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LIFESTYLE + FASHION VOLUME 1 | ISSUE 1 | SPRING 2019


ON THE COVER PHOTO BY MICHAEL CLUBB ISAAC COUCH POSES FOR A PORTRAIT IN THE FABRIC STUDIO A THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON MARCH 19, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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OUR MISSION

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he mission of KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion is to promote the individuality, creativity, and uniqueness of storytelling by University of Kentucky’s students through utilizing all of our publishing platforms provided through Kernel Media. KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion strives to bring awareness to the stories that inspire us — through art, human interest, enterprise, investigative, health and wellbeing, or recreation — on and around campus and throughout our community. Whether through words or pictures, our diverse staff welcomes, embraces and invites all perspectives allowing us to bring to life a variety of stories that we want to tell. Produced and distributed in the fall and spring semesters on the campus of the University of Kentucky and throughout the city of Lexington, KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion aspires to be an important voice for our community.

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FROM THE EDITORS

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appy spring, everyone!

This semester, KRNL has evolved. We decided that it was important to start using our publication as a platform to tell local stories. As journalists, designers, photographers, etc., we have used our skills and perspectives to tell the stories that we find important in interesting and unique ways. In the first edition of the new KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion magazine, you are going to see a diverse mix of content. Keep turning pages and we guarantee there will be something for you. In my first year at KRNL, I have fallen in awe of the people behind the creation of this magazine, each so passionate about their part in this brand. As you flip through, you will be reading stories picked and told by our KRNL staff. These stories made us smile, learn something new, and inspired us, and we think they will do the same for you.

ALLIE KING

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he semester is coming to an end which means graduation, summer, and a new school year are right around the corner. Us wildcats call Kentucky our home because we’re either Kentucky natives or it’s our college’s home state; therefore, we all have the right to say we have Kentucky pride. Each year we are moving on to the next chapter in our lives, but the one thing we will all have in common is the state of Kentucky. Being a Kentucky native myself, as well as a graduating University of Kentucky senior and 4th year kernelite, I am more than proud to call Kentucky my home and have the opportunity to share other Kentucky proud persons stories and personalities. Please take your time to indulge yourself in this beautifully curated publication that expresses awareness, community and our state’s amazing beings.

JILLIAN JONES

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i everyone!

Thank you for taking the time to flip through the pages of KRNL. This semester we have moved from a fashion publication to both fashion and lifestyle. This has been an amazing change for us, and we have embraced all of the challenges and successes that have come with this change. A big concept we aimed to focus on for this issue is community. Here in Lexington and at UK, we are a big family. As a family, one of the most important jobs for us is to acknowledge what makes a community thrive, and also what makes it different. Here at KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion, we came together as a team to celebrate what makes our community unique. We are proud of our community, and that is what we wanted to share with the world. We are so excited for you all to read!

ABIGAIL FELDKAMP

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TABLE OF CONTENTS AWARENESS WE ALL COMPARE ...................................................................................................... 8 ESSENTIAL OILS ......................................................................................................... 18 THE IKI MOVEMENT................................................................................................... 20 FASHION: FESTIVAL FINDS....................................................................................... 22 SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVALS ..................................................................................... 27 GILDA WABBIT’S JOURNEY...................................................................................... 28 FASHION IN THE STARS............................................................................................ 30 CLUB DODGEBALL .................................................................................................... 32 SPRING TUNES ........................................................................................................... 34

EXPRESSION WAKE UP CALL ........................................................................................................... 36 RALPH STEADMAN .................................................................................................... 40 A NEW KENTUCKY HOME ........................................................................................ 42 FASHION: FRESH FASHION ...................................................................................... 46 DOGS IN A CATS’ WORLD ....................................................................................... 52 A ‘COLORFUL’ APPROACH TO B&W....................................................................... 54 LOCAL NOVELTIES..................................................................................................... 60 TREATING EACH OTHER WITH LOVE ..................................................................... 63 THE ART OF BURNING MAN.................................................................................... 64

KENTUCKY PROUD

SPICY FAT CAT FOR THE WILDCATS ....................................................................... 66 HOW DO YOU DEFINE SUCCESS? .......................................................................... 69 LET’S GO CLUBBIN’ ................................................................................................... 70 INSTAGRAMABLE PLACES IN LEXINGTON ........................................................... 72 FASHION: RETRO REVIVAL........................................................................................ 74 PARKETTE DRIVE-IN................................................................................................... 80 NEED A NAP? ............................................................................................................. 82 THE SCOOP ON ICE CREAM.................................................................................... 83 A KERNEL OF FRIENDSHIP ....................................................................................... 84 MADE FROM SCRATCH............................................................................................. 86 ONE TANK .................................................................................................................. 88 ESPRESSO YOURSELF................................................................................................ 90 ATHENIAN GRILL........................................................................................................ 92 PREPARED FOR CHANGE.......................................................................................... 94 CONTRIBUTORS ........................................................................................................ 96 KRNL MODELS ........................................................................................................... 97 KRNL SPONSORS ....................................................................................................... 98

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AWARENESS

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HOPE NOLAN

@HOPE.R.NOLAN

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BROOKE ICHINOSE @BROOKEICHINOSE


WE ALL COMPARE

THE COMPLICATED PATH TO INDIVIDUALITY BY ALLIE KING AND BRITTANY LYDEN | PHOTOS BY SYDNEY CARTER

“Perceived weight discrimination is significantly associated with a current diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders and mental health services use.”

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(Hatzenbuehler ML, Keyes KM, Hasin DS)

crolling through photos that have been angled, lit and edited to perfection can make you lose sight of what is real. It creates a flawless image that we are wired to desire for our everyday selves. By pursuing a fake perfection, we are depriving the world of all of the things that make us. We go to the extremes to portray ourselves as the status quo, fighting anything that gets in the way: comfort, self-esteem and health. We lose ourselves to the challenge of perfection, an unobtainable goal. We want to celebrate the way your body tells your story: Show off scars because they’ve healed, be proud of muscles and rolls, and let freckles shine like the sun that put them there. We choose to live in a world that accepts more than one form of beauty. As we learn to celebrate ourselves, we must also learn to be honest about our struggles. Recovery is non-linear. Even those with the highest self-esteem will feel low from time to time. Understand that there will be days when you will feel less than 100 percent. Continue to ignore the misleading idea of a “perfect” self. Love yourself and others for their unique color, shape, size and humanity. Each of these 14 people has an equally beautiful, unique story.

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I DO MY BEST TO PLEASE

MINA NAZIRUDDIN @MINALOVE510

TABITHA OLATOYAN

@LIFEWITHIFE_

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KELLIE PATRICK @_KELLIEPATRICK


KALEAH WILSON

HOPE NOLAN

@KALEVAGE

@HOPE.R.NOLAN

BECKY WANG

@ITSBECKYWANG

TORY STEPHENSON @TORYXS

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TABITHA OLATOYAN @LIFEWITHIFE_

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I CAN’T TAKE IT I can’t take the criticism. I can’t take the comparing. We are not Tetris pieces trying to fit wherever we can. We are individuals trying to survive in a complex world, just like everyone else. So we decided to stand up. We showed our struggles with images, not words. Words can be taken out of context, so we used the rawness of an image to express our story. We defied the norm by showing our struggles through something naturally beautiful. No edits. No perfect poses. Pure creativity. Imperfections shown perfectly. Individuals remaining unique. Each, so different, were able to see the beauty in each other. Every “flaw” that, in turn, defines the person. Every scar tells a story. S P R I N G 2 0 1 9 | 13


IT’S HARD NOT TO OVERTHINK

EMAN GHONEIM

BRITTANY LYDEN @BLYDEN12

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BECKY WANG

@ITSBECKYWANG


BROOKE ICHINOSE @BROOKEICHINOSE

NEHA YOUSUF @NEEHAW19

KELLIE PATRICK

@_KELLIEPATRICK

ALAINA EVERHART

@ALAINA_EVERHART

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PAIGE ISAAC @SRSLY_WHY

BECKY WANG

@ITSBECKYWANG

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ALAINA EVERHART @ALAINA_EVERHART


e c n e differ

EMBRACE THE

SAMMY ARMATO

@SAMMYJOARMATO

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ESSENTIAL FOR YOUR LIFE

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ARTICLE AND ILLUSTRATIONS BY BRITTANY LYDEN

ssential oils are all the buzz today, but how much do you really know about them? Are they all the same? Are they even legitimate?

THE BASICS

Essential oils are extracted from flowers, bark, stems, leaves, roots and other parts of plants. The oils can be used for physical or psychological therapy and have been used for hundreds of years. There are two primary ways essential oils are used: oil diffusing and topical use.

At first search, oils seem to be expensive, but the real key to purchasing is to be sure the oils you use are pure. Pure oils are key because the real benefit of using essential oils is the all natural aspect. To ensure this, read the ingredients carefully.

When using topically, you will want to dilute the oils due to the potency. This can be done simply by combining the oil with everyday oils most people already have in their kitchen. Some examples are castor oil or coconut oil. You can add a few drops into your lotion or deoderant as well.

THE DIFFUSER

How it works: Fill the diffuser with clean, roomtemperature tap water to the line instructed on the diffuser. Pour three to ten drops of the oil of your choosing into the water. Plug in and turn on the diffuser. Relax and enjoy the scent.

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For years, candles have been a common household product to keep your home smelling fresh. If you are anything like me, I always forget to blow out candles but still like to have a pleasant, relaxing smell to help me sleep. Oil diffusers are possibly the most common way to use essential oils. While living on campus, candles are actually banned from all housing; this makes essential oil diffusers an easy solution. There are a variety of diffusers on the market and for a poor college kid such as myself, I recommend a middle-of-the-road diffuser. I simply got one from Amazon but did a little research and read many reviews prior to purchase to ensure its quality.


YOUR CHOICES

When choosing the best oil for you, focus on what you need. Here are some oils paired with their uses: Lavender: Relaxation Peppermint: Energy/focus Lemon: Uplifting/energizing Thieves: Cleanse air Tea Tree: Good for skin/immune system Rosemary: Migraine relief Eucalyptus: Helps congestion

These are just some uses of the most common oils. In addition, there are recipes all over the internet. Now I don’t swear off medicine or only rely on essential oils for my overall health. I am on the side of the fewer chemicals the better. Essential oils can get a bad reputation for being a sham, but multiple studies have displayed the benefits of these allnatural oils.

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THE [IKI] MOVEMENT

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WANTS TO ‘PAMPER THE SHIT OUT OF YOU’ BY MAGGIE MARRS | PHOTOS BY EMILY WRENN

on a whim, Stepka and her friend decided to n an oversaturated beauty market, it making you do a double take. Stepka recalled a memory that helped her go to beauty school. A week before they were becomes hard to stand out. set to start classes, her friend backed out, but The beauty industry is growing to new create her salon’s raunchy catchphrase. “I love the shit out of you,” Stepka’s cousin Stepka pressed on. heights, especially with the rise of social Stepka said she had begun to lose her media. This is a market that continually makes used to say, and it became one of those little language at the time, so her billions of dollars in revenue every mother suggested that she come year, with no sign of slowing down back to Lexington to serve the anytime soon. This industry is large Japanese population in becoming an inclusive community the area. So Stepka made her that celebrates differences of all way back to Kentucky. kinds. Stepka and her business The [iki] movement, located partner started the [iki] in downtown Lexington, totally movement because “nobody embodies this philosophy. Salon provides what we do worldwide.” owner Anna Stepka has been in Creating something different the Lexington area most of her is a philosophy Stepka has faith life. Stepka’s father comes from in: a salon focused on self-care neighboring Ohio and her mother inside and out, an all-inclusive came to America from Japan when place, creating harmony with Stepka was a baby. Stepka started mind, body and spirit, a place her salon back in 2017, gaining where they wanted people to massive success in a short time. feel totally taken care of. Stepka’s salon totally embraces At the [iki] movement, the idea of inclusivity and diversity. employees are seen as just She mentioned that the word iki as valuable as customers, a is derived from the Japanese word mindset that is not often present wabi-sabi, which is an aesthetic of in conventional businesses. celebrating imperfections. The salon is open Wednesday Stepka and her [iki] movement through Saturday, in hopes to employees celebrate diversity create a better work-life balance by creating an all-inclusive for employees. A four-day work environment where employees and week further emphasizes their customers are equally celebrated self-care focus, putting service and taken care of. A place that providers first. would typically be described as The salon compensation a women’s safe haven, the [iki] structure is also unconventional: movement eliminates those typical a team-based pay ideal gender roles by offering “hair where there are no tips. This sculpting” and “hair painting” again creates a stress-free instead of the usual women’s cut/ environment for customers and color or men’s cut/color. This ANNA STEPKA, THE FOUNDER OF IKI MOVEMENT, BEGINS THE SALON’S employees, where you don’t have mindset is further reinforced with SIGNATURE HAIR SCULPTING PROCESS FOR A CLIENT. to worry if you offended someone its unisex product line, Davine, that takes care of all your pampering needs, male things we all carry with us throughout our by not properly tipping. These aspects put the lives. It rides on the line of inappropriate, customers’ mind at ease, and a salon that does or female. which made Stepka giggle as she remembered. not require employees to get add-ons or up“Let us pamper the shit out of you.” Stepka’s adult career started at an auto sell puts employees at ease too. The company’s iconic catchphrase catches “It’s all about how you frame it,” Stepka said. you off guard the moment you read the words, dealership, selling cars with a friend. One day,

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THE SALON INCORPORATES NATURAL LIGHTING, ARRAYS OF PLANTS AND COZY FURNITURE TO CREATE A COMFORTABLE, WELCOMING SPACE.

Something she and her team have seemed to master is creating an environment where beauty starts on the inside first, a place where everyone feels comfortable and self-care is put first. “Beauty to me is security, confidence, everything is in line from the inside out,”

Stepka said, an unconventional response from someone who values the unconventional. Stepka and her team have big plans for the future, further expanding the salon and adding skin and nail services to their pampering list. They will be further pushing the boundaries of beauty, every well-groomed step of the way.

LEFT

A SELECTION OF THE SALON’S UNISEX DAVINE PRODUCTS ARE DISPLAYED. RIGHT

THE IKI MOVEMENT OFFERS A NUMBER OF PAMPERING SERVICES IN ADDITION TO HAIR SCULPTING, INCLUDING AROMATHERAPY, CONDITIONING TREATMENTS AND BROW TAILORING.

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PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER TOP $34 PANTS $34 JAMES C

FESTIVAL FINDS

With summer right around the corner, every student begins to wonder what they’re going to be doing with their 3 month break. Whether you’re traveling, going to music festivals, working, or just chilling, summer is the perfect time to experiment with style. We took some of our favorite summer and music festival trends and styled them in a fun, arcade shoot.

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PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER DRESS $98 TOP $48 MACY’S

PHOTOS JORDAN PRATHER SHORTS $400 PANTS $130 ONENESS

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PHOTO SYD

PHOTO JORD

SYD

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O ABOVE LEFT DNEY CARTER SHIRT $50 ONENESS

ABOVE RIGHT DAN PRATHER PULLOVER $90 JEANS $230 JACKET $250 ONENESS

PHOTO DNEY CARTER TOP $35 SHORTS $34 MACY’S

PHOTO SYDNEY CARTER TOP $24 SKIRT $38 JAMESC BOUTIQUE

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PHOTO LEFT JORDAN PRATHER JACKET $250 ONENESS PHOTO RIGHT SYDNEY CARTER TOP $28 PANTS $44 JAMESC BOUTIQUE

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: SHIRT $75 PULLOVER $90 JEANS $230 SHIRT $50 SHORTS $90 ONENESS

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SUMMER

MUSIC FESTIVALS COMPILED BY LINDSAY BAISAS | DESIGNED BY AUTUMN HASSELL

BONNAROO The Bonnaroo Music Festival is definitely one to look into. This festival is unique because not only do you get to listen to amazing live performances, but you also get a builtin camping experience on the grounds of the event. It will be located in Manchester, Tennessee on June 13 to 16 and 4-day general admission tickets are currently around $340.

