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August 14, 2013 • www.theobserver.com • Vol CXXVI, No. 12

COVERING: BELLEVILLE • BLOOMFIELD

Alma agrees to pay

• EAST NEWARK • HARRISON • KEARNY • LYNDHURST • NORTH ARLINGTON • NUTLEY

Making waves over cleaning the river By Ron Leir Observer Correspondent

By Ron Leir Observer Correspondent EAST NEWARK – A three-year legal battle between East Newark and Alma Realty Co., the owner of the former Clark Thread/First Republic Industrial Center, 900 Passaic Ave., has finally ended. On July 30, in East Newark Municipal Court, Alma attorney Vincent Nuzzi signed off on an agreement to pay the borough $100,000 in fines arising from allegations that the company had failed to correct numerousfire code violations at the empty 35-building complex. The agreement calls for Alma to compensate the borough with two payments of $50,000 apiece within two weeks. Meanwhile, East Newark Mayor Joseph Smith said that talks between the borough and Alma over concluding terms of a stalled redevelopment agreement for the desolate 13acre site remain “at a standstill,” with no end in sight. Ironically, only nine miles away in Belleville, Alma is preparing to redevelop the old SoHo Hospital building at Belleville and Franklin Aves. after having successfully bid for the property which Essex County foreclosed on after the last occupant, Garden State Research see ALMA page

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LYNDHURST – hat started out as a public celebration of a federal/state initiative to clean up part of the Passaic River segued into sniping between a congressman and a state environmentalist over allocation of funding for the river’s restoration. Gov. Chris Christie triggered the brouhaha when it was disclosed that his administration intended to divert to the state treasury $40 million from a $130 million partial settlement with corporations responsible for the industrial pollution of the river – a move that irked Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. (D-Paterson). These developments played out last Wednesday in Riverside County Park North at a press confab convened by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the state Department of Environmental Protection. Bergen County Executive Kathy Donovan and Lynd-

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Photos by Ron Leir

As cleanup of the Passaic River continues, Rep. Bill Pascrell (inset) is battling Gov. Chris Christie over allocation of funds to remove pollutants from the water.

see CLEANUP page

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Kearny boosts public safety rosters a notch By Ron Leir Observer Correspondent KEARNY – Every time he’d pass the Midland Ave. firehouse while walking home from St. Stephen’s School, Sean Brady’s heart started to pump in earnest. “As kids, we used to get tours of the firehouse,” Brady

recalled last week. “That was where the dream began.” Last Tuesday, Aug. 6, the dream became a reality as the 27-year-old took his first step on the ladder to becoming a career firefighter when the Kearny governing body appointed him as a member of the Kearny Fire Department, effective Sept. 9, at a starting salary of $33,000 a year.

At the same meeting, the mayor and Town Council also authorized the Fire Department to submit a new application for a federal SAFER (Staffing for Adequate Fire & Emergency Response) grant to hire 15 additional firefighters. They also agreed to hire three new police officers. Although the town had planned to hire three new

201-991-1300 KEARNY OFFICE 213 Kearny Ave, Kearny, New Jersey

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firefighters, Brady was the only applicant remaining on a state-certified appointment list with 30 names Officials said the others were eliminated because they were either no longer interested, had gotten other jobs or failed to satisfy residency or background checks. Now, the town will ask state see HIRINGS page

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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By Ron Leir Observer Correspondent KEARNY – Kearny veteran was expected back home from overseas duty this past weekend and, aside from greeting his family, he had another particular joy awaiting him. He’s getting married to his high school sweetheart. When his plane touched down at Liberty International Airport in Newark on Friday, Shane Paul McAlinden was ready to formally propose to Kayla Lockartd and present her with an engagement ring. So we were told by his aunt, Christine Griffin of Harrison. And it will be a very short step, from engagement to the altar: The couple are to be hitched Aug. 16 at the First Presbyterian Church on Kearny Ave. The young soldier is 22 and his bride-to-be is 19. Born and raised in Kearny, McAlinden attended Garfield School and Lincoln Middle School before entering Kearny High, from which he graduated in June 2010. And, a year later, he went into the Army. Kevin Donnelly of Kearny will be Shane’s best man at the wedding. They’ve been best buddies since senior year of high school. Donnelly said he’s always known Shane to be “kind of adventurous.” “Shane’s always been gung ho about going into the military,” Donnelly said. Originally, McAlinden – who’d been working as a stock clerk at ShopRite

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Photos courtesy Christine Griffin

Army Pvt. Shane McAlinden (inset), shown in his fatigues, and with fiancee Kayla Lockart in front of military museum at Ft. Benning, Ga.

during his high school days – wanted to go into the Marines, Donnelly said, but the induction process seemed to take forever so he switched to the Army. “I’m proud of him,” Donnelly said. After going through boot camp at Fort Benning, Ga., McAlinden was stationed temporarily in Seattle with an infantry unit at Fort Lewis and, in November 2012, his unit was deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, for a nine-month tour with Bravo Company. Now he’s back, on a 29day leave, in his hometown where, according to his aunt, he’s considering applying to become a Kearny police officer.

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He’s also getting reacquainted with his mom, Lorraine; his sister, Jordan, 20, who’s pursuing certification as an early childhood teacher at New Jersey City University in Jersey City, and his brother, Jacob, 7, a first-grader at Franklin School. Interesting side note: Lorraine and her twin sister, Patricia, are believed to be among the last (if not the last) babies born at the old West Hudson Hospital in Kearny. Griffin, business administrator for the Harrison Board of Education, says her nephew “is truly an inspiration to everyone he meets. The whole family is really proud of him.” Her other

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nephew, former Kearny resident Patrick Polise, 21, now of Brick, “just got called up by the Marines.” Kayla, meanwhile, is continuing to pursue a career as a teacher, going for her degree and certification at NJCU. Her mom, Maria, is a teacher in the Kearny public school system and her dad, Pat, works for PSE&G. The couple won’t have very long to settle into their new life: McAlinden is due back in Seattle at the end of his leave time and he’ll be promoted to the rank of Specialist when he returns to duty. He’s got a year and a half left in his tour but he’s not sure where he’ll be assigned for the duration, Griffin said.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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Reports from the Kearny PD blotter T

his is a public service announcement from Police Chief John Dowie to the residents of Kearny: Lock your cars! One would think that advice should not be necessary, but one of the KPD blotter reports from last week indicates that some people need reminding. On Aug. 3, at 1:15 a.m., Officer Steve Hroncich was dispatched to the 700 block of Elm St. on the report of a disturbance on the street. He arrived to see a group of youths running away from a parked car, a car the officer found had been entered. Hroncich spoke to neighbors who had heard the commotion, located video surveillance cameras in the area and got a description of the kids. He also found that other vehicles had been entered and their contents strewn along the street. Hroncich broadcast an alert, and at 2:20 a.m. Officer Leroy Bibbs located the group at Kearny and Garfield Aves. As Bibbs approached, one of the girls in the pack was seen discarding a handbag, police said. Questioned, the kids reportedly started admitting they had been part of what cops called a “burglary spree group.” Police said the youths -- five in all -- had started out on Chestnut St. and made their way over to Elm, looking for unlocked vehicles and finding at least five. From these they allegedly stole the handbag (labelled Louis Vuitton), a pair of running shoes, a Miller Beer hat, loose change, sets of keys, CD cases and CDs and miscellaneous vehicle paperwork

(found littering path of flight). Police said the kids had also gone through the CDs and discarded the ones they didn’t like. Details on their musical preferences were not available. Charged with various counts of burglary to a motor vehicle, conspiracy to commit such burglary and theft from a vehicle were two boys from Belleville, aged 15 and 17, and three girls, a 15-year-old from Newark and two from Kearny, one 16 and one 13.  Those under 16 were also charged with violation of the town curfew. The teens were processed at headquarters and released to their parents or other responsible adults. Other recent reports from the KPD blotter included the following: Aug. 4 At 12:20 a.m., the Walmart parking lot was the scene of a dispute between two pedestrians and the occupants of a SUV Range Rover that had stopped to let them cross in front of it. Apparently, the pedestrians did not move fast enough, those in the SUV lost patience, words were exchanged, the driver threw a soda on one of the walkers, the pedestrian kicked the SUV, the driver confronted the kicker, the passenger made reference to having a gun but then told the driver, “This ain’t worth it man,” whereupon the SUV left Walmart and drove to the Wawa, pursued by the sodasplashed pedestrian. The pedestrian had second thoughts when he saw a black handgun pointed at

him, police said. He left the Wawa  and called the cops. The responding officer, Ben Wuelfing, viewed the security videos from both Walmart and Wawa, obtained descriptions of the vehicle and its occupants and turned the info over to the detective bureau, which is following up.

on patrol near 250 Kearny Ave. at 2:45 p.m. when he saw two individuals involved in a dispute. He separated them, ran a warrant check and found that one, 24-year-old Ider Vivasperez of Hillside was wanted by Clifton, police said. Vivasperez was arrested and taken to HQ for processing.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Borough gets A+ financial rating North Arlington has achieved a stellar A+ rating for its financial stability by Standard & Poors Rating Services. The rating helps the borough obtain lower interest rates and lowers the debt cost for taxpayers.  In its evaluation of the borough’s finances, Standard & Poors cited strong wealth levels, strong income levels, and rapid debt amortization as justification for the high rating. S&P said: “North Arlington’s

debt position is favorable, in our view. We view the borough’s net debt as low both per capita and in terms of market value at $1,400 and 1.44%” The agency noted that 75% of the borough’s principal is due to be paid off in five years, with full redemption in 12 years. The borough approved a zero tax increase 2013 budget in the spring and last month the Borough Council majority voted to roll $7.6 million in short-term notes into one long-

term bond that will allow the borough to take advantage of today’s low interest rates and save taxpayers money on accumulated debt. The financing plan will spread the borough’s debt over 14 years.  Mayor Peter Massa said the rating reflects the hard work the borough has done to keep a lid on taxes and manage debt properly through the tough recession years and the failure of the EnCap development plan.

S&P mentioned the EnCap bankruptcy as one of the “stressors” that the borough has had to overcome. The mayor said the borough will strengthen its financial position when two former EnCap properties are put back on the tax rolls and the borough begins to aggressively pursue redevelopment opportunities. “The borough’s financial future right now looks very bright.  With finances under control we can turn our at-

tention to attracting quality developers to the community,” said Massa. In its evaluation of the borough S&P noted: “The borough has taken several steps to help strengthen its financial position. These include but are not limited to savings in health benefits, salaries and wages, utilities, and shared costs. These steps are crucial, in our view, to restoring the borough’s pre-recessionary reserves.”

Local artists invited to participate in ‘Art on the Avenue’ Due to the overwhelming success of last year’s Nutley “Art on the Avenue” festival, Commissioner Steven L. Rogers and the Department of Public Affairs have announced plans to sponsor the second annual festival

this fall. The event will take place on Sunday, Oct. 5 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the grounds of the Nutley Free Public Library, 93 Booth Drive. The festival will once again feature local artists of vari-

ous photography, painting, sketch and sculpture. Artists who contact the Department of Public Affairs will be directed to complete a registration form for the event. Although the deadline for registration is Sept. 20, early

registration is encouraged as space is limited. Registration is free. Artists will have the unique opportunity to display their work in Nutley’s downtown area with the option to sell to the public. “Last year’s ‘Art on the Avenue’ was an outstanding event for the both artists and

the Township,” commented Rogers. “It was inspiring to see our community join together and support the many local artists that participated.” For more information, please contact the Department of Public Affairs at 973-284-4976.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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Relax bulk rules for Passaic Ave., DCA says By Ron Leir Observer Correspondent

property in Kearny remains fairly silent. The one exception is demolition activity proceeding on the site of the former American Modern Metals industrial complex on the east side of Passaic Ave. where an explosion and fire at a bat manufacturing facility took the lives of two employees in 1986. But town officials say

KEARNY – nlike the neighboring town of Harrison, where the sounds of pile-driving, excavating and actual construction can be heard in its riverfront development area, the relatively modest stretch of waterfront

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they’re uncertain what the future may hold for the property. Several years ago, after designating a 77-acre section of its southern waterfront bordering the Passaic River, along Passaic Ave. from Bergen Ave. south to the East Newark border at Johnston Ave., as an area in need of redevelopment, the town commissioned planner Susan Gruel to draft

a conceptual redevelopment plan for the area and the study was released in November 2007. Since then, the town took a step backward when, in March 2012, Pathmark – an anchor supermarket for the past 19 years – shut its store on the river side of Passaic Ave., putting about 100 employees out of work. Vornado Realty, the

landowner, has sought to market the property but there’ve been no takers. So, at the last Town Council meeting, held on Aug. 7, Kearny called on the state Department of Community Affairs’ General Planning Services Division to offer an assessment of the plan in hopes see PASSAIC AVE page

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Municipal Boundary

AV E

100-Year Floodplains 500-Year Floodplains

THE CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION OFFERINGS AT KEARNY HIGH SCHOOL ARE AS FOLLOWS:

LN

E ST MAP L

ST WINDSO R

HIGHLAND

AVE

BRIGHTO N AVE

DR

LINDSAY

BELG RO VE

AVE HUDSON COUNTY 699 / PASSAIC

Tow n of Ke ar ny

AVE

PATTERSON ST

ALEXANDER AVE

Ci ty of Ne w ar k

WILSO N

ARCHIBALD TER

ROSE ST

MARSHALL ST

CLARK AVE

CHESTNUT ST

KEARNY AVE

MAPLE ST

HIGHLAND AVE

JOHN ST

GRANT AVE

T

E DR

AVE

LINCOLN AVE

SHE RIDAN

AIC S

ROV

JOHNSTON AVE

Town of Kearny Boro of East Newark

1 inch equals 400 feet

by Ron Leir, map courtesy Town of Kearny Passaic AvenuePhoto Redevelopment Area

Town of Kearny, Hudson County TOP: State planner Robert Tessier assesses Passaic Ave. Redevelopment New Jersey Plan. BOTTOM: Yellow border denotes redevelopment area bordering Passaic River. 0

200

400 Feet

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STRUCTURED LEARNING EXPERIENCES ARE OFFERED IN THE ABOVE AREAS

WOODLAND AVE

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ALL CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT KEARNY HIGH SCHOOL ARE OFFERED WITHOUT REGARD TO RACE, COLOR, CREED, RELIGION, NATIONAL ORIGIN, ANCESTRY, AGE, MARITAL STATUS, AFFECTATIONAL OR SEXUAL ORIENTATION OR GENDER, SOCIAL OR ECONOMIC STATUS, OR DISABILITY. LIMITED ENGLISH LANGUAGE SKILLS WILL NOT BE A BARRIER TO ADMISSION AND PARTICIPATION IN THESE PROGRAMS.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

thoughts&views The contents of letters do not reflect the opinion of The Observer staff. Letters must be kept to a maximum of 250 words. Any letters that exceed the maximum will be edited, at the discretion of the publisher, who reserves the right at any time to reject or edit the letters for space. Letters must include the writer’s name, address, and telephone number for verification purposes. The deadline for letters is Thursday at 5 p.m. Any letters that arrive after deadline will not be considered for the upcoming publication. Letters can be sent by e-mail to publisher@theobserver.com or mailed to 39 Seeley Ave., Kearny, N.J. 07032. Anonymous letters will not be published under any circumstances.

