2022-2023 Drink Local

Page 1

drink

local a guide to Kentucky Spirits

2022-2023

by Kentucky Monthly Magazine k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 1


Eat Your Bourbon Marketplace

Cocktails & Mocktails • Lunch & Dinner • Grab & Go 2708 Frankfort Avenue | Louisville, Ky 40206


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Cheers

from the Kentucky Monthly team.

O N T H E C OV E R Kentucky Coffee Whiskey, page 24

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COFFEE & PIE SHOOTER

GARNISH DEHYDRATED APPLE GLASSWARE SHOT GLASS

inside drink local

1 ounce Kentucky Coffee Whiskey

4 GRAPE EXPECTATIONS

¾ ounce apple cider

Sip and savor locally with a visit to a Kentucky winery

1 teaspoon brown sugar syrup

10 DECADENT DELIGHTS

Add ingredients into a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake. Strain into a shot glass. Garnish with dehydrated apple slice.

18 DRINK LOUISVILLE BEER

Spirited treats abound in the Bluegrass State

A passport program encourages beer lovers to sample Louisville’s lively craft brewing scene

22 MIKE AND THE MANHATTAN Lexington mixologist shares the finer points of the classic cocktail

24 PRIME PAIRING

Drink Local is presented by Kentucky Monthly Magazine KENTUCKY MONTHLY (ISSN 1542-0507) is published 10 times per year by Vested Interest Publications, Inc., 100 Consumer Lane, Frankfort, KY 40601. Periodicals Postage Paid at Frankfort, KY and at additional mailing offices. Kentucky Monthly is printed and distributed by Freeport Press, New Philadelphia, Ohio.

Kentucky Coffee Whiskey combines two favorites into one delicious drink

28 DRINK + EAT LOCAL Spirit-serving Kentucky restaurant guide

30 POUR YOURSELF A GOOD BOOK Cocktail recipes, the history of moonshine, and more can be found in these reads

Publisher + Editor-in-Chief STEPHEN M. VEST Associate Editor PATRICIA RANFT Assistant Editor DEBORAH KOHL KREMER Contributing Editor TED SLOAN Creative Director REBECCA REDDING Business Manager BARBARA KAY VEST Senior Account Executive LINDSEY COLLINS Account Executive KELLEY BURCHELL Account Executive TERESA REVLETT

kentuckymonthly.com | ad@kentuckymonthly.com | 1.888.329.0053

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 3


BY TRACEY TEO

GRAPE EXPECTATIONS Sip and savor locally with a visit to a Kentucky winery

Kentucky is world-renowned for its booming bourbon industry, but there’s another alcoholic beverage that attracts visitors from far and wide—wine. The Bluegrass State was wine country long before it was bourbon country. Known as the Rhine of America in the early 1800s, Kentucky was a burgeoning wine region that produced dozens of varietals. By the latter part of the 19th century, the industry had declined, but in the last 20 years, it’s been revived in a big way. With more than 70 wineries across the state, it would be impossible to visit them all in one trip. Here are a few standouts to get you started on an odyssey through Kentucky’s viticultural regions.

4 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY DRINK LOCAL


To browse a listing of Kentucky wineries, go to kyproud.com/wine.

Equus Run owner Cynthia Bohn

StoneBrook Winery Dennis Walter, owner of StoneBrook Winery, produces wine on his northern Kentucky farm near the Camp Springs community in Campbell County just as his greatgreat-grandfather did. According to Walter, winemaking was such an integral part of this ancestor’s life, his headstone is etched with clusters of grapes. During this early vintner’s time, wine tourism wasn’t a thing, so much of what makes StoneBrook so charming today—namely, a rustic tasting room and a well-curated outdoor space—didn’t exist, but what remains constant is the pastoral beauty of this pocket of the state that abuts the Ohio border. In a white gazebo surrounded by delicate wildflowers, guests sip their favorite vintages, including an estate-bottled Vidal Blanc, as they take in the spectacular view of the rolling hills and valleys. Allie, a lovable black lab, snoozes at their feet. Others do their sipping

and swirling in the rustic farmhouse tasting room, where tasting five wines costs $5. The ruby-colored Chambourcin is always a hit. This low-tannin wine has a slight earthiness that’s balanced by notes of black cherry. Walter encourages wine enthusiasts to give his sweet fruit wines a try, which isn’t always easy. “Fruit wines have a bad rap for being syrupy sweet,” Walter said. “But over the years, we have developed formulas and techniques that prevent that syrupy aftertaste.” Strawberry and blueberry wines fly off the shelves, but blackberry is the bestseller. These are straightforward, unpretentious wines— summer in a glass. No need to analyze them trying to detect nuances of this or notes of that—just drink and enjoy. Celebrating a special occasion? Hop aboard the Belle of Cincinnati paddle wheeler for a wine tasting and sunset dinner cruise on the Ohio River. StoneBrook partners with BB Riverboats. For tickets, visit bbriverboats.com.

