KGNU Magazine - Summer/ Fall Issue

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contents 5 MISSION STATEMENT KGNU is an independent, non-commercial community radio station licensed in Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collins, dedicated to serving its listeners. We seek to stimulate, educate, and entertain our audience; to reflect the diversity of the local and world community; and to provide a channel for individuals, groups, issues, and music that have been overlooked, suppressed, or underrepresented by other media. The station seeks to expand the listening audience through the excellence of its programming without compromising the principles stated here. Publication Title KGNU Magazine Issue Date 2017-2018 Frequency of Publication Annual Authorized Publisher Boulder Community Broadcast Association, Inc. dba KGNU Volume 39, Issue 1 Editors Risë Keller, Roz Brown, Tim Russo, Sarah Shirazi Design Adam Batliner Art+Design adam@adambatliner.com Cover Art Design Robert Linder RSLphotography@outlook.com Contributors Alternative Radio, Joe Richey, Deeprawk Dave Ashton, Ginger Perry, Indra Raj, Sean Makau, Maeve Conran, Tim Russo, Nile Southern, Elena Klaver, Duncan Campbell, Josiah Hesse, Nikki Kayser, Riley Ann, Sarah Shirazi Advertising Sales Kenneth Flowe, kenneth@kgnu.org Sean Makau, promotions@kgnu.org Sarah Shirazi, sarah@kgnu.org Printing Signature Offset

L etter From The Station Manager

9 How to Get Involved

with KGNU—Putting the “U” in KGNU

13 Program Schedule 14 Program Descriptions 17 KGNU Membership 20 News Department Collaborations

22 Malkia Cyril: You Can’t

KGNU would like to thank the following foundations for their support.

Turn Off Our Power

23 The Media is Not The Enemy

26 Interview with Jesca Hoop

28 History of KGNU’s Eclipse Show

32 Meet the People Behind KGNU

KGNU Studios

KGNU Magazine

Boulder 4700 Walnut St Boulder, CO 80301 office: (303) 449-4885 | (800) 737-3030 studio: (303) 442-4242 or dj@kgnu.org

KGNU Magazine is our print magazine

Denver 700 Kalamath St Denver, CO 80204 office: (303) 825-5468 studio: (303) 825-0619 Comment Line (303) 447-9911

featuring information about KGNU programming, our volunteer-powered community, and much, much more. The KGNU Magazine is published periodically by the Boulder Community Broadcast Association, Inc. dba KGNU. The 2017 issue focuses on empowering readers and listeners to reclaim the media, invest in local media, and to make media work for community. At KGNU, you are the “U” in KGNU. With you, we can reclaim the media!

AfterFM is a registered trademark of the Boulder Community Broadcast Association, Inc. in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.


LIVE MUSIC & EVENT CENTER Concerts Special Events Parties Zero Waste Receptions Solar Powered* “The best sounding venue in the state.” “Not a bad seat in the house”

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“Best concert venue I've ever been to.”

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303.258.3637

*Beer chilled to 32.5 degrees, by the sun

4 | KGNU Magazine

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS. LIVE. where music comes to play


Editorial Letter from the KGNU Station Manager INSIDE KGNU In this edition of the KGNU Magazine, you’ll read about amazing people who have joined the KGNU leadership team on our Board of Directors, committees, staff, and of course our heart and soul: the KGNU volunteer family. These dedicated folks are crucial to keeping our independent and truly unique Colorado community radio experience on air 24/7, bringing you diverse perspectives, issues, voices, music, culture, events, debates, and programs that you will not hear elsewhere. In these pages, you’ll get a sense of where we’ve been and a glimpse at where we’re headed as we approach the 40th anniversary of KGNU’s first broadcast in 2018. You’ll see some of what you can discover when your dial hits 88.5 FM and 1390 AM in Denver and Boulder, 98.7 FM in Fort Collins, 93.7 FM in Nederland, or when you use our media player for an enhanced listening experience on your computer or mobile device at KGNU.org, AfterFM.com and News.KGNU.org. Our Summer/Fall 2017 KGNU Magazine reveals how you can get involved with KGNU, updates programming information, from welcoming broadcast journalist Laura Flanders to extending Pasa La Voz to an hour-long format to bidding the iconic Free Speech Radio News goodbye. You’ll learn about new segments in our News and Public Affairs programming from PoCo (People of Color) in BoCo to Resistance Radio. We will whet your palate with stories about the new music scene, interviews with Jesca Hoop, along with a perspective on the evolution of Colorado’s cornerstone Hip-Hop show, Eclipse. You’ll read inspiring interviews with Angela Davis, Amy Goodman, and Malkia Cyril, who avows, “You can’t turn off our power!”

RECLAIM THE MEDIA! KGNU has been amplifying local voices, perspectives, stories, culture, art, and independent music for 39 years. We have a sense of urgency to keep community as the root and

driving force of community media. To maintain and reclaim our media, we must continue to invest in and involve ourselves in local, independent, community-oriented and community-focused media.

“NECESSARY ILLUSIONS” During a recent conference held at the University of Colorado-Boulder called Reporting in the Age of Alternative Facts, The Nation reporter John Nichols stated, “Our media system does not work.” He said the corporate media failed many of us and our communities during the most recent election year, shunning their responsibility for aiding and abetting the “manufacture of consent” that led to the “surprise” election results and the aftermath. Nichols highlighted the “media manipulation, media deception, information suppression, and systematic information distortion” and their roles in setting the stage for the now-profuse use of Fake News. Real Fake News and the constant barrage of White House accusations about Fake News have been deployed to delegitimize credible, far-reaching stories when they do break, creating what Noam Chomsky alludes to in his classic book Manufacturing Consent as the fabrication of a “necessary illusion” that perpetuates a constant uncertainty about facts and “alternative facts.” Nichols says, however, that we are experiencing a “rare moment for media [in the US] to prove ourselves.” Fast-forward to today: The media, with the exception of the so-called alt-right, have been deemed “enemies of the people” by President Trump. “We’ve always been the enemy of the people…[because] we’re supposed to tell the people what they don’t want to know,” says Nichols. Consequently, the media is being increasingly criminalized as the White House ramps up its aggressive discourse, as evidenced by the May arrest of Public News Service reporter Dan Heyman in West Virginia for “speaking loudly” to a public official as he performed his job as a reporter asking questions. And the leak that revealed Trump’s recommen-

By Tim Russo, KGNU Station Manager dation to former FBI Director James Comey that he “should consider putting reporters in prison for publishing classified information.” This criminalization and delegitimization of the media has been combined with an active attempt in the Trump administration’s proposed federal budget to completely defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and all federal support for public and community media.

TRANSFORMATIVE MEDIA Amy Goodman of Democracy Now! says don’t fear the media; “be the Me in Media!” Access to information is our right. The Protect My Public Media campaign (protectmypublicmedia.org) to defend the US $445 million federal budget for public and community media is a growing campaign that all listeners of local public and community programming can get behind. Just “Say NO to 0!” in the President’s budget. Obtaining trustworthy, quality information from a diversity of perspectives from the peoples who face these issues to those who analyze and report on the issues— should not be a challenge in a healthy democracy. Ironically, corporate media and the current White House agenda, the threats to defund the CPB, the FCC’s proposed dissolution of net neutrality, and increased media consolidation have risen to be among the greatest obstacles to becoming a well-informed, engaged citizenry. Commercial and corporate media have failed as the fourth estate to keep power in check. Speaking at a KGNU event in Boulder, Amy Goodman said, “This is our responsibility. There’s a reason why our profession (journalism) is the only one explicitly protected by the US Constitution: because we’re supposed to be the checks and balance on power. This is part of our job.” Back in 1980, the historically corporate-dominated media landscape in the US and abroad led the UNESCO’s International Commission for the Study of Communication Problems to produce the Many Voices One World report, citing the “concentration of the media, commercialization of the media, and unequal access to information and communication” as Continued on pg 20

KGNU Community Radio | 5


WHAT’S NEW WITH KGNU?! NEW FM TRANSLATOR IN FORT COLLINS! 287

K254CH LAPORTE, CO COVERAGE

Fort Collins and the surrounding area now tuning into KGNU Community Radio loud and clear on 98.7 FM 25

Wellington

Alternative Radio, the BBC Newshour and BBC Headlines, as well as Colorado’s oldest running Reggae, Hip-Hop, and Bluegrass music programs.

Interested in Partnering With KGNU in Fort Collins? Contact Promotions Coordinator Sean Makau: Promotions@kgnu.org or (303) 449-4885 Pierce

Larimer

NEW KGNU STAFF

Fort Fort Collins Collins

Windsor

34

Loveland In March, KGNU kicked off Loveland its new Fort Collins signal with a “Signal ReleaseCampion Party” in Down54CH. Field strength above 50.00 db uV/m. town Fort Collins at Hodi’s Half Note. In April, Berthoud 4Total Housing Units: 101,993 KGNU partnered with Colorado State University’s second annual ACT Human Rights Film Mead Lyons Festival. In April, KGNU partnered with FocoMX for their three-day music festival. KGNU has also started collaborating with KCSU, the college station at CSU-Fort Collins, on events and promotion opportunities. 34B

15

Estes Park km36

KGNU’s mission to provide the Front Range with independent, non-commercial, music, news, and cultural programming now reaches more listeners than ever following approval by the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) to expand KGNU’s reach to a wider audience in Fort Collins. “This is a timely milestone for us as we prepare to celebrate 40 years of broadcasting in 2018,” says KGNU Station Manager Tim Russo. KGNU returned to Fort Collins in January 2017 at 98.7 FM, to offer a profound breath of fresh air for people seeking more diverse viewpoints. KGNU airs voices, culture, analysis, and critical perspectives from individuals and experts throughout the New American Majority, bringing programming to Fort Collins that other radio outlets simply do not carry. Fort Collins can now tune in for award-winning local and national news programming such as Democracy Now!, the Thom Hartmann Hour, The Ralph Nader Hour, Indian Voices, Counterspin, the Tavis Smiley Show, A Public Affair,

6 | KGNU Magazine

NEW KGNU BOARD MEMBERS KGNU has welcomed four new board members over the past year, including Barbara Stern, Roz Brown, Rebekah Hartman, and Elena Klaver.

Ault

K254CH K254CH

KGNU Out and About in the Fort Collins Scene

gram, and community relations. A proud Colorado native and graduate of CU-Denver, you can ask Sarah where to eat or go hot-springing, and you will be satisfied with her recommendations. When she’s not listening to KGNU, she likes to listen to Persian pop music. You can catch Sarah on Musica Mundi every now and then.

Eaton KGNU recently welcomed three new staff members including Music Director Indra Raj (learn more about Indra on pg 30), Promotions Coordinator Sean Makau, and Community DeGreeley Greeley velopment Director Sarah Shirazi. Kersey 85

Evans

La Salle Milliken

V-Soft Communications LLC ® © Gilcrest

Platteville

Promotions Coordinator Sean Makau hails from Northern California, and has called Denver home for over seven years. Growing up on Experimental Oldies (ELO, Wreckless Eric, etc.), Sean has been DJing since 2005 at various different Northern California College Radio Stations. Since finding KGNU in 2013, Sean has been DJing and volunteering to alert the world to KGNU’s eclectic and diverse music. Underground Rap and Experimental Music is what Sean listens to day-to-day, but he will bob his head to just about anything.

Community Development Director Sarah Shirazi joined KGNU in April 2016. Sarah brings over a decade of experience in nonprofit management with an emphasis in development, community relations, and marketing. Sarah manages KGNU’s fundraising events, grants, planned-giving program, underwriting pro-

KGNU Staff

Station Manager Tim Russo manager@kgnu.org Community Development Director Sarah Shirazi sarah@kgnu.org Music Director Indra Raj music@kgnu.org News and Public Affairs Director Maeve Conran maeve@kgnu.org Operations Director Evan Perkins evan@kgnu.org Membership Director Nikki Kayser nikki@kgnu.org Promotions Coordinator Sean Makau promotions@kgnu.org Denver Program Manager Dave Ashton dave@kgnu.org Underwriting Manager Kenneth Flowe kenneth@kgnu.org Boulder Trainer Joel Davis rtc@kgnu.org Engineer: Jim Mross IT: Sean Williams, Peter Billig In-House Counsel: Gregg Friedman Outside Counsel: Aaron Kraft, Holland & Hart

KGNU Board of Directors Jon Walton, Chair Liz Lane, Vice-Chair Jeannie Brisson, Treasurer Risë Keller, Secretary Roz Brown Rebekah Hartman Elena Klaver Barbara Stern Robin Van Norman Tim Russo, Station Manager (ex officio, non-voting)

Community Advisory Board Members Thia Gonzales Roxy Goss Carmen Ramirez Louis Wolfe


many thanks to our underwriters! 303 BLUES PROJECT facebook.com/303-Blues-Project (720) 422-7504

COTTONWOOD CUSTOM BUILDERS cottonwoodcustombuilders.com (303) 449-3076

JAZZ ON 2ND AVENUE jazzon2ndave.com (720) 924-6222

STANDARD BIKE REPAIR standardbikerepair.com (720) 837-8984

ALTERNATIVE LAW OFFICE OF MARC MILAVITZ alt-law.com (303) 442-2166

DENVER FOLKLORE CENTER denverfolklore.com (303) 777-4786

LAUGHING GOAT COFFEEHOUSE thelaughinggoat.com (303) 440-4628

SUSPECT PRESS suspectpress.com

AMERICAS LATINO ECO FESTIVAL americaslatinoecofestival.org

DENVER BIKE + SKI REPAIR www.denverbikeandskirepair.com (720) 675-7466

LAW OFFICE OF NEDA ZAMAN nedalaw.com (213) 381-3777

ARISE MUSIC FESTIVAL arisefestival.com (720) 608-8830

ECO-CYCLE ecocycle.org (303) 444-6634

LYONS AUTOMOTIVE lyonsautomotive.com (303) 823-6760

ARUGULA arugularestaurant.com (303) 443-5100

ECOSCAPE DESIGN ecoscapedesign.com (303) 447-2282

LYONS LAWN AND LANDSCAPE (720) 341-5596

TANGERINE RESTAURANT tangerineboulder.com (303) 443-2333

BOULDER BACH FESTIVAL boulderbachfestival.org (720) 507-5052

EDWARD JONES edwardjones.com (800) 441-2357

LYONS RECORDER lyonsrecorder.com (303) 823-6625

TELLURIDE RIDE FESTIVAL ridefestival.com (970) 369-0000

BOULDER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OFFICE bouldercounty.org (303) 441-3500