THE GOVERNORS BALL The Governors Ball is a music festival that is set to take place at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. This festival features plenty of popular artists such as Tyler, The Creator, Florence + The Machine, Louis The Child and so many more. Performances and activities will take place from May 31 to June 2. Nothing like starting off your summer in the Big Apple. A general admission weekend pass is currently priced at $305.

LOLLAPALOOZA Lollapalooza is definitely a popular music festival that is worth the hype. The location for this festival is prime being in the city of Chicago, Illinois. Not only do you get to listen to your favorite music artists, but you also get to experience all that downtown Chicago has to offer. Since this festival will take place on the dates on August 1 to 4, it is the perfect time, and weather, to visit Chicago. Although the lineup nor the ticket pricing has come out yet, general admission tickets start around $340. Check out festival details at www.lollapalooza.com.

FORECASTLE

FIREFLY The Firefly Festival will take place on the dates of June 21 to 23 in Dover, Delaware. Like Bonnaroo, this is camping music festival and according to the firefly website, it’s the largest on the East Coast. If you enjoy the outdoors, this would be the perfect event to add to your bucket list. Not only are you surrounded by nature, but you also have the opportunity to enjoy live music performances! Currently, a weekend general admission pass is $300. That is a deal considering all the amazing artists that will be attending this year.

Just an hour away from Lexington is the Forecastle Festival located in Louisville, Kentucky. This festival also offers a variety of music and they typically include a good mix between well-known artists and upcoming artists within their lineup. This year, some of the popular artists that will be attending are The Killers, Playboi Carti and The Avett Brothers. The dates for this festival are July 12 to 14. Currently, it’s only $164.50 for a 3 day general admission pass.

BUNBURY The Bunbury Music Festival is a great event for college students to enjoy a chill vibe with a variety of music genres. Located just a little over an hour away from Lexington, the festival will take place in Cincinnati, Ohio on May 31 to June 2. Currently, a general admission 3-day pass is priced at $189, which is fairly cheap compared to other music festivals.

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GILDA WABBIT’S JOURNEY BY ABIGAIL FELDKAMP

For years, shows like “Rupaul’s Drag Race” were kept as a secret to those who watched. With the rise of gay culture, a phenomenal art form has found its way into the mainstream media. The art of drag incorporates dance, theater, fashion, comedy and much more. KRNL sat down with Louisville Play Mate and former UK student, Samuel Penn — or as most people know him, Gilda Wabbit — to talk about what life is like as a modern drag queen. She studied classical voice at UK then moved to New York to be an opera singer, while also managing a restaurant. Growing tired of just being in the chorus, Gilda dreamed of starring in her own show.

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fter speaking with a queen who goes by Sutton Lee Seymour, Gilda realized that she could sing the music she wanted and become a drag queen as a full-time job. She made her debut on an open stage night. She did a song that was a trio, and she sang all three parts. After blowing the crowd away, the queen realized that this was what she was meant to do. After hustling for months, Gilda finally had enough gigs to pay the bills. She has had a successful career doing shows across the country and now performs weekly at Play Louisville as one of the Play Mates. Using her classical music background as an influence, Gilda would describe her drag as “silly, smart, and smutty.”

Q: How did you get your drag name? A: “Gilda Wabbit” comes from the Looney Tunes episode “What’s Opera, Doc?” Elmer Fudd was chasing Bugs Bunny and he said “kill da wabbit, kill da wabbit”… I was trying to find a name that is silly and funny, but I also have a classical music background. That was the name that stuck. Q: Best/worst parts of being a drag queen? A: “Best parts about being a drag queen? I’m beautiful, and I get to make myself beautiful every night. That’s a really cool part that we don’t get to talk about very often is that you get to choose how you look. When I walk in on days where I haven’t slept very much and I have dark circles under my eyes and I get to throw on a huge face of makeup. Sure, when you look up close it’s not going to look amazing because I’m wearing so much makeup, but once I’m on stage you can’t tell me nothing, so that’s like super fun. Another best part about being a drag queen is that you get to be an artist and get paid for it. (The) worst part about being a drag queen is that it’s very uncomfortable, like very

uncomfortable. When I was in Columbus, I had a show on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and I had a photo shoot on Monday, and I still haven’t recovered because my body is just tired.” Q: Tell me more about being the star of a popular meme. A: “That was literally the first month after I quit my day job. Long story short, I had gotten this brunch gig. It was our second show, and I was angrily texting; you can see in the picture where I was co-host because she was running late. I was like this is our second show and I don’t wanna get fired, like, get there on time. I didn’t even notice the woman that was sitting next to me because it’s New York. You don’t pay attention to who’s sitting next to you. You’re just on the subway. My friends started texting me pictures asking if that was me on the subway, and I was like “Holy crap. That is me on the subway.” That was when ‘subway creatures’ posted it on their Instagram. For a brief moment, I was a little famous, and then it died away. “Then, it got picked up by conservative Twitter, and they were making fun of me and the woman sitting next to me. That’s when it really blew up and Buzzfeed and Vice picked it up. One night I was at a friend’s house and my phone started blowing up and I was like “I don’t know what’s happening, but I’ve gotta go.” Like I can’t focus because everyone is contacting me. I don’t know what’s happening, but I’m getting all these mentions and I need to deal with it. Then, it became a meme because people were making fun of the conservatives. It was really cool. I got interviewed by Vice, Buzzfeed, BBC, and local news stations and stuff. A lot of people forget about it now, but every year one of my friends is like ‘You were in this?’ and I’m just like ‘You were following me on Facebook back then, like of course I was in this.’ But I’m grateful for it.”

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Q: Inspirations? A: “Oh, god. Everyone asks about my favorite ‘Rupaul’s Drag Race’ girls, and my fave Ru girl is Courtney Act. I’m obsessed with her. She’s so beautiful. She’s so eloquent and well spoken. I just wanna represent myself that well someday. “I also really like this artist named Lip Synca, who is a legendary drag queen. I actually got to work with her on Sasha Velour’s nightgowns. We were both in that together, which was amazing. She is everything because she revolutionized the way lip syncing is done and drag culture. She was making crazy mixes before computers. She was taking tapes, playing them, recording 30 seconds on a new tape. I don’t even know how she did it. I think she’s super amazing. “I’m really inspired by people who aren’t drag queens. I am super into an opera singer named Beverly Sills. She was a fabulous American Soprano, but she also did a lot of charity work. I think she’s amazing. I try to pull inspiration from everywhere. Literally, anyone who’s a redhead, like Reba McEntire, to die for, the Judd Sisters, to die for. I’m also really into girls who are like really pretty but aren’t afraid to be ugly. Like Kate McKinnon is hilarious. She’s so glam but also be like ‘This is my stupid face.’ I’m just obsessed with that.” Q: How do you feel about drag moving more into the mainstream? A: “First of all, I’m appreciative, because I really think that’s the reason that I can make this my living. I know there were girls doing drag full time before ‘Rupaul’s Drag Race.’ I know that that hustle was hard. Drag Race has helped a lot of girls make their artform a job instead of just a hobby. I also think that [drag moving into the mainstream] is really cool because it’s allowing us to have conversations about gender that we weren’t having before.


It’s sort of normalizing the conversation about gender. It’s like, hey, I’m a man in a dress, but not every drag queen is a man in a dress, and let’s talk about it. I think that’s really cool. “I think there’s some danger in [drag moving into the mainstream] because drag has been in the past really political. I try to maintain that in my drag, in terms of talking overtly about politics and stuff like that. I think there’s a lot of young drag queens who don’t know their history. For them, drag is like being a pop star. That’s great. Being a pop star is cool, but you also have an opportunity as a leader in the LBGTQ community for you to say something more than that. I want girls to lean into that. You’re more than a pretty girl on stage lip-syncing to Dua Lipa.” Q: What do you want to tell those living in Lexington about drag?

A: Step one, it doesn’t

matter if you’re a drag queen or not, but when you wake up, you have to believe you’re fabulous no matter what job you’re doing. You’re doing it for a reason, and if you believe in yourself, you’re going to do a hell of a lot better job. Everyone around you is going to see that, and you’re going to be celebrated for it. That’s a lesson I learned doing drag that I should’ve learned before, because I’m fierce, but I didn’t know it, and that sucks. A big thing I want to emphasize when I’m doing drag is that I’m just a human underneath all this. I feel like a lot of people look at drag queens and they think that we’re just like weird perverts or that they stereotype us as people that want to be women. Some drag queens do want to be women, and some drag queens are women. Not all of us want to be that, but you can’t stereotype us into those things. You can’t just be like ‘That person just wants to be a woman.’ You shouldn’t look at me and be like ‘That person is a pervert.’ I’m a husband, I’m

a son, I’m an uncle, I’m a brother. Underneath all of this, I’m a human, and I just want you to get to know me. Q: What would you tell those who want to start drag, but maybe are afraid to try it? A: “Practice, practice, practice. Every time you have free time, put on a face, and then once you feel comfortable in it, not like ‘this is amazing’ but ‘this is fine,’ get out of the house. When you put on a costume, leave the house. If you don’t mingle with people, they won’t know who you are. You might walk out the door 10 months later looking like you belong on TV, but no one’s gonna know who you are or care. If you really wanna do drag, you have to get out there. Once you get comfortable to leave the house, leave, meet people, go to a bar, show up. Even if you’re not performing, go to a place and be like ‘Yeah girl I’m fabulous. I might not be on stage, but hi, hello.’ That’s really important. That was really hard for me when I started. My first gig was in November, and my second one wasn’t until February, because I spent December and January scared in my bedroom, like, ‘I don’t know. Am I good enough for this?’ As soon as I started leaving the house, people told me I should go on stage more.”

PHOTO BY HANNAH D’ERAMO

GILDA WABBIT POSES BACKSTAGE AT PLAY LOUISVILLE ON FEB. 22, 2019

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FASHION IN THE STARS BY ABIGAIL FELDKAMP | PHOTOS BY HANNAH D’ERAMO

What’s your sign? That’s a question heard quite often, but how much are you actually like your zodiac?

Capricorn: December 22- January 19

Aquarius: January 20- February 18

Lauren Turner Capricorns are hardworking and honest people who are family-minded and devoted to their goals. Their style is simple but sophisticated, while also keeping it cozy. They also rely on basics, but with a twist.

Rick Childress Aquarians are fair and logical beings, who rely on friendship and teamwork. They are inviting souls; therefore, their style is unique and creative, with vibrant and experimental aspects.

Cancer: June 21- July 22 Lindsay Baisas Cancers are nurturing souls who are patient and helpful. Their style is elegant and refined, and they rely on timeless classics.

Leo: July 23- August 22 Emily Turner Leos are courageous and loyal, which makes them kind and entertaining people. Leos have a style that doesn’t rely on trend and tends to focus on vibrant hues.

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Pisces: February 19- March 20 Trey Warren Pisces are sensitive, but this makes them imaginative and wise. They also have an air of mystery to them. Pisces have a style that sticks with comfortable faves and gem tones.

Virgo: August 23- September 22 Rachel Porter Virgos are witty and organizational. They are also helpful and resourceful. Virgos are style chameleons and dress mostly in classic pieces with pastel colors.


Aries: March 21- April 19

Taurus: April 20- May 20

Gemini: May 21- June 20

LeAnna Williams Aries are bold and confident beings who have a sense of willpower. This makes them confident and caring. They have a style that is soft and elegant with streamlined and sleek pieces.

Tory Stephenson Tauruses are stubborn, but this makes them supportive and dedicated people. They are also very happy and romantic beings. Their style makes a statement and is comfortable,

Rachael Courtney Geminis are clever and wise, with a charming sense of adventure. They have a style that is feminine, colorful and on-trend.

Libra: September 23- October 22 Sydney Carter Libras are charming, sincere and fair. They have a style that puts a twist on classics. They rely on lush fabrics, such as silk and suede.

but is also fashion-forward.

Scorpio: October 23- November 21 Jillian Jones Scorpios are passionate trendsetters, despite being reserved. They are brave and protective individuals. Scorpios rely on staples when it comes to their style, but they aren’t afraid to show a little skin.

Sagittarius: November 22- December 21 Sawyer Sanchez Sagittariuses are funny and fair-minded. This makes them optimistic and enthusiastic. When it comes to style, Sagittariuses prefer polished, feminine silhouettes, with softer colors.

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UK CLUB DODGEBALL TEAM CAPTAIN AND CIVIL ENGINEERNG SENIOR, EVAN KASCHELHOFFER, THROWS A DODGEBALL DURING PRACTICE AT THE JOHNSON RECREATION CENTER ON MARCH 4, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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CLUB DODGEBALL

AN ULTRA-COMPETITIVE TWIST ON GYM CLASS

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t was nearly midnight at the Johnson Center, and Evan Kaschelhoffer was on top of his game. Kaschelhoffer, the stocky senior captain of UK’s club dodgeball team, was launching screaming rubber dodgeballs at packs of his teammates. During a scrimmage-practice on a night before spring break, he was taking no prisoners. “That one hurt my marble sack,” one of his teammates bellowed in pain after one of Kascheloffer’s 50-mile-per-hour missiles found its mark below the belt, sending him tumbling to the hardwood gym floor. Competitiveness mixed with levity at the late-night practice. The teammates were obviously friends who were very serious about their game. Kaschelhoffer, a civil engineering major, has played club dodgeball for three years. UK’s team is usually among the nation’s best. They spend much of the year traveling to various tournaments around the country, and they’ve made the national tournament’s Elite Eight for six years running. Kaschelhoffer said he could only really describe the team’s atmosphere with one word: “Family.” “You end up spending weekends together at tournaments,” Kaschelhoffer said. “You do eight-, six-, five-hour car rides. You bond.” Justin Conti, a freshman journalism major who joined the team in 2018, called the team “very homey.” He added that the sport is an excellent stress reliever after classes, exams or rough weeks. “I just lost my wallet,” Conti said with a smile. “So I’m relieving some stress.” Conti said that as a first-semester freshman he became interested in the team in part because dodgeball was banned at his high school in New York. Freshmen showing up to college have a multitude of club sport options like basketball or volleyball, he said.

BY RICK CHILDRESS | PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CLUBB

THE UK CLUB DODGEBALL TEAM STARTS A DODGEBALL SCRIMMAGE DURING PRACTICE AT THE JOHNSON RECREATION CENTER ON MARCH 4, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

“But club dodgeball is so different, you know?” Conti said. “It’s very unique.” The sport’s technique is unique, for sure. The perfect dodgeball throw, Conti said, requires getting the perfect grip. “You would think you would palm it,” Conti said. Instead, a would-be dodgeball thrower should pinch the rubber ball around the air hole with their whole hand, tightly placing the thumb below the air hole and gripping above the hole with the other four fingers. This grip causes the ball to spin after it’s released. The generated spin causes the ball to fly faster. Daniel Lajuenesse, a junior agriculture economics major and assistant captain, said that one now-graduated teammate regularly tossed the ball at speeds ranging above 70 mph He said that Kaschelhoffer is the team’s current hardest thrower as his darts top out in the low 60s.

Lajuenesse said that getting hit by the ball will leave a light sting for about 10 seconds, but there is rarely any bruising. Like his captain, Lajuenesse described the team as a family, adding that he’d made some real, long-lasting friendships through the team. “They’re some of my best friends now,” Lajuenesse said. “Most of the guys I hang out with, most of my friends, have been made from dodgeball.” The team is currently running low on players. Conti said that next year, there will be a big push to get new players and added that they’ll be looking “to haul in as many freshman as we can.” “It feels like a varsity sport,” Conti said. “Every dodgeball team is like a connected family. They’re all friendly with each other and at the end of the day they’re all playing dodgeball.”