In praise of lousy prose If you love good writing, you probably also love bad writing--providing it’s deliberately bad. It takes a good writer to deliberately create bad writing. Which is why fans of the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest wait impatiently every year for the prizes to be awarded. The contest, named for 19th century British novelist Edward George Bulwer-Lytton -- who coined “it was a dark and stormy night” --- has been around since 1982. Sponsored by the English Department at San Jose State University, the competition challenges entrants to compose “the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels.” Here are some of my favorities among the recently announced 2013 winners. As usual, I find the runners-up funnier than the top choices, so my picks are not necessarily the judges’. In the Adventure category: “As the sun dropped below the horizon, the safari guide confirmed the approaching cape buffaloes were herbivores, which calmed everyone in the group, except for Herb,

of course.” -- Ron D. Smith, Louisville, Ky.

the troll didn’t do much of anything.” -- Rachel Flanigan, Honolulu  Crime writing: “This was going to be a “It was such a beautiful science fiction novel until I night; the bright moonlight realized that you actually have illuminated the sky, the thick to know some real science for clouds floated leisurely by just it to work well, so I changed it above the silhouette of the to a fantasy novel instead, betall, majestic trees, and I was cause that way I can just make viewing it all from the frontup the rules as I go, unhamrow seat of the bullet hole in pered by the laws of physics my car trunk.” -- Tonya Lavel, or chemistry, as if you knew Barbados, W.I. what they were anyway.” -“Observing how the Thor F. Carden, Madison corpse’s blood streaked the melting vanilla ice cream, Tenn. Historical Fiction: Frank wanted to snap his pen “It was a long shot by any in half and add drops of blue measure, good bowman ink to the mix, completing the though he was, and he didn’t color trio of the American flag want to risk it with his kid, -- or the French flag, given but a lot was on the line, and that the body had just fallen that big, red apple was square from the top of the Las Vegas on his dear boy’s head, and Eiffel Tower onto a creme he had to shoot it off . . . then glacee cart.” -- Alanna Smith, everything went still, and WilWappingers Falls, N.Y. liam Tell heard the sound of music, quiet, then gently ris Fantasy: ing, like an overture.” -- John “There once was a nasty, Holmes, St. Petersburg, Fla. evil troll who lived beneath “General Lee arranged for a bridge and took pleasure the dreaded surrender yet in collecting gold from the capitalized on his opponents’ unsuspecting users of the weaknesses to the very end, infrastructure; however, no striking a tiny parting blow one used the bridge because for the Army of Northern Viran evil troll lived under it so ginia (chuckling to himself) as

Don’t forget to check www.theobserver.com for news that didn’t make it into this week’s paper

he remembered from Academy days how many Union commanders had struggled with spelling even common words, and so ran his finger along the map and settled on Appomattox.” -- Randal Pilz, Milton, Fla. Purple Prose: “There is a special pinkness to the sky as the sun rises on a crisp January morning, kissing the clouds, warming the fields, and waking the livestock, who move quietly to their feet and begin to mill about their pens, like patrons in a crowded theater lobby who, instead of waiting to see the show, are waiting to be made into steaks or bacon.” -Ward Willats, Felton, Calif. Miscellaneous: “Our tale begins with the encounter of two gentlemen; I’m going to describe the second gentleman first.” -- Mark Donnelly, County Wicklow, Ireland “Tony was unsure if the voice had said ‘Sven’ or ‘Ten’, but no one had ever called him Sven, and the ceiling lights were shining directly into his eyes, and recognizing

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Vile Puns: “What the Highway Department’s chief IT guy for the new computerized roadway hated most was listening to the ‘smart’ components complain about being mixed with asphalt instead of silicon and made into speed bumps instead of graceful vases, like the one today from chip J176: ‘I coulda had glass; I coulda been a container; I coulda been some bottle, instead of a bump, which is what I am’.” — Brian Brandt, Lansdale, Pa. “The veterinarian had suggested the tasty yellow fruit as a way to cure the undiagnosed lack of appetite that was ebbing away the very life of his fluffy little friend and Mark was fraught with anguish as he kept wondering, ‘Will a chick eat a banana?’” -- Nancy Hoffman, Peaks Island, Maine For more, much more, visit www.bulwer-lytton.com “where ‘www’ means ‘wretched writers welcome’.” – Karen Zautyk

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the familiar sad, yet concerned, look on the referee’s face, he was gonna go with ‘Ten’.”-- Warren Blair, Ashburn, Va.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

HIRINGS from

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Civil Service to certify a new appointment list so that it will be in a position to hire more firefighters if money is available to do so. A Newark native who spent his early years in Kearny before his family moved to Monmouth County, Brady said he joined the Fire Explorers, sponsored by the Boy Scouts, while attending Middletown North High School, which offered a sort of apprenticeship to firefighting. It also led to an opportunity for the real thing when he was accepted as a member of the Middletown Township Fire Department, which is considered “the world’s largest all-volunteer fire department” with 11 firehouses and some 600 members. After a two-year stint with the volunteers from 2004 to 2006, Brady enlisted in the Navy with the idea of becoming eligible for a college education after military service. He was shipped overseas, seeing combat action during two deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq and was then assigned to South Korean for a third tour, completing his service in 2010. His volunteer experience came in handy while going through aircraft and shipboard firefighting training with the Navy. After returning to the U.S., Brady signed up to study fire science at New Jersey City University and took the test for firefighter. Although he went through the Fire Academy as a volunteer firefighter in Middletown, Brady said he’ll still need a more advanced level of training required by Kearny. He’s scheduled to begin that training Sept. 16 at the Middlesex Fire Academy in Sayreville and finish by mid-November. After that, he’ll take 160 hours of EMT training to qualify as a full-fledged firefighter. In hopes of getting a helping hand from the federal government, Mayor Alberto Santos and the Town Council ratified a recommendation by Fire Chief Steven Dyl to try – for the third time in three years – to pry loose money from FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) to add 15 firefighters at an annual cost Santos estimated at $900,000 which, he said, would have a “significant impact” on the

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said: “I’m awaiting results of the state sergeant’s test which was given in June and we have existing lists for captain and lieutenant which will expire in less than a year. A new test for captain will be given in September.” The rookies hired last Tuesday are: Daniel Esteves, Kevin Arnesman and Jordenson Jean. Esteves, 30, an alumnus of Queen of Peace High School, North Arlington, and William Paterson University, has been see HIRINGS page Photos by Ron Leir

GRAND OPENING! CALL TODAY TO REGISTER!

New hirees, from l., are: Police Officers Jordenson Jean, Kevin Arnesman and Daniel Esteves, and Firefighter Sean Brady.

town, once the two-year grant covering salaries and benefits expires. “We desperately need this,” Santos said. Both the Police and Fire Departments are “well below” the levels set by the town’s recommended Tables of Organization, he added, “but we haven’t been able to do much due to our budget constraints.” Currently, Dyl said, the Fire Department is operating “at a bare minimum of 15” personnel per shift but if he can count on filling the three slots the town budgeted for in 2013 (including Brady) and if the SAFER grant comes through, “I will have 23 per shift” and that should be sufficient to ride with four people per apparatus. As for the mayor’s concern about absorbing the costs for the extra firefighters, Dyl said that with the number of retirements in the department projected between now and 2017, coupled with a somewhat lower pay scale for new hires, as provided in the last labor contract, the town should realize enough payroll savings so as not to overwhelm taxpayers. Meanwhile, the town now has three new police officers who will undergo a two-day orientation Sept. 16-17 before heading to the Passaic County Police Academy for six months’ training, according to Police Chief John Dowie. Dowie, who welcomes any help he can get, said: “I’m down 22 [from his T.O.] between rank-and-file and superiors. Of the 13 people who left last year, half were superiors.” Asked about promotional opportunities, Dowie

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

01

responsibility for the river’s cleanup – is scooping out the hurst Mayor Robert Giangetop two feet of mud into bargruso to call attention to the es which transport it to Clean start of a $20 million project Earth in Kearny for treatment to remove 20,000 cubic yards and, ultimately, shipment by of toxic soil laced with PCBs, rail to a disposal site out west. dioxin and mercury – indusThe mud is de-waterered for trial pollutants from years separate processing. After the ago – from a half-mile-long, digging is completed, a multifive-acre section of mudflats layered cap of sand, stone, bordering the park in Lyndfabric will be placed atop the hurst. mud. Great Lakes Dredge & Dock “The level of contamination of Staten Island, N.Y., has in this area of river sediment been retained by the Lower is very high and the EPA is Passaic Cooperating Parties ensuring it doesn’t move Group – which has accepted and contaminate other areas

CLEANUp from

of the [17-mile-long] Lower Passaic River,” Regional EPA Administrator Judith Enck said. “This cleanup removes some of the worse contamination … while the EPA continues to develop long-term cleanup plans for a 17-mile stretch of the Lower Passaic River between the Dundee Dam and Newark Bay,” she added. An EPA feasibility study focused on remediating the lower eight miles of the river containing the most serious “hot spots” is due by year’s end.

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DEP Commissioner Bob Martin insisted that the state is committed to getting the river clean.

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Enck paid tribute to the late Ella Filippone, founder of the Passaic River Coalition, and the late Carol Johnston of the Ironbound Community Corp. of Newark for their steadfast advocacy in pushing government to restore the health of the river. “In the next book that’s written about the river, there needs to be a special chapter on the role of the public,” Enck said, and the role played by those individuals in particular. Their dedication “inspires me” to get the job done, she added. DEP Commissioner Bob Martin said that it was “a top environmental priority of the Christie administration … to restore this river to one that can be a swimmable and fishable natural resource and an economic engine to benefit towns like Lyndhurst and … other urban communities….” Still, both Enck conceded that it would like take “years and years” to achieve a full restoration at a cost that, Pascrell noted, “could top $2 billion” by EPA’s estimates so, by that measure, “we will have a long way to go.” And that’s why, Pascrell said in an Aug. 6 letter to Christie, “… it is essential that all funding recovered from the responsible parties be put towards the remediation and environmental restoration of the Passaic River, and not di-

verted to alternate programs.” Speaking to reporters after the public presentation, DEP’s Martin said that Pascrell was all wet. “The major reason we went into this litigation,” the commissioner said, “was that the state may have to pick up an ‘orphan share’ of the cleanup costs and that could approach anywhere from $200 to $400 million” beyond whatever monies are ultimately collected from the corporations, particularly Occidental Chemical, one of the major players involved in the litigation. Aside from that consideration, Martin said, “Before EPA got involved, the state did a lot of research to understand the magnitude of the problem with the river and the congressman seems to forget the ongoing costs involved with that research. He needs to get his facts right.” The commissioner said that the state is “focused on the recovery of prior costs and the future. We’re not anywhere done with the litigation with Occidental and others.” Martin reiterated the state’s commitment to making sure that all of the “major parties” that are part of the cleanup agreement deliver the goods. “We expect to hold them accountable,” he said, “and I’m disappointed the congressman is making this a political issue.”


out&about

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

09

Mirroring real life in art: sex abuse & gangs

By Ryan Sloan Observer Correspondent At 25, she’s already written two fiction books. And while neither has yet been published — we’re certainly hoping they are soon — Lane Legend has tackled two topics that have gotten a lot of attention in the news media over the last few years: the Jerry Sandusky scandal at Penn State University and gang violence. In her books, Legend has borrowed from the reality of the two and developed two pieces that, in many ways, mirror reality but that are, indeed, fiction. And she does so quite well. The first book she wrote, “Ol’ State and Sensation,” is about a boy who goes to a state university — and who is molested by a coach just as it was to have happened at Penn State. (Of course, in the book, the university isn’t called Penn State). But there’s an added twist to the fate of the victim in the book. And it’s one that while we’re not sure if it’s happened to any of the victims in reality, it’s one that often does happens to victims of sexual abuse, Legend says.

“The main character’s name is Cory Calhoun,” she says. “And in the book, we see him in adulthood. There’s a cycle. The statistics say 70% of kids who are abused as kids go on to be abusers themselves in adulthood.” When we asked her why she was driven to write a book such as this — aside from the obvious … she’s also a Penn State alumna — Legend says she studied sociology at University Park. “And I’ve always been interested in how the mind

operates,” she says. “I’ve been interested in under-culture. Plus this was a very hot topic for a long time.” She says a lot of what she wrote about in the book and a lot of her general interest came to the surface recently with the Ohio case where Ariel Castro had, in his home, at least three kidnapped girls who became adults while in his captivity for a decade or more. Her other book, “The Boy of Black Wonder,” while also fiction, touches on yet another concept that’s constantly in the

news — gang violence. “It’s the story of a young guy, in 1980 in Spanish Harlem, who is involved in gang culture — it’s a play off the Latin Kings. He’s narcoleptic. He wakes up at 23 and realizes most of his life has been a dream,” Legend says. Because of the dreams, the kid, called Juan, has to decipher what’s actually real and what’s not. And, he’s faced with deciding whether he prefers the violent life or the more peaceful life. Why write books at 25?

Lane isn’t just a writer. At present, she’s also working to develop her career at an advertising agency. So why in such an intense world — what you see on TV about working in advertising is often based on reality — or how, really, does she find time to put pen to paper, to put fingers to keyboard, to do this? “Juggling a career and trying to get books published is very hard these days,” she says. “And it’s made even harder that so many are now selfpublishing.” But she doesn’t want to selfpublish. She knows she could create e-books and get them out into circulation. But there’s something about printed books, she says, that is incomparable to reading books on an e-reader. “I still think there are a lot of humans who want that tangible product,” she says. “But that also means it’s necessary to find agents. And finding an agent is not a simple task. It’s a hard market to break, but it’s one I am determined to break.” And we certainly hope she does, sooner than later. And we’ll let you know where and when you can buy her books as soon as they’re out.

Author explores at-risk teen girls’ behavior By Laurie Perrone Observer Guest Correspondent “Bad” is an intriguing young adult novel about teens overcoming risky behavior written by Jean Ferris. Since the dawn of time we have been analyzing and defining coming-of-age, yet we still come up short in finding any “absolutes.” With every generation there will always be something ugly about comingof-age catching us off-guard

thus leaving us to ask ourselves where we might have gone wrong. Jean Ferris, author of the young adult novel, “Bad,” first took steps researching the subject and interviewing urban teens in a girls’ rehabilitation center before writing this brutally honest book. Ferris does not promise any “absolutes,” but she does remain candid and thorough in her work. Through her main character, Dallas, Ferris illus-

trates how truly difficult it is for any young person to walk away from criminal patterns. Ferris uses the technique of story shifting well, depicting the realistic recovery process in rehabilitation. Parts of the story show Dallas slowly gaining momentum through personal victories only to abruptly slip into small relapses. Ferris shoots from the hip in her story-telling, demanding the attention of her audience, and capturing empathy from

those willing enough to examine and digest urban teen life against the backdrop of innercity blight. From beginning to end she is unafraid of exposing other gritty teen issues such as teen substance addiction, girl street gangs, teen pregnancy, amoral institution mentality, teen violence and inmate abuse. “Bad” is an excellent documentary-style novel that rivets the mind in unexpected ways, expressing how urban teens

must re-learn trust, love and self-respect in the midst of regaining stolen or lost innocence from years of tough survival. To see more about author Jean Ferris and her work, go to http://www.jeanferris.com/ my_works.htm. The author’s works have earned her many nominations and awards. Most recently, she was nominated for the 2008/2009 Children’s Choice Award by the Missouri Association of School Librarians.


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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Rock n’ Roll fantasy comes true Kearny native opens for rock legends, Bad Company Kearny native Billy Spanton and the Ramblin’ Train will perform at the Lithuanian Catholic Community Club, 6 Davis Ave., Kearny, on Sept. 21. Growing up on Brighton Ave., Billy Spanton learned how to play multiple musical instruments to emulate his

favorite rockers — Lynyrd Skynyrd, AC/DC, The Rolling Stones, and Bad Company, among others. He and his buddies started their own band — Short Circuit – playing cover songs and eventually playing a few of their own. During this time, they had the privilege of

opening for .38 Special, The Outlaws, and The Marshall Tucker Band. Spanton settled down and had a family. Life sort of got in the way and the band broke up. Never losing his passion for classic rock music, he regrouped and started a new rock band, Made in the Shade,

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even getting the opportunity to perform with Bad Company drummer Simon Kirke. Spanton has played at such venues as BB King’s in New York City and the Stone Pony in Asbury Park. Fast forward to today and Billy’s got a new band — Billy Spanton and the Ramblin’ Train, which includes Kearny natives Brian McGee, Rod “Lima” Nunez, Dennis Colchado and Ekat Pereyra. Spanton’s hard work and never-ending passion for his music has paid off: He recently completed his first solo CD, aptly titled “Long, Long Road,” featuring Simon Kirke on some tracks, and if that’s not enough, he and his crew

opened for his all-time favorite band, Bad Company, on July 16 at the Artpark Outdoor Amphitheater in Lewiston, N.Y. Playing for about 8,000 rock fans in blistering heat, this rock ‘n roll fantasy in the making has been a dream of his for over 30 years. “I spent my childhood listening to Bad Company. I played their records over and over and over. Paul Rodgers, in my opinion, is rock royalty and his voice is unmatched. To have the opportunity to open for them is a lifelong dream … a mind-blowing dream actually,” he says. For more information about the Sept. 21 gig, go to www. billyspanton.com.

