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Agriculture FA M I L I E S

FIRST QUARTER 2020

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Cadiz-Trigg County Tourist & Convention Commission

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UPCOMING AG EVENTS JAN. 14

questions, call 606-864-4167.

What: Ag Advancement Meeting Where: Letcher County Extension, 478 Extension Drive, Whitesburg, KY Info: Monthly meeting What: Private Pesticide

5162 Russellville Road, Bowling Green, KY Info: Contact Annhall Norris at 859-257-

JAN. 25

When: Noon Jan. 14

1812 or cs-hes.ca.uky.edu/homebased_

What: Southeast Kentucky

processing_microprocessing/ to sign up

When: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

What: Beekeepers

Sheep Producers Association Where: Laurel County Extension Service,

FEB. 4

Zirconia Alleyne

When: 6 p.m. Feb. 4 Where: Harlan County Extension Depot,

Info: Annual meeting event for members.

When: 6 p.m. Jan. 14

110 River St., Harlan, KY

Guest speakers will be Dr. Don Ely and

Where: Barren County Extension Service,

Info: The Harlan County Beekeepers meet

Dr. Debra Aaron from the University of

1463 West Main St., Glasgow, KY

Kentucky. The Association will provide a

monthly. If you are a beekeeper or are

JAN. 15

lamb main dish. Members are asked to

What: 4-H Livestock

bring a side dish to share. Registration

When: 6-8 p.m. Jan. 15

annual membership dues) and/or register

Educational Programs Where: Marshall Rd Location- Kenton Cty Extension, 10990 Marshall Road, Coving-

is required. To join the association ($10 for the meeting, call the Extension Office at 606-864-4167.

JAN. 28

ton, KY Info: To participate in showing livestock,

What: Trimble County

beef, sheep, swine, dairy, goats or country

Cattlemen’s Association

ham next summer, the educational meet-

When: 6:30 p.m. Jan. 28

ings will have to be completed before

Where: Trimble County Cooperative

your animal is tagged and weighed in.

Extension Service, 43 High Country Lane,

JAN. 21

What: 2020 Farm Bill, Crop Outlook and Risk Management

Bedford, KY Info: Dinner and program. To reserve a

JAN. 30

Where: Henry County Extension Office,

What: County Cattlemen’s Association

2151 Campbellsburg Road, New Castle, KY

When: 7-8:30 p.m. Jan. 30

Info: This meeting will help farmers with

Where: Whitley County Extension Service,

their 2018 Farm Bill decisions for the 2019

4275 N. Highway 25W, Goldbug, Wil-

and 2020 Crops. Examples will illustrate

liamsburg, KY

the prices and yields where PLC may provide larger payments than ARC. The market outlook will be provided for the 2019 and 2020 crops along with a discussion of the safety net provided by crop insurance, farm program payments, and marketing tools to manage revenue risk. A decision tool to help with farm bill decisions will be demonstrated.

JAN. 31

What: Tobacco Production and GAP Training

JAN. 23

When: Noon Jan. 23 Where: Letcher County Extension, 478

join us! For more information, call 606573-4464.

FEB. 7

What: Kentucky-Tennessee

Where: Logan County Extension Office, 255 John Paul Road, Russellville, KY

FEB. 12

When: Feb. 12-15 Where: Louisville Fairgrounds

FEB. 17

What: Orchard Production Where: Bullitt County Extension Service, 384 Halls Lane, Shepherdsville, KY Info: How to plant and manage home orchards. Pre-registration is required. Call 502-543-2257 to pre-register.

FEB. 20

What: Kentucky Alfalfa and

Info: Dr. Bob Pearce, UK Extension

111 Opportunity Way, Elizabethtown, KY

Tobacco Specialist, will provide a produc-

Info: $30 Registration Fee

Info: Come see how maple syrup is made

When: 1 to 4 p.m. Jan. 31

from local trees

Where: Henry County Extension Office, 2151 Campbellsburg Road, New Castle, KY

What: Kentucky Dairy Partners Annual Meeting/Young Dairy Producers Meeting

Where: Sloan Convention Center, 1021 Wilkinson Trace, Bowling Green, KY

MARCH 18

What: Cow Calf Profitability Conference

When: 6-9 p.m. Jan. 23

tion update including new variety and

Where: Warren County Extension Office,

Where: Laurel County Extension Service,

fungicide information in addition to the

5162 Russellville Road, Bowling Green, KY

200 County Extension Road, London, KY

required GAP training. To register for this

Info: The Cooperative Extension Service

class call 845-2811.

is responsible for the training of private pesticide applicators in each of Kentucky’s

FEB. 3

What: Homebased

www.kentuckynewera.com 713 South Main Street Hopkinsville, KY 42240 270-886-4444

ABOUT US Ag Families is a quarterly magazine serving those whose

up in the southern Pennyrile. Inside you’ll find new and useful agricultural information, ideas for

When: Feb. 25-26

Info: Dr. Bob Pearce, UK Extension Tobacco Specialist, will provide a produc-

US Department of Agriculture

livlihood grows from the ground

FEB. 25

What: Private Pesticide Applicator Training

USDA Office of Rural Development

webmaster@kentuckynewera.com

Where: Hardin County Extension Office,

What: Tobacco Production/GAP Training

Jason Travis

CONTACT US

When: 6-9 p.m. Feb. 17

sion, 1117 Frankfort Road, Shelbyville, KY

Extension Drive, Whitesburg, KY

Tyler Dixon Tonya S. Grace Jon Russelburg

What: National Farm Machinery Show

When: Feb. 20

class call 633-4593.

