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Sea Island, Georgia Following our successful B4 (Building Better Beverage Business™) Client Summit, IMI is pleased to announce the following management changes: Don Billings, the 24-year veteran founder and current president of IMI is ascending to the position of Chairman of Incentive Marketing, Inc. (the parent company) and will be overseeing the innovation division that includes in the Mix hospitality magazine and B to B web and mobile platforms. Larry McGinn, currently IMI’s Vice President of Sales and Marketing, has assumed the role of president of IMI and will lead the B4 agency side of the business with hospitality clients and beverage suppliers. Larry has been with IMI for 11 years, having joined Don after successful stints in the national account sales channel for beer, wine, spirits and nonalcohol suppliers. Sherry King, CFO of Incentive Marketing, Inc., joins Don, Larry and Celeste Dinos on the Board of Directors as a shareholder. About IMI: Incentive Marketing, Inc. was started by Don Billings as an incentive agency servicing numerous beverage suppliers and distributors. In 1994, Don worked with Marriott International to develop the hospitality industry’s first supplier-supported national beverage program (Marriott’s Gold Standard Beverage Program). From there, IMI has grown to service 23 national hospitality operators in the areas of beverage programming, promotions, training, education and innovation. As initiators of Creativity Meets Technology, IMI has delivered to its clients numerous web and mobile platforms that drive beverage business. Moving forward, IMI’s iManage™ web platform will revolutionize custom menu management, promotions, education and staff training, and incentives. For additional information, please contact: Larry McGinn @ Larry@IMIagency.com Don Billings @ Don@IMIagency.com Release Date: November 15, 2012

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Media Print

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Natalie Bovis is a recognized beverage consultant and mixologist. She recently has teamed up with in the Mix to broadcast her new Edible Cocktails video series with us on our Web site, ITMmag.com. Below is a review of her latest book, “Edible Cocktails: Seasonal Cocktails with a Fresh Twist.” Natalie has authored three other books: “Preggatinis™: Mixology for the Mom To Be,” “The Bubbly Bride™,” and “Your Ultimate Wedding Cocktail Guide.”

Cocktails”

by Natalie Bovis (Adams Media)

A Review by Blair Frodelius

Natalie Bovis

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Natalie Bovis is known for making some of the most delectable drinks on the planet and the ones she’s included herein are no exception. This book looks slim, but don’t let it fool you; the recipes included will easily keep you busy for a year. There are over 200 pages of amazingly creative and valuable cocktail-related information. Not only will you find many original cocktails, but the real treat here is the recipes for making your own ingredients. As more and more bartenders are looking to craft bespoke ingredients for their cocktails, this volume will prove a great launching point. Detailed instructions on how to make your own syrups, jams, jellies, shrubs, infusions, liqueurs, bitters, mixers and garnishes provide a wealth of invaluable information for anyone looking to make the leap beyond pre-bottled ingredients. This is down-to-earth stuff, not technical molecular mixology that would require you to buy expensive equipment. In other words, anyone can do it. Along with the text are plenty of gorgeous photos artfully illuminating the cocktails within. An added bonus is the contributions by other world-class bartenders about everything from mindful bartending to “greening” up your bar. Rating: A Blair Frodelius is the force behind GoodSpiritsNews.com and is a professional full-time musician, an award-winning mixologist, USBG Spirits Professional, BarSmarts Live graduate and member of the Museum of the American Cocktail. Many of his original cocktails can be found in the 75th anniversary edition of “Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide.”


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I prefer to incorporate the latest in thinking and technology when I assist a company in developing a training program. So, when it occurred that I would write an article about bartender training, I immediately turned to … the 18th century. And there I found Benjamin Franklin, known for extolling the virtues of wine, among a few other things. In this case, he was speaking about the techniques of (I’m sure it was beverage) training: “Tell me and I forget,” Franklin started. I was now thinking he was doing more than just “extolling” wine. Franklin continued, “Teach me and I may remember.” Interesting for a man who never saw a classroom after 10 years of age. But finally he got to the core of what is widely considered one of his most meaningful quotes, and that’s saying a lot: “Involve me and I learn.” In fairness, some attribute this to Confucius. And there is a similar Chinese proverb, “I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand.” However, I don’t think Confucius was involved with beverage training, not in 450 B.C., so I’m going with Franklin. Regardless, t h e “involve me and I learn” statement has been used for decades to support the ideas behind everything from Experiential Learning Theory (ELT) in higher education to technology-driven interactive training, to petting zoos. And then there are bartenders.

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I’m going to assume that you execute the standard practices just fine, and in a way that would please Franklin – tell, teach (the “why” of tell) and involve. You have training manuals, procedures, standards and perhaps additional training aids such as videos or even e-learning products. But your bartenders function unlike any other employees in your organization. They create and sell products, produce bill, accept payment for the products and interact with customers. Who else does this? No one. Your chef creates products but doesn’t accept payment, your servers accept payments and interact with customers, but don’t create products. This brings me to the Super Bowl, which is right around the corner. And I’m wondering, can we learn anything here? How does a quarterback or a defensive tackle get trained? We can’t blame Franklin for not knowing. But looking outside the food and beverage box for a better way to do things may be a smart idea. So, let’s look at football. How are football players trained? They watch the competition’s game films. They practice. They stay in shape and work at endurance. They memorize plays and calls. And they’re taught by specialists – there’s a defensive coach and an offensive coach, a kicking coach, and even a special teams coach. And finally, player stats are kept, updated and known by all.