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11

Never too young to learn to dance Now in its 17th year, Visions Dance Studio of Kearny is offering a new class, “Tiny Tutus and Tiny Tuxes,” an introductory class for first-time ballerinas and ballerinos for ages 12 to 18 months. Structured to stimulate motor development and listening skills, the class invites children to sing along to songs, learn basic stretching and ballet steps. Visions also offers classes in musical theater, song and dance, Hip Hop Start (ages 4 to 5) and Hip Hop Move (ages 6 to 8), Tiny Tumblers (ages 4 to 6), Latin Rhythms and Dance (ages 4 and up), Broadway Kids (ages 4 to 6), choreography, pre-pointe and self-defense (ages 4 and up). The studio will also provide two classes on cultural dance: one exploring classic steps and movement patterns within various world regions (including African and Latin Caribbean and a fusion of Chinese and Japanese movement postures and positions set to a house dance style) and the other focusing on body percussion.

Children as young as 18-months-old are welcome at Visions Dance Studio, 202 Midland Ave., Kearny. Visions professional staff offers customary classes in ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical, gymnastics for toddlers, pre-k and tiny tots. . RIGHT Visions Dance Studio’s 2012-2013 competition team had a prize-winning season, participating in competitions in New Jersey against dancers from all over the northeast. The team brought home honors in many categories, winning dozens of medals and trophies. They also won awards for backstage mannerism, best choreographed numbers and came home with “Best Overall” for several numbers.

Visions also offers zumba classes for adults. Girls and boys of all ages and levels can register for classes, which run from September to June. Registration for fall classes will be Aug. 20, 21, 22, 27, 28 and 29, from 6 to 9 p.m., at the studio, 202 Midland Ave. Classes start Tuesday, Sept. 3. For more information, call the studio at 201-991-1718.

Make room in your heart for Kenya Happy-go-lucky Kenya (ID#89544), a 5-6-year-old female pit bull terrier, waits for a forever home to call her own at the Bergen County Animal Shelter, 100 United Lane, Teterboro. This loving gal does not act her age at all and she will make a wonderful family companion for anyone searching for a devoted and fun forever friend. However, the shelter advises that Kenya cannot be in a home with cats. The shelter recommends walks and hand feeding as great ways to bond. Kenya will also need plenty of physical and mental stimulation. Because she is madly in love with toys and enjoys playing rough, the shelter advises that her new family should ultimately introduce a safer and more mindful play style. For information, call the

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

01

that Alma “had to put in a sprinkler system for the two cell towers within the stairCenter, failed to make the wells that provide a means required payments. Back at the old First Repub- of egress for each building so lic site in East Newark, Smith you’d have a self-contained fire suppression system.” said the borough has been in Most of the infractions cited and out of court with Alma in by the borough were fire code efforts to get the company to violations, according to Smith. properly secure the property The mayor said the amount against the potential of breakof the fines “mushroomed” ins and fire. “They had to make sure that over time, from the initial citations, as the company continthe buildings were boarded ued to contest the allegations, up safely, that all the electric was taken out, that the gas and “and it took almost three years water were shut off [with one to cure all the violations.” After initially engaging exception], that nothing comattorney Thomas Wall as bustible was stored there,” special counsel in the matter, Smith said. the borough later assigned its As a safeguard that would allow two wireless companies municipal prosecutor Michael Cifelli to take over, on the to place antennas on the roof premise that as a specialist of two buildings, Smith said

ALMA from

in environmental law in his private practice, Cifelli could expedite the case. Legal fees will be part of the settlement agreement with Alma approved by the court, the mayor said. Alma was represented in court by Dover attorney Vincent Nuzzi, who represented one of two N.J. state troopers who lost their jobs in the aftermath of being involved in a high-speed escort of a caravan of luxury cars along the Garden State Parkway in March 2012. Now that this distraction appears to be settled, the borough can again refocus on its negotiations with Alma on what will happen to the former factory complex. Both sides had five years

to conclude a redevelopment agreement for the site, but now, according to Smith, “we’re well into our seventh or eighth year” of talks. Smith said Alma initially intended to convert the industrial buildings – which have been registered as federal historic landmarks – to several hundred residential condominium apartments but when the real estate market turned sour in 2008, the company proposed switching to rental units. Representatives of the borough and the company squabbled over the configuration and number of on-site parking spaces and over the tax abatement sought by Alma. Smith said that while the borough was willing to go

along with some form of an abatement, it had to be assured that it would be getting enough money to cover all the municipal costs associated with the project, particularly educating children living at the site. At times, Smith said, discussions back and forth became heated and, finally, “we got to the point where we only had the lawyers and planners meet.” Smith said he couldn’t recall when the last negotiation session was held. The borough is also battling with Alma on another front – real estate taxes. Alma is appealing the taxes on its property from 2008 through to the current year, according to Smith.

Clara Maass ranked among best in Metro Area U.S. News & World Report recently named Clara Maass Medical Center, Belleville, a Barnabas Health facility, among the 2013-2014 Best Hospitals in the New York Metro Area and scored the medical center as high performing in diabetes, nephrology, neurol-

ogy and orthopedics. Clara Maass joins Newark Beth Israel and St. Barnabas Medical Center, also Barnabas Health facilities, in achieving this recognition. It is the fourth consecutive year that Clara Maass has been given this distinction by the

magazine. “We are proud again to be recognized for providing outstanding health care to our patients and the members of the communities we serve,” said Mary Ellen Clyne, president and CEO of Clara Maass. “It is a testament to the hard work

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and excellence of our medical staff and employees.” Recently, the New Jersey State Department of Health rated Clara Maass tops in the state for patient treatment of heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical infection prevention in its annual hospital performance report. In addition, the report cited CMMC for having an excellent record of patient safety, scoring zero or very low in the number of unsafe incidences involving patients, according to 2011 data examined by the state depart-

ment. The U.S. News & World Report rankings were completed based on information provided by the American Hospital Association, which compiles data on U.S. hospitals based on surveys and other sources. The publication initially evaluated 5,000 hospitals in its rankings, looking at patient safety, mortality rates, physician specialists and other categories. The U.S. News & World Report annual hospital rankings can be found at http://usnews. com.

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around town

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Belleville

loway, a middle-aged British society lady, is planning a party.  While she is ordering food and flowers, an old lover drops by unexpectedly.  At the same time, in another part of London, a shell-shocked veteran faces commitment to a mental institution.  The fate of a man she never met will alter Clarissa’s world view forever. For more information or to request help in locating a copy of the book club selection, call Bloomfield Celebrate the Dig Into Read- the Reference Desk at 973566-6200, ext 502. Admission ing summer program at the is free.  Bloomfield Library with live Oakeside Bloomfield Culturanimals from the Turtle Back al Center, 240 Belleville Ave., Zoo on Wednesday, Aug. 14, sponsors a trip to Grounds for at 1:30 p.m. Reading program participants will be treated to Sculpture, Hamilton, a 35-acre a presentation of live animals, sculpture garden with over 270 sculptures on Sunday, Oct. refreshments and a grab bag to reward them for taking part 13. A bus leaves Oakeside at 9 a.m. Cost is $55 per person, in the program. Registration which includes bus and admisfor the program is required and is limited to children who sion, but does not include meals. Participants can take have signed up for the suma self-guided tour or join a mer reading.  A second session at 2:45 p.m. will be added docent-led tour at 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. Lunch is available at sevif necessary. eral venues on site, or particiIt’s not too late to regispants can pack a picnic lunch. ter for the library’s Dig Into After the sculpture garden, Reading program. Come to the bus will stop at a nearby the children’s library to sign up. The program ends on Aug. Cracker Barrel restaurant and gift shop and will leave at 30. Readers who successfully complete the program will be about 6:30 p.m. Reservations must be paid within five days given a brand new book. of booking to ensure a place. It’s all about “Birds and There are no refunds on paid Witches and Bloomfield: On reservations. Call the Oakethe 200th Anniversary of the side office at 973-429-0960. Death of Alexander Wilson” Join the MetroEast Chapter at the Bloomfield Public of the New Jersey Association Library, 90 Broad St., on Aug. 21 at 6 p.m. Hosted by Bloom- of Women Business Owners (NJAWBO MetroEast) at field resident Rick Wright, a Senioritas, 285 Glenwood Ave., widely-published writer and lecturer at birding events, this Bloomfield, for a fun networking event on Tuesday, Aug. 20, illustrated seminar will introfrom 6 to 9 p.m. duce you to the life and work The cost is $20 for members, of Alexander Wilson. Arriving $25 for nonmembers and $20 from Scotland as a political and economic refugee in 1794, for member guests. For reservations, please regWilson provided eyewitness ister online at www.whoscomtales from early 19th century ing.com/njawbo-region2 or Bloomfield that offer insights into our area’s history. Wright call 201-258-4593. You can is book review editor for Bird- also email questions to: info@ ing and the American Birding njawbo-metroeast.org. For more information about Association Blog. For more inNJAWBO MetroEast, visit formation, call 973-566-6200, www.njawbo-metroeast.org. ext. 502. The Bloomfield Library’s Harrison book club will meet in the Come read, sing and play board room on Monday, Sept. with your child at Little Ones 9, from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. to Learning at the Harrison discuss “Mrs. Dalloway” by Public Library, 415 Harrison Virginia Woolf. Clarissa DalTickets are now available for St. Peter’s Rosary Confraternity’s annual Communion Breakfast to be held on Oct. 6, after the 8:30 a.m. Mass at the Chandelier Restaurant, 340 Franklin Ave. Tickets are $22 each and are available by calling the rectory at 973-751-2002. The speaker will be Sister Marlene Milasus, O.S.B.

Ave. The program is held on Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. for children up to 36 months. No registration is needed; however, space is limited to the first 15 children. The Town of Harrison Senior Center is sponsoring a Tropical Luau party on Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 11:30 a.m. for Harrison seniors only. For more information, call Rita at the Senior Center at 973-268-2463.

at the Henrietta Benstead Senior Center runs a trip to the Taj Mahal in Atlantic City every third Wednesday of the month. The cost is $30 and the bus leaves from the center at 60 Columbia Ave. at 9:30 a.m. Coffee and donuts are provided before the bus leaves, plus a goody bag on the way home. The next trips are Aug. 21 and Sept. 18. For more information, call Lucy at 973-731-6942. The Presbyterian BoysGirls Club, 663 Kearny Ave., Kearny continues to be open to Spruce Terrace Senior members and guests, ages 8 Housing Community, 21 to 15, in August on Tuesdays Spruce St., Kearny will be and Thursdays from 7 to 9 opening its waiting list on p.m. and offers basketball, Sept. 9 at 9 a.m. Applicants dodgeball, wiffleball, kick ball, must be 62 and over. Income gymnastics, bowling, bumper limits must not exceed $27,000 pool, air hockey, foozball, arts for one person or $30,080 for and crafts, ping pong and electwo persons. (Equal Housing tronic games. Opportunity.) Mary’s Traveling Seniors “Dig Into Reading” Vacation of Kearny are organizing a Reading Challenge at Kearny trip to Wildwood Sept. 8-12 Public Library, 318 Kearny (five days, four nights). Price Ave., will end on Friday, Aug. includes: four nights, accom16. Book logs will not be acmodations in Wildwood, four cepted after that date. breakfasts and dinners, three Children ages 2 1/2 - 5 years nights of entertainment, a old are invited to preschool dolphin watch cruise, visit to art at the Main Library, from 11 Cape May and Atlantic City, a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Aug. with a bonus rebate, trans20.The library will provide portation, all taxes, gratuities the art materials. Registration and luggage handling. Packis not necessary, but space is age price is $475 for double limited. occupancy; single occupancy Magician Joe Fischer will is $90 extra. A $150 deposit is perform a magic show at the required. Seats are limited. main library on Tuesday, Aug. Call Mary at 201-998-1030. 20, at 4:30 p.m. Kearny Little League will Check out the huge selechold its third annual fun fair at tion of donated and discarded the Doyle Pavilion at Riverhardcover and paperback bank Park on Aug. 18, from books, audiobooks and CDs noon to 6 p.m. The event will at the Main Library, during its include a water slide, dunk week-long book sale Aug. 19tank, slip and slide, music 22. The library will be selling raffles and much more. The the books for 25¢ each or 5 for fair is open to all registered $1. Hours are: Monday, TuesLittle League participants (Litday and Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to tle League, Mini Minor and 6 p.m.; and Wednesday, 9:30 TBall), coaches, parents and a.m. to 8 p.m. The library will siblings. The cost is free to all be closed on Friday, Aug. 23. registered players and coaches Be whisked away to the and a $10 donation per person magical world of Never Land for adults and a $5 donation at the Main Library with a for children. The cost includes “Peter Pan” double feature on all food, drinks and activities. Monday, Aug. 19. “Peter Pan” For more information, call (G-rated) will be shown at Tom Witt, president of Kearny 1:30 p.m. and the 2002 sequel Little League, at 201-314-4924 “Peter Pan: Return to Never or Kearny Recreation DepartLand” at 2:30 p.m. downstairs. ment at (201) 955-7983. Popcorn and light refreshLyndhurst ments will be served. Area gardeners are invited The Arts and Crafts Club

13

to showcase their best floral or vegetable product in a nonjuried event at the Lyndhurst Garden Club’s annual flower and plant show on Saturday, Aug. 17, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lyndhurst Senior Citizen building, 260 Cleveland Ave. Registration will be at 10 a.m. and participation awards at 1 p.m. Gardeners can also choose from among plants, gardening accessories and books, unique planters and attic treasurers available at the sales tables. For more information, call 201-939-0033. Good Shepherd Medical Adult Center, 725 Valley Brook Ave., invites the community to its first annual health fair on Aug. 30 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Food, music, arts, entertainment, games, prizes and more are in the offing. For more information, call 941-565-0861. Lyndhurst Food Pantry, on the first floor of the Municipal Annex, 253 Stuyvesant Ave., is re-stocking. This pantry, which serves more than 140 needy Lyndhurst families, welcomes donations of canned vegetables, peanut butter, jelly, cereal, applesauce, condiments, and paper products. No expired items will be accepted. All donations can be dropped off at the pantry. Anyone interested in holding a food drive for the pantry is invited to contact Sarah Anderson of the Lyndhurst Health Department at 201-804-2421. Lyndhurst Youth Roller Hockey League is seeking boys and girls of all ages and levels for these divisions: Mites (grades K-2), Midgets (grades 3-5) and Juniors (grades 6-8). Registration fee is $55 for Lyndhurst residents and $65 for non-residents. Applications are available at www.leaguelineup.com/lyhl. Mail or drop off completed applications to: Lyndhurst Youth Hockey League, c/o Lyndhurst Parks Dept., 250 Cleveland Ave., Lyndhurst, N.J. 07071. For more information, visit www. leaguelineup.com/lyhl or email lyndhockey@ymail.com. The Lyndhurst Elks will host an Elvis tribute on Saturday, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m., at the Polish see AROUND TOWN page

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

KPD from

03

St. Michael’s Medical Center in Newark. Reed also travelled to the hospital to interview the man, who reportedly admitted to having been drinking. Blood was drawn for analysis, and Valdemar Salandrea, 43, of Jersey City was

charged with DWI, careless driving and operating an uninsured vehicle. The cycle was impounded. Aug. 5 On this day, when everyone else was dumping Russian vodka in the streets to protest that country’s anti-gay policies, a 32-year-

old Kearny man  walked into a liquor store at Kearny and Seeley Aves. at 4:10 p.m. and allegedly walked out with a stolen bottle of Smirnoff. Officer Sean Kelly responded to the report of the theft and broadcast a description of the suspect and direction of flight. A short time later, Det. Ray Lopez

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spotted Gheorghe Vasile, 32, of Kearny at Beech St. and Stewart Ave., reportedly with a bottle of Smirnoff protruding from his backpack. The theft victim was brought to the scene and ID’d the suspect, police said.  Vasile was charged with shoplifting and violation of the town ordinance on open containers of alcohol. Police said he was also wanted on warrants, from Hanover, Sparta, Dover and Newark.  Processed at HQ , he was transported to the Hudson County Jail by the Sheriff ’s Office. Aug. 6 At 1:20 a.m., Officer Dean Gasser and Sgt. Charles Smith came upon a man and a woman having a heated argument on Belgrove Drive at Rose St. As the officers approached, the man took off, running through the nearby apartments and scaling two fences. The cops pursued but eventually lost him. However, the guy obligingly circled back. He was apprehended at Johnson Ave. and John St. by Officer Derek Hemphill and was found to be wanted on a contempt warrant, police said. In a search incidental to arrest, 39-year-old Kearny resident Anthony Joana was allegedly found to be in possession of a partially smoked marijuana cigar. He was charged on the warrant and with possession of pot and drug paraphernalia. Joana told police he was not feeling well, and Kearny EMS took him to Clara Maass Medical Center.

front-seat passenger holding a cigar. Said passenger exited the car, started to walk away, was told to stop  and began to run, police said. He was, however, caught and allegedly found to be in possession of two partially smoked marijuana cigars and a plastic bag containing more of the weed. Charged with possession and use of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest was Steven McGirr, 22, of Kearny. Aug. 7 At 7 p.m., Det. Ray Lopez came upon two women yelling and apparently chasing a third on Forest St. near Pierce Place. As he approached, one entered a car  and reportedly raced away at a high rate of speed. He followed, but she returned to the scene of the altercation -- and now she had a knife in her hand, police said. Lopez disarmed and arrested her. Piscataway resident Jamye Dunham, 22, was charged with possession of a weapon, possession for unlawful purposes and driving with a suspended license.