DESIGNER Maegan Saalwaechter

Kelly Jackson

Info: Grain conference

Stored Forages Conferences

required GAP training. To register for this

270-887-3270

Zirconia Alleyne

When: 7:30 a.m. Feb. 7

Where: Shelby County Cooperative Exten-

fungicide information in addition to the

ADVERTISING

CONTRIBUTORS

Grain Conference

When: 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 31

tion update including new variety and

What: Maple Syrup Demo

interested in beekeeping, come out and

spot, call 502-255-7188.

When: 8:30-9:30 a.m. Jan. 21

EDITOR zalleyne@kentuckynewera.com

200 County Extension Road, London, KY

Applicator Training

Agriculture FA M I L I E S

When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 18

cultivating great things on your farm and a host of other fun activities for everyone in your family. Ag Families also seeks to educate readers about the role agriculture plays in the

APRIL 27

What: Buzz about Honey

local economy.

When: 6-7 p.m. April 27 Where: AG Learning Center, 95 Park

120 counties. The certification is valid for

Microprocessor Training

Drive, Nicholasville, KY

three years. At that time, you must attend

When: 9:30 a.m. Feb. 3

Info: Elizabeth Coots, Woodford County

another training session. If you have any

Where: Warren County Extension Office,

FCS Agent AG Center

First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 1


A LOOK BACK AT STATE AGRICULTURE IN 2019 WRITER: JON RUSSELBURG

As 2020 begins, it’s important to look back at the previous year to see what was accomplished in agriculture.

BEEFIN IT UP Beef production had a milestone year in 2019. Since launching in March 2018, Kentucky Cattlemen’s ground beef marked $1 million in total farm gate sales. “This project has been a dream of the Kentucky ag community for decades, and it is exciting to see this product fly off the shelves at Kroger stores throughout Kentucky and surrounding states,” Quarles said. “I applaud them for their success and wish them the best as this product generates additional income for Kentucky cattle producers.” Kentucky Cattlemen’s ground beef is fresh, natural beef produced by Kentucky agricultural families. It is ground and packaged by Creation Gardens in Louisville and distributed from Kroger’s Louisville distribution center.

HYPE ABOUT HEMP

COOK WILD KENTUCKY

Hemp was the talk of most agricultural towns in 2019. Nearly 1,000 growers and an influx of new processors cultivated the recently legalized crop. “We expect that momentum to continue in 2020, and we look forward to seeing more farmers apply to grow this crop that connects Kentucky’s past with its future,” said Kentucky Agricultural Commissioner Ryan Quarels said in a news release. “At the same time, we strongly urge anyone considering growing hemp to make sure they fully understand the risks as well as the opportunities involved in entering an emerging industry.” The application period for the Kentucky hemp licensing program ends March 15.

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife also brought awareness to the Cook Wild Kentucky program in 2019. The program is a recipe card series from the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment that aims to educate Kentuckians on how to prepare wild game. “It is an unfortunate reality that 1 in 6 Kentuckians is food insecure, and at the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, we started the Kentucky Hunger Initiative to find new and engaging ways to combat hunger,” Quarles said in October.

2 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020


AG TAG The Ag Tag program donations also marked the second-highest in the program’s history. In 2019, Kentucky farmers raised $613,246.37 for the Ag Tag program. Kentucky motorists who buy or renew farm vehicle license plates are given the option to make a voluntary donation of up to $10 to the Ag Tag fund. Half of the donated money goes to the 4-H and Future Farmers of America funds in the county that the tags are registered in. “The Ag Tag Program has succeeded in providing much-needed funding for promoting agriculture and educating Kentucky’s youth on the importance of agriculture in our everyday lives,” Quarles said. “We are deeply grateful to every Kentucky farmer who made a voluntary donation. Your generosity will help ensure that Kentucky agriculture has a bright future.”

Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles presented ceremonial Ag Tag checks to state 4-H officers and FFA officers at the Kentucky State Fair in Louisville. Photos from Kentucky Department of Agriculture

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First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 3


KENTUCKY WINTER WHEAT PRODUCTION UP 27% FROM 2018 WRITER: US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

LOUISVILLE – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the 2019 Small Grains Summar y report, showing an increase in Kentucky’s winter wheat production from a year ago. A higher yield per acre drove the increase, along with an increase in the number of acres harvested for grain. “Rain hampered seeding last fall and the crop struggled early, but generally favorable conditions thereafter helped the crop finish well,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “Yield was above the five year average, while production was below the five year average.” Kentucky farmers harvested 25.1 million bushels of winter wheat during the summer of 2019 according to the Kentucky Field Office of USDA National Agricultur-

al Statistics Service. This was up 27% from the previous year. Yield is estimated at 76.0 bushels per acre, up 10.0 bushels from 2018. Farmers seeded 460,000 acres last fall, up 10,000 acres from 2018. Area harvested for grain totaled 330,000 acres. Acres for other uses totaled 130,000 acres and was used as cover crop, cut as hay, chopped for silage or abandoned. Production of all wheat for the U.S. totaled 1.96 billion bushels, up 4% from 2018. Grain area har vested totaled 38.1 million acres, down 4 percent from the previous year. The United States yield is estimated at 51.6 bushels per acre, up 4.0 bushels from last year. The levels of production and changes from 2018 by type are winter wheat, 1.30 billion bushels, up 10%; other spring wheat, 600 million bushels, down 4%, and durum wheat, 57.7 million bushels, down 26%.

