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INDY PARKS

GOLF FACILITIES STUDY

NOVEMBER 2018


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Coffin Golf Course

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


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TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Introduction

6

2

Golf Operations Analysis

12

3

Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

36

4

Site Analysis

72

5

Opinion of Probable Costs

200

6

Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

238


4

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document summarizes a thorough evaluation of the 13 public golf courses owned by Indy Parks. This is an important evaluation given that the 13 courses owned by Indy Parks comprise about 1,800 acres of land. The study was undertaken in order to outline trends in the golf industry, to determine how many courses the Indianapolis golf market can support, to identify which courses ought to remain and which courses may be good candidates for transition to other uses, and to explore potential reuse scenarios. The evaluation of each course consisted of site visits and interviews with staff and vendor operators, an architectural inventory and analysis of buildings and structures, and an inventory of the physical condition of each course including access, parking, cart paths, bridges, vegetation, erosion control measures, and site amenities. The analysis of existing facilities to remain included an estimate of the capital expenditures likely required to maintain and improve the facilities over the next 20 years. This equates to about $27.3M. Of this amount, $6.3M is estimated to be required for buildings and facilities, and $21M is required for site improvements.

The Golf Operations Analysis documents the fact that the Indy Parks portfolio faces the same industry trends as the national picture: demand has declined steadily since 2000, and participation has declined at an even faster rate, due in large part to generational shifts. Many municipalities are taking steps to determine the right number, locations, and golf experience types that can be supported by the current and future market. Fortunately, the current model of concessionaire operated courses has somewhat insulated Indy Parks from many of the problems and losses experienced by other municipalities across the United States. Going forward however, national and local trends will put added pressure on the ability to maintain revenues and control expenses. This study is a result of the proactive recognition of the need to adjust the Indy Parks golf portfolio, update the structure of concessionaire agreements, and plan for future capital expenditures. These actions will help balance the need to preserve and continue to offer golf as a key recreational benefit to Indy Parks constituents, while being fiscally responsible and adapting to changing market needs. Anyone reading this report may benefit from this condensed summary of the most important specific takeaways: •• Rounds played in the Indianapolis golf market area have declined 21% in the last 7 years •• Revenues have fallen 9.6% in the last 7 years •• The local golf market is oversupplied by about 10% •• Demand is projected to decline another 20% by 2025 •• After 2035, demand is projected to fall by 40%-60% of 2018 demand •• Net revenue generated by the Indy Parks courses was about $471,000 in 2017, but this revenue is produced almost entirely by 4 of the 13 courses in the portfolio (Eagle Creek, Sarah Shank, Pleasant Run and Sahm). •• More than 60% of the revenue produced goes to debt service on improvements to Eagle Creek Golf Course •• Courses envisioned to remain golf facilities are estimated to require $27.3M in capital expenditures over the next 20 years. Of this amount, it is likely $14.5M will be required for irrigation systems alone


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As a part of this study, a methodology for comparing golf course redevelopment potential was developed. To better understand the opportunities at each of these facilities, this analysis included neighboring land uses, market fundamentals, operational efficiencies, and local park need for the areas surrounding the 13 municipal golf facilities in Indianapolis. The Riverside Regional Park Master Plan, adopted in 2017, recommended the transition of Riverside and South Grove Golf Courses to alternative public recreation uses. The outcomes of the analysis undertaken by this study have resulted in the additional recommendation to re-purpose Thatcher and Whispering Hills Golf Courses. Even with the re-purposing of Riverside, South Grove, Thatcher and Whispering Hills, there is an adequate supply of public golf options available to the local golf market.

The Indy Parks Comprehensive Master Plan has identified gaps in services in park facilities and programs in the neighborhoods surrounding Thatcher and Whispering Hills. As a part of this study, a further analysis of local demographic and real estate trends explores the redevelopment potential of these two courses, and provides an understanding of the neighborhoods surrounding Thatcher and Whispering Hills. In addition, study of the local watersheds, changing land uses, and existing environmental and ecological conditions resulted in three redevelopment concepts for each course. After review and feedback from Indy Parks, one preferred concept for each course was put forth.

The preferred Thatcher concept proposes the implementation of a natural wetland area to improve detention and water quality within the Mill Run and Eagle Creek watersheds, and creates a direct connection across Vermont Street to the existing Thatcher Park site to the south. Walking trails, picnic areas, multi-use playfields, an adventure play experience, off-leash dog park, and a performance venue round out the recommendations for the reuse of Thatcher Golf Course.

The Whispering Hills preferred concept includes shared-use nature trails, a drone racing course, a natural prairie restoration area, solar farm, sledding hill, and archery range that take advantage of the site’s existing conditions reflecting its former use as a landfill and quarry site.


6

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


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INTRODUCTION 08

Purpose of the Plan - Issue At Hand

09

How to Use the Plan

09

Plan Methodology

10

What the Plan Does Not Include

10

Project Schedule


8

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Pleasant Run Golf Course

PURPOSE OF THE PLAN – ISSUE AT HAND Nationwide, the U.S. has experienced a decline of golfers since the early 2000s. With the decline in number of rounds being played per year, an increasing number of public and private golf courses in the U.S. are becoming cost-prohibitive to maintain. As a result, many communities are faced with the need to determine whether to make changes to existing courses or - more often than not - to find other uses for them. Some have reimagined new uses for underperforming golf courses that are less expensive to maintain, more aligned with current and future recreational trends, more ecologically sound, or provide more substantial revenue generation capacity – or all of the above. In Indianapolis, golf demand has remained relatively stable thanks to a large base of aging golfers, who tend to golf more frequently than their younger counterparts. However, in the next 10 to 20 years, golf demand is likely to decline further as the younger cohort ages.

In consideration of these trends, in 2017 the Indy Parks and Recreation Department (Indy Parks) determined a need for a comprehensive evaluation of the City’s thirteen public golf courses, and the development of a strategic plan to guide their improvement or repurposing. This resulted in a planning process that has culminated in the Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study. The plan includes the following components: •• Evaluation of the physical condition of the golf courses •• Evaluation of the existing private management agreements •• Identification of capital improvements needs •• Evaluation of revenue generation •• Assessment of the market position of the golf facilities and determination of a shortage or surplus of golf facilities •• Exploration of a repurposing of some existing facilities for alternative uses Indy Parks selected a consultant team in summer 2017 and initiated work in fall 2017. The study concluded in August 2018. The consultant team was led by RATIO Architects (RATIO), and included Pellucid Corporation (Pellucid), Edgehill Golf Advisors (Edgehill), WDi Architecture (WDi), and Greenstreet.


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Winding River Golf Course

HOW TO USE THE PLAN The Plan establishes recommendations that will guide funding, improvements, and repurposing of the City’s thirteen golf courses. Additionally, these recommendations support Indy Parks’ ability to review and evaluate future projects and developments. Indy Parks can also use the Plan to support applications for grants and to demonstrate that future projects are within Indy Parks’ larger holistic vision, rather than stand-alone projects.

PLAN METHODOLOGY The consultant team broke the initial investigation into four primary components: •• Golf Operations Analysis. Led by Edgehill and Pellucid, this component evaluated the market demand for public golf in Indianapolis, and evaluated the performance of the City’s portfolio of facilities in meeting that demand. Pellucid and Edgehill also evaluated the concessionaire agreements for management of the courses and made recommendations for adjustments to the contracts. •• Land Use / Site Analysis. Led by RATIO, the land use / site analysis documented existing conditions in and around each golf course. In addition to site specific observations and recommendations, the evaluation included analysis of adjacent land uses, floodplains, access and connectivity, and other factors to ensure that the broader context of each course might influence its future. The

report synthesized these observations into a series of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analyses. The SWOT Analyses provide Indy Parks and interested parties a baseline understanding of issues and opportunities for each golf course. This will also guide future decisionmaking on potential enhancements to existing courses and/or repurposing of existing golf courses into other uses. •• Real Estate Market Analysis. Led by Greenstreet, the real estate market analysis evaluated each golf course’s market potential for repurposing as parks or other land uses. It examines each golf course’s performance, as well as the need for park space in the surrounding neighborhoods. The real estate market analysis includes a review of national precedents that are intended to inform and inspire conversation about the opportunities available for repurposing golf courses. •• Golf Facilities Condition Analysis. Led by WDi, this component surveyed the condition of the structures within each of the thirteen golf courses. The findings are documented in a grading rubric for each facility. Additionally, there are recommendations to guide future improvements to the golf facilities.


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WHAT THE PLAN DOES NOT INCLUDE

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

PROJECT SCHEDULE

The planning process did not include: •• An ecological or environmental evaluation of each course beyond a cursory review of readily observable characteristics •• Civil engineering or analysis of the condition of underground utilities •• Detailed design of new facilities

INDY PARKS GOLF FACILITIES ANALYSIS Preliminary Schedule

•• A public input process •• A strategic economic development/improvement funding plan These tasks may prove to be important implementation steps but were not considered critical to the initial evaluation.

Phase 1 | INVESTIGATION Task 1.1 Task 1.2 Task 1.3 Task 1.4 Task 1.5

Kickoff Meeting Golf Facilities Analysis Architectural Inventory and Analysis Site Analysis Meetings (2)

Phase 2 | VISIONING Task 2.1 Task 2.2 Task 2.3 Task 2.4

Land Market Analysis Concept Development Facilities Recommendations Meetings (3)

Phase 3 | CONCLUSION Task 3.1 Task 3.2 Task 3.3 Task 3.4 Task 3.5

Evaluation Concept Refinement Phasing and Implementation Documentation Presentations (3 - Parks Board, CCC, MDC)


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Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Operation Analysis

13

GOLF OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 14 Introduction 15

U.S. National Golf Industry Conditions & Trends

18

Golf Operations Overview

19

Historical Rounds and Revenue Performance

20

Indianapolis Golf Local Market vs. National Trends

24 Analysis 25

Guidance & Recommendations

31

Golf Operations Analysis Conclusions

32 Glossary


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

INTRODUCTION As part of the development of the Golf Facilities Study for the future operation of Indy Parks, the following steps were taken: •• Generated 11 Golf Local Market Analyzer (GLMA) reports, covering the 13 Indy Parks golf facilities and the entire Indianapolis Designated Marketing Area (DMA) •• Conducted site visits to all 13 Indy Parks golf facilities, along with three additional privately operated golf facilities for comparative purposes

Aerial photography of Thatcher Golf Course / Source: Google Earth Pro

•• Reviewed the concessionaire contracts applicable to each facility •• Reviewed and transcribed historical rounds and revenue data provided by Indy Parks covering the years 2011-2017 •• Created weather reports detailing golf playable hours and weather adjusted capacity for the years 2011-2017. •• Calculated course utilization percentages and revenue per available round benchmarks to determine relative course performance


Golf Operation Analysis

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U.S. NATIONAL GOLF INDUSTRY CONDITIONS & TRENDS

1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

448.4m

460.8m

458.1m

450.0m

455.4m

457.7m

10-Year Median 459 M

441.2m

451.4m

467.1m

481.3m

486.8m

518.4m

Key measures of participation, annual frequency, course supply, and velocity have been tracked since 2000, along with consistent survey data from 1980 courtesy of the National Sporting Goods Association. The following charts are indicative of industry trends. Rounds have declined -13.5% nationally since 2000.

2017


16

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THE U.S. GOLFER BASE

2017 20.8m

2016 20.9m

2015 21.0m

2014 22.0m

2013 22.9m

2012 24.0m

2011 24.4m

2010 26.3m

POPULATION AGED 7+

2005 27.4m

2002 29.8m

1995 25.7m

1990 24.4m

1985 19.7m

2000 29.4m

In addition to the drop in rounds demand, golf participation has also fallen from a peak of 29.8 million in 2002 to 21 million in 2016 (participation is survey based and is a trailing statistic).

Participation as a percentage of the population has also fallen. By this metric, what we term “golf relevance” has declined by -39.7% since its peak in 1999. As we look into the future golf operation of Indy Parks, it is important to recognize these national benchmarks and determine their impact. •• Rounds demand has declined -13.5% since 2001. •• Participation has dropped by -29.3% since 2002. •• Participation as a percentage of population has dropped -39.7% since 1999.

2013

7.6%

8.0%

8.5% 2012

2014

7.1%

2011

7.2%

2010

7.3%

2005

8.8%

2002

9.7%

2000

POPULATION AGED 7+

10.6%

1995

12.0%

1990

12.1%

11.1%

1985

10.9%

9.3%

THE U.S. PARTICIPATION RATE

2015

2016

2017


Golf Operation Analysis

These numbers are obviously causing some contraction in the golf industry. However, there is one important factor in the above data that needs to be emphasized – rounds demand has not fallen as much as both of our participation metrics. The reason for this can be found in the patterns of age and frequency of annual rounds played by different age segments of the golfer base, showing a significant drop in participation among the 18-44 year old age segments in the US population. The chart at the top right illustrates several important factors:

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Generational Shifts Continue... Age #Golfers (Ms) #Golfers (Ms) # Group 2008 2016 Change 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+

2.8 5.2 5.7 4.9 3.2 1.6 0.9

•• Due to the lower frequencies of the younger age segments, rounds demand is not falling at the same rate as participation. •• Rounds demand has remained relatively steady on a “weather adjusted” basis since 2010. The dynamics of age-based participation from 1995-2015 not only confirm the above findings, but also allow us to look into the future: •• Based on the relatively low rate of participation of golfers currently aged 18-44, there will be fewer golfers moving into the “high frequency” older age segments beginning about 2025.

Avg. Frequency (rds/golfers/yr) 2016

-7% -6% -6% -4% +1% +7% -1%

12.4 12.9 13.7 15.8 25.1 37.1 35.9

-1.2 -2.0 -2.2 -1.4 +0.3 +1.3 0

“Red Numbers,” are creeping up as Gen X/Y move into middle age (45-54) while Millennials continue to embrace golf like their predecessors did. Also now seeing some ‘softness’ at the 75+ top end as the Silent Generation phases out; some consolation is that those remaining are still playing at similar frequency to the 65-74 peak play rate.

•• There are 5.4 million fewer golfers aged 18-44 in 2016 than there were in 2008. •• There are 1.6 million more “high frequency” golfers aged 55+.

1.6 3.2 3.5 3.5 3.5 2.9 0.9

8-Year CACR

Age-Based Participation Year 1995 2005 2015 Cross Reference By Age Group

18-24

25-34

2,419 2,942 1,206

5,644 4,438 2,642

-50%

-53%

Age Group* 35-44 45-54

55-64

65-74

4,861 5,385 3,127 29.3% -36%

1,802 2,982 3,283 -33.4% 80%

1,613 1,521 3,013 -17.0% 87%

3,628 4,188 3,254 -42.3% -10%

*Number of golfers, 2+ rds/yr frequency. - Increased frequency is masking attrition among Baby Boomers - We still end up with a big increase in older golfers. Source: Pellucid/Edgehill (2017)

•• By 2035, it is estimated that there will be 3 million fewer golfers aged 55+. •• Given the annual rounds frequency of those groups, demand will begin to fall by 2035 with the loss estimated at over 100 million rounds.

In 2013, Barney Adams published an article detailing his study of National Golf Foundation (NGF) data. Barney Adams was the founder of Adams Golf and is a respected golf industry veteran. He commissioned a study from the Mathematics Department at Clarkson University to investigate the data.


18

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

“While researching NGF data I came across an interesting statistic. From the late 80s to now, the percentage of amateur golfers over 40 has increased some 30%. The total number of golfers is the same, but as a percentage, the over 40 group has gone from 42% to 54%.” Barney Adams, Tour Test Article, January 27, 2013 “Then we ran another, more realistic test. Starting with the same NGF results, we again looked forward for a 28-year time period, but this time we factored in today’s significant reduction in birth rates. Sumona’s finding: ‘At a 90% confidence level, the golf business will decline by 40-60%.’ Sumona Mondal, Assistant Professor of Statistics, Clarkson University.

The Clarkson study was conducted in 2012, so the 28year period would extend to 2040. In the final analysis our projections may be a little less dire, but the Adams study supports the position that golf demand will fall significantly – most likely starting in 2025 and accelerating after 2035. In conclusion, the plan’s assessment of the US golf market is as follows: •• Relatively stable rounds demand over the next 10 years as Baby Boomers continue to play golf at high frequency levels •• Declining demand starting in 2025 due to the oldest Baby Boomers reaching the 75+ age segment •• Fewer younger age segment golfers will replace aging Baby Boomers (it is estimated that there will be at least 3 million fewer high frequency golfers by 2035) •• Estimated 100 million fewer rounds played by 2035, based on a current 10-year median of about 459 million •• Rounds demand will fall about 20% from current levels In light of these national trends, the Plan goes on to assess the current comparative performance of the Indy Parks golf operations to determine whether the current performance mirrors national trends, and also to compare demographics and future growth projections.

GOLF OPERATIONS OVERVIEW Indy Parks operates 13 golf facilities - 12 golf courses and one Golf Academy practice facility. The facilities are managed by five “concessionaires” with separate and distinct contractual agreements for each facility. Overall, site visit observations were very positive. The facilities as a whole are in good shape. •• The concessionaires appear to be qualified. •• The allocation of facilities appears to be insulating Indy Parks in large part from the risk of operational losses. •• Playing conditions are remarkably consistent at 10 of 12 golf facilities and would be considered to be good. •• Clubhouse conditions were uniformly clean and neat. •• Irrigation systems have had good routine maintenance and pumping stations have been replaced as capital expense items in cooperation with the concessionaires as needed at several facilities. This means that none of the irrigation systems are in immediate need of replacement. •• There appears to be a good working relationship between the concessionaires and Indy Parks Staff. Based on initial observations, the current arrangements are working well. The facilities are in relatively good condition in terms of turf and physical plant conditions. However, some trends were identified that require additional analytics.


Golf Operation Analysis

19

HISTORICAL ROUNDS & REVENUE PERFORMANCE Indy Parks provided Rounds and Revenues data for 2010-2017. Due to some changes made for the 2011 season, the 2011-2017 seasons were able to be consistently evaluated, and Weather Adjusted Capacity (WAC) calculations used to augment Indy Parks’ data. This resulted in weather adjusted measurements of course utilization percentages and Revenue per Available Round (RevPAR). •• Rounds have fallen from about 322,000 in 2010 to 255,500 in 2017 - a decrease of 20.7%

The change in course utilization percentages reflects current “supply dilution” conditions in the market. From a RevPAR perspective, the modest drop of -1.8% indicates that the Indy Parks facilities have been able to somewhat mitigate the decrease in rounds with price adjustments. It is, however, a concern that rounds have fallen by an amount that is larger than the national trend of -13.7% since 2002. Demographic data can begin to help identify the reasons for rounds decline and other changes in golf participation in Indianapolis.

•• Revenues have fallen from about $7,918,473 in 2010 to $7,161,196 in 2017 - a decrease of 9.6% •• Course utilization has fallen from 38.2% in 2011 to 34.7% in 2017 - a decrease of 9.2% •• RevPAR has fallen from $9.59 in 2011 to $9.42 in 2017 - a decrease of 1.8% •• The Indianapolis Designated Marketing Area (DMA) golf market is over-supplied by -10.1% according to the GLMA data measuring course construction vs. population growth since 1980 (see table below).

GLMA Data: Indianapolis, IN DMA

Private Public-Premium Public-Value Public-Price Learning & Practice Total Pop% Change-CAGR Ann Supp. Absorp/Dilution* Cume Absorp/Dilution*

1980 Holes

1990 Holes

CAGR

200 Holes

441 324 891 396 117 2,169

459 396 945 432 117 2,349

0.4% 2.0% 0.6% 0.9% 0.0% 0.8%

504 702 1,242 540 225 3,213

CAGR 0.9% 5.9% 2.8% 2.3% 6.8% 3.2% 1.1% -2.1% -20.8%

*Reports requiring summarization use only the largest radius or drive time around each center point to calculate.

2012 Holes 522 720 1,269 540 234 3,285

CAGR 0.3% 0.2% 0.2% 0.0% 0.3% 0.2% 1.1% 0.9% -10.1%


20

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

INDIANAPOLIS GOLF LOCAL MARKET VS. NATIONAL TRENDS In 2010, Indiana’s participation rate was 8% and Frequency was 23.4. In 2015, Indiana’s 7.2% participation rate was identical to the National participation rate, and annual rounds frequency was 15.8. There are some notable issues in these numbers when compared to the National data.

Year

Fac. Rptd Rds

Golfers

Avg. Frequency

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

455.4 481.3 457.7 450.0 458.1 460.8 447.4

24.4 24.0 22.9 22.0 21.0 21.0 20.5

18.7 20.1 20.0 20.5 21.8 21.9 21.8

The 2017 survey data from the National Sporting Goods Association would indicate a drop in Indiana participation to 6.5% (-9.7%) for the 2016 NSGA Survey year, with an increase in frequency to 17.3 (+9.5%), keeping rounds demand relatively stable. This trend was also reflected in the 2017 Indy Parks rounds data. Weather Adjusted Capacity actually went down -2.7% in 2017 while rounds only decreased by -0.9%. Indy Parks’ decline of -20.7% in rounds played since 2010 should be viewed in light of the fact that the market has lost ~10% of rounds in the same period. Below is the round performance for the Designated Marketing Area for reference:

DESIGNATED MARKETING AREA INDIANAPOLIS, IN

2000-2017 2000-2017 CHANGE: -1,218,656 CAGR: -1.6% % CHANGE: -23.8% 2010-2017 CAGR: -1.3%

5M •• Indiana’s 10% decline in participation from 2010 to 2016 was less than the 14% drop for the US. •• Indiana’s 32.5% drop in frequency is a major concern. Frequency in the US is increasing due to the age factors outlined earlier in the Plan.

4M

•• The net impact of these numbers produces a -33.9% decline in estimated rounds demand in Indianapolis since 2010. 3M

2017 | 3,897,122

2016 | 4,368,971

2015 | 3,979,026

2014 | 3,947,446

2013 | 4,056,985

2012 | 4,430,228

2011 | 4,004,926

2010 | 4,285,271

2005 | 4,735,025

1M

2000 | 5,115,778

2M


Golf Operation Analysis

21

Each Indy Parks facility has its own unique demographic profile. Due to their close proximity, Coffin, Riverside, South Grove, and the Golf Academy effectively share the same demographics, but all the other properties have nuances in their profiles that the Plan has evaluated. The primary drivers of golf participation and frequency (annual rounds played) are: age, income, and ethnicity. The following table shows a ranked summary of those factors for each of the Indy Park golf courses:

Index Rankings 10-Minute Population

Age Index

Ethnicity Index

Income Index

Average Index

5-Year Population Growth

53,145 47,200 89,755 29,510 68,072 102,787 94,625 80,881 103,338 100,389 100,389 100,389

96 105 100 90 91 95 103 94 99 92 92 92

110 109 118 119 85 107 94 89 73 70 70 70

124 115 107 114 110 77 78 77 77 82 82 82

110 110 108 108 95 93 92 87 83 81 81 81

5.9% 10.2% 7.1% 17.0% 9.5% 0.4% 0.6% 0.2% 1.1% -1.0% -1.0% -1.0%

Sahm Whispering Hills Smock Winding River Eagle Creek Sarah Shank Pleasant Run Thatcher Douglass Coffin Riverside South Grove Sorted by Average Index.


22

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Combining the age, income, and ethnicity indices with projected population growth, and factoring in the 2011-2017 Rounds and Revenue data, produces a Projected Relative Performance Analysis:

Projected Relative Performance Analysis

Golf Course Eagle Creek Sarah Shank Pleasant Run Sahm Douglass South Grove Winding River Smock Whispering Hills Coffin Riverside Thatcher Total / Average* Cume % Change

2017 Course Rounds

Course Rounds DemoAdjusted Course Course Rounds Rounds CACR CACR

39,922 27,332 26,127 36,284 8,068 21,013 26,821 23,668 13,085 11,374 16,001 5,768 255,463

1.5% 1.3% 1.5% 0.6% -3.6% -2.8% 0.0% -4.4% -5.2% -2.0% -3.5% -6.3% -0.93%

1.5% 1.2% 1.5% 0.7% -3.8% -3.0% 0.0% -4.2% -5.4% -2.1% -3.7% -6.5% -0.92%

2022 Course Rounds Projection 42,869 28,979 28,040 37,477 6,528 17,899 26,825 18,700 9,530 10,192 13,033 3,884 243,955 -4.5%

2017 Course REV $1,499,927 $840,692 $724,150 $1,008,824 $102,025 $479,275 $676,055 $840,593 $217,688 $293,980 $371,976 $106,011 $7,161,196

Course Revenues (REV) DemoAdjusted 2022 Course Course Course REV REV REV CACR CACR Projection 4.0% 3.5% 2.7% 2.0% -2.5% -1.7% -0.7% -1.5% -3.0% -4.4% -3.7% -5.6% 0.49%

4.0% 3.3% 2.6% 2.1% -2.6% -1.7% -0.6% -1.4% -3.1% -4.6% -3.8% -5.8% 0.81%

$1,798,954 $980,937 $817,689 $1,113,428 $88,764 $437,627 $654,384 $780,200 $184,058 $225,660 $300,467 $75,180 $7,457,349 4.1%

CACR = Compound Annual Change Rate

The above chart is a summary of some very complex factors for each of the Indy Parks golf courses: •• •• •• ••

Weighted age, income, and ethnicity baselines Projected population growth Revenue trends 2011-2017 Rounds trends 2011-2017

This analysis effectively outlines the projected performance of the Indy Parks golf courses over the next 5 years. The good news is that revenue is projected to increase 4.1%, even though rounds will see a decline of 4.5%.

This analysis also helps support the relative stability that is projected for the golf industry in general over the next several years. Concessionaire payments to Indy Parks should remain stable or increase slightly over the next five years. This five-year period of relative stability will take Indy Parks out almost to the 2024 end of the term of the current concessionaire agreements that cover all courses except Riverside, Coffin, Smock, and Eagle Creek, which expire in 2019. Identifying the relative performance of each facility can also help to provide guidance on any potential repurposing of golf facilities to alternative uses.


Golf Operation Analysis

23

Riverside Golf Academy’s Revenue & Lesson/Merchandise Riverside Golf Academy

2011

Revenue $240,369 Lesson/Merchandise $225,213

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

% Change

$249,386 $290,367

$251,422 $248,479

$225,514 $268,393

$229,004 $167,269

$217,513 $128,217

$220,182 $99,336

-8.4% -55.9%

Regarding concessionaire agreements, it must be understood that the current structure has been pieced together since 2011 and each agreement is different. The aggregate sum of these payments to Indy Parks has remained relatively consistent since 2014 ($429,564) and increased in 2017 ($470,739) due to higher payments from Eagle Creek, Pleasant Run, Sarah Shank, South Grove and Winding River. There was a slight decline at Sahm. Smock has an unusual contract in that its concessionaire payments are directed to a local nonprofit organization. Coffin, Riverside, and the Golf Academy have made no concessionaire payments since 2011. This is due to declining revenue performance over that period that is projected to continue as shown in our projection chart above. Thatcher, Whispering Hills, and Douglass also make no contributions. Again, the chart at the left outlines the relative revenue problems for the properties that are not contributing payments to Indy Parks. As for the Golf Academy, Revenue has actually declined by -8.4% since 2011 (see table above). Even though Indy Parks has no contractual interest in lesson income or merchandise sales, those revenues have fallen -55.9% since 2011. While the Golf Academy has been considered a positive contributor in the past, there are clear indications that the financial issues at Coffin and Riverside are also affecting the operation of the Golf Academy. Another major issue is long term debt associated with the Eagle Creek facility. With annual payments of $289,258.32, this debt consumed over 60% of the total 2017 concessionaire revenue for the year. Under the current terms (assuming 2021 renewal), this debt will not be fully amortized until 2028. We would anticipate that there will be some discussion of this debt as part of the negotiations of a new concessionaire agreement for Eagle Creek when the current agreement expires in 2019.

