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KESWICK Lifestyles in Keswick and its environs - February 2018

LIFE

In this issue

At Long Last

Keswick Hunt Club Prepares for Major Renovations

also: going out, overheard, only in keswick, bookworm, travel and much more


Justin H. Wiley

Peter A. Wiley

434.981.5528 justin@wileyproperty.com

434.422.2090 peter@wileyproperty.com

132A East Main Street • Orange, VA 22960

503 Faulconer Drive, Suite 6 • Charlottesville, VA 22903

MLS#571183 • $1,795,000

MLS#558491 • $1,150,000

STAVE MILL FARM – Charming 85 ac property surrounded by large estates in Albemarle County. The stuccoed main house successfully combines the conveniences of a new house with the charm and craftsmanship of an old Virginia manor home. Some of the many high points of this 3 bedroom home include custom woodwork, custom kitchen with Aga and sub-zero fridges, and 50 KW generator. Other features include a 2 bedroom guest cottage, stable, riding arena, board fencing, and equipment barn.

SOUTHERN ALBEMBARLE FARM – A beautiful, medium-sized horse farm or retreat 14 miles from town. The turn-ofthe-century farmhouse is well-sited in the center of 77 acres of fenced pasture and fields, with a beautiful stable, large pond and trails. The farm offers privacy and views and is adjacent to over 1500 acres of protected farmland. A 6-stall center aisle barn with power, hot and cold water, bathroom, tack room, wash stall and shavings storage is positioned near the large outdoor ring.

Justin H. Wiley – 434.981.5528

Peter A. Wiley – 434.422.2090

MLS# 566744 • $550,000

MLS# 549637 • $850,000

MERRYMOUNT –Located in the most desirable area of Somerset, is nestled amongst large estates, with incredible views of both the Blue Ridge, and the Southwest mountains. The 1850’s house is perfectly situated on 5 acres, and could be bought with additional land, if needed. The 3 bedroom house is in need of renovations, but is structurally sound, and could easily be added onto. Much of the surrounding land is in conservation easement, and the view from this property will not change.

ALLEN FARM – A 121 acre parcel with a good mix of hardwoods and native grasses, teaming with wildlife, in the Catterton area of Free Union. This well-priced land offers unsurpassed privacy and good views of Buck Mountain with some Blue Ridge vistas. Multiple building sites and a good farm road already in place. Adjoins hundreds of acres of protected land. Parcel is not under conservation easement.

Justin H. Wiley – 434.981.5528

Peter A. Wiley – 434.422.2090

MLS# 559333 • $525,000

MLS# 550846 • $859,900

PUMPHOUSE ROAD – Small horse property located in the heart of Somerset and the Keswick Hunt. This mostly open and fenced 14.5 acre offering has a 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom house built in the 1940’s. Many recent improvements include a finished basement, 2 renovated bathrooms and remodeled kitchen. Situated at the end of a county road with great privacy. A 4-stall stable with tack room, wash stall & 2 new run-in sheds make this a great horse property.

GRACELAND – A venerable 265-acre tract of farmland superbly located in the Green Springs Historic District with 3,500 feet of road frontage and bordered along the South Anna River. The open and rolling land has a dense wooded buffer surrounding each large field and along the perimeter. The property has several large, usable pastures to the south, and rises to the north forming a bluff above the South Anna River. Many potential building sites and ideal for horses.

Justin H. Wiley – 434.981.5528

Peter A. Wiley – 434.422.2090

W W W .W I L E Y P R O P E R T Y. C O M


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FEBRUARY 2018


Tell it to..keswick .efil kciw life... sek ot ti lleT COLUMNISTS

Send a “Letter :ottodrthe aehEditor” revO ruof oyKeswick ro efiL kLife ciwsor eKyour fo ”rOverheard otidE eht otto: retteL“ a dneS Keswick Life,7PO 492Box 2 AV32, ,kcKeswick, iwseK ,23VA xoB 22947 OP ,efiL kciwseK or email to: keswicklife@gmail.com moc.lCharles iamg@efilkcThacher iwsek :ot liaand me ro wife

Ann moved to Keswick in 2008 from New York, to be near their kids and (now) four grandchildren. He has been an avid fly fisher for over 35 years, traveling extensively, primarily in pursuit of wily trout. Along with two other anglers, Charlie was a founder of the Anglers Club of Charlottesville, which has about 65 august members. He is a member of the Anglers Club of New York and the Paris Fario Club, and writes regularly for the New York Club’s journal and Classic Angling, a British magazine. Also, he has compiled and published a bibliography of angling books. Suzanne Nash, raised in Lynchburg Virginia, graduated from Wake Forest University and immediately moved to Charlottesville, Virginia to pursue all sorts of things, including working in insurance, marketing and television. The mother of two teenagers is currently the manufacturer of a lingerie and swimsuit design company, the director of education at Grace Episcopal Church and enjoys freelance writing and theatre in her free time.

“The education of even a small child, therefore, does not aim at preparing him for school, but for life.” Maria Montessori • Classrooms for children 18 months - grade 8 • Parent-infant classes on Fridays • Comprehensive curriculum at all levels • Individualized, self-paced instruction • Experienced, credentialed faculty

• • • •

9 acre campus Year-round options available Mixed-age classrooms Wide variety of afterschool enrichment & summer programs • Vibrant, active family community • Rolling admissions process

Tony Vanderwarker, raised in New England, spent a couple years at Yale and then served two years in the Peace Corps where he got bitten both by tsetse flies and the writing bug. He went to film school at NYU and made documentaries and a full length film which didn’t sell so he decided to try shorter films and went into advertising. Fifteen years later, he had his own ad agency in Chicago where he did “Be Like Mike” for Gatorade. When his partners bought him out, Tony finally had a chance to write full time. It only took him fifteen more years to finally get a book published. “Who cares?” Tony says, “some writers hit paydirt fast, others take longer. I’m just glad my time has come.” visit www.tonyvanderwarker. com Mary Morony author of the novel Apron Strings is a Charlottesville native and long time resident of Keswick. Raising four children to adulthood and her unique perspective on life has given her lots of food for thought. She now lives on a farm in Orange County with her husband Ralph Morony, three dogs, two guineas and no cat. Check out Mary’s blog at www.marymorony.com. or email to: keswicklife@gmail.com

Send a “Letter to the Editor” of Keswick Life or your Overheard to:

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Keswick Life, PO Box 32, Keswick, VA 22947 or email to: keswicklife@gmail.com

440 Pinnacle Place Charlottesville, VA 22911 MountaintopMontessori.org

Life,your PO Box 32, Keswick, VA 22947Life and our WeKeswick welcome pitches to Keswick Opinion column – it’s bestLife to send them via email, Send a “Letter to the Editor” of Keswick or your Overheard to: to keswicklife@gmail.com. Tell it to keswick life...

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KESWICK Tell it to..keswick .efil kciw life... sek ot ti lleT

Send a “Letter :ottodrthe aehEditor” revO ruof oyKeswick ro efiL kLife ciwsor eKyour fo ”rOverheard otidE eht otto: retteL“ a dneS Keswick Life,7PO 492Box 2 AV32, ,kcKeswick, iwseK ,23VA xoB 22947 OP ,efiL kciwseK or email to: keswicklife@gmail.com moc.liamg@efilkciwsek :ot liame ro

LIFE

IN THISFEBRUARY ISSUE 2018

Lifestyles in Keswick and its environs Letters: Editor, PO Box 32, Keswick, VA 22947 Editor: 434-242-8033 or keswicklife@gmail.com Advertising: 434-249-8900 or ads@keswicklife.com The minds behind Keswick Life:

EDITORIAL

EDITOR/FOUNDER Winkie Motley CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Colin J. Dougherty COLUMNISTS Tony Vanderwarker, Suzanne Nash, Mary Morony CONTRIBUTORS Sam Johnson (What's Cooking) and Charles Thacher (Travel) PROOF READER Staff Assistant

8 ON THE COVER At Long Last

Keswick Hunt Club Plans for Renovations

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

A number of members concerned about the condition

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Colin J. Dougherty Published by a division of Keswick Life PHOTOGRAPHY Mary Kalergis and John Markey (Keswick Scene)

of the 100 year+ Keswick Hunt Club have stepped forward with a plan and initial funding for a major renovation of the club. The Board stressed that a major consideration of the renovation was to retain the history of the building, site and structures. Read all about it on page 8.

ADVERTISING

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Every month we bring you lifestyles in Keswick and its’ environs, from the scoop of a party and horsey happenings to practical advice on making the most of your garden, preserving land and updates from the surroundings! But don’t take our word for it - subscribe and discover, Keswick Life!

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10 KESWICK SCENE 12 ON EXHIBIT Show stopper! Keswick Hunt Club's 2018 Ball was For more than forty years, Sally Mann has made exone for the record books. Co-chairs Kinsey Marable and Susie Matheson wanted to do a “traditional” hunt club ball and they pulled it off elegantly. Pin lights spectacularly strung overhead set the scene. Check out the full photo journal and story on page 10!

Pebble Hill Shop, The Shadwell Store, Wiley Brothers Real Estate Office - Orange, Keswick Hall, Loring Woodriff Real Estate, Keswick Club, Clifton Inn, Montpelier, Somerset Store, Cismont Store, In Vino Veritas, Foods of All Nations, Laurie Holladay Interiors, McLean Faulconer, Monticello, Frank Hardy, Inc., Feast, Middleburg Tack Exchange, Faulconer Hardware, The Eternal Attic, Albemarle Bakery, Palladio, Darden, Roy Wheeler Realty

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LEGAL STUFF

or email to:LIFE keswicklife@gmail.com © 2018 KESWICK All editorial is fully protected by copyKeswick Life, PObeBox 32, Keswick, VA 22947 right and may not reproduced without written consent and explicittopermission editor Life andor publisher. The editor Send a “Letter the Editor”ofofthe Keswick your Overheard to: assumes no responsibility for the information herein and reserves the right to refuse any advertising and/or editorial submission.

perimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Her new show explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Read all about the current show, take a road trip, tell it to Keswick Life!

16 WHAT'S COOKING 20 TRAVEL Sam's open faced chicken sandwich with brioche, and Charlie Thacher beating the winter blues! This month, a sweet onion jam is sure to please a kitchen full of friends and be sure to have a copy of Keswick Life around for, well, entertainment of course! Get step by step instructions for Sam's recipe on page 16!

Keswick Life, PO Box 32, Keswick, VA 22947 or email to: keswicklife@gmail.com

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the southern fishing area of Chile, a rugged country, Coyhaique with a population of about 50,000, and Puerto Aisen with about 17,000, are the only cities in the region. Escape into a handful of tiny villages along the 500-mile stretch of road running north-south, most of which is unpaved. Read the story, write in and tell Keswick Life about your winter time adventures!

FEBRUARY 2018


OVERHEARD

Here and there... in Keswick On and Off The Market “Rougemont Farm”, located off picturesque Route 231 north of Cismont with 419 acres, farm improvements and a 4 bed, 3.5 bath, 4005 sf home built in 1948 has just sold for $5 million. Also closed this month was 1680 Running Deer Road with 4 beds, 3 baths, 2850 sf on 2.3 acres was listed at $349.9k and sold for $326k. 214 Autumn Ridge Drive with 4 beds, 3 baths, 2962 sf on 2.3 acres was listed at $409.9k and sold for $375k. 3392 Darby Drive with 4 beds, 4.5 baths and 3420 sf was listed at $659k and sold for $579.5k. Pending is “Keswick Hill” at 6182 Turkey Sag Road with 3 beds, 4.5 baths, 3335 sf and 25.7 acres listed at $1.27m. In Glenmore 3667 Newbridge Road with 3 beds, 3.5 baths and 3472 sf listed at $825k. 2436 Ferndown Road with 3 beds, 2.5 baths and 3009 sf listed at $652k. 2352 Ferndown Lane with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 3226 sf listed at $529k. 3370 Cotswold Lane with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 2681 sf listed at $519k. 3402 Cesford Grange with 4 beds, 2.5 baths and 3215 sf listed at $525k. 1831 Westerham Street with 5 beds, 4.5 baths and 5066 sf listed at $537.5k. 2131 Farringdon Road with 4 beds, 4.5 baths and 4090 sf listed at $915k. 1506 Bremberton Lane with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 2702 sf at $504.9. 3399 Darby Road with 4 beds, 4.5 baths and 4487 sf listed at $629k. A foreclosure at 2585 Watkins lane with 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 3427 sf on 3.2 acres is under contract, listed at 464.9k New to the market in Glenmore is 2011 Piper Way with 5 beds, 4.5 baths and 4303 sf priced at $825k. 1521 Bremberton Lane with 3 beds, 2 baths and 2086 sf priced at $465k. 3211 Wallingford Lane with 5 beds, 4.5 baths and 3689 sf priced at $569.9k. 1383 Tattersall Court with 5 beds, 4.5 baths and 6619 sf priced at $1.1m. 1539 Kinross Lane with 6 beds, 4.5 baths and 5600 sf priced at $760k and 3511 Wedgewood Court with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 3650 sf priced at $599k. Around the area 4433 Richmond Road with 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 4400 sf and 133 acres is available at $2.5m. 72 Red Maple Lane with 4 beds, 2.5 baths and 2772 sf is available at $398.5k. 777 Club Drive in Keswick Estate with 6 beds, 5 baths, 5079 sf on 1.7 acres is available at $875k. 341 Pelham Drive with 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 4643 sf on 4.1 acres is available at $849k. 843 Campbell Road with 4 beds, 4 baths, 3384 sf on 10 acres is available at $775k.