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FIND WHAT YOU NEED FOR SPRING AT THE FAIRVIEW FARM CENTER WRITER: ZIRCONIA ALLEYNE It might be wintertime, but the trucks are still rolling in at the Fair view Farm Center on Ladybug Lane. Owner Jonathan Nolt said this time of year is when farmers do maintenance work on large farm equipment, update hand tools and prepare the ground for spring planting. “There’s not much going on in the fields, but they probably should be working on their equipment,” Nolt said. From cultivator points to blades for hay cutters and teeth for the hay rakes, Nolt said the farm center offers a wide array of tools, hardware, clothing and farm supplies. There are also things for children like wagons, bicycles and BB guns. “(We offer) anything you need for the farm, including roller chains and sprockets and pulleys, plumbing supplies, electrical supplies,” he said. Nolt moved to Fair view from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, about 10 years ago because he had family in the area and “I felt there was a need for this around here.” Along with a large inventor y of farm supplies, Fair view Farm Center specializes in tractor and machiner y repair, welding and fabrication, steel sales, PTO shaft repair, hydraulic hoses and cyl-

inder repair, to name a few. Nolt said the maintenance team stays pretty busy getting farmers’ machiner y in tip-top shape for the upcoming planting season. “The shop is usually booked out four to six weeks on big projects,” Nolt said. “We do smaller stuff in between, but on major projects, we’re booked out.” Nolt said the maintenance staff can work on any brand of farm equipment. As far as popular brands, Nolt said Milwaukee power tools are prevalent with customers. “It’s one of the fastest expanding segments of the business,” he said. “We switched from DeWALT to Milwaukee about four years ago, and it’s the best thing we could have done. You get a five-year warranty on these, versus a one-year with a DeWALT. You pay a little bit more, but you’re getting what you pay for.” Nolt said the best part about the shop is getting to know area farmers. “I enjoy the interactions I have with all my customers,” he said. “It’s about building relationships most of all, and we enjoy it.”

First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 5


AUCTIONS AND AGRICULTURE WRITER: ZIRCONIA ALLEYNE

Light rain wet the windshield of a nearly new John Deere XUV that sat eye to eye with nearly 30 eager bidders at a recent auction on Greenville Road. Auctioneer Paul Whisler overlooked the bidding from inside a bright blue Bolinger Real Estate and Auction broadcast trailer, calling the bids higher and higher over the mic until the competition ceased. Lucky bidder No. 46 snagged the name-brand utility vehicle for $18,000 — a steal compared to its online list price starting at $26,000. A fleet of trucks and five 2018 Kubota tractors also sold to the highest bidders at the Friday, Dec. 13, auction. Miscellaneous tools, trailers, office equipment and other wares went to bidders who stuck around until the building was cleared. Whisler is one of three auctioneers with Bolinger Real Estate and Auction, which includes the company’s namesake and founder Ben Bolinger as well as Kelvin DeBerry. The business was formed about a year ago, Whisler said. “There’s three of us that are on the auction and real estate side, and then you have the girls that are a part of the team also. They do the clerking and the checking side.” Once the final bid rolled in, bidders settled up inside and rolled off the lot with their new commodities. Whisler explained that auctions are where many farmers score great deals on equipment, land and livestock. “Auctions are a very big part of the Ag community and always

6 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020

have been,” Whisler said. “I would say about half the farms that are sold in this area are sold at auctions.” He went on to note that prior to technology, tobacco was mostly sold at auction, and livestock auctions are still important to the industry. Kentucky Tennessee Livestock Market has two auction houses, one in Guthrie and another in Cross Plains, Tennessee. According to the company’s website, the team sells around 98,000 head of cattle a year in both locations. Kentucky Tennessee Livestock has a steer and heifer sale scheduled for 7 p.m. Jan. 28 in Guthrie. Bolinger Real Estate and Auction is scheduled to host an absolute real estate auction of 82 acres in Caldwell County on Feb. 20. The Greenville Road lot and building were cleared of auction items by 2 p.m. that wet, wintr y Friday in December. Nearly everything was sold, all the way down to the vintage sign that hung over the building’s restrooms that went for $22. “Signs always do well,” Whisler said. “If it’s old and has something to do with Hopkinsville, it usually does pretty well.” Whisler kept up the momentum on the microphone all the way to the end. He said the rhythm is all about the cadence of numbers and an eight-day training to become a principal auctioneer helps you learn. “In the chant, you have numbers and filler words in between to fill the dead space, but it’s mainly numbers,” he said. “You put those two together and say it fast.”