Based on information developed about a Chestnut St. location, the Vice Squad arranged to make an undercover drug buy there. At 10:30 p.m., the suspected dealer, in possession of several packets of pot, arrived -- and then took off running, discarding the marijuana along the way, police said. He was overtaken and arrested.  Anthony Baez, 19, of Kearny was charged with possession of pot and paraOfficer Joseph Vulcano phernalia, possession with responded to a two-car acci- intent to distribute, and dent on Rt. 7 at 11:30 a.m. and possession with intent near reportedly found that one of school property and a public the motorists, Joseph Minpark. ickene, 19, of Jersey City was driving with a suspended Aug. 8 license and was wanted on a At 7:20 a.m., Officer Dave warrant out of Linden. Min- Rakowski was at Passaic ickene was charged on those Ave. and Riverview Court counts and also with carewhen he spotted 27-yearless driving and failure to old Daniel Foster of Verona, surrender a revoked license. who he knew to be wanted on a Kearny warrant for the At 11 p.m., the Vice Squad alleged unlawful taking of a was on Beech St. when they vehicle, police said, he was came upon a vehicle from booked at HQ on that and which wafted the strong two other reported warrants, odor of burnt marijuana, po- from Riverdale and the N.J. lice said. Following the car Transit Police. and stopping it on Schuyler Ave., they reportedly saw the – Karen Zautyk


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sports&recreation THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Local hoop enthusiasts get tips from Hall of Fame coach Hurley

SPORTS VIEW Contact Jim at Ogsmar@aol.com

Riverside County Park will be home to both NA, QP this season If you take a drive around the area’s high school playing facilities, you will basically find a local array of excellence--Fields of Dreams so to speak. Most of the area’s high school fields have undergone major renovations and restorations over the last few years. We’ve seen the construction of a brand new Harrison High School and its state of the art stadium. It’s an athletic facility that draws raves from people all over New Jersey and has been utilized as a home field for other local schools in need. We’ve seen the major renovations made at Harvey Field in Kearny two years ago, complete with its FieldTurf surface. The same can be said for Franklin School Field, where Kearny plays baseball and practices soccer. Belleville just recently had a major renovation to Belleville Stadium, complete with FieldTurf and a restoration of the long-standing concrete bleachers. The Nutley Oval had an overhaul a few years ago and remains one of the finest in the area. Five years ago, Lynd-

hurst was fortunate to gain the new recreational facility that is used for baseball, softball as well as boys’ and girls’ soccer. The Lyndhurst High School main field was renovated with FieldTurf three years ago. Now, there’s a new athletic facility in the area that will become the home of both Queen of Peace and North Arlington football and soccer teams this fall. Both schools recently announced a deal with the Bergen County Parks Department to utilize the brand new state-of-the-art facility inside Riverside County Park South on the Lyndhurst/North Arlington border. It’s a blessing for both schools, considering that last fall, Hurricane Sandy turned all of the schools’ fall programs into vagabonds, searching for fields to practice and play on. For example, Queen of Peace did not have a home field for football last fall. The Golden Griffins played three home games at Harrison and a fourth--ironically against neighboring rival North Arlington--at Belleville Stadium. see VIEW page

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Photo by Jim Hague

The Mullins brothers, 7-year-old Matheus and 8-year-old William, of Kearny had a ball at the Hoopsville Cares basketball camp in Jersey City.

from July 6 through last Sunday. They learned all aspects of the game of basketball while learning also about hard work, integrity, It all started three years ago, leadership, honesty, education, when Ron Lagman approached Kearny resident Julius David to see sportsmanship and dedication. On Sunday, the youngsters were if he could run a basketball clinic given a treat, as Hall of Fame with the Filipino community in basketball coach Bob Hurley of St. mind. Anthony High School gave a guest “Filipinos love basketball,” lecture. Hurley commanded the David said. kids’ attention and by the end of the It was the birth of Hoopsville hour-long session, he had the kids Cares, a basketball teaching noneating out of his hands. profit organization, run solely on All summer long, Hurley has charitable contributions. “Ron was able to get some spon- been traveling, coaching and organizing at camps and clinics. He had sors, but whatever else we get, it comes from donations,” said David, just returned from the Pennsylvania a long-time youth basketball coach Poconos the night before, where he and currently the freshman coach at conducted a camp strictly for young St. Anthony High School in Jersey girls, to make it back to his native City. “We started out with 10 or 15 Jersey City to give the lecture. “I do six weeks of camp during kids.” the summer and I do maybe two or This year, more than 65 youngthree lectures a week,” said Hurley, sters, ages 7 through 13, went to the METS Charter School in Jersey who was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in City every Saturday and Sunday By Jim Hague Observer Sports Writer

2010. “I guess I’ve been with about 7,500 kids throughout the course of the summer.” Hurley was asked if it ever gets tiring. “This is all I do now,” Hurley said. “My life is all basketball. I still love going into a gym and doing things off the top of my head. I have to remember the ages of the kids as I do it.” Some of the youngsters didn’t know who Hurley was. One asked, “Who are you?” “Who am I? I’m the guy whose picture is on the wall over there,” Hurley said, pointing to a giant banner honoring Hurley for winning the 1,000th game of his coaching career last year. But there were others who were in awe of Hurley. “It’s amazing to be with a Hall of Fame coach,” said Julius David Jr., the camp director’s 12-year-old see Hoopsville next page


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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

15

and instructors. “It’s fun to give back to son, who Hurley used in a lot the game I love,” said Farih, of his demonstrations. “It’s fun who will be a junior on the to learn from him.” Peacocks this season. “I want David Jr. was asked if it to teach the kids what I was was a little stressful being the taught. The potential is there center of the camp’s attention. for them to become good “Somewhat, because I was basketball players. I didn’t afraid that I might mess up,” play until my freshman year he said, laughing. at Kearny, so these kids are Hurley tried to use refergetting a head start. I see a ences that his audience might whole lot of energy out there. understand, like mentioning These kids want to learn, from boxing champion Manny Pac- beginning to end. I see myself quiao, who is from the Philip- wanting to be like these kids.” pines. The elder David was excited “The Filipino kids are terto see just how much his camp rific because they love basket- has grown. ball,” Hurley said. “It’s huge “It’s way better than I could in the Philippines. There’s so have expected,” David said. “It much diversity in Jersey City was a good turnout. Instead these days. You never can of being on a beach or playexpect to see one group.” ing video games, these kids The Hoopsville Cares group wanted to learn about basketfeatured kids from all races, ball. They’re dribbling and creeds and backgrounds. shooting. I’m very excited. I Mohamed Farih, the former don’t think it can get any betKearny High standout who ter than this. Coach Hurley remains on the St. Peter’s Uni- has a lot of drills to keep the versity roster after walking on kids interested.” to the team two years ago, was Hurley’s ball handling drills one of the camp’s counselors have been used at his camps

HOOPSVILLE from

for almost 40 years. “When you have really young kids, you have to make an effort,” Hurley said. “It’s the challenge of teaching that keeps you sharp. I’m running camps all summer, so I’m able to do new things there. I’m not trying to re-invent myself. It was different and fun. You could feel the energy, the basketballs bouncing in the building. It’s all part of the learning and I really enjoyed doing it.” David was in awe of Hurley’s presence. “He taught the kids things that they could do without having a hoop at home,” David said. “They can do the drills in their basements, in their backyard, in the driveway. The kids all had fun with it. It was awesome to see. When you have younger kids like this, they represent the future of the sport.” Photo by Jim Hague William Mullins is eight Julius David Sr. and his 12-year-old son, Julius Jr. of Kearny were part of years old. His father, Bill, is the Hoopsville Cares basketball camp that the David Sr. organized. the former head boys’ coach at Kearny High who still coaches that he wants to learn more. “I had a lot of fun and I feel the volleyball team. “I like to play basketball,” like I’m a better shooter now,” The younger Mullins said William Mullins said. “I like Benjamin said. “This was to learn about dribbling, but I cool.” like to shoot.” David was glad that his His 7-year-old brother, camp was a success. Matheus, was also a partici“Seeing the little kids do pant. the drills means a lot,” David “I want to play basketball said. “I think they retain more. because Dad was a coach,” It’s a misconception to think Matheus said. “I liked the that the little ones can’t pick knockout part, because I won.” up things. Well, we had 60 Knockout is a shooting and basketballs bouncing at once dribbling drill. and they were all doing it. It “It was a lot of fun and I was great.” was glad to be here,” Matheus And it was highlighted by said. an appearance from basketball Benjamin Minguito is an royalty. Not a bad thing at all. 8-year-old Kearny resident.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

VIEW from

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“We didn’t think Riverside County Park would be ready for us,” Queen of Peace athletic director Ed Abromaitis said. “Harrison was ready to accommodate us again. But we received word that it would be ready in time for the fall.” Abromaitis said that a meeting was held last week between Ron Kistner, the executive director of Bergen County Parks, Dave Hutchinson, the athletic director at North Arlington and himself to discuss scheduling for the fall. “We’re very excited,” said Abromaitis, whose football, boys’ and girls’ soccer teams will call the new facility home this fall. “We have five home football games scheduled and we’re pretty excited about it.” The Golden Griffins begin the football season at home Sept. 14 against Manchester Regional at 1 p.m., christening the new facility. “It’s a big blessing,” Abromaitis said. “It’s really huge for us and huge for our program. We were scrambling last year for places to play and practice. Now we have one of the best facilities around.” The facility will have lights, a concession stand, bleachers to

hold 600 spectators and a press box. Hutchinson needed to find a suitable home facility, considering Rip Collins Field in North Arlington, severely damaged by the floods of the last two storms, would not be available this fall. “We’re basically in transition,” Hutchinson said. “We weren’t sure what we were going to do and weren’t sure what the county would give us. It’s a great facility.” The Vikings’ football team will open its home season at Riverside County Park on Sept. 20 against Wallington. Last year, the North Arlington boys’ soccer team earned a berth in the NJSIAA North Jersey Section 2, Group I playoffs, but couldn’t play its scheduled home game in the states because there wasn’t a suitable home field available. “We basically had to forfeit the home field and ended up playing our home game on the road,” Hutchinson said. “Now we have a place that can withstand some bad weather. We’re excited about it.” To the borough’s credit, a referendum was passed to make the necessary improvements at Rip Collins, including new

17

Photo by Jim Hague

The new athletic facility at Riverside County Park is undergoing finishing touches and will be ready shortly, especially when Queen of Peace plays host to Manchester Regional Sept. 14.

locker rooms and more importantly, a new FieldTurf surface. “The project is slated to start in the fall,” Hutchinson said. “We will return to Rip Collins in 2014. We wanted to be at Rip and it was a tough decision not to play there. But the county reached out to us to come and play at Riverside County Park. It’s a no-brainer. It’s the right thing to do.” Hutchinson said that he was able to agree on a schedule

with Abromaitis for boys’ and girls’ soccer. Everything seems to be in place. And on Nov. 1, the two football teams will meet at Riverside County Park. There’s no need to go to Belleville this year.

“We were offered a state-ofthe-art field to use,” Hutchinson said. “It was hard to turn down.”

baseball and softball field will be finished in time for the spring, giving both schools the option to play those sports there. Yes, it’s certainly a Field of Dreams for QP and NA. And it’s great news that the powersthat-be in Bergen County are allowing the two local schools to play there.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

A battle of champions in Lyndhurst, By Jim Hague Observer Sports Writer It started out as a simple idea and blossomed into an impromptu reunion that people in Lyndhurst will remember for a very long time. Lyndhurst athletic director and head baseball coach Frank “Butch” Servideo was trying to find a way to raise funds in order to buy his baseball team rings for winning the NJSIAA North Jersey Section 2, Group II state championship last spring. So Servideo called upon his last team to capture a state title, namely the 2008 Golden Bears who won the overall Group I state crown. “We decided to have a reunion game, pitting the 2008 team against the 2013 team,” Servideo said. Each member of the 2008 team had to donate a certain amount of money to participate. All of the money raised would go directly to buying championship rings for the 2013 squad. It seemed like a

Photo by Jim Hague

The 2013 Lyndhurst state champions (l.) took on the 2008 Lyndhurst state champs (r.) in a charity baseball game last week, with coach Butch Servideo (c.) serving as an umpire. The 2008 team won, 10-2.

a great cause last Thursday night at the Lyndhurst Recreation facility. The older guys donned blue shirts, while the younger ones were wearing

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was happy about that.” Glenn Flora, who pitched that 2008 squad to the state crown, earning First Team All-State honors for a second straight year, didn’t hesitate at all and took his familiar place on the mound. “It’s fun to bring it back to our high school days,” said Flora, who still pitches at William Paterson University. “It was a good idea to do something like this. It gives us all the opportunity to remember what we did, which was something pretty special. When I heard about this, I jumped at the opportunity. I think we all did.” Bubba Jasinski, who just completed a fine collegiate career at Misiercordia University, agreed. “This is awesome,” Jasinski said. “We’re getting a chance to go up against another state championship team from story continued next page

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gold. All shirts proclaimed their state championships inside a bat on the shirt. Servideo wanted to be as impartial as he could, considering he coached both teams. So he decided to serve as one of the umpires for the game. Former Lyndhurst head girls’ basketball coach Perrin Mosca, who has now moved on to coach at his alma mater of Hackensack, was the plate umpire. “I can’t root for one or the other, so I decided to umpire,” Servideo said. “No one can say anything about me showing partiality. We had a great turnout. It was great seeing all the guys again. I think the younger guys want to come out and prove something. I know both teams held practices to get ready.” Added Servideo, “When I reached out to the 2008 team to help with buying the rings, they were more than willing. They wanted to help and I

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

19

for a good cause Lyndhurst. I hadn’t seen a lot of these guys in five years. It’s great to be together again.” Jasinski believed that his team had the upper hand. “I think we have an advantage because some of us are coming off solid college seasons,” Jasinski said. “We didn’t think we could just show up here and play. We’re going for the win.” Anthony Dorio, who went on to have a fine career at William Paterson, was also excited to be a part of the reunion. “When I first received the letter, I was a little surprised,” Dorio said. “I didn’t think anything like this could ever take place. It was a great idea to

come back and see everyone. I hadn’t seen some of them since our last game together.” Dorio still plays actively for the South Bergen Bullets of the Metropolitan League as he tries to become a police officer. Frank Pica showed up wearing dark-rimmed glasses, looking like Rick Vaughn (Charlie Sheen) in the movie, “Major League.” “We’re like the family that never left Lyndhurst,” said Pica, who now works as a driver for the Jersey City Sanitation Authority. “I didn’t hesitate one bit to come back. This is amazing.” Pica said that he has always loved the movie and loved

Charlie Sheen, thus the reason for the get-up. The 2013 state champions were also up for the challenge. “I’m very excited about it,” said Max Hart, who was the starting pitcher for the 2013 team. “I said I always wanted to play against this team. It felt good to be here playing again. I’m going to remember this for the rest of my life. I loved the chance to face Flora. I wanted to see what he had left.” Hart is headed to St. Thomas Aquinas University in Peekskill, N.Y., next month. “I think we have an advantage because we have been playing all along,” Hart said. “They haven’t played together in a while.”