Spring Forward

Yum - Shadwell's Restaurant

You may want to store up some extra sleep in the next few days because you are about to lose an hour of it. Come March 11 at 2 a.m. most of America will be “springing forward” as daylight saving time kicks in, giving us another hour of sunlight.

Located a mile from the site of Peter Jefferson’s Albemarle County estate, a restaurant takes its name from Shadwell, the birthplace of Thomas Jefferson. The accomplishments of Mr. Jefferson, the third President of the United States, are well known. Perhaps less well known, but of equal importance, is his status as one of America’s original culinarians. Through his travel in Europe, he was able to learn about various cultures and culinary traditions, bringing back this knowledge and using it to cultivate his crops. Combining this fresh produce with local meats and other ingredients, he was able to provide his family and guests with his interpretation of what he was exposed to in France, Italy and beyond. Shadwell’s Restaurant has the same mission. They serve high-quality food and drink in a casual, comfortable, family-friendly atmosphere. They want everyone to feel welcome and comfortable at Shadwell’s, and are excited to have you as their guest. Taking great pride in the reputation as the best restaurant in Charlottesville for authentic, Chesapeake Bay-inspired seafood and local hand cut steaks. They believe Mr. Jefferson’s vision, of always surrounding himself with good conversation, good friends and good times. Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness indeed!

Here’s a look at seven things you may not have known about daylight saving time. 1. “Spring forward and fall back” is an easy way to remember how to set the clock when daylight saving times begins and ends. You set your clock forward one hour at 2 a.m. on March 11. You’ll set it back one hour at 2 a.m. on Nov. 4. 2. In the United States, daylight saving time began on March 21, 1918. U.S. government officials reasoned that fuel could be saved by reducing the need for lighting in the home. 3. Ancient agrarian civilizations used a form of daylight saving time, adjusting their timekeeping depending on the sun’s activity. 4. Many people call it daylight savings time. The official name is daylight saving time. No ‘s’ on ‘saving.’ 5. Benjamin Franklin came up with an idea to reset clocks in the summer months as a way to conserve energy. 6. A standardized system of beginning and ending daylight saving time came in 1966 when the Uniform Time Act became law. While it was a federal act, states were granted the power to decide if they wanted to remain on standard time year-round. 7. Arizona (except for the Navajo, who do observe daylight saving time on tribal lands), Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands do not observe daylight saving time.

Closed Virginia National Bank’s Orange Office, located at 102 East Main Street in Orange, will close permanently at 5 p.m. on Friday, April 13, 2018. Effective February 1, 2018, the Orange office hours were changed to 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Weekdays Only.

Record Setting For the third straight year, a record number of applicants – including the most-ever minority and first-generation college students – have applied for admission to the University of Virginia. Unofficial totals as of Thursday morning showed there were 37,188 applicants, an increase of 1 percent above last year’s record pool. Of those students, 11,739 were minorities, representing a 4 percent rise over last year; and 4,483 were first-generation college applicants, a 10 percent increase from 2017. Applicants’ average SAT scores, class ranks and grade-point averages were also higher than last year’s Applicants’ mean combined scores on the SAT’s math and verbal sections was 1,383, up from 1,337 last year. The Office of Undergraduate Admission is finalizing its early-action decisions and regular application decisions will be released by April 1. All students offered admission will have until May 1 to accept their offers. The enrollment target for the fall’s first-year class is 3,725 students.

Reduced in Glenmore is 2075 Piper Way with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 3792 sf down from $538.9k to $517k. 2242 Waterside Way with 4 beds, 4.4 baths and 4218 sf down from $895k to $850k. 3376 Dunscroft Court with 3 beds, 2.5 baths and 2668 sf down from $511k to $439k. 3575 Turnbridge Lane with 6 beds, 5.5 baths and 6000 sf is down from $789k to $750k. 1488 Perth Court with 4 beds, 3.5 baths and 4829 sf is down from $639k to $539k. In Keswick Estate 1071 Club Drive with 4 beds, 3.5 baths, 3758 sf on 2.15 acres is down from $875k to $825k.

Bravo Gardy Bloemers was second in the CDI Amateur at Global Dressage 5 in Intermediate I class. First time out in International competition! (pictured below)

6

KESWICK LIFE


Going Out Guide The GOING The Going Out Guide OUT Guide The Going Out Guide Mark your calendars! Save the date! Don’t be late! The Going Out Guide The

Mark your calendars! Save the date! Don’t be late!

What: In Pursuit of Truth: An Evening with the National Book Awards

Mark your calendars! Save the date! Don’t be late! Mark your calendars! Save the date! Don’t be late! What:Mark ACCyour Basketball Tournament calendars! Save the date! Don’t be late!

What: In Pursuit of Truth: An Evening with the National Book Where: The Paramount Theater, Charlottesville, VA Awards What: In Pursuit of Truth: An Evening with the National Book When: Saturday, March 24th 8:00PM What: In Pursuit Truth: An Evening with the National Book Awards The Virginia Festival ofofthe Book at returns to The Paramount Theater on March 24, Where: The Paramount Theater, Charlottesville, VA 2018 with their program In 24th Pursuit Truth: An Evening with the National Book When: Saturday, March at of 8:00PM Awards

When: Saturday, March 24th at 8:00PM

When: March 6-10th Where: Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Awards,Saturday, hosted in partnership with National Book Foundation, UVA Arts, and Where: The Paramount Charlottesville, VA When: March Theater, 24th atthe 8:00PM The Virginia Festival ofand the the Book returns to The Paramount TheaterFoundation on March 24, Encyclopedia Virginia Virginia Indian Program at Virginia for Where: The Paramount Theater, Charlottesville, VA

What: ACC Basketball Tournament When: 6-10th What: ACC Basketball Tournament The 2018March ACC Men's Basketball Tournament will be played from March 6 to March 10 Where: Barclays Center in Brooklyn, at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.All gamesN.Y. will be broadcast on either ESPN, ESPN When: 6-10th What: March ACC Basketball Tournament

2 or ESPNU, as well as the ACC Network, the ESPN app and theACC.com. Where: Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. When: March 6-10th . Final bracket will be published after thebelast ACCfrom regular season The 2018 ACCseedings Men's Basketball Tournament will played March 6 togames Marchare 10 Where: Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. played on Saturday, March 3. at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.All games will be broadcast on either ESPN, ESPN The 2018 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament will be played from March 6 to March 10 2 or ESPNU, as well as the ACC Network, the ESPN app and theACC.com. at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.All games will beplayed broadcast onMarch either ESPN The Virginia Cavaliers got be 18 published points from Tywill Jerome as they beat Georgia Tech 65-54 The 2018 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament from 6ESPN, togames March 10 Final bracket seedings will after thebe last ACC regular season are 2at or ESPNU, as well as the ACC Network, the ESPN app and theACC.com. to clinch the ACC regular season title for the third time in five years. The Cavs will be Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y.All games will be broadcast on either ESPN, ESPN played on Saturday, March 3. Final bracket seedings be published after last ACC regular season games are seed as in the conference tournament in Brooklyn. 2the or top ESPNU, wellACC as will the ACC Network, the the ESPN app and theACC.com. played on Saturday, March 3. published after the last ACC regular season games are Final bracket seedings will be The Virginia Cavaliers got 18 points from Ty Jerome as they beat Georgia Tech 65-54 played Saturday, March 3. to clinchonthe ACC regular season title for the third time in five years. The Cavs will be The Virginia Cavaliers got 18 points from Ty Jerome as they beat Georgia Tech 65-54 the top seed in the ACC conference tournament in Brooklyn. What: NCAA Basketball Tournament to clinch the ACC regular title for the time fivebeat years. The Cavs be The Virginia Cavaliers gotseason 18 points from Tythird Jerome asinthey Georgia Techwill 65-54 the top seed in the ACC conference tournament in Brooklyn. When: March 2nd to clinch the ACC 14th-April regular season title for the third time in five years. The Cavs will be the top seed in the ACC conference tournament in Brooklyn. What: NCAA Basketball Tournament The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament will involve 68 teams playing When: March 14th-April 2nd in a single-elimination tournament to determine What: NCAA Basketball Tournamentthe national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It is scheduled... wikipedia.org When: March 14th-April 2nd What: NCAA Basketball Tournament Network: CBS, TNT, TBS,I Men's truTVBasketball Tournament will involve 68 teams playing The 2018 NCAA Division

When: March 14th-April 2nd

in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA The 2018 NCAA Division Men's Basketball Tournament will involve 68 teams playing Selection MarchI 11 Division I Sunday: college basketball. It is scheduled... wikipedia.org in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national men'splaying NCAA First Four: March 13-14 The 2018 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament willchampion involve 68ofteams Network: CBS, TNT, TBS, truTV Division I college basketball. is scheduled... First/Second Rounds: March It 15-18 in a single-elimination tournament to determinewikipedia.org the national champion of men's NCAA Network: CBS, TNT, TBS, truTV Sweet 16:ISunday: March 22-24 Division college basketball. Selection March 11 It is scheduled... wikipedia.org Elite 8: March 24-25 Network: CBS, TNT, TBS, truTV First Four: March 13-14 Selection Sunday: March 11 Final Four: March 31 First/Second Rounds: March 15-18 First Four:Sunday: March 13-14 Championship game: April Selection March Sweet 16: March 22-24 11 2 First/Second Rounds: March 15-18 First March 13-14 Elite Four: 8: March 24-25 Sweet 16: March 22-24 Dayton First/Second Rounds: Final Four: March 31 March 15-18March 13-14 Elite 8:16: March 24-25 First/Second Pittsburgh March 15 & 17 Sweet March 22-24April 2 Championship game: Final Four: March 31 First/Second Wichita March 15 & 17 Elite 8: March 24-25 Championship game: April 2 First/Second Dallas March 15 & 17 Final Four: March 31 Dayton March 13-14 First/Second Boise March 15 17 Championship game: April 2 First/Second Pittsburgh March 15 &&17 Dayton March 16 13-14 First/Second Charlotte March & 18 First/Second Wichita March 15 & 17 First/Second Pittsburgh March First/Second Dallas Detroit March15 16& &17 18 Dayton March 13-14 First/Second March 15 & 17 First/Second Wichita March 15 & 17 First/Second Nashville March 16 & 18 First/Second Pittsburgh March 15 & 17 First/Second Boise March 15 & 17 First/Second March 15 & 17 First/Second Dallas San Diego 16 & 18 First/Second Wichita March 16 15 & 18 17 First/Second Charlotte March First/Second Boise March 15 & 17 Midwest Regional Omaha 23 25 First/Second Dallas March 15 & 17 First/Second Detroit March 16 & 18 First/Second Charlotte March 16 & 18 West Regional Los Angeles 22 24 First/Second Boise March 15 & 17 First/Second Nashville March 16 & 18 First/Second Detroit March 16 & 18 South Regional Charlotte Atlanta March16 22& 24 First/Second March First/Second San Diego March 16 &&18 18 First/Second Nashville March 16 & 18 East Regional Boston March 23 & 25 First/Second Detroit March 16 & 18 Midwest Regional Omaha March 23 & 25 First/Second San Diego March 1631&April 18 2 FinalRegional Four SanAngeles Antonio March16 First/Second Nashville March West Los March 22 & & 18 24 Midwest Regional Omaha March 23 & 25 First/Second Diego March South Regional San Atlanta March 16 22 & & 18 24 West Regional Los Angeles March 22 & 24 Midwest Regional Omaha March East Regional Boston March 23 23 & & 25 25 South Regional Los Atlanta March 22 22 & & 24 24 West Regional March Final FourThe Horse San Angeles Antonio March 31- April 2 What: and the Camera East Regional Boston March 23 & 25 South Regional Atlanta March 22 & 24 Final Four San March Antonio18thMarch March 23 31-&April When: Through East Regional Boston 25 2 Final Four National San Antonio March 31-Middleburg, April 2 Where: Sporting Library, Virginia

What: The Horse and the Camera The Horse andHorse the Camera: From the Judith & Jo Tartt, Jr. Photography Collection When: Through March What: The and 18th the Camera Capturing the horse at rest and in motionMiddleburg, has been an obsession for many since the Where: National Sporting Virginia When: Through March What: The Horse and 18th theLibrary, Camera advent of the camera. From the first frames of a horse at full gallop from Edweard Where: National Sporting Virginia When: Through March 18thLibrary, Muybridge's Animal Locomotion wellMiddleburg, into theTartt, 20th Jr. century, photographers were The Horse and the Camera: From and the Judith & Jo Photography Collection Where: National Sporting Library, Middleburg, Virginia fascinated with the imagery of a horse standing still and the grace and power of Capturing the horse at rest and in motion has been an obsession for many since the