GARDEN CORNER

DEER-PROOFING LANDSCAPES WRITER: KELLY JACKSON, CHRISTIAN COUNTY EXTENSION OFFICE Winter and early spring can be tough on landscape plants, especially those within the sights of a hungry deer population. Damage can also occur from bucks rubbing trees with their antlers during the rutting season and other times of the year. The simple fact is that no tree or shrub is “deer proof”. But if you have a recently planted tree you want to protect from deer, you do have a few options. Repellents can be applied directly to plants causing them to taste bad. They have varying degrees of success and none are 100% effective. Most ‘home remedy’ repellents, such as soap, human hair and pet waste are questionable at best. A spray of 20 percent whole eggs and 80 percent water is one of the most effective repellents. To prevent the sprayer from clogging, remove the chalaza or white membrane attached to the yolk before mixing the eggs. The egg mixture is weather resistant but must be reapplied in about 30 days. Repellents should be applied on a dry day with temperatures above freezing to a height of 6 feet on the tree or shrub. Some gardeners have reported success with planting strong-scented plants like lantana, catmint, chives, mint, sage or thyme to act as repellents near plants they are trying to protect.

Another option are commercially available tubes of Vexar plastic netting wrapped around individual trees. Plastic tubes are also sold that help protect the trunk. Neither are as effective as installing a deer fence around the property (the only sure way to control deer damage), but they are a much less expensive option to try first. Deer are creatures of habit, so new plants added to an existing landscape already severely damaged by deer will likely suf fer extreme-browsing pressure. Selecting plants that deer rarely browse can improve your chances of success. Some trees to consider include bald cypress, crape myrtle, eastern redcedar, ginkgo, kousa dogwood, saucer magnolia, sugar maple. Shrubs like barberr y, beautybush, boxwood, abelia, junipers, spirea, and viburnum are also less likely to be eaten by deer but are not deer-proof. Even if the deer don’t find these plants palatable, they may still suffer antler rubbing damage. Snow cover or high deer populations can also force deer to eat plants they typically would not. For a list of more deer-resistant plants or for other questions, please contact the Christian County Extension Office at 270-8866328.

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JANES IS NEW MASTER GRAZING COORDINATOR WRITER: JASON TRAVIS, UK RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER

Agriculture has played a major role in the life of Caldwell County resident Carrie Janes. Originally from Wabash, Ind., Janes’ family ran what was at one time the largest dairy operation in the Hoosier State. Her family also grew wheat, soybeans and corn. Since 2011, she has worked a small cow-calf operation on her own farm. Earlier this month, she assumed the position of master grazing coordinator at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center at Princeton. Janes recalls good memories on the family farm, including helping with the milking operation and riding alongside her dad on the tractor. “I don’t remember a day without farming, honestly,” she said. “I’ve got pictures of me up on the tractor.” After high school, she studied and received an associate degree in of fice technology at Inter national Business College. She then attended Purdue University and received a bachelor’s degree in interpersonal and public communications. Eventually, she went back to school and became a registered nurse. Janes said the career change allowed her to help people and pursue her interests in science and medicine. She worked eight years as an ER nurse and spent six years in psychiatric nursing. Later she purchased a 50-acre farm in Caldwell County. In addition to raising cattle, she has shown in both the American Quarter Horse Association and the American Paint Horse Association. She also has home-raised two Reserve World Champion Paint Horses. In her new position as master grazing coordinator, Janes will draw on her experience in both agriculture and the medical field as it relates to research and diagnostics. She spent her first day on the job collecting soil samples, working in the lab with different root, soil and hay samples and performing analyses. Dr. Chris Teutsch, Associate Extension Professor and Forage Extension Specialist at the University of Kentucky Research and Educa-

8 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020

tion Center, said the position of Master Grazing Coordinator includes a wide range of duties. “Carrie will be coordinating the Master Grazer Program for the state. That entails organizing and carr ying out a number of different meetings, including grazing schools that will be held at multiple locations and fencing schools for livestock,” Dr. Teutsch said. “She will also be working on other programs, such

as forages at the Kentucky Cattleman’s Association.” Janes said she can easily identify with area farmers and understands the importance of making land more sustainable for years to come. For more information on forages and forage related educational events visit the UK Forages webpage at http://forages.ca.uky.edu/.


BIDS BEING REVIEWED FOR AG CENTER WRITER: TONYA S. GRACE

Construction slated for early next year Officials are in the process of reviewing bids for the new multipurpose ag facility planned for the community, and those bids are expected to be in place by the first part of January, said Brandon Garnett, who serves on a committee that is overseeing building of the facility. Garnett said construction will begin soon after the bids are in place, weather permitting. He said all of the dirt work, i.e., efforts to prepare the ground for the foundation, has been completed, as has the site work at the property behind the Christian County Extension Ser vice on Pembroke Road where the new 300 foot by 150-foot structure will be located. “We would like the work to be completed mid-year of 2020 as far as the building itself is concerned,” said Garnett, whose agency gave $100,000 toward construction of the facility. Garnett is regional vice president for southwest Kentucky for Farm Credit Mid-America. He noted that there have been no changes in plans for the construction for the most part apart from slight adjustments based on the needs and recommendations of the engineers. “Things are on track as originally presented,” Garnett said. He said the new facility has gotten positive feedback in the community. A groundbreaking in September boasted good attendance and