What Benjamin Franklin Said, Or Did He? This learned and beloved “first citizen” of ours is perhaps the most widely quoted of our Founding Fathers. But is he quoted correctly? While popular sources credit Franklin with the “Tell me and I forget” quote, academic sources favor Confucius. In the beverage world, it is widely believed that Franklin exclaimed “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” Hard to argue with the statement itself, but in fact the Founding Father was writing, in a letter to Andre Morellet in 1779, about wine. In fact, Franklin even spoke of the marvels of the human elbow, placed perfectly so we could easily drink wine! (Source: Isaacson, Walter. Benjamin Franklin: An American Life. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003. pp. 374-5.) Cote de Beaune, Burgundy19

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So let’s apply this to bartender training or teaching. Better yet, let’s call it bartender development. 1. The competition’s “game films” – Have you sent your bartender to watch the competition? To watch the best bars in your city? If you’re the best bar, send them to the best bars in another city – all bars where customers like your customers would visit. 2. Practice – Do you require practice, like pouring shots for speed and accuracy? And do you have the right practice equipment? 3. Stay in shape – There are plenty of studies that correlate wellness to productivity, exercise to on-the-job success, even leadership effectiveness. Do you offer any health-related incentives to your team? 4. Memorize the plays – Memorize the recipes. When is the last time you checked against this critical ability? Have you tested the bartenders? Have you tested the consistency of your six most popular drinks? Or knowledge about the latest bourbon you added to your bar? 5. Defensive coaches vs. offensive coaches – Is your training reactive, designed to fix problems, or is it proactive? Who conducts your training? Is it assigned to one person? Is your best guest interaction trainer also your best bartending skills trainer? 6. Do you have a “special teams” coach? – Maybe the owner or general manager, someone to ensure that there is a development plan for each bartender, based on the bartender’s long term goals. 7. Finally, what are your players’ stats? – Dollars per shift? Per hour worked? Average check? Signature items sold? Ratio of food to beverage? Aligned to support your business objectives, of course.

I have no doubt Franklin would have figured this out eventually. How about “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn. Coach me like it’s the Super Bowl and we all win.” 20

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Ned Barker is a hotel industr y veteran and principal of Grill Ventures Consulting, Inc. (GrillVC.com). Specializing in F&B, GVC works with both hotel and restaurant companies. GVC’s work ranges from full concept development to operations/marketing review & analysis, to special one-off project assignments.


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well with wine. Today we have such a variety of food choices that span the flavor spectrum and craft beer has the versatility to pair with all of them. Drinkers are looking beyond the wine list in restaurants across the country, knowing that many great meals pair better with a full-bodied beer like Samuel Adams Boston Lager® than with another cabernet. ITM: Can you tell us about some of the beer and food pairings that we will experience at this year’s Epcot client event? JK: We have worked with the culinary team at EPCOT to show the versatility of the food and beer pairings and how they complement each other. Tonight, you will see Samuel Adams® Octoberfest paired with a slow-poached lobster tail with a creamy pumpkin risotto. The sweetness of the lobster is enhanced by the sweet and roasted malt character of the beer. We will also have a classic pairing of Samuel Adams Boston Lager being served with a pastureraised prime tenderloin of beef with bleu cheese mashed potatoes and pinot noir demi-glace. We also have some great pairings with our Whitewater IPA, as well as New World and Thirteenth Hour, which are both from our Barrel Room Collection.

Tiffani S. Williams, Adult Beverage & Restaurant Marketing, HMSHost, Afsaneh Sheibani, Marketing Standards, HMSHost, Ana Merino, Guest of HMSHost’s, Doug Draper, Alison Jessie, Multi-Media Marketing, HMSHost.

ITM: Chef Damon, what was it like working with Samuel Adams beers on these pairings? Chef: I was excited to be a part of creating these beer and food pairings. The brewers have a vast knowledge that we were able to tap into, making it a fun and educational experience. With the wide range of flavor profiles of the Samuel Adams beers, we were able to create some fantastic pairings, like my personal favorite, the butter-poached lobster with Samuel Adams Octoberfest.

Scott Hempstead (center), Director On-Premise National Accounts, with Chef Dale Reynolds, Chef Damon Lauder and the culinary team at Walt Disney Properties.

ITM: When creating food and beer pairings, what do you look for in a beer? Chef: One thing we look for is contrast, to create balance. For example, hoppier beers will cut some of a food’s richness. We also look at characteristics that will complement the food, like a beer’s citrus notes, which match the flavors in many seafood dishes. ITM: If you had to choose one food and beer pairing, what would it be? JK: Boston Lager and beef. The upfront malt flavor matches the meat’s caramelized flavors, and its hoppy finish prepares the palate for the next bite.

FROM LEFT: Andrew Shipe, Vice President Marketing, ARAMARK Sports & Entertainment, Sarah Longwell, ABI, Bill McClure, iMi Agency, Doug Nason, Chateau Ste. Michelle. in the Mix www.intheMixMagazine.com

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Raspberry Truffle Mocha Cocoa Pictured Right. Makes 1 drink • • • •

6 oz dark chocolate cocoa pre-mix, HOT (right) 2 shots espresso 3/4 oz Monin Raspberry Puree Swirl of raspberry white chocolate whip (see recipe)

Garnish: drizzle of raspberry puree, shaved chocolate Measure dark chocolate cocoa pre-mix into mug. Add in espresso and puree. Stir well. Top with a swirl of raspberry white chocolate whip.