The Horse and the This Camera: From shows the Judith & Jo Tartt, of Jr. Photography Collection equine movement. exhibition a brief andfrom antique equine advent of the camera. From the first frames of timeline a horse at vintage full gallop Edweard Capturing the horse at rest and in motion has been an obsession for many since the photographs from the pinnacle of black-and-white photography on loan from the The Horse and the Camera: From the Judith & Jo Tartt, Jr. Photography Collection Muybridge's Animal Locomotion and well into the 20th century, photographers were advent of the camera. From the first frames of a horse at full gallop from Edweard private collection of Judith and Jo Tartt, Jr. Guests to the NSLM will experience the Capturing the horse at rest and in motion has been an obsession for many since the fascinated with the imagery of a horse standing still and the grace and power of Muybridge's Animal Locomotion and well into the 20th over century, photographers were changes photographic imagery and horsemanship the course of aEdweard century! advent ofinthe camera. the first frames oftimeline a horse at vintage full gallop equine movement. ThisFrom exhibition shows a brief of and from antique equine fascinated with the imagery of a horse standing still and the grace and power of The Horse and thethe Camera: From the Judith &the Jo Tartt, Jr. Photography Collection is Muybridge's Animal Locomotion well into 20th century, photographers photographs from pinnacle ofand black-and-white photography on loan fromwere the equine movement. This exhibition shows a brief timeline of vintage and antique equine made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Akre fascinated with the imagery of a horse standing still and the grace and power of private collection of Judith and Jo Tartt, Jr. Guests to the NSLM will experience the photographs fromThis the exhibition pinnacle of black-and-white photography on antique loan from the equine movement. shows a brief timeline of vintage and equine changes in photographic imagery and687-6542 horsemanship the course of a century! For further information: .Phone: (540) -Email:over info@nationalsporting.org private collection of Judith and Jo Tartt, Jr. Guests to the NSLM will experience the photographs from the pinnacle black-and-white photography on loan from the The Horse and the Camera: Fromofthe Judith & Jo Tartt, Jr. Photography Collection is changes in photographic imagery and horsemanship over the course of a century! private collection of Judith and Jo Tartt, Jr. Guests to the NSLM will experience the made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Akre The Horse the Camera: From the & Jo Tartt,over Jr. Photography Collection is changes in and photographic imagery andJudith horsemanship the course of a century! For further information: .Phone: (540) support 687-6542of-Email: info@nationalsporting.org made possible through the generous Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Akre The Horse and the Camera: From the Judith & Jo Tartt, Jr. Photography Collection is

further information: .Phone: (540) support 687-6542of-Email: 7.For made possible through the generous Mr. & info@nationalsporting.org Mrs. Charles T. Akre

. . .

2018 with their program In Book Pursuit of Truth: An Paramount Evening with the National Book the Humanities. 2017 National Book Awards Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Never The Virginia Festival of the returns tofinalists The Theater on March 24, Awards, hosted in partnership with the National Book Foundation, UVA Arts, and Caught) and David Grann (Killers of the Flower Moon) will join 2017 National Book 2018Virginia with their program In Book Pursuit of Truth: An Paramount Evening with the National Book The Festival of the returns to The Theater on March 24, Encyclopedia Virginia and the Virginia Indian Program at Virginia Foundation for Awards longlisted author Kevin Young (Bunk) in a discussion of the stories and Awards, hosted in partnership with the National Book Foundation, UVA Arts, and 2018 with their program In Pursuit of Truth: An Evening with the National Book the Humanities. 2017 National Awards finalists Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Never facts their books bring to light, the impacts of racism and social inequality in Encyclopedia Virginia and theBook Virginia Program at Virginia Foundation for Awards, hosted in partnership withhidden the Indian National Book Foundation, UVA Arts, and Caught) and David Grann (Killers of the Flower Moon) will join 2017 National Book America that their work speaks to, and ultimately, the pursuit of truthFoundation in their (Never awardthe Humanities. 2017 National Awards finalists Erica Armstrong Dunbar Encyclopedia Virginia and theBook Virginia Indian Program at Virginia for Awards longlisted author Kevin Young (Bunk)Moon) in a discussion of the stories and winning nonfiction. National Book Foundation executive director Lisa Lucas will Caught) and David Grann (Killers of the Flower will join 2017 National Book the Humanities. 2017 National Book Awards finalists Erica Armstrong Dunbar (Never facts their books bring to light, theYoung hidden impacts and social inequality in moderate. Book sales and signing will Phone: 434-979-1333 Awards longlisted author Kevin (Bunk) inofaracism discussion of the storiesBook and Caught) and David Grann (Killers of thefollow Flower Moon) will join 2017 National America that their work speaks to, and ultimately, the pursuit of truth in their awardTickets: $10.00 Student, In Office, Main Street, facts their books bring to$17.50 light, thePerson: hiddenParamount impactsinofaBox racism and215 social in Awards longlisted author Kevin Young (Bunk) discussion ofEast theinequality stories and winning nonfiction. National Book Foundation executive director Lisa Lucas will Charlottesville, VA 22902, Monday-Friday 10AM-2PM America their worktospeaks to, and ultimately, of truth in inequality their awardfacts theirthat books bring light, the hidden impactsthe of pursuit racism and social in moderate. Book salesNational and signing will follow Phone: 434-979-1333 winning nonfiction. Book Foundation executive director Lisa Lucas will America that their work speaks to, and ultimately, the pursuit of truth in their awardTickets: $10.00 Student, $17.50 In Person: Paramount Box Office, 215 East Main Street, moderate. Book salesNational and signing follow Phone: 434-979-1333 winning nonfiction. Bookwill Foundation executive director Lisa Lucas will Charlottesville, VA 22902, Monday-Friday 10AM-2PM Tickets: $10.00 Student, $17.50 In Person: Paramount Box Office, 215 East Main Street, What: Keswick Garden Club Flower Show moderate. Book sales and signing will follow Phone: 434-979-1333 Charlottesville, VA 22902, Monday-Friday 10AM-2PM Tickets: Student, $17.50 In Person: Paramount Box Office, 215 East Main Street, When:$10.00 Wednesday, April 11th from 2:00-5:00pm Charlottesville, VA 22902, Monday-Friday 10AM-2PM Where: Grace Church

What: Keswick Garden Club Flower Show When: April 11th 2:00-5:00pm Open toWednesday, the public Theme is “Art infrom Bloom.” What: Keswick Garden Club Flower Show Where: Grace Church When: April 11th 2:00-5:00pm What: Wednesday, Keswick Garden Clubfrom Flower Show Where: Grace Church When: Wednesday, April 11th from 2:00-5:00pm Open to the public Theme is “Art in Bloom.” Where: Grace Church

What: Historic Garden Week Open to the public Theme is “Art in Bloom.” When: Sunday, Open to the public April Theme22nd is “Art in Bloom.” Where: Keswick environs.

What: Historic Garden Week Visitors Sunday, will travelApril historic roads amid scenic vistas through part of picturesque When: 22nd What: Historic Garden Week Keswick Hunt country, situated in the Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District, Where: Keswick environs. When: Sunday, 22ndWeek What: HistoricApril Garden listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 in recognition of its historical

Where: Keswick environs. When: Sunday, 22nd significance theApril early settlement of Albemarle County. Thepart district contains a Visitors will to travel historic roads amid scenic vistas through of picturesque Where: Keswick environs. broad range ofcountry, 18th and 19th century architectureMountains as well as 20th estates, all Keswick Hunt situated in the Southwest Ruralcentury Historic District, Visitors will travel historic roads amid scenichomes vistas through part picturesque evocative ofNational grand, classically inspired of itsof earlier history. listed on the Register of Historicmanor Places in 1992reflective in recognition of its historical Keswick Hunt country, situated in the Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District, Visitors will willto have accesssettlement to five amid ofofAlbemarle County’s finest private, historic Visitors travel historic roads scenic vistas through part of picturesque significance the early Albemarle County. The district contains a listed on the National Register ofin Historic Places inMountains 1992 in recognition its historical properties, dating to thecentury Jefferson era. .Historic Garden Week inof Keswick Hunt Keswick Hunt thearchitecture Southwest Rural Historic District, broad range of country, 18thback andsituated 19th as well as 20th century estates, all significance to the early settlement of Albemarle County. The district a Country celebrating 85 years ofof tradition listed on the Register Historic Placeshomes in 1992 in recognition of itscontains historical evocative of National grand, classically inspired manor reflective of its earlier history. broad range of 18th and 19th century architecture as well as 20th century estates, all highlighting beautiful historic landmark significance the early settlement AlbemarleCounty’s County. finest The district contains a Visitors willto have access to five of of Albemarle private, historic evocative ofgardens grand, classically inspired manor homes reflective ofcentury its earlier history. homesrange and of Castle Hill, Benbroad of 18thback and architecture as Garden well as 20th estates, all properties, dating to19th the century Jefferson era. .Historic Week in Keswick Hunt Visitors will have access to as fivewell of Albemarle County’s finest private, Coolyn, celebrating East Belmont Farm asmanor homes evocative of grand, classically reflective of its earlier historic history. Country 85 years ofinspired tradition properties, dating back to the Jefferson era. .Historic Garden Week in Keswick Hunt architecturally renowned Visitors willbeautiful have access to Chopping five of Albemarle County’s finest private, historic highlighting historic landmark Country celebrating 85 years of tradition Bottomand Farm. Shuttle tours conducted properties, dating back to the Jefferson homes gardens of Castle Hill, Ben-era. .Historic Garden Week in Keswick Hunt highlighting beautiful landmark Sunday,celebrating April 22, 2018 ofas .Parking, Country 85historic years tradition Coolyn, East Belmont Farm well as homes and gardens ofhistoric Castleavailable Hill, Bentransportation and vendors at highlighting beautiful landmark architecturally renowned Chopping Coolyn, East Belmont Farm as well as Castleand Hill Cidery. For tickets and homes gardens of Castle Hill, BenBottom Farm. Shuttle tours conducted architecturally renowned information please Coolyn, East Belmont Farm Chopping ascontact: well as Sunday, April 22, 2018 .Parking, Bottom Farm. Shuttle tours conducted www.vagardenweek.org . Tour proceeds architecturally renowned Chopping transportation and vendors available at Sunday, April 22,and 2018 .Parking, fund the restoration preservation of Bottom Farm. Shuttle tours conducted Castle Hill Cidery. For tickets and transportation and22, vendors available at Virginia’s April historic public and Sunday, 2018gardens .Parking, information please contact: Castle Hill Cidery. For tickets and landscapes. transportation and vendors available at www.vagardenweek.org . Tour proceeds information please contact: Castle Cidery.and For tickets and fund theHill restoration preservation of www.vagardenweek.org . Tour proceeds information contact: Virginia’s historic please public gardens and fund the restoration and preservation of www.vagardenweek.org . Tour proceeds landscapes. Virginia’s historic public gardens and fund the restoration and preservation of landscapes. Virginia’s historic public gardens and

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7 FEBRUARY news, and happenings Be sure to check in oftenevents to keep you current on all of the2018 local For further information: .Phone: (540) 687-6542 -Email: info@nationalsporting.org

7.

Be sure to check in oftenevents to keep you current on all of the local news, and happenings news, events and happenings


COVER STORY

At Long Last BY TONY VANDERWARKER AND WINKIE MOTLEY

Keswick Hunt Club

Plans for Renovations

A number of members concerned about the condition of the Hunt Club have stepped forward with a plan and initial funding for a major renovation of the club. In a presentation to the members on February 6, they presented preliminary plans including renovation to the kitchen, bathrooms, HVAC, a teardown of the Huntsman’s cottage and building a new one along with a new barn. Moving the structures opens up space for parking on the property as well as protecting the existing trees. The Board stressed that a major consideration of the renovation was to retain the historic character of the club so any additions will be add-ons not changes to the interior.

The physical condition of the club necessitates a full-scale renovation. The kitchen is in terrible shape and the electrical system is sketchy to say the least. The bathrooms are not handicap-accessible and those deficiencies alone not only make the club unsafe and also limit its potential for rental income. Instead of financing the renovation by raising dues, the Board is beginning a campaign to raise the funds from the membership and interested members of the Keswick and equine community. Indications are that a portion of the estimated 2.5 million dollar cost has been pledged. While a construction schedule and finished plans are in the works, the Board intends to begin construction as soon as possible. Hopefully in the near future, the club will be good to go for another hundred years. he Keswick Hunt Club was established in 1896. In 1898 the clubhouse was built under the direction of Horatio MacGruder. The building has been used continuously as a club house for social events related to fox hunting. The veranda, constructed prior to 1925, surrounds three s ides of the rectangular structure and since the time of construction, has been partially enclosed. The building is in the late Victorian style, with a side gable and an Edwardian bay window. Dubbed as “A Brilliant Social Event,” the

Keswick Hunt Club building was dedicated on this day in 1898. The Daily Progress reported: “Just on the crown of a finely wooded hill near Keswick stands the new and commodious building of the Keswick Hunt Club.”