Catcher Austin Meeney was also thrilled to have the chance. “I’ve been very excited about this game since it was organized,” Meeney said. “I always wondered what would happen if we got the chance to play them. It means a lot that they would come back and help us.” Meeney is headed to Montclair State, but more than likely won’t play baseball there. “This is the last organized game I’ll play with my close friends,” Meeney said. “I really want to win.” Bobby DeMarco, who is headed to Drew University to join the swim team there,

also jumped at the chance to participate. “I never thought I’d get a chance to play those guys,” DeMarco said. “It was pretty nice that they came out to do this for us. I definitely feel a sense of Lyndhurst pride. They all showed they still care. It’s a lot of fun.” That was true, until the game started for real. The 2008 team showed the younger guys just who were still boss, taking a 10-2 decision. “It was a case of boys against men,” Servideo said. It was also a case of baseball camaraderie between two champions from Lyndhurst.

www.theobserver.com


20

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

th

SDA starts 135 year, new academic program When school opens on Sept. 5, St. Dominic Academy in Jersey City will be celebrating two momentous occasions: the beginning of its 135th anniversary year and the opening of a new program for grades 7 and 8. School will begin for the newest and youngest members of the SDA community with an 8 a.m. orientation breakfast for students and parents. At 8:30 a.m. the girls

in seventh and eighth grades will be greeted by their SDA “Big Sisters,” members of the sophomore class, who will assist further with their orientation program. Later in the morning, the academy will welcome transfer students and then returning students. Classes will begin officially for grades 7 to 12, on Friday, Sept. 6. An opening school liturgy will take place on Friday, Sept. 13, at 11

a.m. at St. Aloysius Church. Starting this fall, SDA – through Project Lead the Way -- will begin offering courses in science, technology, engineering and math for students in grades 7 and 8. PLTW is the nation’s leading provider of STEM curricula to middle and high schools with more than 5,300 programs in over 4,700 schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Academic honors Local residents achieved academic honors at the following schools: Heather Ware of Kearny was named to the Dean’s List at the University of New Hampshire’s, Durham, N.H. Chengchen Hou of Lynd-

hurst was named to the Honor Roll at Cheshire Academy in Cheshire, Conn. Alexandra Colon of Kearny earned honors at Westminster School, Simbury, Conn. Lauren Garbe, Paul Giordano, Jonathan Guarino, Lauren

Guzzo of Lyndhurst; Danni Candido, Morgan Chapman and Melissa Teresco of Bloomfield; Travis Fahey, Jaclyn Isabella, Allyson Lynch, Paris Metzger, Dana Principe, Gianna Scarpelli and Laura Urbanovich of Nutley; Elizabeth

The academy will offer PLTW’s Gateway to Technology program, designed to engage the natural curiosity and imagination of middle school students, while introducing them to engineering, robotics, computer modeling, and energy, among other STEM-related subjects. “PLTW has a long history of successfully engaging students in STEM subjects,” said Academic Dean John

Seborowski. “St. Dominic Academy is proud to offer PLTW to our students, giving them an advantage over their peers when it comes to high school, college and career readiness.” In July, SDA faculty member Christina Manuel attended an intensive multiday PLTW training session to gain insights into implementing the hands-on, projectbased curriculum.

Tapia of Belleville, all made the Dean’s List at the University of Scranton, Scranton, Pa. Alexandra Giammanco of Lyndhurst was named to the Dean’s List at Wilkes-Barre University, Pa. Alexandra Brincka, Karissa Carty, Alexandra Ferri, Paige Mazzi, Jessamyn Nucum, Jenny Osbun, Kaitlyn Rossi and Allison Spagnuolo, all of Bloomfield; Nicolas Costanza,

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of Lyndhurst; Louis Brooks, Gabrielle Guider and Alyssa Scerbak, all of Nutley, were named to the Dean’s List at the University of Delaware, Newark, Del. Anthony Greenfield and Solange Ramkissoon, both of Bloomfield, and Corey Mosher of North Arlington were named to the Dean’s List at the University of New Haven, West Haven, Conn.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

13

21

2553. Takeout orders are availRegistration is required. BCAS events throughout the 29, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. An For more information on year. To R.S.V.P., contact Don accomplished solo entertainer able. National Home, 730 New North Arlington Senior library programs, visit http:// Torino of the BCAS at greaand recording artist who has Jersey Ave. A $20 donation is nutley.bccls.org, email library@ tauk4@aol.com or 201-230-4983. performed on both sides of the Activity Center, 11 York Rd., requested. The program inhosts an end of summer bingo nutleynj.org or call 973-667 North Hudson Community Atlantic, Dr. Bill Kolb (a.k.a. cludes a light dinner and show. Action Corporation will be luncheon on Friday, Aug. 30. 0405. “Dr. Zither”) brings his beauTickets are $20 in advance or For information, call 201-998The cast of the Cherry providing a low cost/no cost tiful music to the Lyndhurst $25 at the door. 5636. Blossom Players will present dental van, twice a month, in Library. One of the foundFor tickets or more informa- front of the Kearny Health North Arlington Girl Scout “How to Succeed in Business ing members of the North tion, call Julie at 201-424-2659 Troop 4451 is seeking donaWithout Really Trying!” at the Center, 645 Kearny Ave. SerAmerica Zither Orchestra, he or Chris at 201-438-2750. Bring a vices include exams, x-rays, tions for a “Sweets for the Philhower Chapel (ground has given concerts across the canned good for the Lyndhurst cleanings, fillings and extracTroops” cookie drive to send floor) of Vincent United MethUnited States, and has played Food Pantry. cases of Girl Scout cookies to odist Church, 100 Vincent Pl., tions. with internationally recogRegistration is open for the Nutley. Ticket prices are $16 NJ Family Care, HMO and nized zither virtuosos as Tomy U.S. troops. So far, more than Sea Creature Mobile Craft pro- Medicaid plans are accepted. for general admission and $14 Temerson, and Freddy Golden. 20 cases containing 240 boxes gram at the Lyndhurst Public have been sent. There are for students and seniors (65+). A sliding fee schedule based Also performing will be his Library, 355 Valley Brook Ave., still 40 cases left. The troop is Performances are Aug. 14 to 16 on income is available to those star pupil, Lyndhurst resident on Thursday, Aug. 22, from at 8 p.m., Aug. 17 at 2 and 8 p.m. with no insurance. Gina Gerbasio, who may be the reaching out to the commu2:30 to 3:15 p.m., for children nity to help meet their quota. and Aug. 18 at 2 p.m. Proof of address, proof of youngest zither player in the in kindergarten to grade 4. To People can contribute $48 per If you would like to reserve income and picture ID are country. Space is limited and register for library programs case but any amount will be tickets please email: tickets@ required. registration is necessary.  To or for more information, call accepted. Send checks payable cbpllc.org or call: 973-785-1353 To make an appointment, register, please email romeo@ 201-804-2478. to North Arlington Girl Scout and leave a detailed voice-mail call NHCAC at 201-210-0200. bccls.org or call the library at The Lyndhurst Health Troop 4451 to 172 Rutherford message.  Tickets reserved via The Woman’s Club of Lynd201-804-2478, ext. 7. Department is collecting Pl., North Arlington, N.J. 07031. email or phone must be pickedhurst is sponsoring a trip to the donations for students in The troop will deliver cases to up and paid for 10 minutes North Arlington Sands Casino in Bethlehem, Pa. need. Items sought include The Angry Coffee Bean hosts the recruiting center on Bloom- prior to the requested perforon Thursday, Sept. 19. Anyone backpacks, dividers, and 3-ring interested should call Janet field Ave. in Bloomfield. a creative writing meeting mance time; if not, they may binders.  Donations can be be void and sold. The troupe Ricligiano at 201-935-1208. Seats group on the second and fourth dropped off at the Health DeMonday of each month. An Nutley strongly suggests for this (and are limited so call ASAP. partment, 601 Riverside Ave., open mind and notebook are Nutley Public Library, 93 all future) production/s that Any woman interested in Suite 1, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Booth Dr., will host Preschool tickets be ordered in advance joining the Woman’s Club may required. For more informauntil Aug. 31. Anyone with chil- do so by contacting Membertion, call 201-772-5554. Story Time on Wednesday, of opening night. No reserves dren in need of school supplies ship Chairman Marilyn Falcone The North Arlington WomAug. 14, at 10 a.m. for Nutley will be honored later than is asked to contact the Health residents only. No registration the 14th. ‘Day-of’ or ‘At-door’ at 201-933-6459 or Delores Per- an’s Club sponsors a breakfast Department at 201-804-2500 at Applebee’s Restaurant, is required. tickets will only be sold if availrotta at 201-939-5237. to schedule a pick-up of the Kearny, on Saturday, Aug. 31, The library’s End of Summer able. Walk-ins are not guaranZither Musical Event at the needed supplies. teed. Tickets for the summer from 8 to 10 a.m. The cost is Reading Party will be held on Lyndhurst Library, 355 Valley Get an up-close view of the performances quickly sell out. $10. For tickets, call 201-889Thursday, Aug. 15, at 1:30 p.m. Brook Ave., on Thursday, Aug. Meadowlands District’s scenic beauty and wildlife with a two-hour guided pontoon boat cruise of the Hackensack River and its surrounding marshes on Aug. 16, 20 and 22 at 5:30 p.m. and Aug. 21 at 10 a.m. NJMC staff will discuss the region’s human and environmental history and point out birds and other wildlife along the way. Admission is $15 per person; the event is designed for ages 10 and up. The cruise departs from River Barge Park, Announce the acceptance of applications from Hudson County organizations for the Fiscal year 260 Outwater Lane, Carlstadt. 2014 State/County Local Arts Program Grant funded in part by The New Jersey State Council Pre-registration is required. For on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. a complete schedule, directions, and to register, visit www.njmeadowlands.gov/enAPPLICATIONS AND GUIDELINES WILL BE AVAILABLE ONLINE ON AUGUST 23, 2013 AT vironment/tours.html, or call hudsoncountynj.org 201-460-4640. Look for herons, egrets, Hudson County Office of Cultural & Heritage Affairs shorebirds and ospreys and 583 Newark Avenue other raptors on the free Jersey City, NJ 07306 Third-Tuesday-of-the-Month bird walk with the NJMC and (201)459-2070 BCAS on Aug. 20 from 10 a.m. NOTE: THE DEADLINE FOR CORRECTLY COMPLETED APPLICATIONS to noon. The walk starts at Harrier Meadow on Disposal IS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2013. LATE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT Road near Schuyler Avenue, BE ACCPTED FOR CONSIDERATION. North Arlington. Please park inside the fenced-in area. APPLICATION “WEBINAR” ONLINE WORKSHOP Check meadowblog.net for WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013, 6:00 PM. last-minute updates. You will RSVP: 201-459-2070 OR rkakolewski@hcnj.us have to sign a standard liability BY AUGUST 20, 2013 release that is good for NJMC/ AROUND TOWN from

HUDSON COUNTY CULTURAL & HERITAGE AFFAIRS THOMAS A. DEGISE, COUNTY EXECUTIVE AND THE BOARD OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS


22

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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officer with the Essex County Sheriff’s Ofworking as a meter fice and currently is a reader for Public Service security manager for the Electric & Gas. A nephGateway Group in Newew of the mayor, Esteark. He has a B.A. from ves is a member of the Montclair University. Kearny Board of EducaJordenson, 28, born tion and now becomes and raised in Newark the third Kearny cop on where he graduated the BOE, joining Deputy from Arts High School, Chief George King and is an employee of LabDet. John Plaugic. Corp, Montclair. He was Arnesman, 31, origilicensed as a medical asnally from Kinnelon and sistant at Sanford-Brown now a Newark resident, Institute. has served as a Class 2 In other public safety HIRINGS from

news, the governing body authorized the purchase of three 2014 Ford Explorers (Police Interceptors) from Charles Winner Inc. of Cherry Hill for $79,707 under state contract, along with radio and computer equipment for the vehicles, and agreed to buy a 2013 Chevrolet Tahoe for $29,828 from Day Chevrolet Inc. of Monroeville, Pa., to replace the vehicle used by Chief Dyl.

Local residents enter Phi Kappa Phi Four local residents who attend Kean University, Union, are now members of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. They are: Rene Rydberg of Bloomfield, Joseph Segriff of Harrison, and Celeste Regal

and Nayhelie FerminTaveras, both of Kearny. Approximately 32,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni are initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10% of seniors and

7.5% of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10% of the number of candidates for graduate degrees are also eligible, as are faculty, professional staff, and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Bloomfield artist debuts at Oakeside Mark “AJ” Szep is presenting his first solo photography show – “Never Alone: Black & White Images of Stone Angels” – at the Oakeside Bloomfield Cultural Center, 240 Belleville Ave., Bloomfield. The exhibit, which can be seen Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., runs through Aug. 31. Evening viewings are by appointment only. Szep’s exhibit is the culmination of a threeyear project to document the use of stone angels in cemeteries throughout New Jersey. Each angel demonstrates the beauty and craftsmanship that went into creating these funerary

Angel With Offerings

objects, which were often used in the beginning decades of the last century especially among the newly arriving immigrant populations from Europe. “I am extremely thrilled to be presenting

my first photography show at Oakeside. The artistry and grace inherent in these angels serve as a nice compliment to the elegance of the Oakes Mansion’s turnof-the-century architecture,” Szep said. Szep has been active in photography and oil painting for the past decade. His artwork appears in private collections and has been featured in many local art shows throughout northern New Jersey. His online gallery can be found at www.markajszep.com. For more information, call Oakeside at 973-4290960 or e-mail Szep at szepma@yahoo.com.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Up to 40% of businesses never recover after experiencing a major disaster. Do you have a plan to keep your business running if disaster strikes? For a free online tool that helps you develop an emergency plan, visit Ready.gov/business.

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Deadline for obituaries:

Monday by 10 AM

George P. Blauvelt George P. Blauvelt of Bloomfield passed away on July 23 at home surrounded by his loving family. George grew up in Kearny, and was a proud alumnus of Moravian College. He was an English teacher in Phillipsburg, Glen Ridge, and Hillside for many years. He was also director of education at Integrity House before retirement. He was preceded in death by his sister, Susan Gay McCarthy. He is survived by his loving wife, Judy (nee FoxWeaver), and was the devoted father of Rebecca O’Sullivan and her husband, Daniel, Alison Spinner and her husband, Joe, and stepdaughter, Karen McKechan and her husband, Richard; brother of Judy Blauvelt Woodworth and cousin of Kathy Pike Klein and her husband, Dick. He also leaves his cherished eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, as well as many adored nieces and nephews. Edward S. Buta Edward S. Buta, 78, died on July 17 at the Columbus Longterm Acute Care Hospital in Newark. Born in Newark, he was a lifelong resident of North Arlington. He served as a North Arlington police officer for 26 years before retiring as sergeant in 1986. He served in the United States Army and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign War Post 4697, the Knights of Columbus Council Queen of Peace Council 3428, and the Patrolman’s Benevolent Association Local 95, all of North Arlington. He was the beloved husband of Mary Jo (nee Meehan), the adored father of Diane Clare and her husband John of Michigan, the cherished grandfather of Jennifer and Daniel Clare, the loving brother of Marilyn Janoski of Arizona, the late Robert Buta , and the dear brother-in-law of Joan Buta. Arrangements were by the Parow Funeral Home, 185 Ridge Rd., North Arlington. A funeral Mass was held on Monday, July 22, at Our Lady Queen of Peace Church, North Arlington. Entombment fol-

obituaries

lowed in Holy Cross Chapel Mausoleum, North Arlington. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the Wounded Warriors Project, P.O Box 758517, Topeka, Kan. 66675.