It is important to emphasize that even with the Eagle Creek debt service, the current structure has insulated Indy Parks from a significant downturn in golf activity in the Indianapolis market. They have managed to operate the 13 facilities without creating a drain on the Indy Parks budget or a situation requiring cash subsidies from the City. It is also important to note that the facilities are in relatively good physical condition. Municipalities across the US have been impacted by the decline in golf participation. Noted examples can be found in Detroit, Tucson, Stockton, Chicago, and Atlanta to name a few. Many municipalities have seen their golf operations transition from self-sufficient operations to a subsidized public service. So far, Indy Parks has been able to avoid this situation using the current structure. It is not, however, without some problems – as noted above, the performance of several properties is problematic and has created a situation in which two concessionaires are running Whispering Hills, Douglass, and Thatcher on almost a pro-bono basis. The issues at Coffin, Riverside, and the Golf Academy are also bringing some capital needs into current items requiring immediate attention. In examining how the current structure will be transitioned into long-term planning for Indy Parks, it is important to consider the factors outlined so far: •• Declining local and national golf participation •• Relatively stable near-term projections •• Current issues at Coffin, Riverside, and the Golf Academy •• Additional declines in anticipated golf demand after 2025


24

ANALYSIS The recently completed (November 2017) Riverside Park Master Plan calls for the conversion of Riverside and South Grove to alternative uses. The plan also calls for changes to the Coffin Golf Course and improvements to the Golf Academy. The 20-year time span covered by the Riverside Park plan coincides with the intended time span of this plan. In light of the National and Local trends outlined in this report; the closures of Riverside and South Grove Golf Courses make perfect sense. The good community reaction to the Riverside Park plan is also an opportunity for Indy Parks to reduce their golf footprint in recognition of the decline in golf demand caused by dropping participation in Indianapolis. Even though there may be a relatively stable base for golf demand over the next several years, golf demand is expected to experience another drop as the current large group of golfers aged 55+ are replaced by fewer younger golfers beginning in about 2025. With the decision to close Riverside and South Grove made, the question becomes what to do with the rest of the portfolio. There are also some very big questions regarding infrastructure needs that have to be considered when the time frame horizon extends 20 years into the future. 20%

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

While it is encouraging to have contracts in place for all but Riverside, Coffin, and Eagle Creek golf courses through 2024, within 20 years an almost total replacement of key capital expense items and/or components may be required – clubhouses, irrigation systems, paved parking areas, and possibly turf issues such as greens, bunker, and tee renovations. The reality is that current revenues will not provide the resources to meet those long-term needs. The concessionaires are constricted by reasonable contract lengths and terms. Indy Parks is using a large part of the concessionaire payments to retire Eagle Creek debt and has not been able to put aside capital expense reserves that could help fund those needs. Looking to the future of Indy Parks golf operations, the analysis and projections of this plan identify the four strongest performing properties as Eagle Creek, Pleasant Run, Sarah Shank, and Sahm. Winding River and Smock would be considered marginal performers. Coffin, Riverside, South Grove, Douglass, Thatcher, and Whispering Hills are all projected to continue as weak performers. While only 6 courses in Indiana have closed since 2015 out of 500 nationally, since 2006 Indiana has the 8th highest closure rate in the US. This calculation is based on the number of golf courses in each state at the end of 2005 and the percentage of those that have closed from 2006 to 2016. In Indiana, 64 of 439 (14.6%) golf courses have closed since 2006. Nationally the average closure percentage is 10.5%.

18% 16%

NET PERCENT CLOSURE OF GOLF COURSES BY STATE

14%

INDIANA HAS THE 8TH HIGHEST GOLF COURSE CLOSURE RATE IN THE U.S.

12% 10% 8% 6% 4%

VT DC

AL SC NM DE KY MD IN AR OH NC GA HI TN TX NV FL VA MO MI IL PA CA WV MN WA MS UT NH AK OR NY NE NJ KS MT AZ OK ME ID CO MA WY RI WI IA ND CT SD

0%

LA

2%


Golf Operation Analysis

Some additional information on course closures is also instructive. Nine-hole courses comprise 29.1% of the golf courses in the US, and yet they account for 41.9% of the closures. While many golf industry commentators attribute much of the decline in golf participation to a lack of time, and have actively encouraged nine-hole play, the higher closure rate of those facilities indicates two things: •• Industry initiatives do not appear to have stimulated an increase in rounds demand at ninehole facilities. •• The cost of operations appears to make nine-hole operations economically less viable. In the final analysis, the decision to close Riverside and South Grove contained in the adopted Riverside Park Master Plan will eliminate two weak performers in the Indy Parks portfolio. Although South Grove has been historically well-run and generated revenue for Indy Parks, this plan’s projection based on revenue trends and demographics indicate that it will continue to decline in performance over the next five years. In light of the nine-hole course closure data above, Douglass, Thatcher, and Whispering Hills could also be considered as possible closure candidates. This plan will further examine Douglass in the next section; Thatcher and Whispering Hills are weak performers and projected to decline further over the next 5 years.

25

GUIDANCE & RECOMMENDATIONS This section of the plan will provide individual course observations and outline a suggested approach to address long-term capital expenses. These recommendations may be used as a guideline in the creation of new and consistent concessionaire agreements.

Coffin The Riverside Park Master Plan has determined that Coffin will survive as the single golf facility remaining in Riverside Park. This makes sense from the standpoint of being a relatively modern design, due to its 1995 renovation. Coffin is currently performing poorly. Some maintenance problems are tied to larger upstream drainage issues. Other issues, such as the introduction of Bermuda grass, can and should be addressed more immediately. In light of the future closure of Riverside Golf Course and its shared maintenance facility, the completion of the new maintenance facility will also be required. The Riverside Master Plan calls for improvements and funding for Coffin later in the implementation process. Upon the completion of this study, however, it seems advisable to make these improvements as soon as possible. While it may be possible to defer a full-scale renovation and new clubhouse facility to a later time, without some short-term maintenance improvements, Coffin will continue to be one of the weakest performers in the portfolio.


26

Riverside The Riverside Golf Course management contract is scheduled to end in December 2019. Detailed planning for that golf course’s reuse should occur afterwards to begin the implementation of the Riverside Regional Park Master Plan.

Riverside Golf Academy The Golf Academy has suffered from a decline in revenues. Some operational issues have caused lesson income and merchandise sales to decline very significantly. Although Indy Parks has no vested interest in lessons or merchandise, steps should be taken to improve operations. The Riverside Park Master Plan calls for significant funding ($1,500,000) being sought for improvements in 2018 and 2019. This funding would allow the Golf Academy to invest in new digital golf range and instructional equipment. Tremendous interest in simulators and launch monitors is evident across the golf industry. The success of Top Golf is an indication of this trend, but really is only the tip of the iceberg. Top Golf owns Top Tracer (used by CBS Sports on television) and is making a golf range version that has

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

been installed successfully at a few locations in the US. Top Tracer can be a way to engage new golfers, particularly Millennials. GolfZon, AboutGolf, and FlightScope are a few other examples of digital golf trends that are starting to become a bigger factor in the golf industry. The improvement of the Golf Academy is recommended as a good investment in the future. With a properly developed plan, the Golf Academy could play an important contributory role in the future of Indy Parks’ golf operations.

Sahm Sahm’s performance is projected to be good over the next 5 years. This should carry the course out to almost the conclusion of the current concessionaire contract in 2024. The current contract reflects that it includes allowances for the concessionaire also operating Douglass and Whispering Hills. Subject to decisions made regarding those two properties, a new agreement for Sahm should most likely resemble those in place for Pleasant Run and/or Sarah Shank. This should result in higher revenues for Indy Parks after 2024.


Golf Operation Analysis

27

Frederick Douglass

Whispering Hills

Eagle Creek

The projections of this plan show that Douglass will not suffer significant additional erosion in performance over the next five years. It should be noted that the current concessionaire has kept the property in good shape.

Whispering Hills is a strong candidate for closure. Declining performance makes it a very weak performer. Some bad publicity regarding landfill issues may have impacted performance - this could potentially be mitigated with the addition of improved signage. However, given the current economic viability of ninehole facilities we outlined above, Whispering Hills faces a difficult future.

Eagle Creek showed good performance improvement in 2017. In the projections of this study, it shows as the likely top performer over the next five years. The course has a modern design and should continue to be a relatively stable part of the Indy Parks portfolio.

In addition, the historical significance of the course is important. Beyond that, Douglass would be a natural fit with the expanded programming at the Golf Academy. It is the hope that a changing role for Douglass will factor into any future concessionaire agreement for the course.

Since the concessionaire agreement runs to 2024, there is some time to address the issue. Early initiation of these discussions could also result in a re-evaluation of the Sahm agreement.

The current concessionaire agreement expires in 2019, and it will be important to carefully consider the structure of the agreement regarding interest and principal to help address the course’s long-term debt. It appears that the concessionaire and Indy Parks are working together to address some needed long-term infrastructure repairs, such as the retention pond. Additional longterm capital improvements should be considered, to include drainage repairs. The development of a consistent approach to dealing with long-term capital improvements will be addressed later in this report.


28

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Smock

Pleasant Run

Sarah Shank

Although Smock showed some operational improvement in 2017, 5-year projections would indicate weak performance due to operational declines in 2011 -2016.

Pleasant Run is well managed, is outperforming its market, and is projected to continue as a strong contributor for the next five years.

Sarah Shank shares the same management as Pleasant Run and is also outperforming its demographic market. It is predicted that this level of performance will continue over the long term.

The Smock concessionaire agreement expires in 2019. The current agreement is unusual and generates no direct revenue for Indy Parks. Although the recommendations of this plan would defer to any political arrangement that would continue the current payment structure beyond 2019, a similar agreement to what is in place for Sarah Shank and Pleasant Run may be recommended as an alternative. Currently, Smock is underperforming its relatively strong demographic base. Close attention should be paid to 2018 results continuing to show improvement. Smock should be able to capitalize on its location and demographics and become a better contributor to Indy Parks’ golf operations.

It is recommended that the current concessionaire agreement for Pleasant Run be used as a model for future agreements across the portfolio. Aside from eventual long-term infrastructure needs, there are no immediate problems at Pleasant Run. This should remain true for a relatively long period using the same management parameters.


Golf Operation Analysis

29

South Grove

Thatcher

Winding River

With the decision to ultimately close South Grove already made, the remaining question centers on timing. Because the current concessionaire agreement expires in 2024, any redevelopment opportunities that arise prior to that point would need to be undertaken with the cooperation of the current management.

Unless the current concessionaire wants to continue operating Thatcher through the term of their agreement (2024), this plan would recommend that the course be closed as soon as practical.

Winding River benefits from a relatively modern course design. Management is good and performance results are average. It is important to note that the local 10-minute population base is by far the lowest in the portfolio. However, the age, income and ethnicity average index is good, and the 17% population growth projected over the next five years is by far the highest in the portfolio. With the closure of South Grove and a decision on Thatcher, a new concessionaire agreement for Winding River could be developed along the lines of Pleasant Run.


30

General Concessionaire Agreement Comments One of the biggest issues in outside management contracts is the differentiation between what is considered routine maintenance and what is considered capital improvements involving long-term repairs, renovation, and/or replacement. Usually routine maintenance is the responsibility of the management entity and expenditures that result in an improvement with a useful life that extends beyond the term of the contract being subject to negotiation. Unfortunately, the lines become blurred with strict definitions being difficult and the interests of the management entity being different than the owner’s need to protect the value of their investment. When combined with the current nature of the golf business, both parties have a tougher time as expense control causes both short-term and long-term deferrals of some routine maintenance and capital infrastructure investments. This dichotomy is the primary cause of the problems facing golf courses that use outside management today. The management company - having the obligations of lease payments or contractual profit incentives - is interested in the quality of the product for the term of the contract. The fact that the clubhouse and irrigation systems are five years older is of less concern to them than the owner, who now faces the inevitable replacement in five fewer years.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

This plan recommends the development of a consistent approach that will define how these issues will be addressed across the various concessionaire agreements, all of which will need to be re-negotiated by 2024. As an example, the annual inspection of an HVAC system may be a part of the base contract, while a complete HVAC replacement will likely have a longer useful life than the term of the contract. If an HVAC system has a $30,000 price tag and a 15-year life, there is effectively an annual cost of $2,000. If the concessionaire has 5 years to run on their agreement, they would be responsible for $10,000 over the 5 years. The same approach would apply to an irrigation system with a 30-year useful life or a maintenance facility with a 40-year life. Changing depreciation allowances and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) useful life terms make some determinations less accurate. For example, landscape improvement depreciation at one time was 31.5 years and has now been reduced to 20 years for tax purposes in the private sector. This study has not examined whether there are changes to this in the new tax law, but the general idea is that GAAP terms may not necessarily be a true indicator of actual useful life. Further, because public sector accounting is different in that depreciation is generally replaced by the establishment of capital reserves, the framework must be structured accordingly.


Golf Operation Analysis

Effectively, it appears that a similar approach is what Indy Parks has used to share capital expense investments at the golf courses on a case by case basis. (e.g. he maintenance building at Sarah Shank.) The plan’s recommendation simply suggests that the process be more clearly defined and incorporated uniformly in all new agreements. This approach should result in a better operating structure for fewer golf facilities, reflecting the current and anticipated future demand for golf in Indianapolis. However, this new structure will only work if a greater portion of concessionaire payments can be used to establish the capital reserves needed to cover future long-term repairs and necessary renovations and replacements of operating assets for the remaining properties in the portfolio. The most significant roadblock is the debt at Eagle Creek. The earliest possible retirement of that debt should be an objective of the long-term plan for Indy Parks. With that debt retired, a new concessionaire agreement for Eagle Creek can be more consistent with the other agreements and the terms will make it easier to ensure that a good concessionaire will be either retained or attracted to Eagle Creek. It will also allow a considerably higher amount of revenue available to create reserves that will be required over the next 20 – 25 years.

31

GOLF OPERATIONS ANALYSIS CONCLUSIONS Overall, Indy Parks has done a good job of finding a way to operate its golf facilities under difficult market conditions without suffering the losses that have plagued many municipal golf operations across the US. The concessionaires have played a big part in helping to both maintain the successful properties and keep some marginal facilities in good condition. As compared with other municipalities’ facilities, the condition of the turf and overall physical plants in the Indy Parks golf portfolio is also very good. However, the reality of current golf market conditions and those projected out into the future mean that some actions need to be taken to avoid future subsidies and the inevitable need for large expenditures to maintain and replace aging infrastructure. The development and acceptance of the Riverside Park Master Plan has provided an opportunity to adjust the Indy Parks golf footprint. We also feel that a welldeveloped short-term plan to improve conditions at Coffin coupled with improvements at the Golf Academy have an excellent chance of correcting the current problems that exist. The development of this Golf Facilities Study is an opportunity to make additional adjustments. The number of golf facilities may be reduced, but the remaining courses will continue to provide good service to Indianapolis golfers. Putting the courses on a sound financial foundation by developing a system that allows for the creation of capital reserves will help to maintain and even improve the remaining facilities. Most importantly, there is the opportunity to reduce the prospect of any needed subsidies in the future.


32

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

GLOSSARY Golf Local Market Analyzer Is a Pellucid-proprietary software product that analyzes any geography in the US specific to golf. The dimensions of this analysis are: •• Demographics (from license via Alteryx, Experian underlying projections from US Census data). •• Golf participation, frequency, consumer-reported rounds and Play Rate (total and demographic composition by income, age & ethnicity groups), annual 40K HH survey licensed from National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA), Pellucid smoothing and customized calculated measures. •• Golf supply (holes, public/private, location), licensed from Internet Golf Course Database (IGDB) which is a 4-company consortium in which Pellucid is a controlling member. Annual refresh of all US courses (25+ facts per course) via website review and manual enhancement/arbitration where missing or conflicting facts. Pellucid applies our proprietary consumer-based segmentation at each Demographic Marketing Area (DMA) level based on factors of access (public/private), experience type (Regulationlength vs. Learning & Practice) and value groups (Public-Premium, Public-Value, Public-Price). This allows relevant comparisons to peer groups vs. comparing 18 hole courses to 9 hole courses, $75 greens fee courses to $25 courses etc. •• Golf rounds, Pellucid annual survey and projections from limited, balanced sample (geographically across markets as well as within market using Pellucid’s consumer-based facility segmentation described above) with cross-checks to Golf Datatech summary rounds information at 61 US markets level. Velocity (annual rounds per 18-hole equivalent courses) is a Pellucid-proprietary equalized measure of the rounds production for all facilities that can be compared across all types of facilities.

•• Supply equilibrium and dilution/absorption - Using a combination of the supply data and the Year Built field, we can reconstruct the supply levels for any year for any US geography. We use our chosen benchmark year of 1990 as “equilibrium” for supply/demand in the US (based on average course profitability and rounds throughput for that year which were both healthy prior to the industry clarion call to “build a course a day” which was the precursor to the current down cycle. For the period from 1990-2000, we measure supply absorption/ dilution by the difference in population growth to golf supply growth. Post-2000, when state and market-level rounds data became available, we use the comparison of supply to rounds demand as a more accurate measure of progress to equilibrium as declining participation in the post2000 period de-coupled the previous relationship between population and golfers/rounds growth. As an example, if supply growth was 1% annual from 2000-2010 and rounds demand declined by 1% annually during the same period, then the market moved further from equilibrium or suffered further supply dilution of 20% (a 2% differential annually for 10 years).

Compound Annual Change Rate (CACR) Uses the standard financial formula of Compound Annual Growth rate or CAGR but, since a number of the metrics in the golf industry are moving backwards, these can’t be termed “growth rates” so we’ve adopted a more generic term which can be used to describe the rate of change whether it be positive or negative in direction.


Golf Operation Analysis

33

Course Utilization (CU) & Revenueper-Available Round (RevPAR)

Local Demographic Adjustment Indices

A Pellucid/Edgehill proprietary methodology for calculating weather impact on a rules-based, nationallyapplied methodology around the variables of in-season, daylight hours, temperature (absolute & relative), precipitation, wind speed and other variables. Using the above factors, we have developed standardized and consistently-applied rules for what constitutes a Golf Playable Hour (GPH). We partner with nationallyacclaimed AccuWeather and their underlying data from over 5K stations nationally for which they have 10-yr historical data at the hourly level up to yesterday. By applying our rules to their dynamic weather data and tying each US golf course to its nearest weather station, we calculate GPH for each and every course for various periods (current month, current year, previous 2 years, 10-year Normal etc.). We apply a constant throughput of 28 rounds per hour (uses alternating 8 and 9 minute tee time as our arbitrary but consistent standard) to extend GPH to Capacity Rounds. For example, at the national level for the year 2017, the average US facility had ~2,232 GPH which translates to Capacity Rounds of ~62,500 annual. CU then becomes the simple calculation of Played Rounds/ Capacity Rounds. RevPAR becomes the similarly simple calculation of Total Revenue (or Golf Fees Revenue)/Capacity Rounds. Given that we use weather specific to each facility and a constant throughput for GPH, facilities of any type and geography can be comparatively measured for productivity (CU). For financial performance one has to consider that the lower Greens Fee and average total ticket for facilities <18 holes are going to be lower in RevPAR than facilities that are 18 holes or more.

Because the participation data applied is at the state level (lowest geography due to incidence rates and lack of industry support for larger annual survey), we need to acknowledge how the local market/draw area demographics differ from the state distribution (for ethnicity, this data is only stable at national level so we’re factoring how the local ethnicity mix compares to the national number to create this index value). We know that the Play Rate (annual rounds per capita) varies widely across these three key demographic breaks: •• Income - participation correlates highly to household income, the higher the income the higher the participation rate and frequency •• Age - rounds played frequency correlates highly to age (older is better) so the presence of seniors in a geography will positively impact the estimated rounds played •• Ethnicity - participation varies widely across the 4 key groups from the highest (White/Caucasian followed by Asians) to lowest (tie, African Americans and Hispanics). We apply these differential Play Rates to the distribution of the population by to create Rounds Potential estimates. If the demographic distribution in the chosen market or draw area matches the state distribution, the indices for Income, Age and Ethnicity will all be 100. If an area has a higher household income bias, the Income index will be >100. If an area has a higher concentration of African Americans than the state benchmark, then the Ethnicity index will be <100. When these indices are applied to the rounds estimates coming, they will either inflate (Index >100) or deflate (Index <100) the results due to the locality’s demographic differences and their impact on golf participation.


34

At the April 2, 2018 Meeting, Indy Parks asked if we could quantify the impact of the proposed closures of Riverside, South Grove, Thatcher and Whispering Hills. The main basic question was if these closures would negatively affect the availability of golf in markets immediately surrounding these properties. We decided to look at the number of “golfers” per course in the 10 minute Drive Time area surrounding each course. To do this, we took the base population and used the 6.5% most recent golf Participation Rate. We then adjusted for the Average Demographic Index (combining Age, Ethnicity and Income) we created for each course in our complete report. We then divided that adjusted number of estimated golfers by the number of public facilities. We are including that data with this report. The Golfers/EHE is a metric we track regularly both on a national level and local levels. EHE is short for “eighteen hole equivalents”. The 10 Minute drive time areas reveal a wide dispersion of estimated golfers/ Public EHE. It underscores the “Supply Dilution” impact of Coffin, Riverside and South Grove essentially sharing proximity and common demographics. The ultimate closures of Riverside and South Grove would effectively raise the 881 Golfers/Public EHE for each to 2,643 to support Coffin alone. That number is slightly above the average of 2,367 Golfers/Public EHE for all the facilities (and not far off the national figure of ~2,300 Golfers/ Public EHE as an additional reference point). Because of the big variance in the individual facilities, we expanded to look at the 20 Minute Drive Time areas to see what would change. This got a little more complicated in that we had to create new Average Demographic Indices for the expanded populations; but the results helped confirm the conclusions we will outline below.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

The results from the 20 Minute Drive Time expansion brought in a larger number of facilities for each area; however, the Golfer/Public EHE became more “balanced” and remained relatively consistent at 2,506 Golfers/ Public EHE. The ultimate closures of Riverside and South Grove would actually take Coffin to 8,220/Public EHE which would give it the highest average of all the facilities in the system. In light of Coffin’s current low Course Utilization rate of 20.7%, this high number should enhance the chances that Coffin could be operated successfully in the future. It should also be noted that using the 10 Minute Drive Time, only Douglass, Pleasant Run and Sarah Shank have no golf alternatives. All the others have competitive facilities. In the 20 Minute Drive Time analysis, all the facilities have alternative public golf facilities. If we look at a couple of national benchmarks, there are some additional instructive points to consider. In the US, there are about 2,300 Golfers/Public EHE. This is remarkably similar to what Indianapolis shows in both the 10 and 20 Minute Drive Time areas (2,367 and 2,506 respectively). Nationally, the Course Utilization rate is 52% compared to the average of 35% for the Indy Parks facilities and about 34% for the entire Indianapolis Demographic Marketing Area (or DMA). In the final analysis, our data suggests that the potential closures of Riverside, South Grove, Thatcher and Whispering Hills would not create a shortage of golf opportunities in their respective draw areas. All have Public courses available as alternatives. In fact, given the low Course Utilization rates, both for the Indy Parks courses and the other Public facilities in the entire Indianapolis market; the closures would represent less than 2% of the Public golf supply in the Indianapolis market. Hence, the math and our professional opinion suggest this action by Indy Parks will have minor impact on accessibility to golf as a recreational pursuit and will likely only improve the Course Utilization and financial health of the remaining facilities.


Golf Operation Analysis

35

# Golfers

Golfers Adj for Index

Total EHE

Private EHE

Public EHE

124

110

5.9%

61.0% 6.5%

3,454

3,800

3.5

0

3.5

1,086

109

115

110

10.2%

23.6% 6.5% 3,068

3,375

1.5

0

1.5

2,250

Smock

89,755

100

118

107

108

7.1%

46.3% 6.5% 5,834

6,301

4.0

0

4.0

1,575

Winding River

29,510

90

119

114

108

17.0%

47.3% 6.5%

1,918

2,072

4.0

0

4.0

518

Golfers/ Public EHE

Part Rate

110

105

CU %

Average Index

96

47,200

5 Year Pop Growth

Income Index

53,145

Whispering Hills

Age Index

Sahm

Course

10 Minute Pop

Ethnicity Index

10-Minute Drive Time Draw Area

Eagle Creek

68,072

91

85

110

95

9.5%

29.7% 6.5%

4,425

4,203

4.0

1

4.0

1,051

Sarah Shank

102,787

95

107

77

93

0.4%

46.3% 6.5%

6,681

6,213

1.0

0

1.0

6,213

Pleasant Run

94,625

103

94

78

92

0.6%

42.4% 6.5%

6,151

5,659

1.0

0

1.0

5,659

Thatcher

80,881

94

89

77

87

0.2%

11.9%

6.5% 5,257

4,574

2.5

0

2.5

1,830

Douglass

103,338

99

73

77

83

1.1%

15.0% 6.5%

6,717

5,575

1.0

0

1.0

5,575

Coffin

100,389

92

70

82

81

-1.0%

20.7% 6.5% 6,525

5,285

8.0

2

6.0

881

Riverside

100,389

92

70

82

81

-1.0%

35.0% 6.5% 6,525

5,285

8.0

2

6.0

881

South Grove

100,389

92

70

82

81

-1.0%

38.9% 6.5% 6,525

5,285

8.0

2

6.0

881

Average 2,367

5 Year Pop Growth

Private EHE

Public EHE

Golfers/ Public EHE

125

110

5.9%

61.0% 6.5% 28,253 31,079 22.0

9

13

2,391

Whispering Hills

358,228

98

95

92

95

10.2%

23.6% 6.5% 23,285 22,121

8.0

1

7

3,160

Smock

333,861

98

117

107

107

7.1%

46.3% 6.5% 21,701 23,220 13.0

2

11.0

2,111

Winding River

208,222

98

116

102

105

17.0%

47.3% 6.5% 13,534

9.5

0

9.5

1,496

Eagle Creek

363,332

96

89

104

96

9.5%

29.7% 6.5% 23,617 22,672 16.5

4

12.5

1,814

Sarah Shank

515,447

97

100

88

95

0.4%

46.3% 6.5% 33,504 31,829

15.0

0

15.0

2,122

Pleasant Run

462,180

98

91

88

92

0.6%

42.4% 6.5% 30,042 27,638

9.0

1

8.0

3,455

Thatcher

439,891

94

91

91

92

0.2%

11.9%

6.5% 28,593 26,305 13.0

3

10

2,631

Douglass

570,691

97

86

88

90

1.1%

15.0% 6.5% 37,095 33,385 16.5

4

12.5

2,671

Coffin

515,249

96

84

89

90

-1.0%

20.7% 6.5% 33,491 30,142

16.0

5

11.0

2,740

Riverside

515,249

96

84

89

90

-1.0%

35.0% 6.5% 33,491 30,142

16.0

2

11.0

2,740

South Grove

515,249

96

84

89

90

-1.0%

38.9% 6.5% 33,491 30,142

16.0

2

11.0

2,740

14,211

Total EHE

Average Index

104

Golfers Adj for Index

Income Index

101

# Golfers

Ethnicity Index

434,669

Part Rate

Age Index

Sahm

Course

CU %

10 Minute Pop

20-Minute Drive Time Draw Area

Average 2,506


36

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

GOLF COURSE MARKET ANALYSIS & REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL 38

Redevelopment Potential

50

Market Understanding & Analysis

56

Alternative Uses

37


38

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

GOLF COURSE MARKET ANALYSIS & REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL

REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL As a part of this study, a methodology for comparing golf course redevelopment potential was developed. To better understand the opportunities at each of these facilities, this analysis included neighboring land uses, market fundamentals, operational efficiencies, and local park need for the areas surrounding the 13 municipal golf facilities in Indianapolis. For the purposes of this study, â&#x20AC;&#x153;redevelopment potentialâ&#x20AC;? is defined as any use other than a golf course. This data-driven method is simply one way to quantify and consider redevelopment potential and is only intended to inform the decision-making process. Other analyses and qualitative factors should also be taken into consideration.

39


40

MEASURING REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL Three indices were created to measure the important aspects of a golf course’s redevelopment potential. Golf Course Performance measures each course’s operating performance in order to identify which courses are underperforming, Park Need quantifies and measures the surrounding community’s need for additional parks space, and Market Potential measures the market characteristics that support commercial or residential development.

Definitions of Variables Golf course redevelopment potential was analyzed using a composite of these indices, which were based on the variables below. •• RevPAR 2017 – A proprietary methodology for calculating the total revenue per available round. •• Change in RevPAR 2011-2017 – A proprietary analysis that identifies annual changes in Revenue per Available Round between 2011 and 2017. This indicates a course’s long-term stability and facility performance. •• 2017 Course Utilization Rate – A proprietary methodology for measuring facility performance. Of the available rounds, including a factor for weather, this is the percent of rounds utilized per course. •• Average Index – Annual rounds of golf per capita varies widely across different income brackets,

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

ages, and ethnic groups. The Average Index measures course area demographic indicators compared to the state distribution to identify areas with populations more likely to participate in golf. •• Average Facility Grade – Each building on every course was given a grade. Due to the differences in the number of facilities on each course, an average grade of all facilities for each course was included in this analysis. •• Population Per Square Mile – Population density figures are based on 2017 Esri estimates, adjusted to 1-mile radius areas around the course. Compared to low-density areas, areas with higher densities require additional park space to serve the needs of residents. •• Median Household Income – The median income for households within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. This variable indicates the spending power of the surrounding area and is often used by developers to identify areas of investment. Areas with higher incomes and densities can support more commercial development and higher-end residential development. •• Median Home Value – The median home value of occupied homes within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. Median home values are a key component of understanding the residential market.