a diversity of people from across the county, and some people have expressed interest in hosting their monthly events in the building. Garnett said he believes the important thing at this point is that the committee and the Christian County Extension Center Foundation Board are working diligently to ensure the cost of the construction project stays within budget. The facility is a $1.7 to $2 million project. Additionally, he said it’s important that the dirt work is complete and the project is on track. The new ag facility will be a metal building with a dirt floor where livestock shows and other similar events can be hosted, and it will also include a meeting room, restrooms and space that can be utilized for serving and as a kitchen and concession area for the facility. Garnett said he and others envision the new building “first and foremost” as a place that will be used actively from an agricultural perspective by the community’s youth, 4-H and Future Farmers of America participants who will take part in livestock-related programs and others. In addition to the support of Garnett’s agency, the building is being funded with contributions from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, the Governor’s Office of Ag Policy, the Christian County Ag Extension Foundation and through the local H-CC WINS program.

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JUNIOR CHEF

! K O O C N A C S ID THESE K

NSLP APPROVED RECIPES MADE BY STUDENTS Kentucky Farm to School Junior Chef is a statewide high school cooking competition designed to offer youth the opportunity to learn valuable skills in recipe development, food preparation, marketing, public presentation, organization, teamwork and community involvement.

TURKEY VEGGIE LETTUCE WRAPS

the wok, add the ginger, pepper and basil

From Trigg County 4-H

and stir. Heat thoroughly. Remove from the

Makes 48 servings

heat and stir in the stir fry sauce and 1/2 cup soy sauce.

2/3 cup sesame oil

3) Wash and dry the romaine leaves. Place

8 pounds ground turkey

of the turkey and vegetable mixture onto

½-inch pieces

sour sauce on the side. CCP: Hold meat

2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

on a clean surface. Spoon about 1/4 cup

8 cups raw cauliflower, chopped into

each lettuce leaf. Serve with sweet and

8 cups raw broccoli, chopped

mixture at 135 degrees or higher.

4 cups raw onion, chopped

SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE

8 garlic cloves, minced

2 cups rice vinegar

4 cups carrots, shredded

16 cups raw cabbage, shredded

6 cups chicken broth, low-sodium

4 cups red sweet peppers, diced

2 cups granulated sugar

2 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons raw ginger root

4 teaspoons ground black pepper 8 bay leaves

2 cups stir-fry sauce ½ cup soy sauce

96 Romaine inner lettuce leaves

½ cup soy sauce

4 cups canned cranberry sauce 5 1/3 cups pineapple juice

2 tablespoons, plus 2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 ½ cups cornstarch 2 cups water

1) Heat 1/2 cup of sesame oil and 1/2

1) Combine the chicken broth, vinegar,

cup olive oil in large wok over medium

sugar, soy sauce, cranberry sauce, pineap-

heat. Add the ground turkey and cook

ple juice, and ginger in a large pan. Bring

until reaches internal temperature of 165

to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10

degrees. Drain and set aside.

minutes.

2) Heat the remainder of the oils on medi-

2) Combine cornstarch and water and mix

um heat. Add the vegetables to the wok

until smooth. Add to the simmer mixture,

in the order they are listed and stir fry for

stirring occasionally. Heat until thickened.

one to two minutes. Return the turkey to

Cool and serve with lettuce wrap.

10 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020


BEAR PAW QUICHE TURKEY SAUSAGE

From Harlan County Makes 48 servings

8 pounds ground turkey 2 teaspoons ground sage 4 teaspoons ground, dried thyme 4 teaspoons dried marjoram 1 teaspoon paprika 5 tablespoons, plus 1 teaspoon Mrs. Dash seasoning blend 1 teaspoon ground white pepper 2 cups raw onions, finely chopped

BISCUITS 4 cups margarine 16 cups self-rising flour 6 cups cultured buttermilk, low fat

BEAR PAW QUICHE 8 cups swiss cheese, shredded 8 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 2 cups zucchini squash, shredded 2 cups red onion, finely chopped 2 cups mustard greens, chiffonade 48 eggs 2 cups 1% milk 3 cups sorghum molasses For Turkey Sausage: Mix spices and ground turkey. Brown turkey to 165 degrees F. Halfway through add onions and stir. Remove from heat and set aside. Hold at 135 degrees. For Biscuits: Cut margarine into flour with pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add buttermilk, stirring until ingredients are moistened. Place dough on lightly floured surface and knead 3 or 4 times. Roll dough out to 1.2 inch thickness. Cut 48 rounds with biscuit cutter. Roll each biscuit into a 5-inch round on floured surface. Spray muffin pan and place biscuits in muffin pan. For Bear Paw Quiche: Heat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare sausage according to recipe and set aside to cool. Prepare zucchini, pepper and mustard greens and mix well with sausage when cool. Beat eggs and milk in large bowl until blended. Spoon 1/4 cup of sausage/vegetable mixture into each biscuit shell. Add 2 TBSP of cheese atop sausage mixture. Pour in egg mixture evenly. Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake at 350 degrees until filling is set and biscuits are golden brown, 25-35 minutes. Rotate pans half through the cooking process. Remove from pans and hold at 135 degrees or higher for service. Serve with molasses for dipping. Find more Junior Chef recipes at www.kyagr.com/junior-chef