Mary L. Cosgrove Mary L. Cosgrove entered into eternal rest on Aug. 10. She was 91. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, she lived in Kearny before moving to North Arlington 28 years ago. Arrangements were by the Armitage and Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Dr., Kearny. A funeral Mass was held in Queen of Peace Church, followed by private cremation. Her ashes will be placed with her beloved late husband Samuel in Holy Cross Mausoleum at a later date. To leave an online condolence, please visit www.armitagewiggins.com. During World War II, Mary was a manager at a Rolls Royce factory that manufactured engines for the military. She is survived by her daughter and son in law Christine and Thomas Keelen, her brothers Sammy, Joseph and James Cosgrove, her grandsons and their wives Tom and June Keelen and Andrew and Felicia Keelen, and her two great grandchildren Mackenzie Rose and Shane Joseph. In lieu of flowers, kindly consider a donation to the American Cancer Society. Eva Germano Eva Germano (nee Naboychik), 87, died Aug. 2 at the Clara Maass Medical Center, Belleville. Born in Kearny, she lived in North Arlington for the past 62 years and was a member of the North Arlington Nutrition and Activity Center and the AARP. She worked as a bookkeeper for the Malcolm Clothing Co. in Passaic for 10 years before retiring 24 years ago. Previously, she worked for the Warnaco Co. in Kearny for 10 years. She was the beloved wife of 67 years of John J., the cherished mother of Joseph Germano and his late wife Sarah,

Albert Germano and his wife Sharon, and Janet GermanoMedina and her late husband John, the adored grandmother of John, Joseph, Michael, John, Kimberly and Heidi, the greatgrandmother of Logan, Giana and Amily, and the dear aunt of many nieces and nephews. The funeral was from the Parow Funeral Home, 185 Ridge Rd., North Arlington, on Monday, Aug. 5, with a funeral Mass in Our Lady Queen of Peace Church, North Arlington. Entombment followed in Holy Cross Chapel Mausoleum, North Arlington. Donations in her memory may be made to the Sarah Germano Memorial Scholarship Fund, Barnegat High School, 180 Bengal Blvd., Barnegat, N.J. 08005.

Susan L. Mazol Susan L. Mazol died Aug. 8 at East Orange Hospital. She was 42. She was a lifelong Kearny resident. Arrangements were by the Armitage and Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Belgrove Dr., Kearny. A Mass was held in St. Cecilia’s Church, followed by a private cremation. To leave an online condolence, please visit www.armitagewiggins.com.   Susan was the daughter of Dennis and the late Judith Mazol. She is survived by her companion David Antosh and her sons Brendan Cannon and Kyle Antosh. Also surviving are her siblings and their spouses David and Kathleen Mazol, Janice and Robert Belbol, Daniel and Mandi Mazol and Caryn and Kenneth Smith. Douglas D. McNie Douglas D. McNie, 70, of North Arlington and Ortley Beach, passed away on Aug. 9 at home after a battle with bladder cancer. Born in Kearny, to the late Ian and Juanita (nee Lang) McNie, he resided in North Arlington for 48 years. He was a retired lithographer (pressman) with the American Lithographers of America Local 1 in New York City. He worked for many printing companies including Eastern Colortype in Clifton, Continental Can in Paterson and

25

To submit an obituary: fax: 201-991-8941

obituaries@theobserver.com

Command Web in Secaucus. He also worked as a driver for Friendship House in Hackensack for 10 years. He was a founding member of the North Arlington Volunteer Emergency Squad, a member of the OBTA in Ortley Beach , and a member of the Masonic Temple Lodge No. 80 F.&A.M., in Lyndhurst. He is survived by his devoted wife of almost 50 years, Martha A. (nee Siernos), his cherished children, Keith D. of Lyndhurst, Tracy A. Rozansky and her husband Paul of Wayne, his four loving grandchildren Keith Ian, Joseph and Aiden McNie, Jacob Rozansky and a fifth grandchild due in

November. He was predeceased by his beloved brother, Robert and nephew, Robert McNie (2013) and his sister-in-law, Carol Siernos. He is also survived by his loving sister-in-law, Ruth McNie of Whiting and his nephew Craig McNie and his wife Cindy of East Stroudsburg, Pa., and his special cousin, Ruthanne Rodziewicz and her husband Mark of South Amboy. A funeral service was held at the Parow Funeral Home, 185 Ridge Road, North Arlington. on Tuesday, Aug. 13. Entombment followed in Holy Cross see OBITS page

28

Mulligan Funeral Home 331 Cleveland Avenue, Harrison

Licensed Funeral Directors serving your needs include:

Frank X. Mulligan III, Manager, NJ Lic. 4221 Frank X. Mulligan, Jr., NJ Lic. 2953 Private Parking at 10 Frank Rodgers Blvd. North

973-481-4333

visit us at: www.mulliganfuneralhome.org

MARIO TEIXEIRA, JR., #2542 DIRECTOR-MANAGER

Shaw-Buyus Home for Services

138 DAVIS AVE. • KEARNY, NJ 07032

Tel: (201) 991-2265

WILFRED ARMITAGE & WIGGINS FUNERAL HOME Mark G. Wiggins, Manager N.J. Lic. #3916 John W. Armitage, Director N.J. Lic#2642

You will feel as if friends of family have taken over when you entrust funeral arrangements to the Wilfred Armitage Funeral Home. The family-owned firm has been in business for 75 years, serving generations in West Hudson and South Bergen. Its beautiful facilities, in a setting reminiscent of a colonial mansion, reflect the graciousness and tact of its understanding personnel.

Wilfred Armitage & Wiggins Funeral Home

596 Belgrove Dr. • Kearny, NJ 07032 (201) 991-0657


26

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

www.theobserver.com

The Observer is not responsible for typographical errors. Credit for errors will not be granted after the next week’s publication. No changes or refunds. Deadline for classifieds is Monday by 4:00 PM.

HOUSE FOR SALE

For sale: Corner lot, 88x95 w/existing house in developing area of Kearny. Serious inquiries only, by appoinment. Developers welcomed! (201)233-8089

North Arlington: 3 rooms w/heat & parking $950 2nd floor Garden Apt. 3 rooms w/ heat & parking 1st floor $950. 3 Rooms w/ heat & parking $1050. 4 Rooms w/ heat & parking $1300 Garden Apt. Lyndhurst: 3 Rooms $1050 Lovely Garden Apt. Kearny: 3 Rooms $875 w/heat & parking.

OʼHARA AGENCY (201)997-6300 BUSINESS FOR SALE Business For Sale Full Hair Salon/Spa. Located in Belleville NJ. Contact 908-338-0283.

HALL FOR RENT Party Hall

Rental • Affordable • A/C • Nice Setting

201-889-6677 201-572-1839

CLASSIFIEDS

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

KEARNY AVE Office/Store for rent. Supply own utilities. One month security. Available Now. (201)997-0026 (201)600-8563.

Kearny Studio for rent for one persom. $550 everything included No Pets. No Smoking. Call 201-450-2118 se habla español LYNDHURST 3 Bedrooms, 2 bath, Large LR/DR, Kitchen, W/D Hook up, Hardwood Floors. Close to transportation. $2000/month + Utilities, 1 month security. No pets. Available 9/1. Call 201-424-5578.

KEARNY 2 bedroom apt. 1st floor. EIK, LR, AC. $1125/mo + 1-1/2 months security. Hardwood floors. W/D hook-up. Yard, Basement storage. No pets. Available immed. Close to NYC transportation. Good credit required. Call between the hrs. of 7AM-3PM, M-F (201)998-8226 for appt. KEARNY 2 bedrooms, airy 1st floor, newly decorated, washer/dryer hook-up. Garfield school area $1150/month plus utilities. 1-1/2 months security. 1 year lease. No pets. No smoking. (917)232-1642 KEARNY 2nd floor, kitchen/LR combo. 2 bedrooms. HT/HW/Electricity included. 1-1/2 months security. $1100/month (201)832-0303 KEARNY 2nd Floor, 2 family House, 2 bedroom 1 bath, LV DR. Kitchen. $1200 1-1/2 month Security. 201-991-3223. KEARNY 3 bedrooms, 1st floor, Parking for one car. No pets allowed. $1250/month Available September 1st. (201)618-1791 after 6pm. KEARNY 3 bedrooms, LR, Kitchen. Central AC. Hardwood Floors. Separate utilities. 1-1/2 months security. Parking optional. (973)380-9007. KEARNY 3 LG ROOMS (ONE BEDROOM) AT BELGROVE APTS. $935 INCLUDING HEAT/HOT WATER. LAUNDRY ROOM. NO PETS. (973)493-7868 KEARNY Small Studo $700/month Ht/Hw included 1 1/2 month security. Call Super between 11am-8pm (201)998-9006.

KEARNY 355 Kearny Ave. 1 bedroom, in Basement, $700/m. HT/HW included also 1 Bedroom apartment $850. (201)283-4591 (973)465-0166 KEARNY 4 rooms, 2 bedrooms, good location. 2nd floor. 6 family house. $1100/month plus 1-1/2 months security deposit. Refrigerator and stove included. Laundry hook-up available at additional cost. No pets allowed. w/w carpet. Available. For additional information and showing please call (201)998-2615 KEARNY Apartment for rent, Studio Apartment with a basement for storage in nice location, heat and hot water included, available immediately, $780.00/per month rent, 1 1/2 month security. No pets. If interested, please call Joanne 973-699-3146. KEARNY Apt. 2nd Floor. 3 BR + Large closets, L/R. Modern kitchen and Bath. Hardwood Floors, Central A/C. $1400 + Utilities and 1 month security. Close to transportation & Schools. No pets. Must see Available 9/1. Call 201-991-6968. KEARNY Arlington area. 5 rooms, 1 bath 1-1/2 months security. $1200 + utilities. No pets. (201)213-1871

KEARNY Newly renovated, hardwood floors. Laundry onsite.HT/HW included. 2 BR start at $985. 1 BR start at $825. Jr.1 BR start at $750. (201)289-7096

HARRISON 3 Family home, 3 bedrooms, LR, Bathroom, Kitchen. 1st floor.1 mth deposit. 973-482-9450 HARRISON Available Sept. 1st. 5 Rms., 2 BDRM Apt, on Cross St., Off-St. Parking for 1 car. C/A, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups in laundry room. Newer Home 1st floor completely refinished. Fresh Paint thru-out, new Spanish tile kitchen floor, hardwood floors re-finished. No Pets. Rent $1350/month + utilities +1-1/2 month security. Call 973-485-1295. HARRISON 1 bedroom apt. Available Sept.1st., Near Transportation. Rent $850/Month + Utilities & 1 1/5 Month Security. No Pets. Call 973-483-5678. HARRISON 2 & 3 bedroom apts. Harrison Ave., Walking distance to Path. Available September 1st. 973-714-2368. HARRISON 2 bedrooms, DR, LR. Apt. on quiet street near public transportation and park. Utilities separate. $1250/mo (973)801-0603 HARRISON 2 bedrooms, LR, DR, EIK, $1050/month. 1-1/2 months security. No Pets. Separate utilities. (973)380-9007 HARRISON 2 to 4 bedroom beautiful apartments for rent. Available Aug/Sept 1st. Text or call. 201-268-2925 HARRISON 2nd floor 1 bedroom apartment. No pets. 1-1/2 months security. Available now. (201)998-3722 (201)991-8453, day. HARRISON 3 bedroom, new carpets, refrigerator, stove, supply own utilities. Good for students. Phone 201-667-3092. HARRISON 3rd floor, 1 bedroom, heat supplied. No pets. No smoking. Close to PATH. 1 month security. $900/month. Available September 1st. (973)484-9694 HARRISON 3rd floor. 2 bedrooms. LR, Kitchen, balcony, laundry. Street parking. $1100/month Separate utilities. 1 month security. No pets. (973)673-1111

HARRISON 4 room apt, near PATH, C/A,. Utilities not included, 1 month security. Available September 1st (973)563-9894 (973)428-0252. HARRISON 4 rooms, 1st floor. No pets. Smoke free. $980+ Utilities. 1 1/2 months security. References required. (973)482-9786 HARRISON 5 Large Rooms. Furnished. $1150 + Utilities. Near PATH & NJIT Shuttle. (973)484-7271 (973)485-2300 HARRISON Brand New Apt. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, Available Now. No Pets. (646)675-5113 HARRISON Cross St. 3rd floor. Modern 3 bedroom w/fridge. Parking available. Available August 15th. No smoking. No pets. 1-1/2 months security. Walk to PATH. Call Susy (973)615-3765 HARRISON Large 3rd floor apt., large bedroom, LR, DR, kitchen, bathroom, large walk-in closet. $1000/month 1-1/2 months security. Separate utilities. No pets/smoking. Available now. (862)371-9418 HARRISON Modern 1 bedroom apt. Private entrance, quiet and clean. Includes refrigerator. No pets. $750 plus utilities. Security & lease (862)223-9974 HARRISON Modern 1 Bedroom, 1st floor Close to Path, off street parking available $975 monthly, Furnished. (973)481-3996 HARRISON Newer 3 bedrooms, LR/DR/EIK, 1 parking, A/C. Clean, Sunny. Walk to Path, Park, School. Available now. (917)306-8181 Zhang. HARRISON 1 bedroom apt on ground floor of newer home, close to PATH. L/R, small kitchen w/stove & refrigerator, air cond., ceiling fans & new carpeting. Available September 1st. Rent $775 Utilities Seperate plus 1-1/2 months security. Non Smoker, No laundry hook-up/No pets. Call (973)482-2628 leave message.

KEARNY AVE. Office/ Store for rent. Single Room office with half bath. Heat included, $950 per month. One month security required. Available as of September 1st. Call (973)477-0797 or (973)479-9979. Office or Store Space for Rent on 746 Kearny Avenue. Call (973)334-4202 (973)723-7494 Office Space fully furnished - single room office, Heat, A/C & Electricity included. Close to Path. $350 per month. Other larger offices Available. Build to suit 2,000 SQ./FT. Available. (973) 481-3996

SPACE FOR RENT

Commercial Space for small business, medical office, attorney office or other small business. 564 Union Ave. 1750sq.ft.(5 offices, kitchen, reception & waiting area) Call (973)202-8580

CONDO FOR RENT

KEARNYArlington Section. 2 bedrooms, laundry, EIK, LR. $1300/month 2 months security. Separate utilities. Available Now. (201)240-6513

To place a classified ad, please call

201.991.1600 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

To place an ad call: 201-991-1600 classified@theobserver.com

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

POLICY

KEARNY

KEARNY 3r d floor. 3 bedrooms. One month security. No pets. Call after 5:00pm (201)736-6264 (201)955-2857 KEARNY Apartment on Ivy Street. 1st floor. 2 bedrooms, EIK, LR, laundry. HT included. $1200 + one month security. Available September 1st. (551)200-2363 KEARNY BETWEEN SUSSEX ST. & KEARNY AVE. 2 BEDROOMS. LR, DR, KITCHEN. NO PETS. AVAILABLE NOW. CALL 973-477-4797. KEARNY 1 Bedroom Apartment on Liberty Street. Hard-wood floor. HT/HW Included. $900 Rent Plus 1 month Security. No Pets. For More Information Call (201)306-2994 KEARNY 1st floor 5 rooms, 2 bedrooms, washer/dryer hook-up. 1-1/2 Month Security. Utilities not included, No Pets. Available September 1st. (973)670-5726 KEARNY 2 & 3 bedroom apts., completely renovated. Central air/heat. Close to school & transportation Parking available. (973)634-5485

There are

NO REFUNDS or CHANGES with CLASSIFIED ADS Please note there will be a

$10.00

PROCESSING FEE if changes need to be made for running specials

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

There will be a $10.00 processing fee when Cancelling an ad before it is published for the first time. • $10 processing fee if changes need to be made for running specials

KEARNY Arlington Section. 1 bedroom $800 + security, Heat & Hot water included. (908)696-1866

KEARNY Brand new Two Family House. 1st or 2nd floor available. 3 bedrooms, LR, kitchen, central AC/HT. Basement storage. Washer/dryer hook-up. Off-street parking. Yard. $1675/month + utilities. Available Immed. Close to NYC transportation. Good credit required. Call between the hrs. of 6AM-3PM, M-F (201)998-8226 for appt. KEARNY EXTRA LARGE APT. 4 BEDROOMS. IDEAL FOR LARGE FAMILY $1650/MONTH SHOWING BY APPTS. (732)602-4043 (201)674-1473

BELLEVILLE BELLEVILLE Updated 2nd floor Apartment. 2 Bedrooms, Kitchen, LR, DR, Plus Extra Room with Many Posibilities. (973)986-7848 If No Answer Leave Message, We speak Spanish.

