher Council Penny Hamlet, Teacher in Charge, Quaker Ridge Gwen Johnson, Teacher, Scarsdale High School John Klemme, Principal, Scarsdale High School Lorella Lamonaca, Teacher, Edgewood Michael McDermott, Principal, Scarsdale Middle School Lisa Onofri, Teacher, Heathcote Nicole Pisano, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Nancy Rodgers, Teacher, Fox Meadow Lynne Shain, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, Scarsdale Paul Solomon, President, Edgemont Teachers Association Vivian Sonnenborn, Teacher, Greenville Jeannette Stockton, Teacher, Edgemont Jr/Sr High School Sharon Waskow, Librarian, Scarsdale Middle School Joan Weber, Assistant Superintendent for Personnel & Administrative Services, Scarsdale Emma Wixted, Teacher, Scarsdale Middle School Diane Wrobleski, Teacher, Scarsdale High School Gerry Young, Principal, Greenacres School Fran Garafolo, STI Secretary

Policy Board Standing Committees Accreditation

John Dean Phyllis DiBianco Linda Fisher Mike McDermott Lynne Shain Vivian Sonnenborn Susan Taylor Joan Weber

Past Directors of the STI 

Incentives for Innovation Mary Beth Gose Ken Holvig Gwen Johnson Vivian Sonnenborn Susan Taylor Joan Weber Gerry Young

Judith Schwartz 1980-2002 Doris Breslow 1979-1980  Ralph Ricci 1975-1979 Werner Feig 1972-1975 Doris Breslow 1969-1972, founder

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SCARSDALE TEACHERS INSTITUTE SPRING/SUMMER 2010

SERVING THE SCARSDALE AND EDGEMONT COMMUNITIES

STI Spring 2010 Catalog  

Spring STI catalog

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