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SPRING TUNES KRNL PLAYLIST VOL. I BY KORIANA BLEVINS

Here at KRNL Lifestyle and Fashion, we’re excited about spring. That is why we created an eclectic mix that will be sure to put you in the mood for sunnier days. If you’re looking for a playlist that is perfect for road trips or getting ready with your BFFs before a night on the town, you’ve come to the right place. Each song is strategically picked to represent KRNL readers: lively, curious, adventurous, bold, funny, smart and, most importantly, unique. Each song taps into the mind of one who is in love with love, travel, art, creativity and having fun. Music is not just a creative outlet; it’s a form of self-expression and identity. The music we listen to is just a small facet of who we are, or whom we want to be. It is our hope that our readers are constantly seeking new music, new experiences, and new chances for growth. Here’s to spring! LOVE SUPREME / NAO SUNSETS - PT. 2 / SG LEWIS WHAT YOU NEED / BAYNK WANDERLUST / ALUNAGEORGE LAY IT ON ME (FEAT KEIYNAN LONSDALE) / KASBO YOU & ME / MARC E. BASSY JUST FRIENDS / HAYDEN JAMES HISTORY / COSMO’S MIDNIGHT BLOOM / TROYE SIVAN RETROGRADE / MAGGIE ROGERS TALK ABOUT IT / FOLEY THE CITY (WITH QUINN XCII) / LOUIS THE CHILD LOVE YOU MORE / CHELSEA CUTLER BUZZIN / ALINA BARAZ SHE WON’S LET ME DOWN (FEAT. LEO STANNARD) / EMBRZ, FRENCH BRAIDS REMIX

ARTWORK FROM SPOTIFY


EXPRESSION

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WAKE UP CALL

YMCA JUMPSTART CLASS IS ‘A REAL FAMILY’ BY BAILEY VANDIVER PHOTOS BY ARDEN BARNES

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ATTENDEES OF THE YMCA JUMP START FITNESS CLASS DO A ROUND OF CAN-CAN LIKE EXERCISES ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

hat do a former vice mayor, a New York Times bestselling author, a judge and a sorority house mother have in common? They all attend the Jump Start group exercise class at the East High YMCA along with approximately 30 other people who show up at the Y at 6 a.m. three days a week to exercise together. On the morning of Feb. 22, YMCA healthy living director and Jump Start instructor Debbi Dean dropped her stuff off in her office before heading to the basement, where the class is held. Nearly 20 years ago, when Dean began the class, that room in the basement was not yet built. Instead, she and the inaugural members of the class worked out in the multi-purpose room on the first floor. Dean had already been teaching group exercise classes for several years when a good friend of hers convinced her to come to the Y to teach this 6 a.m. class. “So that’s how I got to the Y, and I’ve been here longer than I’ve been anywhere else teaching,” she said. “It’s my home.” When Dean got down to the basement on this February morning, longtime member of the class Diane Johnson was already there. Dean said Johnson walks from her home before every class meeting and is often the first to arrive. “This is the best class in the Y,” Johnson said. The people who trickled in to the bright, energetic room from the dark, cold morning outside took their places around the room, their reflections looking back at them from floor-to-ceiling mirrors. As an aerobic mix of “Beat It” started playing, Dean took her place at the front of the class to lead the class in 25 minutes of cardio. Dean said she has two formats for the class.

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The first, which was the plan for that day, was 25 minutes of cardio, followed by weights, then push-ups and abs. “It’s high-impact, low-impact aerobics,” she said. “It used to be higher for longer, and the older I get, the lower it gets,” she jokingly added. The ages of the class members vary widely— as do the heights of the high knees they do. A few minutes later, the oldest attendee that day walked in, stopping to say hi to a few people before taking her place in the back of the room and jumping right in to some jumping jacks. Isabel Yates said she often gets there about five minutes late— because sometimes she’s sleeping on her good ear and doesn’t hear her alarm. She is 94 years old. “I tell you, you have to get up early…” she said. “But it’s lots of fun, and it makes you get started for the day, and that’s why I like it.” Yates, who is still active in the city, has been attending Jump Start for 10 or 12 years, she said. But before she was the second oldest member of the class, she was vice mayor of Lexington from 1999 to 2002. She said the class has not changed much since she joined— “but it’s gotten bigger and we’ve gotten more united with each other.” Yates called the class “a real family,” and she said that if she’s not at class one day, everybody calls asking what’s wrong. “And if you’re sick or something, they call you and come to see you sometimes,” she said. The oldest member of the class, 96-year-old Virginia Bell, is proof of this. She was absent that day because of a hip injury, and after several members of the class asked how she was doing, one class member said she had plans to

visit and take her a meal later that day. As the cardio workout continued, Dean shouted encouragements from the front of the room, but most people were comfortably in their rhythm. It was clear these people had spent many, many mornings exactly like this. Two women stepped arm in arm to the beat, while others chatted even as they continued their workout. Many of them wore matching Jump Start t-shirts that boasted 20 years of a class that brought them “Love, friends, family” and more. Without breaking stride in the workout, one man— one of the five in attendance that day— began running around the room, bells in one hand and envelopes in the other. This was Steve Hupman, who is in the commercial real estate business and has attended the class almost since the beginning. “We got word in the locker room that there was some crazy lady upstairs who was near our age… and so some of us plugged in and just couldn’t get out of it,” he said. Hupman is a big part of the Y’s scholarship campaign, which raises money to support the YMCA’s pledge to never turn anyone away. “It reaches deep into our community, and helps pull up some people that need the help, so those of us who have been, I’m going to say, overly blessed, choose to share in that fashion.” The bells were Hupman’s way of making campaign-giving fun— as members of the class give, Hupman hands out their pledge cards, which he decorates with stickers. “We just celebrate each individual giver, and they really like that, I think,” he said. “They love it,” Dean said. Every year, Hupman matches in donations what the class pledges. Last year, the Jump Start class alone raised $40,000. The East

MARY CATHERINE DORSETT DANCES WITH THE CLASS DURING THE YMCA JUMP START FITNESS CLASS ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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DEBBI DEAN LEADS THE YMCA JUMP START FITNESS CLASS IN AN EXERCISE ROUTINE ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

High YMCA’s overall goal this year is about $300,000, which is about half the goal of all the Y’s across the state. “This one alone is one of the smallest ones, and we raise the most,” Dean said. After the music ended and the group had completed its 25 minutes of cardio, the exercisers took a quick break before starting their weight and ab exercises. It was at this point that Yates took her leave— she said she normally stayed for that part but had to get to her Friday hair appointment. The last half hour of the class passed by in a more subdued fashion— at least as far as the music was concerned. As the class ended, people filed out of the workout room— passing by the bulletin board that Dean said she sets up differently every month. This month’s question was “What do you love about the Y?” and Post-It notes in tones of red and pink displayed people’s answers. Many mentioned the Jump Start class— like the one that read “Debbi Dean and my 6am family xoxo.” Several of the class’s members didn’t part for long, though, as their Friday tradition is to meet at Third Street Stuff & Coffee after their workout. Dean said as many as 15 sometimes spend part of their Friday morning at Third Street, where owner Pat Gerhard reserves a couple of tables just for them. The coffee dates have been happening for somewhere between 12 and 15 years, Dean said, though they weren’t always at Third Street. This was only Jill Malusky’s second time at a post-workout Third Street meeting, since she normally has to go straight from the Y to her job at the Lexington Public Library. Malusky has only been attending Jump Start since August, and she said she had “no idea what I was walking into” the first time. “I walked in and I was like, ‘Woah, what’s going on?’” she said. “I think they were worried that I wouldn’t stay or come back, and everyone was so friendly and wonderful and just grabbed me and pulled me in, and I was like I don’t want to leave. I love this.” As they sipped their coffee, side conversations died down and everyone gathered around


for Hupman to read each person’s horoscope. “No make up,” someone said as he prepared to read. This is a reference to a former member of the class— a Japanese man who would always implore Hupman not to make up anyone’s horoscope. Finishing up their coffee and preparing to leave, class members hugged and said goodbye. When each member first stepped foot into the Jump Start class, the real estate agent, judge, author and so many more may have had little in common— though they do boast “a really impressive resume,” as Mulasky put it. But you don’t realize that when you’re working out together, Mulasky said; as Hupman said, “sweating is the great equalizer.” After years and years of sweating together, this diverse group of people considers themselves to be a family, or a mini community. And as they each left Third Street to do the next thing on their Friday schedules, they all had one thing in common. In less than 72 hours, they’d be back in the Y basement, working out together.

STEVE HUPMAN KISSES ISABEL YATES ON THE CHEEK WHILE HOLDING ENVELOPES AND RINGING BELLS CELEBRATING THE CLASS MEMBERS GIVING TO THE YMCA’S SCHOLARSHIP FUND DURING THE YMCA JUMP START FITNESS CLASS ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

MEMBERS OF THE YMCA JUMP START FITNESS CLASS REACT AFTER STEVE HUBMAN READS KIM EDWARD’S HOROSCOPE ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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A CHARACTER OF SORTS RALPH STEADMAN’S WORK ON DISPLAY AT UK ART MUSEUM BY ARDEN BARNES PORTRAITS BY RIKARD OSTERLUND ARTWORK PROVIDED BY THE STEADMAN FOUNDATION

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hen Ralph Steadman first met one of his closest friends and collaborator, Steadman was sketching the scenes of the Kentucky Derby with Revlon makeup samples. “They said you were weird, but not that weird,” Steadman said Hunter S. Thompson, an outspoken gonzo-journalist, told him when they first met. Steadman, a satirical cartoonist and illustrator, was using makeup as art materials because he had lost his inks. The two met to cover the 1970 Derby for Scanlon’s Monthly. Their first collaboration was also the first instance of Gonzo journalism. Gonzo journalism is a style of journalism where the writer inserts themselves in the story and reporting and writing is done without claims of impartialness— a style of journalism “where you do not simply cover the story but become the story,” Steadman’s biography states. Works of Steadman’s Gonzo-style art are being shown in “Ralph Steadman: A Retrospective,” an exhibit at the University of Kentucky Art Museum until May 5. The show is a traveling exhibition created by the Ralph Steadman Foundation, and the foundation wanted a major venue in Kentucky. The UK Art Museum typically does not feature travelling shows, but Janie Welker, curator of the UK Art Museum, and Stuart Horodner, director of the UK Art Museum, both agreed this was a show that the art museum needed to have. “When we started really looking at it, it just really made sense for us to have it,” Welker said. “This is such a politically divisive moment in the United States and in Europe as well and so I think his work is more relevant than ever.” Steadman’s work ranges from satirical social commentary to “wonderful, magical” children’s book illustrations; however, Steadman is most known for his cartoons commenting on the social and political climate of the times. “He’ll take aim at anyone that he thinks is behaving badly,” Welker said. The exhibition features Steadman’s cartoons, illustrations, collages and “artifacts” from his pieces, including some of the original Derby makeup sketches. Steadman’s first job was as a radar operator at the de Havilland Aircraft Factory. It was here that Steadman learned technical drawing, which

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THE KENTUCKY DERBY IS DECADENT AND DEPRAVED SCANLAN’S MONTHLY, 1970

PHOTO BY RIKARD OSTERLUND RALPH STEADMAN IN HIS MAIDSTONE STUDIO, JAN. 7 2014.

became a recognizable characteristic in his illustrative style. Steadman referred to mixing technical drawing with organic shapes and lines in his work as “clumsiness and refining.” Steadman’s first cartoon was published in the Manchester Evening Chronicle in 1956. Steadman continues to create, claiming “I wouldn’t really know what else to do,” and adding there may even be two more books in him if he


EMERGENCY MOUSE, THE WARD ANDERSEN PRESS, 1978

tries hard enough. Steadman said that along with his daughter, Sadie, the completion of his book I, Leonardo, a humorous biography of Leonardo da Vinci, meeting Thompson was one of his top life experiences. Steadman and Thompson remained collaborative partners and friends until Thompson’s death by suicide in 2005. Steadman said he knew Thompson was going to commit suicide. “Hunter told me — when he did commit suicide, I knew it was going to happen,” Steadman said. “It was a very strange thing.” Steadman went with Thompson to a funeral director in Los Angeles to help design the funeral. Thompson wished for his ashes to be shot out of a cannon, topped with a symbolic, Gonzo fist. Thompson’s wishes came true, six months after his death, with a large monetary contribution from Johnny Depp, according to the UK Art Museum and various media outlets. Approximately 250 of Thompson’s friends and family came together to watch the 153-foot, fist-topped cannon fire off at his ranch, Owl Farm, in Woody Creek, Colorado, dispersing Thompson’s ashes over the valley. Ralph recalls trying to sketch the fist that

would top the cannon. He said Thompson stopped him and said, “Two thumbs, Ralph. Two thumbs.” A Gonzo fist has two thumbs. Steadman did eventually draw the fist in his piece, “Hunter’s Memorial,” featuring an illustration of the cannon topped with a Gonzo fist. A print of “Hunter’s Memorial” is included in the Steadman exhibition at the UK Art Museum.

LEFT HUNTER’S MEMORIAL SCREENPRINT SIGNED 20 AUG. 2005 ABOVE PHOTO BY RIKARD OSTERLUND A PORTRAIT OF RALPH STEADMAN IN HIS MAIDSTONE STUDIO, JAN. 7 2014.

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A NEW KENTUCKY HOME

LORI COOLEY AND HER ANIMALS FIND HAPPINESS AT HER FARM ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY ARDEN BARNES

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LORI COOLEY TRAINS A FOAL TO WEAR A BRIDLE ON COOLEY’S FARM ON JUNE 28, 2018, IN HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY. THE FOAL’S MOTHER TAKES A DIRT BATH AND STAYS CLOSE BY DURING TRAINING.

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ori Cooley is not alone. Cooley, 58, shares her Harrison County farm with two dogs, three cats, seven goats, eight chicks and 10 horses. She lived in Houston for 28 years, but left after her boyfriend died in a polo accident nearly five years ago. “It was a bummer,” she said. “I can say that now.” She said after going through something like that, her brain didn’t work, that she couldn’t process anything. So she moved back in with her family in Indiana. “After two weeks in Indiana I remembered why I left in the first place,” she said. She then moved to Kentucky. Cooley had always loved Kentucky, so she began looking for a home there, finding one in Harrison County.

Cooley’s farm is 25 acres and houses a cemetery, barn, both an indoor and outdoor riding ring and a cabin-like home with antebellum roots. “I mean, it’s nothing. It’s not anything fancy, but it fits the bill— with the funky old house and the cemetery...” she said. “I’m super happy here. I’ve never been as happy as I am now. I love this place.” In her time in Kentucky— about a year and a half— she has completed a plethora of projects, including hauling the spare wood out of her hayloft. She’s repurposed that wood, creating a kitchen table and overhead lamp for herself. She’ll do just about anything, but nothing too crazy. “What would happen to my animals?” she said.

LIGHT HITS A PHOTO IN LORI COOLEY’S HOUSE SHOWING HER TIME AS AN EVENTER ON JULY 4, 2018.

Cooley is proud of her home and her animals. “It was just me,” she said. “But I got it done.”

LORI COOLEY GIVES ONE OF HER MARES PRENATAL VITAMINS ON JUNE 28, 2018, ON HER FARM IN HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY.

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LORI COOLEY RIDES HER HORSE, GALIANA, ON JUNE 28, 2018, IN HER RIDING RING ON HER FARM IN HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY.

ABOVE COOLEY WASHES THE PAWS OF HER DOG, SPOT, AFTER DOING CHORES ON A MUDDY DEC. 27, 2018. LEFT COOLEY HOLDS A DAY OLD CHICK IN HER HOME IN HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY ON DEC. 27, 2018. THE CHICKS HAVE TO BE KEPT AT 95 DEGREES SO COOLEY SET UP A HEAT LAMP IN HER COVERED BACK PORCH. SHE PURCHASED 16 EGGS FROM EBAY, 14 WERE FERTILE AND 8 HAVE HATCHED. “A BOTTLE OF WINE AND A COMPUTER AND EBAY AND LOOK AT WHAT CAN HAPPEN,” COOLEY JOKED.