A detailed description of the building itself included: “The building is ceiled with the best North Carolina pine; has a floor of excellent smoothness, and is plentifully supplied with doors and windows to admit the cool mountain breeze. The situation of the club-house is almost ideal. To the north and west one catches a magnificent view of the southwest mountains, a brotherhood long since made famous by historic old ‘Monticello.’ A country highway passes near the building, a telephone line runs by the door, and the post office and telegraph office at Keswick are scarcely half a mile distant. The article went on to describe the party that followed the dedication ceremony: “The audience hall was artistically decorated with sweeping draperies of white and red, while flags and unique club devices were gracefully disposed here and there. The music was furnished by an excellent band from Washington, and the entertainment in every detail was a most pleasing and decided success. Refreshments were served during the evening and it was not till half-past 3 a.m. that the bright hours of gayety were brought to an end. The Keswick Hunt Club continues to operate to this day and, in addition to continuing the tradition of the fox hunt, the club has continuously sponsored the Keswick Horse Show since its inception in 1904 and has supported several local nonprofits.

Pictured at the right: Plans of the original drawings from 1898.

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KESWICK LIFE


KESWICK SCENE

Keswick Hunt Club - 2018 Hunt Ball

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MARKEY AND MARY KALERGIS

2018 Hunt Ball One member remarked, “That party was the best and most fun of any I’ve been to in the past thirty years.” Co-chairs Kinsey Marable and Susie Matheson wanted to do a “traditional” hunt club ball and they pulled it off elegantly. Pin lights spectacularly strung overhead set the scene thanks to the volunteer lighting crew of Sandy Rives, Mark Mascotte, Murdoch Matheson and David Perdue who made the place sparkle. The table settings anchored by antique French candelabra added to the elegance and an always delicious dinner from Sandy Motley complimented the Hunt Ball tradition. Deedi Coleman, Sandra Burke, Dolly Buswell, Anne Coles, Christina Markey, Annie Vanderwarker and Susan Rives assisted in the setup for the evening. The band "A Town A List" took over after dinner and got the place rocking thanks to sponsors Kenny Wheeler, David Perdue, Sandy Rives, Rocky Taylor, Kinsey Marable and Annie Vanderwarker. Even the weather cooperated to make it a truly remarkable evening. Top Row: Nancy Wiley with co-event chair, Kinsey Marable, next, tables, chairs and style transformed the space into an epic gala. Second Row: David Perdue with Christina Markey, Anne Taylor with Keswick Life columnist Tony Vanderwarker, then Diane Manning with her sons Brad and Brian. Third Row: Brook Royster and Robbie Mascotte, the opposite, KHC Board Member Paul Manning with jt-MFH Will Coleman. Fourth Row: KHC Board Member Peter Taylor.

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FEBRUARY 2018


COMMUNITY

Founder's Day - Medals in Architecture, Law, and Citizen Leadership ADAPTED BY KESWICK LIFE

The University of Virginia and

subjects involving implicit or explicit marketsantitrust law, criminal law and procedure, and corporate law.

the Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello will present their highest honors, the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medals in Architecture, Law, and Citizen Leadership during their joint Founder's Day activities.

Morgan Carrington "Cary" Fowler Jr., an

American agriculturalist and former executive director of the Crop Trust whose decades of work championing crop diversity and conservation included the creation of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault — the world’s largest collection of crop diversity, housing more than 930,000 distinct varieties.

The awards are presented jointly by UVA, which he founded in Charlottesville in 1819, and by the Foundation, the independent, nonprofit organization that owns and operates his home, Monticello. The 2018 recipients are:

Sir David Adjaye OBE,

a globally acclaimed architect and founder of Adjaye Associates renowned for his ingenious use of materials and sculptural designs, including the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Frank H. Easterbrook, a judge on the U.S. Court

of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and senior lecturer

of law at the University of Chicago Law School known for his expertise in antitrust law, criminal law and procedure, and other subjects involving implicit or explicit marketsantitrust law, criminal law and procedure, and other subjects involving implicit or explicit marketsantitrust law, criminal law and procedure, and other

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medals are the highest external honors bestowed by the University, which grants no honorary degrees. They recognize achievements of those who embrace endeavors in which Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence and third U.S. president, excelled and held in high regard.

CREATING YOUR POSITION WITH POLISH AND INTEGRITY. anne.hooff@fontaine.com | fontaine.com

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KESWICK LIFE


A Vi rg i n ia C ou n t ry L i f e

684 IVY DEPOT RD. - c. 1850 farm house in the heart of Ivy. This 5 bedroom renovations recent improvements include bluestone walkways, fieldstone retaining walls, copper roofing, robust gardens and sprawling lawns. Wonderful studio apt./office above a 2 car garage connected by covered breezeway was newly built in 2014. Grounds consist of extensive landscaping/hardscaping, a barn with fenced paddock. 4 acres, flanked by a quiet stream. 5 min drive to UVA. MLS#559117 $2,195,000

THE GARDNER FARM - A personal parkland. An expansive retreat of 1,563 acres that offers the highest degree of privacy and bucolic tranquility rural Virginia can offer. 4 miles of the South Anna River traverses the property with approximately 20 miles in trails extending through forests. Several unique river crossings, 4 scenic ponds and a 30 acre lake. MLS# 551631 $7,500,000

BLOOMINGDALE - c. 1840, Bloomingdale is a noteworthy Orange County, VA historic property located in the heart of Somerset. The Federal manor has a magnificent center hall with grand proportioned rooms (11 ft. ceilings on main floor) and fireplaces in every room (8 total). Geothermal heating and air, renovated sun porch saltwater pool, incredible Southwest and Blue Ridge Mt. views. MLS# 567939 $1,200,000

HIDDEN SPRINGS FARM - c. 1800 home and 157-ac. Extraordinary mountain setting and views, the property includes a 2 BR guest home, log cabin guest house, and 3 story garage/barn. Incredible attention to detail this home is s signature Free Union farm. MLS#566997 $2,500,000

KESWICK ESTATE Located only 5 miles east of Charlottesville Keswick Estate offers the best building opportunities in the area. Adjoining the Keswick Hall and Golf Club with current renovations underway at the Hotel and and newly designed Pete Dye Golf Course, “Full Cry�, the chance to build your own signature custom home awaits. Fulfill the dream and choose a homesite; golf views, water views or tranquil wooded views there is potential with myriad of options to select on homesite or house design. Contact Murdoch Matheson, exclusive Listing Agent for over 40 homesites in Keswick Estate, for maps and pricing.

Murdoch Matheson

434.981.7439

mmatheson@frankhardy.com

murdoch-matheson.com

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FEBRUARY 2018


LIFE, MAKE IT HAPPEN! Try Not To Take Offense

As a society, we take offense more often

than we once did. One of the few advantages I have discovered from being old is that you notice important stuff like this. Not to say that you can do much about it other than taking note. I don’t know why we are all so thin-skinned, but it seems easier these days to be mad, injured, misunderstood or downright pissed than to talk. Maybe the multiplicity of personal breaches correlates to the impersonal nature of texting or social media. Heck, I have friends on Facebook I wouldn't know if I drove over them. From my perspective, chatting via text, if you can call it that, is a set up for misunderstanding. With the nuance of body language absent, how do you know what someone means? Unspoken clues in a conversation can make a huge difference in understanding and can help to avoid hurt feelings. When I hold our collected foibles up for scrutiny in this column, it may feel as if I am pointing my wizened finger at offenders in judgment as I stand above the fray. For a refreshing change, today I am tearing a page from my own sordid playbook for my object lesson du mois. Prior to a recent book event, the shop's proprietor emailed me the following: "In reading the book, I noticed that the black character is written in a dialect. I want to ask if you would not read that section as part of your book talk. If we had black members of the audience, I am

BY MARY MORONY

concerned that they would feel uncomfortable in the shop. I think the conversation about whites writing black dialect has changed a lot in the past few years. Please read from another section." At first, I must admit the missive put me off, one might even say offended me. Ashamed as I am to admit, I found myself verging on shooting the messenger. Forgive this next mixed metaphor, I applied the brakes only moments before I could brush my hands together smug in my own offended sensibilities. A small voice at the back of my mind shouted, "Why?" Why, indeed. My host could not have been more within the bounds of propriety to ask me not to offend the shop's clientele. Not ready to let go of my indignation, however, my next move was to go to The Oracle (Google). I typed in the question how, indeed, had the conversation changed over the years in regards to whites writing black dialect and waited to see the changes. Again the wee voice shrieked, "Why?" Was I waiting for the Oracle to speak because I wanted the answer? Of course not! My mind, once offended, did not plan to stop until a meal was served in the form of some sort of crow and consumed by the other party involved. My overwrought reaction was to a perceived reprimand. I was asked not to make a customer uncomfortable. Well, (hear the outrage with hand squarely

on hips) no well-brought up Southerner would dream of making anyone feel uncomfortable. I embarrass myself at times at how deluded I can be. Once I scraped away all of my knee-jerk needs to exact revenge, I had to appreciate the deluge of irony. When I stopped reacting and feeding my bruised ego, I realized if I didn't want to offend anyone in the bookstore, I would not be able to read a word from my latest novel, or any of my novels for that matter. Everything I write about is designed to offend—alcoholism, drug addiction, family dysfunction, racism, rape, sexual abuse, incest, just to fit on a few, all taboo subjects. The great preponderance of readers would find something offensive in my subject matter. So why do I, a self proclaimed good little southern girl, choose such inflammatory subjects you might ask? To start a conversation, about taboo, about how easy it is to take offense and how difficult it is to move beyond a perceived attack. I stand before you hoisted on my own petard, writing about offensive things and getting caught up in peevish details. What a gift! Taking offense is a choice. One we all tend to forget and in the process give our power away. These days, folks, me included choose injury over a conversation. Using their pet peeves, region, political ideology, patterns of speech, education, you name it as a barrier to honest discourse. We aren't meant to agree. What would be

the point of different points of view? Communication is the exchanging of thoughts and ideas not browbeating someone into agreement. I don't know if we have dumbed down because of the ways we relate or we are just lazy? Could our sensitivity be predicated on the need to be right? Could it be that we are too invested in our own worldview and aren't interested in anyone changing it? To protect ourselves, we retreat to hurt feelings and taking offense. Hubs suggested people are frightened of a more than usual uncertain future. Spoiler alert: the future, no matter the times, is uncertain. That’s a fact of life. I admit I don’t know why we are so prone to put up our metaphorical dukes, however I know for a fact it isn’t helping any of us. Since I’m no better at jumping to the offensive than anyone else, I can’t offer any pearls of wisdom other than just stop it. Treat the need to defend and entrench like any bad habit. The first and hardest step is to notice it. From there you can enlist all your usual habit breaking aides including laughing at yourself. Taking yourself too seriously is a dangerously slippery incline leading straight to being offended. So quit it! Learn to laugh at yourselves. Honestly, it can’t help but improve your life. Chances are you are every bit as ridiculous as I am.

ON EXHIBIT

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings

National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. March 4, 2018 – May 28, 2018 For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including portraits, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossingsexplores how her

relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 125 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann’s powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: family, landscape, battlefields, legacy, and mortality. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann’s art; her family photographs; contemporary representations of the black body; the landscape as repository of cultural and personal memory; and Mann’s debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Lexicon of Landscapes by Michelle Gagliano

at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business February 28, 2018 July 15, 2018 Opening reception will be

hibit will be viewable from 9AM-4:30PM, Mondays-Fridays Gagliano drew inspiration for this set of work from British author Robert Macfarlane’s book Landmarks, which celebrates the language of the landscape. As a resident the beautiful Virginia countryside, Gagliano works in solidarity with Macfarlane's mission to preserve all of landscape’s rich descriptive botanical terms and local vernacular.

February 28 from 4PM-8PM. Light refreshments will be served. Come meet the artist. Children welcome. RSVP Sponsored generously by the Darden Art Committee and the Batten Institute for Entrepreneurship and Innovation The exhibit will be held at the Darden School of Business in three locations: the Alumni Lounge, the Darden Art Gallery, & the Batten Institute Suite #209 The ex-

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Gagliano’s abstract paintings have long been reflective of the environment in which they are created. In Lexicon of Landscapes, she has created a unique exhibit that seeks to explore, exploit, and execute an awareness of the vocabulary of place. Her work visually preserves the descriptive words of nature, enchanting and embedding our consciousness with this sensibility.

