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THE I M PULS E IS SUE

Artist Spotlight

Th e Spon tan eous M e nu

Welcome to taking risks, breaking the norms, and ultimately getting out of your comfort zone. Act upon your immediate thoughts.

Interviews with illustrator, Caleb Boyles, and textile artist, Chloe Walters, based around the spontaneity in their craft.

Switch up the traditional and try something unconventional. These recipes are sure to give your meals a spin on the usual boring dinner.


This is not an authentic Kinfolk Magazine . This project is part of a Current Trends and Forecasting class at Savannah College of Art and Design. All content in this magazine do not reflect their views of Kinfolk Magazine or is affiliated in any way.


Published by Ouur Media Amagertory 14, Level 1 1160 Copenhagen, Denmark 5210 N Williams Avenue Portland, Oregon 97217 USA Telephone: 503-946-8400 Kinfolk is a slow lifestyle magazine published by Ouur that explores ways for readers to simplify their lives, cultivate community and spend more time with their friends and family. www.kinfolk.com Ouur is a lifestyle publisher and agency creating print and digital media for younger creative audience. www.ouurmedia.com Printed in Canada

(c) 2016 Kinfolk Magazine All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the editor, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the editor, addressed “Attention: Kinfolk Permissions,� at the address below: info@kinfolk.com The views expressed in Kinfolk magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the company or its staff. Publication Design by Charlotte Heal Cover Photography by Jessie Scott


OLIVIA BRANDT Editor in Chief & Creative D irec tor

PA I G E H O M B E R G

LILLY BRASILI

Ar t D irec tor

Editor

HANNAH PLEASANT

KELLY HIPPENMEYER

D esig n D irec tor

Styli st

CALEB BOYLES

CHRISTOPHER DOWELL

Illu strator

Photog rapher

CHLOE WALTERS JESSIE SCOTT Photog rapher

Weaver & Illu strator

ASHLEY CUNNINGHAM

D UL C E C OR AZ ON

C ontr ibuting Wr iter

MIGH TY G OODR I DG E

ADAM CIOFFI

Photog rapher

C ontr ibuting Wr iter

K AT I E F R E Z Z A

EBONY VICTOR

Photog rapher

JESSICA RUSSELL Photog rapher

C ontr ibuting Wr iter

ELIANA DOCKTERMAN C ontr ibuting Wr iter

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WE LC OME To be impulsive or think and act on an impulse is a natural act of our human minds. How is it that we as human beings can feel so compelled by something whether it is a person, a place, or simply an object, and allow it to trigger an unseen action or provoke an unconventional thought? There could be many answers, you could say it is human nature, how we’re programmed or dive into the depths of psychology and find where in the mind this notion born. Not to say one is right or wrong but we are just glad that it happens. Due to the idea of an impulse we have ignited the creative sparks that developed into the multitude of essays within this issue of Kinfolk. We have found it inspiring, creating an issue full of concepts that we experience everyday and investigating them, dissecting beneath the surface. There is the act of an impulse and a reaction to it. These reactions often come unexpectedly, created by passion, belief, drive. Where does that reaction take us, what are the consequences. Or maybe it’s a benefit? We hope that these reactions flow through your veins and the words of our contributors set you on a whim, cue the goosebumps, and ultimately inspire. We best show case our impulses through emotion, whether it is emotions only executed in the mind or brought out through facial expression, language of the body, even art. We investigated how impulses can affect our everyday lives and how a day would look if we payed attention to our impulses and acted on them, well impulsively. It can sometimes be hard to break out of your typical routine and adhere to your instinctive impulse so we

have also given some tips (if you’re feeling rebellious) to help you do so. And as a team of so called “creatives” it is only right to think that we best showcase our inclinations through art. Looking to an assortment of different mediums and materials, spotlights throughout this issue are turned to a handful of artists that create on an impulse. We believe that even though design and architecture is planned quite strategically, there is still the suggestion of taking risks in design and going out on a whim; after all, taking a chance and doing something intriguingly different is why there are so many different styles within architecture. In our Architectural Juxtaposition piece, we have showcased the diversity in design within one city and how modern structure can stand next to rich history to create composition. Sometimes we get stuck in a rut, especially in the creative field. Who would have thought in a world full of ideas and wonder that it is humanly possible to be lost between the translation of our minds and the creative possibilities locked inside. We hope that this issue can help you find that Motivating Force, or Ignite your pulse to get you back to the creative plans brewing inside you. Or if you were lost and don’t need to be found, we hope that this content will add a little spark to life, maybe even break the norm. Take our Impulse issue, enjoy the stories of moments that were invigorating and all started from one impulsive action. And trust us, we will not be disappointed if you suddenly feel the urge to set it down and go thrive in actions of spontaneity. After all, that’s how we felt while creating it.

OLIVIA BRANDT


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WORDS ASHLEY CUNNIN GH A M

S o mething A b o u t a R isk Risks can come in tiny, simple packages and something dangerous to me might not be dangerous to you.