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PHOTO LEFT JORDAN PRATHER LOGAN’S PHOTO ABOVE JORDAN PRATHER ROMPER $38 EARRINGS $15 JAMESC BOUTIQUE PHOTO BELOW MICHAEL CLUBB JUMPSUIT $548 EARRINGS $125 AJ’S CASUALS


FRESH FASHION

Spring is here, which means we are celebrating spring fashion and trends. The warmer, fresh air is sure to brighten up anyone’s day - whether you’re a bold colors or pastel kind of person. Here’s to spring and all of the colors and nature it brings with it!

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER DRESS $48 EARRINGS $22 JAMESC BOUTIQUE

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PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER

DRESS $302

DRESS $156 EARRINGS $22

COTTON PATCH

COTTON PATCH

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER

DRESS $48 EARRINGS $22

LOGAN’S

ROMPER $38 EARRINGS $15 JAMESC BOUTIQUE

RN AH SH 4848 | K| RK N L LL ILFI EF SE TS YT LY EL E+ +F AF S I OI O NN


PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER TWO PIECE SET $170 EARRINGS $20 COTTON PATCH

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PHOTO MICHAEL CLUBB LOGAN’S

PHOTO MICHAEL CLUBB EARRINGS AJ’S CASUALS

PHOTO RIGHT MICHAEL CLUBB LOGAN’S

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PHOTO ISAAC JANSSEN EARRINGS $20 COTTON PATCH

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DOGS IN A CATS’ WORLD

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SERVICE ANIMALS AT UK

or a campus so passionate about their beloved Cats, one would think that a natural rivalry with dogs would occur. But at the University of Kentucky, the two species seem to co-exist, especially in the classroom, where students and service dogs in training are learning together. The dogs aren’t in class to learn how to write term papers or to better understand organic chemistry. “Having dogs in class teaches the dogs patience, which is something that they will use every single day as a service dog. It is so important that these dogs receive plenty of socialization, and I think that a college campus is a great place for a dog to socialize,” said Abby Sheeler, president of 4 Paws at the University of Kentucky. Two campus organizations, Wildcat Service Dogs and 4 Paws for Ability, are making this possible, pairing students with puppies to train in hopes that the latter will learn the skills necessary to one day be paired with a “forever person.” “We are both organizations that have a passion for animals and helping individuals with disabilities,” Sheeler said. Besides outfitting their program dogs in different colored vests (4 Paws dogs wear mostly red and WSD dogs wear blue), the main difference between the respective programs is that 4 Paws is a nationwide program, and the larger of the two. WSD is a UK-only program and is completely student funded, explaining why they only have four current program dogs, as compared to 4 Paws’ 57. “I started out in WSD because I missed my own dogs and thought it would be fun to play with puppies in my dorm,” said Emma Rhodes, a previous puppy trainer and current president of Wildcat Service Dogs. “But once I learned what the organization was about, I fell in love with puppy raising and the vast improvements these dogs make to the lives of the people who need them.” Wildcat Service Dogs pairs their Golden Retriever or Labrador Retriever puppies with trainers beginning between eight and 12 weeks old. These trainers, all of whom are college students, must finance the animal’s food,

BY EMILY BAEHNER

grooming, toys and some veterinary bills. They are also responsible for socializing, training and housing their service dog partner, to provide them with obedience training that will equip them to transition into a specialized service track. And a partnership it truly is. “WSD’s tagline is ‘helping students, help dogs, help people, one paw at a time,’ and that really encompasses everything that we hope to achieve as an organization,” said Brenna Kirkpatrick, WSD’s vice president. Following their completion of the WSD program over their first 10 to 12 months of life, the Wildcat Service Dogs will move to advanced training at the Assistance Dogs for Achieving Independence partner facility in Sylvania, Ohio, where they will receive a year of advanced training before being placed with their “forever person.” WSD dogs have become mobility assistance dogs, skilled in-home companions and bomb detection dogs. 4 Paws for Ability is a non-profit organization that breeds, trains and places service dogs with children and veterans with disabilities, specializing with these two groups as they are most often turned down by other service dog organizations. Following a timeline similar to that of WSD, 4 Paws trainers receive their dog between 10 weeks and four months and keep them for 10 to 12 months before they are evaluated for advanced task training. With the motto “Taking the dis out of disability,” 4 Paws places Alzheimer assistance dogs, autism assistance dogs, diabetic alert dogs, FASD assistance dogs, facilitated guide dogs, hearing ear dogs, mobility assistance dogs, multipurpose assistance dogs, seizure assistance dogs and veteran assistance dogs. Student puppy-raisers are the key to getting dogs started on the path to fulfilling these needs, by socializing the dogs and working on basic obedience. “We want to make sure our dogs are used to every noise, surrounding, person and environment possible so when they go onto advanced training, they are confident dogs,” Sheeler said. For both training programs, learning doesn’t stop with the dogs, but also includes educating

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the public. Students involved in both programs play a significant role in normalizing the presence of service dogs on the UK campus and in the community, in hopes that the public understands the work that these animals do. This includes helping to clarify the definition of a service animal. “One of our goals as an organization is to increase awareness of the differences between service animals, therapy animals, and emotional support animals…” Kirkpatrick said. “We emphasize to our members that not all disabilities are visible and that we support the working animal community as a whole.” Members of these organizations also work to speak out against the negative consequences that fake service animals can have on real service dogs and the perception of these animals. Rhodes said that when untrained dogs are brought into public places that service dogs are granted access to, it can cause people to discriminate against the real dogs. “There is no legal registry and dogs don’t need any kind of identification, so there is no legal way to prevent people from buying their pets a vest and bringing them in public. The only real way to stop it is to keep trying to educate and spread awareness as much as possible,” she said. Sheeler said those at her organization see untrained service dogs all the time. “It’s extremely frustrating that people do not understand the time, money and training that go into these dogs to become service dogs. It’s not about having a dog by your side; a service dog is much more than that,” Sheeler said. Educating the public in this way fosters widespread awareness of the roles of service animals. Bringing the dogs into the college classroom helps to do just that. In doing so, WSD and 4 Paws have led to widespread acceptance of program dogs on campus. And for the students involved in these programs, it’s a chance to share their love for helping others with the rest of campus. “I have a passion for working with individuals with disabilities and working with animals, and this organization allowed me to collide my two passions into one program,” Sheeler said.


PHOTO BY MICHAEL CLUBB

4 PAWS FOR ABILITY SERVICE DOG, TELLY MONSTER, A GOLDEN LAB, POSES FOR A PICTURE AT THE GATTON STUDENT CENTER ON MARCH 7, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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ISAAC COUCH’S

‘COLORFUL’ APPROACH TO BLACK AND WHITE BY SARAH LADD | PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CLUBB WRITTEN BY SARAH LADD | PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CLUBB

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ISAAC COUCH, A MERCHANDISING APPAREL AND TEXTILES SENIOR, WORKS ON A JACKET FOR HIS CLOTHING BRAND, COLOR-FUL, IN THE FABRICS STUDIO AT THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON FEB. 28, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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ISAAC COUCH, A MERCHANDISING APPAREL AND TEXTILES SENIOR, SEWS HIS LOGO INTO A JACKET FOR HIS CLOTHING BRAND, COLOR-FUL, IN THE FABRICS STUDIO AT THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON FEB. 28, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

is brand’s name is Color-ful, but Isaac Couch’s clothing shows a deep-rooted fascination with black and white. The sharply juxtaposed black-and-white pieces are the University of Kentucky fashion designer’s personal representations of Yin and Yang, the concept of dualism: two strong, opposing forces complementing each other and intertwining. This concept for the UK senior presents itself in the form of large black and white pieces of cloth meeting and intertwining in a way to complement the contour of the piece and the body of the wearer. Couch said the reason for this artistic decision goes back to his emotional connection with his clothing. He grew up an only child, and he feels that this experience helped make him the “hands-on, creative person” he is today. He said that growing up, he sometimes made things to play with since he had no brothers or sisters. That helped mold his desire to create and helped drive his process, which sometimes includes his visioning pieces at night and getting up to sketch his ideas, then working for months to create them. This loneliness he felt as a child helped him to find comfort in himself. Although his loneliness helped drive his creativity, he said that it also drove him to a dark place. “I kind of realized that because of that, I was kind of putting myself

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in a hole. I was kind of isolating myself from others,” he said. He’s always been obsessed with the color black, but he chooses to represent the loneliness he experienced in his life in this color because he felt like it was a darkness that enveloped him. The white in his pieces stands for the good things in his life and how his family and friends have been a positive force and a support system. The first pieces in his current collection of clothing are mostly black, but as the collection grows, more white starts to appear in the designs. This is intentional, as he seeks to demonstrate his own personal transformation. “I’m starting to embrace that light,” he said. He now allows himself to make more friends, be more social and get close to people. Many of the pieces that the merchandising apparel and textiles student makes also feature rips and tears, both of which make another personal statement for him. He wants to demonstrate a theory with these pieces: the idea that fashion is both an “escape” and a “cocoon.” “The ripped parts, the pieces that are hanging off, kind of represent that unfinished weave or that hole... that yearning to do exactly what you want,” he said. He recognizes that not everyone can do that they want to do or are


ISAAC COUCH THREADS A NEEDLE THROUGH FABRIC IN THE FABRICS STUDIO AT THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON MARCH 19, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

passionate about, and he feels that fashion helps accentuate both this escape and safe place where people can represent what they feel by the clothes they choose to wear. He said that the biggest challenge is knowing how much of himself and his personal struggles to reveal in his clothing, and he wonders if people will accept him after they see that side of him. “Yeah, I am emotionally connected to these pieces, so how much of myself do I give my audience when I’m posting on Instagram or whatever it may be?” he asked himself. “Do I tell the whole story? Do I kind of allude to it? Or do I just say ‘Hey, here’s a cool thing that I made’?” It’s an ongoing process for Couch, and one he is exploring more and more as he seeks the right balance. As for now, he said he will continue to learn and perfect his trade, trying to recreate the works of this favorite designers such as Kanye West, Fear of God and his current favorite, Tom Brown. His dream job used to be working and designing for a big company like Dior, but now he wants to someday own his own company and compete with his favorite designers. Persia Woodard, a merchandising apparel and textiles junior at UK who models a lot of Couch’s clothing, said she believes he can do it, too. “I feel like his work is New York Fashion Week material,” she said. “I definitely think his pieces will be on the runway someday.” Woodard and Couch began working closely together last

ISAAC COUCH TRIES ON A JACKET FROM HIS CLOTHING BRAND, COLOR-FUL, IN THE FABRICS STUDIO AT THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON FEB. 28, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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ISAAC COUCH POSES FOR A PORTRAIT IN THE FABRIC STUDIO A THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON MARCH 19, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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ISAAC COUCH WORKS ON A JACKET FOR HIS CLOTHING BRAND, COLOR-FUL, IN THE FABRICS STUDIO AT THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON THURSDAY, FEB. 28, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY

semester, after she invited him to be a student designer at a fashion show she was hosting. After his successful pieces at that show, she fell in love with his work. Now, she enjoys modeling his pieces for photo shoots and said they make her “feel like a boss.” Couch’s dreams of owning his own company someday became much closer to reality in March, when he was offered a full ride to SAIC (School of the Art Institute of Chicago), where he hopes to pursue a master’s degree and perfect his trade. The 100 percent tuition scholarship he was offered is through a new program called New Artist Society Scholarship, which offers certain students between 50 and 100 percent tuition waivers. According to the SAIC website, normal graduate tuition starts around $1,730 per credit hour, making it about $5,000 per class. For Couch, it would be free. “It makes me feel great,” Couch said of the offer. “To be acknowledged and accepted into such a competitive program with no formal education on design shows me that I’m on the right path, my work is meaningful and has great potential.” He added that the offer “reassures me to trust myself, my ideas and my process.” RIGHT: ISAAC COUCH POSES FOR A PORTRAIT IN THE FABRIC STUDIO A THE UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES BUILDING ON MARCH 19, 2019 IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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LOCAL NOVELTIES PLACES IN LEXINGTON TO FIND A GOOD BOOK BY BAILEY VANDIVER | PHOTOS BY MICHAEL CLUBB

“A town isn’t a town without a bookstore,” Neil Gaiman wrote in his novel American Gods. With many bookstores within its city limits, from national chains to locally owned independent shops, Lexington most definitely qualifies as a town. Each bookstore in the city has its own charm and personality, and these three offer a representation of the literary community in Lexington.

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BLACK SWAN BOOKS | 505 E MAXWELL ST., LEXINGTON, KY 40502

community seems very strong, though ike Courtney wanted his busihis lack of new books in the store keeps ness to be the first listed under him out of the loop a little bit, he said. “Used Books” in the yellow pages. He also wanted to have a good logo. He said he doesn’t know if it’s as This is how he landed on the name “Black strong as some of those established Swan Books.” writers he was talking about, such as Or at least that’s one origin story— he Berry, Ed McClanahan, Gurney Norsaid there are several. man, James Baker Hall and Bobbie Ann “I should’ve gone with The Angry AardMason— who studied at UK together vark, if I had thought about it,” Courtney and have the nickname “the Fab Five.” said. But he said there seem to be more Courtney started and incorporated Black people involved now in the Kentucky Swan Books in 1984. literary circle, and they seem like a tight “I went out and bought a book, and then group. more books,” Courtney said. “But I’m not as close them, simply Courtney, who attended graduate school because I am just not out as much as I at UK, had worked at UK in Special Colused to,” he said. “You know, I don’t go lections before “the money ran out” and he out and party after I close.” needed a new path. One recent Larkspur book that “I decided I better go find another way to Courtney would recommend to readers have fun,” he said. is The Essential Essays of Wendell Berry. Black Swan has a huge inventory— Another book he has in stock that he Courtney said he has no idea just how many said would be especially good for colbooks he has in his shop, plus more he has lege kids is Hiking the Bluegrass and Bestored away. But he said he probably carries yond by Valerie Askren. more inventory “by single title” than anyCourtney said making recommenbody else in town. MIKE COURTNEY, OWNER OF BLACK SWAN BOOKS, POSES dations is hard because it depends on He said the store has a lot of subject matter FOR A PICTURE WITH HIS BOOK RECOMMENDATION, “HIKE what a reader’s area of interest is; for that others don’t, such as a whole section on THE BLUEGRASS AND BEYOND,” ON FEB. 22, 2019, IN example, he personally reads mostly LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. philosophy and large sections on military his19th and early 20th century books. tory and horses. Courtney described the inHe said he can’t compete with Amazon Courtney said he thinks it harms a comventory as more academic, but not textbooks. and other bookstores in the city on most new munity to not have any physical bookstores, And the store does have a large literary sec- books, though he does carry new Larkspur though things like Amazon make things more tion, including rare books. Press books. “We’ve got some awfully good rare books Larkspur Press, owned by Gray Zeitz, is difficult for bookstores in today’s world. right now,” he said. While Courtney’s used book inventory is huge, he doesn’t carry many new books. The few new books he carries are typically written by his friends— which include many of Kentucky’s literary giants, such as Wendell Berry. He described those friends as “the established Kentucky writers.”

approaching its 45th anniversary, so it’s older than Black Swan Books. Courtney said he’s been carrying Larkspur-printed books since the beginning of his shop. “Either he called on me, or I called him,” Courtney said of the partnership between him and Zeitz. Courtney said he thinks Kentucky’s literary

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He said he knows a lot of bookstores are closing, but the thought hasn’t crossed his mind yet— even though his wife asks him every day. He said he’ll work at Black Swan Books until he feels like he can’t work anymore— or until he runs out of books. That won’t happen, he insists.