KESWICK LIFE


COMMUNITY

Addressed and Assessed ADDRESSED President Teresa A. Sullivan will deliver the commencement address at the University of Virginia's 189thFinal Exercises on May 19 and 20. Sullivan will speak on the Lawn both days following the traditional academic procession, which begins at 10 a.m. In 2015, UVA began dividing graduation ceremonies over two days, a change spurred in part by growing student enrollment. Students from the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences will graduate on May 19. Students from all other schools and the Data Science Institute will participate on May 20. Valediction, which features presentation of the class gift and university and class awards, is scheduled for May 18. Its speaker has not yet been announced. “The Final Exercises ceremonies are joyful occasions, and participating with our graduates and their families is one of the greatest pleasures of being president,” Sullivan said. “I’m honored to be the commencement speaker for this year’s ceremonies, and I look forward to celebrating this significant moment in our students’ lives in May.” As president, Sullivan already fulfills an important role in Final Exercises. For students wearing caps and gowns, it might be the most significant role: The president officially confers degrees to graduating students as part of the formal program for Final Exercises. This year’s ceremonies will mark the last Final Exercises with Sullivan serving as president. Sullivan, who took office in 2010 as the first female president and the eighth overall president of UVA, plans to step down this summer. She will be succeeded by James E. Ryan, a School of Law graduate and former faculty member who currently serves as dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. The Board of Visitors announced Ryan’s appointment in September. The opportunity to deliver the commencement address reflects a tradition at UVA for outgoing presidents. In 2010, then-President John T. Casteen III was the graduation speaker as he neared conclusion of a 20-year tenure as president. In 1990, outgoing President Robert M. O’Neil delivered the graduation address. Other University presidents delivering Final Exercises addresses as their tenures concluded were Frank L. Hereford Jr. in 1985, Edgar F. Shannon Jr. in 1974, and Colgate W. Darden in 1959. In her time here, Sullivan has broad-

ADPATED BY WINKIE MOTLEY

ened the diversity of the student population, implemented a new strategic plan, grown UVA’s research portfolio, prioritized efforts to address generational turnover among faculty, and guided the successful conclusion of a $3 billion capital campaign. She has championed safety and quality as hallmarks of patient care at the UVA Health System. As the University neared its bicentennial, Sullivan launched the President’s Commission on Slavery and the University to explore and report on UVA’s historical relationship with slavery. That effort has significantly increased the University’s understanding of the legacy of slavery, with research and instruction ongoing. It also led to the recommendation to establish a Memorial to Enslaved Laborers, which will be constructed on Grounds east of Brooks Hall across from The Corner. The Board of Visitors approved the memorial design in June. Sullivan also led preparations for the University’s bicentennial celebration, which began in October. In anticipation of its 200th anniversary, the University re-opened its centerpiece Rotunda in 2016 after a two-year, $58 million renovation that included significant repairs and upgrades to the interior, exterior and landscaping. The project expanded classroom space in the building, and included installation of new marble capitals above the Rotunda’s famous columns, as well as a new dome and oculus. President Sullivan is a scholar in labor force demography and the author or coauthor of six books and many scholarly articles. She is a graduate of Michigan State University’s James Madison College, and earned her doctoral degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. She came to UVA from the University of Michigan, where she had served as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. Prior to that, she was executive vice chancellor for academic affairs for the University of Texas System and a faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin. She is married to Douglas Laycock, the Robert E. Scott Distinguished Professor of Law at UVA. They have two adult sons.

ASSESSED

Albemarle County is mailing 2018 Change of Assessment notices to taxpayers today, January 26, 2018, reflecting changes in property values resulting from the County's recently completed annual reassessment. The notices contain the new 2018 assessed values along-

side the 2017 and 2016 values. They also provide the estimated new tax levy and compare that new tax levy to the two previous years. We calculated the proposed tax levy by using the 2018 assessed value and the 2017 tax rate. The Board of Supervisors will set the 2018 tax rate at a later date; therefore the actual tax levy for 2018 may differ from this notice. Please direct any questions regarding the new assessment notice to the Office of the County Assessor. The 2018 assessment changes are generally due to increases in the real estate market; however individual value changes can vary greatly from the average change for the County even within the same property type and neighborhood. The Assessor’s office completed detailed reviews of thousands of properties and many required updating of information in their assessment records and resulted, in some cases, in large increases to assessments. Furthermore, a reorganization of properties in the rural areas has improved the ability of the Assessor’s Office to value rural properties and supported an increase in land assessments for some portions of the rural areas. The change in the County's total "Taxable Value" tax base has increased by 2.2% over the 2017 year-end base. Overall taxable assessment changes by property type are: • Urban Residential (County Water & Sewer): +2.50% • Residential up to 20 acres: +3.20% • Rural (20 to 99.99 acres): +0.20% • Rural (100 acres and over): 0.00% • Commercial Properties: +1.40% • Multi-Family: +0.80% The above results by property class are average overall increases, but individual properties within each class may vary greatly from those amounts. The reassessment figures reflect the values of existing properties and do not include the value of new construction. New construction is estimated to be valued at $250,000,000 for the assessment period and includes new parcels created through a subdivision. Virginia by Statute requires localities to assess property at 100% of fair market value, based on an objective analysis of the property's fair market value, independent of any influence on the part of the County or the County Board of Supervisors. The average annual reassessment changes for each magisterial district are as follows: • Rio: +1.00% • Jack Jouett: +2.50%

13

• Rivanna: +2.90% • Samuel Miller: +2.50% • Scottsville: +2.50% • Town of Scottsville: -2.30% • White Hall: +2.10% The first half real estate tax bills, based on the new assessments, will be mailed in late April 2018. County officials recommend that anyone who would like more information, or who wishes a review of their assessment, contact the Office of the County Assessor at (434) 296-5856. You can find real estate assessment information on the County's Website,www. albemarle.org, under Online Services, GIS-Web. Information includes property descriptions, maps, and sales information. The Assessor's Office provides computers that can be used by the public during normal business hours. There is a process in place to appeal disputed assessments. As a first step, taxpayers are encouraged to contact the Assessor's Office to ensure the correctness of County records and to receive an explanation of the basis of their property's valuation. If visiting the Assessor's Office, we highly recommend that citizens make an appointment to ensure that the appropriate staff member, who can best explain the valuation of their specific property, is available. If a taxpayer desires to request an official internal review, they can submit a 2018 Administrative Review form, located on the County website, on the County Assessor page. This form can also be mailed, emailed or faxed upon request. The deadline to return this form to request an internal review by the Assessor's office is February 28, 2018. If a property owner does not receive satisfaction with this step, they can request an appeal by the Board of Equalization (BOE) whose members are appointed by the Board of Supervisors. The BOE is made up of Albemarle County citizens who have completed training by the Virginia Department of Taxation. All appeals to the Board of Equalization must be filed by March 30, 2018, or within 30 days of the date of the response letter for a previously requested 2018 Administrative Review. The Assessor's Office will accept applications for qualifying properties to enter the Land Use Tax Deferral Program, with the $15 (minimum) application fee, through March 2, 2018. A new application for each parcel is required to enroll in the program. Documentation of a five-year history of the qualifying use must be provided to qualify. A new application is not needed if a property is currently under the land use assessment program.

FEBRUARY 2018


14

KESWICK LIFE


ONLY IN KESWICK Hospital Humor

I recently had the opportunity to get an

inside look at the U.S. heacare system. The ER at MJ. When I walked in, everything was going as fast as glue going uphill, “Sit down over there and fill out this form and bring it to me when you’re finished,” the nurse says. Hurry up and wait time. Whole waiting room is coughing. I’m thinking, “I’ll get the flu before I get seen.” Five minutes later I was sitting in a chair having an EKG. Before I knew it, the place went into warp speed. A team suddenly appeared out of nowhere, pushing me into a wheelchair, rushing me into a room crowded with blinking lights. They stripped off my shirt and put on one of those gowns that puts your butt on parade, slapped gizmos on my chest, stuck in an IV, everyone looking grim like I was going to say Sayonara right there. And they had an appointed angel, a Florence Nightingale trained in crisis management, “It’s okay, sweetheart,” she cooed to me, “don’t be concerned about all this rushing around, we just want to make sure you’re okay.” I felt like saying, “Who are you kidding? You guys are outdoing E.R., they could take lessons from you.” But of course, you say nothing First, they treat you like you’re a goner, then when they’ve got you all wired up, wheel you into a room and park you for four hours while they usher in a bunch of docs. My primary care doc, one of my cardiologist’s colleagues and finally, my cardiologist. All the while, this infernal beeping is going on from the various machines they’ve got me hooked up to. And outside in the ER corridor, EMTs from Louisa and Orange are parading back and forth pushing poor saps on gurneys. My cardiologist tells me, “I’m glad you came in, it’s time for the pacemaker. We’re scheduled for 7:30 tomorrow

BY TONY VANDERWARKER morning.” In the meantime, I discover I’m going to spend the night cooped up in this tiny room in the ER. “We’re full up with flu cases so we don’t have a bed available for you,” a nurse explains. “But I can get you some food if you like. Up until midnight you can have anything you want.” I’m tempted to say, “A double martini straight up with two olives,” but I know I’d be wasting my breath. “No thanks,” I say, “I don’t have much of an appetite.” “Suit yourself, just press the red button if you change your mind.” I check my watch, 5:30. I’ve been in ER going on five hours now. Only fourteen more to go until the “procedure”. In hospitals, they don’t call anything by their real name. An operation is a “procedure.” One thing I’m not good at is waiting. I complain to my wife when she visits, “I can’t believe I’m going to be locked up in this hellhole for half a damn day. I tell you, this is worse than a third-world hospital. I can’t sleep with all this beeping going on and the traffic going by outside is like being parked in the pull off lane on 64.” “Let me see if I can get you something to help you sleep.” She comes back with holding a capsule up between her fingers. “This should do the trick, I had to pull some strings to get it,” she tells me. “It’s an Ambien, you should sleep like a baby.” When she leaves, I take the Ambien. Big mistake—no one told me Ambien is a psychedelic. I have nightmares about

sliding naked down the gray hull of a sinking battleship toward the thirty-foot high waves, but I never get to them, just keep sliding, first this way, and then that. It is horrible. Thankfully, I wake up and the sliding stops. I check my watch, it’s 4:30. Good-only three hours to go. Unfortunately, my ass has gone to sleep and I’m so wired up, I can’t move. By squinching around, I manage to shift the weight to my left cheek. Then to the right. Some relief but the beepings still there and the EMTs keep rushing by. Out in the ER, I notice that no one seems to pay attention to the fact that it’s 4:30 in the morning. In the ER, I realize, the sun doesn’t go up or go down. It’s like living in the Arctic Circle. Finally, I get a reprieve. A nurse comes in and announces, “We’re going to take you up to prep.” Jailbreak! I finally get to escape from my prison. Who ever thought I’d be looking forward to my “procedure”? But I am. I delight in the new environments as she navigates my gurney down corridors, into elevators, more corridors, finally stopping in an open area with a couple of blue-gowned nurses standing around. As they begin scrubbing me down, my cardiologist shows up. “How’d you sleep?” “I never got out of ER—so not well, thanks.”

He sounds like he’s memorized them in medical school, ticking through them, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. They are so grim I’m tempted to say, “Okay, you talked me out of this. I’m going home.” But I’ve gotten this far, so what the hell? He finishes up by stating, “But that only happens in 1% of the cases.” Why didn’t he start by saying that? I’m wondering. From there on in, it was easy going. Didn’t feel a thing during the procedure, incision stung a bit but nothing I couldn’t deal with. And the best part? I got an actual room to recuperate in—bathroom, view of the surroundings, big screen TV, room service. Only problem was, I had to stay there for another night. They promised me I’d be discharged by 9:30. One of my primary care docs showed up, the cardiologist—everyone said I was good to go. Except it never happened. 9:30 came and went, then 10, then 10:30, then 11. I decided it was easier to get out of a state prison than a hospital. When my wife showed up, I put her on her meanest setting and let her loose on the hospital staff. Finally, at 11:45 I escaped. Free--free at last! By the way, here’s a gratuitous piece of advice. Try to avoid going to MJ during flu season. Other times, the place is a four-star hotel, but when flu time rolls around, stifle your symptoms if you can and give the place a wide berth.

“Oh dear,” he says. “Okay, let me explain what we’re going to do.” He takes me through the procedure then says, “I’ve got to tell you the things that can go wrong.”

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FEBRUARY 2018


WHAT'S COOKING Open Face Chicken Sandwich served on Brioche Bread w/Sweet Onion Jam BY SAM JOHNSON

Ingredients: 1 Loaf of Brioche Bread 1 Pound Chicken Breast (Grilled & Sliced) 4 Sweet Onions

onion jam mixture, bacon and Swiss cheese. Place on a broiler pan. Broil 4-6 inches from the heat for 3-4 minutes or until cheese is melted. Yield: 8 servings. Once sandwiches come from oven, top with arugula salad- dressed with Dijon mustard, lemon juice, and salt & pepper.

1 Pound of bacon 1 Container of Arugula 2 cups of Mayo 1tbs of Dijon mustard Instructions: Cut up onions and sauté with olive oil salt and pepper until golden brown. As onions are cooking add ½ Cup of Apple Cider Vinegar and ½ Cup of Sugar. Continue to cook until most liquid is cooked out of onions.