Some people have sky dived down to the dirt out of airplanes. Some people have backpacked through uncharted mountain trails and swam into the darkness of the ocean. Some people have staked their lives on taking big, unpredictable risks and take them every day. I, however, am a fraidy-cat and have done none of those things or anything close to them. My idea of an everyday risk is picking a wedgie on the street in broad daylight and not caring if the woman in the Toyota saw me do it. I would never streak across a college campus and I’m still debating about dying my hair the forest green I’ve dreamed of having. I’m indecisive, so imagine my surprise when he swayed into the room and my heart chose him without question. There are tons of things I haven’t done and might not ever do. But what I have done is reached inside my chest, no medical background whatsoever, and given my heart away to someone. I have fallen utterly and stupidly in love, like the kind depicted in every cheesy Rom-Com anyone has ever seen. I know some people will say “Booooo Ash! That’s nothing.” But the risk wasn’t falling in love. That part was actually pretty easy and required very little thought. It was falling out. It was choosing to love myself more. It was openly crying. It was refusing to accept excuses. It was talking to God and then deciding to walk away from the person I’d grown comfortable calling mine. It was looking at myself a mess and deciding that I wasn’t going to compromise my growth for his regardless of how much he meant to me. It was healing and moving towards loving again. I think people are mistaken when they hold on to the idea that risks are required to be high-flying or death defying to be meaningful. Risks can come in tiny, simple packages and something dangerous to me might not be dangerous to you. You bought that blueberry muffin knowing good and well chocolate is your favorite? That’s a risk. You took 15 minutes of your 20 minute break between classes to take a nap? That’s a risk. You got your heart ripped to pieces and sewed it back together on your own in the hopes that someone will take better care of it this goround? I’d say that’s a risk too. A scary one. 24


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WORDS ADA M CIO FFI

First La nd ing Some call it a “gut feeling� while others refer to it as instinct.

When I first got to Savannah, it marked a milestone of being over a thousand miles from home. No nerves throbbed, no bones ached, there was only vigor. The excitement of being in an entirely new environment rushed unfathomable adrenalin through my veins. The family stressed more than anything, as the youngest child was the first of the new generation to move far, far away. It did not become a bother, an idea for what was to come remained the only worry for a while. Fast forward to the here and now where friends were made, loved ones left, and festivals were celebrated. New territory conquered by a young student. As I edge close to graduation next Winter, a thought occurred. Not a thought that had been poisoning the mind for years, a sudden piqued interest, rather an ephemeral epiphany juxtaposed with anxiety of the present and future emerged. I asked myself: what am I doing; how did I get here? Mundane excuses persisted as substitution to explaining the physical and financial reasons. Not 26

enough money given here, the call of jobs all being on the coast there, or the irritating family pushing one to great lengths for escape. What else does one think of when coming from the Midwest? However, I find these reasons to be wearing and overhanded. No, there is a deeper train of thought present. One veiled in subtext that can only develop through reflection. Something had subtly pushed me to this place. That exact push, I realized, was the force to enter a shop almost completely at random during a film festival, only to meet a professional I wished to speak to. It was the same specter leading my gaze to other options in looking for a job, fining internships that caught my passions. Unrecognized in the past, the imaginary companion asked me to say things to new people and to write something different for myself. The invisible tour guide dragged me through scrupulous decisions during harrowing moments in split seconds. I believe age comes with self-identification and comprehension of this force. Molecular dissection networks the urge with the reason why I love horror


movies so much, frightening and exciting me. The unruly mood to explore somewhere new brought me recreation, and heart strings involuntarily begged for kissing the woman I love despite how off guard she had me. Those stories baffled me. It caught me laughing to myself at night and stayed with me during walks through the rain, though I never asked it to. I never wondered in depth until I asked myself those questions.

new. It took people to the west, to the stars, and to each other. These actions take a desire to change based on what is already known so one may grow, to improve into maturity. I may not have completed a task for changes in humanity, but I discovered why I am here and what brought me. I wanted change, I wanted to grow, to challenge the unknown of post-modern adulthood. Though almost entirely on impulse, I learned that the decision to come here was from finally understanding what I wanted. Though unaware, it displayed my path to manhood.