EMPORIUM PRESENTS emporiumpresents.com (615) 301-8728

MARTY’S MEALS martysmeals.com (303) 442-0777

THE CARIBOU ROOM thecaribouroom.com (303) 258-3637

MARK JAFFEE markjaffeedds.com (303) 449-8299

TREEFORT MUSIC FEST treefortmusicfest.com

BOULDER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL bouldercountryday.org (303) 527-4931 BOULDER CHAMBER boulderchamber.com (303) 442-1044 BOULDER BOOKSTORE boulderbookstore.net (303) 447-2074 BOULDER OPERA boulderoperacompany.com (303) 731-2036 BOULDER WEEKLY boulderweekly.com (303) 494-5511 BLUE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION bluefcu.com (303) 243-5766 BROCK MEDIA brockpub.com (303) 443-0600 CELTIC CONNECTION celticevents.com (303) 777-0502 COLORADO BLUES SOCIETY coblues.com (303) 415-2737 COLORADO MAHLERFEST mahlerfest.com (303) 492-8970 COLORADO MUSIC FESTIVAL CENTER FOR MUSICAL ARTS comusic.org (303) 665-0599 COMMUNITY FOUNDATION SERVING BOULDER COUNTY commfound.org (303) 442-0436 COMMUNITY SHARES COLORADO cshares.org (303) 861-7507 CONSERVATION COLORADO conservationco.org (303) 333-7846

FANCY TIGER CRAFTS fancytigercrafts.com (303) 733-3855

SWALLOW HILL swallowhillmusic.org (303) 777-1003 TABLE MESA HARDWARE tablemesahardware.com (303) 499-7211

VINTAGE MOTORS OF LYONS vintagemotorslyons.com (303) 931-5280

FARMER’S PORCH thefarmersporch.com

MARQUEE MAGAZINE marqueemagazine.com (303) 442-2480

FISKE PLANETARIUM colorado.edu/fiske (303) 492-5002

MERCURY CAFE mercurycafe.com (303) 294-9258

FRIENDSHIP BRIDGE friendshipbridge.org (303) 674-0717

MOAB FOLK FESTIVAL moabfolkfestival.com (435) 259-3198

GALVANIZE galvanize.com (303) 749-0038

MOTUS THEATER motustheater.org

WORLD DENVER worlddenver.org (303) 592-5760

MOUNTAIN EAR themtnear.com (303) 810-5409

YELLOW SCENE yellowscene.com (303) 828-2700

MOUNTAIN SUN PUB mountainsunpub.com (303) 546-0886

Z2 ENTERTAINMENT BoulderTheater.com / foxtheatre.com (303) 786-7030

GAY AND LESBIAN FUND FOR COLORADO gaylesbianfund.org (303) 292-4455 GRACE DESIGN gracedesign.com (303) 823-8100 GREEN RIDE BOULDER greenrideboulder.com (303) 997-0238 GREEN GIRL RECYCLING greengirlrecycling.com (303) 442-7535 HARLEQUIN’S GARDENS harlequinsgardens.com (303) 939-9403 HISTORY COLORADO CENTER historycolorado.org (303) 447-8679 HUNGER FREE COLORADO hungerfreecolorado.org (855) 855-4626 INDEPENDENT POWER SYSTEMS solarips.com (303) 443-0115 INDIAN PEAKS SPRING WATER indianpeaksspringwater.com (303) 440-0432 IWILL & TRUST iwillandtrust.com (303) 557-0951

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR COLLEGE ADMISSIONS COUNSELING nacacnet.org (703) 243-9375 (800)-822-6285 ONESEED EXPEDITIONS oneseedexpeditions.com (303) 586-4723 PIZZA BAR 66 pizzabar66.com (303) 823-6262 POP CULTURE CLASSROOM popcultureclassroom.org REDSTONE REVIEW facebook.com/RedstoneReview (303) 823-6358 ROWDY MERMAID rowdymermaid.com (303) 396-0498 SBG PRODUCTIONS & PLANET BLUEGRASS bluegrass.com (303) 823-0848 SHAMBALA shambhalamountain.org 1-888-788-7221

VOICES FOR CHILDREN CASA vfccasa.org (303) 440-7059 WESTERN DISPOSAL SERVICES westerndisposal.com (303) 444-2037

LOCAL BUSINESSES SUPPORT KGNU! These local businesses and nonprofits contribute money, goods and services to KGNU. We encourage you to let them know you appreciate their support of KGNU. If you want to let our listeners know that your business supports KGNU, contact our underwriting manager, Kenneth Flowe at Kenneth@kgnu.org or (303) 449-4885.

KGNU Community Radio | 7


Thanks to these Supporting Businesses! Ace Eat Serve aceeatserve.com AEG Live aeglive.com Alfalfa’s alfalfas.com American Adventure Expeditions americanadventure.com Angelo’s Aurora angeloscds.com Arleigh B arleigh.com Arugula Ristorante arugularistorante.com Avery Brewing averybrewing.com Azitra: Indian Culinary Nirvana azitra.us Black and Read blackandread.net Blue Federal Credit Union bluefcu.com Bayou Bob’s bayoubobs.com Beatrice and Woodsley beatriceandwoodsley.com Beau Jo’s Colorado Style Pizza beaujos.com Birdy Magazine birdymagazine.com Blackbelly Market blackbelly.com Blue Ribbon Farm facebook.com/BRFarmLongmont Boulder Arts and Crafts Gallery boulderartsandcrafts.com Boulder County AIDS Project bcap.org Boulder County Care careconnectbc.org Boulder Beer boulderbeer.com The Boulder Cork bouldercork.com Boulder Map Gallery bouldermapgallery.com Boulder Marriott marriott.com/hotels/boulder Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art bmoca.org Boulder Phone boulderphone.com Boulder Weekly boulderweekly.com Boulder Women Songwriters http://womensongwriters. weebly.com/

8 | KGNU Magazine

Brock Media brockpub.com Butterfly Pavilion butterflies.org California Pizza Kitchen cpk.com/29thstreet/boulder Cantina Laredo cantinalaredo.com Caribou Room thecaribouroom.com Celtic Events celticevents.com Centro Latin Kitchen centromexican.com Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom cervantesmasterpiece.com Chef Bob Sampson chefbob.sampson@gmail. com Chipotle chipotle.com City Donuts citydonutsaurora.com City O’ City cityocitydenver.com Colorado Daily coloradodaily.com Comedy Works comedyworks.org Community Cycles communitycycles.org Cosmos Pizza cosmospizza.com Cucina Colore cucinacolore.com D’Angelo’s Deli dangelosdeli.com Dazzle Restaurant dazzlejazz.com Denver Museum of Nature and Science dmns.org Denver Bike + Ski Repair denverbikeandskirepair.com Eight Days A Week 8days.com Eco Cycle ecocycle.org ECO Products ecoproducts.com Fresh Thymes Eatery freshthymeseatery.com Fox Theatre foxtheatre.com Greater Park Hill greaterparkhill.org Gold Hill Inn goldhillinn.com Green Girl Recycling greengirlrecycling.com Greenbriar Inn greenbriarinn.com

Half Fast Subs halffastsubs.com Hapa Sushi hapasushi.com Harlequin’s Gardens harlequinsgardens.com Harpo’s Sports Bar harpossportsgrill.com Hi-Dive hi-dive.com Highland City Club highlandcityclub.com Highlander Magazine highlandermagazine.com Hungry Buffs hungrybuffs.com Illegal Pete’s illegalpetes.com Il Fornaio ilfornaio.com Indivisible East Boulder indivisibleeastboulder.org Indulge Bistro and Wine Bar indulgewinebar.com Intercambio intercambio.org Jax Fish House jaxfishhouse.com Julien’s Cliffhouse Kombucha cliffhousekombucha.com King Soopers kingsoopers.com Kokoro kokororestaurants.com KT’s Hickory Pit BBQ ktsbbq.com Ku Cha House of Tea kuchatea.com Larkburger larkburger.com LaLuz laluzgrill.com Liquor Mart liquormart.com Live Nation livenation.com Lola Coastal Mexican loladenver.com Lucky’s Market luckysmarket.com Lyons Magazine livability.com/co/lyons Mad Greens madgreens.com Marquee Magazine marqueemag.com Mercury Café mercurycafe.com Mercury’s Messengers mercurysmessengers.com Moe’s Bagel moesbagel.com

Moe’s Original BBQ moesoriginalbbq.com Mojo Taqueria mojotaqueria.com Mountain Sun Pubs and Breweries mountainsunpub.com Museum of Contemporary Art mcadenver.org Mutiny Information Cafe mutinyinfocafe.com Nooch Vegan Market noochveganmarket.tumblr. com Old Chicago oldchicago.com One Love Garden Supply onelovegardensupply.com Organic Sandwich Company organicsandwichco.com Oriental Theatre theorientaltheater.com Oskar Blues oskarblues.com Boulder Out outboulder.org OZO Coffee ozocoffee.com Pizza Rev pizzarev.com Pizzeria Da Lupo pizzeriadalupo.com Protein Bar theproteinbar.com Redstone Meadery redstonemeadery.com Redstone Review facebook.com/redstonereview Recollect Records recollectrecords.com Rialto Café rialtocafe.com River and Woods riverandwoodsboulder.com Samm Sherman instagram.com/pastrysamm Sanitas Brewery sanitasbrewery.com Savory Cuisines savorycuisines.com Secret Sauce Food & Beverage secretsaucedenver.com Sexy Pizza sexypizzaonline.com Sienna Wine Bar siennawinebar.com Snarf’s eatsnarfs.com Soda Jerks Presents sodajerkpresents.com

Still Cellars stillcellars.com Swallow Hill Music swallowhillmusic.org Sugar Beet sugarbeetrestaurant.com Summit Steakhouse thesummitsteakhouse.com Suspect Press suspectpress.com Taco Junky tacojunky.com Tahona Tequila Bistro tahonaboulder.com Tangerine tangerineboulder.com Taste of Colorado atasteofcolorado.com The Corner thecornerboulder.com The Kitchen thekitchenbistros.com The Kitchen Next Door thekitchenbistros.com The Marquis Theater themarquistheater.com The Post Brewing Co. postbrewing.com Twist and Shout twistandshout.com Twisted Pine Brewery twistedpinebrewing.com Vesta Dipping Grill vestadenver.com Virgilio’s Pizzeria and Wine Bar ilovepizzapie.com Via Toscana viatoscana.com Voodoo Doughnut voodoodoughnut.com Walnut Cafe walnutcafe.com Wapos Mexican Cocina waposboulder.com Waterloo Restaurant waterloolouisville.com Wax Trax Records waxtraxrecords.com West End Tavern thewestendtavern.com Whole Foods Market wholefoodsboulder.com WOW! Children’s Museum wowchildrensmuseum.com Z2 Entertainment foxtheatre.com Zolo Grill zologrill.com


Putting the “U” in You’re a KGNU listener,

member, a total fan—maybe you’re even volunteering or grooving as a DJ—but have you ever considered deepening your involvement with KGNU? How about volunteering on a committee? KGNU’s committees help the station continue to evolve, chrysalis-like, into the miracle of audio democracy that is KGNU. The Programming Committee, for instance, looks all over the world for the best shows available. This committee is responsible for, among other things, the finely-tuned public-affairs sweet spot between 3:30-5pm that includes The Shortwave Report, Making Contact, Economic Update, Reveal, Between the Lines, and the return of TUC Radio. As former KGNU Board member Gavin Dahl says, “I think of the Program Committee as a KGNU fan club. Participation has really increased over the past year, and it’s been great getting more Denver volunteers involved. We have invigorating conversations and consider all program proposals before making recommendations to staff. It’s quite a DO-ocracy so… show up!” Or, consider volunteering as a member of the Development Committee, which orchestrates special events, outreach, and all things

fundraising-related. The Events Committee designs KGNU events in music, film, and public affairs that stimulate the community while raising awareness of the station. The work of KGNU’s committees literally impacts what moves between listeners’ ears and hearts. As Board member Robin Van Norman says, “My committee work has given me a much better understanding of what it takes to run a community radio organization like KGNU. I’ve developed friendships and a great deal of respect for the volunteers, staff and Board members of KGNU.” Driving a MissionDriven Vehicle KGNU is a radiant gem in the constellation of community radio stations, and that’s primarily because of

“ I T MA K E S ME FEEL GOOD TO SUPPORT AN ORGANIZATION THAT I AM PASSIONATE ABOUT AND FEEL IS SO I MP O R T A N T TO OUR C O MMU N I T Y.” –R O B I N V A N N O R MA N , BOARD ME MB E R SINCE 2014

BY N IL E SOUT HERN

IT’S TIME TO STEP UP, PARTICIPATE, AND BE THE MEDIA YOU WANT TO HEAR! KGNU Community Radio | 9


year, get along well with people in a consensus enour volunteer participation and financial support. To vironment, are involved with KGNU’s committees, engage as a volunteer: table events, make presen“KGNU has consider asking a member of KGNU’s staff or Nomitations at schools, work at the front desk answering enabled me to nating Committee about applying. It’s a privilege to phones, or read headlines for the weekday Morning pursue what I love.” help determine the future of locally sustained radio! Magazine. You can also help with updates to the –Jen Cornell, Many DJs over the years have become main kgnu.org website, the AfterFM digital streamVolunteer active on committees, extending ing channel, the news.kgnu.org site, the Program and enriching their engageGuide, data entry, graphic design, morning or afment with the station. If ternoon news hosting, and implementing the mas“It was an honor to you are a DJ who does sive music library digitization project. Volunteering serve on the board with not otherwise engage at KGNU can be empowering and personally reother volunteers in support of with the station, step warding. As longtime volunteer and former Board KGNU. Being on the board was one up to committee member Arleigh says, “I always enjoy myself when service, and help of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever I volunteer. I have made friends and made work the station continue connections at KGNU. I’ve done. I’m very proud of KGNU, and nurturing the comlearned so much about happy to be part of the KGNU munity with quality radio, people, noncommunity.” – Arleigh, former “Community programming well profit businesses, Board member radio can effect into the future! and about myself.” the listener to ‘be the Another way to go deeper as change’ for a better “I came a volunteer is world.” –Marge Taniwaki, to KGNU to volunteer to serve on the Nominating Committee and reconnect with my station’s Board of and Producer Directors. The Nomcommunity when I moved back to “Knowing there’s inating Committee recBoulder. It worked! I am continually a like-minded tribe ommends candidates to delighted to work with so many the Board for the 3-6 year service of individuals keeping smart, engaged, compassionate, commitments. The Board meets monthly, grassroots radio alive always and generous people in the KGNU alternating between Denver and Boulder. makes me proud to be community. –Risë Keller, If you have been a member for at least a

associated with KGNU.” –Roz Brown, KGNU Board of Directors

Secretary, KGNU Board of Directors

COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE COMMITTEE NAME

PURPOSE

CHAIR(S)

MEETS*

BUDGET COMMITTEE

MONITORS THE STATION'S BUDGET. ASSISTS THE STATION MANAGER IN PUTTING TOGETHER THE ANNUAL BUDGET.