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

41

•• Vacant Housing Units – The percent of vacant units, both owner-occupied and rental, within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. Vacancy rates can indicate the long-term stability and marketability of an area. Areas with high vacancies are associated with lower property values and are significantly less likely to attract private investment.

•• 2017 Total Sales – Total sales of retailers within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. Commercial users tend to cluster, and sales data can indicate existing retail strength and clustering.

•• Building and Neighborhood Services Building Permit Data – This comes from the City of Indianapolis and measures the sum of total investments over a 5-year time frame within a 1-mile radius. Permit data indicates recent market activity that may not yet be reflected in Census, Esri, or ACS data.

•• Priority Ranking from Township Residents – Residents of each township were asked to rank 22 program priorities. For this analysis, the golf ranking for each township was included.

•• Projected Population Growth Through 2040 – The number of new residents expected within a township through 2040 based on the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization. Areas with growing populations will need additional park space to serve new residents. •• WalkScore – WalkScore® measures the “walkability” or proximity to common services and amenities. Higher scores indicate more amenities are located nearby. •• 2017 Daytime Population: Workers – Total number of daytime workers within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. This is a common measure for commercial real estate developers because it indicates how many people with spending power are located in the area during the day.

•• Distance to Other Non-Golf Course Parks – Measure of the direct distance (not driving distance) to the nearest non-golf course park.

•• Distance to the Nearest Greenway/Corridor – Measure of the direct distance (not driving distance) to the nearest greenway or multi-use corridor. •• Percent of Adults who are Obese – CDC data from 2015 at the census tract level. •• Urban Tree Canopy – Neighborhood-level data from Keep Indianapolis Beautiful that is used as a way to measure greenspace access outside of Indy Parks’ portfolio of facilities and locations. •• No Leisure-Time Physical Activity Among Adults Aged 18 or Older – CDC data from 2015 at the census tract level. Indicates that area residents need more access to recreational opportunities.


42

INDEX METHODOLOGY Each index provides a composite score for each golf course. Scores were created by analyzing a series of variables related to each index. Within each variable, every data point for each golf course is ranked from 1 - 4 in comparison to the other courses. This ranking is based on a data clustering method known as the Jenks Optimization method that is designed to find natural breaks in the data. This strategy seeks to reduce variance within classes and maximize variance between classes. Each variable is then weighted on a scale of 1 - 5 according to its importance. The individual variable scores are then added together to create an overall score for each of the three indices (Golf Course Performance, Park Need, and Market Potential). The goal of the scoring is to determine which courses are best suited for redevelopment based on a comprehensive view of redevelopment potential. Higher scoring golf courses are more appropriate for redevelopment than lower scoring courses. The following section provides an overview of the variables selected for each of the three indices. Selected variables are quantitative, objective measures that should be used to inform the decision-making process, not to be the only determining factor. More detailed information, including source information, can be found in the appendix.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Golf Course Performance The Course Performance Index was compiled using a composite score from the following five variables. These variables came from the Golf Facilities Condition Analysis and the Golf Operations Analysis. These variables are quantitative measures of the operational efficiencies, along with a qualitative assessment of facility conditions on each course.

Variable

Weight

RevPAR 2017 Course Utilization 2017 Average Demographic Index Change in RevPAR 2011-2017 Average Facility Grade

5 4 3 2 1

The best performing golf course is Sahm, followed by Sarah Shank, Smock, Winding River, Pleasant Run and Eagle Creek. The worst performing golf courses are Douglass, Coffin, Thatcher, Riverside, South Grove, and Whispering Hills. Lower performing courses are better suited for reuse because they are less likely to generate revenue and may become a drain on Indy Parks resources in coming years.

Site Location

Total Score

Sahm Golf Course

18

Sarah Shank Golf Course

27

Smock Golf Course

28

Winding River Golf Course

29

Pleasant Run Golf Course

30

Eagle Creek Golf Club

31

Whispering Hills Golf Course

47

South Grove Golf Course

47

Riverside Golf Course

51

Thatcher Golf Course

54

Coffin Golf Course

54

Douglass Golf Course

55

*High Scores indicate the poorest performing courses. The highest score possible is 60 and the lowest score possible is 13.


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

43

Park Need

Market Potential

The Park Need Index quantifies and measures the surrounding community’s need for additional parks space using a composite score based on the following eight variables. These variables came from a variety of sources, including the City of Indianapolis, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Esri.

The Market Potential Index measures the market characteristics that support commercial or residential development. This index was created using a composite score from the following nine variables. These variables came from a variety of sources, including the City of Indianapolis, Esri, and walkscore.com.

Variable

Variable

Weight

Priority Ranking from Township Residents Distance to Other Non-Golf Course Parks Distance to Nearest Greenway/Corridor Projected Population Growth Population Density per Square Mile No Leisure-Time Physical Activity Among Adults Aged >=18 Years Percent of Adults Who are Obese Urban Tree Canopy

5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1

The Park Need Index indicates that the areas surrounding Douglass, Sarah Shank, Coffin, and South Grove are most in need of additional park space. These courses are better suited to change uses from a golf course to another recreational space due to the priorities of township residents, distance to other park space, and health indicators and outcomes.

Site Location

Total Score

Weight

BNS Building Permit Data Median Household Income Vacant Housing Units Percentage Median Home Value Projected Population Growth 2017 Daytime Population: Workers Population Density per Square Mile 2017 Total Sales WalkScore®

5 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 1

The Market Potential Index indicates that areas surrounding Sahm, Pleasant Run, and Smock are best suited for redevelopment opportunities including residential, retail, and office. From a market redevelopment perspective, these courses are better suited to change uses due to surrounding private investment and demographic indicators.

Site Location

Total Score

Douglass Golf Course

78

Sahm Golf Course

81

Sarah Shank Golf Course

77

Pleasant Run Golf Course

78

Coffin Golf Course

76

Smock Golf Course

74

South Grove Golf Course

75

Douglass Golf Course

67

Pleasant Run Golf Course

72

Sarah Shank Golf Course

65

Riverside Golf Academy

71

Whispering Hills Golf Course

65

Thatcher Golf Course

71

Thatcher Golf Course

63

Riverside Golf Course

64

South Grove Golf Course

61

Smock Golf Course

62

Eagle Creek Golf Club

60

Whispering Hills Golf Course

52

Riverside Golf Academy

57

Winding River Golf Course

48

Winding River Golf Course

53

Eagle Creek Golf Club

37

Coffin Golf Course

52

Sahm Golf Course

37

Riverside Golf Course

47

*High scores indicate the surrounding community’s need for non-golf course park space. The highest score possible is 96, the lowest score possible is 24

*High Scores indicate that a site is better suited for redevelopment given existing market conditions. The highest score possible is 108 and the lowest score possible is 27.


44

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Summary Table Park Need

Redevelopment Potential

Market Opportunity

WINDING RIVER

WHISPERING HILLS

THATCHER

SOUTH GROVE

SMOCK

SARAH SHANK

SAHM

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE RIVERSIDE GOLF ACADEMY

N/A FOR MARKET OPPORTUNITY

PLEASANT RUN

EAGLE CREEK

DOUGLASS

COFFIN

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL Understanding that each course will have a unique set of course performance, park need, and market opportunity scores, this analysis utilizes all three to identify and inform redevelopment potential. The overall redevelopment potential is measured by charting the indices of both Course Performance and Park Need, as well as Course Performance and Market Potential. This is intended to help simplify and visualize the redevelopment potential for individual golf courses.

45


46

Course Performance & Park Need Based on the Golf Course Performance Index, the worst performing courses are located near the top of the chart, while the best performing courses remain near the bottom. Park Need is visualized horizontally, with the areas with the highest need located near the right of the chart. Areas with the lowest park need are located near the left. Courses in the upperrightmost quadrant have been identified as most suited for redeveloping into a different park use. These courses include Douglass, Coffin, Thatcher, South Grove, Riverside, and Whispering Hills.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

Course Performance and Market Potential Based on the Golf Course Performance Index, the worst performing courses are located near the top of the chart, while the best performing courses remain near the bottom. Market Potential is visualized horizontally, with the areas with the highest market potential located near the right of the chart. Areas with the lowest market potential are located near the left. Courses in the upper-rightmost quadrant have been identified as most suited for redeveloping into non-park uses. These courses include Douglass, Whispering Hills, Thatcher, and South Grove.

47

Additional Considerations The courses identified as most appropriate for redevelopment are Coffin, Douglass, Riverside, South Grove, Thatcher, and Whispering Hills. However, it is important to note that this analysis is only one layer in the decision to redevelop courses into other uses. The political climate, market realities, historic considerations, and other factors will also play a role. The Riverside Regional Park Master Plan identified South Grove and Riverside as potential courses for new park or recreational uses. Due to the results of the scoring, this analysis supports that decision. Finally, although Douglass has been identified as a course that would be appropriate for redevelopment, the historic significance of the site should be considered. Before selecting this course as a reuse candidate, additional consideration should be given to its important history.


48

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

CASE STUDIES

Source: New York City Economic Development Corporation

Source: National Recreation and Park Association

WETLAND MITIGATION BANKING

STREAM MITIGATION BANKING

New York City Economic Development Corporation in Partnership with the New York City Parks Department

Prince William Environmental Bank

New York, NY Staten Island will soon be home to New York Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first wetland mitigation bank. The 68-acre Saw Mill Creek Marsh will be restored in two phases. Phase One will restore 54 acres and will create a mixture of open water, mudflat, low marsh, high marsh, scrub-shrub, wetland, and upland buffer. Before the site became a city-owned property, it suffered from illegal dumping over the last century. It is estimated to cost $12.5 million to restore the site, but the city estimates that the site will generate approximately 13 credits, worth approximately $1.5 million each, that can be sold to developers. In January, the US Army Corps of Engineers determined that the project successfully met its requirements and released 1.68 tidal wetland credits, which the city will be able to sell.

Prince William County, VA Through a formal request for proposals, the Prince William County Park Authority partnered with Angler Environmental to construct a stream mitigation bank entirely on public park lands. Angler assumed all costs, liabilities, and risks for the success of the bank. With over 20 miles of streams and riparian buffers in 10 different banks, the Prince William Environmental Bank is expected to generate between 30,000 and 40,000 mitigation credits. The project is expected to generate $3.5 million in the first 10 years of the bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operation.


21st St Bear Creek Regional Park

Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

49 Bear Creek Regional Park

To Colorado Springs +-3.26 AC

Bear Creek Cañon Park

Gold

To Colorado Springs +-5.35 AC

Ca m pR

Cr

Hig

k re e

ne en

B ea

rC

Stratton Open Space

ey Ch

Rd

hD

r

ta

Pike National Forest

es

oad

Chamberlain Trail

Helen Hunt Falls

* To Colorado Springs +-208 AC

North Cheyenne Cañon Park

*

Mt Muscoco

*

Seven Falls 1858

Starsmore Center

*

*

s)

Hully Gully Public Access Easement To Colorado Springs +- 1.2 AC

tag eR dS Ol 0.5

0.25

Throughout the country, many privately owned golf courses have been redeveloped as housing. This strategy has been used on courses that have closed due to a lack of demand and on courses where golf no longer represents the highest and best possible use for the land. Royal Oak, Michigan is one of the few examples of a municipallyowned course being partially sold and developed into a 10-acre housing development and 40-acre public park. The City sold the 10 acres to a private developer for $3.85 million, and the development will include both single family homes and townhomes. Most of the proceeds from the sale will be used to finance the golf course-topark conversion.

0.5 Miles

Proposed Land Exchange Map Legend Updated 24 FEB 2016

FOREST CONVERSION Conceptual Chamberlain Trail Trails

To Colorado Springs Parks

To Colorado Springs

+- 371.21 AC +- 115.4 AC New Public Trail Easements

Proposed Public Trail Easement To Broadmoor Hotel Property Boundary

Royal Oak, MI

0

To Broadmoor +-189.5 AC Public Accees to Future Trail System

To The Broadmoor +- 190.05 AC

The Highlands, Grand Rapids, MI Pike National Forest Existing Parkland

In early 2017, the 100-year old former Highlands Golf Course was purchased by the Blandford Nature Center and the Land Conservancy of West Michigan. The 121-acre course is being restored into a natural habitat, with trails and public programs. Although the site still resembled a golf course during its first summer season, it has attracted a variety of wildlife including turtles, fox, deer, muskrat, and a variety of birds and insects.

Shrine

*

Chamberlain Trail Easement To Colorado Springs +- 4.4 AC

d

Go (C lo ld Cam sed p to V Rd ehic le

SELLING LAND TO RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPER

Source: http://blandfordnaturecenter.org

. PRAIRIE /

*

Lake

South Cañon Trail Public Easement To Colorado Springs +- 3.4 AC

Emergency Access for Hully Gully

Hully Gully

Source: www.freep.com

Broadmoor Hotel

Chamberlain Trail Public Easement To Colorado Springs +-23.7 AC

*

CM Zoo

Chamberlain Trail (Final Alignment to be Determined)

Cloud Camp

*

Source: parks.coloradosprings.gov

Chamberlain Trail Public Easement To Colorado Springs Alignment to be Determined +- 74.1 AC

LAND EXCHANGE

Pike National Forest

Antenna Farm

NORAD

Colorado Springs, CO Cheyenne Mountain

State Park The City of Colorado Springs completed a land exchange in late 2016 with The Broadmoor, a hotel and resort company. Through the exchange, The Broadmoor received 180 acres in exchange for the City gaining 371 acres of property and 115 acres of new public trail easements. The appraised value of the property the City transferred was approximately $2.1 million, while the appraised value of the land they received was approximately $3.6 million. Despite the rigorous public input process, and the fact that the land exchange achieved several of the major goals identified in the Colorado Springs Parks Master Plan, there was still some public opposition. However, in late 2016, the City Council approved the land exchange.

Ave

Rd


50

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

GOLF COURSE MARKET ANALYSIS & REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL

MARKET UNDERSTANDING & ANALYSIS The following section provides an understanding of the market to inform potential redevelopment decisions. It is based on thorough research of local demographic and real estate trends affecting the market potential of Indy Parks’ golf courses. Some of the factors taken into consideration include population and income trends, rent, vacancy, and absorption of various asset classes across Marion County. The market analysis component of the study is simply one way to understand the areas surrounding Thatcher and Whispering Hills, which have been identified as best suited for redevelopment. This type of analysis also ensures that the study is comprehensive. For the purposes of this study, “redevelopment potential” is defined as any use other than a golf course.

51


52

THATCHER OVERVIEW Located on Indianapolis’ west side, Thatcher is surrounded by older, low-density housing stock and a cluster of industrial uses. It is located across Eagle Creek from Allison Transmission and Speedway’s Main Street. Although the population in the Thatcher area is projected to see modest growth over the next five years, it is likely to be at a much lower rate than Marion County as a whole. Vacancy is significantly higher in the Thatcher area than the County, and since 2010, the Thatcher area has seen an increase in vacancy each year. Median household incomes and home values are low compared to Marion County.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Demographics

Thacher Golf Course Study Area Thatcher Study Area*

Marion County

2010 Population

8,128

903,393

2017 Population

8,141

952,385

Projected 2022 Population Annual Population Growth Rate 2010-2017 Projected Annual Population Growth Rate 2017-2022 2017 Average Household Size 2017 Owner Occupied

8,220

986,710

0.02%

0.76%

0.10%

0.71%

2.61

2.45

43.3%

47.5%

42.1%

40.6%

2017 Renter Occupied 2017 Vacancy Rate

14.7%

11.9%

2017 Median Home Value

$80,078

$129,273

2017 Median Income

$36,131

$44,907

Blue Collar Workers

35.1%

22.5%

White Collar Workers

38.6%

58.9%

Service Industry Workers

26.2%

18.5%

*The Thatcher golf course study area is defined as a 1-mile radius surrounding the clubhouse. Data Source: ESRI 2017


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

53

Office Analysis

Residential Analysis

Thatcher is unlikely to capture a significant amount of demand from potential office users due to site specific constraints such as lack of access and visibility, as well as market realities such as high vacancy and low rents in Thatcher’s western submarket. The majority of submarkets within the Indy Metro area, with the exception of Downtown and North Meridian/Carmel, have not seen new office construction in recent years due to the ample supply of affordable space. To justify office development, rents would need to reach cost-effective levels. For example, rents in the North Meridian/Carmel submarket, where recent new construction has occurred, have averaged well above $20 per square foot, compared to the Thatcher’s Western submarket, which has seen an average vacancy of 28.6 percent and average rents of $15.50. The combination of site and market constraints make office development at the Thatcher site unlikely.

The Thatcher site has several existing assets, such as its topographic character and proximity to Thatcher Park, Chuck Klein Sports Complex, and Eagle Creek, which could be leveraged as unique selling points for a single-family development. However, market constraints make it an unlikely prospect. Existing high vacancy and low home values would make it difficult to attract new market-rate development to the site. Subsidized housing may be a potential, but due to the site’s distance from supportive services, it may not be the optimal location for affordable housing.

Retail Analysis Although Thatcher is located less than half a mile from Speedway’s successful Main Street, retail is not likely to be successful on the Thatcher site. In order to thrive, retail typically needs at least one or more of the following characteristics: high traffic counts, strong household incomes nearby, high residential or employment density, high visibility, strong urban form that is conducive to retail, and/or ease of access. Given the lack of access, low traffic counts, and relatively low disposable incomes, retail development at the Thatcher site is likely unfeasible. It is also important to note that - with the exception of entertainment and recreation retail does not lead market momentum; instead, retail typically follows residential or office development. For retail to be supported at the Thatcher site, significant residential investment in the surrounding area would likely need to occur.

Industrial Analysis Due to its proximity to Allison Transmission, as well as the cluster of supportive industries along Gasoline Alley, Thatcher could likely support flex/industrial development. The Indianapolis Industrial market is strong, with the western submarket (which includes Thatcher, Speedway, and extends out to Brownsburg) outperforming the overall market. The overall Indianapolis market has a vacancy rate of 4.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2017, while the western submarket had a significantly lower vacancy rate of 2.7 percent.

Market Performance

Thacher Golf Course Study Area Thatcher Area*

Indianapolis Metro Market

Office Rents Per Square Foot

$15.50

$20.17

Office Vacancy Rate

28.6%

17.4%

Retail Rents Per Square Foot

$10.04

$17.58

Retail Vacancy Rate

7.1%

5.7%

Multifamily Rents Per Unit

$727

$904

Multifamily Vacancy Rate Industrial Rents Per Square Foot Industrial Vacancy Rate

8.3%

6.6%

$3.50

$3.86

2.7%

4.9%

*The Thatcher golf course study area is defined as a 1-mile radius surrounding the clubhouse. Data Source: JLL and CBRE Market Reports, Q4 2017, Thatcher is located in the western submarket


54

WHISPERING HILLS OVERVIEW Located on Marion County’s far southeast side, the land surrounding Whispering Hills is primarily undeveloped, with the exception of a subdivision just west of the course. Unlike Thatcher, the Whispering Hills area has a lower residential vacancy rate and higher median home value compared to Marion County. Although the area saw a larger population growth rate between 2000-2017 compared to the County, growth is projected to slow over the next five years. In late 2016, the Indy Star released an article about potential contamination in and around Whispering Hills Golf Course due to the site’s history as a former landfill. Given the site’s recent negative press about potential contamination, lack of population density, lack of nearby commercial development, and abundant availability of land for development in the surrounding area, market rate development will likely be a challenge at the Whispering Hills site.

Office Analysis Office users typically want to locate to areas that balance costs of occupancy with ease of access, surrounding amenities, clusters of similar users or clients, and employee housing options. As such, the Whispering Hills site is not likely to be a competitive site for office development. Construction costs are likely high, subsequently driving up cost-of-occupancy, and few other businesses are located the study area. Amenities in the surrounding area are scarce, and with the exception of an adjacent residential subdivision, housing options are limited and undiversified.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Demographics

Whispering Hills Golf Course Study Area Whispering Hills Study Area*

Marion County

2010 Population

1,554

903,393

2017 Population

1,763

952,385

Projected 2022 Population Annual Population Growth Rate 2010-2017 Projected Annual Population Growth Rate 2017-2022 2017 Average Household Size 2017 Owner Occupied

1,891

986,710

1.27%

0.76%

0.70%

0.71%

2.50

2.45

89.0%

47.5%

2017 Renter Occupied

6.7%

40.6%

2017 Vacancy Rate

4.5%

11.9%

2017 Median Home Value

$187,772

$129,273

2017 Median Income

$78,554

$44,907

Blue Collar Workers

15.8%

22.5%

White Collar Workers

71.8%

58.9%

Service Industry Workers

12.4%

18.5%

*The Whispering Hills golf course study area is defined as a 1-mile radius surrounding the clubhouse. Data Source: ESRI 2017


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

55

Retail Analysis

Industrial Analysis

Although disposable incomes around Whispering Hills are relatively high, population and employment density are low. It is important to remember that retail follows residential, it is not typically a driver of market momentum. For retail development to be a possibility at Whispering Hills, environmental concerns aside, significant employment or residential densification would have to occur.

Although the southeast submarket, home to the Whispering Hills site, commands slightly lower rents than the greater Indianapolis market, the area could likely support small-scale flex/industrial development. The Indianapolis Industrial market is strong, and the southeast submarket has a lower vacancy rate (2.4 percent) than the overall Indianapolis market (4.8 percent). However, depending on the type of development/user, industrial development on-site could face opposition from property owners in the nearby subdivision. Furthermore, potential industrial users may also be hesitant to acquire of use a property due to the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real and perceived environmental issues.

Residential Analysis The surrounding area could support additional residential development, however, the main constraints for residential development at the Whispering Hills site would be the potential and perceived environmental concerns resulting from its proximity to a former landfill. This could potentially render the site unmarketable to potential developers and consumers. In addition, the availability of development-ready land in the surrounding area would make the Whispering Hills site unattractive for development due to the recent negative press, as well as potential risks and high-costs. Developers have ample land options in the area and would likely pursue other sites. As a result, residential redevelopment is not recommended.

Market Performance

Whispering Hills Golf Course Study Area Whispering Hills Study Area

Indianapolis Metro Market

Office Rents Per Square Foot

$15.77

$20.17

Office Vacancy Rate

18.6%

17.4%

Retail Rents Per Square Foot

$12.58

$17.58

Retail Vacancy Rate

9.9%

5.7%

Multifamily Rents Per Unit

$667

$904

Multifamily Vacancy Rate Industrial Rents Per Square Foot Industrial Vacancy Rate

8.8%

6.6%

$3.59

$3.86

2.4%

4.9%

*Whispering Hills is located in the Southeast Submarket Data Source: JLL and CBRE Market Reports, Q4 2017


56

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

GOLF COURSE MARKET ANALYSIS & REDEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL

ALTERNATIVE USES Based on the Course Performance Index, other park planning efforts, and conversations with the Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study team, Thatcher and Whispering Hills have been identified as the courses most suitable for redevelopment. However, as the Market Understanding section described, marketbased redevelopment for office, retail, residential or industrial uses will likely not be appropriate for either site. Instead, other recreational uses should be explored for both Thatcher and Whispering Hills. This is supported by the survey findings from the Indy Parks Comprehensive Master Plan, which found that Wayne and Warren townships, home to Thatcher and Whispering Hills, ranked golf significantly lower as a preferred recreational opportunity compared to the other seven townships. The following list of alternatives is not comprehensive-- instead, this list was generated through conversations with the Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study team and research about national trends in recreation. Additionally, revenue projections assume recreational demand at the county level. Although these projections would be applicable to Thatcher and Whispering Hills, they do not consider any site-specific issues.

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58

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

ARCHERY In recent years, archery has rapidly increased in popularity in the U.S. Between 2008 and 2013, there was a 24% increase in archery participation and there are now more than 24 million archers nationally.1 Archery is a relatively inexpensive recreational use to develop depending on the facilities constructed. A simple outdoor archery facility can cost as little as $10,000 to $50,000 for site preparation and facility development. Larger, more elaborate facilities with indoor components can cost up to $1 million. The space requirements for archery are fairly flexibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; half-acre facilities are common, but typically, most moderatelysized ranges are five acres. North-facing ranges, within 45 degrees of north, are ideal and will allow the range to host World Archery sanctioned events, and natural barriers and topography should be considered to improve safety. According to the Archery Trade Association, a typical market, like the Central Indiana region, can support 15 archery parks per 250,000 people. Of these parks, 20-30% should be large enough to support programs and competitions. Currently, there are only a handful of small archery facilities in Marion County, so there is likely demand to support additional facilities.

Source: Koteewi Archery Range | visithamiltoncountyDOTcom 1

Indy Parks Master Plan; American Recreation Coalition


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

A local example of a large, successful archery facility is the Koteewi Range located in Strawtown Koteewi Park in Hamilton County. The facility cost $770,000 to construct in 2015 and has 96 shooting lanes and 33 targets. The facility was built using a grant from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, and the Hamilton County Parks and Recreation Department has an operational agreement with a private operator to run the facility. The operator pays rent to the Parks Department and is able to run a pro shop on site. Through the rent payments, the Parks Department is able to maintain the facilities. The facility is not intended to be an income generator for the Parks Department; instead, it is simply intended to be a community resource. According to both the Archery Trade Association and Hamilton County Parks and Recreation staff, unsuccessful models are typically focused on generating significant income. According to the Hamilton County Parks and Recreation Department, at least 50% of visitors to the Koteewi Range are first time visitors. The facility provides memberships and tournaments for experienced archers, but also hosts birthday parties, school field trips, scout groups, and other youth organizations. The site caters heavily towards people with disabilities, providing adaptive archery for those who would otherwise be unable to participate in the sport. Annually, the Koteewi Range sees between 10,000 and 15,000 visitors. Single visits with bow rental, a bucket of arrows, and an hour of range time cost $15, and yearly memberships are also available.

2

American Recreation Coalition; U.S. Census

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Demand Methodology To calculate the pool of potential archers in Indianapolis, the number of archers nationally (24,000,000) was multiplied by the percent of the US population that resides in Indianapolis (0.3%).2 This resulted in a potential market of 73,854 potential archers in Indianapolis. This was multiplied by a range of capture rates (5%-15%) to account for a variety of X-factors, which have the ability to change the current trajectory of the market. The capture rates for an archery range are assumed to be higher than the other uses in this analysis that require a yearly membership; the archery analysis only includes single-day passes and non-archers are more likely to participate. Unlike other types of recreational uses that require specific skills or ownership of a particular product, archery is more accessible to those with little to no experience. Based on a $15 day-pass visit with equipment rental, archery could potentially generate the following range of revenues:

Low (5% Capture Rate)

Medium (10% Capture Rate)

High (15% Capture Rate)

$55,000

$111,000

$166,000

The range of low to high capture rates assume that there will be between 10 and 30 visitors a day. However, actual the number of visitors and actual revenues will be highly dependent on the type of facility created. If the archery facility were a regional destination with ample amenities, the revenue projection could be even higher. But if the facilities created are minimal, revenues could fall below the projected amounts.


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

DRONE COURSE Nationally, approximately 3.3 million drones were sold in 2017, a 36% increase over 2016. Today, over 8% of Americans own a drone, which is only projected to increase in coming years.3 Drone courses provide flying challenges and obstacle courses while creating a safe location for users to fly. These courses are relatively inexpensive to create, costing as little as $5,000, depending on the facilities developed. Currently, there are no flying sites in Marion County accredited by the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest model aviation association and current leading safety organization for unmanned aircraft systems, which includes both drones and model airplanes. Model airplane flying sites in surrounding counties require annual membership dues that range between $60-$80 per adult, $30-$40 for juniors, and $100-$120 for families. To encourage long-term interest in a potential drone-friendly park and create more sustainable demand, obstacles, racing courses, and other items of interest should be considered.

