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Pacesetter The magazine of Kettering College of Medical Arts

2006 Commencement Kettering College’s 38th graduating class marks a milestone

Spring/Summer 2006


president’s message

How We Change the World Graduating more students than ever before, Kettering College of Medical Arts celebrated, at its April 29 commencement, accomplishments that will change the world. I think of education that way. You help light a fire in a student. That student learns how to put new knowledge, new skills, and—if we teach well—new compassion into daily practice. And the world itself is new. If that student is from Kettering College, the prospects for the care of the sick and vulnerable improve measurably. That’s why every student’s diploma makes me glad and makes me proud. Commencement is a beginning, a start. And the wonder is

“Blessed with imagination, human beings never shake

that commencements occur again and again. Blessed with imagination, human beings never shake off the desire for something better. For as long as we are healthy, we dwell,

off the desire for something better. For as long as we are

healthy, we dwell in

possibility.”

so to speak, in possibility. So with this new issue—new version—of Pacesetter, we celebrate the success of students who, like our thousands of alumni, have had a dream and have walked in the direction of that dream until it became an accomplishment.

Just now we’re celebrating, too, the imminent windup of construction of the Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences. Within this grand addition to the Southern Boulevard streetscape, labs, classrooms, and offices for faculty will be housed. So will a Learning Resources Center, which combines the medical library, the college library, the computer lab, a production center, and the Academic Support Center. So will a student center and a gem of a little chapel. So will such other facilities as Kettering Medical Center’s Wallace-Kettering Neuroscience Institute. The Boonshoft Center, remember, will also contain possibility. No one knows what ideas will come to birth in the new space—what new way of teaching and learning, what new vision of compassion in health care, what new technique for treating patients. If sensing all this, I realize that I dwell in possibility, I also realize that I dwell in gratitude. It’s a daily wonder to be part of an institution all of you appreciate and love and in your different ways have helped to make.


Pacesetter

the magazine of Kettering College of Medical Arts

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departments 2 Campus Notes

11 Partnerships

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Pacesetter Public Relations Office Kettering College of Medical Arts 3737 Southern Blvd. Kettering, OH 45429 1-800-433-5262 www.kcma.edu pacesetter@kcma.edu

Preview: Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences As the demand for health care education continues to grow, Kettering College looks forward to moving into the new building in time for classes this fall.

On the Cover

Pacesetter is published twice yearly by the public relations office at Kettering College of Medical Arts for the alumni, friends, faculty, staff, and students of Kettering College.

Commencement 2006 The class of 2006 is the largest in Kettering College history.

12 Campus Candids Nursing graduates ANNETTE CABAY (left) and JENNIFER CAMPBELL (right) celebrate their achievement at Kettering College’s 38th commencement.

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features

8 Alumni News 10 Class Notes

S P R I N G / S U M M E R 20 06

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Alumni Weekend 2005 The weekend in pictures

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A Look Back at 1970 EDITOR Mindy Claggett ASSISTANT EDITOR Cheryl Kennison CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Winona Winkler-Wendth, Pam McGinnis DESIGN Summa PHOTOS Lee Ann Yahle, Michael Henry, Mindy Claggett, Kettering College Archives PRINTING Mound Printing Kettering College of Medical Arts is a fully accredited, coeducational college that specializes in health science education. A division of Kettering Medical Center, the College is located on the KMC campus in a suburb of Dayton, Ohio, and is chartered by the Seventh-day Adventist Church. An institution of Christian higher education, Kettering College graduates health care professionals of high character who, in the tradition of the Master Healer, give whole-person care to their patients and generous service to their communities.

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campus notes Comings and goings >> College’s respiratory care program. During the 2005-06 school year, the past two years, during which Carolyn Zangri joined the the Kettering College family saw time he was a clinical instructor College staff as an office assistant for KCMA. Plahtinsky moved to the addition and departure of several faculty and staff members. for the medical sonography and Chattanooga, Tenn. respiratory care programs at the Early in the fall semester, alumna At the end of the summer start of the winter term. Zangri semester, the physician assistant Estella Wetzel joined the nursing came to Kettering College from faculty as an instructor. Wetzel program bids farewell to Scott and the DNA testing facility Orchid earned her associate’s degree in Patti Massey as they begin a new nursing from Kettering College in Biosciences, where she was a partfuture in PA education at the 1999. She then spent four years in time secretary. Manchester, N.H., campus of the the Kettering Medical Massachsetts Center cardiac care unit College of > Respiratory Care Faculty > Medical Sonography Faculty Pharmacy while working on her bachelor’s degree in and Health