Equus Run Vineyards Wine country and horse country are a beautiful pairing at Equus Run Vineyards. Situated on 38 bucolic acres in the the Bluegrass, this Midway winery is nestled among famous Thoroughbred farms and overlooks South Elkhorn Creek. Join a complimentary guided tour that showcases the wine production facility housed in a renovated tobacco barn. A guide breaks down the science behind the fermentation process and explains how aging in oak barrels imparts layered, complex flavors. The tour concludes in the stone tasting room, where tastings range from $7-$10. Savor the spice and peppery bite of a fullbodied Petite Sirah or sip a fruit-forward Grenache that recalls the Southern Rhone Valley. Those who prefer sweet wines may select from the Farmstead Series of orchard fruit wines with fun names like Hootie Berry Blackberry and Peachy Piggy. k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 5


This winery features attractions that go beyond the grapes. Get out on the putting green or paddle South Elkhorn Creek in a kayak. (Guests bring their own kayaks.) A 1,400-seat amphitheater hosts ticketed concerts.

If You Go: STONEBROOK WINERY 6570 Vineyard Lane Melbourne 859.635.0111 stonebrookwinery.com LOVERS LEAP VINEYARDS & WINERY 1180 Lanes Mill Road Lawrenceburg 502.839.1299 loversleapwine.com EQUUS RUN VINEYARDS 1280 Moores Mill Road Midway, 859.846.9463 equusrunvineyards.com

Tunes in the Vines, a free afternoon music series, kicks off on May 22 with the British-inspired band the Twiggenburys and runs through the end of October. Performances are in the tasting room gardens. Bring a picnic and drink in the ephemeral beauty of spring in Kentucky’s horse country.

Lovers Leap Vineyards & Winery If a romantic trip through the wine regions of France isn’t in the cards this year, take that special someone to Lawrenceburg’s Lovers Leap Winery, where you can taste superb vintages much like those grown in Bordeaux, including a full-bodied Cabernet Sauvignon aged in Kentucky oak barrels and an unexpectedly bold 2017 reserve Merlot.

6 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY DRINK LOCAL

After you’ve been greeted by friendly golden retrievers Bella and Bodie, take a stroll through verdant vineyards, where eight varietals of sun-kissed grapes dangle gracefully from leafy vines. Then settle in the tasting room for a delectable wine and chocolate tasting. When paired properly, wine and chocolate complement each other. In general, lighter wines pair best with lighter chocolates, and heavier, full-bodied wines pair best with more intense chocolates. Wine maker Bryan Jones said, “When the two are combined, we refer to what happens as an expansion of flavors. Acids in the wine break any bonds in the chocolate that would normally hold back some flavors. This release is a new experience created by the wine, and the wine is also deliciously changed to some degree by the chocolate.” The 2019 reserve Cynthiana paired with raspberry-infused dark chocolate is always a palate pleaser. Q


From the ONLY Meadery in Kentucky (inside the largest cultivated beer garden) to the state’s ONLY true farm-to-bottle Distillery, Oldham County is home to 10 unique attractions found in just ONE PLACE in Kentucky – Only in Oldham.

MEAD & CRAFT CIDER OLDHAM COUNTY, KENTUCKY

Group Tour

Itineraries! TourOldhamKY.com

Horse Farm B&Bs

• 800-813-9953


Come to Covington

Find it in Frankfort


Thoughtfully crafted itineraries incorporate three cities for a perfect bourbon excursion— distinctive distilleries, mouth-watering culinary offerings, and bourbon-centric attractions & lodging.

ComeFindBourbon.com Bourbon Comes From Bardstown

Come Find Bourbon is a partnership between meetNKY, Visit Frankfort, and Visit Bardstown.


SPIRITED TREATS ABOUND IN THE BLUEGRASS STATE

DECADENT DELIGHTS

B

ourbon generally is thought of as the sweetest of whiskeys, likely due to the spirits aging in charred oak barrels and, in the process, acquiring hints of smoky caramel and vanilla. These sumptuous flavors enhance candies, cakes and other sweet treats. When people think of sweets made with Kentucky’s signature spirit, it’s likely that the bourbon ball first comes to mind. The confection was developed by Ruth Hanly Booe, who—along with business partner Rebecca Gooch— established a Frankfort candy business in 1919. Booe was inspired to combine bourbon with chocolate and, in 1938, the bourbon ball was born. Eighty-four years later, Rebecca Ruth Chocolates continues to produce the candy in the Commonwealth’s capital. Consisting of a bitesize ball of buttery, nutty, sugary bourbon goodness enrobed in chocolate and often topped with a pecan half, the bourbon ball remains a popular confection but isn’t the only sweet treat made in Kentucky using the amber spirit. The following pages contain a selection of local producers that offer bourbon delicacies to satisfy any sweet tooth.