Source: Indianapolis RC South indyrcsouthDOTorg

It is important to note that the FAA Modernization and Reauthorization Act of 2012 requires hobbyist drone operators to contact airport management and the air traffic control tower if operating a drone within five miles of an airport. Whispering Hills is located approximately 2 miles from the Post Air Airport, a small, privately-owned, single-runway airport. Thatcher is located approximately 3.5 miles from the Indianapolis International Airport. Arrangements can be made with airports to operate drone facilities, but these would need to be negotiated with the individual airport operators. Source: Phoenix Drone Course thedronesmagDOTcom

3

Pew Research Center

Source: Indianapolis Westside RC Model Club indywestrcDOTorg


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

Currently, most recreational drone owners fly on private property, existing parks, or other open spaces because there are no established facilities specifically for drones in the region. In order to attract these users to pay to fly in a designated facility, the facility will need to provide an unparalleled experience for drone operators. At this point, an open field or concrete pad will likely not be enough of an incentive for drone operators to pay any type of membership dues, unless new or more rigorous regulations are enforced. Nationally, there are only a few examples of parks departments beginning to create spaces for drone operators to fly. There have been some attempts to create privately-operated indoor drone facilities in the U.S., but most of those have gone out of business. Internationally, some drone arenas have successfully opened, but these locations typically have much stricter enforcement of outdoor drone operation than most locations in the U.S. However, if Indy Parks were to create a unique facility for drone operation, it would likely be unparalleled in the Midwest. Furthermore, due to the high expense to purchase a drone, owners tend to have more disposable income than many other segments of the market.

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Demand Methodology Assuming the same percentage of Indianapolis residents own a drone as the national average of 8%, approximately 76,000 Indy residents own a drone. This is the potential market that a drone arena or course would draw from. This was multiplied by a range of capture rates, and then multiplied by a proposed annual membership cost of $80. This is similar to the membership costs of many of the model aviation clubs in the region. Based on these assumptions, a drone course or arena could potentially generate the following range of revenues:

Low (5% Capture Rate)

Medium (10% Capture Rate)

High (15% Capture Rate)

$30,000

$61,000

$91,000

The above capture rates assume between 380 to 1140 annual memberships. Actual revenues will depend highly on the type of facility created. Currently, owners have very little incentive to join any type of membership-based facility. Unless the Parks Department can create a unique and exciting experience for drone operators, they will likely not be willing to pay to fly their drones in a designated facility. However, these projections do not consider the potential to create a free drone park, which could potentially be a unique and appropriate fit for the proposed sites. There are few publicly accessible places for people to legally fly drones, so creating a free drone park could still create an exciting destination for operators. Furthermore, one day events and tournaments with a unique course could attract drone operators from around the Midwest, thereby drastically changing potential revenues. There is also a potential tie to economic development initiatives if the Parks Department connected with local educational institutions, such as Ivy Tech or Purdue Polytechnic, and/or the logistics sector for drone education and repair. Regional institutions may also provide a potential market; Indiana State University has one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first undergraduate programs for Unmanned Systems Technology, and Purdue University has an active drone club.


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

FOOTGOLF Footgolf combines soccer and golf and is played on a golf course. The game requires players to kick a soccer ball into 21-inch diameter holes in as few shots as possible. Creating a footgolf facility is likely the simplest and least expensive transition from a traditional golf use. According to the American Footgolf League, it typically costs between $3,000 - $5,000 to create a footgolf course on an existing golf course, and an 18-hole foot golf course can be created on 9 holes of a golf course. Due to the sport’s novelty and the broad appeal of soccer, footgolf is able to draw people to golf courses who otherwise may never visit. Source: Footgolf | GolfkingdomDOTnet

Demand Methodology According to the American Footgolf League, the majority of footgolf players are between the ages of 18 and 45, an age group that accounts for 41% of Marion County’s population,4 or approximately 390,000 residents. The capture rate for footgolf is estimated to be lower than other recreational activities in this analysis based on conversations with the operator of Coffin Footgolf and the fact that it is not yet a well-known activity. The revenue projections assume that the average footgolfer will spend approximately $17 on playing fees, which parallels the current footgolf rates at Coffin Golf Course. The walking rate for Monday-Friday is $15 per person while the rate for weekends and holidays is $18. The $17 projection also aligns with the national average from the American Footgolf League. However, this does not capture ball rentals, cart rentals, or concession purchases.

Low (5% Capture Rate)

Medium (10% Capture Rate)

High (15% Capture Rate)

$17,000

$33,000

$50,000

These capture rates assume that there will be between 3 and 8 footgolfers a day. To achieve these capture rates, a fairly intensive marketing strategy to attract potential foot golf players will be necessary. Coffin Footgolf typically sees approximately 10 to 12 footgolfers a week during the summer months, not including fundraising events and other larger footgolfing groups. Coffin Footgolf has seen the most success attracting people to the course by offering promotions like 4

US Census

Source: Footgolf | FrenchlickDOTcom

Groupons, connecting to Marian University, and offering organizational fundraising events. Other potential opportunities include partnering with Circle City Athletics or other young adult sports leagues, as well as creating more connections to youth soccer organizations. The initial investment to create a footgolf course is low, and maintenance is significantly less expensive than golf course maintenance. However, based on the performance of the existing footgolf facility in the Parks Department’s portfolio, this will likely not be a large revenue generator for either the Department or the Department’s concessionaires. Furthermore, without a deliberate and intensive marketing effort, there is likely not a large enough market in Marion County to support additional footgolf courses.


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

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ZIPLINE/CANOPY WALK The average US zipline or aerial challenge course saw a 9% growth in annual revenue and a 10% increase in guest count between 2016 and 2017. These courses are growing in popularity, with one important caveat. Solely zip line attractions attract a significantly lower percentage of repeat business compared to aerial adventure parks. Only 10-15% of first-time zip line customers return for a second visit. Alternatively, aerial adventure courses see at least 50% of customers return because these courses test peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skills, encouraging them to return to see what they can accomplish with another attempt. Between 2014 and 2015, the number of new aerial adventure parks grew by 40%, while zip lines and canopy tours grew by only 13%.5 Go Ape Treetop Adventures, located in Eagle Creek, is a national zipline and aerial course operator. Go Ape provides the capital investment, design, building, and operation of each course. The park department partners pay nothing, but partners receive a percentage of each ticket sale. Existing Go Ape courses range from 7 to 10 acres, with a minimum of 3 acres required. However, walking trails can coexist with Go Ape courses as most of the course utilizes the tree canopy, leaving ample space on the ground. Although both Whispering Hills and Thatcher would be potential candidates for a new zipline or aerial course from an operational perspective due to the existing tree canopy, ADA compliance, and customer flow, neither site has the surrounding amenities or market potential to support this type of facility. It is difficult to have a successful zip line or aerial course as a stand-alone activity, and both Thatcher and Whispering Hills are currently too isolated to support this type of facility. Privately run facilities like Go Ape perform best in affluent areas or in locations that contain other attractions or clusters of recreational activities. However, according to Go Ape leadership, the Indianapolis region likely has the market potential to support another zip line or aerial course, but an appropriate location would need to be identified in order to ensure success. Source: Go Ape Chessington | chessingtonDOTcom 5

Zipline and Challenge Course Industry Report- XOLA


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

HAY FARMING

DESTINATION DOG PARK

According to the Indiana State Department of Agriculture, there is market potential for hay production in the Midwest due to the multi-year drought in western portions of the U.S. Although sales and production can vary drastically due to local and national weather patterns, soil fertility, and rainfall, hay may be a potential revenue generating use. However, when weather patterns favor other parts of the country, local hay producers typically see lower profits due to additional product availability.

Nationally, off-leash dog parks are the fastest growing segment of city parks.7 Around 2010, the number of households with a dog surpassed the number of households with children,8 leading to a shift in residents’ park priorities. In Marion County, residents are now prioritizing dog parks over other types of facilities as off-leash dog parks were ranked 15th in Marion County’s priority rankings.9 Additionally, according to the Indy Parks Master Plan, Thatcher is located in an underserved Dog Park Area. However, because both Thatcher and Whispering Hills are located in areas where most houses have large backyards, a potential dog park would have to provide a unique experience for owners and their pets.

Yields and sales prices are highly variable and can vary drastically by year. Similarly, different types of hay can generate different yields and sales prices, and different species may also require additional inputs. More than one harvest per year is common, but the number of cuttings is highly dependent on rainfall. Furthermore, hay is a perennial, lowering annual costs due to the fact that the site would not need to be replanted each year. Although initial capital costs to develop and manage a hay farm are fairly low, it is likely more efficient to lease land to an existing hay producer. If Indy Parks were interested in acting as the producer, investments in trained staff, sales, and on-site equipment and storage will be required. In January of 2018, the average price for all hay nationally was $139 per ton, an increase of $17 per ton compared to January of 2017. In Indiana, hay is at a premium, selling for an average of $175 a ton in January of 2018.6 Price, however, is highly dependent on density of the bale and quality of the hay. It’s important to note that while hay production may generate revenue for Indy Parks, an agricultural monoculture may increase soil erosion and the heavy use of fertilizers and pesticides may impact water quality.

These facilities can have a wide range of potential costs, depending on the amenities provided. Several companies offer high-profile contests and grants to offset the costs of dog park development. These include: •• Beneful’s $500,000 Dream Dog Park Makeover •• PetSafe’s Bark for Your Park with grants ranging from $5,000 to $25,000 •• Nutro’s Room to Run Dog Park Appreciation Project with thirty $2,000 grants.

A national example of a municipality leasing land to a hay producer and harvester is the City of Maryville, Missouri. The Parks Department created an RFP to select a qualified hay harvester to maintain 133 acres of City owned property within the Mozingo Lake Recreation Park. The hay lease generates approximately $5,600 annually for the City. 6 7 8 9

US Department of Agriculture Trust for Public Land American Veterinary Medical Foundation; U.S. Census Indy Parks Master Plan

Source: Dog Wood Park Frisbee Field | Facebook


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

65

Case Studies Shaggy Pines Dog Park – Ada, Michigan (Grand Rapids Metro Area) Shaggy Pines Dog Park is a 20-acre dog park located in the Grand Rapids Metro Area, approximately 14 miles from downtown. The park includes a hiking trail, a sandy “doggy mountain” for digging, a swimming pond, a small dog area, agility equipment, and coffee/treat bar. The park also provides the Shaggy Shuttle that picks dogs up from their homes to play at the park, then shuttles the dogs back. Owners do not need to be home, or even be members of the park, to be able to use the service. The park provides different membership levels (weekends only, unlimited) as well as single-visit payment options.

Dog Wood Park – Jacksonville, FL Dog Wood Park is a 42-acre off-leash park that includes a 2-acre lake for swimming, 10-acre natural wooded area with hiking trails, a 25-acre open frisbee/ball field, agility equipment, separate area for small dogs, and a night-play option. The park provides membership and single-visit payment options.

Demand Methodology Source: Shaggy Shuttle | ShaggyPinesDOTcom

Today, approximately 37% of US households own a dog.10 Assuming the same percentage for Marion County households, approximately 141,452 households in the county own a dog, which would be the total market for a potential dog park. However, dog parks tend to have a neighborhood-oriented trade area, typically serving households within a short drive. In order to account for the different types of potential facilities that could be created, this analysis includes a range of capture rates. As a destination dog park with unique amenities or services, a high capture rate is more appropriate to project revenues. If the dog park only provides standard amenities and services, a lower capture rate should be considered.

Source: Dog Wood Park Lake | Facebook 10

American Veterinary Medical Foundation; US Census


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

The following revenue projections assume a single $75 yearly pass for each household, the standard annual rate at the Indy Park Bark Parks. It does not account for multiple dogs in a household or the discounted passes provided later in the year. The revenue projections were calculated by multiplying the approximate number of Marion County households that own a dog by the capture rate, and then multiplying by the yearly pass cost. Based on these assumptions, a dog park could potentially generate the following range of revenues:

Low (5% Capture Rate)

Medium (10% Capture Rate)

High (15% Capture Rate)

$53,000

$106,000

$159,000

These capture rates assume a range of memberships from 707 at the lowest and 2,122 at the highest. This is similar to the number of annual passes at the Indy Parks Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular dog park, Broad Ripple Bark Park, which had approximately 1,100 annual memberships in 2017. However, according to Broad Ripple Park staff, the success of the Bark Park is due to its central location as well as it being the first dog park created by the Parks Department. Both Thatcher and Whispering Hills are less centrally-located and will therefore need to be able to attract people and their pets with some type of unique amenity or service.

Source: Shaggy Pines | ShaggyPinesDOTcom

HORSEBACK RIDING/ EQUESTRIAN There are few horseback riding facilities in Marion County, which could be a potential revenue generating recreational opportunity. However, horseback riding has seen a decrease in participation in recent years; horseback riding declined 29 percent between 2008 and 2013 (Indy Parks Master Plan). Other potential challenges, such as the road requirements for horse trailers and potential erosion issues, should also be taken into consideration. Fort Harrison State Park has the Hoosier Trail Rides, which gives visitors who do not own a horse the opportunity to ride for $21 for 30 minutes. For visitors who own a horse, the Indiana State Department of Natural Resources charges $5 per horse and $7 per vehicle for park entrance.

Source: Hoosier Trail Rides at Fort Harrison State Park | Facebook


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

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MOTOCROSS/ATV

SWITCHGRASS FARMING

The all-terrain vehicle (ATV) market, which includes fourwheelers, three-wheelers, and off-road motorcycles, is projected to continue growing at about eight percent each year (Business Wire). However, few nearby facilities exist for Central Indiana residents. The closest locations are in Lafayette, Columbus, and Laurel, all approximately a one-hour drive from Indianapolis.

Switchgrass is a perennial grass that is native to the Midwest. It can be used to make ethanol, and in coming years, it has the potential to surpass corn and soybeans as a biofuel. Switchgrass can be grown on lands that cannot support crop of food production or in areas with lower quality soil. With good establishment and management, the crop can be harvested for a minimum of five to ten years without the need to reseed. It is productive even during droughts, reduces erosion, and provides habitat wildlife. The inputs required to produce switchgrass are approximately 3.5 times less than for corn, and it can provide five times more energy than it takes to grow it, making it significantly more efficient and attractive for ethanol production.

Due to the high impact of the tires, the durability of the underlying soils should be evaluated, as well as the potential impact on any wildlife habitats. Cost to develop such a course depends on the number of turns and hills, existing topography, and amount of clearing required. The State Department of Natural Resources has motorized vehicle trails (not including snow mobile trails) at Redbird State Recreation Area and Interlake State Recreation area, both in southwestern Indiana. The state charges $15 per off-road vehicle, which includes entrance to the property, or $75 annually for unlimited trail use.

However, major challenges remain. The most significant barrier is processing switchgrass into ethanol because it requires a more complex refining process than for crops like corn. However, the Journal of Crop Science predicts that by 2025, new breakthroughs will be made in the refining process, potentially making switchgrass and other native trees and grasses the most significant energy crops. According to a Pennsylvania State University study, total costs are estimated to be $4,300 per acre while total revenues are estimated at $5,300 per acre over a fifteen-year period. However, the possibility of leasing property to larger producers who already own the necessary equipment should be considered in order to maximize the return on the investment.

Source: Badlands Off Road Park, Indiana | Facebook

Source: Haspin Acres Off-Road and Motocross Park | Facebook

Source: Switchgrass Washington 6 year growth | audubonDOTorg


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOLAR FARMING Due to the significant amount of land available on existing golf courses, alternative energy production through solar panels is a potential alternative use for Thatcher and Whispering Hills. However, due to the 2017 passage of Indiana Senate Bill 309 (SB 309), this alternative may only generate limited financial benefits for the City of Indianapolis. SB 309 gradually lowers the compensation rate for customers who install alternative energy devices. Previously, customers who installed alternative energy devices saw their expenses offset by not only producing their own energy, but by then being able to sell excess energy back to the power grid at the retail rate. Known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;net metering,â&#x20AC;? this incentive helped off-set the cost to install alternative energy devices so that customers would see an eventual return on their investment. The City of Indianapolis and its Parks Department are not exempt from the SB 309 limitations because Indianapolis Power and Light (IPL) is an investor-owned entity. Net metering at a lower rate is still available, but only if an organization joins the program before July 1, 2022. By joining before that date, net metering will be available for ten years. After that time, a lower reimbursement rate will come into effect, making it more difficult to offset the investment costs of installing alternative energy devices.

Source: Indiana Municipal Power Agency Solar Farm I impaDOTcom

However, the city could lease land to a utility company or other larger-scale producer. The City of Evansville is partnering with Vectren Corporation, the utility provider for portions of southern Indiana, on a $5.5 million solar farm project. The 15-acre site will include 8,000 panels and will be the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first solar project, providing enough power for approximately 300 homes annually. Vectren will own and operate the solar farm on 15 acres of land leased from the City of Evansville. Similarly, the City of Greenfield sold 17-acres to the Indiana Municipal Power Agency to develop a 11,000-panel solar farm. The land was sold for approximately $170,000, and the farm will provide enough power for 400 homes annually.

Source: Rendering Vectren and Evansville Solar | wikyDOTcom


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

WETLAND MITIGATION BANKING Wetland mitigation banking helps compensate for the unavoidable impacts to wetlands due to development. When wetland losses are unavoidable, that wetland must be replaced within the same watershed. Wetland mitigation banking allows for outside entities, such as units of government, corporations, or individuals, to create or restore a large wetland area in advance of any development impacts so that â&#x20AC;&#x153;wetland creditsâ&#x20AC;? can be sold in the future to offset unavoidable impacts. These credits are sold to the developers who must offset wetland losses. According to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM), wetland credits are in high demand due to the amount of development occurring in the region and the limited supply of mitigation credits. Currently, there is only one wetland mitigation bank that serves the Central Indiana region, and that bank is about to sell out of credits. Depending on the quality and type of wetland, these mitigation banks can generate between $55,000 and $85,000 an acre in Central Indiana. However, economies of scale are important for mitigation banking, requiring a significant number of acres in order to make sure development is feasible. The history of the site is also critical as the cost to develop new wetlands can vary widely. For instance, if the site was historically a wetland, it is often significantly cheaper to reestablish a wetland on-site than to establish a wetland on a historically non-wetland site.

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Wetlands included in the mitigation program must comply with numerous reporting requirements and meet specific benchmarks. These wetlands will be required to have specific vegetation and wildlife standards, diversity rates, and survival rates, which would be evaluated through monitoring and reports to regulatory agencies, including the Army Corps of Engineers and IDEM. Parks departments throughout the Midwest have established mitigation banks with varied success. Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park and Slate Run Metro Park outside of Columbus, Ohio were restored as wetland mitigation banks and are maintained by the Columbus and Franklin County Metro Parks Department. The 500-acre wetland mitigation bank includes trails and a boardwalk. The Metro Parks Department was able to sell credits for approximately $50,000 to $60,000 an acre (The Columbus Dispatch; Stream and Wetlands Foundation).

Source: Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park Wetland Bank | metroparksDOTnet


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Variable

Definition/Reasoning

A Pellucid/Edgehill proprietary methodology for calculating the total revenue per RevPAR 2017 available round. A Pellucid/Edgehill analysis that identifies annual changes in Revenue per Change in RevPAR Available Round between 2011 and 2017. This indicates a course’s long-term 2011-2017 stability and facility performance. A Pellucid/Edgehill proprietary methodology for measuring facility performance. Course Utilization Of the available rounds, including a factor for weather, this is the percent of 2017 rounds utilized per course. Annual rounds of golf per capita varies widely across different income Average Index brackets, ages, and ethnic groups. The Average Index measures course area (Age, Ethnicity, and demographic indicators compared to the state distribution to identify areas Incomes) with populations more likely to participate in golf. Each building on every course was given a grade by the architects at WDi. Due Average Facility Grade to the differences in the number of facilities on each course, an average grade of all facilities on each course was taken. Population density figures are based on 2017 Esri estimates, adjusted to 1-mile Population Density per radius areas around the course. Compared to low-density areas, areas with Square Mile higher densities require additional park space to serve the needs of residents. The median income for households within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. This variable indicates the spending power of the surrounding area Median Household and is often used by developers to identify areas of investment. Areas with Income higher incomes and densities can support more commercial development and higher-end residential development. The median home value of occupied homes within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Median Home Value Esri estimates. Median Home values are a key component of understanding the residential market. The percent of vacant units, both owner-occupied and rental, within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri estimates. Vacancy rates can indicate the long-term Vacant Housing Units stability and marketability of an area. Areas with high vacancies are associated Percentage with lower property values and are significantly less likely to attract private investment. BNS Building Permit Data

This comes from the City of Indianapolis. Measures the sum of total investments over a 5-year timeframe within a 1-mile radius. Indicates recent market activity that may not yet be reflected in Census, Esri, or ACS data.

The number of new residents expected within a township through 2040 based Projected Population on the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization. Areas with growing Growth Through 2040 populations will need additional park space to serve new residents. WalkScore® measures the “walkability” or proximity to common services and WalkScore® amenities. Higher scores indicate more amenities are located nearby. Total number of daytime workers within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 Esri 2017 Daytime estimates. This is a common measure for commercial real estate developers Population: Workers because it indicates how many people with spending power are located in the area during the day.

Source Pellucid/Edgehill Analysis Pellucid/Edgehill Analysis Pellucid/Edgehill Analysis Pellucid/Edgehill Analysis WDi Analysis Esri, 2017

Esri, 2017

Esri, 2017

Esri, 2017 City of Indianapolis, Building and Neighborhood Services Indianapolis MPO projections Walkscore.com Esri, 2017


Golf Course Market Analysis & Redevelopment Potential

Total sales of retailers within a 1-mile radius based on 2017 ESRI estimates. Commercial users tend to cluster, and sales data can indicate existing retail strength and clustering. Distance to other non- Measure of the direct distance (not driving distance) to the nearest non-golf golf course parks course park. Priority Ranking from Residents of each township were asked to rank 22 program priorities. For this Township Residents analysis, the golf ranking for each township was included. Distance to nearest Measure of the direct distance (not driving distance) to the nearest greenway greenway/corridor or multi-use corridor. Percent of Adults who CDC data from 2015 at the census tract level. Indicates that area residents are Obese need more access to recreational opportunities. Neighborhood level data from Keep Indianapolis Beautiful used as a way to Urban Tree Canopy measure greenspace access outside of Indy Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portfolio of facilities and locations. No leisure-time physical activity CDC data from 2015 at the census tract level. Indicates that area residents among adults aged need more access to recreational opportunities. >=18 years 2017 Total Sales

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Esri, 2017 City of Indianapolis Indy Parks Comprehensive Plan City of Indianapolis CDC 500 Cities Data Keep Indianapolis Beautiful CDC 500 Cities Data


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis

73

SITE ANALYSIS 74 Glossary 78

The 13 Golf Courses

80 Coffin 90

Frederick Douglass

100 Eagle Creek 110 Pleasant Run 120 Riverside 130 Sahm 140 Sarah Shank 150 Smock 160 South Grove 170 Thatcher 180 Whispering Hills 190 Winding River


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

GLOSSARY The series of golf course site analyses following this section contains a series of technical terms. This section will provide definitions of these terms.

TRANSPORTATION Interstate Interstates are the highest classification of Arterials and were designed and constructed with mobility and long-distance travel in mind. Since their inception in the 1950â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the Interstate System has provided a superior network of limited access, divided highways offering high levels of mobility while linking the major urban areas of the United States. Determining the functional classification designation of many roadways can be somewhat subjective, but with the Interstate category of Arterials, there is no ambiguity. Roadways in this functional classification category are officially designated as Interstates by the Secretary of Transportation, and all routes that comprise the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways belong to the Interstate functional classification category and are considered Principal Arterials. Source: Federal Highway Administration | https://www.fhwa.dot. gov/planning/processes/statewide/related/highway_functional_ classifications/section03.cfm#Toc336872981

Major Arterial These roadways serve major centers of metropolitan areas, provide a high degree of mobility and can also provide mobility through rural areas. Unlike their access-controlled counterparts, abutting land uses can be served directly. Forms of access for Other Principal Arterial roadways include driveways to specific parcels and at-grade intersections with other roadways. For the most part, roadways that fall into the top three functional classification categories (Interstate, Other Freeways & Expressways and Other Principal Arterials) provide similar service in both urban and rural areas. The primary difference is that there are usually multiple Arterial routes serving a particular urban area, radiating out from the urban center to serve the surrounding region. In contrast, an expanse of a rural area of equal size would be served by a single Arterial. Source: Federal Highway Administration | https://www.fhwa.dot. gov/planning/processes/statewide/related/highway_functional_ classifications/section03.cfm#Toc336872981


Site Analysis

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Minor Arterial

Major & Minor Collector

Minor Arterials provide service for trips of moderate length, serve geographic areas that are smaller than their higher Arterial counterparts and offer connectivity to the higher Arterial system. In an urban context, they interconnect and augment the higher Arterial system, provide intra-community continuity and may carry local bus routes.

Collectors serve a critical role in the roadway network by gathering traffic from Local Roads and funneling them to the Arterial network. Within the context of functional classification, Collectors are broken down into two categories: Major Collectors and Minor Collectors. Until recently, this division was considered only in the rural environment. Currently, all Collectors, regardless of whether they are within a rural area or an urban area, may be sub-stratified into major and minor categories. The determination of whether a given Collector is a Major or a Minor Collector is frequently one of the biggest challenges in functionally classifying a roadway network.

In rural settings, Minor Arterials should be identified and spaced at intervals consistent with population density, so that all developed areas are within a reasonable distance of a higher level Arterial. Additionally, Minor Arterials in rural areas are typically designed to provide relatively high overall travel speeds, with minimum interference to through movement. The spacing of Minor Arterial streets may typically vary from 1/8- to 1/2-mile in the central business district (CBD) and 2 to 3 miles in the suburban fringes. Normally, the spacing should not exceed 1 mile in fully developed areas. Source: Federal Highway Administration | https://www.fhwa.dot. gov/planning/processes/statewide/related/highway_functional_ classifications/section03.cfm#Toc336872981

In the rural environment, Collectors generally serve primarily intra-county travel (rather than statewide) and constitute those routes on which (independent of traffic volume) predominant travel distances are shorter than on Arterial routes. Consequently, more moderate speeds may be posted. The distinctions between Major Collectors and Minor Collectors are often subtle. Generally, Major Collector routes are longer in length; have lower connecting driveway densities; have higher speed limits; are spaced at greater intervals; have higher annual average traffic volumes; and may have more travel lanes than their Minor Collector counterparts. Careful consideration should be given to these factors when assigning a Major or Minor Collector designation. In rural areas, AADT and spacing may be the most significant designation factors. Since Major Collectors offer more mobility and Minor Collectors offer more access, it is beneficial to reexamine these two fundamental concepts of functional classification. Overall, the total mileage of Major Collectors is typically lower than the total mileage of Minor Collectors, while the total Collector mileage is typically one-third of the Local roadway network. Source: Federal Highway Administration | https://www.fhwa.dot. gov/planning/processes/statewide/related/highway_functional_ classifications/section03.cfm#Toc336872981


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Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Annual Average Daily Traffic

Signalized Intersection

Roadway traffic volumes are typically expressed as annual average daily traffic (AADT) and represent one of the most objective characteristics of a roadway’s usage, providing a standard, easy to understand and simple metric for comparing the relative importance of roadways. In general, the higher the traffic volume is, the higher the functional classification will be (relative to the norms in the surrounding area). Therefore, examining the AADT with other roadways in both the immediate vicinity (and in the region as a whole) is helpful when deciding a “borderline” roadway classification. If, for example, when trying to determine whether a given roadway with an AADT of 3,500 should be classified as a Minor Arterial or Major Collector, most of the Minor Arterials (in the immediate area and the region at large) fall within the 4,000 to 10,000 range, and the Major Collectors fall within the 2,000 to 4,000 range, the roadway should be classified as a Major Collector.

Existing roadway intersections that have traffic signals, such as traffic lights.

Source: Federal Highway Administration | https://www.fhwa.dot. gov/planning/processes/statewide/related/highway_functional_ classifications/section03.cfm#Toc336872981

On-Street Bike Path Bike lanes designate an exclusive space for bicyclists through the use of pavement markings and signage. The bike lane is located adjacent to motor vehicle travel lanes and flows in the same direction as motor vehicle traffic. Bike lanes are typically on the right side of the street, between the adjacent travel lane and curb, road edge, or parking lane. This facility type may be located on the left side when installed on one-way streets, or may be buffered if space permits. See contra-flow bike lanes for a discussion of alternate direction flow. Bike lanes enable bicyclists to ride at their preferred speed without interference from prevailing traffic conditions. Bike lanes also facilitate predictable behavior and movements between bicyclists and motorists. Bicyclists may leave the bike lane to pass other bicyclists, make left turns, avoid obstacles or debris, and avoid other conflicts with other users of the street. NACTO: https://nacto.org/publication/urban-bikeway-design-guide/bikelanes/conventional-bike-lanes/

Sidewalk Gap Indicates gaps within the existing sidewalk network. Sidewalk gaps pose barriers to pedestrian connectivity and access to nearby facilities and areas.