Sam's open facer - chicken sandwich on brioche, put a smile on our editor's faces at a recent retreat!

Cut bread into eight 1-in. slices and toast slices. Meanwhile, Cut up onions and sauté with olive oil salt and pepper until golden brown. As onions are cooking add ½ Cup of Apple Cider Vinegar and ½ Cup of Sugar. Continue to cook until most liquid is cooked out of onions. While onions are cooking, fry bacon until crispy. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, Dijon mustard and pepper; mix well. Spread Dijon mixture over each bread slice. Top with chicken,

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16

KESWICK LIFE


503 Faulconer Drive Charlottesville, VA 22903 Office: 434.295.1131 Fax: 434.293.7377

MCLFarm, EAN FAULCONER INC. Estate and Residential Brokers

The right realtor makes all the difference!

◆ WHITE GABLES ◆

Gracious and easy living with pastoral and mountain views minutes west of UVA. From the entrance foyer enter the spacious living room with gas fireplace and views, the dining area with built in shelving and “cooks” kitchen. Recently upgraded kitchen has marble counters, subzero refrigerator and cozy breakfast area. Besides the master suite there is an additional bedroom. Two covered terraces, elevator service and two inside parking spaces. MLS#571246 $739,000 Charlotte Dammann 434.981.1250

◆ GARTHFIELD LANE ◆ 5 MILES WEST OFF GARTH-Brick Georgian over 6,500 square feet under roof, 3.74 private acres, loaded with quality features, Western School District. $975,000. Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076

◆ BELLAIR ◆ Charming c. 1953 brick home on private 1± acre lot offers 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, living room, kitchen, dining room, 2 fireplaces and hardwood floors. Convenient, close-in location minutes west of the City limits. MLS#566703 $849,000 Steve McLean 434.981.1863

◆ LENNOX ◆ Historic, and private southern Albemarle County farm on 150+/- acres with guest cottage and great charm among other large estates. Only 20 minutes south of Charlottesville. MLS#561792 $1,695,000. Available with 23 acres, $785,000. Tim Michel 434.960.1124

◆ FARMINGTON ◆ Classic 4 bedroom brick residence in most private 2.3 acre setting, beautiful views! Large formal rooms, custom design kitchen, two fireplaces, 2-car garage, walk-out basement. MLS#569134 Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076

◆ KESWICK ◆ GREAT PRICE! 5-6 bedroom, brick home, superb lot on first fairway, golf and mountain views. Close to Club, many great features, home in very good condition. MLS#571628 $875,000 Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076

◆ KESWICK ESTATE ◆ Exquisite, 4-bedroom home with premium finishes, paneled study, 1st-floor master suite, home theater, infinity pool, charming guest house, and professionally designed gardens. Short walk to Keswick Hall. MLS#556917 $1,895,000 Steve McLean 434.981.1863

www.mcleanfaulconer.com 17

FEBRUARY 2018


BOOKWORM

Three for a Warm Fire BY SUZANNE NASH

If you have never been on a reading re-

treat…I highly recommend it! I am lucky enough to have a few wonderful friends who gather each year for a weekend of quiet reading…ok maybe not quite so quiet! We also drink and eat and laugh and share our favorite books with each other in a beautiful estate near Gordonsville. I shared these latest finds with them and I am sure in the next few months I will share some of their favorites… Enchantress of Numbers: A Novel of Ada Lovelace by Jennifer Chiaverini, introduced me to a historical figure I knew very little about, the daughter of Lord Byron. I adore the poetry of Lord Byron and always saw him as a romantic figure who associated with his little gang of creative artists, but I knew very little about his wife, Lady Annabella Byron. Born Anne Isabella Milbanke, Annabelle was a very no-nonsense woman who was a gifted mathematician. She was, at first, captivated by George Gordon Byron, then appalled by him. After marriage she comes to discover the mercurial nature of her husband and begins to suspect the unnatural relationship he has with his half-sister, Augusta Marie. This novel follows the path of Ada, her and Byron’s daughter, who faces the burden of fame from the moment she is born.

She is whisked away from her father so that Annabella can try and shape her daughter’s future without the influence of Lord Byron’s unbalanced way of life. She refuses to let Ada succumb to anything that seems driven by her imagination and her days are heavy with mathematics and practical applications. Ada becomes a very studious young woman who thrives, yet whose imagination still finds an outlet through mathematics via the friendship with Charles Babbage who invented the Difference Engine, the very first programmed computing machine. I was fascinated by this largely unknown pioneer of technology and loved the way Chiaverini presented Ada, as well as her mother. It has made me want to explore this area of history a bit more. I took a flight with a layover in Iceland recently and that led me to pick up an Icelandic writer named Yrsa Sigurdardottier. I am really glad I am writing this name and not having to say it out loud as I would surely butcher it. If you don’t mind reading names you can’t pronounce then I highly recommend her latest book, The Legacy. Apparently Yrsa is the “Queen of Icelandic thriller writers” and I can see why. She develops a detective, Detective Huldar, who is grasping at straws as he tries to figure out a baffling

EQUESTRIAN ESTATE ON 144 ACRES IN SOMERSET - REDUCED

murder of a mother and wife who seems to have no enemies. A list of numbers, which no one understands, is left at the scene. When the victim’s child is found hiding under the bed, child psychologist Freyja must help the police learn what they can from the only witness. I really enjoy Swedish and Norwegian writers and so I was curious to see if the Icelandic thriller might have a similar feel….a bit of darkness that seems ever present. It has a slight Nordic feel, but I think the fact that Iceland has the lowest violent crime rate in all of the world keeps the atmosphere a bit lighter. A violent murder is not a normal, everyday occurrence and so the scrutiny of the police is very intense. I will be reading more from this author in the near future and booking a flight for a crime free vacation! Sing Unburied Sing is a new novel from Jesmyn Ward, winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Salvage the Bones. I just have to rave a little about the voices in this novel. The rhym and cadence of the dialogue pulled me in from the beginning. Language inflections for regional speech can be tricky…it can pull you in or push you away with its differences. I was hooked from page one. That said, if you do not immediately succumb to the cadence please try and hold on for a few

chapters until you fall into the patterns… it is worth it! The past and present flow together in this book as ghosts and the living walk freely through these pages. The injustice and inequality of races is clearly front and center in this book as it is set in Mississippi and is told from the view points of a mixed race child, Jojo, his African-American mother, Leonie, and an African American ghost child who was killed escaping from Parchman prison. History is filled with the unburied dead, those who never rest with the injustice of the world and part of this novel looks at how we put to rest the past and set those spirits free. It is beautiful and lyrical and moving and it’s a novel I will return to because it is one that deserves more than one reading. From Pops and his pain to Mam, who always has one foot in the realm of spirit, each character spoke to me. A good writer can take even the most unlikely of characters, one with all of the qualities you most dislike and somehow make you empathize and love them. Fall in love with all of these wonderful creations as you dance between the realms of past and present, physical and spirit. Have a great rest of your month and keep turning those pages!

MANICURED 120 ACRE ESTATE FIVE MINUTES TO TOWN

Adaven Farm • $2,845,000

Round Hill Farm • $5,900,000

A family compound set privately in the rolling hills of Somerset, adjacent to Keswick Hunt territory, with mountain and pastoral views. Main house constructed ‘06 of the finest new, reclaimed materials, enhanced by a 2 bed, 2 bath guest house (1,900 sf bank barn converted to guest house with stunning results), vaulted guest/ in-law quarters over garage, saltwater pool with pool house, center-aisle barn, equipment shed, regulation dressage arena and multiple paddocks. Every inch turn-key. Includes division right and dramatic 2nd building site. MLS# 556651

With the centerpiece a stately, circa 1940 brick residence shaded by massive hardwoods and sited magnificently to enjoy 280 degree Blue Ridge views, Round Hill Farm is truly a rare opportunity in Charlottesville: A pristine 120 acre estate with extensive frontage on the Rivanna Reservoir that is only 5 minutes to all conveniences and under 10 minutes to UVA and Downtown. The home includes 5 bedrooms, 6.5 bathrooms plus garage apartment. A pool overlooking the views, gardens, greenhouse, chicken coop and barns complete the offering.

434.466.2992 lwoodriff@loringwoodriff.com

401 Park Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 WWW.LORINGWOODRIFF.COM

18

KESWICK LIFE


PROPERTIES ON THE MARKET

PROPERTIES ON THE MARKET

PROPERTIES ON THE MARKET

Redcliffe Redcliffe

Adaven Farm in Adaven Farm

A family compound set privately in the Redcliffe, c. 1902, is one of Virginia’s most in beautiful estates exemplifying stylish, rolling hills of Somerset, adjacent to A family Hunt compound set privately in the Redcliffe, c. 1902, is one of Virginia’s most Keswick territory, with mountain comfortable, country living only minutes rolling hills of views. Somerset, adjacent to beautiful estates exemplifying stylish, pastoral Main house from historic Charlottesville and UVA and and Keswick Hunt territory, with mountain comfortable, country living only minutes sited on 45 private acres with jaw constructed ‘06 of the finest new, and pastoral views. Main by house from historic Charlottesville UVA and reclaimed materials, enhanced a2 dropping mountain views.and This classic constructed ‘06 house of the(1,900 finest new, sited on with 45 private acres fieldstone with jaw bed, 2 bath guest sf bank colonial center-core reclaimed materials, enhanced a2 dropping mountain This classic barn converted to guest housebywith construction includes views. extensive additions bed, 2 bath guest vaulted house (1,900 bank colonial center-core fieldstone results), guest/sfin-law of the finestwith materials. It also features 6,550 stunning barn converted to guest house pool with construction includes extensive additions over garage, saltwater finished square feet of living area and quarters stunning results), vaulted guest/ in-law of the finest materials. It also features 6,550 family-oriented floor plan with formal with pool house, center-aisle barn, quarters over garage, saltwater pool finished of living and shed, regulation dressage living andsquare diningfeet rooms, billiardarea room, 5 equipment with pool house, center-aisle barn, family-oriented floor plan6 with formal arena and multiple paddocks. Every bedrooms, 3 full baths, fireplaces, equipment shed, regulation dressage living and dining rooms, billiard room, 5 inch turn-key. Includes division right professionally designed kitchen/family arena and multiple paddocks. bedrooms, 3 ceilings, full baths, 6 fireplaces, dramatic 2nd building site. Every MLS# room with 15' imported English and inch turn-key. Includes division right professionally designed kitchen/family oak moldings and cabinetry, art gallery, 556651 and dramatic 2nd rbuilding site. MLS# room with 15' ceilings, imported English t y lovely landscaping, soccer/baseball field, 556651 oak moldings and cabinetry, art gallery, 4-car garage, saltwater pool, guest house r y lovely landscaping, soccer/baseball field, t and stream. 4-car garage, saltwater pool, guest house For further information contact : andfurther stream.information contact For Loring Woodriff 434-466-2992 Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076 For further information contact : For further information contact Loring Woodriff 434-466-2992 Jim Faulconer 434.981.0076

$4,495,000 $4,495,000

Pumphouse Road Pumphouse Road

Small horse property located in the heart of Somerset and the Keswick Hunt. This Small horse located in the heart mostly openproperty and fenced 14.5 ac. offering of Somerset and the Keswick Hunt. This has a three bedroom and three bathroom mostly open 14.5 ac. offering house builtand in fenced the 1940's. Recent has a three bedroom and three improvements include a bathroom finished house built in the 1940's. Recent basement, two renovated bathrooms and improvements include remodeled kitchen. Situateda atfinished the end basement, and of a countytwo roadrenovated with greatbathrooms privacy. a four remodeled kitchen. Situated atstall the and end stall stable with tackroom, wash of a county road sheds with great privacy. four twonew run-in make this a agreat stall stable with tackroom, wash stall and horse property.y. twonew run-in sheds make this a great horse property.y.

For further information contact Justin Wiley 540.672.5603 For further information contact Justin Wiley 540.672.5603

$ 525,000 20. $ 525,000 20.