CANDIES BAUER’S CANDIES Bauer’s, located in Lawrenceburg, is best known as the originator and producer of Modjeskas—soft caramel-covered marshmallows first developed in 1889 as “caramel biscuits” and later renamed to honor a famous Polish actress. The company also offers Bourbon Sea Salt Caramels. BAUERSCANDY.COM

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502.839.3700

OLD KENTUCKY CHOCOL ATES Since 1964, the Lexington confectioner has produced a plethora of sweet concoctions, which, despite the company’s name, are not limited to chocolates. Popular among the spirited options are Bourbon Chocolates (bourbon balls), Bourbon Truffles and Bourbon Cherries—Maraschino cherries aged in bourbon and dipped in dark chocolate. OLDKYCANDY.COM

BY PATRICIA RANFT

10 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY D RINK LOCA L

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859.278.4444


TO PURCHASE... Visit local shops that specialize in Kentucky-made products or order online.

JAMS, SYRUPS & SAUCES FRIENDS DRIFT INN FARM This family-owned business in Pike County produces various jellies, jams and preserves, including Blackberry Bourbon Jam and Bourbon Peach Cobbler Jam. FRIENDSDRIFTINN.COM 606.433.0156

APPLECREEK SPECIALTY FOODS

Bourbon Barrel Foods A powerhouse on the bourbon-infused food scene, Louisville-based Bourbon Barrel Foods offers savory sauces and seasonings in addition to its scrumptious sweets, which include chocolate bars, Bourbon Smoked Sea Salt & Bourbon Caramel Sauce, Bourbon Smoked Cacao Nibs and Bourbon Chocolate Sauce, Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup, Blueberry Bourbon and Cardamom Jam, and Black Raspberry Jam. BOURBONBARRELFOODS.COM

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502.333.6103

ANDRIA’S CANDIES This Owensboro establishment was opened in 1959 by Thomas Andriarkos, a descendant of Greek candy-makers who had immigrated to the United States in 1906. Current owner David Atkinson purchased the business in 1991. Andria’s Kentucky Bourbon Chocolates—the company’s version of bourbon balls—are the most popular candy produced there, accounting for around 80 percent of the company’s sales. CHOCOLATE-CANDY.COM

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270.684.3733

SHARP’S CANDIES OF KENTUCKY All of the bourbon confections at this candy maker are concocted with Woodford Reserve. The Lexington-based Sharp’s sells Bourbon Cremes—bourbon balls that are enrobed in either milk chocolate or dark chocolate; Bourbon Cherries—bourbon-soaked cherry cordials dipped in semisweet chocolate; and Bourbon Truffles. SHARPSCANDIES.COM

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859.276.4625

Established in Louisville in 1991, Applecreek Specialty Foods initially produced fruit butters and preserves. The business has expanded to include such spirited options as Kentucky Bourbon Cherry Preserves, Kentucky Bourbon Chocolate Sauce and Kentucky Bourbon Caramel Sauce. APPLECREEKSF.COM 502.916.2116

BUFFALO TRACE SAUCES + PRESERVES The world-renowned Frankfort distillery offers its own label of Bourbon Fudge Sauce, Bourbon Flavored Caramel Sauce and Bourbon Cherry Preserves. BUFFALOTRACEDISTILLERY.COM 1.866.729.3722

PAPPY & COMPANY Maple syrup takes on more complex flavors when aged in bourbon barrels. Louisville’s Pappy & Company, owned by fourth-generation members of the Van Winkle family, produces Pappy Van Winkle Bourbon Barrel-Aged Pure Maple Syrup, Bourbon Barrel-Aged Nib Brittle, and, of course, Pappy & Company Bourbon Balls. PAPPYCO.COM 1.888.834.9831

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 11


CAKES

CANDIES CONTINUED

GETHSEMANI FARMS Handcrafted by the Trappist Monks at the Abbey of Gethsemani in Nelson County, Kentucky Bourbon Fruitcakes are available in various sizes. Other bourbon-laced confections produced at the farms are Chocolate Mint Julep Bourbon Fudge, Butter Walnut Bourbon Fudge, and Chocolate Bourbon Fudge with Pecans. GETHSEMANIFARMS.ORG 1.800.549.0912

ADAM MATTHEWS BAKERY Founded in 1982, this Louisville bakery produces the Bourbon Pecan Chocolate Chip Pie, the Bourbon Caramel Cheesecake, and the star of its bourbon collection, the Kentucky Woods Bourbon Barrel Cake. Sold worldwide, this confection features brown sugar cake batter blended with chocolate cake batter. Bourbon is added to the mix, along with a topping of walnuts. After it is baked, the cake is soaked in bourbon, then drizzled with chocolate and maple caramel syrups.