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WILD FIG BOOKS & COFFEE | 726 N LIMESTONE, LEXINGTON, KY 40508

n the year 2018, for the first time in the 21st century, the number of black-owned bookstores in the United States increased instead of decreased. Thanks to the community of Lexington, Wild Fig Coffee & Books helped that statistic by staying open. Back when Crystal Wilkinson and Ron Davis owned Wild Fig, community organizer April Taylor was a frequent customer. Now, Taylor is the co-founder of the Wild Fig worker-cooperative. Wild Fig opened in its current location on North Limestone in 2015; before that, it was located in Meadowthorpe. The pair announced the store would be closing in August 2018, but quick action from the community allowed it to reopen under new management just a few months later. Taylor was one of the first people to call for the community to try to purchase the shop. Some individuals were interested in purchasing Wild Fig, so Taylor and other members of the community had less than 30 days to come up with the $25,000 needed. “A lot of people who are paid to do that kind of work aren’t able to do that,” Taylor said. “So we kind of went into it thinking that we would at least be able to raise some money and that we would be able to give that to Crystal and Ron as a love offering for having provided this space to the community for so many years.” But what they were trying to do gained more and more attention, even on a national scale. Dozens of people from all over the country donated, Taylor said. A generous community member made it possible, Taylor said. Not everyone who pledged money was able to pay it all up front, so a community member loaned the future worker-cooperative the money at no interest. If the Wild Fig had closed permanently, Taylor said, Lexington would have lost an important organizing place. Black bookstores have historically been a place where communities organize, she said, and this made black bookstores a target of COINTELPRO, the counterintelligence program, in the 1960s. According to a February 2018 article in The Atlantic, then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover was worried about the rise of the Black Power movement. He wrote a memo instructing Bureau offices to beware of black independent

APRIL TAYLOR, CO-FOUNDER OF THE WILD FIG WORKER CO-OP, POSES FOR A PICTURE AT WILD FIG COFFEE AND BOOKS ON FEB. 25, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

booksellers because “black extremist bookstores… represent propaganda outlets for revolutionary and hate publications and culture centers for extremism.” Taylor said this targeting is one of the reasons that so few black-owned bookstores could be found across the U.S. Just a few years ago, the number was around 50 in the nation. Before she became involved with management of Wild Fig, Taylor said she was a frequent customer because it was a “really safe, affirming space” to do community work. “It would mean that I could spend time in a place where I know that I wouldn’t be subjected to microaggressions, or weird looks from people,” she said. “And it’s not really that Wild Fig is all black at any given time; it’s just that the people that you know are in the space are people who will affirm other people’s humanity.” That is partly why Taylor and others describe Wild Fig with two adjectives: safe and sacred. It’s sacred, Taylor said, because Wild Fig is “a way for us to put a stake down” in an area that is rapidly gentrifying. “Gentrification is going to happen, and we may not be able to completely stop it, but we can protect these spaces where all of us are welcome,” Taylor said. Taylor said Wild Fig’s food is very affordable— so that it’s “accessible to everybody in the neighborhood.”

She said many people in the neighborhood are in active addiction or are newly sober, or are sex workers. People who may have seen as a nuisance by others in the neighborhood can find a welcoming space at Wild Fig, she said. “I’m a lifelong Lexingtonian, and I’ve not found any other space like that where everybody, no matter what their ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or income, can walk in and feel just as valid as anybody else.” Taylor said that Wild Fig has a limited retail space for books, and they focus on a few important things when filling that space. First, Wild Fig aims to publish things published by local authors. Secondly, Wild Fig has an emphasis on books for kids. Taylor said they “make sure that there are books on the shelf that kids are able to see themselves reflected in.” Lastly, Wild Fig sports an activism section, which Taylor said is popular, that includes material on self-help and healing as well. Taylor said there have been many really cool moments since Wild Fig reopened, such as the addition of drumming circles, which she said is a great point of connection. “Also, too, these really simple moments…” she said. “That’s the thing that I think means the most to me, whether it’s drumming or just a regular Sunday afternoon. It’s the moments you step back and you see how much joy resonates for people in this space.”

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KATHY RATHER, OWNER OF UNIQUE BOOKS, POSES FOR A PICTURE AT UNIQUE BOOKS ON MARCH 1, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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UNIQUE BOOKS | 227 WOODLAND AVE, LEXINGTON, KY 40502

n 1998, Kathy Rather’s family was downsizing. This meant Rather had boxes of books— “cheap, trashy novels,” in her words. “And my kids were yelling at me and said, ‘What are you going to do with these books?’ and I said, ‘Oh, I’m going to open a bookstore,’” she said. “And I did.” That bookstore is Unique Books, located in the Woodland Triangle area. The cozy shop boasts shelf after shelf of general used books— from history to philosophy to mysteries to science fiction and more. Unique Books has been in its current location on Woodland Avenue, just a few blocks from UK’s campus, for 16 years. Before that, it was located on Buckhorn Drive, in a shop about a third of the size. “We reached the point either we needed to close or expand,” Rather said. Rather’s husband found the new location, and they sublet for six months to see if they could “make a go of it,” Rather said. Obviously they could, and Unique Books remains. The inventory has changed, though: Rather said that in their old location, they sold mostly mysteries and romance, while those genres aren’t big sellers on Woodland. “We’ve kind of had to change out our in-

ventory to suit the neighborhood,” Rather said. Rather said most customers come to a used bookstore when looking for older books. She said sometimes customers come in looking for a specific book, though they often call ahead of time— “letting their fingers do the walking.” Others do come in just to peruse the store, she said. She said that business has been “up and down” as things like e-readers and ordering books via Amazon have become more popular. But she said there is still value in printed books, both for authors looking to get published and for customers looking for a good read. “People that are true readers— I’m not going to say bibliophiles because that implies elitism— but if they’re true readers, they want to hold that book,” she said. And the benefit of coming to a bookstore for your reading needs means you can get the book immediately, she said. “You can come in and you can walk out the door with it and go home and read it,” she said. Rather said that instead of recommending specific titles, she likes to recommend authors or genres “based on what people come in asking for.” She gave several examples: A “little old lady” might walk in the door looking for cozy

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mysteries, while college students are less likely to be looking for those. A 60-year-old gentleman, she said, may be looking for westerns. In fact, a man walked into the store on this Friday afternoon looking for exactly that— when asked if he needed any help, he said he wanted “paperback westerns” and was pointed toward a section in the front corner of the store. Rather said that independent bookstores provide a service of supplying books to a community; additionally, they offer part-time employment for students. “I think also, it kind of goes into the shop local mentality,” she said, meaning shopping at locally owned businesses rather than big chains. Unique Books is nestled among other local businesses— like Shop Local Kentucky across the street and fellow independent bookstore Black Swan Books just around the corner. Rather said that Woodland Triangle is the oldest continuous shopping area in Lexington, with most of the buildings being more than 100 years old. Rather, a Chicago native, has lived in Kentucky for almost 40 years. She said she believes she moved to an area that appreciates literature. “I really and truly think it does,” she said.


TREATING EACH OTHER WITH LOVE SWEET BLESSINGS GIFTS CAKES TO LOCAL CHILDREN BY RACHAEL COURTNEY

Sweet Blessings cakes brings joy and creativity for anyone who volunteers there. Located at the corner of East Maxwell and Martin Luther King Boulevard, Sweet Blessings is the perfect distance from campus. Students can walk over and volunteer every Tuesday from 9 a.m. ‘till 9 p.m. Not only are you working to help give back, but you are also having fun doing it. At Sweet Blessings, cakes are made every Tuesday to give to children in the community who do not have the resources to make or buy their own. Children are able to choose what kind of cake design they want, and Sweet Blessings will make it possible. Sweet Blessings started in 2011 when founder Ashley Gann noticed that many children in poverty were not receiving a cake on their birthday. With three production facilities in Lexington, Harrodsburg, and Frankfort, Sweet Blessings has been able to make cakes for more than 11,800 children. Every birthday cake comes wrapped with a bow on top and a special birthday note to the child. Below is a Q&A with Gann. Q: How many staff/volunteers are a part of Sweet Blessings? A: I am the only staff member. We have hundreds of volunteers across our three production locations, delivery drivers, board members and others. On any Tuesday during the school year, we may have five dozen volunteers come and go in the Lexington location alone. Q: What are some events coming up that students can take part in? A: On May 5, 2019, we will hold The Great Cake Race 5K/1M. This is our largest fundraiser of the year. Last year we had 800 registered participants. Each year we celebrate the anniversary of our first cake by making cakes for as many qualifying children as possible in one day. Last year we made cakes for more than 150 children that day. People may register... and get more information on our website, www. sweetblessingscakes.org. Q: On average, how many cakes go out every Tuesday? A: Our volume changes a great deal. Last year we made cakes for close to 2,600 children. We are very comfortable making cakes for 50+ children every Tuesday. The most cakes we have ever made on a regular Tuesday is 72. Q: What inspired you to start Sweet Blessings? A: Wow! That is a very long story. Here is the much-abbreviated version. I have a master’s degree in public health and had a successful career in that field. God put cakes in my life, and my husband and I knew it was for a reason. It took several years, including a move back to Kentucky — I am from Frankfort — and a brief time in culinary school. I felt God telling me to “spend more time making a difference and less time making a living.” I didn’t know what that meant. However, when one day the pastor was talking about inner-city outreach in downtown Lexington, and I knew I was being called to use cake to reach children and families. I never really decided to start Sweet Blessings. I just woke up each morning and took the next step as God guided me. Our first cake was Feb 26, 2011.

PHOTO BY SYDNEY CARTER UNICORN CAKE PREPARED FOR A GIRL’S BIRTHDAY BY THE COOKS AT SWEET BLESSINGS ON JAN. 29TH, 2019.

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SPONSORED CONTENT

VISIT ‘NO SPECTATORS: THE ART OF BURNING MAN’ IN CINCINNATI THIS SUMMER

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CHRISTOPHER SCHARDT, NOVA, 2016. PHOTO BY RON BLUNT. THE ART OF BURNING MAN WILL HAVE ITS FIRST OPENING ON APRIL 26, 2019 AT THE CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM.

CHRISTOPHER SCHARDT, NOVA, 2016. PHOTO BY RON BLUNT.

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BY ARDEN BARNES

ave you ever wanted to go to Burning Man? The Cincinnati Art Museum’s “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” exhibit gives viewers the experience of the art of Burning Man months in advance of the cultural movement held annually in the Black Rock Desert outside Reno, Nevada. The exhibit will take over most of the Cincinnati Art Museum and explore “the maker culture, ethos, principles and creative spirit of Burning Man” through oversized sculptures, jewelry, video, and photography, according to the Cincinnati Art Museum press release. “Burning Man is one of the most influential movements in contemporary American art and design,” said Cameron Kitchin, Cincinnati Art Museum’s Louis and Louise Dieterle Nippert Director. “The artists, architects, designers and participants who gather at Black Rock City thrive in a democratic and inclusive model of artistic expression. Working with the thinkers and artists who create the culture challenges the very notion of a curated art museum.” “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” will be presented in two phases, with the first opening April 26 and the second June 7. Both phases of the exhibition will close Sept. 2, coinciding with the end of Burning Man. The exhibit is free to the public and multiple public programs will be offered to accompany the exhibit, the press release stated. The exhibition was originally installed in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery. After the presentation in Cincinnati, the exhibition will move to the Oakland Museum of California in October. The name “No Spectators” comes from a long-standing saying at Burning Man. “You are encouraged to fully participate. It’s all about being there, being fully present, and not just observing,” Aktinson said. “There are no outsiders. Everyone is part of the experience.” The exhibit features the artwork of multiple artists and designers who participate in Burning Man, including Candy Chang, Marco Cochrane, Duane Flatmo, Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Five Ton Crane Arts Collective, Scott Froschauer, Android Jones and Richard Wilks, the FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt and others, the press release stated.


KENTUCKY PROUD

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MEAT SCIENCE GRADUATE STUDENT MARLEE KELLEY, RIGHT, CARVES INTO A SLAB OF BEEF WHILE SENIOR ANIMAL SCIENCE MAJOR EMMA HORNEY AND MEAT LAB MANAGER BROCK BILLINGSLEY TAKE THE BEEF AND SHAPE IT INTO CUTS IN THE UK BUTCHER SHOP MEAT LAB ON MARCH 19, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

SPICY FAT CAT FOR THE WILDCATS UK BUTCHER SHOP KEEPS UK COMMUNITY WELL FED

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f you’ve ever had a Spicy Fat Cat at a UK sporting event, you unknowingly benefitted from a little-known feature of the University of Kentucky campus: the butcher shop, or “boutique,” as it is called, since it is only open part time. Located in the basement of the Garrigus building in the College of Agriculture, the sixyear-old shop sells fresh beef, pork and lamb from the UK farms in Woodford County and the Research and Education Center at Princeton

BY SARAH LADD | PHOTOS BY ARDEN BARNES

to the Lexington community. The animals are brought in from these locations and killed onsite under full USDA supervision. All proceeds from the shop go back into research for the college of agriculture. Shop manager Brock Billingsley, who graduated from UK in 2015 with a degree in community leadership and development and started working at the butcher shop in April 2017, said great emphasis is placed on making sure the animals feel no pain. They also

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work to ensure the animals don’t experience discomfort while they wait, doing so by keeping a rough floor so the livestock cannot slip and hurt themselves. Billingsley said the care for animals begins at the UK farms, where the animals are raised and fed based on the research done in the shop. However, department head Dr. Richard Coffey did not respond to any communication efforts from KRNL or requests to visit the farm. There are no preservatives added to the meat


the shop sells, and there is no waste, according to Billingsley. After the meat is separated, he said they sell the hides for leather and sell other excess for cosmetic products. “What our goal is is to teach,” Billingsley said. “We’re not just teaching kids, we’re teaching people across the state, across the nation who come here for workshops over the summer, cattleman’s meetings.” He said he loves that it’s not a “full-blown profitable business,” and he has always loved both teaching and meat science. “This is kind of a mix between my passion for teaching people who want to learn as well as meat science and doing a little manual labor and working with animals,” he said. “So, it’s a perfect combination for what I want to do. That’s a true blessing for me to be able to blend

all that. A lot of people can’t say that about what they do. So I’m very happy with where I’m at.” Billingsley has the help of a team of four students, and he said managing them is his favorite part of the job. Together, they research better ways to feed animals and to cook meat. The small boutique is only a small part of their work. Behind the scenes, there are classes and classrooms, research kitchens, a kill floor on sight where student workers help slaughter the animals, and freezers where they are able to dry age the meat for up to two weeks, unlike the 72-hour wet aging process that companies like Tyson implement, according to Billingsley. This practice in particular, Billingsley said, provides a better quality of meat for the shop than the average package you can buy in chain stores. The team that works with Billingsley includes

MEAT LAB MANAGER BROCK BILLINGSLEY PLACES BEEF STEAKS ON A TRAY IN THE UK BUTCHER SHOP MEAT LAB FACILITY ON MARCH 19, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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agriculture economics senior Emma Shelton, who in January was awarded UK student employee of the year; Luke Wilson, a senior who is studying individualized curriculum in agriculture with a focus on plant soil science and agriculture economy; animal science senior Emma Horney; and Justin Smith, a sophomore studying agricultural education. Shelton began working for the shop in 2017 and runs it’s social media. She said she puts focus on being engaging with her audience, which primarily consists of Lexingtonians as well as nurses and doctors from the nearby hospitals. Her active posts about the shop boosted the online followers and created a more engaged community. “I really enjoy getting to engage with the public like that,” Shelton said. “Getting to provide them something that brings so much enjoyment and so much happiness in their lives.” Wilson’s background includes being raised on a farm near Owensboro, so when he came to work in the butcher shop in January 2018, he already had experience. “I just kinda jumped in feet first,” he said.