BELLEVILLE 1 bedroom apartment located in nice area. Heat and Hot Water included, 1 parking space and Laundry facilities on site. $925 per month 1-1/2 months security, No pets. Available Now August 1st, If interested please call Joanne (973)699-3146. BELLEVILLE 3 Bedrooms. 3rd floor. and 1 bedroom on 2nd Fl. Available. No pets. Call Mike 9am-6pm (201)994-5056 or (201)991-9857 BELLEVILLE 360 Washington Ave. 1 bedroom, LR, kitchen. HT/HW, refrigerator and stove included. Parking, laundry, AC wall unit. (973)932-6848 (732)493-1165 BELLEVILLE Ground floor, 1 bedroom, all utillities included. One block to Clara Maass. $1000/month. No pets. No smoking. (973)450-0767

THREE & FOUR WEEKS

SPECIAL MUST RUN

CONSECUTIVELY HARRISON HARRISON 3rd Floor, 2 1/2 bedrooms. Newly Renovated. Kitchen, L/R, bath. Available September 1st. $1250/mth +utilities. Close to transportation. 1 1/2 months security (201)491-4174 (973)202-9195

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

www.theobserver.com

The Observer is not responsible for typographical errors. Credit for errors will not be granted after the next week’s publication. No changes or refunds. Deadline for classifieds is Monday by 4:00 PM.

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

HARRISON- 1st Floor Apt. 2 bedrooms, LV, Kitchen. No. Pets. $950 + Utilities. 1-1/2/Month Security Deposit. Available Sept. 15th. 973-585-4113.

N.ARLINGTON Recently renovated spacious 2nd floor apartment in 2 family home. Close to shops and transportation to NYC. 2-1/2 bedrooms, LR, DR w/hardwood floors, EIK. On site parking. Available immediately $1400/month plus utilities. (732)561-7474 N.ARLINGTON Three large modern rooms, one bedroom. 2nd floor. Hardwood floors. Tile kitchen, Laundry facilities. HT/HW supplied. Close to NY trans. No dogs. (973)714-2368 N.ARLINGTON 4 Rooms. 2 bedroom. HT/HW Included. $1100/month 1-1/2 Months Security. Available September 1st. (201)998-1663

HARRISON- 5 large rooms, newer house, 2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, Kitchen Appliances, central Air/Heat. Smoke-Free Environment. No Pets. Plenty of parking. 1-1/2 mo. security. Available August.1st. (973)481-1721.

LYNDHURST

LYNDHURST 3 bedroom Apt Large LV, EIK, 1 bath . $1350/month + utilities. Available Sept. 1st. 602-604 New Jersey Ave, Lyndhurst. LYNDHURST 3 room apt. HT/HW supplied. No smoking. No pets. $1000/month. 1 month security. Available Now. (201)933-3676

N. ARLINGTON

N.ARLINGTON Studio Apt. For 1 person. Heat and Hot water Supplied. No pets. 1-1/2 months security. $600/month. (201)401-0488. N.ARLINGTON New 2 bedroom apartment. $1200 plus utilities & security. Central Air/Heat 1 parking space. Also Recently Renovated 3 bedroom apt. $1300 + Utilities. Central Air/Heat. 1 parking space. Available Sept. 1st. (201)966-8094

NUTLEY

NUTLEY Large 1 Bedroom apartment, EIK, large LR. 2nd Floor, private house $950 + Utilities. No pets. Call Steve (201)341-7825

NORTH NEWARK

N. Newark Belleville Line 3 1/2 rooms, 2nd Fl. of 2 family house. Freshly painted. Tile Floor in Kitchen. Hardwood Floors and bright rooms. Rent $900/Month + Utilities and 1 month security. No pets. Call 201-874-5972. N.NEWARK Large 3 bedroom apt, completely renovated w/new kitchen & new bath. Section 8 accepted. Available Immediately. Call (973)202-8580 Super (973)925-3812

www.theobserver.com PAVING

PAVING

JAG PAVING CORP.

Commercial & Residential Driveways Parking Lots • Belgian Blocks • Sidewalks • Steps • Pavers • Retaining Walls • All asphalt work Lic By NJ, Member of BBB *Fully Insured * Free Estimates

www.jagpaving.com LORENA (201)991-4165 Cell:(201)401-4525 Kearny Fax:(201)997-5783

MASONRY

MASONRY

ALL CONCRETE WORK

SIDEWALKS, PATIOS, DRIVEWAYS, RETAINING WALLS, STEPS

BRICK PAVER DESIGNS SANTOS CONSTRUCTION CO. FREE ESTIMATES. Family Owned For Over 30 Years Fully Insured and Licensed Call Our Office: 973-589-2712

“LET US SHOW YOU OUR WORK”

CLASSIFIEDS ROOM FOR RENT

667 Chase Ave., Lyndhurst. $600 each room, 2 rooms for rent on 1st floor. Good condition. No pets. More information call (201)667-5920 or (201)933-4758.

BELLEVILLE For 1 person ONLY Furnished 1 large room for rent. $500/month. Everything included. No Pets. No Smoking. We speak spanish/english. Available now. (201)852-8216 BELLEVILLE Nice area. Room for rent. $400. 1 month security. Call after 4:00pm (973)336-5335 (862)215-9440 Belleville Room for rent. Share bathroom. Utilities included. 1-1/2 months security. No kitchen. No pets. No smoking. (973)759-7077 HARRISON room for rent. $450/month. Internet, cable and utilities included. (973)525-3860 KEARNY Studio/Room in Kearny with Private Entrance. $600 all utilities included. Close to transportation. Call 973-981-3826. KEARNY Furnished Room. close to transportation. For One Person, No Smoking. References and Security required. Utilities, Cable & Internet included $500. 201-428-8558. KEARNY Private Room with Private Bathroom for rent. Good for one person. No Smoking/Drinking. Internet and satellite included. Call (201)283-4601 KEARNY Room for rent. No cooking. No smoking. Hablamos español. (201)212-1837 (201)424-7465

FURNISHED ROOM

EMPLOYMENT CDL Drivers A/B Call Today Start Tomorrow, Great Pay & Benefits. (201)991-1586 Driver Part time Class A Hazmat Lic 1-2 days a week Retirees Welcome Call Mike @ 201-939-1644 Help Wanted Sales Representative, bi-lingual a must. Must be Motivated & Outgoing. 701 Main St. Belleville, NJ, 07109. Learn production, tubular heating elements. Strong, mechanical with basic electrical knowledge. Experienced heliarc welding a plus. Near Penn Station Nwk, Ironbound. Call (973)589-4876 Now Hiring! Property inspectors FT/PT in your area. Full, free training provided. msangelabove@ comcast.net (732)766-4425 ask for Mel

Pediatric Office in Kearny seeking a part-time medical assistant Experience a must, Spanish speaking a plus. Please fax resume to 201-998-0021.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Full Liquor License for sale, restaurant. Kearny only. (201)991-5122 (201)803-2086

ROOFING

G & R Builders

All Roofing & Siding. Also Repairs. Work guaranteed. Lic.#13VH02536200 Free Estimates 20% Senior Citizen Discounts (201)893-0656

Belleville furnished room for rent. One month security. Call (973)450-9457 after 5:00pm. Se Habla Español/Ingles.

SERVICES OFFERED

SERVICES OFFERED

Cut Your Mortgage In Half Maintain Your Current LifeStyle (201)805-4999 Free Call

ROOFING

N&J REMODELERS

Roofing + Siding Specialist. Windows,

Doors, Decks, Kitchen/ Baths. Complete Home Renovation. Quality workmanship. All work guaranteed. Free Estimate. Fully Insured Nick (201)997-7657

• New + Re-roofing • Slate Repairs • Gutters Cleaned • Flat Roofing • Also Do Painting Free Estimates Fully Insured

(201)998-5153

HANDYMAN DO IT ALL

Interior/Exterior new & repairs. All types of Carpentry.Reasonable rates,quality work, reliable, experienced. 13VH06620900

(201)991-3223

LANDSCAPING ANDRIELLO LANDSCAPE

HOME IMPROVEMENT

COMPUTER SERVICES

A1 Affordable Rubbish Removal Attics, Basements, Yard Cleaning. We Haul or you Can Rent 10-15 Cubic Yard Containers. We Accept Visa/Mastercard (201)998-1262

FM Property Home Repairs & Improvements

J. M. Electronics Computer Repair *Free Computer Check-up *We Buy & Sell Computers *TV Repair LCD & Plasma

ANDRIELLO CLEANOUTS

Yards, Garages, Basements, Attics, Real Estate, Rubbish Removal/Demolition Lic.13VH04443200

(201)874-1577

ARMIN CLEANOUTS

Rubbish removal garages, Basements, Attics, Demolition Weʼll match any price

(973)460-2963

CLEANING SERVICES Annieʼs Cleaning Service Homes, offices. Move in-out cleaning. Gift Certificates Avail. Excellent references 973-667-6739 862-210-0681

MARIO ESPOSITO

Couple from Poland

LANDSCAPING LLC Spring Clean-ups Lawn maintenance Top Soil • Mulch Free Estimates (201)438-3991

SERVICES OFFERED I&C Cleaning Services. Weʼll Clean it all for you. Residential & Commercial Free Estimates. 201-772-9597 201-772-9593

PERSONALS

To place an ad call: 201-991-1600 classified@theobserver.com

RUBBISH REMOVAL

• Construction •Design • Maint./Clean Ups • Shrub Trimming • Grass Cutting Lic.13VH04443200

(201)939-7308

27

Will clean houses, apartment, offices. References

201-997-4932 leave message

WANTED TO BUY

Estates Bought & Sold Fine Furniture Antiques, Accessories, Gold & Silver.

Cash Paid (201)920-8875 HOME IMPROVEMENT

• Kitchens • Bathrooms • Doors • Floors • Windows • Painting • Decks All types of repairs Lic. # 13VH05674000

Fully Insured

201-428-7160

www.repairsbyfm.com fred@repairsbyfm.com

G & R Builders

Roofing, Siding, Windows/Doors Decks, Painting, Tiles & Masonry, Sheet Rock All types of Carpentry Lic.#13VH02536200 Free Estimates 20% Senior Citizen Discounts

(201)893-0656

CONSTRUCTION

Angel Martinez Construccion LLC Chimney Specialist • Relining • Chimney Caps • Leaks • Water Proofing • Dampers • Cleanings • Flashings All types of Masonry: Chimneys • Rebuild • Repairs • Stucco Roofing, Siding & Steps: New and Repairs Gutters Service Fully Ins. and License (201)952-0076

GUTTERS D. FITZGERALD Seamless Gutters Installed. Gutters Cleaned We-R- Also Dennieʼs Painting & Roofing Slate Roofs repaired. 1(800)479-3262

All inside or outside repairs. Windows, painting, sheetrock, carpentry, masonry, and decks. No job too big or small. Free estimates. Tom (201)424-5042

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

EMERALD ELECTRIC

25 years experience • All types of electrical wiring • 24 hour emergency service. Free estimate 10% off with ad Lic.# 11909 El. Insp.#7566

(201)955-2678

PAINTING & DECORATING ALEXANDER PAINTING, DECORATING Sheet rock/drywall. Skim coat, tape & spackle Water damage. Wallpaper remove. 15+years of experience. Free Estimates. (973)985-6644

AN AMERICAN PAINTER

Exterior & Interior Powerwashing & Housecleaning Decks & Siding Refinished FREE Estimates! Senior Discounts! William J. McGuire (201)955-2520

ANDREAS PAINTING Professional House Painter 165 Interior & Exterior Printing-Plastering-Taping Free Estimates (201)997-0706 Speak slow on answer machine please

CHRIS PAINTING Interior & Exterior Spray Aluminum siding • Sheetrock • Water damages • Lead safe. Fully Insured! (201)896-0292 SAL POLIZZOTTO

Painting, Decorating interior, exterior, Paper Hanging, ceiling. Full Installation, General Repairs. Over 14 years experience. FREE ESTIMATE

(201)939-8781

PLUMBING

Handyman Star

Woman is looking for a man for a serious relationship. Ages from 60-65. Divorced or single. If Interested write to P.O. BOX 317 Kearny, N.J. 07032.

502 Kearny Ave. Kearny, NJ 07032 Call Jeff for more information at (201)486-2057

JOSEPH V. FERRIERO

Plumbing & Heating Kitchen and bath remodeling. Carpentry. Fully Ins. Free Est. Lic# 165 (201)637-1775

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Some ads may be misleading, We ask all readers to use their good judgment when responding to these type of ads in which they ask you for a fee.


28

THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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The Observer is not responsible for typographical errors. Credit for errors will not be granted after the next week’s publication. No changes or refunds. Deadline for classifieds is Monday by 4:00 PM.

PLUMBING

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ELECTRICAL SERVICES

25 years experience Twin Electric Quality Work. Good affordable prices. Senior discounts. Fully Insured. Bonded. Lic. 16158 (973)715-4150 (201)562-5985

MOVING SALE

Moving Sale 704 Bergen St. Every Sat/Sun First 3 weeks in August 9am-6pm. Furniture, Clothing, Appliances & more.

GARAGE & YARD SALE

Big Yard Sale. Tools, plumbing, furniture, toys, books, towels, dishes, kitchen table, handbags & chairs and much more. 100 Bergen Ave., Kearny. 201-997-6222 Fri 8/16 4pm to & Sun. 8/25. 5pm-

Garage Sale 92 Bergen Ave. Kearny. Sat 8/17- Sun 8/18. 9am-4pm. Lots of Items. Furniture, baby items, electronics, good clothes, toys, video games and much more! Garage Sale 468 Passaic Avenue, Kearny. 8/17-8/18 9am-5pm. Various household items, childrenʼs items, clothing, shoes, and china. Garage sale. Household goods, tools, crafts, gardening equipment, furniture. 40 Noel Drive, N.Arlington 8/16-8/17 9am-3pm Huge Yard Sale 221 Quincy Ave. Kearny. Saturday 8/17. from 9am-5pm. Funiture, Clothes, Bikes, tools, too much to mention. Rain Date 8/24. Yard Sale Moving Out of State August 17/24/31 From 10am to 4pm. 407 Forest St. Kearny. Variety of items.

AUTOMOBILES WANTED

J & F TOWING CA$H 4 JUNK

CAR$ $200-$500 PAID ON THE SPOT. FREE TOWING 201-428-0441 ANY CAR, VAN OR TRUCK. NO TITLE, NO KEYS, NO PROBLEM. AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE

Car for Sale 2006 Hyundai Elantra, Beige, 81,000 miles, Good Condition. $5,000 negotiable. For info call 551-697-6002. .

ITEM FOR SALE

Bridgestone tires - Had dealer install Vogue W/W Tires on my new 2013 Cadillac XTS as an option. Have for sale new factory equipped potenza RE 97as high performance all-season B/W for this car. Size 245/40/R-20. Price 4 tires $450. Call 973-485-1295. “DJ Equipment” 1 amp Peavey, 5 Disc C.D. Player w/ 2 Large Speakers, and Stands. Also M.S.A. Classic 10 string steel guitar, $1500 or B.O. 201-954-4287 Dennie.