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Alisa French

Estella Wetzel

> Nursing Faculty

nursing, which she received from KCMA in 2004. Assistant professor Alisa French joined the respiratory care faculty during the winter semester after serving as a health promotions specialist and respiratory therapist at Children’s Medical Center in Dayton for more than 20 years. She is a 1981 graduate of Kettering

Kelvin Paulsen

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Carolyn Zangri > Office Assistant, RT/MS

Kelvin Paulsen, who earned an associate’s degree in medical sonography from Kettering College in 2004, took over for Amy Plahtinsky on the medical sonography faculty. Paulsen completed his bachelor’s degree this spring. A registered vascular technician, he has worked in the vascular lab at Grandview Medical Center for

Troops to Nurses >> new program connects KCMA to military med techs A new Kettering College program called Troops to Nurses (T2N) is designed to transition military medical technicians into registered nurses. The program has received support throughout the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base community in Dayton, and enthusiasm seems to be high from both the prospective medical technicians and the WPAFB medical leadership. The first group of these experienced technicians joined the Kettering College community in the summer term to complete prerequisite courses. Program nursing classes begin this fall, with a projected graduation of December 2007. For more information, contact Stephanie Butkus (stephanie.butkus@kcma.edu) or Dave Price (david.price@kcma.edu).

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Fran Angerer > Physician Assistant Faculty

Sciences. Scott Massey will be the PA program director, and Patti Massey will assist in the pharmacy program while she completes her doctorate in pharmacology. With the departure of Dr. Mona Sedrak, who is now the new academic coordinator for the PA program at SUNY-Downstate, another Kettering College alum has come on-board to assist in the interim. Fran Angerer, a 1993 Kettering College physician assistant graduate, did a pediatric residency at the Yale PA post-graduate program. After returning to the Dayton area and working in family practice, Angerer pursued a master’s degree in public health at Johns Hopkins. Upon completion of her master’s, she then worked in Albania for three years before returning again to the Dayton area.


campus notes Sciences professor earns community service award Assistant professor Dan Schoun was honored as a 2006 Community Service Award winner at the Kettering Medical Center Network’s annual Excellence for Life banquet in April. Outside the college, Schoun, who teaches math and physics at Kettering College, is making an important impact on the community, particularly among area

HONOR STUDENT COLLECTS READING GLASSES FOR MISSION When Vaughan-Beaven Service Learning Honors Program director Paula Reams sent out the call for donations of reading glasses to distribute during the program’s trip to Belize in May, nursing student Laura Sherrets rose to the challenge. She collected enough money from her classmates in Nursing 120 and from family and friends to purchase 55 pairs of new reading glasses. “I’m over 40, and I know how hard it is to read without glasses,” said Sherrets, who also is a member of the honors program. “I can’t imagine how hard it would be to read without eyesight.”

Physician assistant master’s & human biology programs

youth. For several years, Schoun has served on different levels of the Pathfinders, a Seventh-day Adventist youth group. Last December, he and his group of young people went on a mission trip to Puerto Rico, where they did cement work and visited orphanages. Schoun currently is working on putting the Adventist heritage class online at Kettering College so Pathfinders can receive credit. The Adventist Heritage course is needed for youth to reach different levels of Pathfinders. At the Kettering Seventh-day Adventist Church, Schoun is coordinator of audio-visual equipment, an important responsibility. Truly, Schoun lives his commitment to his faith and community.

Kettering College of Medical Arts now offers two new programs that not only expand the college’s upper-division and graduate-level offerings, but also prepare students for graduate programs such as medical, osteopathic, and dental school. They also provide a solid science foundation for graduate programs in biology. The two programs, a Bachelor of Science in human biology and the Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS), which are already fully subscribed, were accredited by the Ohio Board of Regents this winter and the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools this spring. The human biology track functions as a hard-science “foundation” for the MPAS, which is required for practicing physician assistants. Unlike most pre-medical and pregraduate programs, the College is able to offer students hospital

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experiences not typically available to pre-med students—and access to the anatomy and physiology labs typically not available to students until their first year in medical school. “We believe this combines the best of several academic and professional worlds,” said Dr. Norman Wendth, Dean for Academic Affairs. “We not only have a first-rate faculty to prepare our students for graduate-level coursework, we now have first-rate facilities, as well.” The construction of the new Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences was, in large part, a response to the need for graduatelevel chemistry and biology labs.

learn more>> www.kcma.edu/MPAS Click online to learn more about our new Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies degree program.