WHITE CHICKEN CHILI

From Butler County Makes 48 servings

8 cups USDA chicken, diced 10 cups onions, chopped 6 cups green sweet peppers, chopped 6 cups red sweet peppers, chopped 6 cups orange sweet peppers, chopped 8 tablespoons raw garlic, minced 64 ounces sour cream, reduced fat 64 ounces chicken stock ¾ cup cornstarch 2 teaspoons parsley 2 teaspoons cilantro, minced 4 teaspoons raw honey 8 avocados 6 cups cheddar cheese, shredded 8 cups pork sausage 1 cup margarine ½ cup chili powder ½ cup ground cumin 2 teaspoons red pepper 4 teaspoons onion powder 6 teaspoons table salt 2 teaspoons ground black pepper

1) Wash and chop vegetables and mince garlic. Slice avocado, set aside. 2) Cook sausage in pot then set aside in a bowl. In the same pot, melt 1 cup margarine over medium heat. Add chicken in a single layer and sauté with minced garlic for 3 minutes. Add green peppers, red peppers, yellow or orange peppers and onion in pan with chicken and garlic. Sauté 3 more minutes. Add cooked sausage back to pot and stir. 3) Combine chili powder, ground cumin, red pepper, onion powder, salt and ground pepper in a small bowl and set aside. 4) In a large measuring cup mix chicken stock with cornstarch and pour into cooking pot. Add dry mix to cooking pot and continue stirring. Add cans of beans without draining. Add sour cream until dissolved. Add honey, letting it melt from measuring spoon into chili. Add fresh cilantro and parsley. Simmer for 7 minutes, stirring every couple of minutes. Serve topped with sliced avocado, shredded cheese or sour cream with corn chips on side. CCP: Hold at 135 degrees. First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 11


KDA’S POSTER & ESSAY CONTEST

: S R E M R A F Y K C U T N ‘KE ’ W O R G , T READY, SE

Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles invites Kentucky students to enter the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s (KDA) annual Poster and Essay Contest. The theme of the 2020 contest is “Kentucky Farmers: Ready, Set, Grow.” “I hope every Kentucky student will submit an entry to express in art and writing how our farmers all across the state are helping to grow the safest, most abundant food supply in the world,” Commissioner Quarles said. Students K-12 may submit one poster, an essay of 500 words or less, or a digital entry, which may be photos or original digital artwork. Each entry must include the actual written theme and be postmarked by Friday, March 20. Winners will be notified by Friday, April 17. Winners in the poster and essay competitions will be selected in each grade. One statewide winner will be selected for digital artwork. Each winner will receive a $100 award and will be recognized at the 2020 Poster and Essay Contest Awards Ceremony later next year. Winning entries will be displayed at the 2020 Kentucky State Fair in August in Louisville. For complete contest rules and an entry form, go to kyagr.com/marketing/ag-education.html or contact Elizabeth Gordon, director of the KDA’s Education and Outreach Division, at elizabeth.gordon@ky.gov or 502-782-4125

12 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020


*Information from the Kentucky Proud Ready, Set, Grow website

WHAT DO KENTUCKY FARMERS GROW? To help you with the Kentucky Agriculture Poster and Essay Contest, we thought we would give you a list of the top products Kentucky farmers grow:

ALL COMMODITIES $5.9 BILLION

MISCELLANEOUS CROPS (HEMP, PRODUCE) $183 MILLION

ANIMALS AND PRODUCTS $3.4 BILLION

DAIRY PRODUCTS, MILK $175 MILLION

CROPS $2.5 BILLION

CHICKEN EGGS $158 MILLION

BROILERS (CHICKENS) $1.1 BILLION

HOGS $115 MILLION

OTHER ANIMALS, PRODUCTS (INCLUDES HORSES AND

WHEAT $109 MILLION

STALLION FEES)

$1.1 BILLION

TURKEYS $17.5 MILLION

SOYBEANS $906 MILLION

ON-FARM CHICKENS $1.7 MILLION

CATTLE AND CALVES $739 MILLION

HONEY $889,000

CORN $733 MILLION

MUSHROOMS $173,000

TOBACCO $337 MILLION

WOOL $60,000

HAY $253 MILLION

MOHAIR $8,000

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First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 13


PROCESSOR CONCERNED ABOUT REGULATIONS ON HEMP

WRITER: TONYA S. GRACE

Farmer believes state has ‘driven’ success in the industry One owner of a local hemp business says it’s already difficult for farmers who grow the crop to find buyers for their hemp, and she worries that farmers, processors and others will face fresh difficulties when federal regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture become reality in 2020.