ART EATABLES This Louisville confectioner partners

with numerous Kentucky distilleries to offer its beautiful, tasty confections, which include Small-Batch Bourbon Truffles; Caramel Shots (round bite-size caramels infused with various bourbon combinations, including bourbon paired with ginger, sea salt, orange cream and honey); Old Forester Modjeskas; and Glencairn Easter Eggs— chocolates shaped like diminutive Glencairn tasting glasses and filled with bourbon cream. One item bourbon lovers won’t find is the classic bourbon ball, as the folks at Art Eatables explain on their website: “Bourbon balls are an established tradition in the Commonwealth … We didn’t want to trample on that tradition.”

ARTEATABLES.COM

ADAMMATTHEWS.COM 502.499.2253

MERT ’S CAKES Based in Louisville, Mert’s makes custom-designed wedding cakes and other delicacies, including Louie’s Derby Cake. Created in honor of Kentucky’s most famous horse race, the rich praline cake melds Kentucky bourbon, cream, dark chocolate and butter into a winning dessert. MERTSCAKES.COM 502.244.6200

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502.618.1039

REBECCA RUTH CHOCOL ATES In addition to Rebecca Ruth’s bourbon balls, candy lovers can savor their Bourbon Pecan Brittle, Bourbon Truffles, and Ruth’s Liquor Chocolates, a selection of chocolatedipped balls that feature a creamy filling made with rum, Scotch, mint juleps, Irish coffee, Cognac and bourbon. Aside from the Rebecca Ruthbranded sweets, the company partners with specific bourbon labels—including Buffalo Trace, Evan Williams and Maker’s Mark—to produce candies for those brands. REBECCARUTHONLINE.COM 502.223.7475


WildernessTrailKY.com Danville, KY

Wilderness Trail encourages you to drink responsibly

DRINK LOCAL in Historic Downtown Frankfort Bourbon on Main Capital Cellars Goodwood Brewery Locals Pizza Pub Mortimer Bibb’s Public House Patio Pub Serafini Sig Luscher Brewery The Cooperage Bar

visitfrankfort.com

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 13


HONEY HONEYBEAR FARMS

DOUBLE BARREL HONEY

These Louisville beekeepers partner with Shelbyville’s Jeptha Creed Distillery to produce Kentucky Select Bourbon Honey—raw, unfiltered honey aged in bourbon barrels.

Winchester-based Double Barrel Honey is aged in bourbon barrels for 90 days, then undergoes a double-filtering process that results in subtle oak flavor.

HONEYBEARFARMSKY.COM

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DOUBLEBARRELHONEY.COM

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704.658.8576

502.212.6228

HISTORICALLY GOOD

RUTH HUNT CANDIES

MUTH’S CANDIES A century-old Kentucky candy maker, the Louisville-based Muth’s concocts its bourbon balls—known as Muth’s Bourbon Barrels—with 100-proof Very Old Barton bourbon. MUTHSCANDY.COM

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502.585.2952

Another longtime candy maker, this Mount Sterling company celebrated 100 years of making sweets in 2021. Ruth Hunt collaborates with Woodford Reserve Distillery to produce bourbon balls sold under both the Woodford Reserve and Ruth Hunt labels. Other confections are the toffee-like Bourbon Butter Crunch, Mint Julep Bourbon Balls, Dark Chocolate Caramels with Sea Salt, Bourbon Caramels and Bourbon Chocolate Walnut Fudge. RUTHHUNTCANDY.COM

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1.800.927.0302


availalbe now E.J. Curley & Co. Bourbon is available for purchase in Kentucky. Once completed this historic distillery located along the lush banks of the Kentucky River in Jessamine County, will provide the perfect spot to enjoy a smooth sip of this bourbon. The sixty-acre campus will offer visitors an experience like no other with its storied history, outdoor activities, nestled in nature preserves and stunning limestone palisade cliffs. The revival is underway!

find it in jessamine.

1922 House Winery | Chrisman Mill Vineyard | First Vineyard Winery | Hummingbird Ridge Distillery


SPONSORED CONTENT


SPONSORED CONTENT


A passport program encourages beer lovers to sample Louisville’s lively craft brewing scene

Drink Louisville Beer BY DEBORAH KOHL KREMER

D rink beer. Win prizes. What could be more fun? That is the short story behind the Louisville Ale

Trail, a get-your-passportstamped program created by three beerloving friends in 2020. One of the trail’s cofounders, Michael Moeller, was enjoying a beer a few years ago at a Dayton, Ohio, brewery when he learned about that city’s beer passport program. He had heard about similar trails in bigger cities and was surprised to find one in Dayton. Although Dayton is smaller than Louisville, Moeller also was

18 KE N T U CK Y M O NT H LY DR INK LOCAL

surprised to learn that the two cities had the exact same number of breweries. It was then that he realized that Louisville could have a beer trail. Today, the Louisville Ale Trail has 24 stops. “We have 100 percent participation,” Moeller said. “Every brewery in Louisville is in the passport.” Moeller predicts that, if people look through the passport, they will probably find a brewery


they have never visited. He thinks of it as a way to introduce new beers and breweries and to educate the consumer. “If we can get someone who lives downtown to go out to a brewery in [Jeffersontown], outside of their neighborhood, well, it is a win for us,” co-founder David Satterly said. Beer drinkers purchase the Louisville Ale Trail passport—either at the breweries or online at louisvillealetrail.com

for $10—and then visit the breweries at their leisure. No purchase is necessary to get your passport stamped, but of course, purchases are encouraged. If participants complete at least half the trail, meaning they obtain 12 or more stamps, they can redeem their passport for a Louisville Ale Trail trucker hat or a Louisville Ale Trail barrel stave bottle opener. These openers are handmade by Satterly.