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2oo6 Kettering College Commencement

KETTERING COLLEGE GRADUATES ITS LARGEST-EVER CLASS

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president of Kettering Medical

College of Medical Arts conferred

most exemplifies the spirit and

degrees and certificates on a

practice of the College’s mission.

record 216 students at the

This year’s recipient was Laura

school’s 38th annual commence-

Willis, a 20-year nursing veteran

ment ceremonies.

who earned the Bachelor of

N APRIL 29, Kettering

One of the evening’s highlights

Center, the award is given to the Kettering College graduate who

Science in Nursing. Other

was the presentation of the

nominees for the award included

George B. Nelson Award.

Donna Adeogun (respiratory

Named after the founding

care), Lara Algren (medical sonography), David Castle (physician

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^ Nursing bachelor’s graduate Laura Willis was the 2006 Nelson Award winner.

assistant), John

Thorward (health care professional

Pickett (radiolog-

studies). Nominations are made by

ic technology),

the academic department chairs.

Stephen Roller

In a message entitled “Diversity

(nursing), and

Competencies for 21st-Century

Ross Daniel

Health Care Providers,” keynote

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speaker Samuel Betances told of his upbringing in Chicago and his educational journey from the roots of poverty to a Harvard

God’s idea. God does not know how to make a single color because diversity is His idea. He does not know how to value one soul over another. If we’re good enough for God, we’re good enough for each other.” During the conferral of degrees, College President Charles Scriven granted 156 Associate of Science degrees, 39 Bachelor of Science in Health Professions degrees, four Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees, and 21 certificates of completion. Six of the graduating students received special recognition as members of the

(nursing), Julie Gedart (nursing),

Anna May Vaughan-Winton

Theresa Howland (nursing), Ross

Beaven Service Learning Honors

Daniel Thorward (health care

Program. These honors graduates

professional studies) and

were Adrian Crawford (radiolog-

Elizabeth Parks (respiratory care).

ic technology), Rebekah Fair

doctorate. Betances, who spent decades in university teaching, has taught and written on the U.S. Hispanic experience, on church and society, on education reform, and on race and gender issues. “Very often, we live in a society where people look at you and determine what kind of respect you should get based only on how God made you,” he said. “We have to be able to see people through the fact that diversity is

GIVING TO THE ANNUAL FUND IS CHARACTER-BUILDING Kettering graduates are the best out there—we hear that every day. Our Annual Fund plays a great role in making sure that we continue to build the character of health care here in the Miami Valley, across the country, and in hospitals and clinics internationally. Support the Annual Fund through our annual spring phonathon, by sending us your check today, or by contacting us through the enclosed card or through our web site. We’ll be happy to give you a call and fill out the Annual Fund giving forms for you, and we’re always happy to chat. Join... ■ the Pecce People with a gift of $100 or more, ■ the Applegate Society with a gift of $250 or more, or ■ the Rodenberg Circle with a gift of $500 or more. You will be recognized in Pacesetter and included in special events and celebrations during the next year. Along the way, you’ll discover that giving to Kettering College of Medical Arts is a character-building experience. Call or write us today. Contact Winona Wendth at 937-395-8607 or winona.wendth@kcma.edu.

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in the spotlight Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences nearing completion by PAM M C G INNIS

New building to accommodate growing enrollment at Kettering College

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The impressive, eye-catching exterior of the Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences along Southern Boulevard is complete, with the roof in place, the pre-cast concrete/ brick panels caulked, and the glass installed. Richard Haas, vice president of support services at Kettering Medical Center, said the finishing touches are being done. “They are finishing up the drywall and painting and then will begin putting in the trim.” Kettering College of Medical Arts will occupy the ground floor and first floor of the four-story structure. Haas said the majority of the work will be complete in May. “The plan is that faculty will move in in July, and we’ll be ready for students in August.” On the ground

floor will be the student center, classrooms, and a chapel. The first floor will be home to the library, a computer lab, more classrooms, and the medical library.