14 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020


First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 15


“We don’t need a bunch of extra challenges,” says Katie Moyer of Crofton’s Kentucky Hemp Works, considering the new federal-level rules that grew out of a measure which removed hemp from the controlled Substances Act last year, paving the way for the USDA to get involved in the hemp industry. Moyer recently placed a post on Facebook sharing her concerns about the impact of the new federal regulations, noting among other things that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, which had allowed retesting of crops that tested above the allowable 0.3% THC levels, will no longer allow those retests. “If you test above 0.5% THC, you destroy your crop,” she says in the post, noting that farmers will get “no support from your Ag department. No concern for the value of your crop. Nowhere in the new regulatory scheme does it say that you can blend material or remove the THC to make it compliant. “You’re just at the mercy of the weather, the latitude, rainfall, stress and genetics,” she adds. Additionally, Moyer notes that there will now be a $250 per test fee for any additional testing, and she says state Department of Agriculture changes will make it so difficult for farmers to stay compliant that they will only be able to use “low THC/marginal CBD genetics.” The cost of

doing business in the state will increase along with the cost of CBD, even as the quality of the product will decrease, she says. Moyer notes that USDA has released a draft of what regulations on the federal level will look like, and she says there are “a lot of things in the state level and the federal that we can work around.” But she says that time shouldn’t have to be invested in working around those regulations and searching for a way to stay in business. Instead processors should be doing their jobs, helping farmers who are involved in the hemp industry, providing a good product for consumers and helping people. Moyer says she also is concerned that state agriculture officials are putting the cart before the horse, asking her company and others involved in hemp to sign an agreement to abide by rules not yet in place. They would like more time to address the issue before being locked “into the problem,” she says. In her online post, Moyer says state Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles has “moved forward with onerous regulations” without listening this year to the suggestions of farmers and processors. But Sean Southard, the state department’s

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director of communications, notes that, just as in any other year, the commissioner this year has encouraged growers, processors and the public to provide input about ways to improve the department’s hemp program. One example: its new online grower application, where Southard says people can apply to the program for the first time free of charge. Southard says many farmers have taken advantage of the state’s open door policy to email suggestions to improve the program, and he says input is constantly sought from farmers and the public. “We are considering changes to our program in light of the USDA regulations; however, we have not issued those regulations yet,” he notes. “Once they are ready, we will hold a public comment period on them, like we do with every other regulation. “We look forward to having a robust policy discussion with Kentuckians so that we can follow the law and have as much economic opportunity as possible.” Southard also addresses several of the issues mentioned by Moyer in her online post, noting, for example, that the state Ag department charges a $250 fee for additional testing to offset the time it takes for the department to send out staff members to collect the sample and deliver

it to the lab. Each grower gets one test “on the house,” he explains, and for any additional testing, the state can retest at a cost of $250 if the sample is more than 0.3% THC, the legal limit set by federal and state law. The state receives no funds from the Kentucky General Assembly to operate its hemp program, he notes.

HOW A FARMER FEELS West Kentucky hemp farmer Joseph Sisk considers the impact of the USDA regulations and says he is optimistic that the Kentucky Department of Agriculture will advocate for its farmers and processors. “I would be surprised if anything comes from the state department that will be harmful to my ability to farm hemp,” says Sisk, whose own experiences with the state are the best he’s had with a regulator. He says the state is not trying to stifle the crop’s success but has “absolutely driven it,” and Sisk notes he’s had no issues with the state that would have kept him from having a good hemp crop on his farm. The farmer observes that everyone is learning together in the wake of last year’s

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decision that redefined hemp across the country, and he thinks the subsequent struggles can be worked through. “In that process, USDA has put some language in the rules that are too burdensome about what happens in the event that you go over the 0.3% limit,” he says. “Now there’s that uncertainty in it.” But Sisk says he believes that issue will be rectified, and he also believes that state officials won’t put state regulations in place until the matter is worked out at the federal level. “This program has gone so far, and it’s had some good support,” he says. “If something stops us from growing hemp, it would go in direct contradiction to everything they’ve been working for.” Sisk also says he believes it’s important to get the message out to people about the change in status for the hemp plant and the subsequent involvement of the USDA along with state Ag officials. People, he says, need to understand what’s going on. Moyer urges those interested in Kentucky’s hemp crop to let their voices be heard. Send an email to hemp@ky.gov, speak with your legislator or contact the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

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USDA TO HELP 9 RURAL BUSINESSES LOWER ENERGY COSTS Two western Kentucky farms to install solar panels WRITER: USDA OFFICE OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT

The U.S. Department of Agriculture office of Rural Development is investing $469,561 into nine rural businesses across Kentucky to help them lower their energy costs. According to the release, Folz Farms in Christian County and Cundiff Farms in Trigg County are among the nine to receive Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Loans and Grants as part of the Rural Energy for America Program, also called REAP. Folz Farms in Herndon received two grants, totaling $49,975 and $25,000. Cundiff Farms received $49,999. Both farms will use the grants to install solar systems, which will help save thousands in energy costs, according to the release. One project description explains that the $49,975 grant will be used to purchase and install a 95 kilowatt photovoltaic array system for the Folz grain farm. “This project will save $18,456 per year and will replace 131,829 kilowatt hours,” the description states. “This is enough electricity to power 12.1 homes.” Additional funding for the project comes from a borrower contribution of $149,925, according to the project plan. Funding for these grants is provided through the Rural Energy for America Program, which can be used for energy audits and to install renewable energy systems such as biomass, geothermal, hydropower and solar. The funding can also be used to increase energy efficiency by making improvements to heating, ventilation and cooling systems; insulation; and lighting and refrigeration. In April 2017, President Donald J. Trump established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity to identify legislative, regulatory and policy changes that could promote agriculture and prosperity in rural communities. 18 Agriculture Families First Quarter 2020


THE FARMS AND THEIR PROJECTS HUNT FARMS

GROSS FARMS INC.