Site Analysis

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 100-Year Floodplain Area that will be inundated by the flood event having a 1-percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. The 1-percent annual chance flood is also referred to as the base flood or 100-year flood. Source: FEMA | https://www.fema.gov/flood-zones

500-Year Floodplain Areas between the limits of the base flood and the 0.2-percent-annual-chance (or 500-year) flood. Source: FEMA | https://www.fema.gov/flood-zones

Wetland Wetlands are areas where water covers the soil, or is present either at or near the surface of the soil all year or for varying periods of time during the year, including during the growing season. Water saturation (hydrology) largely determines how the soil develops and the types of plant and animal communities living in and on the soil. Wetlands may support both aquatic and terrestrial species. The prolonged presence of water creates conditions that favor the growth of specially adapted plants (hydrophytes) and promote the development of characteristic wetland (hydric) soils. Wetlands vary widely because of regional and local differences in soils, topography, climate, hydrology, water chemistry, vegetation and other factors, including human disturbance. Indeed, wetlands are found from the tundra to the tropics and on every continent except Antarctica.

77

Two general categories of wetlands are recognized: coastal or tidal wetlands and inland or non-tidal wetlands. •• Tidal wetlands in the United States, as their name suggests, are found along the Atlantic, Pacific, Alaskan and Gulf coasts. They are closely linked to our nation’s estuaries where sea water mixes with fresh water to form an environment of varying salinities. The salt water and the fluctuating water levels (due to tidal action) combine to create a rather difficult environment for most plants. Consequently, many shallow coastal areas are unvegetated mud flats or sand flats. Some plants, however, have successfully adapted to this environment. Certain grasses and grasslike plants that adapt to the saline conditions form the tidal salt marshes that are found along the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific coasts. Mangrove swamps, with salt-loving shrubs or trees, are common in tropical climates, such as in southern Florida and Puerto Rico. Some tidal freshwater wetlands form beyond the upper edges of tidal salt marshes where the influence of salt water ends. •• Non-Tidal wetlands are most common on floodplains along rivers and streams (riparian wetlands), in isolated depressions surrounded by dry land (for example, playas, basins and “potholes”), along the margins of lakes and ponds, and in other low-lying areas where the groundwater intercepts the soil surface or where precipitation sufficiently saturates the soil (vernal pools and bogs). Inland wetlands include marshes and wet meadows dominated by herbaceous plants, swamps dominated by shrubs, and wooded swamps dominated by trees. Source: EPA | https://www.epa.gov/wetlands/what-wetland

Existing Tree Cover Indicative areas with existing trees.


78

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THE 13 GOLF COURSES 69

2

465

1

65

74

3

4 5

70

6 8 7

465

9

10 74

465

70

65

11

12


Site Analysis

79

1 EAGLE CREEK

2 SAHM

3 FREDERICK DOUGLASS

4 RIVERSIDE

5 COFFIN

6 SOUTH GROVE

7 THATCHER

8 PLEASANT RUN

9 WHISPERING HILLS

10 SARAH SHANK

11 WINDING RIVER

12 SMOCK


80

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

C GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

COFFIN

Coffin was originally the Highland Golf Club, a private golf course. In 1921, the property became a public golf course, and the Highland Golf Club was relocated near Rocky Ripple. The golf course is situated within the Cold Spring neighborhood, which is mostly residential with notable educational and healthcare institutions. Coffin Golf Course was completely redesigned, reconstructed, and opened for play in 1995.Â


Site Analysis: Coffin

81

69

465

65 74

COFFIN

70

465

74 70

465 65


82

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW

30TH

Area: ~147 acres Type: 18-hole

Legend Coffin Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

GRANADA

COLD SPRING

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

ER

COLD SPRING

W

TE

RIV

PUTTERS

22ND

HI

WARMAN

E TT YE FA LA 20TH North

0

200

400

800 Feet

COLD SPRING

21ST

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE


Site Analysis: Coffin

83

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Coffin’s location within Riverside Regional Park and in close proximity to residential neighborhoods and prominent educational and healthcare institutions positions the course well to draw significant traffic. •• Distinguished from other golf courses by its historical significance •• Located close to major roadways that can draw traffic from downtown Indianapolis

Weaknesses •• Frequent flooding (as much as 4x/year) •• Chemicals used to maintain the golf course are washed into the White River and downstream during flood events •• Clubhouse is not visible from Cold Spring Road •• The clubhouse and maintenance facilities are located in the floodplain •• The clubhouse and maintenance buildings are old and require improvements or replacement

Opportunities •• Direct connection to LaRue Carter Hospital site (expected to be re-purposed in the near future) •• Connections to the White River Greenway •• Bus routes and local bike/ped network could be expanded to include access to Coffin •• The Riverside Regional Park Master Plan included the establishment of a pedestrian bridge over the White River connecting the east and west sides of the park. The bridge would be located to span the golf course and land near the LaRue Carter Hospital. Improvements to the course should anticipate this new connection.

•• The Riverside Regional Park Master Plan recommended the redesign of Coffin to be more accommodating to different levels of players. The plan also recommended that a new clubhouse and potential banquet facility be constructed next to an existing underused maintenance facility adjacent to Cold Spring Road. This location creates greater visibility for the facility and removes it from the floodplain. •• Riverside and South Grove golf courses are slated to close. This may bring more golfers into Coffin.

Threats •• Most of Coffin is within the 100-year floodplain. •• Redesign of the golf course may occur incrementally. Currently, funding for these improvements is unsecured.

Cultural Analysis In 1903, the private Highland Golf Club was organized to lease the southwest part of Riverside Park for use as a golf course. The City of Indianapolis leased the land to the club, allowing them to construct a 9-hole golf course and a clubhouse that would eventually become public property. The golf course and clubhouse opened in 1904. A lease renewal in 1908 included space for expansion to an 18-hole course. Upon the expiration of the final lease in 1921, the property became a municipal golf course and the Highland Golf Club relocated to a new 100-acre property near Rocky Ripple. The property has operated as a municipal golf course since 1921 and was known as the Charles E. Coffin Golf Course by 1924, honoring Charles E. Coffin (1849–1934), a real estate developer, long-time member of the Board of Park Commissioners, and director of numerous community organizations. The present clubhouse was built about 1962. The course was redesigned and rebuilt in 1995.


84

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Coffin Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Coffin

85

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Maintenance Building

Pavilion

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

10

14

18

10

30

28

20

10

25

20

15

10

15

15

10

5

4

0

0

10

8

8

10

8

10

5

8

5

10

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

20 100

71

64

78

68

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed Pavilion Maintenance Building

1962 (1994) 1994 1985 2011

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments See Riverside Park Master Plan

none none none none none none none none inc

inc

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

inc

inc

none none inc

inc

inc

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

need to complete interior F (1 to 3 years)


86

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE

30TH

Existing Land Use Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial Office Hospital Places of Worship School Parks/Open Space Vacant

GRANADA

COLD SPRING

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

Community Facilities 1 Larue D. Carter Memorial Hospital 2 Bishop Simon Brute College

1

2

ER

COLD SPRING

W

TE

RIV

PUTTERS

22ND

HI

0

200

400

800 Feet

WARMAN

E TT YE FA LA

North

20TH

COLD SPRING

21ST

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE


Site Analysis: Coffin

87

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING

30TH

Zoning Districts D-S Dwelling Suburban District D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-6 Dwelling District Six D-6II Dwelling District Six-Two D-P Planned Unit Development HD-2 Hospital District Two C-4 Community-Regional District C-7 High-Intensity Commercial District PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

GRANADA

COLD SPRING

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

ER

COLD SPRING

W

TE

RIV

PUTTERS

22ND

HI

0

200

400

800 Feet

WARMAN

E TT YE FA LA

North

20TH

COLD SPRING

21ST

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE


88

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE 30TH

13,184

5,633

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

GRANADA

Public Transit

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK COLD SPRING

Bus Stops #15 #30 #37

Pedestrian & Bicycle White RiverTrail On-Street Bike Lane Sidewalk Gap

ER

COLD SPRING

W

TE

RIV

PUTTERS

22ND

HI

E TT YE FA LA

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

WARMAN

17,105

20TH

COLD SPRING

21ST

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE


Site Analysis: Coffin

89

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

30TH

Legend 2-Feet Contour Line Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

GRANADA

COLD SPRING

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

ER

COLD SPRING

W

TE

RIV

PUTTERS

22ND

HI

0

200

400

800 Feet

WARMAN

E TT YE FA LA

North

20TH

COLD SPRING

21ST

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE


90

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

D

GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Douglass is named after Frederick Douglass, who was the leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York. During the era of segregation, Douglass Park was the only public park in Indianapolis to which African Americans were permitted access.


Site Analysis: Frederick Douglass

91

69

465

65

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

74

70

465

74 70

465 65


92

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

DOUGLASS GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW HOVEY

ARSENAL

Area: ~40 acres Type: 9-hole

30TH

Legend

ARSENAL

Douglass Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area

29TH

29TH

SANGSTER

SCHOLFIELD

RALSTON

DR ANDREW J BROWN

COLUMBIA

28TH

27TH

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

HOVEY

SHELDON

YANDES

ARSENAL

25TH


Site Analysis: Frederick Douglass

93

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths

Threats

•• Easy access to the golf course for surrounding neighborhood residents

•• Golfers tend to prefer 18- or 36-hole courses over 9-hole courses

•• Significant cultural and historical value to the community

•• Relative to other public golf courses, Douglass is financially under-performing.

•• Easy access from the Monon Trail •• Shorter-length course that is welcoming to less experienced golfers

Weaknesses •• Land use conflict between residential and industrial uses •• Limited bicycle infrastructure in the neighborhood •• As a 9-hole course, Douglass draws fewer golfers than 18- and 36-hole golf courses do •• The course does not provide positive revenue •• Though Douglass is adjacent to minor arterials, the traffic count suggests the roadways do not bring much regional traffic into Douglass

Opportunities •• Industrial uses may become obsolete in the future, providing redevelopment opportunities •• A more direct connection to the Monon Trail would be beneficial •• Lack of floodplain and wetland is conducive to future development •• The course could act as an amenity to attract future context-sensitive development in the area

Cultural Analysis Douglass Park opened in 1927 after Marcus Stewart, a reporter for the Indianapolis Recorder, campaigned for a park serving the primarily African American neighborhoods living on the city’s northeast side. Stewart, a community activist who urged the city to appoint a black police sergeant, and encouraged his readers to vote, was promoted to editor of the Recorder in 1928. Though the city’s black residents enjoyed the same leisure activities as their white counterparts, systematic segregation prevented them from using many of the recreation facilities and parks. As more African Americans moved to Indianapolis in the 1920s and 30s, Douglass Park became a popular site for community gatherings. In 1928 the northern portion of the park was turned into Douglass Park Golf Course, making it the only golf course in the nation named after an African American. Originally, the course amounted to a few tomato cans buried in the ground, but by 1936, it was expanded to nine holes. The park was frequented by world heavyweight boxing champion Joe Lewis and renowned golfers Ted Rhodes, Charlie Sifford, and Howard Wheeler when they visited the Midwest. Even after the city’s parks and golf courses were integrated in the 1960s, the clubhouse of the Douglass Park Golf Course remained a popular meeting place for local African American politicians, business owners, and civic groups. (Source: historicindianapolis.com, author Gwen Sunkel)


94

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Douglass Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Frederick Douglass

95

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

14

17

30

30

25

20

17

17

10

7

5

10

8

9

10

5

6

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

10 100

76

89

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed

1970 1994

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Others

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments

2010 none none none none A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


96

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

DOUGLASS GOLF COURSE

HOVEY

ARSENAL

EXISTING LAND USE

1

30TH

Existing Land Use

ARSENAL

Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial Heavy Commercial Light Industrial Heavy Industrial Office Places of Worship School Parks/Open Space Utilities/ Transportation Vacant

29TH

29TH

Community Facilities

SANGSTER

SCHOLFIELD

RALSTON

COLUMBIA

1 Julian Coleman Academy 2 Francis W Parker School 56

DR ANDREW J BROWN

28TH

27TH

25TH

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

HOVEY

SHELDON

YANDES

ARSENAL

2


Site Analysis: Frederick Douglass

97

DOUGLASS GOLF COURSE

HOVEY

ARSENAL

CURRENT ZONING

30TH

Legend

ARSENAL

D-5 Dwelling District Five D-7 Dwelling District Seven C-1 Office-Buffer District C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional Commercial I-2 Light Industrial District I-4 Heavy Industrial District PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

29TH

29TH

SANGSTER

SCHOLFIELD

RALSTON

DR ANDREW J BROWN

COLUMBIA

28TH

27TH

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

HOVEY

SHELDON

YANDES

ARSENAL

25TH


98

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

DOUGLASS GOLF COURSE

Vehicular Transportation

11,167

30TH

ARSENAL

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Minor Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

Public Transit

29TH

29TH

Bus Stops #5 #30

Pedestrian & Bicycle

4,137

Monon Trail On-Street Bike Lane Sidewalk Gap

SCHOLFIELD

RALSTON

DR ANDREW J BROWN

COLUMBIA

28TH

SANGSTER

X,XXX

3,625

HOVEY

ARSENAL

TRANSPORTATION

27TH

6,519

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

HOVEY

SHELDON

YANDES

ARSENAL

25TH


Site Analysis: Frederick Douglass

99

DOUGLASS GOLF COURSE

HOVEY

ARSENAL

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 30TH

Legend

ARSENAL

2-Feet Contour Line Existing Tree Area Note: There is no presence of floodplain and wetlands in this area.

29TH

29TH

SANGSTER

SCHOLFIELD

RALSTON

DR ANDREW J BROWN

COLUMBIA

28TH

27TH

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

HOVEY

SHELDON

YANDES

ARSENAL

25TH


100

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

E GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

EAGLE CREEK Eagle Creek is located at the northwest fringes of Marion County within Eagle Creek Regional Park. It is mostly surrounded by affluent and suburban-style residential subdivisions and is adjacent to Eagle Creek Reservoir. A considerable portion of the land surrounding Eagle Creek is either agricultural or natural open space.


Site Analysis: Eagle Creek

101

69

465

EAGLE CREEK

65 74 70

465

74 70

465 65


102

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

EAGLE CREEK GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW

I-65

65TH

Area: ~447 acres Type: 36-hole

Legend RACEWAY

Fox Hollow Estates Subdivision EAGLE

Eagle Creek Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

RACEWAY

EAGLE CREEK

HENDRICKS COUNTY

Eagle Creek Park

The Links Subdivision

North

0 200 400

800 Feet

POTTERS PIKE

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

56TH


Site Analysis: Eagle Creek

103

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Designed by world renowned golf course architects Pete and Alice Dye •• Well-recognized regional golf course •• Two 18-hole courses, a 4000 sf pavilion/conference center and banquet facility provide the capacity to host tournaments and other events •• Accommodates golfers of varying skill levels •• Performs well financially •• Surrounding area demographics and socio-economic trends are conducive to golf •• Houses wetlands and wildlife habitats •• Short drive from Interstate 65, which helps Eagle Creek capture regional traffic

Weaknesses •• Portions of the courses exist in floodplains. As with any golf course, the possibility exists that the chemicals used in maintenance of the course will ultimately find their way into Eagle Creek and other areas downstream.

Opportunities •• Installation of green infrastructure could help mitigate flooding and prevent chemicals from flowing downstream

Threats •• Number of golfers is declining nationally •• Debt structure of recent improvements is a burden to Indy Parks, the course, and its operations.

Cultural Analysis Eagle Creek is notable in that it was designed by Pete and Alice Dye and has long been considered a premier golfing experience located in a beautiful setting. The adjacency of Eagle Creek Reservoir and Eagle Creek Regional Park provides additional recreational opportunities.


104

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Eagle Creek Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Eagle Creek

105

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Service Building

Storage Building

Range Building

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

18

16

10

14

14

30

28

26

20

25

30

20

10

16

18

15

18

10

5

7

8

10

8

10

8

8

6

10

6

10

10

10

8

5

9

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

2 100

77

83

70

79

87

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed Range Building Service Building Storage Building

1970 (1994) 1987 (2007) 1990 1972 2001

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments

2002 none none none none

none none none none A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


106

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

EAGLE CREEK GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE

I-65

65TH

Existing Land Use

RACEWAY

Residential (0-3 units/acre) Parks/Open Space

Community Facilities Fox Hollow Estates Subdivision EAGLE

1 Messiah Lutheran Church at Eagle Creek

RACEWAY

EAGLE CREEK

HENDRICKS COUNTY

Eagle Creek Park

The Links Subdivision 1

North

0 200 400

800 Feet

POTTERS PIKE

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

56TH


Site Analysis: Eagle Creek

107

EAGLE CREEK GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING

I-65

65TH

Zoning Districts

RACEWAY

D-1 Dwelling District One D-S Dwelling Suburban District PK-1 Park District One PK-2 Park District Two

EAGLE

Fox Hollow Estates Subdivision

RACEWAY

EAGLE CREEK

HENDRICKS COUNTY

Eagle Creek Park

The Links Subdivision

North

0 200 400

800 Feet

POTTERS PIKE

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

56TH


108

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

EAGLE CREEK GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION

I-65

65TH

Vehicular Transportation

RACEWAY

X,XXX

2,672

Major Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

EAGLE

Fox Hollow Estates Subdivision

Eagle Creek Park

RACEWAY

EAGLE CREEK

HENDRICKS COUNTY

4,725

5,215

The Links Subdivision

8,873

North

800 Feet

POTTERS PIKE

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

0 200 400

56TH

19,196


Site Analysis: Eagle Creek

109

EAGLE CREEK GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

I-65

65TH

Legend

RACEWAY

Eagle Creek Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

EAGLE

Fox Hollow Estates Subdivision

RACEWAY

EAGLE CREEK

HENDRICKS COUNTY

Eagle Creek Park

The Links Subdivision

North

0 200 400

800 Feet

POTTERS PIKE

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

56TH


110

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

P GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

PLEASANT RUN Pleasant Run was opened in 1922. As a long-standing community golf course, long time patrons refer to Pleasant Run as Irvington Country Club. It is in a residential neighborhood with multiple neighborhood- and regionalserving commercial nodes.


Site Analysis: Pleasant Run

111

69

465

65 74 70

PLEASANT RUN 465

74 70

465 65


112

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

PLEASANT RUN GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW Area: ~105 acres Type: 18-hole

12TH

Legend

Plea s ant Run

11TH EASTRIDGE

Pleasant Run Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

10TH Anderson Cemetery

ST JOSEPH

E PLEASANT RUN PKWY S

ARLINGTON

CAMPBELL

BOLTON

9TH

SPRINGER

MICHIGAN

WASHINGTON

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

KITLEY

KENYON

RIDGEVIEW

KENMORE

SHERIDAN

CATHERWOOD

WEBSTER

LOWELL

IRWIN

YS

PASADENA

PK W E PLEASANT RUN


Site Analysis: Pleasant Run

113

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Past host site of the Men’s City Amateur, Indianapolis Junior City Amateur, and IGA State Public Links Championship •• Proximity to major roadways, including I-465 and Washington St. •• Located in the heart of the Irvington neighborhood •• Multiple bus routes provide access to Pleasant Run

Weaknesses •• Sidewalk gaps are prevalent in the blocks north of Pleasant Run •• Some areas within and around Pleasant Run are within the 100-year floodplain

Opportunities •• Potential to host future local and regional golf tournaments •• Expansion of local bicycle infrastructure and additional connections to the Monon Trail

Threats •• Competes for players with other more recognized golf courses such as Eagle Creek

Cultural Analysis The course is named for Pleasant Run Creek, which traverses the property. In April of 1923, a “slender Englishman” named Alf Ward walked into the office of Indianapolis mayor Lew Shank. He introduced himself as the new golf professional for the city’s municipal club. The mayor sent Alfred out to Irvington with shovels, horses, and a few men. He was to build Pleasant Run, the “finest municipal golf course in the country.”

Alfred started his career at Walton Heath Golf Club in Surrey where he assisted James Braid, the famous Scottish golf pro and course architect. Under Braid’s guidance, he learned how to build golf courses and maintain greens and fairways. Pleasant Run was the 20th course Alfred had built or remodeled. Alf took his men and horses to the site of Pleasant Run and got right to work building a temporary 9-hole course before the new season. For the next two and a half years, he worked to build first this course followed by a brand new 18-hole course the next year. The job required hard labor, often seven days a week. Other golfers were surprised to find Alf on the site as early as 4 o’clock in the morning. The city parks department paid him a salary of $600 per year ($8429.33 in today’s dollars). He also earned money teaching private lessons on the course. Mayor Shank, the city Parks Department, Club President Charles “C. B.” Davis, and club members in general were all pleased with Alfred’s work building the course and skill at teaching golf. Even when the demanding physical labor led to prolonged illnesses that repeatedly forced Alfred out of tournament play. The newspapers printed cheery little clips about him. Alfred resigned from Pleasant Run in 1925. He moved on to become the first golf professional at the Martinsville Country Club in Morgan County, Indiana. He served in this position until 1928. In 1930, he appears in the US Census living at 923 N Hill St in South Bend, Indiana, working at the Notre Dame golf links. Source: http://wardancestry.com/alf-j-ward-slender-englishman-buildspleasant-run-golf-course/ Author: Erika Ward Lopresti


114

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Pleasant Run Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Pleasant Run

115

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Maintenance

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

18

16

10

30

26

26

20

20

10

16

18

10

5

7

8

10

8

8

6

10

10

10

8

100

77

83

70

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed Maintenance Building

1972 2010 (1998) 1996 1975 (2002)

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments soffits need some minor repairs

none none none none

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


116

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

PLEASANT RUN GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE 12TH

Existing Land Use Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial Heavy Commercial Light Industrial Heavy Industrial Office Places of Worship School Parks/Open Space Utilities/Transportation Vacant

EASTRIDGE

10TH Anderson Cemetery

ST JOSEPH

9TH E PLEASANT RUN PKWY S

ARLINGTON

CAMPBELL

BOLTON

Community Facilities 1 Irvington Community Middle School 2 Irvington Community Elementary School

Plea s ant Run

11TH

SPRINGER

MICHIGAN YS

KITLEY

KENYON

RIDGEVIEW

KENMORE

SHERIDAN

CATHERWOOD

WEBSTER

LOWELL

IRWIN

PK W E PLEASANT RUN

PASADENA

1

WASHINGTON

2

North

0

200

400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Pleasant Run

117

PLEASANT RUN GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING 12TH

Legend D-2 Dwelling District Two D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-7 Dwelling District Seven D-8 Dwelling District Eight C-1 Office-Buffer District C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional Commercial I-2 Light Industrial District MU-2 Mixed_use Two District PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

Plea s ant Run

11TH EASTRIDGE

10TH Anderson Cemetery

ST JOSEPH

E PLEASANT RUN PKWY S

ARLINGTON

CAMPBELL

BOLTON

9TH

SPRINGER

MICHIGAN

WASHINGTON

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

KITLEY

KENYON

RIDGEVIEW

KENMORE

SHERIDAN

CATHERWOOD

WEBSTER

LOWELL

IRWIN

YS

PASADENA

PK W E PLEASANT RUN


118

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

PLEASANT RUN GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION 12TH

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Plea s ant Run

11TH

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Minor Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

EASTRIDGE

8,808

10TH

Public Transit

Anderson Cemetery

Bus Stops #3 #8 #10

ST JOSEPH

Pedestrian & Bicycle

9TH E PLEASANT RUN PKWY S

ARLINGTON

BOLTON

CAMPBELL

Pennsy Trail On-Street Bike Lane Sidewalk Gap

2,644

SPRINGER

MICHIGAN

PK E PLEASANT RUN

S WY

721

2,461

WASHINGTON

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

26,709

IRWIN

KITLEY

KENYON

RIDGEVIEW

KENMORE

SHERIDAN

CATHERWOOD

WEBSTER

LOWELL

PASADENA

11,290


Site Analysis: Pleasant Run

119

PLEASANT RUN GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 12TH

Legend Plea s ant Run

11TH

Pleasant Run Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

EASTRIDGE

10TH Anderson Cemetery

ST JOSEPH

E PLEASANT RUN PKWY S

ARLINGTON

CAMPBELL

BOLTON

9TH

SPRINGER

MICHIGAN

WASHINGTON

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

KITLEY

KENYON

RIDGEVIEW

KENMORE

SHERIDAN

CATHERWOOD

WEBSTER

LOWELL

IRWIN

YS

PASADENA

PK W E PLEASANT RUN


120

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

R GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

RIVERSIDE

Riverside consists of the Riverside Golf Course and the Riverside Golf Academy. The former, built in 1901, is the oldest municipal golf course in Indianapolis. The latter is a year-round golf training facility that features a lighted nine-hole golf course, driving range, and an indoor golf academy. The 2017 Riverside Regional Park Master Plan recommended the re-purposing of Riverside Golf Course to other uses. The proposed uses include a cyclocross course, beginner mountain bike course, ecological adventure park experience, transition of the clubhouse to a nature center, a dog park, urban farm, and disc golf course. The Master Plan proposed retaining and improving the academy.


Site Analysis: Riverside

121

69

465

65 74

RIVERSIDE 70

465

74 70

465 65


122

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE & GOLF ACADEMY

OVERVIEW Area: Riverside Golf Course - ~142 acres Golf Academy - ~53 acres Type: 18-hole (Riverside Golf Course)

38TH

Legend Riverside Golf Course Riverside Golf Academy 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

LD CO

NG RI P S

MARIAN UNIVERSITY

30TH

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

WHIT E RIV ER P KWY

ER RIV

COLD SPRIN G

SHARON

WINFIELD

WH

ITE

WH ITE RIV ER PKW Y

65


Site Analysis: Riverside

123

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Access to the White River Greenway •• Proximity to Marian University and Newfields •• The Riverside Academy is one of the few golf academies in the region

Weaknesses •• I-65 is a prominent barrier between Riverside Golf Course and the Academy •• The location of the Lake Sullivan Sports Complex seems isolated •• Lack of bus route access

Opportunities •• Proposed redevelopment of the Riverside Golf Course would include a robust network of pedestrian pathways to improve pedestrian and bicycle circulation •• There are opportunities to connect the western side of the White River Greenway along 38th Street •• Some areas in adjacent neighborhoods provide redevelopment opportunities

Threats •• Most of the Riverside Golf Course and the Golf Academy are located within 100- and 500-year floodplains

Cultural Analysis Riverside consists of the Riverside Golf Course and the Riverside Golf Academy. The former, built in 1901, is arguable the oldest golf course in Indianapolis. The latter is a year-round golf training facility that features a lighted nine-hole golf course, driving range, and an indoor golf academy.


124

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Riverside Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Riverside

125

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Cart Storage Building

Clubhouse

Maintenance Building

Range Building

Storage Building

Category

Academy Clubhouse and Range Building

Points Earned

20

10

12

10

10

5

14

30

28

25

18

15

5

15

20

18

18

18

18

5

18

10

6

5

4

5

2

0

10

6

6

4

4

2

6

10

8

8

5

6

0

0

100

76

74

59

58

19

53

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement Structure

Riverside Golf Course Clubhouse 1956 Cart Shed 1994 Maintenance 1975 Building Range Building 1970 Garage 1980 Riverside Academy Clubhouse 1995

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Roof

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Needs

Comments

none none none none See Riverside Park Master Plan none none none none none none none none none none none none none none See Riverside Park Master Plan A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


126

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE & GOLF ACADEMY

EXISTING LAND USE 38TH

Existing Land Use Residential (0-2 units/acre) Residential (2-3 units/acre) Community Commercial Places of Worship School Parks/Open Space Vacant

2

LD CO

NG RI P S 3 65

Community Facilities

WH COLD SPRIN G

WINFIELD

SHARON

ITE

MARIAN UNIVERSITY

RIV

1

30TH

4

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

WHIT E RIV ER P KWY

ER

Marian University Cold Spring School Indy Cycloplex Riverside High School

WH ITE RIV ER PKW Y

1 2 3 4


Site Analysis: Riverside

127

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE & GOLF ACADEMY

CURRENT ZONING 38TH

Legend D-S Dwelling Suburban District D-4 Dwelling District Five D-P Planned Unit Development MU-1 Mixed-Use District One PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

LD CO

NG RI P S 65

SHARON

WINFIELD

30TH

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

WHIT E RIV ER P KWY

ER RIV

COLD SPRIN G

WH

ITE

WH ITE RIV ER PKW Y

MARIAN UNIVERSITY


128

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE & GOLF ACADEMY

TRANSPORTATION 38TH

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

LD CO

Public Transit

NG RI P S 65

Bus Stops #15 #30 #38

Pedestrian & Bicycle

SHARON

WINFIELD

30TH

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

WHIT E RIV ER P KWY

ER

COLD SPRIN G

WH

ITE

MARIAN UNIVERSITY

RIV

WH ITE RIV ER PKW Y

White RiverTrail Sidewalk Gap


Site Analysis: Riverside

129

RIVERSIDE GOLF COURSE & GOLF ACADEMY

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 38TH

Legend Riverside Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

LD CO

NG RI P S

SHARON

WINFIELD

30TH

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

WHIT E RIV ER P KWY

ER

COLD SPRIN G

WH

ITE

MARIAN UNIVERSITY

RIV

WH ITE RIV ER PKW Y

65


130

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

S GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

SAHM

Sahm was originally named as North Eastway and was designed in 1963 by Pete and Alice Dye. Office parks, residential subdivisions, and regional commercial uses surround Sahm. Aside from I-465 and I-69, north of Sahm lies the Indianapolis Metropolitan Airport.