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“With enrollment

climbing and new programs coming on, the new facility will be completed in the nick of time.” Dr. Charles Scriven, president of Kettering College, expressed excitement and anticipation for

the new facility. “With enrollment climbing and new programs coming on, the new facility will be completed in the nick of time. We’re all excited—and all challenged, even now—by the growing demand for teaching space.” When the planning for the project began several years ago, enrollment at the college was approximately 500 students, Haas said, “so our plans for the structure projected 650 students.” Significant growth recently at the college now has officials looking at enrollment numbers closer to 850 students, so Haas said some changes have been made in the plans. The current Learning Resources Center will become home to the nursing program, and human resources will move from Polen Plaza into trailers,


^ The Learning Resources Center

^ The new chemistry and biology

^ The new science labs will

will gain nearly 3,000 square feet of

labs will be able to accommodate 24

feature a state-of-the-art storage

additional space.

students per class.

and preparation area.

making room for classrooms. Work has begun on the sunken terrace, a quiet area for study or reflection. The fourth floor of the Boonshoft Center will house a portion of the Wallace-Kettering Neuroscience Institute. Rick Mace, vice president of clinical services at Kettering

Medical Center, said the research and development staff (six employees) and the Schizophrenia Imaging Lab will occupy a significant area along with the neuropsychological program and a Flex Surgery room. These areas are used for training and neurosurgical research. “Most of the administration will

also be in the new area,” Mace said, adding that they hope to eventually move the older equipment to the new area to use for research. “I think we’ll be seeing more growth in research and development clinical trials.”

Open up and

say Ah-h-h-h!

When donors see the real results of their

There are still several opportunities

gifts to Kettering College of Medical

for alumni to be a part of Kettering

Arts’ facilities improvement, that’s the

College’s continuous improvement.

first thing we hear: “Ah-h-h-h.”

Give us a call or send a note through

You’re sure to have that reaction, too,

the Web site. We’ll be happy give you

when you see the state-of-the-art

a tour, and we’re sure you’ll also open

equipment in our new Applegate labs,

up and say, “Ah-h-h-h.”

the multi-functional furnishings in our Kettering Student Activities Center, or the hundreds of teaching and learning improvements in our new home in the

And—seeing your name on our donor wall won’t hurt a bit. Contact Winona Wendth at 937-3958607 or winona.wendth@kcma.edu.

Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences.

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alumni news MESSAGE FROM THE ALUMNI PRESIDENT This is a very exciting time to be an active participant in the Kettering College of Medical Arts Alumni Association. As alumni, we are part of a large and growing group of talented and educated women and men. With this year’s historic enrollment of more than 800 students, we are quickly adding to our membership. It is particularly thrilling to see legacy students—second generation students and students whose family are alumni—on campus. I am looking forward to working with all of you. The Alumni Association is undertaking several major projects this year. One is adding to and improving our alumni records. We need updated contact information in order to keep in touch with you. Please take a moment to complete the online update form. If you are in touch with your classmates, please encourage them to update their information. Also, because our alumni represent our alma mater across the state and the country, we are making opportunities for you to get together at events in various areas. Among many plans are alumni refreshment breaks at the hospitals throughout the greater Dayton area and the southwest Ohio region; gatherings on campus to celebrate the college’s expansion; events geared toward our more recent graduates; and an exciting Alumni Weekend you won’t want to miss. Of course, we know not all our alumni are nearby, so we will continue visiting our alumni in both California and Florida and hosting receptions at professional conferences around the country. Connected, involved alumni are essential to the strength and success of Kettering College. We are looking forward to adding your name to the list of alumni who are sharing time and talents to further the mission and vision of our institution. Please call us at the alumni office to explore ways you can get involved. You are a valuable part of Kettering College’s legacy. Thank you for all you do to support and advance Ketering College. Sincerely,

The New College Archives

A call to all alumni o you have old photos, textbooks, event programs, or other college memorabilia from your days at Kettering College of Medical Arts?

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Kettering College’s history and tradition committee is establishing an archive and display area in the new Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences, and we need your help in keeping college memories alive for generations to come. Please take a moment to visit Memory Lane and look through those old boxes in your attic or basement. We are looking for memorabilia from all class years and programs. When you send photos, please indicate names and dates if you know them. When you send other items, please let us know everything about the item you’re sending or donating—stories are wonderful! We look forward to seeing your treasures! For more information or to donate items, please contact Cheryl Kennison, Associate Director of Alumni Programs

Teresa Simmons ’91 President, KCMA Alumni Association

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and Services, at 937-395-8607 or via e-mail at cheryl.kennison@kcma.edu.