TREASURER

MONTHLY MAY - NOV, DATES ANNOUNCED ON KGNU.ORG

CAB (COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD)

GIVES THE COMMUNITY A WAY TO REVIEW THE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE STATION.

STATION MANAGER

SEMIANNUALLY. MEETINGS ANNOUNCED ON KGNU.ORG.

DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

SUPPORTS MOST GENERAL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGNS AT KGNU, INCLUDING PLANNED GIVING, CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS, MAJOR GIFTS, SELECT SPECIAL EVENTS, ETC.

RON NADEL

3RD MONDAY OF THE MONTH AT 5PM

EVENTS COMMITTEE

ORGANIZES KGNU BENEFIT EVENTS.

MEREDITH CARSON

1ST WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6PM

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

RECRUITS, INTERVIEWS, AND RECOMMENDS NEW BOARD MEMBERS.

NILE SOUTHERN, JOY BARRETT

3RD WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6PM

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

REVIEWS KGNU PROGRAMS IN LIGHT OF THE STATION'S MISSION AND STANDARDS. CONSIDERS NEW PROGRAMS ON KGNU. REVIEWS PROGRAMS THAT HAVE RECEIVED COMPLAINTS FROM LISTENERS, STAFF OR VOLUNTEERS.

REBEKAH HARTMAN

4TH TUESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6PM; ALTERNATES BETWEEN BOULDER/DENVER

STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE

OVERSEES IMPLEMENTATION OF KGNU'S STRATEGIC PLAN.

ROZ BROWN

3RD TUESDAY OF THE MONTH AT 6PM

* All regular meeting times and dates may be changed at any time up to 7 days prior to the meeting. All meeting changes will be posted no less than 7 days prior to the meeting date on the kgnu.org committee calendar. Please visit the kgnu.org committee calendar for the most up-to-date committee times and dates.

10 | KGNU Magazine


SO...you wanna be a KGNU-er I would like Great! Get started by to volunteer attending a volunteer at KGNU! orientation.

DONE. Now I know how to become a DJ! BE A DEEJAY

I wonder what else I can do?

PS:

IN 4 EASY STE

ASS TRAINING CL

RADIO PRACTICE!

PREPARE DEMO ON START TO DJ GHTS SLEEPLESS NI

WHERE TO START? Attend a Volunteer Orientation. Held in both Boulder and Denver on the first Thursday of odd-numbered months (January, March, May, July, September, and November), orientations provide an opportunity to meet like-minded people, plug into the station, and learn more about becoming RADIO-active! “As a volunteer DJ at the station, I appreciate the sense of community with all of the other volunteers there and with the listeners. KGNU enriches my life. Recently, I’m getting more involved with committee work and I’m finding it meaningful.” – Ginger Perry, Nominating Committee and DJ

“Being a member of the KGNU Board of Directors means sharing in the responsibility of holding our FCC license, reviewing budgets, fundraising efforts and all Committee activities. It’s a great group of people and we are seeking more KGNU members who are willing to take their volunteer commitment to a deeper level.” – Gavin Dahl, former Board member

KGNU Volunteer Orientation Dates for Summer 2017- Spring 2018 Orientations take place at our Boulder and Denver studios, at 7pm on the first Thursday of odd-numbered months: July 6, 2017 September 7, 2017 November 2, 2017 January 4, 2018 March 1, 2018 May 3, 2018

KGNU Volunteer Outreach Training Dates Summer 2017- Spring 2018 KGNU outreach trainings take place at our Boulder and Denver studios, at 6pm on the second Thursday of odd-numbered months: July 13, 2017 September 14, 2017 November 9, 2017 January 11, 2017 March 8, 2018 May 10, 2018

“KGNU and Community Radio provides not only music and information, but also an outlet for people to be heard. People-powered radio makes a difference!” –Joanne Cole, longtime volunteer and DJ

THANKS... BUT YOU DIDN’T HAVE TO SHOUT!

HOW TO GET INVOLVED WITH KGNU At KGNU, we empower you to be the media. We invite the general public and people from all walks of life to participate in our programs. KGNU broadcasts a diverse mix of music, news and information 24 hours a day. We hold orientations the first Thursday of every other month, and invite prospective volunteers to learn more about the organization and our volunteer opportunities.

TRAINING TO BE ON THE AIR TO BE ON THE AIR, YOU MUST: Attend

a Volunteer Orientation and complete our Basic Radio Training class.

Practice

at your own pace until you are familiar with our equipment and feel comfortable working in our studios.

Schedule & complete

a Finishing Touches class.

Coordinate

with the Music or News department for possible next steps or tasks.

KGNU Community Radio | 11


12 | KGNU Magazine


88.5 FM & 1390 AM Denver + Boulder / 93.7 FM Nederland / 98.7 Fort Collins kgnu.org Music Shows News & Talk – Local News & Talk – Syndicated

Program Schedule MIDNIGHT

3:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 7:59 8:01 8:05 8:25 8:30 8:32 8:35 9:00 9:30 11:00 11:30 Noon 12:05 12:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 2:55 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 MIDNIGHT

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

SLEEPLESS NIGHTS RESTLESS MORNINGS COUNTERSPIN

RESTLESS MORNINGS

COMMUNITY PUBLIC RADIO NEWS BBC: THE NEWSROOM BBC: BUSINESS DAILY / WITNESS

DEMOCRACY NOW! AM COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HONKY TONK HEROES

BBC HEADLINES MORNING MAGAZINE RESISTANCE RADIO

NATURALLY

KGNU COMMENT LINE

WEED B. T. LINES 8:20 RADIO NIBBLES 8:25

GOSPEL CHIME HOUR

TECH TALK

BBC HEADLINES JIM HIGHTOWER A PUBLIC AFFAIR

COUNTERSPIN

HOW ON EARTH

JIM HIGHTOWER

CONNECTIONS

A PUBLIC AFFAIR ALAN WATTS

OLD GRASS GNU GRASS

MORNING SOUND ALTERNATIVE BBC HEADLINES

TERRASONIC

ROOTS AND BRANCHES

E-TOWN TRIBUTARIES LIVING DIALOGUES

BBC HEADLINES

AFTERNOON SOUND ALTERNATIVE

LOCAL PM HEADLINES WITH THE COLORADO INDEPENDENT - PM COMMUNITY CALENDAR METRO SHORTWAVE REPORT

MAKING CONTACT

RALPH NADER

REVEAL

TUC RADIO

ECONOMIC THOM HARTMANN UPDATE PROGRAM W/ PROF R WOLF

TAVIS SMILEY

W.I.N.G.S.

AFRICAN ROOTS

PASA LA VOZ SPROUTS CHINESE RADIO

HEMISPHERES

ALTERNATIVE RADIO

IT’S THE ECONOMY

THE OPERA BOX

KABARET

SEOLTA GAEL

HIGHWAY 322

CLASSICAL MONDAY

¡CORRIENTE!

MUSICA MUNDI

OUTSOURCES

BIONEERS

INDIAN VOICES

LAURA FLANDERS

BBC NEWS HOUR LA LUCHA SIGUE OR LABOR EXCHANGE

REGGAE BLOODLINES

METRO ARTS

BETWEEN THE LINES

BBC HEADLINES

NEW DIMENSIONS

BBC NEWSHOUR

BLUES LEGACY

SOUNDLAB GRATEFUL DEAD HOUR

DIXIELAND OR RAGTIME

BBC NEWSHOUR

ECLIPSE

SWING SHIFT DUSTY GROOVES ELECTRONIC AIR

PRESENT EDGE

REGGAE THE HEAVY SET TRANSFUSIONS

JAZZ LIVES

DUB PALACE SMASH IT BACK!

UNDER THE FLOORBOARDS

KGNU Community Radio | 13


news

Whether it’s local, national, or international, KGNU covers the entire news and public affairs spectrum and showcases communities that are underrepresented in mainstream media.

WEEKDAYS Community Public Radio News Tuesday-Friday 5:30-6:00am A community-based news show from former staff members of Pacifica’s WBAI in New York. BBC The Newsroom Monday-Friday 6:00-6:30am BBC Business Daily Monday-Friday 6:30-6:50am BBC Witness Monday-Friday 6:50-7:00am BBC Newshour Monday-Friday 5:00-6:00pm Saturday, Sunday 6:00-7:00pm News from the international radio service. Dot Org Monday and Thursday at 3:25pm Interviews with local non-profits. kgnu.org/dotorg Democracy Now! Weekdays 7:00-8:00am Award-winning news program hosted by Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez. Morning Magazine Weekdays 8:00am Following the BBC headlines at the top of the hour, you’ll hear state and local news headlines, daily reports from the state capitol, when in session, and wide coverage of local and regional public affairs. kgnu.org/morningmag Resistance Radio/Resistance Radio Calendar Monday 8:25am Looking at groups, individuals and organizations that are engaged in political and social justice activism. Make Them Hear You! Wednesday 8:20am Make Them Hear You! is a weekly feature on KGNU, produced by Chris Mohr, informing listeners about how they can get their voices heard on issues before Congress. Naturally Wednesday 8:25am Herbalist Brigitte Mars shares her wisdom on living a natural life. Sensi: Cannabis News Thursday 8:20am Leland Rucker, the senior editor at Sensi Magazine, joins us weekly to look at the latest news in cannabis in Colorado and nationally. Radio Nibbles Thursday 8:25am Local food and drink feature with John Lehndorff. TechTalks Friday 8:25am High school students at the Innovation Center in Longmont bring us a weekly report looking at how technology is being used in all aspects of society. How On Earth Tuesday 8:32-9:00am Locally produced science show featuring longform interviews, features, and news about science. kgnu.org/howonearth

14 | KGNU Magazine

PoCo in BoCo Second Monday of every month, 8:35-9:00am Tracey Jones and Nikhil Mankekar co-host a monthly series looking at issues facing People of Color in Boulder County. Connections Friday 8:30-9:30am Call-in program covering a wide range of topics. kgnu.org/connections Counterspin Monday 5:30-6:00am and 9:00-9:30am A critique and analysis of recent news coverage from F.A.I.R. (Fairness and Accuracy In Reporting) Alan Watts Tuesday 9:00-9:30am Presentations from the late philosopher and author who specialized in presenting Eastern philosophy and spirituality to Western audiences. Metro Monday-Thursday 3:00-3:30pm Locally produced news and public affairs call-in show that looks at issues affecting the community. kgnu.org/metro. Metro Arts Friday 3:00-3:30pm A weekly show featuring local arts news, from theater reviews to author interviews. Includes the weekly metro arts calendar, a roundup of arts events along the Front Range. The second Friday of every month features Cafe Nuba, with a focus on spoken word and slam poetry. The Laura Flanders Show Friday 3:30-4:00pm A weekly show featuring interviews with social critics, artists, activists, and entrepreneurs who are building tomorrow’s world today. Laura Flanders brings you in-depth conversations about change and change-making with leading thinkers and doers, as well as commentaries and field reports. The Tavis Smiley Show Friday 4:00-5:00pm Tavis Smiley discusses politics, news, and culture with his guests. Shortwave Report Monday 3:30-4:00pm A 30-minute review of news stories broadcast over shortwave radio from around the globe. The Ralph Nader Radio Hour Monday 4:00-5:00pm A weekly radio show featuring consumer advocate, lawyer, and author Ralph Nader. Making Contact Tuesday 3:30-4:00pm A weekly radio show that highlights vital grassroots voices. Between the Lines Wednesday 3:30-4:00pm A weekly syndicated half-hour news magazine featuring progressive perspectives on national and international political, economic and social issues. TUC Radio Thursday 3:30-4:00pm A weekly program examining the untold stories of the impact of big corporations on society.