CLASSIFIEDS 25

To place an ad call: 201-991-1600 classified@theobserver.com

Irvington, passed away suddenly on July 14. She was 65. Born in Passaic, she was a lifelong Chapel Mausoleum, North Arlington. resident of Irvington. Arlene was a Contributions in memory of Dougschool crossing guard for the Townlas may be made to a charity of your ship of Irvington for 24 years. choice. Predeceased by her husband, Earl (2006), Arlene is survived by her lovEugene J. Przebieglec ing children, Kathleen Neal, Robert, Eugene “Gene” J. Przebieglec, 85, Patrick and Dennis Sprague and two died Aug. 5 at his home in North grandchildren. Arlington. Funeral services were under the Born in North Arlington he was a Daniel G. Sierchio direction of the Mulligan Funeral lifelong resident. Daniel G. Sierchio, 79, passed away Home, 331 Cleveland Ave., Harrison. He worked as a meter technion Aug. 6. For information or to send condocian for the Western Electric Co. in He was the husband of the late lences to the family please visit mulKearny for 30 years before retiring Eileen Sierchio and father of the late liganfuneralhome.org. 23 years ago. He was an amateur Veronica and Renee Sierchio. At the request of the family, an radio operator using the call sign He is survived by daughters Karen expression of sympathy may be made “WB2ZMU.” Sierchio and Dana Sierchio Conrow, to: American Heart Association, P.O. He served in the U.S. Air Force four grandchildren Danielle, Jennifer, Box 417005, Boston, Mass. 02241-7005 during the Korean War. He was a Jessica, Daniel and 12 great-grandin loving memory of Arlene. member of the American Legion Post children. 139 in Lyndhurst, Queen of Peace Son of Jenny Mayo and the late Thomas Vacca Knights of Columbus Council 3428 Jerry Sierchio, he was brother to Thomas Vacca of North Arlington, and Peter B. O’Connor 4th Degree Maryann, Philomena, Patrick. Nicho- formerly of Kearny, died suddenly on Assembly, Senior Harmony Club, las, Christine, and the late Geraldine. Aug. 9 at home. He was 50. Senior Activity and Nutrition Center, Born and raised in Newark, he lived Arrangements were by the Armitall of North Arlington; Holy Name in Kearny for 38 years. He enjoyed age and Wiggins Funeral Home, 596 Society of Mt. Carmel Church and hunting, fishing, and the past 10 years Belgrove Dr., Kearny. To leave an Polish American Citizens Club, both metal detecting and working in his online condolence please visit www. in Lyndhurst; and Telephone Piotomato garden. armitagewiggins.com. neers of America. He served as an MP in the military Tom had been a warehouse manHe was the beloved husband of the and worked at Schiffenhaus in Newager for World Trade Transport. He late Dolores (nee Daniels), the cher- ark until he retired. and his wife ran a Ferret Rescue busiished father of Nancy O’Keefe and A memorial is planned for Sunday ness. her husband Jim of Colonia and Rita Aug. 18, at 1 p.m. at Copestone Ophir Son of Joanne (nee Lourenco) and Przebieglec of Dingmans Ferry, Pa., Lodge #108, 225 Kearny Ave., Kearny. the late James, he is also survived by the adored grandfather of Gregory In lieu of flowers, contributions are his wife Lorri (nee Payne), his daughChelstowski, Kristy Ingram and her suggested to the family to assist for ter Karen and his brothers James and husband Jeffrey, Adam Chelstowski the services. Michael. and his wife Abigail, Austin PrzebieIn lieu of flowers, kindly consider glec and his wife Morgan, the loving Arlene Sprague a donation to the American Heart brother of Alfonse Przebieglec and Arlene Sprague, (nee Grimm) of Association. OBITS from

his wife Helen, the brother in law of Barbara Pryblick and Kathleen Przebieglec and the dear uncle of many nieces and nephews. The funeral was from the Parow Funeral Home, 185 Ridge Rd., North Arlington, on Friday, Aug. 9, with a funeral Mass in St. Michael’s Church, Lyndhurst. Entombment followed in Holy Cross Chapel Mausoleum, North Arlington.

Wee Willies best in division The Wee Willies softball team of Lyndhurst has been crowned 2013 Spring League Champs of the Secaucus Tanner Division, adding to its recent Fall League Championship of 2012. The team did so in stunning fashion by sweeping the #1 seed in the best of three series final. Owner “Willie” Schlessinger was so shocked, he has promised barbecued ribs instead of the usual liverwurst sandwiches for the championship

Standing, from l.: Ace Burke, Bobby Finelli, Wayne Fasano, Wayne (1st championship)Fasano Jr., Andrew Reichers, Lou Barbarelli, George Jessen, Ryan Fasano and Keith Wester. Kneeling, from l.: Tom Corkin, Michael Faulk along with coaches Brielle and Gianna Faulk. Not pictured: Steven Finelli and John Mooney.


THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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HCCC celebrates fine art Hudson County Community College (HCCC) Foundation, Jersey City, announces its art collection now includes over 500 works, permanently installed throughout the public areas of the college’s buildings in Jersey City and Union City. Established in 2006 to coincide with the initiation of the college’s fine arts studies program, the collection includes highly respected paintings, sculptures, photographs, limited edition prints and American craft pottery and ephemera from American artists and emerging and established New

Jersey artists including Arman, Richard Artschwager, Jo Baer and more. “The intention has always been to provide our students and our neighbors in the Hudson County community with opportunities to have their lives enriched by beautiful artwork, and to provide a point of reference and inspiration for everyone, but most especially for our fine arts students,” said HCCC President Dr. Glen Gabert. Individuals, estates, corporations and other organizations have directly donated several pieces for the collection. Mon-

etary donations for art purchases are maximized by matching funds, and donations are given not only for acquiring works of art, but also for special events, and items in kind, such as art books for the college library. Two works produced by HCCC students are also added each year as part of its Heritage Collection, celebrating emerging talent in the community. “I don’t know of any other county or community college that is doing what we’re doing, which is turning all the public areas of the college into an educational art museum,” said

Dr. Andrea Siegel, coordinator of the college’s permanent collection of art. She also noted that there has been a generous amount of community input — from students, faculty, staff and community members — regarding suggestions for acquisitions and placement, and that the college’s facilities department has been extraordinary in installing work. “HCCC Happenings,” the college’s monthly newsletter includes a page that provides information on new acquisitions and exhibits and articles on artists whose works are

included in the collection. The college also hosts a series of “Foundation Art Talk” sessions throughout the year which feature noted artists. The first session of the 2013-2014 series is scheduled for Friday, Oct. 18, 2013 at 11 a.m. with Kimberly Camp, a Camden native and former director of the legendary Barnes Collection. Her paintings and dolls have been shown in more than 100 solo and group exhibitions through the United States. The event will be held in the Follett Room of the college’s Culinary Conference Center.

THEME: BACK TO SCHOOL

Solutions from 8/07/13

ACROSS 1. Group of wives 6. *Requires parental involvement 9. Cyberspace soliloquy 13. Yawning 14. Barley bristle 15. It’s controversial in fight against crime 16. Japanese bed 17. Decompose 18. *Found in art class 19. *Pedagogue 21. *Energy outlet 23. Magic’s infection 24. It often holds 24 25. Tax pro 28. First female Attorney General 30. Breath freshener 35. Two quarters 37. Grannies 39. Top of Lady Liberty 40. Seed covering 41. Virgo’s brightest star 43. “Laughing on the inside” in text message 44. Officially allowed 46. Way, way off 47. Diabolical 48. Doghouse 50. Cupid’s counterpart 52. “The ___” by The Doors 53. Swerve 55. Bovine sound 57. *Junior’s ruler? 60. *Required substance 64. Editor’s insertion mark 65. Tarzan’s mom, e.g. 67. Papal court 68. Like a video game bird 69. *Sophomore’s grade 70. *Class action to find president 71. 100 centavos 72. Baseball Giant and hall-of-famer 73. “The Sun Also _____” DOWN 1. Dagger handle 2. Flu symptom 3. Pro ____ 4. Period 5. Large upright stone 6. Young salmon 7. *Pencil type 8. Bone hollow

9. Highlands hillside 10. It’s often denoted in red 11. Half of binary code 12. Used for styling 15. Trickery 20. 0 and 2, e.g. 22. “C’___ la vie!” 24. Pine, e.g. 25. *Calcium sulfate’s common name 26. Humorous slang for “Paris” 27. Set straight 29. Famous valley 31. This king was a merry old soul 32. Treasure collection 33. Perform in 34. *Not to be left behind 36. Custard dessert

38. Capone’s mark 42. Enophile’s sensory concern 45. Funny business 49. Actor DiCaprio 51. Goal-oriented activity 54. Inspiration for poets and musicians 56. Eyes 57. All there 58. Units of work 59. Infamous Roman Emperor 60. Blowhole 61. Wraths 62. Not naughty 63. Beanery sign 64. Upper limit 66. *Teacher’s apple-giver


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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

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west side of Passaic Ave. which is likely be a “design constraint” for future development there, he said. Still, Tessier said, the town can find some positives in the fact that existing retailers in the area like ShopRite, Applebee’s and Burger King “are doing well. Those are hints of what will work here.” Also, Tessier said, “If you took down certain structures, you could come up with five commercial retail yields for 10 pad sites and five midsize big box retail facilities that would generate 541,000 square feet of commercial/retail – if you took the handcuffs [bulk standard restrictions] off.” Additionally, Tessier said, the town should reconsider its current prohibition on drivethrough uses for such things as fast food places. “I can’t say that would tip the balance but you should discuss it,” he said. “Get a consultant and re-do the plan.” Santos said the town is getting some proposals for “small residential in-fill. The bat factory and Inland Steel sites could have the potential for residential development,” comparable to the new St. George Apartments in neighboring East Newark. As for the drive-thru issue, Santos wasn’t particularly receptive. “If it leads to fast food proliferation, I don’t think that does anybody any good,” he said.

Campers on a mission I

GENERAL COSMETIC & IMPLANT DENTISTRY

05

station. Robert J. Tessier, a proof learning how to better fessional planner with showcase the site for DCA, recommended prospective developers. that the town consider Mayor Alberto Santos making its bulk standard said: “We’ve not had requirements for retail much success, in part, operations less restricdue to the bad economy tive. The plan now calls and, in part, due to for no more than 40,000 environmental issues square feet for singleso we’ve focused on the story retail and a maxiadaptive re-use of existmum of 120,000 square ing buildings.” feet for two-story retail. The plan advises And, Tessier said, setting aside a 46-acre requirements for such shopping center district things as “decorative with retail, banks, movie walls” for parking contheaters, health clubs figurations are “all addand deck parking; an ing costs to prospective 11-acre “overlay district” developers.” within the shopping Envisioning a watercenter district for mixed- front plaza park facing use development of mudflats and industrial artist live/work spaces, scenery in Newark isn’t galleries, night clubs, going to be “a pretty picrestaurants, bars, fitness ture for people sitting on centers, offices; a 28-acre their decks in condos,” area also for “mixedso the town needs to uses,” and a 3-acre be more realistic about residential district off those prospects, Tessier Belgrove Drive and Clark said. Ave. that could include Kearny needs to spur senior housing and/or action on cleaning up assisted living facilities. the “brownfields” (areas Drive-thru uses would of contamination) in be prohibited throughout the area, Tessier said. the area. Despite a memorandum The plan suggests of agreement with some creating a mixed-use property owners to clean district in the Toch up certain sites, “there’s Industrial Park complex been no movement.” including lofts, retail, of- The town also needs to fices and entertainment press the railroad on a uses. It also proposes a right-of-way abandonpassive waterfront park ment situation on one on the west side of Pasproperty where “there saic Ave., along with a is siding going to a dead continuous waterfront track.” He said DCA is walkway; improved peworking with the state destrian crossings across Department of TransporPassaic Ave.; wider tation to try and resolve sidewalks; separation of it. “That could be a big vehicular and truck traf- lift,” he said. fic where feasible; and Then there’s the isa jitney service to and sue of the “flood plain” from the Harrison PATH running through the PASSAIC AVE from

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Queen of Peace High School in North Arlington recently hosted about 240 teens and adult chaperones for Catholic Heart Workcamp, whose mission is serving the neglected, broken-hearted and marginalized in any way needed. This summer, more than 13,000 teens volunteered in CHWC with

50 cities around the U.S. The North Arlington contingent, representing nine parishes from around the country, traveled from as far away as Colorado to volunteer in the areas of Newark, Paterson, Elizabeth and East Orange. The North Arlington camp volunteers scraped, painted, weeded, cleaned, organized,

and cooked a spaghetti dinner at locations such as the Father English Center in Paterson, the Ladies Rest Shelter in Newark, the Elizabeth Coalition to House the Homeless, and the ARC of Essex County. This is the third summer that Queen of Peace High School has opened its doors to Catholic Heart Workcamp.


THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

Borough bond sales draws low interest rate The Borough of North Arlington sold more than $7.63 million in bonds this week, at an extremely competitive 2.75 percent interest rate, which, officials say, will save taxpayers approximately $375,000  in interest costs over the life of the bonds. The bond sale represents a consolidation of outstanding debt, which was approved by the council majority last month. At the time Council President and Finance Committee Chairman Al  Granell said the borough needed to act quickly to take advantage of historically low interest rates and avoid the costs associated with rolling over two temporary notes that are due to expire this month. The $7.63 million bond sale rep-

resents no new borrowing, but merely consolidates existing debt of some 25 different purchase and improvement projects into one low interest, 14 year bond.  “I am extremely pleased by the interest rate we were able to get in the bond market and excited that we can pass along even more savings to the taxpayers than anticipated, said Granell. The council president said besides the savings over the life of the bonds, the borough will be spared the cost of rolling over  temporary notes to finance debt. The good financial news comes on the heels of an A+ e rating of the borough’s finances by Wall Street. Mayor Peter Massa said the favorable interest rate on the bonds demonstrates

the confidence investors have in the borough’s finances. “My administration has worked very hard through some lean recession years to control spending and debt levels and now we are reaping the reward of that management plan,” said Massa. The mayor  said the bond sale allows the borough to  more effectively manage debt in the coming years and limit the impact on taxpayers. Councilman Peter Norcia, who has been assigned to work on a redevelopment plan for the borough with the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission, noted that with the debt plan in place, the borough can move aggressively to market the community and attract developers to town.

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201.991.1600

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Educational Department chair and several members and are then selected on the basis of interest, community service and participation in school activities.  Amaral is president of SAAD, vice president of the class of 2014, is active with the Student Government Association, REACH (Responsible Educated Adolescents Can Help), the Student Board, and ERASE (Ending Racism and Sexism Everywhere.) She is also on the crew and soccer teams. Gonzalez is the Student Government’s recording secretary, a

member of SAAD, Municipal Alliance Junior Representative, Student Board, National Honor Society, Fishing Club and is also on the crew team. GCI offers a “mini college experience” at Douglass College on the campus of the University of Rutgers.  Delegates experience a sample of college life by living in a dorm, eating in a cafeteria, attending lectures and workshops. They learn about career choices from volunteer professional speakers and how to network with other delegates from all over the state. 

Peter J. Scordilis, DC CSCS Charles Mascenik, DC CSCS

Tel: 973.483.3380 Fax: 973.483.3382

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KHS students attend Girls Career Institute Arlington Woman’s Club recently sponsored Kearny High School students Cati Amaral and Tiffany Gonzalez to attend Girls Career Institute at Douglass College, New Brunswick. Girls’ Career Institute is an annual program held at Douglass College and sponsored by the NJSFWC for high school junior girls to explore women’s issues and encourage awareness to contemporary problems.   Prospective delegates are recommended by the Kearny High School Guidance Department and interviewed by the Arlington Woman’s Club

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THE OBSERVER | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013

IF WE CAN’T REACH YOU . . . ! U O Y T R E L A T ’ N WE CA HUDSON COUNTY EMERGENCY ALERT REGISTRATION Register TODAY! Mobile and Home Phone Public Safety Alerts

Register at http://www.hudsoncountynj.org


Aug. 14, 2013 Edition of The Observer