Some call it a “gut feeling” while others refer to it as instinct. To answer the questions I asked myself, the instincts were simply a knowledge of “me”. A colloquial self-image allowed the subconscious to recommend action. Everyone has that sensibility, as my mother told me, to make decisions for benefit whether presently or not. It’s part of the human condition. It drove men and women to conquer, to innovate, to create or destroy, to overcome prejudice, or to discover something 27


WORDS E B O N Y V I C TO R

Th e N i g ht Im pul s e Won Impulse is not a word that is usually in my vocabulary, but that night the impulse to let myself be free with him was so strong that I couldn’t possibly fight it. It was a breezy, summer night and I was out on the town with my best friend, Leah. She was visiting Philadelphia from Georgia and we were having the best time reuniting after a long two years. We started the night with dinner in the city at one of my favorite Italian restaurants. Next on the list was a visit to an underground speakeasy for a few drinks. After sitting and drinking in a nice, but quiet atmosphere, Anna and I were ready to dance. We made our way around the city hopping from club to club until we ended up at a place right on the Delaware River. I had never been to Cavanaugh’s River Deck before, but I had a feeling our night was going to take a turn for the better when we arrived. The music was pumping and the drinks were flowing, so Leah and I wasted no time hitting the dance floor. We ran into a couple of my friends from high school who joined our little dance party. I couldn’t remember a time that I had this much fun since turning 21. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw a young man and his friends staring at my girls dancing. When we made eye contact, the young man started making his way towards us. I was annoyed because creepy men trying to take us home usually interrupted nights like this. Because of this I regularly made it a habit to ignore men trying to dance with or talk to me, but that night something was different. When Daniel approached me to dance I immediately felt a jolt in my stomach, but I still said no. I continued dancing with my girls and tried to ignore the fact that he hadn’t left. A couple songs went by and when he asked again I felt the same jolt in my stomach. I had the strongest urge to say yes, so I did. I danced with him for over an hour before he asked if we could go sit at the bar to talk. I obliged and after getting a drink we began to get to know each other. After about thirty minutes of talking we exchanged numbers and went back out on the dance floor. He asked me if he could kiss me and for some reason that I still can’t figure out I had the impulse to say yes again, so I did.

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Right there on the dance floor, in the middle of an outside club, under the bright moon and summer breeze, I kissed Daniel for the first time. On most days I am the epitome of a control freak. I don’t do anything without a plan, and I get serious anxiety when someone tries to bring spontaneity into my life. I don’t speak to strangers because I am skeptical all the time. I don’t believe in public displays of affection because I think that certain things are to be left behind closed doors. That night I abandoned all my judgment and self imposed rules. I let someone dance with me, I gave a stranger my number, and I made out with someone I had just met in public. Still to this day I can’t put a reason on to why I felt different with Daniel. Impulse is not a word that is usually in my vocabulary, but that night the impulse to let myself be free with him was so strong that I couldn’t possibly fight it. The ending to the story is that I did not go home with Daniel that night, but we did stay in contact. He is now my boyfriend and we will have been together for almost six months. Impulse makes people do a lot silly things without thinking of the consequences. It can really be a terrifying concept at times, but it is also needed. Sometimes we must throw caution to the wind and listen to that impulsive voice telling us not to be afraid to live because we might just miss out on something great.


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Impulse


I M P U L S I V E D AY

8 : 0 0 a . m . Wake up (feeling anxious, yet excited) 9 : 0 0 a . m . Treat myself to a bubble bath… and a mimosa 10 : 0 0 a . m . Get dressed up, because who knows where this day will take me 10 : 15 a . m . Put on mismatched socks (mostly because it’s laundry day, but also for fun) 10 : 3 0 a . m . Add a dash of cinnamon to a latte and smear extra cream cheese on a bagel 11 : 0 0 a . m . Roam around aimlessly, pretending to be a tourist 11 : 0 5 a . m . Pet every dog along the way 11 : 4 5 a . m . Get bangs (a classically spontaneous decision) 12 : 3 0 p . m . Kidnap my best friend from work, without getting her fired 12 : 4 5 p . m . Go on the hunt for the best mac and cheese in town 2 : 0 0 p . m . Return my best friend to work, so she can continue being responsible 2 : 3 0 p . m . Buy fancy stationery 3 : 0 0 p . m . Mail everyone a note (including my crush) 4 : 0 0 p . m . Realize it’s only 4pm and there is a lot of spontaneity left in the day 32


I M P U L S I V E D AY

4 : 0 5 p . m . Take a power nap 5 : 4 5 p . m . Change into leggings, looking cute is overrated 6 : 0 0 p . m . Go to the park 6 : 15 p . m . Sit next to a stranger and chat about anything and everything 7 : 0 0 p . m . Call all of my friends for a “come as you are party”, Mary Kate and Ashley style 7 : 15 p . m . Pretend like I know what I’m doing when buying wine and cheese 7 : 3 0 p . m . Buy Reese’s Cups to go with the wine and cheese (because I know what I’m doing, duh) 8 : 0 0 p . m . Get the party started 9 : 0 0 p . m . Dance like nobody’s watching, even though all of my friends are… and snapchatting it 9 : 3 0 p . m . Put on a scary movie 10 : 0 0 p . m . Close my eyes during 80% of it 10 : 3 0 p . m . Fall asleep on the couch due to too much wine and spontaneity 12 : 0 0 p . m . Have a midnight snack, cookies in bed… without worrying about the crumbs 12 : 15 p . m . Go to sleep (feeling bold and accomplished) W O R D S B Y L I L LY B R A S I L I

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P H OTO G R A P H S

ST YLIN G

CASTIN G

C H R I S TO P H E R D O W E L L

PA I G E H O M B E R G & O L I V I A B R A N D T

K E L LY H I P P E N M E Y E R

A M o t iva ting F orce The underlying movement of our actions being provoked. An unseen burst of motion comes from within creating blurred movements of the body being projected into unseen acts. It drives us, forcing the object into passage.