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alumni news 1975 grad honored at 2005 Alumni Weekend Sonography, PA programs celebrate milestone anniversaries Alumni Weekend 2005 was a wonderful occasion filled with fellowship and fun. In addition to celebrating the honor classes of Kettering College of Medical Arts, this fall’s alumni weekend also honored two special anniversaries, the 25th anniversary of the sonography program and the 30th anniversary of the physician assistant program. Louie Job (physician assistant ’75) was presented with the Alumnus of the Year award during the alumni banquet at Carillon Historical Park.

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Current and former faculty and staff: Mary Wohlers, Mary Jo Pyle, Margaret Rodenburg, Sherrill Caviness

ALUMNI A S S O C I AT I O N

We want to hear from you! You may notice that something is missing from our alumni section— you! Your classmates want to hear from you, and the Alumni Association needs updated contact information so we can let you know about the exciting things that are happening at Kettering College of Medical Arts. We know

^ Dr. Charles Scriven, Kettering College president; Louie Job ’75, Alumnus of the Year; and Teresa Simmons ’91, Alumni Association president

^ Nivia Varela, Alumni Association student representative; Beverly

you’ll want to be a part of them. Update your information online. Visit www.kcma.edu/Alumni and click on “Update Your Information,” or call us at 937-395-8607.

(Brendel) Cobb ’74

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class notes

___ 1970s

Merle C. Peterson ’71 is administrative director of radiology at Florida Hospital. He and his wife, Peggy, live in Orlando, Fla., and are the proud new grandparents of Zachary. Merle’s e-mail is petersonmp@earthlink.net. Beverly (Brendel) Cobb ’74 received her doctorate in 2004 from Andrews University and is the Dean for Students and Learning at Kettering College. She and her husband, Dan, live in Waynesville, Ohio. Bev’s e-mail is beverly.cobb@kcma.edu. Dennis Johnson ’74 and his wife, Hazel, live in Hong Kong, where Dennis is the director of the cardiopulmonary laboratory at Hong Kong Adventist Hospital. His e-mail is cplab@hkah.org.hk. Mary (Franz) Leschak ’74 and her husband, Stephen, live in Weirsdale, Fla., and have two children, Michelle and Stephen. Mary is retired after working in dietetics for 25 years. Her e-mail is leschaksm@yahoo.com. Margo (Schneider) Miller ’74, ’00 is the technical director of the vascular lab and general lab for Kettering Medical Center and Kettering Medical Center-Sycamore in diagnostic ultrasound. She and her husband, Michael, live in Kettering and have two children, ages 16 and 18. Margo’s e-mail is margo.miller@kmcnetwork.org. Patti (Bieranowski) Middleton ’75 works in the cardiac rehabilitation department at Kettering Medical Center. Patti and her husband, Mark, live in Centerville, Ohio. Daughter Diana is a student at Kettering College. Patti’s e-mail address is middlml@aol.com. Jan (Dunbar) Prettyman ’78 is a physician assistant for the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center in surgery. She and her husband, Gene, live in Centerville, Ohio, and are five-time grandparents.

___ 1980s

Michael Karr ’80 is a physician assistant for Avon Medical Center. He and his wife, Ruthie, live in Frostproof, Fla. J. Robert Franks ’80 is a physician assistant for Cherry Hill Hospital. He lives in Goldsboro, N.C. Doug Eulberg ’81 is a physician assistant for Advanced Heart and Lung Surgeons and the Region 6 representative for the Ohio Association of Physician Assistants. He lives in Beavercreek, Ohio. Benjamin Irwin ’81 is a senior software

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engineer for Electronic Data Systems. He and his wife, Marcia, live in Largo, Fla. Ben’s e-mail is ben@doggiedudes.com. Jeffrey Ochs ’81 ’00 and his wife, Tammy, live in Miamisburg, Ohio. Jeff is a physician assistant in the emergency department at Middletown Regional Hospital. His e-mail is ochs13@aol.com. David Starkey ’81 and Kay (Kinder) Starkey ’80 live in Centerville, Ohio, and have three children. David works at Children’s Medical Center in Dayton. His e-mail is dstar58@sbcglobal.net. Norma (Weber) Allex ’82 is a manager for respiratory care at Mercy Hospital Fairfield in Fairfield, Ohio. She and her husband, Mark, live in Oakwood, Ohio. Rohanna (Edwards) Deal ’89, ’92 and Harold “Dusty” Deal ’90 live in Centerville, Ohio, and have two children. Rohanna is a physician assistant at the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center and serves on an Alumni Association committee. Her e-mail is rohanna80@hotmail.com.