Site Analysis: Sahm

131

69

465

SAHM

65 74 70

465

74 70

465 65


132

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SAHM GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW

69

North

0

200 400

86TH

Area: ~162 acres Type: 18-hole

800 Feet

MASTERS

MASTERS

IDE ES M HO

BA SH

FIRESIDE

CRAIG

AINTREE

OLL E KN L T CAS CENTER RUN

82ND

S S TLETON Q U A R E

NELSON B KLEIN

CA

KA ST EE L

CASTLE CREEK

91ST

Sahm Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

86TH

Legend

465


Site Analysis: Sahm

133

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Proximity to major roadways (I-69 and I-465) and anchor businesses provides easy local and regional access •• Demographics of surrounding areas place high value on access to golf facilities •• Financially, one of the best performing golf courses in Indianapolis

Weaknesses •• Limited bike/ped infrastructure in surrounding neighborhoods

Opportunities •• Maintain and upgrade existing facilities as needed to continue to attract more golfers

Threats •• Number of golfers is declining nationally

Cultural Analysis Sahm Golf Course - originally named North Eastway by the city of Indianapolis - was designed in 1963 by Pete and Alice Dye. Sahm was one of the first courses designed by the Dyes, after nine holes at El Dorado (Royal Oaks), and 18 holes for the Dr. Harlan Hatcher for the Michigan University. Source: http://www.sahmgolf.com/about-us/


134

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Sahm Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Sahm

135

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Service Building

Storage Building

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

16

18

10

16

30

25

25

26

25

20

15

16

15

15

10

5

10

5

5

10

8

8

8

10

10

5

8

5

5

100

74

87

69

76

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed Range Building Service Building Storage Building

1962 1994 2011 1965 2002

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments fascia needs minor repair

none none none none

none none none none A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


136

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SAHM GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE 0

200 400

86TH

North

69

800 Feet

MASTERS

MASTERS

IDE ES M HO

BA SH

FIRESIDE

CRAIG

AINTREE

OLL E KN L T CAS CENTER RUN

82ND

S S TLETON Q U A R E

NELSON B KLEIN

CA

KA ST EE L

CASTLE CREEK

91ST

Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial Heavy Commercial Light Industrial Office Places of Worship Parks/Open Space Utilities/Transportation Other Special Uses Vacant

86TH

Existing Land Use

465


Site Analysis: Sahm

137

SAHM GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING 0

200 400

86TH

North

69

800 Feet

MASTERS

MASTERS

IDE ES M HO

BA SH

FIRESIDE

CRAIG

AINTREE

OLL E KN L T CAS CENTER RUN

82ND

S S TLETON Q U A R E

NELSON B KLEIN

CA

KA ST EE L

CASTLE CREEK

91ST

D-2 Dwelling District Two D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-6 Dwelling District Six D-6II Dwelling District Six-Two D-7 Dwelling District Seven D-P Planned Unit Development MU-1 Mixed-Use One District C-S Commercial - Special District C-1 Office-Buffer District C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional District C-5 General Commercial District I-1 Restricted Industrial District I-3 Medium Industrial District PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

86TH

Legend

465


138

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SAHM GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION 0

200 400

86TH

North

69

800 Feet

MASTERS

MASTERS

IDE ES M HO

BA SH

FIRESIDE

CRAIG

AINTREE

OLL E KN L T CAS CENTER RUN

Pedestrian & Bicycle

KA ST EE L

NELSON B KLEIN

82ND

S S TLETON Q U A R E

Bus Stops #19 #86

CA

91ST

Public Transit

CASTLE CREEK

X,XXX

Interstate Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Minor Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

86TH

Vehicular Transportation

Existing Sidewalk 465


Site Analysis: Sahm

139

SAHM GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 0

200 400

86TH

North

69

800 Feet

MASTERS

MASTERS

IDE ES M HO

BA SH

FIRESIDE

CRAIG

AINTREE

OLL E KN L T CAS CENTER RUN

82ND

S S TLETON Q U A R E

NELSON B KLEIN

CA

KA ST EE L

CASTLE CREEK

91ST

Sahm Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

86TH

Legend

465


140

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

S GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

SARAH SHANK Sarah Shank Golf Course opened in 1928, and it is located southeast of Downtown Indianapolis. It is close to Interstate 65 and several neighborhood-serving commercial developments. It is in the heart of a residential neighborhood characterized by a traditional grid street system.


Site Analysis: Sarah Shank

141

69

465

65 74 70

465

SARAH SHANK 74 70

465 65


142

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW

BRADBURY HARLAN

FINLEY

WALKER RURAL

ST PAUL

TEMPLE

WALKER

SOUTHERN

PERKINS

N MA CH UR CH

KEYSTONE

SOUTHERN

VILLA

GIMBER

CAMERON CAMERON

ROYAL

ALBANY

CENTRE

ALBANY

26TH

ALICE

TACOMA

KEYSTONE

ST PAUL

VILLA

TROY

MAIN

MERTS

Area: ~112 acres Type: 18-hole

Legend Sarah Shank Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

North

0

200

400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Sarah Shank

143

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Access to multiple bus routes •• Nearby nodes of neighborhood-serving commercial uses •• Proximity to Interstate 65 •• The course boasts three water bodies – Pleasant Run, Sarah Run, and Bean Creek

Weaknesses •• Bike/ped facilities are limited in this area •• Floodplain and wetland areas are prevalent in the northern half of the course, and portions of the course to the southeast lie within the 500-year floodplain •• Land use conflict between residential and nonresidential uses

Opportunities •• Close sidewalk gaps in adjacent neighborhoods

Threats •• Number of golfers is declining nationally

Cultural Analysis The Sarah Shank Golf Course was named after the wife of Indianapolis Mayor Samuel Lewis Shank. Sarah was very involved in city government and served on the board of park commissioners, the board of public safety, and the board of public works, nominated by her husband. Sarah Shank died on Feb. 1, 1924 from complications of pneumonia. With Samuel Shank as mayor until 1926, it is most likely that the golf course was named in her honor. The golf course was in planning stages the year after her death, and was designed by Lawrence V. Sheridan, landscape architect. Source: Indianapolis News 1921, 1922, 1924, 1925.


144

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Sarah Shank Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Sarah Shank

145

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Maintenance Building

Category

Cart Storage Building

Points Earned

20

16

16

16

30

26

26

30

20

18

18

18

10

5

10

10

10

8

8

10

10

8

8

10

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

3 100

81

89

94

Component Replacement Structure

Clubhouse Cart Shed Maintenance Building

1962 (2014) 1994

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Other Envelope

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Roof

Needs

Comments hazardous condition at entry

none none none none

exterior needs minor repair

2010

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


146

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

BRADBURY HARLAN

FINLEY

WALKER RURAL

ST PAUL

TEMPLE

WALKER

SOUTHERN

PERKINS

N MA CH UR CH

KEYSTONE

SOUTHERN

VILLA

GIMBER

CAMERON CAMERON

ROYAL

ALBANY

CENTRE

ALBANY

26TH

ALICE

TACOMA

KEYSTONE

ST PAUL

VILLA

TROY

MAIN

MERTS

Existing Land Use Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial

Heavy Commercial Office Places of Worship Parks/Open Space

Utilities/Transportation Vacant Other Special Uses


Site Analysis: Sarah Shank

147

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

BRADBURY HARLAN

FINLEY

WALKER RURAL

ST PAUL

TEMPLE

WALKER

SOUTHERN

PERKINS

N MA CH UR CH

KEYSTONE

SOUTHERN

VILLA

GIMBER

CAMERON CAMERON

ROYAL

ALBANY

CENTRE

ALBANY

26TH

ALICE

TACOMA

KEYSTONE

ST PAUL

VILLA

TROY

MAIN

MERTS

Legend D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-7 Dwelling District Seven C-1 Office-Buffer District

C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional Commercial C-5 General Commercial District

PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts


148

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

BRADBURY HARLAN

FINLEY

WALKER

3,625

RURAL

ST PAUL

TEMPLE

WALKER

1,366

SOUTHERN

PERKINS

N MA CH UR CH

KEYSTONE

SOUTHERN

VILLA

GIMBER

CAMERON CAMERON

18,592

ROYAL

ALBANY

CENTRE

TROY

ALBANY

2,408 26TH

ALICE

TACOMA

KEYSTONE

ST PAUL

VILLA

9,003

MAIN

MERTS

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Minor Arterial Major Collector Minor Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

Public Transit Bus Stops #12 #13 #16 #26

Pedestrian & Bicycle Sidewalk Gap


Site Analysis: Sarah Shank

149

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

BRADBURY

HARLAN

FINLEY

WALKER RURAL

ST PAUL

TEMPLE

WALKER

SOUTHERN

PERKINS

N MA CH UR CH

KEYSTONE

SOUTHERN

VILLA

GIMBER

CAMERON CAMERON

ROYAL

ALBANY

CENTRE

ALBANY

26TH

ALICE

TACOMA

KEYSTONE

ST PAUL

VILLA

TROY

MAIN

MERTS

Legend Sarah Shank Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland


150

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

S GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

SMOCK

Smock Golf Course is located at the southern edge of the City of Indianapolis / Marion County. It is in an auto-centric area where most non-residential development serves users at the regional scale. Examples include: Greenwood Park Mall to the west, Costco Wholesale, a Walmart Supercenter, and Kroger to the east. Additionally, there are regional healthcare facilities, such as SouthPointe Healthcare Center, Franciscan Health Indianapolis, and Community Hospital South, nearby. North of Smock lies Mary Bryan Elementary School, which serves most of the suburbanstyle subdivision in this region.


Site Analysis: Smock

151

69

465

65 74 70

465

74 70

465 65

SMOCK


65

152

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW COUNTY LINE

Area: ~160 acres Type: 18-hole

Legend Smock Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

EMERSON

JOHNSON COUNTY

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

WHEATCRAFT

WELDER

COUNTY LINE

North

0

200 400

800 Feet

SHERMAN WILD IVY

PLEASANT LAKE

PLEASANT CREEK

TOWHEES

ALCONA


Site Analysis: Smock

153

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths

Opportunities

•• Proximity to various goods and services, including regional commercial and healthcare facilities

•• Existing agricultural land provides potential for future development

•• Easy access to Interstate 65

•• Smock’s driving range could, at times, serve as a temporary concert or social gathering space

•• Pleasant Run Creek and Merry Branch run through the course

Weaknesses •• Weak transportation network for non-vehicular modes of transportation •• The area lacks a general identity, since it is mostly dominated by subdivisions, individual commercial developments, and office parks

•• The diverse land uses around Smock enable future redevelopment to accommodate a mix of residential, commercial, office, and community uses •• Mid-rise and urban-style development may prove to be an attractive contrast to the suburban character of this area

Threats •• Floodplain and wetland areas create constraints for future development •• Smock is situated adjacent to Johnson County inter-city/county coordination may be necessary for future projects and development

Cultural Analysis Carl E. Smock was involved with city government in the 1910s-1950s in the Southport area. He was the Perry Township assessor for 20 years. Smock died in 1970 and the golf course was constructed sometime between 1973 and 1976; although no evidence was available, it is a safe assumption that his political work was recognized with the naming of the golf course that had previously been farmland. Source: Indianapolis Star, 1970.


154

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Smock Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Smock

155

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review Smock

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Maintenance & Driving Range Building

Category

Cart Storage

Points Earned

20

18

18

18

30

26

24

26

20

10

20

18

10

6

6

8

10

8

8

10

10

10

8

10

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

4 100

78

88

90

Component Replacement

Clubhouse/Cart Storage

2001

Maintenance/ Range Building

2001

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Other Envelope

Needs

Roof

Structure

Comments needs some painting and correcting of hazardous condition at entry

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


65

156

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

COUNTY LINE

EXISTING LAND USE Existing Land Use Agricultural Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Community Commercial Heavy Commercial Office Places of Worship Parks/Open Space Utilities/ Transportation Vacant

EMERSON

Community Facilities

JOHNSON COUNTY

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

1

1 SouthPointe Healthcare Center

WHEATCRAFT

WELDER

COUNTY LINE

North

0

200 400

800 Feet

SHERMAN WILD IVY

PLEASANT LAKE

PLEASANT CREEK

TOWHEES

ALCONA


65

Site Analysis: Smock

157

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

COUNTY LINE

CURRENT ZONING Marion County Zoning Districts D-A Dwelling Agriculture District D-P Planned Unit Development District D-3 Dwelling District Three D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-8 Dwelling District Eight C-S Commercial-Special District C-1 Office-Buffer District C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional Commercial HD-1 Hospital District One HD-2 Hospital District Two PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

EMERSON

JOHNSON COUNTY

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

WHEATCRAFT

WELDER

Johnson County Zoning Districts

COUNTY LINE

ALCONA

North

0

200 400

800 Feet

SHERMAN WILD IVY

PLEASANT LAKE

PLEASANT CREEK

TOWHEES

B-1 Business-Professional and Office C-1 Commercial Neighborhood C-2 Commercial - Tourist R-2 Residential Single-Family R-2A Residential Single-Family R-3 Residential -Two and Multi-Family I-1 Industrial Light


65

158

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION COUNTY LINE

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Interstate Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

18,812

EMERSON

24,138

Public Transit

29,117

TODD

Sidewalk Gap

JOHNSON COUNTY

Pedestrian & Bicycle

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

Bus Stops #16

WHEATCRAFT

WELDER

COUNTY LINE

TODD

North

0

200 400

800 Feet

SHERMAN WILD IVY

6,727

PLEASANT LAKE

PLEASANT CREEK

TOWHEES

ALCONA


65

Site Analysis: Smock

159

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

COUNTY LINE

EVIRONMENTAL FEATURES Legend Smock Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

EMERSON

JOHNSON COUNTY

MARION COUNTY / INDIANAPOLIS

WHEATCRAFT

WELDER

COUNTY LINE

North

0

200 400

800 Feet

SHERMAN WILD IVY

PLEASANT LAKE

PLEASANT CREEK

TOWHEES

ALCONA


160

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

S GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

SOUTH GROVE South Grove opened in 1901 and is one of three courses within Riverside Regional Park. The 2017 Riverside Regional Park Master Plan recommends that South Grove be re-purposed over time to other recreational uses. The proposed uses include a baseball/softball facility, tennis center, multipurpose playfields, pedestrian promenade, and a large unprogrammed gathering space provisionally called Celebration Green. Repurposing South Grove would create access to more than 120 acres of green space to the residents living immediately east of the park. The 16Tech Innovation Community is located just to the southeast and will also benefit from the access to the new park space.


Site Analysis: South Grove

161

69

465

65 74 70

SOUTH GROVE

465

74 70

465 65


162

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

OVERVIEW

BURDSAL BURDSAL

Area: ~128 acres Type: 18-hole

23RD

EAST RIVERSIDE

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

South Grove Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

PRUITT HARDING

Legend

22ND

HERSCHELL

ER RIV ITE H W

KOEHNE

MANSFIELD

21ST

19TH

WH ITE HARDING

ER

EAST RIVERSIDE

RIV

18TH

16TH

H 16T

WEST SIDE DISTRICT

North

0

200

400

15TH

800 Feet

WAT ERW AY


Site Analysis: South Grove

163

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Access to multiple bus routes and bike/ped infrastructure •• Access to the White River Greenway •• Proximity to a variety of land uses, including light industrial •• Residents of adjacent neighborhoods will have easy access to new proposed uses •• South Grove’s location within Riverside Regional Park captures a large visitor base across the City

Weaknesses •• While protected by the WR-20(b) levee, FIRM maps show much of South Grove as Zone AH and Zone X, which will place requirements on future development

Opportunities •• Implementation of the Riverside Regional Park Master Plan will activate the land currently occupied by the golf course and make it available to a new generation of users •• A pedestrian bridge over the White River north of South Grove may improve pedestrian circulation around Riverside Park •• There are opportunities to expand the existing bicycle network to connect to White River Greenway and local destinations •• The industrial land uses south of South Grove, over time, may transition into uses that are more conducive to the recommended uses in South Grove based on the Riverside Regional Park Master Plan

Threats •• The process of repurposing South Grove may occur incrementally depending on funding sources

Cultural Analysis South Grove Golf Course opened in 1901 as the second nine-hole golf course in Riverside Park. Heavy use led to the expansion of the course to 18 holes in 1915. This course was free and open to the public without membership. The grounds included a lagoon along the west side of the course. This lagoon, originally provided with a rustic footbridge, was largely filled in the 1990s. In 1916, Riverside and South Grove were the most heavily used golf courses in Indianapolis and South Grove maintained a golf professional on staff year-round to keep up with demand. A two-story brick clubhouse with a wraparound porch, locker rooms, a refreshment stand, and a second-floor assembly hall was built in 1916. Another clubhouse was built nearby around 1990 and the historic clubhouse was demolished c.1994.


164

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from South Grove Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: South Grove

165

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review South Grove

Points Possible

Maintenance Building 1 (new)

Maintenance Building (old)

Category

Cart Storage

Points Earned

20

18

16

8

30

28

15

20

20

18

14

15

10

10

10

8

10

8

10

8

10

8

8

0

100

90

73

59

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement

Cart Shed Maintenance Building Equipment Storage

1992 1994

2010

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Others

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Other Envelope

Needs

Roof

Structure

Comments

none none none none none none none none

See Riverside Park Master Plan

2011

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


166

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

EXISTING LAND USE

BURDSAL BURDSAL

23RD

EAST RIVERSIDE

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5+ units/acre) Community Commercial Heavy Commercial Light Industrial Places of Worship Parks/Open Space Utilities/Transportation Other Special Uses Vacant

PRUITT HARDING

Existing Land Use

22ND

HERSCHELL

ER RIV ITE H W

Community Facilities

21ST

1 Riverside School 44 2 Kuntz Soccer Stadium 3 Stadium Lofts

KOEHNE

MANSFIELD

1

19TH

WH ITE 2

16TH

H 16T

WEST SIDE DISTRICT

North

0

200

400

15TH

800 Feet

3

WAT ERW AY

HARDING

ER

EAST RIVERSIDE

RIV

18TH


Site Analysis: South Grove

167

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK

CURRENT ZONING

BURDSAL BURDSAL

23RD

EAST RIVERSIDE

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

D-5 Dwelling District Five C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-5 General Commercial District C-7 High-Intensity Commercial District I-1 Restricted Industrial District I-2 Light Industrial District I-3 Medium Industrial District CBD-S Central Business District Special PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

PRUITT HARDING

Legend

22ND

HERSCHELL

ER RIV ITE H W

KOEHNE

MANSFIELD

21ST

19TH

WH ITE HARDING

ER

EAST RIVERSIDE

RIV

18TH

16TH

H 16T

WEST SIDE DISTRICT

North

0

200

400

15TH

800 Feet

WAT ERW AY


168

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK BURDSAL

1,934

BURDSAL

Vehicular Transportation COFFIN GOLF COURSE

Public Transit Bus Stops #6 #25 #37

PRUITT HARDING

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

EAST RIVERSIDE

X,XXX

23RD

22ND

HERSCHELL

ER RIV ITE H W

Pedestrian & Bicycle White RiverTrail On-Street Bike Lane Sidewalk Gap

KOEHNE

MANSFIELD

21ST

19TH

WH ITE

4,687

2,274

21,750

HARDING

ER

EAST RIVERSIDE

RIV

18TH

16TH

H 16T

WEST SIDE DISTRICT

North

0

200

400

15TH

800 Feet

WAT ERW AY


Site Analysis: South Grove

169

SOUTH GROVE GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

TAGGART RIVERSIDE PARK BURDSAL BURDSAL

23RD

EAST RIVERSIDE

COFFIN GOLF COURSE

South Grove Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

PRUITT HARDING

Legend

22ND

HERSCHELL

ER RIV ITE H W

KOEHNE

MANSFIELD

21ST

19TH

WH ITE HARDING

ER

EAST RIVERSIDE

RIV

18TH

16TH

H 16T

WEST SIDE DISTRICT

North

0

200

400

15TH

800 Feet

WAT ERW AY


170

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

T GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

THATCHER

A nine-hole golf course, Thatcher is situated along Eagle Creek and in a neighborhood with historic residential homes featuring deep and narrow lots. The course is separated from Eagle Creek by a large levee, so does not have a physical or visual connection to the riparian corridor. Further west resides a greater concentration of multi-family apartments and suburbanstyle subdivisions, Interstate 465, and few regional-serving commercial developments, including a Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club. North of Thatcher lies Allison Transmission, a major industrial complex, that may generate significant traffic volumes on 10th Street. To the east of Thatcher are several smallscale industrial establishments and a water treatment plant.


Site Analysis: Thatcher

171

69

465

65 74 70

THATCHER 465

74 70

465 65


172

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW 10TH

HO LT

10TH

COS SEL L MICHIGAN

COS SEL L

GASOLINE

Area: ~46 acres Type: 9-hole

TAFT

AUBURN

IRIS

MYRON

ROCKVILLE

FLEMING

EDGEHILL

HOLT

COLE

COSSELL

LYNHURST

VERMONT

ROCKVILLE

Legend Thatcher Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green

Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Thatcher

173

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Thatcher does not front a major roadway and is situated in a quieter area, which could be conducive to park/open space uses •• Located immediately adjacent to the future Eagle Creek Trail

Weaknesses •• Only bus route 10 provides access to Thatcher, and bicycle and pedestrian facilities are limited in this area •• Financially, Thatcher is one of the most underperforming golf courses in Indianapolis

Opportunities •• Thatcher presents a significant opportunity to expand Thatcher Park •• The 2016 Indy Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Master Plan identifies a need in Wayne Township for walking trails, picnic areas, nature education programs, nature centers and natural areas •• Creation of a logical connection to Thatcher Park to the south, and greater pedestrian access along Vermont Street •• Creation of a connection to Garden City Elementary School, and opportunities for ecological education •• Creation of an accessible route to/from the future greenway at the top of the levee

•• Mill Run stream flows through the park before exiting into Eagle Creek. It appears that the structure connecting Mill Run with Eagle Creek has about a 490-acre watershed, so redevelopment of the park could present an opportunity to use more naturalized conditions to have a positive impact on a large urban watershed •• The 2016 Indy Parks Master Plan identified a service gap for natural resource areas and off-leash dog parks that Thatcher may be able to fill •• Market analysis indicates that this area has a high need for additional park space

Threats •• The neighborhood may place a great deal of value on the bucolic character of the golf course and may be concerned about re-use options that draw more people to the area •• A portion of the park is designated Flood Zone X as defined by Flood Insurance Rate Maps, so attention will need to be paid to limitations this may place on development

Cultural Analysis A.J. Thatcher served as director of the Parks Department for 7 and a half years up until his death in 1963. Upon his death, the Metropolitan Park Board decided to rename the park in his honor. Source: Indianapolis Star, 1963.


174

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Thatcher Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Thatcher

175

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review Thatcher

Points Possible

Chemical Storage Building

Clubhouse

Service Building

Category

Cart Storage

Points Earned

20

18

16

18

15

30

28

28

28

26

20

14

10

18

10

10

10

6

10

6

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

6

10

6

100

90

76

94

73

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement

Equipment Storage Chemical Storage Service

1985

none none none none

2011 1972

none none none none none none none none

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Other Envelope

Needs

Roof

Structure

Comments

F (1 to 3 years)


176

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE 10TH

HO LT

10TH

COS SEL L MICHIGAN

COS SEL L

GASOLINE 1

TAFT

AUBURN

IRIS

MYRON

ROCKVILLE

FLEMING

EDGEHILL

HOLT

COLE

COSSELL

LYNHURST

VERMONT

ROCKVILLE

Existing Land Use Agriculture Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre) Community Commercial

Community Facilities Heavy Commercial Light Industrial Heavy Industrial Office Public/Semi-Public

School Parks/Open Space Utilities/Transportation Vacant Other Special Uses

1 Garden City Elementary School

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Thatcher

177

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING 10TH

HO LT

10TH

COS SEL L MICHIGAN

COS SEL L

GASOLINE TAFT

AUBURN

IRIS

MYRON

ROCKVILLE

FLEMING

EDGEHILL

HOLT

COLE

COSSELL

LYNHURST

VERMONT

ROCKVILLE

Legend D-A Dwelling Agriculture District D-3 Dwelling District Three D-4 Dwelling District Four D-5 Dwelling District Five D-7 Dwelling District Seven

C-3 Neighborhoood Commercial District C-4 Community-Regional Commercial C-5 General Commercial District

C-7 High-Intensity Commercial District C-S Commercial - Special District I-1 Restricted Industrial District I-2 Light Industrial District

I-3 Medium Industrial District I-4 Heavy Industrial District PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


178

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION 10TH

HO LT

10TH

COS SEL L MICHIGAN

COS SEL L

GASOLINE

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Major Arterial Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

TAFT

AUBURN

IRIS

MYRON

ROCKVILLE

FLEMING

EDGEHILL

HOLT

COLE

COSSELL

LYNHURST

VERMONT

ROCKVILLE

Public Transit Bus Stops #3 #10

Pedestrian & Bicycle Planned Eagle Creek Trail On-Street Buffered Bike Lane Sidewalk Gap

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Thatcher

179

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

10TH

HO LT

10TH

COS SEL L MICHIGAN

COS SEL L

GASOLINE TAFT

AUBURN

IRIS

MYRON

ROCKVILLE

FLEMING

EDGEHILL

HOLT

COLE

COSSELL

LYNHURST

VERMONT

ROCKVILLE

Legend Thatcher Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland North

0

200 400

800 Feet


180

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

W

GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

WHISPERING HILLS

Whispering Hills is located at the intersection of Senour Road and Brookville Road. The land surrounding the course is primarily undeveloped, except for the Whispering Hills subdivision to the west and houses on long narrow and deep lots fronting Davis Road. Senour Road divides Whispering Hills into two halves. The western half is the golf course and a portion of the eastern half contains the clubhouse, parking, maintenance facilities and a driving range.


Site Analysis: Whispering Hills

181

69

465

65 74 70

465

WHISPERING HILLS 74 70

465 65


182

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

SENOUR

QUIET

Area: ~126 acres Type: 9-hole

GERMAN CHURCH

BROO KVILL E

DAVIS

WHISPE RING

BADE

OVERVIEW

Legend Whispering Hills Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green

Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Whispering Hills

183

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Though located at the urban fringe, Whispering Hills is a convenient golfing location for those living in the fringe area.

Weaknesses •• The land east of Senour Road is a former landfill and therefore limited in its redevelopment potential, even for recreational uses. •• In particular, food production is probably not an option for the land east of Senour Road •• Wetlands east of Senour Road are probably not an option (cap must not be disturbed). •• Pedestrian, bicycle, and transit are limited in this area. •• Land use is primarily agricultural and residential. There is a lack of goods and services in this area.

Opportunities •• Whispering Hills is one of the most underperforming in the Indy Parks golf portfolio and therefore is a good candidate for recreational redevelopment •• Although development potential is limited due to the former landfill, this may suggest that the course could transition to a highly naturalized condition and provide unique ecologically based recreational experiences for the south east side: hiking, trail running, mountain biking, birdwatching, and sledding may all be.

Threats •• Adjacent land owners to the west may be concerned about transitioning the land from golf to a park use that may draw more people to the south-east side and create additional energy near to their homes.