The Thom Hartmann Show Wednesday 4:00-5:00pm An hour-long show featuring award-winning author and progressive radio talk-show host Thom Hartmann. Labor Exchange Every other Monday 6:00-6:30pm (alternates with La Lucha Sigue) Locally produced interviews with local and national labor activists and workers. kgnu.org/laborexchange. La Lucha Sigue Every other Monday 6:00-6:30pm (alternates with Labor Exchange) Locally produced news about Latin America and the Caribbean. kgnu.org/laluchasigue Outsources Monday 6:30-7:00pm Locally produced Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender news and interviews. kgnu.org/outsources Hemispheres Tuesday 6:00-7:00pm Interviews and occasional call-in focused on international and national issues. kgnu.org/hemispheres Alternative Radio Wednesday 6:00-7:00pm Talks by and interviews with dissident writers, academics, and activists such as Noam Chomsky, Vandana Shiva, and Michael Parenti. It’s The Economy Thursday 6:00-7:00pm Discussions on various aspects of the economy. kgnu. org/itstheeconomy Tributaries Sunday 12 noon-12:30pm Interviews focused on healthy living. kgnu.org/tributaries Living Dialogues Sunday 12:30-1:00pm View of the New Consciousness. kgnu.org/livingdialogues New Dimensions Sunday 1:00-1:55pm Uncommon wisdom for unconventional times. Threads of Yoga Sunday 1:55-2:00pm Yoga news. Bioneers Sunday 2:00-2:30pm Environmental/spiritual news. W.I.N.G.S. Sunday 2:30-3:00pm Women’s International News Gathering Service. News by and about women. Indian Voices Sunday 3:00-4:00pm Explores Native American issues, music, and culture. kgnu.org/indianvoices Pasa La Voz Sunday 4:00-5:00pm Locally produced program aimed at informing the Spanish-speaking community about topics including health and education. kgnu.org/pasalavoz Sprouts Sunday 5:00-5:30pm Magazine of alternative news. Colorado Chinese Radio Network Sunday 5:30-6:00pm News and Information for Chinese Immigrants. kgnu.org/ chinese All shows are archived and accessible on kgnu. org KGNU Community Radio


MUSIC

KGNU’s eclectic music format covers a wide range of styles and genres. Explore our airwaves and archives to find your favorites within our programming.

FREEFORM Morning Sound Alternative Weekdays 9:30am-12 noon Diverse and eclectic sounds, on the mellow side. You’ll hear everything from ambient electronics to reggae to folk. afterfm.com/morning Afternoon Sound Alternative Weekdays 12 noon-3:00pm Diverse and eclectic sounds, on the more adventurous side. Tune in for everything from free jazz to hip-hop to Cumbia. afterfm.com/afternoon Sound Lab Saturday 7:00-8:00pm Adventures in freeform from the late-night lab. afterfm.com/soundlab Sleepless Nights Nightly 12 midnight-3:00am Combines the aesthetics of the Morning and Afternoon Sound Alternatives, while leaving the door open for more extreme audio excursions. afterfm.com/latenight Restless Mornings Weekdays 3:00-5:30am; Saturday 3:00-6:00am; Sunday 3:00-7:00am Anything can happen as new DJs get their chops behind the mixing board. afterfm.com/practice

WEEKDAY SPECIALTY SHOWS The Opera Box Monday 7:00-8:00pm The start of our Monday evening Classical and modern composition programming. The Opera Box focuses on contemporary and vintage opera recordings and connecting the Colorado Opera community. afterfm.com/opera A Classic Monday Monday 8:00-10:00pm Explore the vast wealth that Classical music has to offer. afterfm.com/classical The Present Edge Monday 10:00pm-12 midnight Exploring the leading edge of contemporary Classical music, avant garde, and experimental sounds. afterfm.com/moderncomposition

Seolta Gael Wednesday 7:00-8:00pm A weekly exploration of Celtic music. afterfm. com/celtic Musica Mundi Wednesday 8:00-10:00pm “Music of the world,” traditional international music. afterfm.com/international Reggae Transfusion Wednesday 10:00pm-12 midnight Explores the full scope of reggae music by giving some of our newest reggae DJs the keys to the control room. afterfm.com/morereggae Highway 322 Thursday 7:00-8:00pm Folk music and Americana. afterfm.com/folk Ragtime America 1st, 2nd, and 4th Thursday 8:00-9:00pm Ragtime enthusiasts, rejoice! afterfm.com/ ragtime Dixieland Marmalade 3RD Thursday 8:00-9:00pm Non-stop Dixieland recordings. afterfm.com/ dixieland Swing Shift Thursday 9:00-10:00pm Music from the big band and swing era. afterfm. com/swing Jazz Lives Thursday 10:00pm-12 midnight Jazz with a focus on traditional, swing, and straight-ahead jazz. afterfm.com/traditionaljazz Blues Legacy Friday 6:00-9:00pm Kicking off Friday night with blues from vintage & contemporary recordings. afterfm.com/blues Dusty Grooves Friday 9:00-11:00pm Classic funk & soul. afterfm.com/funk Smash It Back! Friday 11:00pm-12 midnight Classic punk and other junk. afterfm.com/punk

Kabaret Tuesday 7:00-8:00pm Local musicians and bands play live in KGNU’s performance studio. Kabaret has been a resource for Colorado’s music talent since 1978. afterfm. com/livelocal ¡Corriente! Tuesday 8:00-10:00pm Join us for the music of Latin America, from traditional to modern. afterfm.com/latin The Heavy Set Tuesday 10:00pm-12 midnight The art of improvisation and the shape of jazz to come. The Heavy Set features cutting edge jazz from the past and present. afterfm.com/jazz

Many shows are archived and accessible on kgnu.org

WEEKEND SPECIALTY SHOWS Honky Tonk Heroes Saturday 6:00-9:00am Classic country and new music steeped in that tradition. afterfm.com/country Old Grass Gnu Grass Saturday 9:00am-12 noon Bluegrass music from the traditional to the contemporary. afterfm.com/bluegrass Terrasonic Saturday 12 noon-1:00pm New traditions in international sound. afterfm.com/ world Reggae Bloodlines Saturday 1:00-4:00pm Reggae and its roots: ska, rocksteady, dub, dance hall & more. The second longest running reggae show in the U.S. afterfm.com/reggae African Roots Saturday 4:00-6:00pm The only Colorado radio show focused on the music of Africa. afterfm.com/african The Grateful Dead Hour Saturday 8:00-9:00pm The only show on KGNU dedicated to a single band, this show presents recordings of the band’s live concerts, among others. gdhour.com Electronic Air Saturday 9:00-11:00pm House, IDM, breakbeat, and more. afterfm.com/ electronic Under the Floorboards Saturday 11:00pm-12 midnight Obscure personally produced music and audio art. afterfm.com/diy Gospel Chime Hour Sunday 7:00-9:00am A weekly journey through the roots of Gospel music and its contemporary forms. afterfm.com/ gospel Roots & Branches Sunday 9:00-11:00am Highlighting the traditions of American Folk music and the new permutations of this genre as interpreted by modern artists. afterfm.com/rootsandbranches eTown Sunday 11:00am-12 noon Musical variety show, taped before a live audience. etown.org Eclipse Sunday 7:00-10:00pm Colorado’s longest running hip-hop show. Old school sounds scratched with modern flavor. afterfm.com/eclipse Dub Palace Sunday 10:00pm-12 midnight An exploration into the past, present and future of dub. afterfm.com/dub

KGNU Community Radio | 15


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16 | KGNU Magazine


Dig our Sound? Become a KGNU Listener-Member! For nearly 40 years KGNU has operated as an independent, non-commercial radio station, broadcasting in Boulder, Denver, Nederland and Fort Collins and online at KGNU.ORG and AfterFM.COM. Over 85 percent of KGNU’s funding comes directly from our community of listeners and those who believe in our important mission of community access to our airwaves! Your support as a listener-member is vital. Active listener-members are the single largest source of funding for KGNU. You keep KGNU strong and able to stimulate, educate and entertain you 24/7!

BECOMING A MEMBER IS EASY!

We educate through our

news, cultural/ philosophical and music programs, providing a broad perspective on news and public affairs, cultural programming and eclectic music from all over the world.

We stimulate

and train hundreds of youth and adults each year to share their voices and creativity on the air-waves.

We entertain

through our diverse news, public affairs and music programs from all over the world.

Benefits of Investing in a Community Resource: KGNU Membership • F eeling good by supporting community education and entertainment • Mobile app media player that allows you to take KGNU with you 24/7 • Archives to download and play at your convenience (see playlists online at KGNU.ORG and AfterFM.com • Access to ticket giveaways all year • Member-Partner Discounts (see side panel)

Member-Partner Discounts • Black and Read Bookstore - 10% discount • Boulder Financial Realty - Donates 5% (after tax) to KGNU plus 5% of any commission earned back to buyer, or any non-profit of buyer’s choice • Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art - 2 for 1 admission • City Donuts - 20% discount • Denver Museum of Contemporary Art - 2 for 1 admission • Ozo - 10% discount • Twist and Shout - 10% discount • Wow Children’s Museum - 2 for 1 admission • Mutiny Information Cafe - 10% discount • Nooch Vegan Market - 10% discount on groceries • Weathervane Cafe - 15% off food and drink (no retail)

Become a SOLR MemberSustainer Of Local Radio Contribute $5, $10, $15, or more every month with automatic contributions. Giving is easy on your budget. Membership is ongoing, so you don’t need to renew your membership annually. SOLR members are eligible for one ticket drawing per month and can also choose an annual thank-you gift.

JOIN NOW by visiting KGNU.ORG DROP BY during business hours BOULDER: 4700 Walnut St. DENVER/FT. COLLINS: By appointment OR CALL 303-449-4885

KGNU Community Radio | 17


KGNU’s New Annual Nonprofit and Small-Business Memberships By becoming a Nonprofit or Small-Business Member of KGNU, your organization will gain significant exposure across the Front Range through our on-air, digital, and printed media channels. The KGNU footprint covers a large geographical area across the Front Range (Boulder, Denver and Fort Collins) with a potential 2.3 million listeners, in addition to our strong online audience. We will connect our listeners to your cause or business, which may result in new supporters, clients and more! Not only that but you are also making the statement that you support a true commu-

nity media asset.

BECOMING A MEMBER IS EASY! Come to KGNU’s Boulder studios at 4700 Walnut St., Boulder CO 80301 during business hours, or call (303) 449-4885.

18 | KGNU Magazine

ANNUAL NONPROFIT MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS INCLUDE

ANNUAL SMALL-BUSINESS MEMBERSHIP LEVELS

$200 - Friend of Community Radio

$500 – Friend of Community Radio

• L isting under Nonprofit Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Invitation to a Dot Org interview with blog entry on news.kgnu.org • Logo and link listed on our website on Nonprofit Members Support page • 5 Sponsorship Mentions*

$500 - Patron of Community Radio

• L isting under Nonprofit Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Invitation to a Dot Org interview with blog entry on news.kgnu.org • Logo and link listed on our website on Nonprofit Members Support page • 10 Sponsorship Mentions* • Business Card Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range

$1,000 - Steward of Community Radio

• L isting under Nonprofit Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Invitation to a Dot Org interview with blog entry on news.kgnu.org • Logo and link listed on our website on Nonprofit Members Support page • 2 Free Tickets to one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 20 Sponsorship Mentions* • 1/4 page Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range • Additional 10% off nonprofit underwriting rates

$1,500 - Partner of Community Radio

• L isting under Nonprofit Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Invitation to a Dot.org interview with blog entry on news.kgnu.org • Logo and link listed on our website on Nonprofit Members Support page • 2 Free Tickets to one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 25 Sponsorship Mentions* • 1/2 Page Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range • Additional 15% off nonprofit underwriting rates

• L isting under Business Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Logo and link listed on our website on Small Business Members Support Page • 2 Free Tickets to one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles Sawtelle Memorial Mtn. Jam in Gold Hill or our annual Mardi Gras Dance) • 5 Underwriting spots • Business Card Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range

$1,000 – Steward of Community Radio

• L isting under Business Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Logo and link listed on our website on Small Business Members Support Page • KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 4 Free Tickets to one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 15 Underwriting spots • 1/4 page Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range • 10% off underwriting rates

$2,000 – Partner of Community Radio

• L isting under Business Members in KGNU’s annual Program Guide • Logo and link listed on our website on Small Business Members Support Page • Table display at one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 6 Free Tickets to one of KGNU’s annual Signature events (The Charles or Mardi Gras) • 30 Underwriting spots • 1 Full Page Ad in KGNU’s annual Program Guide, distributed to 15,000 across the Front Range • 15% off underwriting rates

Questions? Contact Sarah@kgnu.org or call (303) 449-4885.

* Sponsor Mentions are 10-second mentions that can be aired during select programs. Example: “This show is supported by the KGNU listener-member and [nonprofit name]. More information at [nonprofit name] dot org.”


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KGNU Community Radio | 19


KGNU Partnerships in News, Books, & Activism Collaborations in the News By Maeve Conran, KGNU News Director In our continual exploration of new ways to collaborate with other independent media in our news programming, we work with the Colorado Independent, we launched an Afternoon Headlines segment Mondays through Fridays at 2:55pm. The Colorado Independent aims to “carry on the tradition of in-depth investigative journalism and smart news commentary by some of Colorado’s best journalists at a time when our state most needs it.” Reporters at the Colorado Independent write the headlines on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; KGNU producers write the headlines on Tuesday and Thursday. We are also reaching out to community groups to create alliances and educate our listeners on national, state, and local politics. Wednesday mornings on the Morning Magazine the feature Make Them Hear You! aims to educate listeners on how they can get their voices heard by legislators on issues before Congress. The League of Women Voters of Boulder County (LWVBC) is working with KGNU on a monthly commentary series, Making Democracy Work for All! The series addresses topics pertaining to our democracy, from money in politics, to how the state legislature works, and how bills are introduced and ultimately passed into law. We are continuing our ongoing partnership with the Boulder Bookstore through our monthly Radio Book Club. Arsen Kashkashian, head buyer at the Boulder Bookstore, selects a book for the KGNU listening audience to read together. We are then joined live in our studios by the author for a book discussion and call-in show. Kashkashian says participating in a book club is a great dynamic way for readers to enjoy a book: “Reading a book is a solitary experience. Once you’ve read it and immersed yourself in this world, it’s great to have somebody to bounce ideas off of.” In October 2016, Geraldine Brooks was our guest, speaking about her new historical novel about King David, The Secret Chord. To celebrate Independent Bookstore Day 2017, on Saturday, April 29, Peter Heller joined Kashkashian and

20 | KGNU Magazine

me for a taped Radio Book Club conversation about Heller’s new book, Celine!, in front of a live audience at the Boulder Bookstore. The Radio Book Club has hosted Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, bestselling authors, and first-time authors. KGNU launched Resistance Radio, a weekly segment airing Monday mornings at 8:20am, to introduce listeners to the local political resistance movement. The 2016 presidential election generated the formation of many new activist groups, many who organized online and have since evolved into organizations that are mobilizing people in all 50 US states to become more politically active. This program is followed by the Resistance Radio Calendar, which highlights events along the Front Range from town hall meetings to weekly peace vigils.