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LEGAL

It's Party Time! If you have licensed venues, there is a good chance you host events in them. You need to be aware that working on events with your wholesalers and with alcohol suppliers can be restricted due to the tied house laws and trade practice regulations. Whether a supplier or wholesaler wants to host their own event at your premises, or whether you are interested in finding out about sponsorship of your own or charitable events onsite, you need to be aware of what the rules are. The tied house laws prevent anyone in another tier giving you anything of value, with only limited exceptions, so the payments and drinks and POS that flow for any parties and special events need to be carefully monitored to make sure you are staying within legal boundaries. Many states place restrictions on how many supplier or wholesaler events can be held in each of your restaurants and bars, on how much can be spent and on who can attend. To add to those complications, each state has its own rules which can vary quite a bit from place to place. Whether it is a party for five hundred people or a supplier rep stopping by to buy promotional drinks for your customers, this can be a very tricky area to navigate when you are trying to do business in a wide range of states. Currently, many states are changing and reworking the exceptions to their tied house laws that allow events to be held by suppliers and wholesalers in retail locations and which allow for sponsorship of events by spirit, wine and beer brands. The states also have widely varying rules on whether retail employees

and consumers can be given samples of product by suppliers and wholesalers and whether and how a retailer can receive free product from a supplier or wholesaler to use at events. On February 12, 2013, Kate Hardy from the Nixon Peabody Beverage Alcohol Team will be highlighting some of the recent developments in this area, in key markets across the country at the Hospitality Law Conference.

Kate Hardy practices exclusively in beverage alcohol law and advises suppliers and retailers, on-premise, off-premise and online, on effective ways to manage their licensed businesses. She grew up in wineries in Australia and France and has been combining a love of wine with the practice of law for nearly fifteen years, most recently in New York City. Nixon Peabody LLP represents a wide range of clients throughout the beverage alcohol industry, complemented by the broad resources of a full-service, national law firm, with sophisticated practices in IP/trademark, tax, environmental, real estate, employment, private equity financing, and M&A law.

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the Soul of

FLOWERS by Helen Benefield Billings

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The Plaza Pomona by Brittany Chardin, President Atlanta Chapter USBG SINGLE RECIPE 1 oz American Fruits Black Currant Cordial (chilled) 4 oz Lieb Family Cellars Blanc de Blancs, NY Sparkling Wine (chilled) ½ oz Local Honey Syrup* (Chilled) If honey syrup and liqueur are not chilled, pour over ice in mixing glass to chill and strain into flute; top with sparkling wine. * Local Honey Syrup: Mix equal parts of honey and warm water; stir to dissolve honey. Will keep for 6 months, in airtight plastic or glass container at room temperature. Can be kept cold for service.

**The local honey syrup may also be mixed with the liqueur in advance into store-n-pour quart containers and kept chilled for service. BANQUET RECIPE (Makes 76 portions for 6 oz glasses) 12 bottles of Lieb Blanc de Blanc 6 (375 ml) Bottles of American Fruits Black Currant Cordial 1 qt local honey syrup * ** See note above on batching cordial and syrup for banquet service.

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Dad was a member of the Chaine de Rotisseurs and the Physicians Wine Guild, and I adopted his passion for cooking and fine French wines. He let me take tastes of many different wines, both at home and when we dined out. Not only did he love to cook, but we also used to frequent the restaurants of the classic 1960s hotels like the Fountainbleu, Doral and Eden Roc. Back then, if it was fine dining, the restaurant genre virtually had to be French. Smitten by all of this, by the time I turned 15 years old I was learning to cook and reading books about the history and traditions of the French wine regions. Of course, you could not read about the wines without encountering a detailed account of the gastronomy. I also learned about the great gastronomes in history. Prosper Montagné, Auguste Escoffier, Antonin Carême and la Varenne became my culinary heroes. Their names were more meaningful to me than the ‘60s sports heroes, like Johnny Unitas or Yogi Berra were to my brothers. Yes, I was quite the young geek! For my 15th birthday I got an omelet pan – I swear. All the other kids in the neighborhood were out riding their bikes or throwing around the pigskin, while I was in the kitchen whipping up a Gruyère omelet. Thanks, Mom. The thing that really sealed the deal for me came in high school when I learned if I asked for French wine in a liquor store they would never ask for identification. “A nice bottle of Corton, please,” and I was in. My expertise was understandably very limited and my ability to pronounce the wines in French was limited to two syllables. I focused on the reds of Burgundy, my father’s favorite region. We would buy a couple of bottles of two-syllable Burgundy, do a little shopping at a gourmet store and then head off to the beach with our booty. I would cook escargots, bubbling up in their shells with garlic and butter in a Dutch oven, and grill duck over the charcoal. People around us flipping burgers and drinking beer thought we were nuts; we sure thought we were cool.

BELOW: French Gastronome, Auguste Escoffier BOTTOM LEFT: Layered mousse by French Master Chef Antonin Car ême BOTTOM RIGHT: La Varenne's three books, "The French Cook," "The French Pastry Chef," "The French Confectioner."

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Fish soup recipe from Waverly Root’s "The Food of France."