Cultural Analysis The east half of Whispering Hills has been a pig farm, then a sand and gravel mine, and from the early 1960s to 1985, it was used as a landfill. By 1995, the landfill was capped, and the course was operational and open to the public. In 2014 IDEM determined the cap had been damaged and efforts are ongoing to manage and monitor any potential contamination that might result. The site’s past likely prevents any re-use as a residential area or location for urban farming.


184

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Whispering Hills Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Whispering Hills

185

GOLF FACILITY REVIEW Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Clubhouse

Driving Range Building

Maintenance Building

Category

Cart Storage

Points Earned

20

20

16

18

14

30

28

28

10

28

20

10

15

10

15

10

8

6

10

10

10

8

8

10

8

10

10

9

4

10

100

82

84

62

86

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement

1992

Comments

2010 none none

hazardous condition at pad

1992

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Others

Wiring Devices

n/a

Panels & Distribution

n/a

Lighting

Interior Finishes

Plumbing Equipment

1992

HVAC Equipment

Clubhouse/Cart Storage Range Building Maintenance Building

Restrooms

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Other Envelope

Needs

Roof

Structure

exterior needs minor repairs A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

F (1 to 3 years)


186

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

QUIET

GERMAN CHURCH

BROO KVILL E

SENOUR

DAVIS

WHISPE RING

BADE

EXISTING LAND USE

Existing Land Use Agricultural Residential (0-3 units/acre) Residential (3-5 units/acre) Residential (5-7 units/acre)

Heavy Commercial Parks/Open Space Other Special Uses Vacant

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Whispering Hills

187

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

QUIET

GERMAN CHURCH

BROO KVILL E

SENOUR

DAVIS

WHISPE RING

BADE

CURRENT ZONING

Legend D-A Dwelling Agriculture District D-2 Dwelling District Two PK-1 Park District One SU Special Districts

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


188

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

BADE

TRANSPORTATION

1,186

4,505 16,081 WHISPE RING

GERMAN CHURCH

BROO KVILL E

QUIET

SENOUR

DAVIS

13,673

606

Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Minor Arterial Major Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


Site Analysis: Whispering Hills

189

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

QUIET

GERMAN CHURCH

BROO KVILL E

SENOUR

DAVIS

WHISPE RING

BADE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES

Legend Whispering Hills Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

North

0

200 400

800 Feet


190

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

W GOLF COURSE SITE ANALYSIS

WINDING RIVER Winding River is an 18-hole golf course situated at the southern edge of the City. West of Winding River is some concentration of residential subdivisions and agricultural lands. Winding River runs along White River, which is mostly wooded along both edges. To the north lies Southwestway Park, and the south is Swamp Creek, which is a natural area. The nearest major highways to Winding River is Highway 37 to the east and Highway 67 to the west. Facilities for alternative transportation are essentially nonexistent here due to the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sparse density.


Site Analysis: Winding River

191

69

465

65 74 70

465

74 70

465 65

WINDING RIVER


192

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTHPORT

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

OVERVIEW

SOUTHPORT

Area: ~167 acres Type: 18-hole

Legend Winding River Golf Course 2-Feet Contour Line Fairway Green Bunker Tee-Off Area Water Body

MANN

WH ITE RIV ER

SOUTHWESTWAY PARK

RALSTON

S MP WA

0

200 400

800 Feet

RE E

C

North

K


Site Analysis: Winding River

193

SWOT ANALYSIS Strengths •• Land use conflict is minimal in this area since the area is mostly residential and open space. •• The Winding River golf course is an average performer relative to other golf courses in the Indy Parks portfolio. •• It is located immediately adjacent to Southwestway Park •• The course hosts the Indianapolis Golf Academy training facility

Weaknesses •• The local transportation network doesn’t adequately accommodate non-vehicular modes of transportation. •• The location is rather isolated; hard to capture regional traffic.

Opportunities •• Closure of lower performing courses may provide resources to Indy Parks to capitalize on Winding River’s position as an instructional facility.

Threats •• No known threats to the course’s future

Cultural Analysis Originally called Southwestway Golf Course, the name was changed to Winding River in 1993. Southwestway Park and its golf course opened in 1968. The course was designed and built by Metropolitan Park Department staff under the direction of Lee Burton. Residents of the south side complained about a lack of golf courses nearby, with one man stating, “Apparently we don’t have enough politicians living on the south side.” The closest course was Sarah Shank, but it was often overcrowded. A.J. Thatcher, then in charge of park department operations, was aware of the issue, but asserted it wasn’t in the budget to develop a park on the southwest side any earlier than 1965. Source: Indianapolis Star, 1993; Indianapolis News, 1963, 1966, 1968.


194

AREA KEY FACTS The following data is gathered within a 2-mile radius from Winding River Golf Course.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Site Analysis: Winding River

195

BUILDING EVALUATION Golf Course Facility Review

Points Possible

Cart Storage

Clubhouse

Maintenance Building

Service Building

Storage Building

Category

Barn

Points Earned

20

19

16

16

19

16

14

30

26

28

28

26

24

15

20

18

10

20

18

10

10

10

10

8

8

10

6

5

10

10

10

10

10

7

7

10

10

10

10

10

8

6

100

93

82

94

93

71

57

Appearance: Is the overall appearance acceptable? Does the appearance enhance the golfing experience? Functionality: Does the building suit its purpose? Does the building have all the features it needs? Does the layout enhance traffic flow through and around the building? Adaptability: Can the building be easily modified to adapt to changing needs? Can the building be easily expanded? Building Systems: Are the building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, power, lighting,) in good condition? Is the equipment in need of replacement or near the end of its expected service life? Building Envelope & Structure: Are the envelope components (roof, doors, windows, walls, etc) in good condition? Is the structural system in good condition? Other Factors: Does the building comply with accessibility standards? Life Safety Code compliance? Other Issues? Bonus Points: Does the building have special features, historical merit, or some other factor that contributes to its usefulness? TOTALS

Component Replacement

Clubhouse/Cart Storage Maintenance Building Service Building Garage Big Red Barn

Others

None = Means the building doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have this component. n/a = No data

Wiring Devices

Panels & Distribution

Lighting

Plumbing Equipment

HVAC Equipment

Interior Finishes

Restrooms

Description & Approximate Year Built (Addition or Renovation)

Other Envelope

Needs

Roof

Structure

Comments

1998 2014

*need to complete exterior painting.

*

1984 1978

none none none none none none none

n/a

n/a

n/a

1920

none none none none

n/a

n/a

n/a

In how many years the component needs to be replaced:

A (15 to 20 years) B (10 to 15 years)

C (5 to 10 years) D (3 to 5 years)

see recommendations in the Building Assessment report. F (1 to 3 years)


196

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTHPORT

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

EXISTING LAND USE

SOUTHPORT

Legend Agriculture Residential (0-3 units/acre) Parks/Open Space Vacant

MANN

WH ITE RIV ER

SOUTHWESTWAY PARK

RALSTON

S MP WA

0

200 400

800 Feet

RE E

C

North

K


Site Analysis: Winding River

197

SOUTHPORT

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

CURRENT ZONING

SOUTHPORT

Zoning Districts D-A Dwelling District Agriculture Parks/Open Space

MANN

WH ITE RIV ER

SOUTHWESTWAY PARK

RALSTON

S MP WA

0

200 400

800 Feet

RE E

C

North

K


198

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

SOUTHPORT

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

TRANSPORTATION

7,895

SOUTHPORT

3,625 Vehicular Transportation

X,XXX

Minor Arterial Minor Collector Signalized Intersection Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

SOUTHWESTWAY PARK

MANN

WH ITE RIV ER

9,984

RALSTON

1,432

S MP WA

0

200 400

800 Feet

RE E

C

North

K


Site Analysis: Winding River

199

SOUTHPORT

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES SOUTHPORT

Legend Winding River Existing Tree Area 100-Year Floodplain 500-Year Floodplain Wetland

MANN

WH ITE RIV ER

SOUTHWESTWAY PARK

RALSTON

S MP WA

0

200 400

800 Feet

RE E

C

North

K


200

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Opinion of Probable Costs

201

OPINION OF PROBABLE COSTS 202 Coffin 206 Frederick Douglass 209 Eagle Creek 213 Pleasant Run 216 Riverside Academy 219 Sahm 223 Sarah Shank 226 Smock 229 South Grove 229 Thatcher 231 Whispering Hills 232 Winding River 236 Irrigation System Analysis


202

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

COFFIN 30TH ST 30TH ST

WARMAN AVE

Fence - replace

ST

UDELL ST

28TH ST

RIVERSIDE DR E

GRANADA CIR

13006ft

WARMAN AVE

GRANADA CIR W

29 TH

27TH ST

WINFIELD AVE

26TH ST

25TH ST

Legend SurfaceDrainage

BURDSAL PKWY

143 7f

t

Repair Surface Drainage

Erosion Control ErosionControl

23RD ST

Existing Bridges

COLD SPRING LN 10644ft

Existing Bridges

PUTTERS LN

Lines Cart Path

Other Proposed Improvement

22ND ST YE FA LA E TT RD

0 200 400

21ST ST

COLD SPRING RD

Fence repair

21ST ST

RIVERSIDE DR E

Repair Erosion Control

Feet Fence: repair 800 1 inch = 700 feet

Cart Path (ft) Repair

22ND ST

Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues

DR

P ER

YE KW

Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot

IV Replace Parking Lot ER 21ST ST T I WH Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


Opinion of Probable Costs

203

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Coffin

Item Cart Paths Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

Unit Cost per Unit LF SqFt

Quantity

Total

$30.00

25,087

$752,610.00

$5.00

60,525

$302,625.00 $1,500,000.00

Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide asphalt cart paths. Assumes replacement of entire system of cart paths

2028-2031. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes $43,550.00 Assumes removal & replacement $0.00 Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $7,500.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

Fencing Bridges

LF EA

$50.00 $10,000.00

871 0

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

5

Arboriculture Trim Remove Site Furnishings

EA EA

$500.00 $3,000.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

Benches

EA

$1,500.00

5

$7,500.00

Water Stations Ball Wash / Sand Stations

EA

$1,000.00

6

$6,000.00

EA

$500.00

6

$3,000.00

Stairs

SF

$15.00

392

$5,880.00

Timber Edging Bank Stabilization

LF LF

$15.00 $250.00

900 1,500

$13,500.00 $375,000.00

Shelters

EA

$5,000.00

2

$10,000.00

Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Notes

$3,047,165.00

Assumes addition of benches as part of renovation work

Assumes removal & replacement of timber stairs

Assumes replacement of one existing shelter and addition of one new shelter


204

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditure Coffin

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~5,650 SF) | ~1956/1994) Roof $13.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

6000 3

$90,480.00 $8,700.00

5650 5 1 5650

$78,648.00

50

$50,000.00 $2,000.00 $22,713.00 $5,000.00 $57,000.00 $177,828.00

$22,713.00 not in totals 20 Year Total Expenditure

$257,541.00

20 Year Total Expenditure

$48,720.00

Cart Storage (~4,200 SF) | ~1994) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes HVAC Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$10.00 $2,500.00 $11,840.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $3,800.00 $100.00

4200

$48,720.00

$48,720.00

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.


Opinion of Probable Costs

205

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditure (continued) Coffin

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Pavilion (~1,300 SF) | ~1985) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $3,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

1300 0 0 0 0 0 1300 1300 5

$3,900.00 $500.00 $4,400.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$4,400.00

Maintenance Building (~5,000 SF) | ~2011) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

5000 2 0 0 0 0 5000 1 50

$45,000.00 $9,000.00

*$225,000.00

$225,000.00

$54,000.00 20 Year Total Expenditure 20 Year Total Expenditure for all Facilities Comments: See the Building Assessment Report for presenting story of Douglass Golf Course. Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$279,000.00 $589,661.00


206

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

ORCHARD AVE

HOVEY ST

30TH ST

Repair fence

aggregate path

ARSENAL AVE

30TH ST

ARSENAL AVE

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

fence top rail missing

29TH ST

29TH ST 454ft

559ft

Eastern cart path - add path?

Gravel path: update or replace repair or remove

SANGSTER AVE

28TH ST

SCHOFIELD AVE

60ft

Legend Trees

300ft

28TH ST

DR A J BROWN AVE

COLUMBIA AVE

Repave maintenance drive

Remove Tree

RALSTON AVE

Repair Tree

27TH ST

Fairway Overhaul Fairways

27TH ST

Minor Overhaul of Fairway

Existing Bridges Existing Bridges

Lines Cart Path Other Proposed Improvement

Cart Path (ft) Repair Replace

Parking Lot Conditions

1 inch = 400 feet

HOVEY ST

Feet 400

25TH ST SHELDON ST

0 100 200

ARSENAL AVE

No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


Opinion of Probable Costs

207

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Frederick Douglass

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

0

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

105711

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

Fencing LF $50.00 Bridges EA $40,000.00 Culverts EA $1,500.00 Arboriculture Trim EA $500.00 Remove EA $3,000.00 Site Furnishings Benches EA $1,500.00 Water Stations EA $1,000.00 Ball Wash / Sand EA $500.00 Stations Stairs SF $15.00 Timber Edging LF $15.00 Bank Stabilization LF $250.00 Shelters EA $5,000.00 Total anticipated cost over 20 years

500 0 0

Notes

$0.00 No paved cart paths on this course Assumes repair & resurfacing of $528,555.00 existing asphalt - parking lots and maintenance drives 2023-2027. See pp. 236-237 for $1,500,000.00 additional irrigation notes $25,000.00 $0.00 $0.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

3 3

$4,500.00 $3,000.00

3

$1,500.00

0 50 0 1

$0.00 $750.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $2,088,305.00


208

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditure Frederick Douglass

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~5,600 SF) | ~1970) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

5600 3 2 5600 2 1 5600 1 56

$50,400.00 $13,500.00 $23,680.00 $77,952.00 $20,000.00 $2,000.00

$45,680.00

$77,952.00

$22,512.00 $16,616.00 $7,504.00 $46,632.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$63,900.00 $234,164.00

Cart Storage (~4,950 SF) | ~1994) Roof $10.00 Envelope $3,000.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $3,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

4950 1

$57,420.00 $4,020.00

4950 1 49

$19,899.00 $5,092.00 $6,566.00 $57,420.00 $35,577.00 20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure Comments: See the Building Assessment Report for presenting story of Douglass Golf Course. Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$92,997.00 $327,161.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

209

EAGLE CREEK 65TH ST

12 2ft

709ft

DANDY

176ft

TRAIL

t 172f

RACEWAY RD

62ND ST

302 ft

416ft

Gravel path across levee

157ft Legend

405ft

Culvert Repair Culvert

Erosion Control Repair Erosion Control

Trees Remove Tree

Bridges

147ft

RACEWAY RD

ErosionControl

Bridge Repair Needed

Existing Bridges Existing Bridges

133ft

16 9ft

Lines Cart Path Other Proposed Improvement

Cart Path (ft) Repair

0 200400

Feet 800

56TH ST

1 inch = 1,000 feet

SUNNYHILL RD

Gravel path from lot to path

Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


210

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Eagle Creek

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Notes

Assumes removal & replacement of 6' $78,810.00 wide asphalt cart paths

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

2,627

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

45,142

$225,710.00

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$3,000,000.00

1

$3,000,000.00

Fencing

LF

$50.00

0

$0.00

Bridges

EA

$40,000.00

2

$80,000.00

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

5

Trim

EA

$500.00

20

$10,000.00

Remove

EA

$3,000.00

10

$30,000.00

EA

$1,500.00

12

$18,000.00

Water Stations Ball Wash / Sand Stations Stairs

EA

$1,000.00

12

$12,000.00

EA

$500.00

12

$6,000.00

SF

$15.00

0

$0.00

Timber Edging

SF

$15.00

6,000

Bank Stabilization

LF

$250.00

1,100

Shelters

EA

$5,000.00

0

2019-2022. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes

Assumes removal and replacement of existing bridges Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $7,500.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

Arboriculture

Site Furnishings Benches

Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Assumes full replacement of timbers at entry (2600 sf) Assumes 100 lineal feet of timber $275,000.00 edging replacement and 1000 lineal feet of pond edge $0.00 $90,000.00

$3,833,020.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

211

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Eagle Creek

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~11,450 SF) | ~1970/1994) Roof $10.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Snack Bar Renovation* Total

11450 6 2 11450 4 2 11450 1 120

$153,430.00 $23,250.00 $36,704.00 $212,970.00 $40,000.00 $4,000.00 $46,029.00 $19,220.00 $16,080.00 $50,000.00 $44,000.00

$215,539.00 $342,144.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$601,683.00

Cart Storage (~7,040 SF) | ~1987) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes HVAC Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$5.00 $2,500.00 $11,840.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $3,800.00 $100.00

7040 2 0 0 0 0 7040 1 70

$47,168.00 $6,700.00

$28,300.80 $5,890.00 $9,380.00 $91,548.80 $5,890.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$97,438.80

Driving Range (~2,940 SF) | ~1990) Roof $10.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $3.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

3000 $6,500.00 2 2940 1 1 2940 1 30

$12,060.00 $47,275.20 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $11,818.80

$18,500.00

$7,440.00 $4,020.00 $75,174.00 $7,440.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$101,114.00


212

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures (continued) Eagle Creek

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Equipment Service Building (~3,415 SF) | ~1970) Roof $10.00 Envelope $10.00 Restrooms $45.00 Finishes $4.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

3415 3000 100 3415 1 3 3415 1 34

$34,150.00 $30,000.00 $4,500.00 $10,000.00 $6,000.00 $10,245.00 $4,800.00 $3,400.00 $103,095.00 20 Year Total Expenditure**

$103,095.00

Equipment Storage Building (~4,372 SF) | ~2001) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes HVAC Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices

$10.00 $2.50 $11,840.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

4400 4200

$68,200.00 $16,275.00

4400 1 22

$20,460.00

$8,640.00 $3,410.00 $108,345.00 $8,640.00 20 Year Total Expenditure $116,985.00 Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure $1,020,315.80 Comments: *See the Building Assessment Report for recommendations; **Replacement cost is $290,275.00. Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.


Opinion of Probable Costs

213

PLEASANT RUN SHERIDAN AVE

CAMPBELL AVE

10TH ST

ST JOSEPH ST

9TH ST

9TH ST

480ft

SPRINGER AVE

ARLINGTON AVE

ST CLAIR ST

MICHIGAN ST

Fence - Repair PLEASANT RUN PKWY SDR

IR W

0 100200

Feet 400

1 inch = 500 feet

Existing Bridges

Cart Path

PASADENA ST

Existing Bridges

Lines

KITLEY AVE

KENYON ST

RIDGEVIEW DR

KENMORE RD

CATHERWOOD AVE

WEBSTER AVE

LOWELL AVE

SHERIDAN AVE

Legend

Other Proposed Improvement

Cart Path (ft) Repair

Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

WASHINGTON ST Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

IN

DR


214

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Pleasant Run

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

250

$7,500.00

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

8587

$42,935.00

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

$1,500,000.00

Fencing

LF

$50.00

150

$7,500.00

Bridges

EA

$10,000.00

9

$90,000.00

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

12

$18,000.00

EA EA

$500.00 $3,000.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

EA EA

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

6 6

$9,000.00 $6,000.00

EA

$500.00

6

$3,000.00

Stairs

SF

$15.00

1279

$19,185.00

Timber Edging

LF

$15.00

1000

$15,000.00

Bank Stabilization

LF

$250.00

1528

$5,000.00

0

Arboriculture Trim Remove Site Furnishings Benches Water Stations Ball Wash / Sand Stations

Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Notes Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide asphalt cart paths Parking lot pavement currently in good shape - assumes the need to resurface within 10 years. 2028-2031. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes Assumes removal and replacement of existing chain link fencing Bridges are generally in good repair assumes need for general maintenance over the next 10 years. Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

Assumes replacement of metal stair and landing at #3 green

Assumed to occur primarily along $382,000.00 Pleasant Run & stream banks (equates to 12.5% of total stream edges) $0.00 $2,120,120.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

215

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Pleasant Run

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~5,765 SF) | ~1972/1994) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00

5800 6 2 5800 3 1 5800 1 57

$44,950.00 $23,250.00 $23,680.00 $107,880.00 $54,000.00 $2,320.00 $23,316.00

$23,680.00

$2,320.00

$19,220.00 $7,638.00 $30,954.00 $195,300.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$54,000.00 $306,254.00

Cart Storage (~3,880 SF) | ~1996) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes HVAC Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices

$5.00 $1.50 $11,840.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

3880 3000

$30,070.00 $6,975.00

3880 1 38

$15,597.60 $7,440.00 $5,092.00 $20,689.60 $44,485.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$8,640.00 $8,640.00 $73,814.60

Maintenance Building (~4,780 SF) | ~1972) Roof $10.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $3.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00

2400 1 1 2400 1 2 4780 1 48

$24,000.00 $5,220.00 $5,800.00 $7,200.00 $10,000.00 $4,000.00 $19,215.60

$45,200.00

$7,440.00 $6,432.00 $11,020.00 $25,647.60 $7,440.00 20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$89,307.60 $469,376.20


216

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

RIVERSIDE ACADEMY T

KNOL

LTON RD

BOSTON C

SP

3ft 62

RD

22ft t1 6f 0 2

Trim vegetation & clear path 318ft

R

LD CO

G IN

38TH ST

8ft 22

Legend Culvert

I-6 5

Repair Culvert

Existing Bridges Existing Bridges

Cart Path (ft)

DR

Repair Replace

Feet 400

1 inch = 400 feet

No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community WHI TE

0 100 200

RIVE

R PK

WY W

Parking Lot Conditions


Opinion of Probable Costs

217

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Riverside Academy

Item Cart Paths Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

LF

$36.00

1,497

SqFt

$5.00

93,302

Notes

Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide concrete cart paths Assumes repair & resurfacing of existing $466,510.00 asphalt 2023-2027. See pp. 236-237 for additional $1,500,000.00 irrigation notes $0.00 $0.00 Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $4,500.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years. $53,892.00

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

Fencing Bridges

LF EA

$50.00 $10,000.00

0 0

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

3

EA

$500.00

20

$3,000.00

5

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

3 3

$4,500.00 $3,000.00

$500.00

3

$1,500.00

$15.00 $15.00 $250.00 $5,000.00

0 100 750 0

$0.00 $1,500.00 $187,500.00 $0.00 $2,247,902.00

Arboriculture Trim

Remove EA Site Furnishings Benches EA Water Stations EA Ball Wash / Sand EA Stations Stairs SF Timber Edging LF Bank Stabilization LF Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Estimated number based upon several $10,000.00 areas where the vegetation overhangs cart paths $15,000.00


218

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilities’ Capital Expenditures Riverside Academy

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~11,650 SF) | ~1995) Roof $10.00 Envelope* $22.50 Restrooms $5,000.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $15,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00

11650 5000 2 11650 1 1 11650 1 100

$116,500.00 $112,500.00 $10,000.00 $187,332.00 $15,000.00 $2,000.00 $46,833.00

$19,220.00 $13,400.00 $256,000.00 $247,565.00 $19,220.00 20 Year Total Expenditure $522,785.00 Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure $522,785.00 Comments: *Includes funding for exterior enhancements. No more monies budgeted for an addition since it is anticipated that a “partner” would contribute funds for this. Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.


Opinion of Probable Costs

219

E

T

ANDIRON DR

5250ft

R FI

D SI

C

E

91ST ST

CASTLE CREEK PKWY NDR

385 7ft

HA

RD

W OO

D

SEA OATS DR

SAHM CT

P G A DR

MASTERS RD

DORAL WDR

10584ft

12 46 ft

14 70 ft

6628ft

Bank stabilization needed

87TH ST

86TH ST CHALLENGE LN ALYS

SA L

CRA

MAPLE LEAF DR MAPLE GLEN DR

Existing Bridges

IG ST

REU

FO U

Legend

Existing Bridges

NION

Lines

LNCart Path Other Proposed Improvement AM NT A AIN NDA Cart Path (ft) LN 'S W Repair AYReplace Parking Lot Conditions

0 120240

Feet 480

ST SH BA

CENTER RUN RD

No Issues

1 inch = 600 feet

MASTERS RD

MAPLE GROVE DR

N

Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


220

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Sahm

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

8965

$268,950.00

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

17973

$89,865.00

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

$1,500,000.00

Fencing

LF

$50.00

1043

$52,150.00

Bridges

EA

$40,000.00

0

$0.00

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

9

$13,500.00

$500.00 $3,000.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

3 3

$4,500.00 $3,000.00

$500.00

3

$1,500.00

$15.00 $15.00 $250.00 $5,000.00

0 0 495 0

Arboriculture Trim EA Remove EA Site Furnishings Benches EA Water Stations EA Ball Wash / Sand EA Stations Stairs SF Timber Edging LF Bank Stabilization LF Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Notes Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide asphalt cart paths Assumes repair & resurfacing of existing asphalt 2036-2039. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes Assumes removal and replacement of about 50% of existing chain link fencing Bridges (3) generally in good repair Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

$0.00 $0.00 $123,750.00 Pond edge stabilization $0.00 $2,077,215.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

221

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Sahm Golf Course

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~8,200 SF) | ~1962) Roof $13.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

8200 5 2 8200 3 1 8200 1 80

$142,844.00 $1,000.00

$19,375.00 $36,704.00 $152,520.00 $54,000.00 $3,600.00 $32,964.00 $22,320.00 $10,720.00 $186,528.00 $208,599.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$1,000.00

$79,920.00 $476,047.00

Cart Storage (~3,278 SF) | ~1994) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices total

$10.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

3300 1

$38,280.00 $6,030.00

3300 3300 1 33

$13,266.00

$38,280.00

$7,440.00 $4,422.00 $23,718.00 $7,440.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$69,438.00

Range Building (~1,400 SF | ~2011) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

1400 4 2 1400 1 1 1400 1 14

$12,600.00 $18,000.00 $16,200.00 $30,240.00 $18,000.00 $3,600.00 $7,560.00

$1,000.00

$1,000.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$2,520.00 $108,720.00 $109,720.00


222

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures (continued) Sahm Golf Course

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Service Building (~3,120 SF) | ~1962) Roof $10.00 Envelope $15.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $3.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

3200 2400 1 3200 1 1 3200 1 32

$32,000.00 $36,000.00 $4,500.00 $9,600.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $9,600.00 $4,800.00 $3,200.00 $111,700.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$111,700.00

Storage Building (~2,700 SF) | ~2002) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices total

$10.00 $2,500.00 $4,500.00 $3.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

2700 2

$41,850.00 $7,750.00

2700 1 27

$12,555.00 $8,640.00 $4,185.00 $66,340.00 20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$8,640.00 $74,980.00 $841,885.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

223

SARAH SHANK OXFORD ST

RURAL ST

SOUTHERN AVE

Gravel path

H U R C

H A M

t 235f

C

PERKINS AVE

SOUTHERN AVE

24TH AVE

TEMPLE AVE

ST PETER ST

WALKER AVE

WALKER AVE

N E AV

NELSON AVE

25TH AVE

GIMBER ST

CAMERON ST CAMERON ST

ErosionControl Establish Erosion Control

Trees Remove Tree

LOCUST LN

WY

CENTRE CT

55f t

TROY AVE

Bridges Bridge Repair Needed

Existing Bridges Existing Bridges ST ALBANY

Lines Cart Path Other Proposed Improvement

Cart Path (ft)

Feet 400

RURAL ST

ALICE AVE

TEMPLE AVE

Repair

TACOMA AVE

KEYSTONE AVE

ST PAUL ST

Erosion Control

E

0 100200

Legend

V PARKER A

ALBANY ST

BACON ST

CENTRE PK

ROYAL RD

D AVE

Tree roots

BERWYN ST

N OAKLA

OXFORD ST

t 0f 10

t 89f

GOLF VIEW DR

BISCHOFF DR

Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot

MAIN ST

Replace Parking Lot

1 inch = 500 feet

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Geographics, DR MERTSEarthstar CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


224

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Sarah Shank

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

783

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

64187

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

Fencing

LF

$50.00

0

Bridges

EA

$40,000.00

2

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

6

EA EA

$500.00 $3,000.00

20 10

$10,000.00 $30,000.00

EA EA

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

3 3

$4,500.00 $3,000.00

EA

$500.00

3

$1,500.00

SF LF

$15.00 $15.00

0 0

$0.00 $0.00

LF

$250.00

200

$50,000.00

$5,000.00

1

$5,000.00 $2,037,425.00

Arboriculture Trim Remove Site Furnishings Benches Water Stations Ball Wash / Sand Stations Stairs Timber Edging Bank Stabilization

Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Notes

Assumes removal & replacement of 6' $23,490.00 wide asphalt cart paths Parking lot pavement currently in good $320,935.00 shape - assumes the need to resurface within 10 years. 2028-2031. See pp. 236-237 for additional $1,500,000.00 irrigation notes $0.00 Assumes repair of damaged bridges & $80,000.00 handrails Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $9,000.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

Assumed to occur primarily upstream/ downstream of bridges


Opinion of Probable Costs

225

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Sarah Shank Golf Course

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~5,670 SF) | ~1956/2014) Roof $13.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

6000 3 2 6000 5 1 6000 1 60

$2,250.00

$2,250.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$140,000.00 $13,500.00 $42,624.00 $129,600.00 $90,000.00 $3,600.00 $32,400.00 $22,320.00 $10,800.00 $484,844.00 $487,094.00

Cart Storage (~3,020 SF) | ~1994) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices total

$5.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $3.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

3020 1

$17,516.00 $5,220.00

3020 3020 1 30

$10,509.60 $6,432.00 $3,480.00 $36,725.60

$6,432.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$43,157.60

20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

$86,400.00 $13,500.00 $16,200.00 $21,600.00 $18,000.00 $3,600.00 $25,920.00 $8,640.00 $9,000.00 $202,860.00 $202,860.00 $733,111.60

Maintenance Building (~4,804 SF | ~2010) Roof $10.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $5.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

4800 4 2 4800 1 1 4800 1 50

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.