Bloomingdale in Bloomingdale

Marsh Run Marsh Marsh RunRun is an extremely private

$ $2,845,000 $ $2,845,000

For further information contact : Murdoch Matheson 434-296-0134 For further information contact : Murdoch Matheson 434-296-0134

$1,200,000 $1,200,000

domain in the prized Somerset area of Marsh Run is an extremely private Orange County. There are 208 acres in domain and in the Somerset area of pasture hayprized with broad views over Orange County. There 208The acres in the Piedmont to the Blueare Ridge. neopasture and hay with broad views over classical four-square style manor dates to the Piedmont to the Blue Thewith neo1940. Here character andRidge. scale met four-square stylewith manor dates to aclassical complete renovation additions 1940. Here and scale met with designed bycharacter Glave & Holmes, Architects, a complete renovationby with additions and executed Wayner designed by Glave secondary & Holmes, Architects, Construction.The residence, and Marsh executed bythe early Wayner Old Run, dates to 19th Construction.The secondary residence, century and is an historic complement to Old farm. MarshThere Run, dates to theand early 19th the are barns a 2002 centurywith and 6is stalls an historic to stable and acomplement large foaling the farm. barns and a 2002 stall, washThere rack,are tack room/office or stable with 6 stallsIn and large foaling grooms apartment. theaKeswick Hunt stall, wash rack, tack room/office or and the Madison-Barbour Rural Historic groomsnear apartment. In the Keswick Hunt District James Madison's Montpelier .and the Madison-Barbour Rural Historic District near James Madison's Montpelier For . further information contact : Joe Samuels. 434.981.3322 For further information contact : Joe Samuels. 434.981.3322

Turkey Sag Turkey Sag

Highground Cottage Highground Cottage

Merrie Mill Extraordinary estate on 407 acres in a Merrie Mill

The Perfect Country House! Total Renovation & New Construction in 2016 The Perfect Country Total 26-acres originally part ofHouse! Old Keswick Renovation & New Construction in 2016 Estate Brick Residence by DC Architect, 26-acres originally part of OldDesign Keswick Gertrude Sawyer Renovation by Estate Brick ResidenceLLc by DC Architect, ARKE design-build First Level Gertrude Sawyer Renovation Design by Master with beautiful bathroom, walkARKE LLc First in closet,design-build fireplace & private StudyLevel with Master with beautiful walkfireplace Living Roombathroom, with fireplace in closet, fireplace & private Study with Gourmet Kitchen * SunPorch * Wooden fireplace Living Room fireplace Floors * Mountain Views with * Mature Trees Gourmet KitchenSought-after * SunPorch * Keswick Wooden & Landscaping. Floors * Mountain Views * Mature Trees Location. & Landscaping. Sought-after Keswick Location. For further information contact : Duke and Sharon Merrick 434.951.5160 For further information contact : Duke and Sharon Merrick 434.951.5160

$ 1,190,000 $ 1,190,000

Originally built in 1840, Bloomingdale is in a noteworthy Orange County, VA historic Originally built in Bloomingdale is property located in1840, the heart of Somerset. a noteworthy Orange has County, VA historic The Federal manor a magnificent property located the heart of Somerset. center hall withingrand proportioned The Federal manor on hasmain a magnificent rooms (11 ft. ceilings floor) and center hall in with grand proportioned fireplaces every room (8 total). rooms (11 ft. ceilings on main floor) and and Numerous improvements fireplaces in every room (8 total). renovations: Geothermal heating and air, Numeroussun improvements renovated porch roughed in and for renovations: Geothermal heating air, secondary kitchen, saltwater pool,and master renovatedfoam sun insulation, porch roughed in and for bathroom, windows secondaryplumbing, kitchen, saltwater pool,plaster. master screens, paint and bathroom, foam insulation, windows and House is situated on 14 AC. w/mature screens, plumbing, paint and plaster. trees and boxwood gardens, and House is situated on 14 AC. w/mature incredible Southwest and Blue Ridge trees andviewss. boxwood gardens, and Mountain incredible Southwest and Blue Ridge Mountain viewss.

$2,450,000 $2,450,000

In the heart of Keswick Hunt and Wine Country this charming cottage on 15 acres In theaheart Keswick Huntwith and Wine offers veryofprivate setting open Country thisstreams charmingplus cottage on 15 fields and views ofacres the offers a very private setting Southwest Mountains. Build with your open barn fields and of this the and ride outstreams or plantplus yourviews grapes, Southwest Build your home has itMountains. all with 3 Bedrooms andbarn 2.5 and ride out orlight-filled plant your grapes, this Bath and large public rooms. home it all with to 3 Bedrooms and 2.5 A rarehas opportunity be in a fabulous Bath and. large light-filled public rooms. location. A rare opportunity to be in a fabulous location. . For further information contact Jane Fogelman 434.981-1274 tFor further information contact Jane Fogelman 434.981-1274 t

$690,000 $690,000

19

r r

premier Keswick location yet just Extraordinary on 407 acres and in a minutes to estate Charlottesville premier Keswick yet just University of Virginia.location Deeply immersed minutes Charlottesville in local farmto& architectural history, and this University of Virginia. Deeply immersed estate offers a notable circa 1857 in local farm with & architectural this residence Colonialhistory, Revival estate offers a notable circa 1857 additions designed by Milton Grigg in residence with Colonial the mid 1900’s, charming guestRevival cottage additions by Milton Grigg in along withdesigned two tenant cottages, barns the mid 1900’s, charmingThe guest cottage and farm structures. property along withstone two tenant cottages, barns includes walled gardens & and farm structures. Thealong property significant specimen trees with includes stone walled gardens & both pasture & wooded land. Views of significant specimen trees along with the Southwest Mountains abound. both pasture & wooded land. Views of For information contact : the further Southwest Mountains abound. Charlotte Dammann 434-981-1250 For further information contact : Charlotte Dammann 434-981-1250

$3,450,000 $3,450,000

FEBRUARY 2018


TRAVEL

Winter Trout Fishing I’m a fair-weather fisherman. Wading in

BY CHARLES THACHER

a 47-foot ketch, provided that they would let him observe the construction (so he would know the boat’s bones intimately). While in Valparaiso he undertook to learn sailing techniques and both GPS and celestial navigation, to prepare for the voyage. After leaving the port, heading west, they did not see land for over thirty days (which would have scared the bejesus out of me), but made it safely through the south sea islands and, after sailing for a year, to Australia. Her father, something of an adventurer himself, had funded the salvaging of a Dutch ship that had sunk near Indonesia in the 18th Century - loaded with the finest European china and porcelains. The Indonesia government had seized the cargo, claiming that it belonged to them. The father had fought the claim for a more than a year, but had finally given up, believing that the government would never acquiesce to an Australian. Jose said that he would like to give it a try, since he looked a lot like an Indonesian, and the authorities might not have formed any negative opinions about Chileans. It worked. After spending many months negotiating in Jakarta, and greasing the skids with some money, he gained possession of the cargo. The whole story seemed far-fetched to me, but then Jose produced the impressive catalogue from a major German auction house that sold the enormous collection – explaining its recovery and estimating the value at $2-3 million euros.

Virginia streams in the winter, just because the temperature has reached the 50s, and a few trout might have awakened from their stupors, doesn’t cut it for me. I need to go south, way south, to find summer. There are really only three practical choices for a trout fisherman Argentina, Chile and New Zealand. Two others, Australia and South Africa, offer some good opportunities but I would not go there only for the fishing. Those into exotica, or just in an argumentative mood, might suggest the mountainous areas of Sri Lanka, Costa Rica or Kenya, but travelling to those remote destinations just for the opportunity to fish one or two streams, mostly for small trout in a managed environment, has little appeal to me. Of the principal destinations, Argentina and Chile are closest, though both require traveling over twenty hours, and probably spending two nights on route, before the fishing begins. Fortunately, all connections to the fishing regions in each country go through Buenos Aires or Santiago – two exciting cities that can entertain a traveler for a few days or more. My first solitary trip to Chile came as a result of hanging out in a saloon (always a productive activity) in Idaho, while on a fishing trip. A late-night conversation with another angler led to the inevitable question, “where have you fished”, and he hooked me with a description of a lodge called El Saltamontes, on the Nirehuau River in southern Chile, where brown trout gorge themselves on grasshoppers (saltamontes), throughout the late summer. For many trout anglers, using hopper imitations is the ultimate flyfishing enjoyment, because the natural insects often move quickly after falling on the water, causing the trout to attack them aggressively on the surface, lest they escape. I count myself among those anglers, so I booked a week at the Lodge for the following February. Chile is one of the most topographically diverse countries in the world. From north to south it extends nearly 2,700 miles, farther than any other country. It is very narrow, averaging slightly over 100 miles wide. There is no road through the lower 700 miles or so, and I would guess that the people in the far north know almost nothing about those in the far south, and vice-versa. Kind of like inside and outside the Washington Beltway. The Andes Mountains run the entire length of Chile, separating it from Bolivia in the far north, then Argentina for the southern 2,200 miles. In the north, the Atacama Desert, which stretches for 500 miles, is the driest place on earth, with some sections having never recorded rainfall. Yet,

Ojos del Salado, at 22,615 feet, the Atacama’s (and Chile’s) highest peak and the world’s highest active volcano, typically has snow on its summit for much of the year. Chile’s south (the bottom 1,000 miles or so) is a land of spectacular mountains, fiords, glaciers, volcanos, lakes and rivers – one of the most beautiful regions of the world to fly over or travel through. Punta Arenas, the southernmost Chilean city on the Straits of Magellan, can be reached only by flying or by driving for over 24 hours southeast from the southern end of the North-South road, into Argentina, then back to the west, with much of it on primitive roads. In central and southern Chile, easterly winds blow moisture off the Pacific, which gets blocked by the Andes, and falls in torrents, often overflowing the rivers that run from the west slope of the mountains the short distance back to the Pacific. While the Argentine side of the Andes is quite dry in the summer, much of it being high desert, the central Chilean side has large rain forests and verdant agricultural land, producing fruits and vegetables that are exported in large quantities to the Northern Hemisphere in our winter. Chile has the second largest aquaculture industry in the world, and is also a major producer and exporter of wine, though the average Chilean prefers beer to wine. The 17.5 million Chileans eat a great deal of fish and poultry, unlike their Argentine neighbors who strongly favor red meats. Chile has a vibrant democratic government and a thriving economy. Its GDP per capita is the highest of any country south of the U.S. It is a safe place, with crime rates lower than ours. I have driven through much of the central part of Chile – roads are typically well maintained,

and Chilean drivers tend to be cautious and courteous. But back to the fishing. I arrived at El Saltamontes Lodge, situated on a working estancia (ranch), after a full day’s trip across the Andes from Argentina to Puerto Montt in the central Lake District, then a 2-hour flight to Coyhaique in southern Chile, followed by a long drive on dirt roads, to find that the Nirehuau River was in flood - running dark brown and way over its banks, right up to the edge of my cabin. My guide said that it would not be fishable for at least two weeks, and that other rivers in the area had the same problem. The only option was fishing in some small ponds. I was the only guest at the Lodge as they had been able to contact everyone else to tell them not to come. Unfortunately, I had been fishing the previous week in Argentina without internet access. The Lodge owners, Jose and Erica Gorroño, suggested that I try the ponds and if I didn’t like them, then fly back north to Puerto Montt, where the rivers might be in better condition. Although the fishing was disappointing, I enjoyed the evenings in the lovely Lodge and particularly meeting the Gorroños and hearing their beguiling stories. Erica was an Australian, who had met Jose while backpacking through Chile, married him and moved with him to the estancia. Jose was a mechanical engineer and, like Erica, a serious adventurer.

Jose’s next story was even more intriguing. Some years ago, he noted that alpacas were becoming very popular, and valuable, in the U.S. In fact, they had become something of a ‘collectible”, since they came in many color variations, some of which sold for a great deal of money. So, he sold his cattle, and travelled to northern Chile and Bolivia, where alpacas are native, and selectively bought the finest specimens that he could find, transporting them over 1,500 miles south to his estancia. His current herd was about 250, which I observed first-hand in the pastures on the estancia. His plan was to charter a large cargo plane, and fly about 200 alpacas to the U.S. (he estimated the initial value at well over $1 million), where he would breed and sell the animals.