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INTERV IEW

P H OTO G R A P H S

ST YLIN G

L I L LY B R A S I L I

C H R I S TO P H E R D O W E L L

K E L LY H I P P E N M E Y E R

Artist Spotlight: Caleb Boyles Right now what I feel like I am doing is just using some kind of visual language that I have developed to be able to communicate the ideas that I have. I think most illustrators have a moment when they draw something they really like and continue to explore that way of drawing. Tell us how you got your start in illustration. I got my start in illustration when I took a semester off of college to figure out what it was I wanted to do. I started an art blog then and started updating it and finding new artists that I liked and I realized I could try to start doing the same thing. How did you develop your very unique style? I don’t think I have a clear style at the moment. Right now what I feel like I am doing is just using some kind of visual language that I have developed to be able to communicate the ideas that I have. I think most illustrators have a moment when they draw something they really like and continue to explore that way of drawing. Did these drawings start as impulsive doodles? Most of the things I drew that led me to how I am drawing now were just bad sketchbook pages of me experimenting until I found a way of drawing that works for me. What gets you in the rhythm to draw? I usually like to go sit in a coffee shop somewhere, get a drink and maybe write a few lists of things I need to do before I start drawing and then I will sit and scroll through Instagram to see if anything in particular really inspires me. 43


What gets you in the rhythm to draw?

What are your plans after graduation?

I usually like to go sit in a coffee shop somewhere, get a drink and maybe write a few lists of things I need to do before I start drawing and then I will sit and scroll through Instagram to see if anything in particular really inspires me.

In an unrealistic world I would get represented by an illustration agency so I could get editorial freelance work but because that probably won’t happen right after college I may just take some time to create a small body of work that I am proud of while working a pretty average job to send to illustration agencies.

What inspires you to draw here at Gallery Espresso? I think the main reason I like working in Gallery Espresso are the big windows that you can sit next to while you are working. The overall atmosphere in the coffee shop is moderately quiet during the evenings because most everyone else is working on something and I can sit down and draw without getting distracted. Are you a planner or a spontaneous artist? I like to sketch out what I draw before I start using any pens or markers but the subject and composition are usually something I come up with on the spot. 44


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INTERV IEW

P H OTO G R A P H S

ST YLIN G

L I L LY B R A S I L I

C H R I S TO P H E R D O W E L L

K E L LY H I P P E N M E Y E R

Artist Spotlight: Chloe Walters My designs have a sort of impulsive style about it, because I don’t really like to plan out how it will look--whenever I strategize I am never happy with the way it turns out. I’m most impulsive with my color choices…I use very minimal accents but I sporadically plop them all over my drawings. Tell us how you got your start in fibers. Originally, I came to SCAD for illustration but I found myself struggling a lot with the push to go digital and creating the composition of these drawings in general. After lots of frustration with illustration from freshmen year, I traveled to Turkey and Persia and visited the studios of rug weavers and silk farmers in rural communities which really ignited my fascination with fibers and its construction. I immediately signed up for the fibers for the non-major class, which incorporates techniques such as drawing, weaving, crocheting--and the rest is history. How has your background influenced your work today? Growing up, I was fortunate enough to travel to many different countries and experience a variety different cultures. I’d fall in love with their way of life, their art, and their environment, so I adapted their artistic styles that are influenced by these qualities. For example, while I visited remote Peruvian villages in the Andes Mountains, I was intrigued with their woven fabrics and the intense textures they created. Using ink washes, I emulate these patterns which I still use in my work today. How did you develop your very unique style? I am constantly drawing and observing people in everyday life. I used to draw with 49


deep detail and color, but I love the fluidity and minimalism that line work can give so my style has become detailed only on the parts of the form I want to accentuate. Would you say your designs started as impulses? Once I find a subject or a composition that I am drawn to, I just sort of go with it. I guess so, yeah. My designs have a sort of impulsive style about it, because I don’t really like to plan out how it will look--whenever I strategize I am never happy with the way it turns out. I’m most impulsive with my color choices…I use very minimal accents but I sporadically plop them all over my drawings. What gets you in the rhythm to weave? When I am content with the colors, weaving is a breeze. Color inspires me so much that no matter how bad the pattern is, if I love the color I love it all. What inspires you to work at your apartment? I love working in my apartment because it is full of family heirlooms, funky lamps, and the textiles I accumulate from my travels—all these things have influenced who I am as an artist and it grounds me when I am creating different pieces. It’s also a mess the vast majority of the time but I like it. Are you a planner or a spontaneous artist? I hate planning…I just do things as I go and hope it turns out looking good. What ignites your pulse? A fresh new moleskin sketchbook and anything that is mauve. How do you incorporate a spur-of-the-moment attitude into your everyday? I’m always wearing something I threw together really last minute…and just about all the food I make is a random mix of whatever is leftover in my fridge that I’m in the mood for! What are your plans after graduation? After graduating this spring I’ll be working at a summer camp in Switzerland for three months and then doing a little traveling. In October I’ll be moving to New York City to work as a print and pattern designer for Macy’s and Bloomingdales!