Sing Along Group By Elena Holly Klaver

Songs and singing them together has always been integral to community building and social movements. Pete Seeger said, “If this world survives a hundred years from now, it may well be because of people singing together.” In the wake of the 2016 US presidential election, many people are seeking solace, community, and respite from dismal news and discouraging prospects for peace, social justice, and environmental protection. In the spirit of this resurgence of community activism, a sing-along group meets in the KGNU Community Room on the first Sunday of the month, from 3:00-6:00pm. In round-robin style, each participant has the opportunity to lead a song, request a song, request that someone sing a specific song, or pass, allowing equal participation. Many people bring the book Rise Up Singing, a collection of more than 1200 songs gathered by Annie Peterson and Peter Blood, long-time musicians, Quakers, and peace and social justice activists. Their web page, riseupandsing.org, has information on singing groups around the nation, and on the health benefits of singing together. Bring an instrument, songs or songbooks, and a healthy snack—or just your desire to sing together. All are welcome.

Continued from pg 5 key obstacles to the democratization of the media and to maintaining healthy democracies. About the still-relevant report, University of San Francisco’s Media Studies Chair Dr. Dorothy Kidd says: The commission’s most radical argument… connected practices of “alternative communication” and “counter-information” to the right to communicate and the democratization of communication. The report gave international credence to grassroots communicative practices (critique, decision-making, and creative participation in media production) of locally based social, political, and cultural movements, arguing that they were vitally needed to counterbalance the dominant media’s hegemonic form and content. Like all community media initiatives, KGNU can only be as effective a media tool as is the participation of the communities it serves and their appropriation of that tool. The broader the participation and appropriation of the tool, the greater the impact the tool can and will have as it amplifies the voices of peoples working together towards un mundo donde quepan muchos mundos, a world where many worlds fit. To strengthen and bloom as a vital community resource—as a Many Voices, One World resource—broad community participation and community investment will assure that this pillar of independent media continues to be a powerful instrument of transformative positive change that reflects strength in the unity of community. Be the U in KGNU, the Me in Media, and let’s work together to reclaim our media now!

The Way Forward Living Dialogues’ Duncan Campbell facilitates The Way Forward (TWF) Art of Dialogue Process Gathering, meeting in the KGNU Community Room, 4700 Walnut Street, Boulder the first Monday of every month from 7:00-9:00 pm, “traversing the Trumpocalypse together” with revelatory dyad and group deep listening-personal story sharing.


One of the things that has become apparent to me and many others is that we need a 21st Century internationalism. I suppose I would also say that I’m really interested in analyses that go beyond the limitations of the nation-state. We tend to think about the nation as the human community that expresses our need to be together with other human beings. But the nation-state is a historical invention. Why does it have to be that way? Why do we always have to think about citizenship within the confines of the nation? I would also suggest that we think about movements that allow us to move beyond the assumption that our projects have to be contained within the nation.

Angela Davis F R O M A TALK EN TITLED

“ B E G IN N IN GS : MOVEMEN TS O F P OS S IBILITY” GIVEN IN SA NTA FE, N EW MEXIC O, O N NOV E MBER 2 , 2 0 1 6 FR O M A LT E RN ATIVE R AD IO

I spent some time, not a lot of time, in South Africa during the month of September. I was so impressed by the younger generation. I had conversations with many of my old friends, people that I met in the 1970s and 1980s. There were nostalgic moments remembering what it used to be like, and also listening to them talk about the difficulties— the fact that the ANC has lost election after election after election. But then, on the other hand, there are these young people, who were born after the downfall of apartheid, and who want to see a new world, who have ideas about the future, who move from roads must fall to fees must fall to free education. I don’t think that social justice movements can survive without art, poetry, music. And not as an addendum, but art has to constitute the very heart of our struggles for freedom, the very heart. Music allows us to feel in ways that we would not know how to feel. And an anti-capitalist vocabulary, an anti-capitalist popular vocabulary, is so important. We began to develop that with Occupy. Our problem in this country is that we’re always focused on outcomes. This is the damage that the nonprofits have done because they want to know immediately, What is your project, what are you going to do, what are you going to achieve, and how can you evaluate that? Some of these things are not achievable right now. We have to think about 20 years, 40 years, 50 years, 100 years, 200 years, 500 years. This is, again, what I really appreciate

about indigenous cosmologies: the ability to think about life in those vast historical terms so that we recognize that what we do at this moment will have consequences for people five generations from now. I think that anti-capitalist projects have to have that long view of future history at their core. What concerns me these days is how to develop collective practices, because we tend to think about self-care as individualistic. I started practicing yoga when I was in jail, and I often say now that I am so thankful for the time that I spent behind bars. In a sense, I treat it now as a gift, because I started a yoga practice. I haven’t always been totally consistent, but it’s a practice that I’ve had with me for the vast majority of my life. But it’s primarily been an individual practice, so I’m interested in how we can develop these kinds of practices that connect us, that bring us together, that allow us to exit our individual selves. Because capitalism insists on the sanctity of individualism. I’m not opposed to individuality. I think individuality is very important. But individualism militates against individuality. I think individuality expresses itself best in a kind of dialectical way in relation to community. So how can we create practices of self-care that bring us together? I’m interested in mindfulness and social justice—a mindfulness that brings us together as community and allows us to contribute our whole selves.

I think that generationality is so important and creating relations across generations. But we can’t assume that the older people have the answer. This is one of the unfortunate factors of growing old. Because I think so many people attempt to address the anxiety of age by assuming that they incorporate all of the knowledge that is to be had, and therefore they speak down to younger people. This is something that I’ve really been conscious of. As I grew older, when I turned 30—because it used to be that people said no one over 30 could be trusted—I’ve been aware of the process and what it means to have been a part of a movement that inspires ideas that animate younger people. In a sense they stand on our shoulders. As we grow older, we should become even more curious than we were when we were younger. And we should also recognize that young people have ideas that we are incapable of having. And one of the reasons, it’s because in a sense they get to benefit from everything we know. They stand on our shoulders. But they not only get to benefit from everything we know, they get to benefit from what they’re able to know based on our generational knowledge. So young people should theoretically know a lot more. As a professor, I’m so excited when I see a student that I think has surpassed what it was that I taught that student, because that is the way it’s supposed to be. That is what history is supposed to be about. So I think if one approaches young people with a posture of attempting to learn what it is they know and not simply with the idea that I’m going to tell you the way we did it and you have to do it the way we did it, even though we weren’t really successful, right? They should be able to make new mistakes. They shouldn’t have to make the old mistakes; they should be able to make new mistakes. I’m excited that we have somewhere to go. We have a long way to go. And let me say, we’re just beginning to deal with racism. We’re just beginning to address issues of gender. We’re just beginning to address a whole range of issues. So I can say that I’m excited because this seems like a really powerful beginning.

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You Can’t Turn Off

Our Power

Malkia Cyril, founder of the Center for Media Justice and the Media Action Grassroots Network, delivered a powerful keynote address (excerpted here) at the Summer 2016 National Federation of Community Broadcasters (NFCB) Conference in Denver to a room full of Community Radio professionals about building a more powerful movement of independent media radicals who should be prepared to fuel a small rebellion. Because knowledge is not power–it is power’s potential and prerequisite–we must use our independent media infrastructure to redistribute free speech in a way that is truly equitable. Just as we organize to redistribute wealth, we must also organize to redistribute ideological power. See, over centuries of expansion and consolidation, capitalism maintained and organized its dominance through agencies of information and culture–like schools and universities, churches and other religious institutions, official news media, and arts and entertainment. This is what the 20th Century Italian philosopher Antonio Gramsci meant by hegemony. When Gramsci talked about working-class or organic intellectuals as those who embrace culture to put it in the service of all, not just the few, his vision was not of individuals sitting alone in an ivory tower thinking great thoughts. Yet, for many communities of color and poor communities in the United States, that is often how we experience community media, as if the word community has been forgotten, as if we are not part of that community.

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Some believe a digital world will fix it, make it possible to reach a scale previously unimagined. But the Internet can only serve democracy to the degree it is democratized. Despite the growth of the Internet, the right of free speech and press continues to be hoarded by the powerful. Its lack alienates the rest of us. Without question, the Internet is one of the most disruptive and powerful communication platforms the world has ever known. But the Internet, too, is subject to the dynamics of capital. Whoever controls it will wield meaning. The only thing stronger than capital is you.

I’m talking about the kind of power that drops the word illegal from media reports about migrants. I’m talking about the kind of power that does not allow police departments their toys or to kill with impunity. I am. Our movement for media justice was not born from private interest, it was born from public necessity. A policy adopted in 1945 reserved 20 percent of new FM frequencies for noncommercial and educational broadcasting. I was proud to fight alongside many of you to expand it in 2010 through the Community Radio Act. Policy and innovation have made community media possible, but people make it powerful. And if you are truly ready to be better than ever before, I believe that we can win. Winning will require a longer vision than many of us are used to. It will require that we reject empty reforms. It will require that we focus more on civil rights than civil liberties, more on human rights and dignity than profit. It will require that we make changes not only in the interest of our field but also in the interests of our communities.

Change will require a million small rebellions. Are you ready to fuel a small rebellion? Radical media has always existed to foreground the hidden transcript, to juxtapose with such nuance as to draw out both humor and irony, both blood and tears, from the stonecold politics of racism, patriarchy, militarism, capitalism. These are the enemy of community. You are the vehicle for community. It’s as simple as that. Through the infrastructure of community media we have the opportunity to battle geographic and demographic isolation, partisan politics, issue fragmentation and all the things that separate us and consolidate power for the ruling class. Are you ready to free the Black shining parts of our nation, our world, and ourselves–that beautiful dark dissidence that demands defense from those who would hunt it down? Conferring the right of free speech does not distribute it. You need cultural infrastructure and power to do that.

It means we must join with movements for Black lives and immigrant rights and justice for Muslims and freedom for transgendered people. It means we must partner with the movement for worker rights to create a new media workforce with skills and jobs, and unions. It means we must ally with the climate justice movement, to hold tech companies accountable to the land. And through these alliances, we can expand and diversify a willing and committed base, a powerful audience and constituency for change. Because there are no voiceless people, only people who have not yet been heard. We are the meeting of culture and power, the meeting of policy and innovation. We are the job creators, the cultural workers, the producers, and we must change meaning at its point of production. Be willing to go where our stories live. Our communities, our future, and, in some cases, our lives, depend on it. Read the full transcript of the speech at http://centerformediajustice.org


Media Is Not

the Enemy

A MY G O O D MAN , E X E CU T I V E P RO D U C E R AN D H O ST O F DEM OC RACY N OW! V I S I T E D DENVE R IN E ARLY A P R I L W HI L E TOURIN G T H E C OU NT RY. T HE S E A R E H IG H L IG H TS F R O M HE R TA L K . So great to be here celebrating independent media. You have such a nexus of independent media here. To be here celebrating and broadcasting from Denver Open Media (home of KGNU’s Denver 1390.) I want to thank Tony Shawcross and Ann Theis, the Colorado Independent, and KGNU. The President of the United States, who has called the media “the enemy of the American people,” and at other times generalizes more broadly just “enemy of the people,” punches the media every hour or so. It truly shocks me because if he laid off the media for just a week, I am horrified to say they would very much embrace him. Because that’s what the corporate media does. It protects the establishment. It is the establishment. The greatest concern now is around voting rights–around the gutting of the Civil Rights Division and the departments of the Justice Department that are so critical to ensuring that people have the right to vote in this country. It is just astounding that supposedly in the most advanced country in the world, a little over half of the population votes. In other places, it’s like 90 percent. Imagine with 40 percent of the voting-age population voting what this country would look like. And it’s possible, it’s doable, because I really do feel people across the political spectrum are good, are compassionate, that those who care about war and peace, that those who care about the growing inequality between not only rich and poor but rich and the rest of us, that people who are deeply concerned about the environment and climate change, about the fate of the planet, racial, economic, social justice, the rights of the LGBT communi-

ty; all of these people together are not a fringe minority, not even a silent majority, but the silenced majority, silenced by the corporate media. Which is why we have to take it back. Which is why we have to take the independent media in our communities so seriously, build it, have faith in it, read it, watch it, consume it, be a part of it, be the “me” in “media.” Which brings me to talking about the resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline and the kind of historic gathering that has taken place in North Dakota and what we can learn from it. You know that Democracy Now! was in North Dakota on Labor Day weekend 2016, where thousands of Native Americans and their allies had gathered at the Sacred Stone Camp. The remarkable camp where first members of Standing Rock–the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation–gathered. And it became the largest unification of Native American tribes in decades. All there to say “No” to the 3.8 billion dollar Dakota Access Pipeline. We went there to see what was happening, to talk to people. And when we got there, it was Friday night and Saturday of Labor Day weekend. A group of people were going from the camps to the tribal burial ground where they were going to plant their flags. They got to the area and the bulldozers were operating at full tilt. And the people began surging forward, and the pipeline guards unleashed

dogs on the Native Americans. It was horrifying. So we posted a video of everything that happened to Facebook that night and within 48 hours there were 14 million views. And this was an answer to all of the corporate networks who said that people don’t care about these issues. Really? No one is interested? 14 million views. After we posted that video we came back to New York and five days later, right before the judge ruled against the Native Americans, it was clear the Governor understood the direction the judge would go and so he called out the National Guard, and the authorities announced that day that I would be arrested–that they were issuing an arrest warrant for me, charging me with criminal trespass, which was ridiculous. I didn’t take it personally. What I felt was this is a message to all journalists: “Do not come to North Dakota.” And this was very important, that I felt we had to challenge it. So I got home and we decided we clearly had to fight this. We came back a month later and they dropped the charges, but said I would face new charges of riot and I’d be arraigned on Monday and I faced a year in jail. So we covered everything that was happening that weekend and on Monday we broadcast in

KGNU Community Radio | 23


front of the local courthouse and jail. And so, that morning there was so much pressure, and so much international media attention, because a journalist was being arrested and because of this international spotlight, all of the media was covering this, the Native Americans that day, who were charged with felonies and misdemeanors–those that had been protesting in the weeks before–most of them had their charges dropped as well. All that happened there is why it matters that the media spotlight must shine in the right direction. Independent media is very much a movement by itself–the Media in Democracy movement–and absolutely a critical part of democracy in this country. We need a media that covers power, not covers for power. We need a media that is the fourth estate, not for the state. And we need a media that covers the movements that make history. You have that media in Denver! Protect it, grow it, support it! Democracy Now! Thank you so much.