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An old copy of the encyclopedic “Larousse Gastronomique” (left) became my bible. I even named my dog after the author later in life. Specifically my copy was the 1961 Crown edition, which was the first English translation of the monumental work, and not the more modern and watered down (but certainly more practical) version. I could spend hours perusing the pages and reveling in the lore – entries about sumptuous banquets, biographies of culinary superstars, and the vague, sketchy recipes that often seem insane by any standard today. One of my favorite recipes is for meat extract. It starts out with ingredients calling for a calf (or one-quarter of a beef carcass), two dozen old hens, a couple of sheep and a large pot. Large pot … no kidding. The trivia and information in this book, which you can find relatively easily and cheaply on Amazon.com, is wonderful for anyone with a penchant for learning about pre-World War II wine and wine with foods, and deepening their understanding of French food and wine. And it is not only a great resource, but a lot of the information is really a hoot! Another seminal book for me, written by an American in 1958, is Waverly Root’s “The Food of France.” The book divides France into three primary domains, based on the principal type of oil mainly used in different regions: olive oil, butter or lard. This ingenious approach demonstrates how climate and terrain dictate what can be grown, and how regions at opposite borders can share very common elements used in defining the cuisine. Where you have mountains and colder climates, lard is the only logical choice – olive trees don’t grow and cows are not practical for the terrain. Where olive trees flourish, you will be in a much warmer climate. Leeks, garlic and fresh herbs are bountiful, along with the rice and even the similarity of fish that come from the warmer Mediterranean waters. Find arable land and a cool climate such as in the north, and voilà – butter and cream. Compare a Mediterranean fish soup, redolent with olive oil, garlic and saffron, with one from the north containing butter, cream and possibly potatoes, and you’ll easily see how long ago the regions shaped the cuisines. This book was instrumental in creating the sense of connectedness between products and places for me. For most of my early career as a chef, and even when I entered the wine trade in 1979, I was immersed in French cuisine and was a diehard Francophile in terms of my wine preferences. I was really confident of my knowledge of the classic wine and food matches. I could dazzle people with the regional rationale and all of the pseudo-sciences that explain why certain


wines match best with certain foods. I became so good at this that I became internationally recognized as a wine and food guru. For many years, I lived in the delusion that I really, really understood wine and food affinities and matching based on region and tradition. It went something like, “The reason oysters have such a perfect affinity with chablis is due primarily to the calcareous soils of the region, which we all know are the Paris basin Kimmeridgean limestone deposits of early brachiopods and ancient oyster beds from the Cretaceous era, impacting the vine and shaping the aromatic minerality and affecting the acidity of the chablis, which illustrates the synergy of the land and the vine in creating gastronomic harmony.” But something was eating at me (figuratively speaking), and deep down inside, I was also feeling more and more like something was very wrong with a lot of the principles and premises for my wine and food matching wisdoms. As my further exposure to the world of wines began to expand in the 1980s and beyond, I began to note the many inconsistencies and uncertainties in my own stories, as well as in the information I used to teach others the “art” of wine and food. The more focus I put on what I thought was traditional, classical and irrefutable pairings, the more I began to observe the vast differences in how people experienced and evaluated not only the same wine, but also the same combinations of wine with food. Certainly two people, even experts, could be in polar opposition about the quality of many wines. And two experts could eat the exact same food with the exact same wine and come up with completely different opinions about whether the match was good or not. Over the past 20 years, I have spent a lot of time critically rethinking much of what I had held for so long as sacred, traditional and even immutable premises for the correct matching of wine and food. One could say I have come full circle, and I find that I am taking a more balanced approach, which has actually allowed me to deepen my knowledge and certainly my love. Sure, the bistros in Paris served fresh Bélon oysters with the traditional crisp, dry wines of muscadet. That being said, this particular wine was served in the bistros as a matter of fashion, convenience and logistics. It was that a restaurant or bistro featuring the Bélon oysters would proudly feature the wines of the area. But don’t forget that if you found the wines too dry and acidic, it was equally fashionable to order a Kir, a mixture of dry white wine and crème de cassis, and enjoy the wine sweetened, with a blush of color. And while the combination of muscadet and oysters may have been the local pairing of the coastal regions

where muscadet and Bélon oysters share a common origin, if you went to the Bordeaux coastal region of Arcachon Bay, where you will find an equal passion for their local oysters and their local wines, it was customary to enjoy your oysters with local red wines and little salty lamb sausages. And if you look carefully in the pages of “Larousse Gastronomique,” you will find a wine and food chart, added to the original text in the 1961 translation, that shows intensely sweet wines, even Chateau d’Yquem, recommended to be served with hors d’oeuvres, fish and crustaceans! Just a couple of years ago I was researching material for my presentation at a wine conference. I had opened up my copy of “Larousse Gastronomique” to look for some information and came across something I missed over my forty-plus years of scouring the pages. Under a section on the proper service of wines are the instructions, “As soon as the third service has succeeded the roasts … the Bordeaux-Lafite, the delicious Romanée, the Hermitage, the Cote Rotie, or, if the guest prefers, the white wines of Bordeaux, the Sauternes, the Saint-Péray, should be served.” What? Bring out the big-gun reds and then offer white and sweet wines, “if the guest prefers”? What about the wine and food matching, the immutable laws of wine and food pairing and the inviolable elements of tradition! Turns out, I have been wrong all this time. Once again in my life, it turns out the more I learn the more amazed I am with how much more there is to discover. But for me today, I have renounced my once-adamant stance that there are irrefutable wine and food combinations. I am now convinced we need to return to the true spirit of hospitality and encourage all wine lovers to feel completely at ease enjoying the wines they love the most, with the foods they desire.