“The bottle openers are a knock back to Louisville’s bourbon heritage,” Satterly said. “We source the staves from Bourbon Barrel Guys in Bardstown, who get them from distilleries like Jim Beam and Maker’s Mark.” If participants visit all the establishments and obtain all the stamps, they receive one of those prizes and are entered to win a $300 Visa gift card, which is referred to on the trail as “Beer Money.” k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 19


Every brewery in Louisville is in the passport.

them,” owner Roger Huff said. “We have the passport front and center on our bar.”

what other breweries are in Louisville.” Moeller said that more than 2,000 people have acquired an Ale Trail passport since its inception.

He said the passport helps the brewery with marketing, and it brings people in to try its popular Key Lime Pie Sour Ale. “It is the gamification of beer, because there is a prize,” Huff said. “But the passport gives people an actual reason to go see

“Louisville is definitely known as a bourbon city,” he said. “But we are a beer city, too, one that rivals all the great beer cities in America.” Q

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Gallant Fox Brewery on Frankfort Avenue opened in April 2020, which was a precarious time to open a business. The brewery wanted to participate in the trail as a way to get people in the door and has been surprised by the results. “Not only do we stamp quite a few passports each week, we also sell the passports and have to keep re-ordering

Grab a Louisville Ale Trail ​passport to begin.

For more information

visit louisvillealetrail.com

20 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY D RINK LOCA L


A UniqUe UndergroUnd dining experience Great Atmosphere • Great Food • Best Brew in Lou

U • FRI WED • THHOUR

HAPPY PM

5-7

Locally Owned & Operated

502-618-4829 • trollpub.com 150 W. Washington St. • Corner of 2nd & Washington Next to KFC YUM! Center • Look for Louie our 8’ Troll Open Daily at 11:00 am

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 21


BY PATRICIA RANFT

Mike and the Manhattan

Did you know? One popular theory about the Manhattan’s origin is that it was created by Dr. Iain Marshall for Lady Randolph Churchill (Jennie Jerome, mother of Winston Churchill) for a banquet she hosted in honor of politician Samuel Jones Tilden. Another account, from the 1923 book Valentine’s Manual of New York, mentions that the cocktail was “invented by a man named Black who kept a place ten doors below Houston Street on Broadway in the [eighteen] sixties.” No matter its origin, the name “Manhattan” has remained with the drink over the decades.

Ask for Mike...

Lexington mixologist shares the finer points of the classic cocktail As evident by its name, the Manhattan cocktail was not conceived in the Bluegrass State, but with whiskey as its primary ingredient, it’s no surprise that the drink enjoys a following among Kentuckians. The cocktail’s origins are somewhat muddled, although a story that the Manhattan was invented at New York City’s Manhattan Club around 1880 carries some merit. Consisting of whiskey, vermouth and bitters, the Manhattan has enjoyed a strong following since.

B L U E S TA L L I O N B R E W I N G C O M PA N Y 610 West 3rd Street Lexington, 859.785.1625 bluestallionbrewing.com With a full-service bar; ales, lagers and IPAs brewed onsite; and Salt & Vinegar GermanAmerican cuisine, Blue Stallion offers customers a prime eating and drinking experience.

“It’s one of the first drinks I ever learned to make,” Blue Stallion Brewing Company General Manager Mike Tate Abbott said. Based in Lexington, Blue Stallion is the thirdoldest craft brewery in central Kentucky and—offering the best of two worlds—boasts a full-service bar. A veteran mixologist, Abbott has 19 years of experience under his belt, along with a passion for the craft. He first learned about wine and cocktails at a food-service job in a fine-dining restaurant. “It was like a whole new world was opened up to me,” he remembered. When he decided to try his hand at bartending, Abbott, a Frankfort native, picked up a copy of The Essential Cocktail: The Art of Mixing Perfect Drinks by Dale DeGroff at the local public library and became hooked on learning about the art, science and technique of mixology. A self-professed cocktail nerd, Abbott then

22 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY D RINK LOCA L


When you drink a Manhattan, you’re gonna taste the vermouth. It’s a fortified red wine, so you’re getting that natural berry flavor,” Abbott said. “But with the coffee and cocoa bitters [of The M.T. Abbott Manhattan], it takes that berry and rounds it out to a berry covered with chocolate—a chocolate berry.”