Featuring

LOCAL BANDS

& COMEDIANS EVERY

FIRST FRIDAY

7PM

DENVER OPEN MEDIA STUDIOS 700 Kalamath St

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DENVER OPEN MEDIA


SOLE Rap is More than Activism INTERVIEW

Some rappers address the hustle of being a rapper and the politics of the “game,” while others rap about everyday life. Tim Holland, better known as Sole (pronounced “Soul”), has rapped about it all. Sole has been involved in music full-time for two decades and was a founder of Anticon, the influential experimental Rap record label, at the forefront of Avant— or Indie-HipHop. Sole’s stream-of-consciousness lyrics about politics and the entrepreneurial aspects of being a rapper give Sole a unique and compelling sound. Not only is Sole a rapper, but he also runs the Denver-based record label Black Box Tapes. His podcast, Solecast, features interviews with creative people ranging from musicians to authors. In this interview, we discuss Sole’s dedication to music and action here in Denver. You can find all things Sole at soleone.org.

Sean Makau: Can you explain your recent activism?

Sole: My “activism” is all over the place. I am an anarchist who wishes to see revolutionary change in our world. My organizing is all over the place, from engaging in media projects that educate and agitate, to street demonstrations, to direct action—whatever I think will bring the situation to a boiling point and pull more people into the struggle. I want to see a working-class movement based around radical ideas that are capable of grinding the system to a halt and meeting people’s needs without the State. SM: Do you call yourself an activist or musician first?

D EN VER’ S OW N TIM HO LLAN D, BETTER K N OW N AS S O LE, MERGES HIS LOVE O F R AP AN D HO PE O F R EVO LU TIO N ARY C HANGE BY S EAN MA KAU

Sole: I actually dislike the term activist, I think it implies the sort of petty sign-holding stuff that people do. To be “active” implies being “busy for the sake of,” and that’s what a lot of “activism” feels like to me: people getting out there to have their voices heard but not having any material impact on events other than trying to get a headline in the paper. My art and my politics are so linked I don’t know if it’s useful to separate them.

SM: How do politics influence your music? Sole: I was radicalized by Public Enemy and Boogie-Down Productions. I have gone on to read a lot of stuff from people like Brecht, Howard Zinn, and the Situationists that reaffirmed to me the importance of art in revolutionary times…. The situationist mantra “Go beyond art” is always ringing in my head, though. I know protest music alone isn’t enough and that if I really give a shit about what I am talking about, and want to KNOW what I am talking about I have to get out there and try these ideas out and see what’s really up. SM:

Do you feel that a difference can be made through music on an activism level?

Sole: Yes, absolutely. If nothing else it reaffirms people’s views of the world, hopefully it can educate and inspire people, and maybe even go beyond that if artists take the time to educate themselves.

SM: You are having a baby! By the time this piece drops, what do you expect to change for your music and political life and what are you excited that will change?

Sole: I don’t know. I imagine I’ll put myself in less “arrestable” situations, but some people say that when you have a child you feel a greater impetus to intervene in the world. I am working on a book and will largely focus on media projects over the next six months or so…. I feel a sense of responsibility, having been organizing in Denver for six years, so it’s hard for me to sit back and watch, especially with these deluded liberals in Denver content to walk everyone off a cliff. SM: How do you feel an artist can feel empowered and take back their voice in this climate of transparency and giving of oneself for listeners to feel connected? Sole: I think it sucks to be honest. I wish it would go back to the way it was before the internet, when artists had mystique. All its done is create a whole bunch of bullshit work where all we do is compete for attention on corporate owned social media platforms. I hate it. I just wanna’ do my thing. SM: Can you explain how you see the music scene in Colorado in relation to music’s role in activism right now? Sole: A lot of my favorite artists out here are engaged in social struggles at different levels. The artists who I think are the most engaged in this work are Flobots, Time, Wheelchair Sports Camp, Ludlow, and Reve Kalell. In the past, we’ve all done fundraisers together and collaborated on lots of stuff. When I really think about it, it’s pretty dope to have this kind of network. I wish we could do more, but I think we will in the future. KGNU Community Radio | 25


JESCA HOOP

INTERVIEW

As a part of our commitment to inform and educate our listeners, KGNU features new music from an eclectic mix of artists, local and from afar. California native Jesca Hoop melds many styles and sounds in her newest album, Memories Are Now, released in February on Sub Pop Records. While on tour this spring KGNU caught up with Jesca to hear her story and her thoughts about her latest release. BY IN D RA RA J

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Indra Raj: I wanted to get a short history of you as a musician and how your music has evolved over time.

Jesca Hoop: Music was what we did as a family. My mother was an amateur coloratura soprano. I might be biased because my mother was my mother and I looked up to her, but she was really good at what she did. And my father was a folk enthusiast and singer and guitar player and he introduced me to some of the music that I still love today. There were five children in my family and we would sing as a pastime. So I gained a sense for harmony at a real early age. [I was] a church-going kid with my family, and we’d all sing in choirs and community theater. It’s something I’ve always done. I started writing when I was 16. My songs were nutty, super crazy, with no structure. It was fun. They were really colorful and imaginative. I didn’t start writing for

the purpose of publishing until I was 28. I released my first record when I was 32. I think this is now my fourth studio record of original material, but there are eight or so records that I’ve finished and released. This one is raw and kind of rough-and-ready more than the others.

IR: In February you released Memories Are Now through Sub Pop Records. Have there been any surprises on stage as far as how people are reacting? JH: I can feel a percolating excitement when particular songs are played so that’s nice. There’s one song that certain people aren’t necessarily sure how to respond to, which is part of the nature of the song, so that’s all good by me. IR: Which song is that?


JH: It’s called “The Coming.” It’s the last song on the record and it is a very direct communication from my perspective, on Christianity and on religion as a whole, on how it causes people to divide. I think that people aren’t always necessarily sure how to respond to it but I like the mixed reactions.

IR: I love the name album’s name – what inspired it? JH: Probably the sound of the words. I think the album needs to ring in a sort of mind frame or a sensation or an attitude, and Memories Are Now is an attitude. It’s an anthem, and a list of affirmations for living in the moment. You don’t have do a million things at once. All you have to do is this, right now, and you can handle that. I have to play a show in an hour’s time, but I’m not doing that right now. I’m speaking to you, so I don’t have to worry about the show. I’ll be doing that show when I’m doing it. It’s an old story.

IR:

It is also a relevant story in a society where we’re being pulled in so many different directions. That seemed like a theme on the album. The song “Cut Connection” has the vamp, “Be part of all things,” and seems to speak to what you’re talking about.

JH: Certainly the songs want to connect. There are only nine songs on the record, but between each one there’s a hand reaching out for connection, and I think for transparency, truth, and communication. IR: Getting back to “The Coming,” the song about Christianity. You grew up in a Mormon household and I read “The Coming” and “Songs of Old” both address that experience in your life. I was wondering if you could talk about that and how those two songs work together on the album. JH:

“Songs of Old” addresses a girl who learns the history of the church, and its foundational flaws and things that have been accepted along the way or brushed under the carpet. Pretty massive movements and corruption at the base–it’s hard for me to look past those things. Moreover, it’s about how these groups and gods that we tie ourselves to that tend to isolate groups. You exclude, and you also close your mind to whatever somebody else has learned or picked up

along the way. It can cause a lot of separation and laziness and ignorance. I haven’t been to church since I was 16, but i wanted to write about it, you know?

IR: That’s wonderfully put because, as you say, there are many people who are kind of toeing that line, wondering, “Is this where I belong or what I believe?”

JH: Especially if you were raised in it as a kid because it’s the only life you knew. So you don’t really have much choice until you’re introduced to something else and your eyes are opened..

IR: Another track that caught my attention, and you made a wonderful video for it, was “The Lost Sky.” The story behind it is heartbreaking, so I was wondering if you could talk about how the song evolved. JH: I had a friend who was in an accident and a coma for a bit. We didn’t know if he would pull out, or we’d lose him. In the process of waiting for him to wake up, he actually had been silently divorced. He woke up two weeks later to find himself without a wife anymore, and there was no contact between them. That got me thinking about what it’s like to have no say in how a relationship plays out, to not be able to communicate. I think that’s something a lot of people can relate to. The song is like a broken record, and that’s what happens when you don’t get to speak to someone. At least to me, you end up repeating the same words, the same sentences again and again.

IR: In June of 2016, you were at KGNU with Sam Beam (of Iron & Wine), promoting your album Love Letter for Fire. What has it been like to move from a place of collaboration to solo work? Has that been inspiring? JH: Something in between. Collaborating comes with its advantages, like shared joy in carrying the load together, doing the writing together, and performing together. And that came with a lot of light-heartedness and ease. And this, I carry it not completely alone, but more alone. But they’re different and they’re not necessarily comparable.

The Coalition of Women Songwriters By Riley Ann Sound The Coalition of Women Songwriters is a free organization for women of all ages, backgrounds, and identities to connect them with other women musicians in the area. They meet on the fourth Monday of every month at 6:15 pm in KGNU’s Community Room, 4700 Walnut St in Boulder, to share stories, workshop songs, and jam. All levels and genres of music are welcome. The group arranges performances to showcase the members’ music at various venues. More information about the group can be found on the Facebook group, womensongwriters.weebly.com, and by contacting RileyAnnSound@gmail.com.

Writers & Records Set in the cozy bohemian library of Mutiny Information Cafe—the Baker neighborhood’s premier books and records shop—this monthly event features writers from Suspect Press magazine (Josiah Hesse, Daniel Landes) and KGNU DJs spinning all-vinyl sets of their favorite records, along with regular guest DJs from the Denver arts scene.

KGNU & Lion’s Lair Quarterly Music Showcase Two amazing Colorado Music staples, KGNU and Denver-based music venue Lion’s Lair, have joined to create a custom Quarterly Music Showcase that features local artists, KGNU DJs. The Quarterly Music Showcase celebrates amazing DJs and artists working in various genres the second Saturday of each month, from 8pm - midnight.

Learn more about Jesca Hoop at jescahoop.com.

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THE LO N GEST- R U N N IN G

The History of KGNU’s

Eclipse Show

The day Chris Nathan first arrived at his freshman dorm room at CU Boulder in June of 1978, he read a prophetic note scribbled on the notepad on his desk: “Eclipse 88.5FM Sunday Night Soul Music.” He had stumbled across a new radio station, and a new program formed by a group of young people of color to combine their music with social commentary. Eclipse: The Shedding of a Blacker Light was the brainchild of budding broadcast luminaries including Steve Chavis, current morning host on First Take with Lando and Chavis on KUVO, and Becky Taylor, two-time winner of the Colorado Association of Black Journalists Award. The Black perspective was front and center, each show closed with the Arabic greeting, “As salaam alaikum,” indicating the influence of the Nation of Islam. Chris tuned in to listen to Eclipse every Sunday he could, while developing his own program, Solid Soul, on University of Colorado-Boulder campus microstation KAIR from 1981-1988. In 1990, he was surprised to hear Steve, Becky, Karen, Iceman, and the other original Eclipse crew announce their final broadcast. That Monday, Chris called KGNU to see if he could help save the show. He enrolled in the radio training class, and soon joined Christina “Weekend Girl” Ross, who was the first to jump in to keep the program on the air. Eliminating the softer, “quiet storm” portion of the show, this duo, and Christina’s brother Rodney (deceased), Benji, and Roland (deceased) brought the weekly funk until 1993, adding a CU Buffs report during the national football championship season in 1990. From 1993-1995, Chris and Heather “Da Spinstah” Reilly kept the turntables spinning on Sunday nights.

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U R BAN MU S IC S HOW O N PLAN ET EARTH: KGN U ’ S EC LIPS E: THE S HED D IN G O F A BLAC K ER LIGHT BY D EEPR AW K DAVE AS HTON

Professor Manning Marable recorded commentaries at KGNU that became a regular feature on Eclipse throughout his tenure as Chairman of Black Studies at CU-Boulder. Marable served on the Board of Directors for the Hip-Hop Summit Action Network (HSAN) a nonprofit coalition of public figures working to utilize Hip-Hop as an agent for social change, and his Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention was nominated for the National Book Award in 2011 and received the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for History.

returned to KGNU. Regular contributors from the late 1990s to mid 2000s included Ayla Simone, Craig Smith, Selector Sam, DJ Dijon, Pontus Pirate, all-around B-Girl Vanessa Solari Espinoza, rapper Lex “Illa” Bennett, Doris Walker, St. Patrick, Gary “DJ Notch” Romero, Damien “Mr. Groove” Rodriguez, and Mikey Thunder. The current Eclipse Family consists of DJs Chris Nathan, Z Rok, A.L., Mimi the Masala, Erin Stereo, DJ Buddha Shenglong, Deeprawk, Solid Theory, Brother Sky, Ja’Mal, and Alisha B.