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It all goes back to the principle so clearly stated in “Larousse Gastronomique,” that the choice between red or white, dry or sweet wine, should always be to offer choices with every course and make sure that our ideals of wine and food pairings are put aside, “if the guest prefers.”

My unabashed passion for French cuisine and French wines has never diminished and the love affair continues to this day. When I am entertaining, I still love to cook classic French foods and truly love to immerse myself and others in the rich diversity of French wines. But you can bet I do not impose my idealistic wine and food Here are the principles of truly great French wine pairing folly on my guests. When you come to my and food: house, you can have white wine with the lamb, red with your oysters, and you will probably be 1. Be proud of your history, land and culture. thunderstruck at how wonderful the wrong wines 2. Grow food and grapes with great care; then can be with most dishes. I will serve the wines I prepare your cuisine and make your wine with love but am always delighted to open another passion. bottle of something different, if my guests prefer. 3. Ensure your love of family and community are always held in greater importance than propriety and any sort of false rules of wine Tim Hanni MW A wine and hospitality industry consultant, and food matching. 4. Eat the foods and drink the wines that you love educator, and consumer researcher. He has worked in the wine industry for more than thirty-five years the most. and is one of the first two resident Americans 5. When you share wine with others, offer your to successfully complete the examination for, guests a choice of wines and do not presume and earn the credential of, Master of Wine. He is everyone is going to like the intense dry red or also a professionally-trained chef and a Certified high-acidity dry white wines, regardless of our Wine Educator accredited by the Society of Wine personal passions or convictions. Educators. timhanni.com

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Regional Food and Wines Burgundy is the center of France, both literally and figuratively. Known for worldclass wines and food, Burgundy has been one of the most powerful areas of France since the days of Charlemagne. By the time the Romans conquered Gaul in 51 A.D., vineyards were probably already in existence in Burgundy, and by 1098 the Cistercians, a group of Roman Catholic monks, had built an abbey and created the first walled vineyard, called a “clos.” Furthermore, Burgundy's strategic location, between northern and southern Europe, made it a center for trade as well as an influential political center with many monasteries and churches. All of these factored into creating what is one of the most interesting and exciting destinations in France today. Burgundian contributions to French cuisine are numerous. From the eponymous boeuf bourguignon, a slow-cooked beef stew, to the gougères, the original cheese puff, to escargot, the garlicky snails cooked in butter, to pan-fried frog legs, Burgundy has made its mark on French cuisine. Stroll into a local bistro in Dijon or Beaune and you will likely be offered jambon persillé, ham chunks with parsley in aspic. Burgundian black truffles, while not as well known as those from Perigord, are also highly prized and come with a much more affordable price tag. Truffled saucisson is not unusual to find as part of a midday snack with a local cheese and a glass of wine. Cheese is another specialty of Burgundy. With the largest herds of goats in France, excellent chèvre is found everywhere. Citeaux, a mild washed-rind cheese made by monks, is an approachable, soft cow's milk cheese made from raw milk and aged for three weeks. Epoisses, perhaps the most aromatic cheese in all of France, is a pungent, raw milk cow's cheese favored by Napoleon and referred to by Brillat-Savarin as the “King of All Cheeses.” Washed with local marc de bourgogne, epoisses develops an orange-red rind and an ivory runny interior that pairs well with dessert wines. 56

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ABOVE: Grand Cru Vineyard near Fixin, Cote de Nuits RIGHT: Chateau de Corton


Wine is certainly important to Burgundy and the world's most expensive wine, Domaine La Romanee-Conti hails from the Cotes d'Or. Essentially, there are five wine districts in Burgundy (also known as “vignoblesâ€?) and two primary grapes, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (some smaller varietals do exist, including Gamay and Aligote). About 60 percent of the wine produced in Burgundy is white wine, with 30 percent devoted to red wine and 10 percent to sparkling wines known as CrĂŠmant de Bourgogne. The most northerly region, Chablis, is famous for its Chardonnay-based white wines. Next comes the Cote d'Or, which is actually divided into two districts, the Cotes de Nuits and the Cote de Beaune, which are the heart of Burgundian excellence. The Cotes de Nuits contains 24 of the 25 Grand Cru designated red wines in Burgundy, while the Cote de Beaune is home to every Grand Cru white wine in Burgundy. Farther south, the Cote Challonaise produces a mix of red and white wines, while the Maconnais produces a large volume of white table wines. Beaujolais, officially part of Burgundy, is even farther south and produces Gamay-based wines under different rules and classifications. Burgundy wines are classified by Cru rankings. Grand Cru is the highest rating, and there are only 32 Grand Cru sites in all of Burgundy. Premier Cru wines are the next highest quality, while the village or communal appellation will just state the name of the town that the wine is from. Furthest down the list are regional appellations like Bourgogne, or sub-regional appellations like Bourgogne Hauts-Cotes des Nuits. While this can be confusing, the overall quality of Burgundian wines is quite good and even wines at the lower classifications can offer a good wine experience. While the best way to experience Burgundy is to visit the region, walk among the vineyards and eat the local foods, many of the best food and wines of Burgundy are readily available in the United States. Use your own palate as a guide and discover the treasures of Burgundy's great food and wine. in the Mix www.intheMixMagazine.com