BRYANT GROSS

This $94,123 grant will help Hunt Farms

This $43,643 grant will help Gross Farms

This $44,296 grant will help Bryant Gross

replace an inefficient grain dryer with a

install a solar system on their poultry farm,

install a solar system, which will help them

tower drying system, which will help them

which will help them save over $10,000

save over $9,850 per year in energy costs.

save over $18,250 per year in energy costs.

per year in energy costs.

HAMILTON GRAIN FARMS, LLC

CUNDIFF FARMS

This $29,985 grant will help Hamilton

This $49,999 grant will help Cundiff Farms

install a solar system, which will help them

Grain Farms replace an inefficient grain

install a solar system, which will help them

save over $7,300 per year in energy costs.

dryer, which will help them save over

save over $30,700 per year in energy

$10,500 per year in energy costs.

costs.

GOOSE CREEK CANDLES, LLC

JASON RALPH FARMS, LLC

This $49,895 grant will help Goose Creek

This $37,791 grant will help Jason Ralph

Candles replace an HVAC system and

will help them save over $27,300 per year

Farms install a solar system, which will

add insulation, which will help them save

in energy costs.

help them save almost $5,500 per year in

about $4,000 per year in energy costs.

energy costs.

DENTON, DARREL LYNN This $45,875 grant will help Denton Farms

FOLZ FARMS These $49,975 and $25,000 grants will be used to install two solar systems, which

D

L SO

2008 JD 9230, 4-WD, Duals.$94,500 2009 JD 9870 STS . . . . . . . $79,500 2013 Rogator RG1100 . . . . $84,500 2013 Miller Atlas 3654 . . . . $47,500

2006 JD 9860 STS . . . . . . . $59,500 2019 JD 6110M, MFD, C/H/A.. . . . . . 2005 Kinze 3500, 8/30, 15/15 . . . . . . Unverferth 8200 Grain Cart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 2009 Case IH 7120, 4-WD, Duals . . . 2006 Cat Challenger MT755B, 1994 JD 918 GH . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74,500 Tracks, C/H/A. . . . . . . . . . . $85,000 JD 1210A Grain Cart . . . . . . . $3,000 2011 Case IH 2162GH, Nice $36,500 2008 JD 635F, GH. . . . . . . . . $9,500 1999 JD 4700 Sprayer. . . . . $39,500 w/Header Wagon . . . . . . . . $39,500 JD 710 Disc Ripper . . . . . . . . $4,500 1996 Case IH 5250, MFWD, 124 HP Financing Available w/Ldr. & Grapple . . . . . . . . $31,500 Through Case IH 496 Disc. . . . . . . . . . $6,000 1978 Chevy C65 Twin Screw, (2) 1,000 Gal. Water Tanks w/Pump, A/B, 427 Eng., 24' Flatbed . . $5,500 House 10' Cutter . . . . . . . . . . $2,000 1010 Skyline Dr. - Hopkinsville, KY 42240 2003 Kinze 3000, 16/31, No-Till, Row DELBERT ROEDER Cleaners, C&B Meters . . . . $29,500 Tye 114-1230 Drill . . . . . . . . . $6,500 ADAM ROEDER, (270) 348-1346 • RANDY YARBRO, (731) 394-8563 Unverferth 1225 Rolling Har. . $6,500 roederauctioncompany.com AGCO Gleaner 800GH w/Header Delbert Roeder - Broker - AHO#4090 Trailer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 Cal Kaufman - Auctioneer - Lic. #NP6114 Case 450B Dozer . . . . . . . . $12,500 Case 2394, 2-WD, Cab . . . . $12,500 Brent Schmidgall - Auctioneer

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2017 JD 5065E, MWFD, Loader, Warr. Til 05/2022 . . . . . . . . $31,500 2008 JD 6330, MFD, Ldr. . . $39,500 Steiger Bearcat II ST225 . . . .$10,500 White 2-105, 2WD, Canopy. . $8,500 Case 2294, 2-WD, Cab . . . . $12,500 2013 Case IH Magnum 210, MFD, Duals, 3 PTO Shaft . . . . . . $84,500 Ford 7710, 2-WD, ROPS. . . . $7,000 IH 1486, 2-WD, Cab . . . . . . . $8,500 2015 JD 640FD Grain Head $49,500 2017 JD 6130M, MFD, Ldr. . $82,500 2006 JD 2320 Compact. . . . $10,000 2016 JD 2032R Compact . . $17,500 2007 JD 635F . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,500 2013 JD MX10 Cutter . . . . . . $5,250 2014 JD 6170R, MFD . . . . . $59,500 NH 465 Disc Mower. . . . . . . . $2,250 Schulte S150 Rotary Mower . .$6,000

First Quarter 2020 Agriculture Families 19


Congressman James Comer met with Chuck Gaskins, senior maintenance manager at Plymouth Tube Co., in his Washington office Nov. 21. Gaskins and Comer discussed work-based learning, apprenticeships, federal workforce investments for training and more. Plymouth Tube Company is at 201 Commerce Court in Hopkinsville. Plymouth Tube is a family-owned company with fifth generation leadership, eight manufacturing plants and nine business units. Photo provided

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Ag Families – January 2020  

Ag Families – January 2020  

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