C L A S S I C M A N H AT TA N

T H E M . T. A B B OT T M A N H AT TA N

GARNISH CHERRY

GARNISH ORANGE PEEL

GLASSWARE COCKTAIL GLASS OR COUPE

GLASSWARE LARGE ROCKS GLASS

2 ounces rye whiskey (preferred) or bourbon

2 ounces Pikesville Rye or Buzzard’s Roost Rye

1 ounce sweet vermouth (Carpano Antica preferred)

1 ounce Carpano Antica Vermouth 1 dash angostura bitters

2 dashes angostura bitters

1 dash Crude Big Bear Coffee & Cocoa Bitters

Ice, for mixing

Ice, for mixing

Add whiskey, vermouth and bitters to a mixing glass over ice. Stir with a barspoon until chilled. Strain into glass and garnish with cherry on a pick.

Add rye, vermouth and bitters to a mixing glass over ice. Stir with a barspoon until chilled. Strain into glass and garnish with orange peel.

checked out more books. on the subject. During a stint running the bourbon and cocktail program at Goodfellas Pizzeria in Lexington’s distillery district, he honed his craft, elevating his cocktail game by working with fresh produce to concoct homemade cordials and elixirs as well as creating specialty drinks. Regarding the Manhattan, he said, “Picking the vermouth is the most important thing—not your whiskey.” For Abbott’s favorite Manhattan, “There’s no other option than Carpano Antica. I could have a bottle [of it] in my fridge and drink it alllll day long. In my opinion, it’s the best sweet vermouth out there.

“You can do bourbon or rye, but I prefer the rye,” Abbott said of mixing a Manhattan. He recommends 2 ounces of rye combined with 1 ounce of vermouth, plus bitters. “The bitters are like the spice cabinet. With a rye whiskey, traditionally you have those bready baking spices, and the aromatic bitters—like angostura—work best with it. The angostura has so much gentian root, cloves and cinnamon, so those pair nicely with the rye whiskey. With the bitters and the spice of the rye, the sweet vermouth balances it out.” Abbott generally mixes up a classic Manhattan when serving customers, but he developed a special recipe for Kentucky Monthly—one with notes of chocolate. Q k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 23


COFFEEMAKER GARNISH ORANGE WEDGE DUSTED WITH BROWN SUGAR AND GROUND COFFEE GLASSWARE CHILLED BEER GLASS

2 ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey ¼ ounce cinnamon syrup 4 ounces Belgian ale Ice, optional Add ice, if using, to glass. Add Kentucky Coffee Whiskey, followed by cinnamon syrup, and then top off with beer. Garnish with orange wedge.

Recipes and images courtesy of Kentucky Coffee Whiskey.

PRIME PAIRING Kentucky Coffee Whiskey combines two favorites into one delicious drink

W

hiskey is thought to have originated on the European mainland, later taken by monks to Ireland and Scotland around 1000-1200 AD. With the development of various distilling and aging techniques, whiskey making evolved over the centuries, resulting in distinct types—including Irish whiskey, Scotch and bourbon, America’s singular native spirit distilled primarily in Kentucky. Today, whiskey enjoys worldwide popularity. Coffee has a tremendous following as well, rating behind only water and tea in global beverage consumption. It’s no surprise that these two faves sometimes are combined, blending together a pair of strong flavors to create tastebud-tantalizing cocktails. The folks at Kentucky Coffee Whiskey have saved coffee and whiskey lovers the time and trouble of mixing the two by releasing Kentucky Coffee. Introduced in 2017, the 66-proof coffee-flavored whiskey, distilled and bottled in the Commonwealth, can be enjoyed on the rocks, neat or in a variety of cocktails.

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Does this make whiskey a breakfast drink? Asking for a friend...

Find Kentucky Coffee Whiskey at select liquor shops across the state. For more information, additional recipes, and to locate a store near you, visit kentuckycoffee.com.

more recipes!

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k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 25


KENTUCKY COFFEETREE GARNISH THIN ORANGE SLICE AND GROUND COFFEE GLASSWARE LARGE ROCKS GLASS

1½ ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey ¼ ounce Italian aperitif such as Aperol ½ ounce coconut-infused sweet vermouth Add ingredients into a mixing glass over fresh ice. Stir with a barspoon until chilled. Strain into large rocks glass over ice. Garnish with orange slice and pinch of ground coffee.

COFFEE MULE

J O E FA S H I O N E D

GARNISH SPRIG OF FRESH MINT, LIME WEDGE, PINCH OF GROUND COFFEE

GARNISH ORANGE PEEL

GLASSWARE COPPER MULE MUG, A FAVORITE COFFEE MUG, OR HIGHBALL GLASS

GLASSWARE LARGE ROCKS GLASS

1½ ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey

2 ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey

1 teaspoon coffee creamer syrup

½ ounce ginger honey

2 dashes aromatic bitters

½ ounce fresh lime juice

Large ice cube

4 ounces club soda

Add ingredients into a mixing glass over ice. Stir until chilled. Strain into glass over ice cube. Hold a lit match a few inches above cocktail, while placing orange peel (outside of peel facing drink) about 2 inches above flame. Squeeze peel so that the oil from the orange passes through the flame, then discard.