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S ER IES O F TIPS

Breaking the Norm W O R D S B Y O L I V I A B R A N DT & P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y J E S S I E S C OT T

Mixing the day to day routine. Adding some zest and spontaneity to the carousel of life. Taking the things we do mindlessly and making it count. How would it impact our lives if daily we did something a little out of the ordinary? Many would ask, why? A simple answer of “just because” or “why not” will suffice, although they might think we are crazy too. Life’s choices are not always created intentionally, our impulses sometimes overcome the logic. So let’s mix that logic and natural reactions, maybe it will create a new normal or something better.

1. Switch your daily cup of Joe with tea, or don’t. It’s hard, we get it. 2. Running can get boring, not to say do like grandma and take the plunge into water aerobics, but what about slowing it down with yoga?

7. Make the bed, then jump on it. 8. Call up an old friend. 9. Don’t forget happy hour (meaning you should remember to go but also remember how you got home)

3. Eat dessert before dinner.

10. Hidden love notes never go out of style.

4. Take the back roads, the scenic route is better anyway.

11. Pick up the book that’s been collecting dust.

5. Feed the dog cat food, just kidding.

12. Take a picture, it lasts longer.

6. Take this moment and reflect on the amazing things that have happened in the past 24 hours.

13. Buy a house plant, they are typically easier than pets.

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Ignite the Pulse It is the sensation that will linger in your mind for minutes, hours, days, even years after. It is the moments in time that you can exactly pin point, so specifically. It is the multitude of emotions that overcome the body and the actions that follow. The mind racing, the gears turning, and you wonder how does the body will react. Then your pulse starts to rise. Or you could even go as far as saying it starts to ignite; to ignite the sensation it was sparked by. In literal terms, these sensations are known as great conductors that carry through fire and electricity that power our lives. But there is also the power of emotion, feelings being conducted by the non conventional conductors to also provide the essential needs of human life. So what is it that sets these sensations into flame? How do we decipher what causes these sensations? By breaking down what ignites the pulse.

It is a reward within itself to get to the seeds of a pomegranate, its natural beauty and candied taste only heighten the act of consuming it. Whether the love of food stems from pure indulgence, satisfaction or the nutritional facets, it is a global phenomenon within itself. There are fond memories often related with food, the inhale of certain aromas typically spark a fond memory. The sense of possession can also drive the emotions that come from food. If you made something from scratch the pride of that pie or roast gives you satisfaction when others come to enjoy it. And then there is the curiosity of food. The new dishes always coming and going, the self wonder if you should take a chance and try it. Food can be enticing, mysterious, bizarre or plainly delicious but it is all of these aspects connected with food that make our heart beats rise and keep

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coming back for more. There always seems to be passion to some extent when music is involved in any situation. In some ways it is the easiest way of expressing one’s self, when we just cannot find the words. Music can bring us focus and tranquility or leave us rambunctious and stimulated. The melody playing in the atmosphere surrounding you can grab hold of your mindset and carry you to a new place. In general the multitude of places music can flow through the body is infinite, this sensation is so low maintenance it can be coming from your ear buds while biking home or open mic night at the local bar. The physicality that tends to go along with music no matter the location is sometimes the ultimate trigger to set our pulses a blaze. Clapping to the beat, singing along, pounding the drum, dancing until your feet are sore show our reactions to the music, regardless if you’re dancing


until your feet are sore show our reactions to the music, regardless if you’re the one producing it or the audience enjoying it. There is that moment we all feel, the butterflies when you’re thirteen, then all of a sudden you are 26 and still feeling the same way when a person of interest walks in the room. It is a private, intimate consciousness that somehow awakes every inch of your body with just one look, one touch, one moment. This interest in another being can overwhelm the mind body and spirit all in one. It can create impulsive reactions or very careful ones, sometimes depending on relationships of the past. These affections can sprout from a simple glance and turn into something much bigger than that moment in time. With each encounter and caress it seems that the ultimate goal after the ignition of the pulse, is to keep it burning. To find these moments of desire to last a lifetime. Art is personal, public, political, it is many things. Most times it is the subject or the conversation behind pieces that tends to rev up the beat of the heart. It can be an endless roller coaster of emotions from your impulses reacting to what you are seeing. Some begging to provoke outrage or hinting at tranquility. Questions upon questions that will only be analyzed, never to be answered. This Interpretation of one’s creative ideas gives us the freedom to be inspired and create more. Having the ability to provoke others to create is an art within itself. It is a power not many realize they have. Once triggered, an idea can cause many stages of developing something into its final art form. A process that brings highs and lows along the way, with the thrill