___ 1990s

Betty (Leis) Harman ’91 and her husband, John, are full-time parents to 2-year-old Hanna and 7-year-old Alex. Betty also is a part-time nurse at the Walnut Creek Campus in Dayton. They live in Kettering. Tonya (Studebaker) Perkins ’91 received her bachelor’s degree in nursing in 1997 from Wright State University and is a staff nurse specialist in the nuclear medicine/PET department at Kettering Medical Center. She and her husband, Scott, live in Springboro, Ohio. Tonya’s e-mail is tonya.perkins@kmcnetwork.org. Eric Van Fossen ’92 is a family practice physician assistant at Primecare Physicians in Sidney, Ohio. He is currently in the U.S. Army Reserves 412th Civil Affairs Battalion and served in Afghanistan from January to October 2004. He was awarded the Combat Medical Badge and the Bronze Star Medal with the Valor device. Arcenio Galindo ’93 is a respiratory clinical specialist for the Mayo Clinic Hospital. He and his wife, Addy, live in Cavecreek, Ariz. Arcenio’s e-mail is galindo.arcenio@mayo.edu. Chyane (Strahler) Collins ’99 and Bruce Collins were married Sept. 2, 2005. Chyane obtained her bachelor’s degree in health services administration in 2002 and her M.B.A. in marketing in May 2006. She recently began a new career at Southern State Community College as

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program director of the respiratory care program. Chyane and Bruce live in Washington Court House, Ohio.

___ 2000s

Michelle ’00 and Juan Abreau ’99 live in Bellbrook, Ohio. Michelle works in respiratory care at Kettering Medical Center, and Juan is a nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital. Angela (Ogot) ’00 and Patrick Ngidari ’04 are the proud new parents of Curtis Mwandima, born March 16, 2006. They live in Miamisburg, Ohio. Amy (Berczelly) Glaser ’01 is a physician assistant for the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center in gastroenterology. Amy’s e-mail is amyglaserpa@hotmail.com. Todd Christie ’02 and Angel (Edwards) ’04 live in Centerville, Ohio, and are the proud parents of Emily Marie, born Oct. 29, 2005. Todd is a physician assistant in cardiology at Kettering Medical Center and Kettering Medical Center-Sycamore. Christina Gomer ’02 and her husband, Christopher, live in Vandalia, Ohio. Christina is a physician assistant for the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center in mental health and is pursuing her master’s degree. Christina’s e-mail is christina.gomer@med.va.gov. Deb (Oktavec) Cannon ’03 and her husband, Bryan, are the proud parents of Andrew Joseph, born Dec. 16, 2005. Deb is a physician assistant for the Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Her e-mail is dcoktavecpac@yahoo.com. Pamela (Grisez) Gilkes ’04 is a nurse at Children’s Medical Center in Dayton. She lives in Huber Heights, Ohio. Jeffrey Kriegelstein ’04 and his wife, Ann, are the proud new parents of Meredith Kale, born Dec. 29, 2005. Jeff works at Kettering Medical Center in the radiology department. His e-mail is jak0627@yahoo.com. Lindsay (Evers) Leach ’05 and Jacob Leach were married on Sept. 16, 2005, and live in Cedarville, Ohio. Lindsay works at Kettering Medical Center in the radiology department.

If you would like to have your information included in future Class Notes, be sure to update your information online at www.kcma.edu/Alumni or call 937-395-8607.


partnerships Edith Applegate honored with named laboratory he old “Cox labs,” whose location in a building on the north side of the Kettering Medical Center grounds required Kettering College students to travel across campus for anatomy and physiology instruction, will move to the Boonshoft Center for Medical Sciences this summer. When this move is complete, they will be renamed the Applegate Anatomy and Physiology Laboratories in honor of long-time Kettering College anatomy and physiology professor Edith Applegate.