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Marc, France’s Other Brandy After finishing a meal in an Italian restaurant, I like to order grappa to accompany my dessert. Grappa, the Italian pomace brandy, has caught on in better restaurants and bars in the last decade. France has a similar pomace brandy, made from the leftovers of the winemaking process, but marc brandy has yet to gain the following of grappa. Instead, France's last undiscovered brandy, marc, remains a mystery to most. Cognac and armagnac are perhaps the greatest brandies in the world, so that may explain why marc brandies are overlooked. Distribution is also limited, with only a small number of marc brandies coming into the United States. Even in France, marc takes a backseat to cognac and armagnac, often being dismissed as an old man’s drink. Luckily, those who take the time to discover marc are in for a delicious surprise. Marc brandies are distilled from grape pomace leftover from the winemaking process. In Burgundy, the b es t ma rc br an d ies ar e ma de from s ome of the top vineyards in the Cotes d'Or. Producer Did ier Meuz a rd actually takes his still into the vineyards in places like Cotes de Nuits and GevreyChambertin, where the pomace is distilled one time (as it is for armagnac) before being stored in oak barrels. His Vieux Marc de Bourgogne, an 18-year old marc brandy, offers an intriguing bouquet of freshly-roasted almonds, honeysuckle and oak, while offering dried plum and raisin notes on the palate. Gabriel Boudier, another Burgundian marc producer, offers both a young, fiery three-year old brandy as well as an elegant but powerful 50-year old Tres Vieux Marc de Bourgogne. While marc is made outside Burgundy, the best French marc comes from Burgundy alone. World-class Chardonnay grapes (and to a lesser extent, Pinot Noir) create this undiscovered treasure of France. Pair Marc de Bourgogne with crêpes suzette, a Tarte Tatin or any fruitbased dessert for a memorable pairing that is both French and still new to most Americans. 58

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BELOW: Chateau GevreyChambertin, Cote de Nuits


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hangin’ C ’ A e r A es, They - The Tim dward M. Korry by E

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Valley within the four walls of the dining room. Tasting Tuesdays was engineered to introduce new wines to guests by offering two-ounce pours of three carefully selected wines. The app is intended to complement this tasting by explaining the flavor profile, telling a compelling story and offering three additional factoids for each wine. All of the instructions and downloads are available through a QR code printed on the mat, so the guest can get started immediately. From there, it is a self-guided tour, and the guest is able to set their own pace. This makes the experience manageable for the servers, bartenders and management so that they can focus on what they do best, which is providing excellent food and beverage service. The app is certainly feature rich, but for real staying power, it needs to be “sticky”. This is an industry term used to describe the ability of an app to hold the users’ attention and bring them back multiple times. Carrabba’s Uncorked has several “sticky” features, such as a wine diary, comments and ratings, social integration and reward badges. For every intended action, such as completing a wine tasting, passing a quiz or just adding a wine to the diary, the user is presented with a badge of honor and a humorous anecdote. In some cases, the guest is also presented with a free appetizer or other similar offer. In the short few weeks this app has been in market, it has seen incredible success. As of press time, this app has had a top grossing week of 1,873 downloads. The app has also been praised by several industry

professionals and bloggers alike, one of whom referred to the app as, “one of the most innovative uses of technology I’ve seen for tasting of food and drink...” The response from Carrabba’s guests has been just as passionate. Currently the app is only available on the iPhone, but development of the Android version has begun and will be available in early 2013. Technology at the table can be a risky proposition. When poorly designed, it can distract from the food and beverage experience. However, the reward for getting it right has an equally significant positive effect. Guests who interact with their smartphones at the table are looking for an enhanced dining experience. This was Shelly’s vision when she served up Carrabba’s Uncorked, two ways. DEVELOPMENT TEAM: IMI AGENCY, ATL KING FISH MEDIA, SALEM CHANNEL V MEDIA, NYC Adam Billings comes from a business marketing background but has spent the past 5 years developing online tools for the hospitality industry. Most recently his focus has been concentrated on cross-platform integration and mobile device management. Adam advises companies on the latest web communication platforms and mobile solutions. adam@IMIagency.com

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B4 Summit attendees consisted of on-premise national account operators, brand suppliers and distributors. The topics of discussion covered a wide array of relevant, intriguing subjects.

Dynamic opening keynote speaker Joey Reiman, CEO and founder of BrightHouse, fired up attendees with his inspiring and unforgettable point of view in “Putting Purpose in the Mix,” a purpose-driven approach to marketing, innovation and leadership.

“iManage Technology,” presented by Adam Billings, Director, Tech no lo g y & Innovation at IMI, showed us a suite of tools to help manage menus, promotions and training.

“Hospitality Next” was presented by Tony Rizzaro, founder of C4 Integrated Solutions. Rizzaro offered fascinating details of his groundbreaking Mobile Vir tual Promotional Platform, the first of its kind. A lively discussion followed. See Tony's article on Augmented Reality, page 104. 74

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Tim Kirkland, CEO of Renegade Hospitality Group, d is c u s s ed “ F u n d a m e n t a l s ,” whic h fo c u s ed on guest in t er ac t ion , communication and call-to-action.

Tony Abou-Ganim, The Modern Mixologist, presented an engaging session about renewed focus on quality and training, at the Beach Club movie theater following a private screening of “Tony & Tina’s Negroni.” This was a brilliant short film created specifically for the B4 Summit, with a spotlight on customer service and training.