people will react, or how they wont. After digging deeper into the four obvious acts of what typically sets our heartbeats a blaze, another answer has formed. Even if we feel the rise in our heart beats from the sweetness of a fruit, the touch of a woman, strum of a chord or the composition of the canvas, it is all of the specific moments, objects, acts, viewed as individuals from the overlying whole of life. The ignited pulse is something we all share as a species, everyone gets to experience it no matter what the situation is. Classifications and dispositions set aside, this action of our bodies is one of life’s simple pleasures that typically goes unnoticed. Our minds go through the motions day to day without notice, sometimes a little awareness can remind us of the ignition of the pulse.

WORDS O L I V I A B R A N DT

P H OTO G R A P H S D U LC E C O R A ZO N

M I G H T YGO O DR ID G E

ST YLIN G K E L LY H I P P E N M E Y E R

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R E CIP ES & F O O D ST YL IN G

P H OTO G R A P H S

H ANN AH PLEASANT

K AT I E F R E Z Z A

T he S p ontane ous Menu Nothing is more boring than using the same ingredients for a meal eaten on the regular. Switch up the typical recipes for your go-to meals and expose your palate to something new. These recipes are sure to bring some new ideas from how you may typically prepare your day to day meals. Break the old habits and bring some excitement to your dishes.

76


R E C I P E

NOT YOUR ORDINARY TOM AND CHEE

G

rilled cheese and tomato soup is a classic bread and soup combination. Being the extra person that

I am, I just had to take it a step further. I absolutely love bacon and if I can find anyway to incorporate it into a meal, best believe it’s in there.

FOR THE GR ILLED CHEESE

FO R THE SO UP

1 loaf of Texas Toast bread

1 Can of Tomato Soup

Butter for the outside of the sandwich

1 teaspoon of Sriracha

1 tablespoon of Dijon Mustard

1/4 cup of Scallions

1 package of Havarti Cheese slices

A drizzle of Sour cream

Slab of Bacon - chopped in small squares 1 Red Onion

M ETH O D

Note: Putting bacon in the oven as it warms up to the appropriate temperature ensures that

the bacon crisps up evenly while cooking. Place bacon on a lined baking sheet or mount on a wire rack. Stick inside the oven and set the temperature to 400 degrees, putting the bacon in as the oven heats up. Cook for 15-20 minutes. While the bacon is cooking, chop your onions so that they make nice arches. Heat up a skillet with oil or butter and caramelize the onions until they are nice and tender. To prepare for the sandwich, spread a layer of dijon mustard on the bottom piece of the bread. Begin to layer the sandwich with cheese, bacon and onion, add another slice of cheese and top with bread. Spread butter on the top and bottom outside pieces of the sandwich then sprinkle with parsley. Toast sandwich in the oven at 400 degrees until bread is golden brown and the cheese is melted, roughly 5-8 minutes each side. You may need to press the sandwich down as the cheese melts. Be sure to flip the sandwich over to ensure even toasting on each side. Time to jazz up that store bought tomato soup. Bring the can of tomato soup to a simmer, add sriracha to the tomato soup to your level of spice tolerance. Top with a drizzle of sour cream and scallions. 78


R E C I P E

SMOKY CHICKEN WITH A WINTER VEGETABLE MEDLEY

I

stepped a little bit out of my comfort zone to bring these meal combinations together. I hate brussels

sprouts and I typically don’t eat them but this recipe right here––had me craving brussels sprouts everyday. I love all things chocolate so adding it to a poultry dish certainly sparked a challenge to make something delicious. Especially considering spices are the key to making food light a bomb in your mouth. I think this recipe will certainly explode your taste buds.

FO R THE CHICKEN

FO R THE VEGETABLES

FO R THE GLAZE

5 Chicken breasts

Salt and pepper to taste

3 tablespoons Balsamic Glaze

3 tablespoons of robust olive oil

3 tablespoons of robust olive oil

2 teaspoons Maple syrup

Pepper to taste

1 ½ pound bag of Brussels Sprouts

3 tablespoons Garlic Salt

10 purple potatoes

2 teaspoons Cocoa Powder

1 large Sweet Potato

2 tablespoons Chili Powder

2 Sweet bell peppers

2 tablespoons Paprika

1-2 sprigs of rosemary

Tomatillo salsa (optional)