STUDENT WORKER HARD HATS HANG IN THE BREAK ROOM AT THE UK BUTCHER SHOP FACILITY ON MARCH 19, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

He interacts with customers in the shop, but mostly works in the processing room and the kill floor. “I don’t see any more honorable stuff than providing food to people on earth,” he said, adding that he enjoys “providing a service to the community” and the learning experience it brings him as a student. Horney works with the USDA inspectors and with the final paperwork before the meat goes into the freezers. She said through working in the role, she has discovered that she wants to work as an inspector when she

STUDENT WORKERS SIT IN THE BREAK ROOM AT THE UK BUTCHER SHOP FACILITY ON MARCH 1, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

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graduates from UK. She also said that her time behind the scenes in the shop has given her more experience with the meat side of the industry. Horney grew up in 4H and FFA. “So I understood the growing and selling the animal process,” she said, but now she feels she has a better understanding of “both sides of an animal’s life.” Smith started working in the shop in January 2019 and said the class associated with the shop, Animal Science 300, was what originally sparked his interest in working with the shop. He said he knew some of the other student workers before coming to work in the shop, so he felt it was an easy transition. He hopes to someday be a high school agricultural teacher, and he said his time in the shop will help him toward that goal. “The experience I’m getting down here with meat science and food science is unmatched anywhere else, in my opinion,” he said. The shop is open to the public Wednesdays and Fridays from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m., and the workers hope in the future that more UK students will come there for their meat supply.


HOW DO YOU DEFINE

SUCCESS? BY BROOKE HORTON | PHOTOS BY JORDAN PRATHER

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY SOPHOMORE JACKIE HILL POSES FOR A PHOTO AT THE WILLIAM T. YOUNG LIBRARY IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

INTEGRATED STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS STUDENT TY’RELL BAKER POSES IN THE GATTON STUDENT CENTER IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

ACCOUNTING PROFESSOR CYNTHIA MILLER POSES FOR A PHOTO IN THE GATTON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

o strive for success can be a difficult task when you have a hazy view of what success is. Merriam-Webster defines success as achieving a goal, or as a degree or measure of succeeding. Whether it’s the classic American Dream or your own personal dreams, we all have our own measure of success. This is what makes us unique and what really sets us apart as people. At first, I wondered who would be a person who had thorough experiences with the highs and lows of success. None other than an athlete came to mind: Jackie Hill, a sophomore studying kinesiology and a member of the UK women’s swimming and diving team. She defined success as “achieving a goal you have set for yourself.” Anyone who has ever played a sport knows goal-setting is major. She said the best qualities of a successful person are “grit and perseverance.” Those are pivotal in success because life is tough. As everyone has heard, “If it were easy, everyone would do it.” We all need to use our grit to get through it because we are strong and we can make it. Hill said that her own personal best quality is that she is disciplined. Setting goals is important and making sure you are setting realistic goals is extremely important. Lastly, I wanted to know what advice she could give to us. “Be a go-getter,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to fail.” This is crucial advice for those in college, a time when we are trying to achieve one of the biggest goals that will shape our lives. We need to remember it’s okay to fail as long as we learn— because then success comes out of

failure. Ty’Rell Baker is the social/PR chair for Phi Beta Sigma of the Mu Theta chapter and is on UK’s National Pan-Hellenic Council as part of the External Program. Baker is studying integrated strategic communications with a creative path and wants to work in the creative side of advertising. His definition of success: being “the best I can possibly be at a given skill set.” I thought this definition was quite different because competition is great, but the best competition is with yourself. He said he thinks the best thing for a person looking to be successful is understanding that you’re going to fail sometimes. As much as we have talked success, failure is a big part of being successful. Baker also said, “I’m stubborn; I don’t like to give up.” I personally love this because if you have that edge to keep fighting, you will most likely win. It is not always the one who finishes first; it’s also who can outlast the other, whether in life, career or school. His advice for college students: “Have confidence even when you feel you shouldn’t be. Confidence is key, no matter what you’re doing.” He’s right: If you’re not confident in yourself, how can you expect others to be? This is a time where we are not only working for a degree or a job, but also figuring out how to market ourselves to the world. Cynthia Miller is an accounting lecturer at UK and studied at the University of Michigan. Her definition of success was “if one has a good sense of themselves and is comfortable in their skin.”

Miller continued with advice for students. “Find people that will cultivate you and help you grow…” she said. “Not in a selfish sense, but being surrounded by the right people.”

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My mom has always told me this, because the people you surround yourself with will affect your actions and behaviors, and it’s true that we are all influential more than we think. “There is so much variation in students but the major theme is to know when to stick it out or when to let yourself off the hook and knowing it’s not a complete failure,” Miller said. As I’ve learned, every failure is a learning experience. It’s truly a failure when you don’t learn from it and make the same mistake. Miller said her own best quality is “always learning and finding the bigger picture.” From these three success stories, I’ve concluded that you have to be persistent but also understand the old country expression “Cutting bait is the best solution.” It’s a fine line, and it takes a couple times to learn, but as someone who’s been learning more and more, success isn’t success without struggle. Life would not be fun or enjoyable if there wasn’t something that was hard about living it. You must work for the success; if not, it’s just given, and success should be achieved, not given. I think it’s harder every day in our generation to really define success; it’s all what you make it and how you want your life to be. My last note is passion isn’t always found. It’s like a diamond; it can be made. Swtart your own discussion about what success means to those around you to determine what success means to you.

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LET’S GO CLUBBIN’ TRY THESE CLUBS AT UK BY AUTUMN HASSELL

PHOTO PROVIDED BY BACKPACKING CLUB

BACKPACKING CLUB

For any students looking to become one with nature, the Backpacking Club is a great group on campus to help you get started in your quest. Created in 2017, the backpacking club has worked as an organization that allows students to easily participate in various backpacking trips at an affordable price. “There were some groups that do hiking or climbing but no one who focused on backpacking. We thought about how the Johnson Center offered trips but they were very expensive. Our goal was kind of to provide a group that could come together and get to know other people interested and backpack at a low cost,” said Kate Clowes, co-president of the club. The club rents gear from the Johnson Center before trips. Trips to

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the Red River Gorge are great for beginners, while longer trips to the Appalachian trail can be ideal from more experienced backpackers. For beginners who are interested, it is important to understand what all backpacking entails. “With hiking, you might leave all your stuff in your car, go out to walk a trail for a day, then come back at the end. In backpacking, you’re going to take a big heavy duty backpack and carry all your supplies in it. It’s a little bit more of an outdoorsy and rustic experience in general,” Clowes said. Cost for trips come down to gas and basic supplies you may need. Students can pick any trips they wish to participate in. Before each trip, a short informational meeting is normally held explaining more details on that route.


KENTUCKY KARANA

PHOTO PROVIDED BY KENTUCKY KARANA

Mixing a blend of eastern and western dance forms, Kentucky Karana enters its third year as the only South Asian dance organization at the University of Kentucky. In 2016, current president Sneha Rajan teamed up with some friends to create a team that would later perform at competitions in North Carolina, Pittsburgh and Louisville. Before the team was created, students at UK did not have the opportunity to practice this type of dance on a club team. “A lot of other big state schools have such a huge dance culture. Many kids from South Asian households have the opportunity to come to college and join that group to stay in touch with their heritage. We wanted there to be an outlet like that at UK as well,” Rajan said. The members of Kentucky Karana primarily practice eastern forms of dance, like Bharatanatyam, Bollywood and Bhangra. Western forms like hiphop and modern are also incorporated. Even students who are just interested in learning more about South Asian arts should take a closer look at joining this club. “You know no matter what is happening, whether it’s dance or school, you always have a group of people who will always have your back,” Rajan said. There is a $50 membership fee and fundraising is done to raise money for additional costs like travel, costumes, hotel costs and competition registration fees. Practice is normally held on Tuesdays and Thursdays for two hours.

COLLEGIATE CURLS

National organization Collegiate Curls made its entrance at the University of Kentucky in March 2018. While the club is fairly new at UK, it is a nationwide organization that works to empower minority students. “The purpose of this club is uplift and support multicultural students through minority support services, hair and health education services and community outreach,” said Jeliah Logan, UK president of Collegiate Curls. While the club has already grown from its first year, Logan still hopes to see Collegiate Curls blossom into a larger organization. “One of my goals for this club would be to expand our membership,” Logan said. “Right now we have 34 members but I’m hoping to get at least 100 by the end of 2020.” There is a $15 fee to join. Meetings are normally held monthly at the Martin Luther King Center, located inside the Gatton Student Center.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY COLLEGIATE CURLS

MINDFULNESS & MEDITATION CLUB

It’s no secret that college can be a stressful time. Whether your stress comes from long days, difficult course work or fear of an upcoming test, the Mindfulness and Meditation club will be a help to you. This club works as a support group for students who wish to take their minds off daily struggles. Club meetings can include a mix of mediation, discussion and, occasionally, yoga. “We meditate for about 15 to 25 minutes and then talk about mindfulness topics. We have a guided advisor, Lance Brunner, who comes here to help us through the meditation,” said Michelle Zhu, co-founder and vice president of the club. With the help of William Kushner, club president, executive members have worked to create a supportive environment where all students can feel comfortable in discussion and self-expression. “Frankly it’s just people with a shared mindset. Maybe we need to get away from the hyper-technology world. It’s a lot of people with ways of similar thinking so it’s a really good social group,” Kushner said. The club is free to join and meetings are held on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. in the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library. PHOTO BY JORDAN PRATHER

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INSTAGRAMABLE PLACES IN LEXINGTON 7 PLACES TO SPICE UP YOUR FEED BY RACHAEL COURTNEY | PHOTOS BY SYDNEY CARTER

North Lime Coffee and Donuts

North Line has many locations, but this one also has a mural where you can take pictures while enjoying your sweet treat. Abraham Lincoln Mural

One of the most famous Kentuckians! This colorful mural, done by Eduardo Kobra, is sure to add some life to your feed.

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Shop Local Kentucky

Before shopping their famous graphic tees and other wares, take a picture by this mural on the outside wall of the Shop Local KY. Kentucky Theatre

The Kentucky Theatre is a staple in downtown Lexington. It hosts a variety of events, including movie screenings and plays.


DV8 Kitchen

DV8 Kitchen is a perfect place for brunch, and it is located close to campus. There is a Colette Miller “Wing” mural that is perfect for your Instagram feed. Thoroughbred Park

Thoroughbred Park is located close to downtown and is home to bronze horses that represent Kentucky’s tradition of horseracing. NoBaked Cookie Dough

NoBaked has a wall just for taking pictures. The interior design of the shop is perfect for Instagram and is covered in millennial pink.

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PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER DRESS $66 ASCOT $8 EARRINGS $8 SHIRT $24 ASCOT $10 STREET SCENE

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RETRO REVIVAL T

INTRO BY ABBEY TEMPLEMAN

imes are changing and fashion is falling back in time into some classic styles. People are finding themselves drawn to the simple yet unique pieces that they can only find at their favorite thrift store. This has started the trend of people shopping at local consignment and vintage-inspired stores. This shift in style was not sudden. In fact, more “retro” styles have become more and more on-trend and you can now find new retro-inspired pieces in stores. For this photoshoot, we are styling with some pieces from the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s: bright colors, bold prints and good vibes. These styles are not hard to find. Here in Lexington, we found three stores where you can find a great selection of retro pieces. Street Scene and Pop’s both carry vintage styles from these decades. Each ensemble has a bold color to fuel the outfit. Also, every piece has a retro touch: a midi length skirt or possibly a daring slip dress. We used accessories found at these stores to help us finish off the outfit. Both sassy and sweet, cat eye sunglasses were the rage during this era. Funky earrings also give off the retro vibe. Accessories are a better way of adding your take on the vintage-style, so it’s important to find the ones that suit you most. However, just because you like vintage styles does not mean you have to drop the brands that you love. Many stores are producing pieces with a retro twist, as it is becoming an on-trend style. Free People is a perfect example of a blend between vintage and trendy clothing. Search for those bold pops of color or funky prints to fill your closet. People are incorporating vintage pieces from their favorite consignment stores with the hot, on-trend styles to create unique outfits that fit with the modern-age. Fill your closet with a few of these classic pieces and some bold choices to show off the new retro style.

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PHOTO SYDNEY CARTER TOP $40 EARRINGS $28 PANTS $78 FREE PEOPLE

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PHOTO SYDNEY CARTER DRESS $14 GLASSES $6 EARRINGS $12 NECKLACE $12 STREET SCENE

PHOTO SYDNEY CARTER SKIRT $98 TOP $30 JACKET $98 EARRINGS $28 FREE PEOPLE

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER TWO PIECE SET $40 GLASSES $6 HEADBAND $15 STREET SCENE PHOTO ABOVE JORDAN PRATHER SHIRT $18 GLASSES $8 STREET SCENE PHOTO RIGHT SYDNEY CARTER ROMPER $19.99 EARRINGS $6 SUNGLASSES $10 POP’S RESALE

SS PP RR II N NG G 22 00 11 99 || 77 77


PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER TOP $68 SCARF $18 JEANS $78 EARRINGS $38 FREE PEOPLE

PHOTO ABOVE SYDNEY CARTER DRESS $14.99 HAT $9.99 POP’S RESALE PHOTO RIGHT SYDNEY CARTER TOP $68 SCARF $18 FREE PEOPLE PHOTO FAR RIGHT SYDNEY CARTER CARDIGAN $16.99 JEANS $24.99 POP’S RESALE

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PHOTO XXXXXX XXXXXXXXX XXXXXX $XX XXXXX $XX VENDOR HERE

PHOTO JORDAN PRATHER SET $29.99 HAT $9.99 POP’S RESALE

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PARKETTE DRIVE-IN

A LOCAL TIME CAPSULE FOR CUSTOMERS

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very ‘50s fantasy includes checkerboard floors, vinyl seats and a jukebox ready to play a couple classics. A local time capsule has all of this, plus food to boot. The Parkette Drive-In has been a staple of Lexington, Kentucky, since 1951, when Joe Smiley first opened shop. According to the restaurant’s website, the West Virginian saw old Lexington’s open land as a prime location for a drive-in. The Parkette would become one of the first major businesses on that side of Lexington. With his signature “Poor Boy” double-decker hamburgers, Smiley was well on his way to creating a long-lasting business. And this still holds true more than half a century later. The Parkette is not just any old restaurant or a simple local favorite. It has become ingrained in the community and stands as a local landmark. In fact, it’s nearly impossible to miss the business, thanks to its signature sign. The 30to 40-foot red and green sign has been standing as a beacon on New Circle Road for nearly three generations. If the giant announcement of chicken, shrimp and fish boxes doesn’t beckon all passersby to stop in for a bite to eat, then the light-up car driving toward the carhop with outstretched food will. According to the website, the sign is worth nearly 10 times as much as its original cost of $10,000 and costs about $1,000 a year to maintain. But that seems like a small price to pay to uphold such a legacy. And upholding the legacy is exactly what coowners Jeff and Randy Kaplan planned to do when they bought the business in 2008 after it had been closed the previous year, according to the website. After working together for years in Jeff’s Subway franchises, the brothers decided to take on this new project for the sake of the Lexington community. The Kaplans are the fifth set of owners of the Parkette. “I thought it would be a great experience to own and operate such a landmark,” Randy said. “We wanted to save it and restore it to a retro ‘50s decor at the same time.”

BY AKHIRA UMAR | PHOTOS BY EMILY WRENN

The Parkette remained closed for eight months while the brothers conducted massive renovation and restoration. Though they did not disclose how much this project cost, Randy hinted that the face-lift cost “a ton.” However, thanks to the brothers’ efforts, the Parkette opened back up as “clean, fresh and full-service” and has remained so since. Customers who grew up using the original car port call boxes can still enjoy that relic while also reminiscing in the storefront when looking at the numerous dated blackand-white photographs covering the walls. A pinball machine, arcade game and a case full of old trinkets — like toy model cars and a Popeye lunch box — show just how dedicated the restaurant is to keep its original charm. However, the add-ons the business has acquired don’t take away from its authenticity. Younger customers are now growing up with the Kaplans’ added deck and patio in the back of the building. This seating area is much larger with classic car memorabilia and multiple garage doors. Jeff said in a HeraldLeader interview that the idea behind this design was for customers to be able to see the antique cars and motorcycles that often come through. The restaurant isn’t the only thing that went through a transformation; so did Randy. Unlike his brother, who has owned several Subway franchises for years, Randy had limited experience about this kind of business before diving in head-first. “I knew a little about the food business prior. I know a lot now,” Randy said. “It was not easy to obtain the experience I have now, but I was willing to learn and grow me as well as the business.” Though the Kaplan brothers brought change to the Parkette, some things remain the same, as they should. The menu has expanded since Smiley first created it, but the classics are all there. Smiley’s Poor Boy, fried chicken and chili cheese dog remain fan favorites, so much so that they’ve even brought local, national and international attention to the Parkette.