Terry Muth, media buyer, shared ideas in breakout sessions on strategic media planning for national promotional and marketing campaigns.

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Ryanne Carrier and the beverage team a t T h e C l o i ste r H o te l h o s t e d a bl ind w ine t a st i n g i n t he Cl o iste r w i n e c e l l a r, aptly na me d “ B l i n d o f f t h e V i ne : H ow G o o d i s Yo u r N o se ?”

“The Innovation Zone” made it s debut in whic h creative concepts, innovative marketing and equipment , as wel l as new media t ools , were present ed in a c asual, hands- on fashion . Participants were Viking Range , C ardinal Inc ., Napa Technolog y, IMI C reat ive S er vices , C O RE™ ( C hildren o f Rest aurant Employees ) ( see st or y page 110 ) and i n the M i x Magazine .

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Larry McGinn mo de ra te d a panel of l e a d i n g exe cuti ve s fro m the hot el, c a su a l di ning a nd di stri buto r channels, di sc u ssi n g stra te g i e s a nd tac t ic s for e n h a n c i n g the g ue st e xpe ri e nce while se l l i n g m o re a nd be tte r beve ra ges.

Larry McGinn, newly appointed president of IMI, shared with the B4 participants IMI’s purpose moving forward: “A few years back, we took a look at our mission statement at IMI and determined that we are all about Building Better Beverage Business™ (B4) for our clients. As the Irish saying goes, “A rising tide lifts all boats.” When we help our clients develop their successful beverage program, our clients and their beverage partners prosper.” CORE (Children of Restaurant Employees) was well represented and held a board meeting on site. A generous contribution was made by in the Mix Magazine on behalf of the B4 Summit participants. Outgoing CORE Chairman Brian Yost of Live Nation announced Joe Smith of Monin Gourmet Flavorings as his successor.

And a huge shout out to Jen Robinson, The Duchess, who expertly organized this unique event, made it all look seamless and with a smile on her face. Along with Gena Berry, CPCE Culinary Works, Diane Svehlak, Dress the Drink, Desserts and Foods, and Jon Shirley, JPS Productions. And a special thanks to the Sea Island F&B team for going the extra mile.

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This flurry of activity took place in the relatively short time of three days. It was an engaging venue featuring receptions, breakouts and dinners, all geared to showcase the latest creativity and mixology ideation. We could not have asked for a more striking setting than The Cloister at Sea Island in the Golden Isles of Georgia’s coast. TOP: The Marsh Grass Bluegrass Band played for the group at Rainbow Island

RIGHT: Adam Billings of IMI with Missi Holle of Kobrand Fine Wine and Spirits FAR RIGHT: IMI’s Christine Brennan and Maggie Daley welcomed the participants

RIGHT: Mo Kennedy, Ste. Michelle Wine Estates and Brian Yost of LiveNation FAR RIGHT: Clay Hall of Francis Ford Coppola Winery and Vanessa Ortiz of BACARDI National Accounts On Premise

RIGHT: Jeff Bartfield of Proximo Spirits and Helen Benefield Billings FAR RIGHT: Missi Holle of Kobrand Fine Wine and Spirits, Carolyn White of Trinchero Family Estates and Robert Gonzales with Remy USA

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FAR LEFT: Clarissa Clark of Mike's Hard Lemonade and Wes Cort of Norwegian Cruise Lines LEFT: Don Billings greets the participants

FAR LEFT: John Maggio of Patrón Spirits, Tony Abou-Ganim and Donna Frederick of Beam Inc. LEFT: Nicole Hannon of Outback Steakhouse and Rob Kring of Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc.

“Our mission was to have our customers leave The Cloister at Sea Island with the knowledge and tools to activate cutting edge, guest-f a c i n g , busine ss-bui ldi ng beverage initiatives with three things in mind: information, innovation and activation.” – Larry McGinn, President, IMI

LEFT: Celeste Dinos of IMI and Greg Rees of Moet Hennessy

FAR LEFT: Macayla Peterson of IMI and Beth Marr of Deutsch Family Wine and Spirits LEFT: Jamie Conahan of Folio Wine Partners with Dianna Stoffer of IHG We at in the Mix and IMI extend special thanks to all of you who took time from your schedules to attend the B4 Summit. in the Mix www.intheMixMagazine.com

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Thank You to Our B4 Summit Sponsors

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Please enjoy responsibly Š Diageo 2011

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Hospitality NeXT

In a Connected Digital World, Brand-in-Hand Experiences Are the Key to Customer Activation and Growth, On and Off Premise.

“We see a bright future for the hospitality industry filled with innovative interactive game-changing mobile consumer experiences,” says Tony Rizzaro, CEO of C4 Integrated Solutions. “Even though that future vision is now, it’s only just begun.”

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Adver torial


Hospitality’s adoption of digital

technology began more than a decade ago.

In the early 1990s, the hospitality industry adopted the then state-of-the-art Web-based point-of-sale (POS) system, the Professional Promotional Manager (PPM) which was created by Online Design, Mr. Rizzaro’s first company. With this on-demand print system, brands and venues alike were able to tailor all of their point-ofsale printed materials by account (local level) while maintaining the national look and feel. While these systems are still in use today, technological advancements and mobile innovation have raced ahead.

What a difference two decades makes. New technologies, mobile innovations and consumer adoption of smartphones have created exciting opportunities for hospitality and spirits marketers ready to seize the first-mover advantage in the next phase of smart mobile marketing.