226

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WELDER PL

IFT SW CT

BROOKS FARM LN

TOWHEES DR

ALCONA DR

SMOCK CREIGHTON LN

19 2f t

SHERMAN DR

TODD RD

Legend Culvert Repair Culvert

Erosion Control ErosionControl Repair Erosion Control

Trees Remove Tree

Bridges Bridge Repair Needed

Existing Bridges

COUNTY LINE RD

Existing Bridges

Cart Path (ft) Repair Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot Replace Parking Lot

0 100200

Feet 400

1 inch = 500 feet

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


Opinion of Probable Costs

227

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Smock Golf Course

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

272

$8,160.00

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

35488

$177,438.36

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,500,000.00

1

$1,500,000.00

Fencing

LF

$50.00

0

$0.00

Bridges

EA

$40,000.00

10

Culverts

EA

$1,500.00

10

EA EA

$500.00 $3,000.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

EA EA

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

6 6

$9,000.00 $6,000.00

EA

$500.00

6

$3,000.00

SF LF

$15.00 $15.00

0 0

$0.00 $0.00

LF

$250.00

1000

Arboriculture Trim Remove Site Furnishings Benches Water Stations Ball Wash / Sand Stations Stairs Timber Edging Bank Stabilization

Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

$5,000.00

Notes Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide asphalt cart paths

2023-2027. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes

Assumes removal & replacement with $400,000.00 wider bridges to better accommodate golf carts Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $15,000.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

Assumed to occur primarily upstream/ $250,000.00 downstream of bridges (equates to 12.5% of total stream edge) 0 $0.00 $2,388,598.36


228

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Smock Golf Course

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse & Cart Storage (~14,708 SF | ~2001) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC1 $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

7500 6 2 7500 3 1 7500 1 75

$50,250.00 $20,100.00

$3,000.00

$36,704.00 $139,500.00 $10,000.00

$40,200.00 $2,320.00 $37,386.00

$13,000.00

$2,320.00

$7,440.00 $8,040.00 $155,976.00 $183,644.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$354,940.00

Range & Maintenance Building (~9,300SF | ~2001) Roof $10.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 total

9300 1 2 9300 1 1 9300 1 60

$124,620.00 $6,030.00 $13,950.00 $172,980.00 $15,500.00 $3,100.00 $43,245.00 $8,640.00 $9,300.00 $130,650.00 $258,075.00 20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8. 1

One unit currently not operating.

$8,640.00 $397,365.00 $752,305.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

229

SOUTH GROVE Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilities’ Capital Expenditures South Grove Golf Course

Refer to the Riverside Park Regional Master Plan.

THATCHER Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilities’ Capital Expenditures Thatcher

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~5,120 SF) | ~2007) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $8,600.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

2600 2 2 2600 2 1 5200 1 60

$23,400.00 $9,000.00 $42,624.00 $48,360.00

$48,360.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$26,000.00 $3,600.00 $28,080.00 $15,480.00 $10,800.00 $158,984.00 $207,344.00

Equipment Storage (~1,890 SF) | ~1985) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$10.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $3.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

1900 1

1900 1900 1 19

$29,450.00 $6,975.00

$5,092.00 $8,835.00 $8,640.00 $2,945.00 $5,092.00 $48,205.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$8,640.00 $61,937.00


230

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures (continued) Thatcher

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Chemical Storage Building (~960 SF) | ~2011) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$10.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $3.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $2,400.00 $100.00

1000 1

$18,000.00 $8,100.00

1000

$3,600.00

1000 1 10

$5,400.00 $4,320.00 $1,800.00 $41,220.00 $41,220.00

20 Year Total Expenditure Service Building (~665 SF) | ~1972) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$5.00 $2,500.00 $4,500.00 $2.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $2,400.00 $100.00

700 1

$5,425.00 $3,875.00

700 1 10

$3,255.00 $4,320.00 $1,550.00 $14,105.00 20 Year Total Expenditure** Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$4,320.00 $18,425.00 $328,926.00


Opinion of Probable Costs

231

WHISPERING HILLS Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Whispering Hills

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse (~6,770 SF) | ~1991) Roof $6.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

3500 1 2 3500 2 1 7000 1 70

$32,550.00 $6,975.00 $27,468.80 $65,100.00 $20,000.00 $2,000.00 $28,140.00 $22,320.00 $22,000.00

$27,468.80

$10,850.00 $28,140.00 $115,475.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$22,320.00 $215,403.80

Range Building (~960 SF) | ~1991) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$5.00 $2,500.00 $11,840.00 $12.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

1000 2

$7,750.00 $7,750.00

1000 1 10

$4,020.00 $8,640.00 $1,550.00 $4,020.00 $17,050.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$8,640.00 $29,710.00

Maintenance Building (~2,500 SF) | ~1991) Roof $5.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $6.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

2500 1 2 2500 1 1 2500 1 30

$19,375.00 $6,975.00

$4,500.00 $10,440.00 $15,000.00 $10,000.00 $2,000.00 $10,050.00

$8,640.00 $31,500.00

$4,650.00 $10,440.00 $10,050.00 $31,000.00 20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8.

$8,640.00 $91,630.00 $336,743.80


232

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WINDING RIVER MANN RD

70ft

Tree line - remove damaged trees & stumps

44 9f t

18 8ft

Repair

Repair fence

87ft

15 7f t

Legend Culvert Repair Culvert

Erosion Control ErosionControl Repair Erosion Control

t 107 5f

406 ft

Trees Remove Tree

Existing Bridges Existing Bridges

Lines Cart Path Other Proposed Improvement

t 4f 35

Cart Path (ft) Repair

277ft

Replace

Parking Lot Conditions No Issues Establish Vegatation for Erosion Control Repair Pavement Repair Parking Lot

RALSTON RD

0 200 400

Replace Parking Lot

Feet 800

1 inch = 700 feet

Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community


Opinion of Probable Costs

233

Opinion of Probable Costs of Site Improvements Winding River

Item

Unit Cost per Unit

Quantity

Total

Cart Paths

LF

$30.00

1150

$34,500.00

Pavement (Parking lots & driveways)

SF

$5.00

8667

$43,335.00

Irrigation Replacement

LS

$1,000,000.00

1

$1,000,000.00

Fencing

LF

$50.00

750

$37,500.00

Bridges

EA

$40,000.00

0

$0.00

Culverts

EA

Arboriculture Trim EA Remove EA Site Furnishings Benches EA Water Stations EA Ball Wash / Sand EA Stations Stairs SF Timber Edging LF Bank Stabilization LF Shelters EA Total anticipated cost over 20 years

Notes Assumes removal & replacement of 6' wide asphalt cart paths Assumes repair & resurfacing of existing asphalt 2028-2031. See pp. 236-237 for additional irrigation notes Assumes removal & replacement of existing fencing

Unit cost is per culvert, per year, assuming general maintenance cost $7,500.00 of $800/year and replacement cost of $6000 every 10 years.

$1,500.00

5

$500.00 $3,000.00

10 5

$5,000.00 $15,000.00

$1,500.00 $1,000.00

6 6

$9,000.00 $6,000.00

$500.00

6

$3,000.00

$15.00 $15.00 $250.00 $5,000.00

0 0 500 0

$0.00 $0.00 $125,000.00 Assumes 500 lineal feet of pond edge $0.00 $1,285,835.00


234

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Winding River

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Clubhouse & Cart Storage (~13,380 SF) | ~1998) Roof $5.00 Envelope $4,500.00 Restrooms $11,840.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $12,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

7000 1 2 7000 3 1 13380 1 100

$27,125.00 $11,625.00 $13,950.00 $27,900.00 $30,000.00 $2,000.00 $16,275.00 $22,320.00 $32,000.00

$5,425.00 $102,300.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$22,320.00 $156,620.00

$5,425.00 $5,425.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$31,500.00 $13,500.00 $16,200.00 $32,400.00 $27,000.00 $3,600.00 $18,900.00 $15,120.00 $6,300.00 $164,520.00 $177,445.00

Maintenance Building (~3,440 SF) | ~2014) Roof $5.00 Envelope $2,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $8,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

3500 3 2 1500 1.5 1 3500 1 35

$7,500.00

$7,500.00

Equipment Service Building1 (~1,945 | ~1980) Roof Envelope Restrooms Finishes Heating Plumbing Lighting Elec Distribution Wiring Devices Total

$5.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $3.00 $2.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $100.00

2000 1 1 2000 2000 1 1945 1 20

$10,000.00 $4,500.00 $4,500.00 $4,000.00 $2,000.00 $3.00 $4,800.00 $20.00 $29,823.00

$6,768.60 $7,440.00 $2,320.00 $9,088.60

$7,440.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8. 1 Recommended for demolition.

$46,351.60


Opinion of Probable Costs

235

Opinion of Probable Costs of Facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Capital Expenditures Winding River

Needed Component

Unit Cost

Quantity

1-3 yrs

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs 15-20 yrs

Garage2 (~680 SF) | ~1979) Roof $6.00 Envelope $6,000.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $4,800.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

700 1

$4,200.00 $6,000.00

700

700 2400 3 $10,200.00 20 Year Total Expenditure

$10,200.00

20 Year Total Expenditure Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

$23,316.00 $413,932.60

Big Red Barn (~2,060 SF) | ~1920) 3

Roof $6.00 Envelope $7,500.00 Restrooms $4,500.00 Finishes $12.00 HVAC $10,000.00 Plumbing $2,000.00 Lighting $3.00 Elec Distribution $8,400.00 Wiring Devices $100.00 Total

2100 1 2 2100 2 1 2100 1 21

$14,616.00 $8,700.00

$23,316.00

Cost multipliers for 3-5 years is 1.2; 5-10 years is 1.3; 10-15 years is 1.6; and 15-20 years is 1.8. 2 Recommended for demolition. 3 Recommended for re-purposing the structure; proposed renovation budget is $210,000.00

Opinion of Probable Costs of All Capital Expenditures All Indy Parks Golf Courses

1-3 yrs Total Facilities Total Sites

$1,084,528.00 $4,325,116.00

Projected Capital Expenditure Needs per Period 3-5 yrs 5-10 yrs 10-15 yrs $522,899.00 $5,825,116.00

$1,362,646.00 $1,897,722.00 $6,825,116.00 $1,325,116.00 Grand 20 Year Total Expenditure

15-20 yrs $1,468,408.00 $2,825,116.00 $27,461,786.00


236

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

IRRIGATION SYSTEM Golf Course

Original Installation or Date of Most Recent Upgrade

New (N) or Updated (U)

Age

Hits Age 30

Notes

Eagle Creek

1988

U

29

2018

The original irrigation system is from the 1970s. It was upgraded in 1988. A new nine system was installed in 2000 when they added 9 holes. The pump stations were installed in 2000 and 2009.

Sahm

2010

N

7

2040

Current irrigation system was installed in 2010.

Whispering Hills

1993

N

24

2023

The original irrigation system from the 1990s, updated controllers were installed in 2010 and the pump was updated in 2017. Assuming no further investment given transition to another use.

Douglass

1995

U

22

2025

Original irrigations system was updated in 1995.

Riverside

1998

N

19

2028

Irrigation system was installed in 1998

Coffin

1995

N

22

2025

Irrigation System was installed in 1995

Riverside Academy

1996

N

21

2026

Irrigation system was installed in 1996

South Grove

1995

N

22

2025

Winding River

1995

N

22

2025

Pleasant Run

1995

N

22

2025

Sarah Shank

1995

N

22

2025

Thatcher

1995

N

22

2025

Smock

1995

N

22

2025

Total Years Average Years

276 21

Up for Renewal Closing

The pipes and heads were installed around 1995. South Grove installed the satellites and main computer in 2010. They upgraded the main irrigation computer again in 2015. South Grove installed a new well, a new VFD and a 30 HP pump in 2017. Assuming no further investment since transitioning to another use. Most of the pipes and heads were installed around 1995. Winding River installed new satellites and main computer in 2011. They also installed two (2) new 30 HP pumps and a VFD in 2011. They replaced the two (2) 30 HP pumps again in 2016 and upgraded the main computer and the VFD computer in 2018. Original irrigation system is in place, satellites and head were upgraded in 2012. Guessing on install date. Original irrigation system is in place, satellites and head were upgraded in 2012. Guessing on install date. Original irrigation system is in place. Pipes and Heads were installed in the mid-1990s. The pumps and satellites were installed in 2006. Assuming no further investment since transitioning to another use. Guessing on dates - No updates available as of June 18, 2018


Opinion of Probable Costs

237

2019-2022

2023 - 2027

2028-2031

2032-2035

2036 - 2039

$3,000,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$1,000,000

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$1,500,000

-

-

-

$3,000,000

Total $4,500,000 $5,500,000 $1,500,000 Grand Total Capital Expenditure Needed $14,500,000


238

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

239

GOLF COURSE REDEVELOPMENT CONCEPTS 240 Thatcher 247 Whispering Hills 254 Precedent Research


240

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER Based on the analysis conducted in this plan, Thatcher is one of the candidate golf course for redevelopment. This section will examine historical aerial photos that depict how Thatcher and its surrounding area have changed over time, what service gaps in park facilities and programs the redevelopment of Thatcher can fill, explore proposed redevelopment concepts, and present the preferred concept, which incorporated feedback from Indy Parks & Recreation Department.

1944.

1956.

1962.

1972.


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

The Indy Parks Master Plan has identified gaps in services in park facilities and programs in the neighborhoods surrounding Thatcher. This, in addition to understanding the local watershed, help inform the redevelopment concepts.

241

Below are their preferences for programs ranked from highest to lowest: 1. Adult Fitness and Wellness 2. Water Fitness Programs 3. Nature Education Programs

INDY PARKS MASTER PLAN IMPLICATIONS

4. Trips

The Indy Parks Master Plan’s Service Area Analysis indicates in the area of Thatcher there is a gap in service for:

8. Senior Programs

•• Natural resources areas •• Off-leash dog parks Additionally, the Plan surveyed residents in Wayne Township, which Thatcher is located within, about their preferences for recreational facilities and programs. Below are their preferences for facilities ranked from highest to lowest: 1. Walking Trails 2. Picnic/Shelters 3. Small Neighborhood Parks 4. Large Regional Parks 5. Indoor Fitness & Exercise 6. Outdoor Fishing Areas 7. Nature Centers 8. Natural Areas 9. Indoor Running/Walking Track 10. Indoor Swimming Pools/Leisure Pools “Outdoor fishing areas, nature centers, and picnic areas shelters are a higher priority compared to the others. Indoor swimming Pools/Leisure pools are a lower priority than the other townships.” - Indy Parks Master Plan

5. Youth Learn-to-Swim 6. Adult art, dance, performing arts 7. Adult Sports 9. Martial Arts/Self-defense 10. Outdoor adventure “Life skill classes, trips are a much higher priority compared to the others; your summer camps, golf and outdoor adventure programs are lower priorities in comparison to the other townships.” - Indy Parks Master Plan

Implementation Plan PA-10-013 Thatcher Park Family Center Structural Renovations The City has budgeted about $405,000 for 2021 for the renovation of structural walls, gym windows, and paint exterior of the Thatcher Park Family Center Structural Renovation.


242

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Mill Run

Thatcher Golf Course (~48 acres) 10TH ALLISON TRANSMISSION

LYNHURST

EAG LE C REE K

BEACHVIEW

COS SEL L

I-465

COLE

WORTH

Approximate watershed (420 acres) for portion of Mill Run that passes through Thatcher

MICKLEY

VERMONT

THATCHER PARK Four adjacent residential properties (~33 acres)

WATERSHED

CRE

Mill Run is a waterway that passes through Thatcher and the residential subdivisions to the west. The diagram above shows the approximate watershed (~420 acres) for the portion of Mill Run that passes through Thatcher. There is an opportunity to implement wetland programming in Thatcher to assist with the detention of runoff.

EK WA

TE RS

HE

D

Eagle Creek Watershed Thatcher is also located along the Eagle Creek River and within the Eagle Creek Watershed. The diagram on the left shows that water along the Eagle Creek River flow downstream to Johnson County. Implementing wetlands in Thatcher would enable better use of natural processes to improve the water quality of runoff entering into the Eagle Creek River.

White River

EAGLE

Mill Run

Eagle Creek Thatcher Golf Course

Downtown Indianapolis


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

243

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 1 ADVENTURE PLAY ZIPLINE / CANOPY WALK

EAGLE CREEK TRAIL

PERFORMANCE VENUE WITH HILL SEATING

COS SEL L PARKING NATURAL AREA WETLANDS ~13 ACRES THATCHER GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY WALKING TRAIL

EAGLE

VERMONT

GASOLINE

CREEK

COLE

PICNIC / MULTI-USE PLAYFIELDS

PLAYGROUND

EDGEHILL

PICNIC / LAWN

ROCKVILLE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

DOG PARK ~4.5 ACRES


244

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 2 ADVENTURE PLAY ZIPLINE / CANOPY WALK

EAGLE CREEK TRAIL

PERFORMANCE VENUE WITH HILL SEATING

COS SEL L PARKING NATURAL AREA WETLANDS ~13 ACRES THATCHER GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY WALKING TRAIL

EAGLE

VERMONT

GASOLINE

CREEK

COLE

PICNIC / MULTI-USE PLAYFIELDS

PLAYGROUND

EDGEHILL

PICNIC / LAWN

ROCKVILLE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

DOG PARK ~4.5 ACRES


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

245

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 3 ADVENTURE PLAY ZIPLINE / CANOPY WALK

EAGLE CREEK TRAIL

PERFORMANCE VENUE WITH HILL SEATING

COS SEL L PARKING NATURAL AREA WETLANDS ~16 ACRES THATCHER GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY WALKING TRAIL

EAGLE

VERMONT

GASOLINE

CREEK

COLE

PICNIC / MULTI-USE PLAYFIELDS

EDGEHILL

PLAYGROUND

ROCKVILLE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

DOG PARK ~4.5 ACRES


246

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

THATCHER GOLF COURSE

PREFERRED CONCEPT ADVENTURE PLAY ZIPLINE / CANOPY WALK

EAGLE CREEK TRAIL

PERFORMANCE VENUE WITH HILL SEATING

COS SEL L CLUBHOUSE EXPANSION FOR COMMUNITY CENTER SPACE NATURAL AREA WETLANDS ~16 ACRES

THATCHER GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY PARKING

PICNIC / MULTI-USE PLAYFIELDS

EAGLE

ENHANCED PEDESTRIAN CROSSING

CREEK

VERMONT

GASOLINE

BASKETBALL COURTS PARKING

COLE

PLAYGROUND SAND VOLLEYBALL COURTS YOUTH SOCCER FIELD

SOFTBALL FIELDS THE EXISTING FIELDHOUSE WILL BE REPLACED BY ADDITIONAL SOFTBALL FIELDS.

SEATING AREA SOCCER FIELD THATCHER PARK & CHUCK KLEIN SPORTS COMPLEX: NEW PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES ARE PROPOSED TO CREATE A COHESIVE ENVIRONMENT IN THE PARK AND THE REDEVELOPED GOLF COURSE.

EDGEHILL

WALKING TRAIL

ROCKVILLE

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

DOG PARK ~4.5 ACRES


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

247

WHISPERING HILLS Whispering Hills is the other candidate golf course for redevelopment. The images below show how Whispering Hills and its surrounding area have changed over the years. There used to be a mine quarry in the eastern portion of Whispering Hills. It is currently capped, and it is used as a driving range ground for the golf course. This section will also examine what service gaps in park facilities and programs the redevelopment of Whispering Hills can fill, explore proposed redevelopment concepts, and present the preferred concept, which incorporated feedback from Indy Parks & Recreation Department.

1956.

1962.

1972.

1978.

1986.

1993.


248

The Indy Parks Master Plan identified gaps in services, pertaining to parks and recreation, for neighborhoods surrounding Whispering Hills. This, in addition to understanding the local watershed, help inform the proposed concepts for redeveloping Whispering Hills.

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

Below are their preferences for programs ranked from highest to lowest: 1. Adult Fitness and Wellness 2. Water Fitness Programs 3. Senior Programs

INDY PARKS MASTER PLAN IMPLICATIONS

4. Nature Education Programs

The Indy Parks Master Plan’s Service Area Analysis indicates in the area of Whispering Hills there is a gap in service for:

8. Martial arts / self-defense

•• Natural resource areas •• Off-lease dog park Additionally, the Plan surveyed residents in Warren Township, which Whispering Hills is located within, about their preferences for recreational facilities and programs. Below are their preferences for facilities ranked from highest to lowest: 1. Small Neighborhood Parks 2. Picnic/Shelters 3. Walking Trails 4. Indoor Swimming Pools / Leisure 5. Indoor Fitness and Exercise 6. Outdoor Swimming / Water Parks 7. Indoor Running / Walking 8. Large Community Signature Parks 9. Natural Areas 10. Outdoor Adventure Parks “Picnic Areas/Shelters are a slightly higher priority compared to the others; Large Regional Parks are lower priorities in comparison to the other townships.” Indy Parks Master Plan

5. Youth Learn-to-Swim 6. Trips (day and extended) 7. Outdoor adventure programs 9. Adult sports 10. Adult art / dance / performing arts “Life skill programs are a much higher priority compared to the others; Large special events, Youth sports programs and Golf are lower priorities in comparison to the other townships.” - Indy Parks Master Plan

Implementation Plan PA-17-010 – Whispering Hills Environmental Remediation The City has budgeted about $525,000 for 2017 for well monitoring and additional soil to cover landfill.


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

249

FRANKLIN

Whispering Hills Golf Course (~130 acres) Zion Creek

465

BRO OKV ILLE

KITLEY

POST

DAVIS

RAYMOND

74

Approximate watershed for portion of Zion Creek that passes through Whispering Hills = 1,200 acres

WATERSHED Whispering Hills is within the Buck Creek watershed, where water drains from the north to the south. Zion Creek also passes through Whispering Hills, and the diagram above shows an approximate watershed for this portion of the waterway. This demonstrates the redevelopment concepts on Whispering Hills, given its location, would be conducive to nature-based programs that provide residents recreational opportunities while assisting with mitigating stormwater runoff.

TROY

Ficher Creek

Buck Creek


250

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 1

GERMAN CHURCH

PLAYGROUND

WHISPE RING

BROO KVILL E

PARKING

SENOUR

PICNIC/LAWN

QUIET

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL

NATURE AREA WITH WALKING TRAILS

North

0

200

400

800 Feet


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

251

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 2

SCULPTURE POINT

WHISPE RING

BROO KVILL E

DRONE RACING COURSE

PARKING

SENOUR

PICNIC/LAWN

QUIET

OBSERVATION / SLEDDING HILL

NATURE AREA WITH WALKING TRAILS

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL

GERMAN CHURCH

PLAYGROUND


252

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

CONCEPT 3

GERMAN CHURCH

PLAYGROUND

WHISPE RING

BROO KVILL E

BALL FIELDS PARKING

SENOUR

DOG PARK PARKING PICNIC/LAWN

QUIET

DOG PARK

NATURE AREA WITH WALKING TRAILS

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL


Golf Course Redevelopment Concepts

253

WHISPERING HILLS GOLF COURSE

PREFERRED CONCEPT SCULPTURE POINT

WHISPE RING

BROO KVILL E

PRAIRIE RESTORATION

DOG PARK WITH ENCLOSURES TO SEPARATE SMALL AND LARGE DOGS AND DOG FITNESS EQUIPMENT PARKING

SENOUR

PICNIC/LAWN

QUIET

ARCHERY RANGE NATURE AREA CONSISTS OF OAK SAVANNAH AND SHARED-USE TRAILS

SOLAR FARM 10+ACRES THIS 26-ACRE PARCEL WILL BE INCORPORATED INTO THE REDEVELOPMENT OF WHISPERING HILLS. OBSERVATION / SLEDDING HILL: THIS PROGRAM WAS MOVED OUTSIDE OF THE FORMER QUARRY SITE.

North

0

200

400

800 Feet

DRONE RACING COURSE

GERMAN CHURCH

PLAYGROUND


254

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Precedent Research

255

APPENDICES

PRECEDENT RESEARCH 256 Conservation Community 258 Agrihood 259 Nature Walk 260 Ecological Restoration 261 Memorial Park


256

CONSERVATION COMMUNITY JACKSON MEADOW Marine on St. Croix, MN | 145 acres •• Single-family detached housing units are clustered together and organized according to the area’s topography, preserving much of the existing prairie landscape. •• Each house has similar architectural style, but differ in terms of layout. •• The local homeowner association controls and maintains the community facilities and open space.

Source: https://www.coenpartners.com

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Precedent Research

DEERPATH FARM Mettawa, IL | 200 acres •• 140 of the 200 acres is resident-owned restored and preserved native landscape that is legally preserved under a conservation easement. •• The Lake Forest Open Lands Association holds the easements and is responsible for maintaining the natural preserves in Deerpath Farm. •• Homes are clustered around a loop road. •• A portion of each residential lot is under conservation easement, with the intention of protecting natural views and resources. Additionally, all homes have a landscape buffer easement that helps to maintain natural screening between homes and streets. Residents are responsible for maintaining these areas.

Source: www.deerpathfarm.com

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AGRIHOOD SOUTH VILLAGE South Burlington, VT •• Vermont’s first conservation community and agrihood, with a 12-acre farm that produces organic fruit, vegetables, eggs, and honey •• Features a traditional neighborhood design with an emphasis on “farm-to-table” •• The community set aside 150 acres of land dedicated to woodland, wetlands, meadows, and wildlife habitats •• There are various programs that allow South Village residents to participate in management of farming operations. Residents can also buy seasonal produce from the farm from a weekly market or subscription. •• The farm hosts a 528-panel photovoltaic solar array that generates approximately 150kw of electricity for the City.

Source: www.southvillage.com

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Precedent Research

NATURE WALK LAKE MARION Woodland, MN | 10 acres •• A series of pathways and wetlands adjacent to Lake Marion. •• The purpose is to preserve the existing biodiversity while enabling users to enjoy visually appealing scenery.

Source: https://www.coenpartners.com

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ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION ACACIA RESERVATION RESTORATION PROJECT Lyndhurst, OH | 155 acres •• Repurposing of a former golf course into an urban ecological preserve to provide habitat for wildlife and filter and treat stormwater. •• As a “stormwater expressway” to Lake Erie, this site enables riparian buffers to regenerate. •• The area is open to the public to enable people to appreciate Northern Ohio’s native plants and wildlife.

Source: http://www.biohabitats.com/projects/acacia-reservation-restoration-project/

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study


Precedent Research

MEMORIAL PARK VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK South Holland, IL •• A monument that recognizes current and former South Holland residents who served during times of conflict, which includes: World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, Operation Desert Storm (Persian Gulf), Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan), and Operation Iraqi Freedom. •• This neighborhood park has a variety of recreational amenities for residents. They include: playgrounds, gazebo, lakefront pathways, and baseball fields.

Source: http://www.southholland.org/departments/public-works/park-information/

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Profile for Keri Mordue VanVlymen

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study  

In 2018, Indy Parks conducted a comprehensive study of their entire portfolio of 13 municipal golf courses in response to the national downw...

Indy Parks Golf Facilities Study  

In 2018, Indy Parks conducted a comprehensive study of their entire portfolio of 13 municipal golf courses in response to the national downw...

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