Fill glass with ice. Add Kentucky Coffee Whiskey, followed by ginger honey and fresh lime juice. Top off with club soda and stir. Allow ingredients to settle. Garnish with mint, lime wedge and ground coffee.

26 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY D RINK LOCA L

Garnish with an orange peel.


KENTUCKY C O F F E E F LOAT GARNISH BLACK WALNUT BITTERS, FILTHY CHERRY AND GRATED ORANGE ZEST GLASSWARE PARFAIT GLASS OR ANY TALL GLASS

1½ ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey 2 tablespoons ice cream 4 ounces club soda 6 dashes black walnut bitters Fill glass halfway with ice. Add Kentucky Coffee Whiskey followed by ice cream. Gently top off with cream soda and allow to foam. Add a dash or two of bitters, and garnish with orange zest and cherry on a pick.

LUCKY IN KENTUCKY GARNISH ORANGE PEEL, COFFEEDUSTED FILTHY CHERRY GLASSWARE NICK & NORA GLASS OR COUPETTE

1½ ounces Kentucky Coffee Whiskey ½ ounce maraschino liqueur 2 dashes orange bitters 2 dashes chocolate bitters Add ingredients into a mixing glass over fresh ice. Stir with a barspoon until chilled. Strain into chilled glass. Twist the orange peel to release the oils over glass, then discard. Garnish with a coffee-dusted cherry on a pick.

RED OAK COFFEE C O C K TA I L GARNISH RASPBERRIES, GROUND COFFEE AND NUTMEG GLASSWARE CHILLED NICK & NORA GLASS

1 ounce Kentucky Coffee Whiskey ½ ounce Pedro Ximénez Sherry ¼ ounce fresh lemon juice ¼ ounce honey syrup 4 raspberries, crushed Add ingredients into a cocktail shaker and gently muddle the raspberries. Add ice and shake hard. Fine strain into glass. Garnish with raspberries on a cocktail pick, pinch of ground coffee and nutmeg. k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 27


Drink and eat local.

The Butcher’s Pub

Flamingo Row BLUEGRASS REGION Carson’s Food & Drink 362 East Main Street Lexington, 859.309.3039 carsonsfoodanddrink.com

Coles 735 Main 735 East Main Street Lexington, 859.266.9000 coles735main.com

Copper & Oak 303 West Main Street Danville, 859.209.2087

Old Vine Bistro 400 Old Vine Street Lexington, 859.523.4141 ovbistro.com

EASTERN REGION The Butcher’s Pub (three locations) 121 North Main Street London, 606.877.2782 112 Kentucky Avenue Pineville, 606.337.8299 401 Main Street Williamsburg, 606.515.6221

LOUISVILLE AREA 610 Magnolia 610 West Magnolia Avenue Louisville, 502.636.0783 610magnolia.com

Brendon’s Catch 23 505 South 4th Street Louisville, 502.909.3323 bcatch23.com

Decca 812 East Market Street Louisville, 502.749.8128

thebutcherspub.com

deccarestaurant.com

Dudley’s on Short 259 West Short Street Lexington, 859.252.1010

Red River Rockhouse 4000 KY Route 11 Campton, 606.668.6656

Jack Fry’s 1007 Bardstown Road Louisville, 502.452.9244

dudleysonshort.com

redriverrockhouse.com

jackfrys.com

Goodwood Frankfort Also in Louisville + Lexington 109 West Main Street Frankfort, 502.871.5070

Silver Creek Restaurant & Bar 350 Silver Lake Drive Mount Sterling, 859.498.7274

Old Talbott Tavern 107 West Stephen Foster Avenue Bardstown, 502.348.3494

goodwood.beer

silvercreek.website

talbotttavern.com

Heirloom Restaurant 125 East Main Street Midway, 859.846.5565

The Winchester 1441 Winchester Avenue Ashland, 606.327.1125

Proof on Main 702 West Main Street Louisville, 502.217.6360

heirloommidway.com

winchester-usa.com

proofonmain.com

copperandoakky.com

28 KE N T U CK Y M O NT H LY DRINK LOCAL


Proof on Main NORTHERN REGION

SOUTHERN REGION

The Baker’s Table 1004 Monmouth Street Newport, 859.261.1941

Charred Oak Grill 305 East Mt. Vernon Street Somerset, 606.451.7935

bakerstablenewport.com

charredoakgrill.com

Beehive Tavern 101 West Riverside Drive Augusta, 606.756.2137

Rosewood Bar & Grill 520 Fairway Drive Lebanon, 270.692.0607

beehiveaugustatavern.com

Bouquet Restaurant 519 Main Street Covington, 859.491.7777

Gerard’s 1907 Tavern 935 College Street Bowling Green, 270.904.8133 gerards1907tavern.com