1-2 sprigs of thyme

M ETH O D

For the Brine: Fill a bowl with enough water to submerge chicken completely. Add 3

tablespoons of garlic salt to warm water until it dissolves. Place chicken breasts in brine for 15 minutes. For the Chicken: After brining the chicken for 15 minutes, rinse chicken with cold water. Place chicken in a dish and rub it down with olive oil and the spices. Cook chicken in the oven on 450 degrees for 18 minutes, flipping the chicken over halfway through allowing each side to brown. Let the chicken rest for 10-15 minutes before cutting. After allowing the meat to rest, cut the chicken breasts and top with tomatillo salsa if you desire. For the vegetables: Dice vegetables and toss in olive oil, salt, pepper, and herbs. Roast vegetables in oven at 400 degrees for 35-40 minutes. Periodically toss the vegetables around in the pan to ensure even cooking. For the glaze: Mix balsamic glaze and maple syrup together and drizzle over the vegetables, I love the glaze with the vegetables but feel free to eat them as you wish. 80


81


R E C I P E

CARAMEL APPLE CRESCENTS

The Bougie Crocker in me decided to keep things simple for dessert but it appears

fancy and tastes great so that’s all that matters. All the items are store bought and super easy to assemble.

FOR THE CRESCENTS

1 can pre-made dough 1 can apple pie filling 1 egg Powdered sugar Cinnamon Caramel Chopped Pecans (optional)

Unroll dough and fill with a tablespoon of the apple pie mixture. Seal the dough by rolling it in a diagonal pattern. Whisk up the egg and brush the top of the pastries. Cook in the oven at 350 degrees for 10-12 minutes. M ETH O D

Sprinkle rolls with the mixture of powdered sugar and cinnamon. Drizzle with caramel and top with pecans if you desire. Serve the dessert warm and add some whipped cream or ice cream for extra indulgence.

82


83


Architectural Juxtaposition P H OTO G R A P H S J ES SICA R US S EL L WORDS L I L LY B R A S I L I


Architecture could easily be considered

viewed as outdated and run-down or historic

the most meticulously planned form of art

and charming. Each unique structure is filled

and expression. Architects spend countless

with details from the past that tell the story of

hours not only ensuring that the building

its history. As different families, businesses

looks beautiful but functions at its highest

or the weeds take over, the building is

potential and standard. Not one slip up

altered and the different pieces must meld

can be made and the pressure is definitely

together to create an ongoing story. But

always on. But, when these painstakingly

this creates the personality we know and

planned structures are placed side by side,

love in the historic homes around each of

something even more stunning is created. A

our neighborhoods. When a new building

city is built that is filled with character and

sits alone, it seems modern, cold, forward

spontaneity. Alone, an old building could be

thinking and clean. The technological

88


advances are apparent and reflected as a

going. A change in zeitgeist. A grandmother’s

minimal powerhouse. The building is no

past and a child’s future. A spontaneity

fuss but built to wow. Like the old building,

unlike any other. When the old and the new

the new building is a true reflection of the

sit together, a city is given life and interest.

times but hasn’t yet had the time to acquire

These thoroughly planned structures don’t

the history and changes. These structures are

seem so rigid anymore. This small dose of

what keep us moving forward but have the

spontaneity in architectural juxtaposition

power to stand the test of time. The magic of

may go unnoticed by most but it can often

a city is created when these two unique (and

be these little things that are the spice of life.

vastly different) types of architecture are combined into one cityscape. You are able to see where we have been and where we are

89


94


95


WORDS

TA K E N F R O M

P H OTO G R A P H S

ELIANA DOCKTERMAN

TI M ES M AGAZINE

TI M ES M AGAZINE

Big Eyes How one of the most popular artists of the 1960s was able to pass off his wife’s work as his own.

For years, Walter Keane was known as one of the most commercially successful artists of the 1960s. His paintings of waif-thin girls with eyes four times their normal size were dubbed “the most popular art now being produced in the free world” in a 1965 LIFE story. But Walter Keane, it turns out, couldn’t even paint. It was his wife, Margaret, who was really creating all the “Big Eye” paintings and kept Walter’s secret after he threatened to have her killed. TIME looked at articles from the 1960s and 1970s—including a profile in LIFE Magazine and critiques of the big eye paintings in the New York Times—and modern-day interviews with Margaret Keane to find out how closely the new Tim Burton film Big Eyes follows Keane’s rise in the art world and eventual exposure as a fraud.

96


Walter Keane claimed to paint the Big Eyes until his death R UL IN G : F a c t Walter (played by Christoph Waltz in the movie) claimed he was inspired by the starving, orphaned children he saw in his supposed travels after World War II. He told LIFE Magazine, “Nobody could paint eyes like El Greco and nobody can paint eyes like Walter Keane.” Walter did acknowledge that Margaret (Amy Adams), too, was a painter, but the paintings credited to her had slightly smaller almond-shaped eyes with a different style. The profile goes on to say: “Margaret, it is true, paints eyes a little like those for which her husband is famous. But hers are not so big and belong as unvaryingly to nubile girls as his belong to what appear to be war waifs.” (Later in the article, the reporter cites critics who say Margaret’s style is superior to Walter’s—even though we now know that all the paintings were by Margaret.)