Apple sold 5 million iPhone 5s in a weekend. Think about it: Apple introduced the iPhone in 2007; since then we’ve seen explosive growth of smartphones, tablets, and mobile devices. Consumers of these electronic devices are also clamoring for a better, faster, and more convenient way to connect with your brands and products. And all by using their smartphone, which is never more than three feet away.

Hospitality’s B IG oppo rt uni t y i s t o evo l ve t o a mobile

ecosystem for brand activation.

90% of consumers trust peer recommendations over ads and promotions.

Delighting consumers with unforgettable experiences is at the core of the hospitality industry. Using the ubiquitous smartphone, with its ability to deliver engaging and immersible infotainment at any time of day, has become the new keystone of the mobile marketing ecosystem. Open up new avenues where you can further reach your consumers, to drive awareness and activation. Think of smartphones as a mini hand-held kiosk, the perfect shopping companion, or a trustworthy “know-it-all” tool.

Adver torial

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What’s i n i t fo r me as t he venue?

25% of search results for the world ’s top 20 brands are links to user-generated content.

Wait s ta f f

Granted, without satisfied and loyal customers, your venue would not survive, but you are probably asking yourselves, “What’s in it for me?” Wouldn’t you like to know what’s hot, what’s not, and what your consumers want the most? Customer experience data can be measured and aggregated into one enormous focus group. Venue and brand can now take the pulse of the customer on an ongoing basis, without having to wait weeks for results. Ondemand reports can spotlight patrons’ likes and interests, by venue, company, or region. Data can be infinitely sliced and diced to help improve ROI. Management can make product decisions with greater speed (e.g., Are mojitos selling? What would make a better mojito?). And because data is captured in real-time, it can be tied to a sale through the point-of-sale system.

t ra i n i n g so l u t i o ns go g ree n.

A well-trained wait staff is your greatest asset. The smartphone makes training easier, effective and more efficient. Most wait staff have a personal mobile device. Training can be pushed out or accessed on a regular basis. No need to go online, review paperwork, or print costly binders. Staff can check their device before their shift, and can use their mobile device as a “cheat sheet” so information is at their fingertips. Impressing patrons with their knowledge often means a bigger tip. And mobile device training keeps everything green. It’s been said, “You can’t improve what you can’t measure.” By capturing real-time training data, you’ll know which staff members have completed training, how well they’re doing or if they require help.

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Our first stop outside the United States was the Mexican island of Cozumel. We were told by the travel agent that we may have a hard time getting proper transportation and care for Arthur outside the United States, but we were quickly and pleasantly surprised by the care and consideration given to him by everyone on the island. The people of Cozumel went out of their way, and every effort was taken to ensure that his comfort and needs were met. Our tour guide’s name was Diego. He took an immediate shine to Arthur, even declaring that Arthur should be called “King Arthur” by everyone else! He stated that, for today, “Cozumel will be called Arthur’s Island,” once again embarrassing our family with so much attention. Although it was a cooler, mostly cloudy day on Cozumel, we were set to swim with the dolphins. Our older children, Jack, age 11, and Sophia, age 10, will tell you that this was the “best experience ever.” We did the “Push, Pull, and Swim” package. I would describe the feel of the dolphins as a warm and wet leather couch. The dolphins’ beauty, grace, and strength were beyond anything we ever expected – truly an awe-inspiring experience.

Grand Cayman was what I would call laid back. “No rush to get anywhere anytime soon” should be their motto. And as they say, “While in Rome, do as the Romans do.” So we enjoyed a day of forgetting our cares and worries as we relaxed on a seven-mile beach. As with Cozumel, the people on Grand Cayman went out of their way to ensure Arthur’s comfort. They even went so far as to carry him and his wheelchair nearly a quarter mile down the sandy beach to our own private spot. Again, the boy was living like a king. While at the beach, we stayed in the water for most of the day. We watched as ships came and went and witnessed huge storms far out at sea, but mostly just enjoyed each other’s company. Castaway Cay (pronounced “key”) is Disney’s very own private island and was our last stop on our vacation. Once used as a stopover for drug runners, the island is now unmistakably Disney. With water bluer than anything I’ve ever seen and not a single thing out of place, it is what my wife described as “absolute paradise.” We enjoyed a day of fun activities and delicious food in a setting that could only be described as storybook. Pure Disney! Later in the day my older son asked my wife to help build a sand castle. As they were building, she could not help but feel a touch of sadness. She wondered where the time went, not only on the trip, but the time in our lives as well. Could this be the last time her son would want his mom to help build a sand castle? What would happen to our family as our kids got older? As tears rolled down her cheeks, she looked out into the water and saw me with our daughter, and then looked up at Arthur, sleeping under a palm tree with his grandma. Then she realized that no matter where the time had gone or what may happen in the future, she had this moment, with her family, to enjoy and be thankful for, all because of a beautiful boy named Arthur. Through time, people have sailed around the world searching for treasure. We have the great fortune of having our treasure with us all the time. His name is Arthur and at this moment, he just happens to be underneath a palm tree on a beautiful island. Who knew? 112

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Crazy

by Barry Wiss, CWE, CSS

For France! Answers at itmmag.com

Barry Wiss is VP of Trade Relations at Trinchero Family Estates and serves on the Board of Directors and Examiners for the Society of Wine Educators

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