Some years earlier, the Gorroños had decided to take two years off and travel to Australia to visit Erica’s parents, with their two children. Jose decided to do it by sail boat even though he had never sailed before. So, he hired a firm in Valparaiso, Chile’s largest seaport, to build

His alpaca plan seemed both ambitious and risky, but then it turned bizarre. He said that vicuñas, a close genetic relative of the alpaca, were extraordinarily valuable in the U.S., because of their fine wool which can be shorn only every third year, but even more so because of their extreme rarity. He claimed that if he had a pure vicuña to the U.S., it could be sold for $500,000. The only thing I knew about vicuñas was that Sherman Adams,

20

KESWICK LIFE


ON EXHIBIT

“Dressing Downton:

President Eisenhower’s chief of staff, fa- tes, with my son Tom. The Nirehuau was lodge in such a spot, and to manage the the surface, while I obstinately fished on mously had to resign because he accept- in good shape, but the weather was typi- construction, was a huge challenge. But, the surface with a large dry fly. In the first ed a gift for his wife of a vicuña coat, so cal Chilean – rain every day. I had recent- the intrepid Jose was up to the task. The hour, I hooked nothing, but Scott caught it must have been valuable at that time. ly broken my collarbone on my casting Lodge opened a year later. two large fish. My envy triumphed over But $500,000? Anyway, it didn’t seem to side in a skiing accident, so I fished with I asked Jose about his Alpaca projects. He my devotion to dry flies, so I also tied on matter, because it was illegal to remove my arm in a sling. Oddly, it improved did fly a herd of over 200 to the U.S., and a streamer. What a day! We hooked about a vicuña from Chile or any of the other my casting, as it forced me to keep my they were ensconced on a rented farm 25 exceptional trout, landing around countries where they lived, and it was elbow close to my side, and to use short- inFeaturing the Catskill Mountain region of New two-thirdsfrom of them. four costumes and accessories theThe hitthree PBSorseries also illegal to import a vicuña into the er strokes, which are good techniques York. He was having problems with the largest weighed 12-15 pounds, by far the at the Virginia Historical Society U.S. But Jose had the solution. He funded for trout fishing. Despite the persistent farm manager, who he had discovered biggest that either of us had ever caught. a project at the biology department of rain, we had good fishing. The only dis- was selling and breeding some of Jose’s The guide said that they fed on the prothe National University to determine if a appointment was that the fish caught in animals privately and keeping the pro- fuse quantities of shrimp and scuds that hehad Virginia to announce that Altria vicuña embryo could be implanted in a the river were not large on Chilean stan- ceeds. He hired aHistorical New YorkSociety lawyeris pleased lived in the lake. He said that thereGroup was a has female alpaca, and delivered live by the dards, mostly 12’-18”, but catching them to breakagreed the management and second small“Dressing lake that was a challenging to sponsorcontract, the VHS’s newest exhibit, Downton: Changing surrogate after the appropriate gestation on hoppers was exciting. We did catch a was disappointed at Changing how slowlyTimes.” and ex- 2 or 3-hour ride on horseback high up in Fashion for period. The biologists had determined few better fish that resided in small, quiet pensively the legal process ground along the mountains, that had produced even that it was possible. So, Jose’s plan was backwaters off of the main river, the larg- in the U.S. I told him that I was shocked! larger trout, exceeding 20 pounds. The Thevicuña nationally touring exhibit willprorun from to have vicuña embryos implanted in est one being one of about four pounds The embryo project had not fact October that these2015 werethrough the sameJanuary strain of2016 fish and several of the female alpacas that he was that Tom caught. It was an unusually duced live offspring, but he wascreated anx- changing that lived exhibition in the river where, in will beashown in the VHS’s newly space, oneatofleast the project sending to the U.S. If they delivered suc- dark color, and when, Adam, our Canadi- ious to try it again. our experience, they rarely grew to even goals of its $38-million “Story of Virginia Campaign.” cessfully, he would be in the clover be- an guide, saw the fish, he exclaimed “My three pounds, demonstrates the power of cause there was no law against remov- god, you’ve hooked Albert”. It was dis- I haven’t returned to El Saltamontes, but diet and water conditions in influencing A great community is full of inspiration. Innisfree takes special care to create exhibition from the popular PBS ing a vicuña embryo from Chile, nor was appointing to realize that, even in such a a The few years later I consists was backof in 35 thecostumes Coy- theand size accessories of fish. a therapeutic work environment for its coworkers that builds a strong sense of MASTERPIECE Classic program. Visitors will be able to explore the lives of Downton’s there a law prohibiting the importing of remote spot, we were catching a fish that haique region to fish for brown trout at community and enhances each person’s unique skills. When Innisfree needed a vicuña embryo into the U.S., and vicu- was well-known to local authorities. the remote and enormousand (350,000 southern fishingWar areaI of Chile is rugaristocratic inhabitants their acres) servantsThe during the World period. more space additional CACF helped expand the weaving studio. ñas produced in thefor U.S. could weavers, be legally Estancia des Los Rios, in the mountains ged country. Coyhaique, with a populaNow, coworkers, likeingenious Mark, who have thatLodge can transform spools of yarn on intomy sec- near the Argentine border – 400 miles tion of about 50,000, and Puerto Aisen sold there. The plan was and,skills The was full of guests “Altria has a long history of support for the arts,” said Jack Nelson, Executive Vice though complicated, seemed ond trip, and thecan food and wine were great, by private plane from Puerto Montt. My with about 17,000, are the only cities in beautiful placemats, canpromising. enjoy working with friends share their carefully President and Chief Technology Officer, Altria Group, and Board Vice Chairman, I spent two daysproducts at the Lodge. in Ourand the conversation crafted with our Talking community. passion is to support theenjoyable, community.as it usu- friend Scott and I fished the river in the the region. Otherwise, there are but a Virginiaand Historical Society. we arehandful pleasedofto tiny support the Virginia the evening to Jose and Erica was fasci- ally is atKeswickLife fishing lodges. Jose was there Estancia its tributaries for “And five days. villages along theHistorical 5002018_Layout 1 12/28/17 10:54 AM Page 1 nating. But fishing the small ponds was only briefly, as he was busy working on The riveraswas beautiful and the fishing mile stretch of road running Society it brings traveling exhibitions like ‘Dressing Downton’ tonorth-south, our hometown. not enjoyable, so I left. Erica generously another ambitious project – creating his enjoyable, but we disappointed most of which is unpaved, This exhibition willwere be a great draw for residents and visitors alike.”and connects offered me the opportunity to return dur- There’s newno Dragonfly Lodge ondo the Picacho Riv- that none of the fish that we caught ex- only on its north end to the rest of the end to what we can together. ing the next season for free. I flew north www.cacfonline.org er. The Picacho was virtually unfished, ceeded 17”. On one day our guide took main Chilean road via a long ferry ride. excited to have Altria Group thisofnationally touring exhibition about two hours to the Lake District, as it was inaccessible by road, requiring us“We to a are small lake which he said had been sponsor Its dozens wild rivers offer much for of Downton Abbey costumes,” said Paul and one CEOofofthe themost Virginia where I found excellent fishing, but that’s a challenging motor boat trip of several stocked about eight years earlier withLevengood, the angler,President but it is also another story. hours over a lake and river to reach the fish from the river. “There Fishingare from a boat, beautiful areas in the world for any tourHistorical Society. many real-life American connections to Downton Abbey, Lodge site. Transporting all of the mate- Scott followed the guide’s advice, using ist to visit. and this exhibition complements the VHS mission to bring our history to life. During The next year I returned to El Saltamon- rials required to build a top-of-the-line a streamer (minnow imitation) just below

Changing Fashion for Changing Times”

T

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the late 19th century, and right up to the outbreak of World War I, hundreds of American women visited England and Europe hoping to marry aristocrats. The series character, Lady Cora, the Countess of Grantham is one such American woman.”

The exhibition and the two major exhibitions that follow it are part of the $38-million “Story of Virginia Campaign,” of which more than $31 million has been raised. “The Story of Virginia Campaign” is designed to help the VHS better utilize portions of its existing facility. This will allow for the display of even more of the Society’s collections as well as hosting more and larger events and exhibitions.

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21 22. 22.

FEBRUARY 2018 KESWICK LIFE


OBITUARY Patricia Schuler, 82, of Keswick,

passed away on February 19, 2018. Patricia was born on July 29, 1935, in Portland, Maine, to the late Robert W. Reilly and Allene Sacco Reilly. She attended Holy Names Academy and St Rose College in Albany, N.Y. Pat's love and passion for animals led her to serve as vice president of the Derry N.H. S.P.C.A and later held a position as a board member with the Virginia Thoroughbred Association (V.T.A). Pat was instrumental in bringing horse racing to Virginia. She was devoted to breeding thoroughbreds in support of the Virginia bred program. She was a devoted mother who raised six wonderful children who she loved with all of her heart. Her pride and joys were her children and grandchildren. Her happiest moments were those when the family gathered at the farm. In addition to her parents, Patricia was preceded in death by her son, Kevin Kennedy Schuler; her brother, John E. Reilly; and her sister, Roberta Jordan. Patricia is survived by her husband of 58 years, Edward Schuler. She also leaves behind five children, Deborah Fiscaletti (Mark) of Florida, Robin Durkin (Sean) of Keswick, Christopher Schuler (Donna) of Ivy, Cailin Collier (Andy) of Keswick, and Matthew Schuler of California; 10 grandchildren, two great grandchildren; and her beloved canine, Murphy. A mass of Christian Burial will be held on Friday, February 23, 2018, at 1 p.m., at Holy Comforter Catholic Church in Charlottesville, Va. A graveside service will follow the mass at Holly Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends on Thursday, February 22, 2018, from 6 until 8 p.m., at Teague Funeral Service in Charlottesville. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made in honor of Pat to the Virginia Thoroughbred Association (V.T.A) or The Cancer Center at

Martha Jefferson Hospital. Condolences may be sent to the family through www. teaguefuneralhome.com.

Walter Edgar Savory, Jr, of St.

George, Virginia and Harmon, West Virginia, died peacefully of a heart attack, Saturday, January 27, 2018, with his family at his side. Walt was born October 23, 1922, in Richmond, Virginia. He was predeceased by his parents, Margaret Travor Savory and Walter Edgar Savory Sr. of Richmond, Virginia; his daughter, Melisande Savory of St. George, Virginia; his sister, Margaret Savory Philips of Richmond, Virginia; and his son-in-law, Peter Graham Delany Sr. of Charlottesville, Virginia. Walt is survived by his loving wife of sixty-six years, Theo Housh Savory; his adoring daughter, Grenelle Savory Delany; and his two grandchildren, Peter Graham Delany Jr. and Charlotte Savory Cowles Delany. Walt was educated at John Marshall High School in Richmond and the University of Virginia. Walt enlisted in the United States Navy and served in World War II as a Navy pilot in the Pacific. Afterwards he returned to finish at the University of Virginia School of Architecture. Walt spent his active childhood years enjoying life to its fullest! He cultivated a love for adventure and the great outdoors at an early age. He grew up in the Depression and learned to combine resourcefulness and ingenuity to its greatest advantage. At age twelve he started a track line through the outskirts of Richmond, catching mink, muskrat, and beaver, and together with his paper route brought home a handsome sum for the times. He later breeded race horses for a stable in Deep Run which started a lifetime love of riding, hunting and equestrian enjoyment. Many weekends

were spent at Keswick Hunt Club watching his daughters ride off to the hounds, and upon their return, engaging in all the merriment at the Club. Walt was a Renaissance man! Upon finishing UVa, he worked at Baskerville & Sons in Richmond, and afterwards for Henderson Heyward at Baker, Heyward & Lorenz of Charlottesville, both renown architectural firms. He specialized in historical design and restoration. This knowledge was applied to the restoration of Millside Farm on South River in Stanardsville, Virginia, an historic residence originally built in 1826. During his early years at Millside, he ran a large farm, raising turkeys and cattle. In the mid-1960's he accepted a job as an architect for the Bureau of Land Management in Washington, D.C. At that time the family enjoyed living in Middleburg, Virginia, engaged in horseback riding activities and spending weekends back at Millside Farm. While at the University of Virginia, he lived on the Range in Woodrow Wilson's room and later on the Lawn next to the Colonnade Club. Also at the University he met his beautiful wife, Theo, at his Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house. Another piece of trivia, unbeknownst to Walt, his navigator on his fighter plane during World War II became his English professor at UVa. Needless to say, he passed with flying colors! Walt was larger than life to his wife, his children, his grandchildren and his many friends. He designed and built his daughter, Grenelle's house, in Charlottesville where many wonderful occasions were spent, parties were had, and Irish whiskeys consumed! No one told a story like Walt, and they were all true! He could entertain into the wee hours, and how we loved our family gatherings! Like all good times, we never wanted them to end. Walt was an avid fly fisherman and was among the best in

the sport. He knew the best trout streams and managed to catch the largest browns and rainbows when most others carried an empty kreel. Many summer family trips were spent in the Western States trout fishing, hiking and discovering areas off the beaten path. He took numerous trips to Alaska with the Bureau of Land Management and flew himself into remote lakes to fish. Walrus, whale blubber and smoked trout journeyed home in his suitcase! After retirement Walt built a cabin retreat high in the mountains in West Virginia. He and Theo loved their time together overlooking incredible views, fishing, hiking, enjoying life with each other. Walt was a prolific reader and many hours were spent leisurely sipping on hot tea engrossed in a book in front of the stone fireplace. The day Walt went to heaven he and Theo arrived at his daughter's house to watch the UVa-Duke game. It had been recorded in order for everyone to gather at one time. Walt and Theo listened to the game on the radio as they drove to Charlottesville. As he was greeted at the door, the game had just ended, and Walt happily announced that UVa had won! He didn't get to watch the game with his family; instead he quietly left with the Lord, knowing that a great game had been won! We loved you Walt, adoring husband, loving father and proud grandfather. We miss you, your love of life, your zest for adventure. No mountain was too high to climb! A memorial celebration of Walter's life will be held in the Spring at St. Paul's Church in Ivy, Va. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Operation Restored Warrior or The Covenant School Scholarship Fund..

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IVY CREEK DRIVE LOT 3 - A unique opportunity to own in Ivy Creek. Country living yet minutes from town. Build your dream home in a dream location. Surrounded by lush rolling hills, and open meadows with mountain views. An over 20 acre parcel less than 10 miles to Downtown Charlottesville. Murray/Western Albemarle district. MLS 571828. $1,950,000. Frank Hardy 434.296.0134.

frankhardy.com

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Profile for Keswick Life

Keswick Life Digital Edition February 2018  

Keswick Life Digital Edition February 2018

Keswick Life Digital Edition February 2018  

Keswick Life Digital Edition February 2018