bouquetrestaurant.com

DeSha’s Restaurant & Bar 1166 U.S. Hwy. 68 Maysville, 606.564.9275

Hickory & Oak 705 State Street Bowling Green, 270.715.9268 hickoryandoakbg.com

deshasmaysville.com

Greyhound Tavern 2500 Dixie Highway Fort Mitchell, 859.331.3767

440 Main/Micki’s on Main 440 East Main Avenue Bowling Green, 270.793.0450 440main.com

greyhoundtavern.com

Otto’s 521 Main Street Covington, 859.491.6678 ottosonmain.com

Pompilio’s 600 Washington Avenue Newport, 859.581.3065 pompilios.com

Guthrie’s Grill 6075 U.S. Hwy. 27 Somerset, 606.425.5987 guthriesgrill.com

WESTERN REGION Colby’s Fine Food and Spirits 204 West 3rd Street Owensboro, 270.685.4239 colbysfinefoodandspirits.com

Copper & Oak Flamingo Row 2640 Perkins Creek Drive Paducah, 270.442.0460 flamingorow.com

The Crowded House 26 West Center Street Madisonville, 270.825.1178 thecrowdedhouseky.com

the freight house 330 South 3rd Street Paducah, 270.908.0006 freighthousefood.com

Grill 211 211 Broadway Street Paducah, 270.933.1707 facebook.com/grill211

Main Street Tavern 801 South Main Street Hopkinsville, 270.484.5066 facebook.com/ mainstreettavern801

The Miller House 301 East 5th Street Owensboro, 270.685.5878 themillerhouserestaurant.com

Patti’s 1880’s Settlement 1793 J.H. O’Bryan Avenue Grand Rivers, 270.362.8844 pattis1880s.com

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 29


may we recommend... POUR YOURSEL F A GO OD BO OK

BOURBON IS MY COMFORT FOOD

THE LITTLE BOOK OF WHISKEY COCKTAILS

KENTUCKY MOONSHINE

From award-winning Louisville-based mixologist, Bourbon Women Board of Directors chair, and Cocktail Contessa blogger Heather Wibbels comes Bourbon Is My Comfort Food: The Bourbon Women Guide to Fantastic Cocktails at Home. This guide provides instructions on cocktail mixing and building a home bar, plus information on various flavor combinations, infusions and garnishes.

In The Little Book of Whiskey Cocktails, scheduled for release by the University Press of Kentucky on Aug. 23, author Bryan Paiement features 40 classic whiskey cocktail recipes and 10 original recipes—including The Godfather, a tribute to Francis Ford Coppola’s 1972 film masterpiece of the same name.

Moonshine has been produced in Kentucky since the area that makes up the Commonwealth was still part of Virginia. First published in 1974, Kentucky Moonshine is a lighthearted look at the history of the spirit, how moonshine was made, and the geography of moonshining.

Slated for release on May 3, the book contains more than 140 recipes that are not limited to bourbon but include cocktails made with vodka, gin, rum and tequila. Published by the University Press of Kentucky, the hardback retails for $27.95.

Paiement provides details of the cocktails’ origins while sharing stories of the whiskey-making world. This entertaining pocketsize book also includes a guide to bar tools and various ways in which the spirit can be mixed, savored and enjoyed. The 5- by 7-inch hardback retails for $14.95.

30 K E N T U CK Y M O NT H LY D RINK LOCA L

The original edition was written by the late David M. Maurer, a linguistics professor at the University of Louisville, and was updated and rereleased with a foreword by culinary author Wes Berry in October 2021. Published by the University Press of Kentucky, the hardback retails for $27.95, and the paperback sells for $17.95.


Q Discover Gallatin County

WHERE TIME PASSES SLOWLY EAG L E CREE K VI N EYAR D TA ST ING RO OM G L ENCO E G EN ERAL STORE NEEL EY FA MI LY D I ST I LLERY J EWEL L’S O N M AI N HO METOWN PI ZZA MR. T ’S L IQ UOR LO NG O S BAR SU NSET G RI LL DIET Z TAV ER N HA MMY ’S R ESTAURAN T & BAR

859-380-0256

k e n t u c k y m o n t h l y. c o m 31


SHOP LOCAL DRINK LOCAL SMOKE LOCAL BE LOCAL

JAK E’S CI GA R BA R I S LOCAT E D I N B RANNO N C R O SSING IN B E T W E E N DRAKE’S AN D MOVIE TAVERN .

118 Langley Drive Nicholasville, KY 40356 859.553.0036 11AM–7PM

100 Langley Drive Nicholasville, KY 40356 859.273.0351 12PM–Late Night


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