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________ Applegates celebrated

Applegate, who taught for 27 years and retired from full-time teaching three years ago, continues to represent the College in a variety of venues, from alumni meetings to scholarship campaign activities to College founders’ events. The College presented Edith and her husband Stan, a former Kettering Medical Center employee, with the Winton Beaven Award for Community Service this spring at a Celebration of Education reception

Edith & Stan Applegate > The Award College leadership

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awarded Edith and Stan Applegate the Winton Beaven Award for Community Service at this year’s “Celebration of Education” reception.

> Surprise announcement More than 80 attendees also heard that evening’s special announcement: the old “Cox labs” will be renamed the Applegate Laboratories when they are relocated in the new College facilities.

at Ridgeleigh Terrace. The reception honored scholarship donors and provided an opportunity for them to meet the students whose lives they made easier through their gifts. The Applegate Laboratories include two labs, a preparation area, and a cadaver room and will be installed on the first floor of the Boonshoft Center. The new labs will be approximately 30 percent larger than the “Cox labs” and were designed by science faculty at the College, ensuring an efficient and effective use of space. “We are thrilled about this and truly honored,” Applegate said. ���Much of what I do now would have been impossible without the support of College leadership years ago.” The most recent edition of her anatomy and physiology textbook, The Anatomy and Physiology Learning System—the first sectional anatomy textbook published in the history of the discipline—now includes a supplementary CD and is still a primary text in the course across the English-speaking world.

Make life easy Planned giving is a wonderful way to ensure the advancement of Kettering College of Medical Arts’ mission and vision—and to make life easier for our students through endowed scholarships. A planned gift can make life easier for you, too. Give us a call, and we’ll help you find ways to ensure an income and ensure the future of the Kettering College. We’ll also connect you with others who have learned the joy of giving without the complications many of us think go along with a planned gift. Call Dave McElwee, director of planned and major gifts, at 937-395-8607 or send an e-mail to Dave.McElwee@kmcnetwork.org. Include your interests and questions. We’ll show you how easy and how rewarding it is.

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campus candids S p r i

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Dr. Beverly Cobb, Dean for Students and Learning, chats with Dr. Hyveth Williams, the guest speaker at the winter convocation in January. Dr. Williams is the senior pastor at Campus Hill Seventh-day Adventist Church in Loma Linda, Calif.

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Chaplain Clive Wilson presents Learning Resources Center director Jennilou Grotevant and associate admissions director Becky McDonald with door prizes at February’s faculty and staff retreat. General education students Debora Sianturi and Rhea Abalorio compete in the three-legged race during the annual KCMA Olympics in April.

Zach Morgan (nursing), Brian Page (human biology), and Jonathan Burey (human biology) are engrossed in the “Big Game” during the campus Super Bowl party in February. Juliette Burnham (human biology) and Melissa Van Liempt (nursing) enjoy fruit dipped in the chocolate fountain as the harpist plays in the background during the “KCMA Cares” Valentine’s Day treat.

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PAC E S E T T E R Spring/Summer ’06

Juanita McKeller (physician assistant) shows off her hula hoop skills at the annual KCMA luau this spring.

K E T T E R I N G C O L L E G E O F M E D I C A L A RT S


1970 the class of

Kettering College of Medical Arts has provided its alumni with many valuable experiences throughout the years. In celebrating the class of 1970’s 35th reunion, we are emphasizing life on campus and major events in 1970.

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President Richard Nixon banned cigarette advertisements from television.

The Environmental Protection Agency began operations.

Apollo 13 returned safely to earth following a harrowing mission.

Earth Day was first celebrated.

Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel won Grammy awards for Record, Song and Album of the Year.

Four students were killed at Kent State University during a demonstration against the U.S. invasion of Cambodia.

The Ford Pinto was introduced.

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Construction of the World Trade Center was completed.

The Ziploc bag was created.


Now is the perfect time to

come

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Kettering College of Medical Arts

ALUMNI WEEKEND 2006

This weekend is about our alumni and giving you the opportunity to gather and experience what Kettering College has to offer today. Come tour the Boonshoft Center for Medical Arts, reflect on the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, and celebrate its future. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss it!

Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID Dayton, OH Permit No. 635 3737 Southern Blvd. Kettering, OH 45429

Change Service Requested


Pacesetter-Spring-Summer2006