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The Parkette has racked up its fair share of acknowledgments and recognitions over the years. Just a few months after the brothers reopened the restaurant in 2009, the City of Lexington proclaimed Aug. 10 as Parkette Day.

IT WAS NOT EASY TO OBTAIN THE EXPERIENCE I HAVE NOW, BUT I WAS WILLING TO LEARN AND GROW ME AS WELL AS THE BUSINESS.

Randy Kaplan Co-owner of Parkette Drive-In

Randy said the most interesting thing about owning Parkette has been how invested the community is, as is evident in the city’s proclamation. He also said that many customers have expressed to him that they are “thrilled” that the Parkette was brought “back to glory.” About a year after Parkette Day was declared, Guy Fieri from Food Network’s Diners, DriveIns and Dives featured the restaurant and its three signature dishes on the show. In December 2013, the Poor Boy burger was voted fifth in the show’s top 10 of all time. This was such a notable achievement that Guy Fieri’s face can be seen throughout the restaurant to mark the occasion. Also in December 2013, the Parkette’s Hot Brown Burger appeared on the Rachael Ray Show. Randy traveled to New York to cook the burger for celebrity chefs Ray and Bobby Flay in front of a live audience. The Parkette has also been featured on the Secrets of Bluegrass Chefs TV show and


The Local Traveler, in which the latter won an Emmy for its segment on the Lexington restaurant. The Travel Channel’s Food Paradise has also filmed the Parkette, but that episode has yet to air. Most recently, the Parkette has been filmed for a German “reality style” TV show called Job Swap. The premise of the show, as explained by Randy, is two employees from a classic diner in Germany switch restaurants with two Parkette employees for three days, in which their work and leisure activities were recorded. Randy said the most rewarding part about owning the Parkette has been “saving a part of Lexington history as well as obtaining some celebrity status from all of the TV shows.” Nearly all of these accolades can be found on the Parkette’s website or on their menus in store. As far as future endeavors for the timeless restaurant, only time can tell. As Randy said, “The future is only as limited as the limits placed upon it.”

THE PARKETTE DRIVE-IN, ORIGINALLY FOUNDED IN 1951, WAS RE-OPENED IN MARCH 2009.

DINNER GUESTS AT THE PARKETTE DRIVE-IN ENJOY A SELECTION OF LOCAL FAVORITES AND ALL-AMERICAN CLASSICS.

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NEED A NAP?

TRY THESE TOP PLACES TO SLEEP ON CAMPUS BY ASHLYNNE ARNETT

Naps sometimes have magical powers: they can improve creativity, reduce stress, brighten your mood, and increase alertness. College students desperatley need these benefits. Our worlds revolve around homework, work, social lives and student involvement. It’s a tough task balancing mental health and being a college student. Some days we need a small nap to help us make it through the day. There is nothing worse than having a gap between your classes and having three hours to kill. Why not take a nap and get motivated within that three hours? Now there’s always the question, “Where can I nap when I’m stuck on campus all day?” No worries, we’ve done the research, and these are some of the best places for you to sleep on campus. WILLY T - SECOND-FLOOR CHAIRS There are many spots in William T Young to nap, but nothing can beat the second-floor chairs. They are moveable, squishy, have builtin desks, and are right next to a plug-in. What more could you want from a nap area? It’s not completely quiet, but enough to relax without being disturbed. And we can’t forget when the sun shines perfectly through the big Willy T windows! If you are looking to sit in the library without doing work, this spot is 10/10 for you. GATTON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS COUCHES

I have spent many of my days on the Gatton couches, but you have to be fast! Those couches go quick and wait for no one. You have to be brave to sleep on those couches with the amount of foot traffic the area gets in a day. The pros that come with it are getting free couch cushions as pillows and tables to put your feet on. Cons are you have to be able to sleep through loud noises at all times. Headphones can’t save you from the social hotspot that is Gatton. GATTON STUDENT CENTER HALLWAY COUCHES

The student center has many places to sleep, but the couches in the hall are the G.O.A.T. They have the perfect curve in the middle to rest your head on and are in the best location since foot traffic is non-existent in the hallways. If you are willing to risk serenity for comfort, the lobby that holds the piano is a cozy nap area, too. Anywhere in the student center can

PHOTO BY MICHAEL CLUBB

A STUDENT FALLS ASLEEP IN THE GATTON COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ATRIUM ON FEB. 18, 2019, IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY.

be a perfect nap area if you allow it. FINE ARTS LIBRARY

ideal nap location. Of course, you have to reserve/book a study room but why not get some homework done and then nap within

A secret gem on campus that few know

that allotted time? You can play music or

about is the Fine Arts Library! It is the perfect

Netflix out loud, turn the lights off, and it’s

place to study and nap. You could hear a pin

completely silent. If you are determined to get

drop throughout the entire library. No study

a good midday nap, this might be the location

room is needed when you enter the library

for you. You can find a study room in Gatton,

since everyone around you is silent. Which

Willy T, and the Student Center.

is why it’s a perfect place to nap on campus, snuggled up behind the bookshelves in the comfy chairs or on the floor. ANY STUDY ROOM ANY study room on campus can be the

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With greatness and hard work comes midday naps! Relax and take your mind off the million things you have to do and snuggle up in one of these five places on campus. We deserve the naps we think we deserve.


THE SCOOP ON

ICE CREAM AROUND LEXINGTON ARTICLE AND PHOTOS BY TORY STEPHENSON

There are plenty of great places to fill your cold cravings in Lexington, and my four go-to’s are all very close to campus.

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raeter’s, Sav’s Chill, One World Ice Cream and Cookie Shop, and Crank and Boom Ice Cream Lounge are all unique and have some of the best ice cream to offer! In the Chevy Chase shopping center, Graeter’s has been a staple for anyone looking to add a sweet treat as a dessert or craving a snack after a shopping spree. If you live in or around the Ohio Valley, you’ve probably been to one of these iconic locations. With classic creamy flavors like Butter Pecan and “Signature Chip” flavors, like my personal favorite Black Raspberry Chip, there is no way to go wrong. Many UK students are very familiar with the stretch of South Limestone containing Local Taco, Two Keys, sQecial Media, and more, but might not be familiar with Sav’s Chill, located across the street from Sav’s Grill, with the same owners. While this shop has very little sitting room, its best characteristic is its handmade gourmet flavors such as Ale-8-One and lavender. Make sure to stop by when you frequent other venues in the area.

If you’re looking for something truly different, check out One World Ice Cream and Cookie Shop on Waller Avenue. They’ve got plenty of options that are hard to find in other ice cream shops, with available Italian Ice — a great non-dairy option— Gelato, Bubble Tea and even Rolled Ice Cream. If you want to taste what you’ve probably seen on your Instagram Explore feed, One World Ice Cream’s rolled ice is some of the best and creamiest I’ve ever had. Last, but certainly not least, Crank and Boom Ice Cream Lounge is my favorite ice cream in Lexington, and it is also a Kentucky Proud product. It is a great place to go with your loved ones, with many special features like the upstairs lounge, bar seating, and even dessert cocktails for those over 21. The location in the industrial district lends to the aesthetic, and the unique flavors make this the spot to beat. You can find Crank and Boom’s main location on Manchester Street, and probably myself as well enjoying a scoop of their bourbon and honey.

PINTS OF ASSORTED FLAVORS OF ICE CREAM SIT IN A FREEZER AT GRAETER’S ICE CREAM ON EUCLID AVENUE IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, ON FEB. 26, 2019.

A SINGLE SCOOP OF BOURBON AND HONEY AND A CAKE POP ENJOYED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CRANK AND BOOM ICE CREAM LOUNGE IN LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, ON MARCH. 12, 2019.

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A KERNEL OF FRIENDSHIP

WHAT THE KENTUCKY KERNEL OFFERS IN ADDITION TO STUDENT JOURNALISM

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BY JILLIAN JONES

our years ago, I was embarking on my journey at the University of Kentucky as an 18-year-old freshman. Moving out of the house for the first time and living in a dorm with a roommate I’d never met was quite scary, to say the least, for such a homebody as I was — and maybe still am. Luckily I was in the Living Learning Program (LLP) for the communication college, so everyone on my dorm floor had something in common. Therefore, it was fairly easy to make friends. My roommate, McKenna Horsley, was a journalism major and had a lot of confidence in what she wanted to do throughout and even after college, so I’ll admit that I was little intimidated. I didn’t even know what my major meant at the time! As we were settling into campus and dorm life, K Week approached, so my roommate and I buddied up for the events. One of them was a cookout right outside of what used to be Bowman’s Den. A couple of students from the student newspaper came by to give us their spiel on why we should join them. McKenna had mentioned the newspaper before to me, but I didn’t ever think twice about it. She told me she was going to stop by their office, and I decided to tag along because I had nothing else to do. We walked into what seemed to be a musky, dungeon-like basement of the Enoch Grehan Journalism building — I still hear a different pronunciation of that building to this day — then took an immediate left into a large room, set up as a newsroom. Students at each computer worked and typed away, as a group of us piled in who were eager to get involved. I never considered myself a great writer — more of a visually creative person — so I was trailing along in the back of the crowd to let everyone get their chance to talk to the editor-in-chief at the time, Will Wright, about how they could start writing for the paper. Once Will was done talking to everyone, I heard a voice pop out from behind a computer screen, in a tone that sounded hopeful, but not too confident, asking, “Anyone want to design?” and my eyes and ears lit up. I jumped out from

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1973 PHOTO PROVIDED BY NANCY GREEN

behind my crowd and said: “Oh, me!” I believe I was just as shocked as the design editor was for volunteering myself so quickly. Little did I know what I was signing up for. The friendships, memories and professional opportunities it has led to not only for myself but for many others, too, are unforgettable and will last a lifetime. For instance, Nancy Green was the Kentucky Kernel adviser from 1972 to 1983, including when the Kernel received independence from the university. She said she remembers the very day it was granted. In her words, the “best day was January 20, 1972, when we became independent, and the best year at the Kernel.” To gain independence meant that the Kentucky Kernel was allowed to make decisions without the university’s editorial interference. During the ‘70s, the Vietnam War was in action, as well as the Kent State killings. College campuses nationwide were filled with protests, including UK. As the


Kernel staff members were trying to report on these incidents, their freedom to report was limited. Those at the Kernel realized it was time to break away from the university’s control. Green vividly remembers her first year under these new and restriction-less freedoms. The Kernel was allowed to keep its home space in the basement of Grehan, but she said it was still a year of surviving: “Pushing through 20-hour work days while not having printing operations on hand, functioning without university subsidy, having to drive the paper 35 miles away in the middle of the night, learning how to operate and repair the typesetting equipment, pasting up the pages of the paper column by column, but most importantly had the ability to make decisions without Univer-

The Kernel is the place where you find your people. Jen Smith 1997-1998 EIC of Kentucky Kernel sity editorial interference.” These challenges only made the newspaper and its staffers stronger. If the Kernel never gained independence, Green said that it would be “zapped off campus by some disgruntled president or trustees [and that] the Kernel would not be the strong, vigorous news source it is [today].” Green said that the Kernel did great things during this time, such as installing cutting-edge equipment and processes even before the local professional paper did. Kernel staffers also attended journalism conferences and shared their processes with the journalism school’s editing classes. “During the early years and beyond, the Kernel enjoyed a collegial relationship with the administration,” she said. “Dr. Singletary was supportive of the Kernel staff and their rights as journalists and he was a strong supporter of the First Amendment. Many UK presidents have been throughout the University’s history of the newspaper.” Across Kentucky Kernel history, so many

Producing some really kickass journalism. Will Wright 2014-2015 EIC of Kentucky Kernel

memories have been made that are considered a favorite, either personally or from a journalism standpoint. Becca Clemons, who was editor-in-chief in 2012-13, said she remembers when there was a weekend of deadly tornadoes that swept across Kentucky and Indiana, and they sent their teams to central and eastern Kentucky to cover it. Jen Smith, editor-in-chief in 1997-98 and current UK journalism school professor, met her future husband during her time at the Kernel. He was a staff photographer. Elizabeth Glass, 2013 design editor, said she remembers a humorous late night in the office when two staffers — Madison Gunter and Jonathan Krueger — were throwing a ball around and accidentally broke a ceiling tile. Damir Kocer, 2015-16 design editor, felt lucky to have a team of clever, kind and capable designers to help guide and work through the nights.

Producing “some really kickass journalism” is a favorite memory of Will Wright’s, who was editor-in-chief in 2015-16. Current editor-in-chief Bailey Vandiver’s favorite memories consist of sharing hot pepper cheese at Charlie Brown’s and a Disney World Kernel vacation after UK’s football bowl game in 2019. Lastly, my favorite memory was when we had another late night in the office in 2015-16 and someone had the great idea to recreate “The Walking Dead” timeline with our staff in place of the characters on one of the whiteboards. They got down to the details with what their best apocalyptic skill set was, how they got killed off in the show, and who survived based on their personalities. I have only witnessed four of the hundreds of editors-in-chief and two out of the many advisers of the Kernel, but each year we have continued to keep getting better, stronger, braver and more creative. Being a “Kernelite” has brought infinite amounts of opportunities to each person who has crossed its path, whether it be moving out of Lexington, Kentucky, to venture into the big city of New York, landing a creative director position in Chicago right out of graduation or landing a programming coordinator position at ESPN. Unanimously, the Kernel alumni I talked to said the decision that most shaped their lives were the friendships and quality work that was formulated from working here. Friendships, memories and skills are created and made that will last each Kernelite a lifetime.

If you want a career in journalism — or even a career that requires writing, editing and/or general communication skills — the Kernel will give you a crash course. There’s no better way to get experience while you’re in school. You’ll make mistakes and learn from them, and develop the skills you need to be a professional journalist. Plus, you’ll form friendships that will last long after you’ve graduated. Becca Clemons 2012-2013 EIC of Kentucky Kernel

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A WIDE SELECTION OF PIES ARE BAKED DAILY AT MISSY’S PIES.


MADE FROM SCRATCH HOW MISSY’S PIES BECAME A BELOVED LOCAL LANDMARK

A

BY RACHEL PORTER | PHOTOS BY EMILY WRENN

s I walked through the door of Missy’s Pies, memories of running around the kitchen in my Nana’s house, Sunday church lunch and family cookouts came to my mind. Yes, these moments can be cheesy, but they are memories that college students crave when away from home. This infamous pie shop on E. High Street brings back these nostalgic times for not only me, but for a lot of students at the University of Kentucky. The bakery’s journey began in 1989 shortly after the also famous Ramsey’s opened. Ramsey’s, Rob Ramsey faced the problem of not having enough time or oven space to bake more pies for the customers. After noticing a place for sale next to the restaurant, Rob and head cook Missy decided to open the pie shop there. However, the next day, Missy was spontaneously off to Connecticut, leaving Ramsey all alone in the pie business. But, with the help of Barbara Pollite, Ramsey made Missy’s Pies come alive. Pollite has been the manager and head baker for over 14 years. She was working at one of Ramsey’s restaurants when he called and asked her to run the bakery. Pollite said the bakery would not be what it is without old-fashioned word-of-mouth. “We try to put out the best product we can, so that being said, we use the best ingredients we can find...” she said. “I get a lot of UK students, they love pie so they definitely do us some business.” The popularity of the pies has even attracted people from multiple states. Pollite said some of her favorite memories at Missy’s Pies have been times when she’s had conversations with people who came from as far as Michigan just to try a slice of key lime pie. “Our pies have literally traveled all over the world,” she said. “ I’ve had people come in and tell me that they were in the airport in Atlanta and somebody offered to buy their Missy’s pie from them, sight unseen.” However, it takes a lot of time and effort for these pies to be created for everyone around the world to eat. Pollite starts her day at 4 a.m. with the longest and most difficult task: the merengue. “You have to make the pie (butterscotch, cream, lemon, etc.), let it set up, and then the next day we will merengue them and have to let them cool and drain before you can box them,” she said. Then she continues with the cream pies and works her way to the dry pies, like the Mayday or brownie pie. She and her six other employees put in numerous hours behind the scenes to bake the best pies possible. Pollite said she often works 24 hours a day for several days leading up to the holidays. With help from her grandmother’s recipes as well as her own, she is able to knock out the original pies quickly.