Walter used a brawl with a night club owner to promote the paintings R UL IN G : M o s t l y F a c t The paintings first became popular after hanging in Enrico Banducci’s hungry i nightclub on Jackson Street in San Francisco. Margaret, who was more shy than Walter, would paint at home while he sold her works in the club. It wasn’t until over a year after he began this practice that Margaret visited the hungry i one night and discovered that Walter was taking credit for her work. Walter and Banducci did indeed fight: Banducci punched Keane for “using obscenity in the presence of a lady,” according to the Chronicle, and Keane was arrested for drunkenness. The two sued each other in 1958, though it is unclear whether they reached an implicit agreement to do so for publicity as the movie suggests.

Walter never tried to paint the big eyes himself R UL IN G : F i c t i o n In the film, neither the audience nor Margaret ever see Walter put paintbrush to canvas in the film (except to sign his name on others’ work). It is true that Walter could not paint—but not for lack of effort. After Margaret first confronted him about peddling the big eye paintings as his own, he said that it would be confusing to correct his lie and that people would sue him. He asked Margaret to teach him how to paint the big eyes, but he was unable to mimic her style. It was only later that Margaret discovered he had also stolen the Parisian street scenes that he had been peddling as his own when the two met at an art fair. 98


Nobody visited the Keane’s mansion R UL IN G : F i c t i o n In the film, next to nobody is allowed in the Keane house for fear that they will discover Margaret’s studio and therefore the Keane secret. Though it is true that nobody—including Margaret’s daughter and their staff—was allowed in Margaret’s studio, Walter Keane would invite socialites and celebrities to their home. “Everybody was screwing everybody,” he writes in his memoir. “Sometimes I’d be going to bed and there’d be three girls in the bed.” The Beach Boys were among the many visitors to the Keane pool, though Margaret rarely met these celebs since she was painting 16 hours per day. Even when Walter left the house, he would call Margaret every hour to ensure that she hadn’t left.

Walter threatened to have Margaret killed R UL IN G : F a c t According to Margaret, Walter not only had many affairs but was abusive to her. “I was in jail,” she said in an interview with the Guardian this year. “He wouldn’t allow me to have any friends. If I tried to slip away from him, he’d follow me. We had a chihuahua and because I loved that little dog so much, he kicked it, and so finally I had to give the dog away. He was very jealous and domineering. And all along he said: ‘If you ever tell anyone I’m going to have you knocked off.’ I knew he knew a lot of mafia people.”

Walter attacked a New York Times critic R UL IN G : F i c t i o n New York Times critic John Canaday did indeed pan the 1964 World’s Fair painting “Tomorrow Forever.” He wrote that Keane “grinds out formula pictures of wide-eyed children with such appalling sentimentality that his product has become synonymous among critics with the very definition of tasteless hack work.” The World’s Fair took down the painting after the review came out. However, there are no reports of Walter trying to attack Canaday with a fork as he did in the movie.

Margaret Keane told the truth after becoming a Jehovah’s Witness R UL IN G : M o s t l y F i c t i o n 99


The film changes the timeline of the Keanes’ court battle. Margaret revealed to a UPI reporter that she was the real artist behind the big eyes in October of 1970 (6 years after they had separated). She even challenged him to a paintoff in San Francisco’s Union Square in Nov. 1970, according to LIFE, but Walter never showed. He did respond by saying she was a “boozing, sex-starved psychopath.” It was only then that Margaret moved to Hawaii and became a Jehovah’s witness. In an interview with SFGate, Margaret credits her third husband, sportswriter Dan McGuire, with helping her decide to tell the truth. “he had a lot to do with helping me see I didn’t have to lie anymore.”

The judge asked the Keanes to each paint a child with big eyes in the courtroom R UL IN G : F a c t A Hawaiian judge really did ask Margaret and Walter to each paint a big eyes picture in the courtroom in front of a crowd to determine who was telling the truth. Margaret completed hers within 53 minutes while Walter pleaded a sore shoulder and didn’t paint anything. Sadly, though Margaret won $4 million in the suit, she didn’t see a cent. Walter had already spent the couple’s entire fortune.

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W W W . K I N F O L K . CO M

KEEP IN TOUCH


There is the act of an impulse and a reaction to it. These reactions often come unexpectedly, created by passion, belief, drive. Where does that reaction take us, what are the consequences. Or maybe it’s a benefit? We hope that these reactions flow through your veins and the words of our contributors set you on a whim, cue the goosebumps, and ultimately inspire.

O L I V I A B R A N DT , C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R

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Kinfolk Magazine: The Impulse Issue. A mock magazine created for Current Trends and Forecasting at the Savannah College of Art & Design in c...

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