By 1994-1995, Hip-Hop constituted 99 percent of the Eclipse show, with an emphasis on turntable mixing and longer sets. The next nucleus to form on KGNU’s Eclipse were all involved in the music scene and many remain influential today: Hakim Khaaliq, DJ Chonz, Petey the Pimp, Francois Baptiste, Jeff “Apostle” Campbell, Kingdom, and “D Tha Man” Williams. These “Radio Bums” were so named while loitering at KGNU’s former studios on Folsom Street in Boulder. Eclipse got national coverage including a write-up with photos in The Source magazine. As HipHop invaded the public consciousness, the Eclipse show inspired thought-leaders and spawned lecture opportunities for its DJs.

From music legends like Kurtis Blow, Ice-T, and Cutmaster Cool V to Denver groups Wheelchair Sports Camp, Council of Word, and 2MX2, countless artists, producers, and DJs have appeared on the Eclipse show. Many people who became regular contributors on the show initially came to perform, dug it, and made it a habit.

As that high-powered collective dispersed to pursue other opportunities, the early 2000s brought in Danny “DJ D-5” Yrigoyen, Matt “Z-Rok” Martinez, Tony and Kiki, MC Erika “Ms. Black America” Russell, and her sidekick, Jennifer Murdock. Rico, aka “DJ Buddha Shenglong,” joined the crew in 2000. Brandon “DJ DSRN” Carter was a teenage sensation on the decks and in the field in the early 2000s, while Aaron “DJ A.L.” Ladley also got started on Eclipse as a kid, moved away, and

Chris Nathan explains the phrase “the shedding of a blacker light”: “Since back in the day, it was the Black perspective, a pro-Black consciousness. And the social conditions the way they are now called for a reemergence, a wave of good, politically-charged music. HipHop has to get relevant again.”

Join KGNU’s Eclipse DJs for a Monthly Live Remote! The Eclipse show is live the 3rd Sunday of every month at Goosetown Tavern located at 3242 E. Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80206. Join us from 7:00-10:00pm.


Joel Davis, founder of KGNU’s

Terrasonic

MEET THE MAN BEHIN D YO U R W EEK LY MAGIC CAR PET R ID E AR O U N D THE WO R LD O F MU S IC BY D EEPR AW K DAVE AS HTO N

New Age Expert” at fledgling yoga music label White Swan Records in 2001. Joel’s success at White Swan opened the opportunity to develop his own imprint, Black Swan, the “funky response” with the heavier electronica global vibe of artists like MC Yogi, DJ Drez, and the Desert Dwellers. Between the two labels, Joel released more than 100 records between 2001 and 2016. “After 20 years in the record business, I came to the realization I’m not really a business guy, I’m an artist too, and it was time to pursue that,” Joel says about launching Conduit Music, a human-curated streaming music service to help you discover the music “you didn’t know you loved.”

Your flight details are confirmed: Saturday at 12:00 noon Mountain Standard Time, prepare for takeoff on your weekly Magic Carpet Ride around the world of music, Terrasonic. Charting the journey is your captain Joel Davis, renowned curator of global sounds and aural textures. When KGNU volunteers dug into committee work to hire a new Music Director in 2016, Joel stepped in and served with distinction as Interim Music Director. Returning in early 2017 to his post as Radio Training Coordinator—one of the first people new volunteers meet—Joel looks back at a lifetime of music under the influence of KGNU. Growing up in Miami, Florida, Joel enjoyed stadium rock at its peak, bearing witness to rock gods Springsteen, Black Sabbath, Def Leppard, and Van Halen at the Hollywood Sportatorium. He moved to Boulder to attend CU and was drawn to KGNU Community Radio after he graduated in 1988. Seeking employment in commercial radio, he attended the same radio training class at KGNU he now teaches. He discovered a universe of music outside the mainstream. “It bowled me over and I realized I had found what I was looking

for, without even knowing I was looking for it,” he recalls. Joel dug into the diverse music library, began DJing free-form on Restless Mornings, engineered live performances on Kabaret, and helped manage the music collection. “I tell people with very little exaggeration that pretty much everything I’ve done in my life since coming to KGNU is as a result of coming to KGNU,” he reflects. While recording conferences as a freelancer, Joel found warehouse work at sacred world music label Sounds True, founded in 1985 by fellow KGNUnit Tami Simon. She recognized his passion and gave him the label to run in 1996, though he knew little about the record business. By 2000, he would manage the release of over 20 records from around the world, punctuated with live recordings of the annual Fez Festival of World Sacred Music in Morocco. After working at management and booking for international artists including father of Nubian music Hamza El Din, Joel answered a newspaper ad seeking a “World Music and

“Conduit is very much inspired by the programming at KGNU: eclectic freeform, under-heard, overlooked stuff that’s not being featured on the front page of Spotify and ITunes. But there’s somebody who thinks you should hear it,” he explains. With a roster of curators including KGNU’s own DJ Erin Stereo, DJ Segue, John Schaefer, Jahsonic, and Ewket, among others, Conduit Music presents music as an art and a human expression. Joel also currently serves as resident DJ at Boulder based B-Corp Dojo4, creating a unique co-working environment and monthly dance parties called Gateway featuring his musical mixes. How did KGNU have such an impact on a young man in the 1980s carrying through until today? “All these different textures and rhythms just made it hard for me to go back. It has something sticky to it—it sticks to the ear. Whereas, that other stuff that’s very commercial, there’s nothing to it! It’s just slick. It slides off the ears; there’s nothing really to grab onto.” Terrasonic is available at AfterFm.com Find Joel Davis at conduitmusic.com

KGNU Community Radio | 29


Indra Raj

INTERVIEW

BY GIN GER PER RY the Internet is that anyone can make a record which encourages so much creativity. It can be overwhelming but that’s the great thing about KGNU. You get introduced to so much music. KGNU is a case for arts education. It’s what we do at KGNU: educate people about music. And I love how dedicated the volunteers are and how the music folks learn from each other.”

“Sharing music is something I’ve done all my life.”

KGNU’s new music director (on board since February 1 this year), Indra Raj comes by her love of music and KGNU honestly. Her father, a native of India who has taught Material Science and Mechanical Engineering at C.U. for 20 years, has had a Saturday morning ritual for the last decade of drinking his coffee and listening to KGNU’s Honky Tonk Heroes and Old Grass GNU Grass. Indra grew up listening to his Indian records every morning. And her mother loved the Beatles.

So did Indra. “I remember reading the lyrics to Sgt. Pepper’s [Lonely Hearts Club Band] and singing along with every word. But it wasn’t until later that I realized what pioneers they were.” Her older brothers–one eight years older, the other four years older–had a big influence too, turning her on to all kinds of Indie music as well as classical music. Her brother was a classical pianist from a young age. Furthermore, Indra started studying classical piano herself when she was five and took up flute at eight. At Fairview High, she was in a choir and that is when her interest in singing

30 | KGNU Magazine

blossomed. She went on to become a singer-songwriter with a band in New York and released an album. “I like to write music,” she continued. “My music is a little folk, rock, jazz. I play guitar as well as piano and flute. I want to try my hand at electronic music. There’s a great music community here. I want to get involved as an artist.” It is obvious that music has been her constant companion. Indra moved to Boulder with her family when she was 10 years old, from Ithaca, New York. After graduating from Oberlin, she moved to New York City, “with big dreams” of becoming a professional musician, and then to Capetown, South Africa, before ending up at Harvard and living and working in Boston. She and her partner Patrick moved back to Boulder in November, for better weather and the mountains and a yard. They even have a puppy now; Sumo–five months old and already 50 pounds–who is the apple of Indra’s eye. When asked about her musical preferences, Indra laughed with a groan, “I like everything! I love everything from hard rock to jazz to country: bluegrass, even some country, electronic, Indie, you name it. I can’t categorize it.” She went on, “We are in a musical renaissance now. The great thing about

One new experience for Indra since becoming Music Director is being an on-air D.J. “I love it,” she says enthusiastically. “At parties I’ll be the one choosing the music. I love sharing it, with no restrictions.” So far, she has served as DJ on Morning and Afternoon Sound Alternatives and the African Roots show. Listening to new music is one of the favorite parts of her job. Scheduling can be a challenge–there are a lot of balls in the air–as she puts it, but there are some great systems already in place and she is working out the kinks. She has helpers in organizing the whole library as well as cataloging the music and with ticket giveaways and internal promotion. “I couldn’t be more thankful for Gary, Scott and Sean and so many others here,” she said. When asked what she does in her spare time, she laughed, “Listen to music.” She also likes to cook, get together with friends and hike and play with her puppy, Sumo. As far as listening to music, she even has her own blog featuring new music she has discovered (tracknumbernineplease.wordpress.com/). Her most recent entry features her favorite tracks of last year that she wanted to highlight. “Finding a balance of everything I do is a challenge. But I am looking forward to the journey ahead. KGNU is a perfect fit for me.” She ended, “I feel really lucky I landed where I did.”


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KGNU Community Radio | 31


KGNU Volunteers GRANT HEALS COMMUNITIES WITH POP-UP GREENMARKETS By Deeprawk Dave Ashton Have you ever experienced a moment of revelation, accompanying a glorious bite of a locally grown tomato, that mass-market produce is artificial? There was never a time when Denver native Beverly Grant was not in tune with the importance of local and organic food. Her family roots dig deep into the agrarian soils, and as she grew up she saw her extended family living “off the grid,” working sustainable technologies and practices. Her grandmother was part-Native Choctaw, an Earth-mother herbalist who made medicine for any ailment. Because of racial animus and the lack of resources available to African Americans at the time, Beverly says, “it was the only lifestyle they could choose to meet their needs and thrive.” When Beverly is on the air on KGNU’s Metro (she hosts every other Wednesday’s Metro

Next time you see Gary Wellborn, thank him for being the brave Music Library Maintainer at KGNU

Over the past 40 years, KGNU has amassed a huge and eclectic music library. Volunteer Gary Wellborn has met the challenge of maintaining order in the collection with dedication and pluck. Since he began the organization project in January 2015 the library is in tip-top shape. Interview by Indra Raj

Indra Raj:

What got you interested in

KGNU?

Gary Wellborn: When I retired from work, [my friend Dan Willging] said, “Come help us!” I started in January a couple of years ago. 32 | KGNU Magazine

show), the focus is on the initialism H.E.A.L., which stands for “Healthy Eating, Active Living.” What is her motivation to share her exuberance on the airwaves to help listeners address their own health concerns? “We’ve got a few generations of folks that don’t even consider food origins, or even really have basic cooking skills. We are geared towards lives of convenience. That’s driven by access, cost. It’s also driven by what’s popular, and what we see in the media.” Beverly counters that mindset by granting KGNU’s listeners access to her own impressive network, bringing in experts and community members to address such concerns as food deserts, food and environmental policy, urban farming, youth engagement, and regenerative systems. Her brainchild Mo Betta Green MarketPlace— seasonal farmers markets with a festive vibe, funky DJ music, and locally-sourced goods—is now in its seventh season. Mo Betta Green MarketPlaces are strategically located to serve communities lacking access to healthy fresh food. The markets can accept trade in SNAP/EBT payments (and offer incentives for customers using this form of currency). In

2017, seasonal Mo Betta Green MarketPlaces will pop up in the Five Points, Park Hill, Cole, and possibly Stapleton neighborhoods. Through partnerships with the Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver Permaculture Guild, CSU Extension Center, and SHARE Northeast Denver, Beverly launched an urban farm in the Cole neighborhood called Seeds of Power Unity Farm in 2016. Its purpose is to source food to Farmers Markets and to provide a learning landscape for growing food, animal care, beekeeping, cooking, canning, and making medicine. Her season officially opens on Juneteenth day, June 17, 2017, at Charles Cousins Plaza on Welton Street in Denver (next to the Blair Caldwell African American Research Library). Bev’s tireless work was recognized with the 2016 Community Impact Award issued by LivWell Colorado at the State Capitol. What preconceptions does Beverly work tirelessly to overturn like a spadeful of fertile soil? “We are conditioned to believe that eating well is costly, that eating healthy doesn’t really taste good, and ‘Well, that’s not really for me.’ So yes I definitely try to slay all these giants, because each one is false.”

IR: What kind of music are you most interested in? Have you discovered anything new in the library since working on this project?

GW: Well, I need to take a look at the old

GW: As far as discovering something, I discover something practically every week. I could listen to anything from Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, to a bluegrass band in the studio like there was today. I listen to old time Rock-and-Roll and old Folk music, and I love Country, of course–the old Country–more than the new stuff. IR: Tell us more about what you’ve actually been doing in KGNU’s music library. GW: When I first started, a lot of shelving in the CD room seemed completely full. So I’ve helped expand that by reorganizing and alphabetizing. Unlike when I started, now a DJ who gets a phone call request can run in there and find it.

IR: What are you planning on doing after you’re done with the CD library?

collections that might be worth something monetarily. I need to figure out what we’re going to do with it – whether or not to digitize. There’s some amazing, classic stuff in there, from all genres.

IR: And after that you mentioned . . . vinyl. GW: Vinyl! That’s a... [laughs]. IR: How many records do you think we have? GW: In the vinyl room, probably 50,000 albums.

IR: What is your main goal in embarking on this huge project? GW: For the DJs when they are trying to put a show together to be able to come in and find something they want. I’d also like to put a listening station in the vinyl room.


Michael Buck, a KGNU volunteer for over 10 years shares his wisdom and experience as DJ and more

KGNU is proud to be powered by volunteers like mixmaster Michael Buck. Michael joined the KGNU music department a decade ago as an after-hours DJ and has progressively worked his way up to hosting a regular Afternoon Sound Alternative show. He also serves on KGNU’s Programming Committee and performs all the data entry for the station’s CDs.

about, and came to a volunteer orientation session and worked my way into the rotation.

IR: What’s the most unexpected discovery you’ve made?

IR: So, what’s your favorite part of KGNU’s music offerings?

MB: Finding the occasional gem in the Americana genres, which I am not really drawn to. But, occasionally, I will find somebody who’s working in those genres with a little bit of a head tilt, you know? They’re not just doing the straight-ahead banjo tune. I enjoy finding those things.

MB: I like the fact that it’s wide ranging. We

IR: What else are you involved in at KGNU?

IR: What KGNU shows do you DJ on? MB: Right now, just the Afternoon Sound Alternative.

have genre-specific shows and freeform shows because sometimes you want one or the other. I really like the challenge of a freeform show and trying to put together something from disparate elements that hopefully makes sense to the listener.

IR: How have your music shows evolved during your time at KGNU?

IR: How did you get involved with some of the

MB: My tastes have broadened since 2006.

work you’ve been doing as a volunteer in terms of the music library?

When I was first doing radio in the ‘80s I was doing my own version of a genre show. When I started my gig at KGNU I did something similar. But before long I wanted to play new music. I’ll still throw in an old favorite as a comfort point, but generally my show went from being quasi-genre focused to great new music.

MB: I also serve on the Program Committee. I’ve been doing that for probably nine years.

Interview by Indra Raj

Indra Raj: How did you first get involved with KGNU?

Michael Buck: I came here in early 2006. I had been a college radio DJ in the ‘80s and kind of missed doing it so I said maybe it’s time to get back into it. I started listening to the station more and finding out what the station was

CHEF VITA CUES UP HIS CULINARY CONCERTS By Deeprawk Dave Ashton What do you consider fresh? To a city’s OGs, it’s what’s nurtured. The Organic Gardeners’ nature. You dig? Vegan Chef Ietef Vita, also known as “DJ Cavem Moetavation,” received his first pair of turntables at age ten, launching himself as an elementary school DJ. A poetry class at Manual High School germinated the rhyme vine that would twist him through the pages of O Magazine, onto the Rachael Ray Show, and around the world. Now he’s sharing his universal message: “Heal ourselves and our communities through healthy eating and Earth conscience, and upend urban stereotypes. Get dirty, growing food, for the freshest result. Beneath the paving stones, the soil.” DJ Cavem established his sound and message over the course of six rap albums. Releasing Wheatgrass with Dead Prez and Digable Plan-

MB: When I got here I said, you know, this is something I could help with. So, I worked with the Music Director and got to be the person who was doing pretty much all the data entry and now I’ve been doing it for 10 years!

ets in 2012 led DJ Cavem to champion the budding Eco Hip-Hop movement. Sold at Natural Grocers stores, his CD The Produce Section served healthy eating as the curriculum for ears unused to rap. Thousands of Denver Public School students have been part of Chef Ietef’s interactive “Going Green and Living Bling” classes and seminars, delivered to the beat. Cavem’s trademark Culinary Concerts combine juicing demonstrations and roots Hip-Hop, spectacles of dance, DJing, recipes, history, animal rights advocacy, word games, and smoothie samples. His innovation garnered an invitation in 2015 to perform in Washington DC, for Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” program combating childhood diabetes and obesity. In 2016 he joined Hip-Hop founding fathers The Cold Crush Brothers at the Schomburg Center in Harlem, New York, in signing a document declaring “Health and Wellness the Tenth Element of Hip-Hop.” In the documentary From Gangs to Gardens, Ietef describes a childhood under pressure in Five Points, walking past a youth detention facility and two liquor stores to Manual High

every day. Although his actions have attracted the attention of mainstream media, serving the community from which he grew remains the focus of his healing instinct. “The people who are suffering the most are usually communities of color,” he told KGNU. Changing eating habits is one section of the garden of community he’s tilling. The DJ Cavem toolshed houses access to green jobs, entrepreneurship, and environmental awareness for the city’s overlooked. Cafe Nuba (“It’s Hot & It’s Black”) is a spoken-word and music showcase founded by the powerful and gentle madwoman Ashara Ekundayo. She brought the spoken-word concept and a host of incredible poets to KGNU’s airwaves in some of the first regular broadcasts from KGNU’s Denver Studio in 2007 with Cafe Nuba. Ashara also happens to be Chef Ietef’s mom. Digest DJ Cavem Moetavation on the Cafe Nuba edition of Metro Arts, at 3:00-3:30pm every second Friday of the month, and find him at djcavem.com or @Ietef on Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat.

KGNU Community Radio | 33


volunteer list Puahau Aki Shareef Aleem Dave Alex Christine Andersen Riley Ann Joey Anthony Bonnie Aona Diana Aqra Arleigh Carl Armon Amy Armstrong Steve Arnold Ty Arthur Ewket Assefa Dan Atkinson Elizabeth Avila Jim Banks Wendy Bannan Joy Barrett Shana Barrios Michele Barone David Barsamian Kim Baxter Tikneshia Beauford Chris Beaver Thomas Behler Beth Bennett Elijah Bent donnie betts Mike Bieszad Mike Bilos Josh Black Andre Blackman Dave Blackwood Nathan Bloodsworth Joscelyn Blumenthal Sofia Bogdanovich Janis Bohan Stephen Brackett Michael Bradshaw Melody Brinkley Dianne Brintnall Jeannie Brisson Kate Brooks Daniel Brown Dave Brown Roz Brown Michael Buck Jennifer Calabrese Kellie Cannon Duncan Campbell Ian Campbell Ann Cantelow Lawrie Carpenter-Staples Meredith Carson Dave Cartwright Magdiel Castillo Julia Caulfield Madelaine Cave Josh Chetwynd Jorge Cisneros Robin Claire Mariah Coe Joanne Cole Doug Collum Brian Comerford Holly Conrad Gina Corey Jen Cornell Michael Cotton Tom Cowing Claudia Cragg Joe Craighead Dennis Creese Steve Cser Martin Dadisman Gavin Dahl Frank Dagnillo Joel Davis Ron Davis Wesley Davis Joe de Cordoba Nichole DeLorimier Marshall Demeranville III Jonny DeStefano Joe Diamo Daniel Dierker Helen Dohrman Will Donohoe Phil Dougan

34 | KGNU Magazine

Elizabeth Downey Mark Doyle Sharon Dryden Frank Dubofsky James Duncan Sara Duniven Shay Dunne Marcus Dupree Chuck Edelstein Jake Edelstein Joel Edelstein CJ Edgecombe Devin Edgley Daniel Edwards Robin Edwards Karl Eggert Roy England Paul Epstein Elaine Erb Guy Errickson Brian Eyster Dave Farrell Astrid Felter Adrian Fernandez Eric Figueroa Mike Finn Mary Fingland Lorraine Filomeno Tricia Fitzpatrick Craig Fornier Fiona Foster Alisha Francis Glenn Francis Jennifer Frank Kathy Frazier John Fredericksmeyer Gregg Friedman Dave Fuller Sam Fuqua Lou Fusaro Michael Gage Luna Galassini Tony Gannaway Miguel Garcia Jeff Garrison Danielle Gauna Doug Gertner Ja’Mal Gilmore Cecilia Girz Dennis Glowniak Thia Gonzales Dave Gloss Roxy Goss Thea Gonzalez Desiree Grandpre Beverly Grant Rob Greene Leo Griep-Ruiz Josh Gross Karen Gruber Christina Guo Sarah Haas Seth Haines Damon Haley Theresa Halsey Kenneth Hamblin III Erin Hamilton Zachary Hancock Rodger Hara Rebekah Hartman Jim Haynes Peter Haywood Sean Hedden Tim Helman Cameron Henderson Drew Henderson Laura Henning Brian Hiatt Terry Hicks Holly Hirst Jeff Hlad Haley Hodgkins Josh Hoelieb Andrew Hogle Jeff Holland Mikey Holmes Mateo Homan Dugar Hotala Len Houle Cathy Howell

Jeffery Hoyle Josh Hukriede Sandra Hunter Terre Hurst Cal Huss John Jackson Crystal Jacquez Karen Janson Jim Jobson Bill Johnson Zach Johnson Michael Jones Tracey Jones Joe Juhasz Martin Kaegel Ross Kahn Tom Kamholz Dennis Kapela Paul Karolyi Ibrahim Kazerooni Richard Keifer Lisa Kelekolio Risë Keller Sean Kenney Paul Kirolyi Elena Klaver Alan Kloverstrom Evi Klett Jim Knopf Diana Korte Gene Korte Elzabieta Kosmicki Kendra Krueger Michael Kruger Karl Kumli Celeste Labadie Aaron Ladley Frank Lambrick Bill Landers Blair Landers Liz Lane Daria Leverne John Lehndorff Jason Leutheuser Dave Lichtenberg Robert Linder Robert Littlepage Brett Littrell Brian Litwin Terri Loconsolo Tonja Loendorf Leslie Lomas Jessica Lovering Farrell Lowe Jenna Lubliner Jeffrey Lund Jerry Maddock Lucila Maestas James Maguire Jacque Major Donovan Makha Matt Malick Marinela Maneiro Mark Mangione Nikhil Mankekar Carrie Marks Brigitte Mars Marcella Marschell Christine Marsh Zack Marsh Kathleen Martindale Matthew Martinez Mike Massa Marta Matthews Carmen Maughan Gary McBride Lance McCarty Alex McCarthy-Hessel Tim McCarthy Pat McCullough Louisa McGarty Tim McGeary David McIntosh Dave McIntyre Amy McKnight Tone McReynolds Scott Medina Kathy Metzger Joseph Mezey Pete Miesel

KGNU could not continue without the labor and love generously donated by our hundreds of volunteers. We thank each and everyone listed here, and all others who dedicated their time to participate in independent, community radio. Elizabeth Miller Skip Miller Steve Miller Mason Millhiser Mike Mills Yukari Miyamae Chris Mohr Matthew Molina Susan Moran Jamie Morgan Dylan Muhlberg Nancy Munson Fordham Murdy Jennifer Murnan Anderson Muth Hannah Leigh Myers Ron Nadel Sonia Narang Chris Nathan Jim Nelson Chip Nesser Allie Northleaf Susan Northleaf Jennifer O’Neill Chris O’Riley Sky Osawa Tim O’Shea Angela Palermo Jeff Palmer Will Parkhill Barbara Paris Joel Parker Neil Parker Kathy Partridge Annie Pautsch William Pepple Ginger Perry Katherine Petersen Chris Pfiefer Chris Pietz Tom Plant Kim Poletti Vinson Powell Curtis Powells Alan Prendergast Steve Priem Carmen Ramirez Karen Raforth Christine Ralston Terry Reardon Skip Reeves Scott Replogle Donna Rhodes Jennifer Rice Joe Richey Jacinto Rico Frosher Riox Barry Roark Tom Roberts Tony Robinson Pat Rodgers Irene Rodriguez Morgan Rogers Rett Rogers Wendy Rochman Jeff Roman Leland Rucker Luz Ruiz Jack Rummel Glenda Russell Melissa Russo Luz Saldano Susan Savage Jim Sawyer John Schaefer Kristine Schaefer Matt Schaffer Stefan Schardt Miriam Schiff Shelley Schlender Nathan Schneider Greg Schultz Danielle Seat Selena Set Adrien Seybert Jon Shaw Steven Sherman-Boemker Katharine Shuler Michael Shuster

Elliot Siff Laura Silk Jose Silva Sabrina Simms Nina Skidmore Kenny Skinner Neil Smart Bob Smith Creighton Smith Kialah Smith Stephanie Smith Alan Sobel Elana Sobel Alejandra Soto Martin Spector Cherrelle Speight Shawna Sprowls Steve Stalzle Eugene Stan Shannon Stein Elle Steinfurth Laurie Stephenson Barbara Stern Fergus Stone Scott Stovall Veronica Straight-Lingo Juliette Strauss Jamie Sudler Matthew Summers Miz Susan Mandy Sutyak Nancy Taddiken Marge Taniwaki Adam Taylor Deb Taylor Alex Telacki Kerry Tenfjord Vols Toadd Marcela Toledo Gretchen Troop Tony Tucker Gretchen Tweed Jeremy Two Elk Richard Two Elk Doug Uhm Bonnie Vanduersen Robin Van Norman Steve Vegas Mark Vignali Mimi Virdi Ietef Vita Sally Voyle David Vorzimer Jon Walton Carolyn Wegner Jeannie Weiffenbach Blair Weigum Farrell Weil Jennette Weisskopt James Weise Louis Weisberg Gary Wellborn Courtney Welsh Roger Wendell Ray Wentz Zack Wentz Joan Wernick Dylan White Tony White Stephen Whitehead Paul Whitens John Wiener Whitney Wilcox Dan Willging Adrian Wilson David Winsett Tim Wintemute Brooke Wise Douglas Wiseman Louis Wolfe Cary Wolfson Shannon Woods Stephen Wright shiquita yarbrough Moutiou Yessoufou Ricci Young Andrew Zicklin Phranque Zygmut


KGNU is CommunityPowered

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We broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week, from our studios and training facilities in Boulder (4700 Walnut St.) and Denver (700 Kalamath St. in the heart of the Santa Fe Arts District).

KGNU EMPOWERS COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION We have more than 400 volunteers, 212 of whom are on-air programmers, and 9 staff members.

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Award-winning programming! KGNU has received many awards and accolades throughout our 39-year history. Most recently, KGNU received a Boulder Weekly Best of Boulder Award for being the area’s “Most Diverse Radio [Station].” Led by KGNU News Director Maeve Conran, KGNU’s News Department received the BoCo Strong Community Resilience Award for its news coverage of local issues and emergency coverage.

KGNU received the 2016 PRNDI News Best Call-in Program Award for the story “What Happens to Our Bodies After Death.” KGNU was also recently recognized with the American League of Bicyclists’ 2016 Silver Award for supporting community cycling.

KGNU Community Radio | 35


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