A SLICE OF MISSY’S CHOCOLATE-AND-PEANUT BUTTER COMBINATION PIE.

There is a reserved amount of seating in the shop, but the closeknitness is what makes the experience feel so homey and sweet. Julie Farral, a freshman at the University of Kentucky, described her first time going there just when she moved to Lexington. “They were very welcoming and so kind, all of them had big smiles on their faces and it was like a little, homey, type of place,” she said. Farral, like many other people, would have never stepped into the bakery if someone had not encouraged her to go there. In this generation, young people often go to restaurants just because they are seen as “trendy” through social media, but somehow Missy’s Pies is one of those magical places that does not need any of that to attract people. It is simply the warmth, tradition and deliciousness that puts all technology to the side and allows others to have a conversation over a simple slice of pie with no distractions. Anyone can have a special moment in Missy’s Pies. They are open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For non-pie people, there is also a lunch menu. Pollitte said the restaurant has Ramsey’s chicken salad, a pimento cheese sandwich, a teriyaki chicken sandwich and much more, including soups, for a reasonable price. There is no excuse not to go to Missy’s Pie Shop one weekend with a group of friends to dive into a slice of pie and support the local economy at the same time.

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ONE TANK TRIPS ADVENTURES YOU CAN GO ON WITH ONE TANK OF GAS BY LEANNA WILLIAMS | DESIGNED BY JILLIAN JONES

As a Kentucky native, a lot of times it can feel like there are no interesting places around. Being on campus the majority of the time, it can be easy to forget that there are so many interesting places within reach. Grab your squad, fill up your car and hit the road to these fun places that are less than a tank of gas away! LOUISVILLE, KY About 78 miles away is the big city of Louisville. It is home to many museums and a variety of fun places to visit. One is the Speed Art Museum, located right beside the University of Louisville’s campus and containing multiple art exhibits inside. Admission is between $10 and $15. Or wait and visit when it is free of cost, on every other Sunday. Other museums in Louisville include the Louisville Slugger Museum, The Kentucky Derby Museum, the Muhammad Ali Center and so many more.

MIDWAY, KY Midway is a small town about 14 miles away from Lexington. Basically, it is two strips of shops and restaurants surrounding a train track that runs down the middle. I visited Midway last October and it was perfect for a little day trip. Midway has a lot of cute boutiques and art stores to visit, as well as pretty scenery and backgrounds that are perfect for an Instagram post. While you are there, you can visit a popular restaurant called Mezzo Italian Cafe that has a variety of tasty meals and desserts.

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Newport/Cincinnati Newport/Cincinnati

Louisville Louisville

NEWPORT, KY / CINCINNATI, OH About an hour-and-a-half drive from Lexington, the Newport Aquarium hosts a multitude of sea life and exhibits. Even better, Newport is only 10 minutes outside of Cincinnati, Ohio, where there is plenty to do even if you just want to set out on foot and explore the city. There, you can catch a Reds game, go to the top of Carew Tower and see the whole city at once, or stop by the zoo.

Midway Midway Lexington Lexington

LEXINGTON, KY There are so many fun places to visit within Lexington. If you want to go shopping, we have Fayette Mall and cool thrift stores like Street Scene or Pop’s Resale. If you like exploring, you can go for a hike at Raven Run or visit the Explorium Science Museum downtown. We are home to a couple museums, like the Headley-Whitney Museum and the Aviation Museum. To add in the basics, Lexington has a bowling alley and arcade that is perfect for a little hangout with friends.

Red Red River River Gorge Gorge RED RIVER GORGE There are many places to hike that are close to Lexington, but Red River Gorge is a favorite. Red River Gorge is 56 miles away from Lexington, making it just a quick hour drive. The Gorge is home to a natural rock bridge, hiking trails, zip line tours and, best of all, Miguel’s Pizza. Miguel’s Pizza is a restaurant right near the Gorge that serves up the best post-hiking meal.

These are just a small fraction of fun places to catch around Kentucky. We live in a beautiful, historic and diverse state, so don’t let the limits of campus hold you back. Queue up these nearby locations for your next free weekend!

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AT CHOCOLATE HOLLER, GUESTS CAN SIP ON RICH CHOCOLATE FROM AROUND THE WORLD OR ENJOY A SPECIALTY HOT COCOA.

ESPRESSO YOURSELF

W

AT THESE COFFEE SHOPS AROUND CAMPUS

e all love our Starbucks coffee that is relatively the same no matter which Starbucks you go to. Here in Lexington, you can skip that generic coffees and adventure off to one of these local coffee shops less than a mile and a half from campus. The list of local coffee shops includes (in no particular order), Chocolate Holler, Coffea, North Lime Coffee & Donuts, Third Street Stuff and Coffee, Lussi Brown Coffee Bar, Common Grounds, Daily Offerings Coffee and Roastery, A Cup of Common Wealth, and last but not least, High on Art and Coffee. I couldn’t just give out a list of my favorite coffee shops near campus without giving you the low-down of each one of them before you go! First, we have Chocolate Holler. This little coffee shop has a lot of open-space with a variety of coffee choices and original drinks in

BY PRESLEY DOSS | PHOTOS BY EMILY WRENN

chocolate form. The atmosphere here is very welcoming, with the sweetest baristas and rustic scenery. It is calm and subtle and would be a great place to have a study session or a good conversation with friends. Coffea is a coffee shop right on campus. The atmosphere here is also very welcoming, with green tile squares covering part of the walls and lanky plants hanging from the ceiling. There are many options of what you can get here, ranging from brewed coffee, espresso’s, hot chocolate and a nice selection of café foods. The baristas are super welcoming and quick with making your coffee. North Lime Coffee & Donuts is located at the intersection of North Lime and West 6th Street. This small hole-in-the-wall coffee shop is loaded with sweet tasting yeast and cake donuts, along with a loaded menu full of brewed coffee, cappuccinos and an option to

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create your own specialized drink. This small but mighty coffee shop would be a nice spot to come chitchat with friends or study a little bit. When you pull into the parking lot of Third Street Stuff and Coffee, all you see is the colorful artwork on the outside of the building. The inside is just as bright and creative. The atmosphere is very welcoming and family friendly, with coloring pages for small kids and a lunch menu. The menu is huge, with coffee drinks, iced and frozen, along with a large selection of food. There are tons of seating options ranging from bar stools to couches and table tops. Lussi Brown Coffee Bar is near the courthouse downtown. It is a small shop that is more grab-andgo than sit-down. If you do decide to sit and stay a while, there are limited seats available. The coffee is good, with a small menu and not many food options, but this

is definitely worth a stop by to try out the coffee. The Common Grounds High Street location is a very unique and comfortable place. Unlike many other coffee shops, Common Grounds is a huge coffee shop filled with tables and couches, along with local artists’ artwork pinned along the walls. The menu is huge and has many options for food and coffee along with many different types of teas. This would be a great place to come to study or enjoy time with friends in a comfortable environment. Daily Offerings Coffee Roastery is downtown, across from Rupp Arena. The coffee shop is a very modern but welcoming open space. The menu is small but contains rich flavors. The baristas behind the counter are very welcoming and knowledgeable of their menu. The coffee shop has windows all around so it is a great place for natural sunlight and


NORTH LIME HAS A REGULAR SELECTION OF TRIED-AND-TRUE DONUTS, BUT INTRODUCES FUN NEW FLAVORS ON A REGULAR BASIS.

VISITORS OF A CUP OF COMMON WEALTH AND ITS SISTER SHOP, CHOCOLATE HOLLER, MAY PURCHASE A DRINK FOR A FUTURE VISITOR AND ADD IT TO THE PAY-IT-FORWARD WALL.

people watching. A Cup of Common Wealth has great character to it. The coffee shop contains a “Pay it Forward” wall, where people can prepay for drinks and hang up a note on the wall for someone to go pick from and get a free drink. The baristas are beyond welcoming and helpful to customers. The menu is huge and has many options. Last but not least, we have High on Art and Coffee. This small coffee shop has huge character. The menu is amazing with so many food and coffee options. The baristas behind the counter are so sweet and welcoming as soon as you walk into the door. There are a few circle tables to sit and enjoy your coffee or breakfast/lunch. Any of these coffee shops would be a great place to escape the hustle and bustle of campus life. Even if you don’t have anything to study or specific to do, take the time and visit these cute places to really get a feel of the amazing town we live in.

COMMON GROUNDS HAS A LARGE COFFEE AND TEA MENU, AS WELL AS A LUNCH SELECTION OF SOUPS, SALADS, SANDWICHES, AND MORE.

AT DAILY OFFERINGS COFFEE ROASTERY, ESPRESSO IS AN ART- SERVED ALONGSIDE DARK CHOCOLATE AND SODA WATER TO BRING OUT THE FLAVOR OF THE DRINK.

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SPONSORED CONTENT

NOT YOUR TRADITIONAL COLLEGE DINING ATHENIAN GRILL SERVING DYNAMIC FLAVOR

F

or the past seven years, Ilias Pappas has grown his passion and talent for serving others, and serving them well, through exceptional food experiences. It all started from a food truck. Since the start of Athenian Grill back in 2013, Pappas has built his operation on three core values: ethical, authentic and sustainably sourced ingredients from local farmers. Anything that comes out of the kitchen contains this promise and, better yet, the quality isn’t sacrificed from the high demand that is required from them. So students who’ve decided to leave their dining hall days behind them may want to reconsider once they experience the newest addition found at both locations of UK’s sit-down dining venues: Athenian Grill. Locally known for Greek/Mediterranean cuisine at its three Lexington locations, Athenian Grill is now bringing ethnic flare to traditional college dining. But if you looked at the students’ dining options a year ago, the journey to transform UK Dining as we knew it was just beginning. Administrators wanted to improve the student experience through the means of food, so in January, they began. When searching for restaurants to accompany the university during this transition, Aramark’s Resident District Manager on campus, Pulkit Vigg — who proudly introduces himself as a resident foodie — was drawn to

BY MACY HAGAN | PHOTOS BY EMILY WRENN

Athenian Grill’s values, mission, and what it had to offer the students at UK. As someone who emphasizes both food and community experiences, Vigg set out to combine the two and partner with local restaurants to deliver not only quality food but quality service and quality professionalism. After meeting the founding owner Pappas, he

his passion for food and people with Pappas, and agreed to bring him to campus once he discovered Athenian Grill’s food “looks good, keeps good, and tastes good.” When Athenian Grill first arrived at the University of Kentucky in fall 2018, Pappas and his team served students during lunchtime hours every other week at Champions Kitchen.

LOOKS GOOD, KEEPS GOOD, AND TASTES GOOD. Pulkit Vigg

Aramark Resident District Manager

Throughout the past semester, Pappas and his team of chefs have enjoyed that energy at the University of Kentucky and have set out to keep students engaged and eager. “We enjoy seeing the excitement on the students’ faces when they come in and see a new menu each day,” he said.

ILIAS PAPPAS PREPARES FOOD FROM ATHENIAN GRILLL IN CHAMPIONS KITCHEN ON THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY.

believed Athenian Grill was a perfect fit for the task. “Ilias is driven and hospitable,” said Vigg, who also noted that’s what caught and kept his eye. “UK is very fortunate to have this platform and we think it is very unique to the university. Having the ability to establish wonder and try new things never before done here all enhances the students’ experience.” All in all, Vigg says he can share

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Then they started serving dinner every other week at The 90. As their popularity grew, so did their presence on campus, as UK Dining offered them not one, but two, permanent stations. Now Athenian Grill team members are dedicated to delivering lunch and dinner cuisine every Monday through Friday at their Champions Kitchen and The 90 locations, as well as the “Spice” station in The 90.

Not only can you see the joy on students’ faces, but almost every day during lunch time, you can see the line of students waiting to be served by the Athenian Grill team. Pappas expressed his commitment to sustainability, serving students of the world, and pushing them to try new styles of food in the semesters to come. Pappas said that Athenian Grill and the University of Kentucky have an “evolving relationship that’s core value is customer service, quality of food, and dynamic flavor profile of the plate.” Overall, Athenian Grill has been able to achieve everything UK set out to find and more.


TOP: A VARIETY OF DISHES AVAILABLE FROM ATHENIAN GRILL AT CHAMPIONS KITCHEN ON THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY’S CAMPUS. LEFT: PAPAS AND A COWORKER PREPARE FOOD FROM ATHENIAN GRILL AT CHAMPIONS KITCHEN ON THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY’S CAMPUS. ABOVE: STUDENTS WAIT IN LINE FOR FOOD FROM ATHENIAN GRILL.

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PREPARED FOR CHANGE

KERNEL SENIORS READY TO FACE THE WORLD MAKEUP BY MAGGIE MARRS | PHOTOS BY JORDAN PRATHER

Our time here at Kernel Media is coming to an end and we are more than prepared for the world that comes after our May graduation. Thankful for the experiences and lessons we have encountered here, we have a mindset of ambition, innovation and progression to take on any adventure that comes.

KORIANA BLEVINS

JILLIAN JONES

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ABIGAIL FELDKAMP


• AVANT-GARDE • adjective: favoring or introducing experimental or unusual ideas noun: an intelligentsia that develops new or experimental concepts Merriam-Webster

SARAH LADD

MCKENNA HORSLEY

HANNAH WOOSLEY


CONTRIBUTORS

ALLIE KING LIFESTYLE EDITOR

JILLIAN JONES EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

ABIGAIL FELDKAMP FASHION EDITOR

BAILEY VANDIVER CHIEF COPY EDITOR

ASHLYNNE ARNETT BLOG EDITOR

JORDAN PRATHER PHOTO EDITOR

ABBEY TEMPLEMAN SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR

BRITTANY LYDEN CREATIVE DIRECTOR

RACHAEL COURTNEY KEY STYLIST

SYDNEY CARTER PHOTOGRAPHER

KORIANA BLEVINS WEB DESIGNER

LEANNA WILLIAMS SOCIAL MEDIA ASSISTANT

PRESLEY DOSS MODEL COORDINATOR

TORY STEPHENSON PHOTOSHOOT COORDINATOR

ARDEN BARNES PHOTOGRAPHER

AUTUMN HASSELL DESIGNER

RACHEL PORTER STYLIST

LINDSAY BAISAS STYLIST

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CONTRIBUTORS BEHIND-THE-SCENES

DESIGNERS

MAY MAY BARTON RYAN CRAIG ANDREA GIUSTI DAVID STEPHENSON

AUTUMN HASSELL JILLIAN JONES ALLIE KING BRITTANY LYDEN

WRITERS

MODELS

ASHLYNNE ARNETT EMILY BAEHNER LINDSAY BAISAS ARDEN BARNES KORIANA BLEVINS RICK CHILDRESS RACHAEL COURTNEY PRESLEY DOSS ABIGAIL FELDKAMP MACY HAGAN AUTUMN HASSELL BROOKE HORTON JILLIAN JONES ALLIE KING SARAH LADD BRITTANY LYDEN MAGGIE MARRS RACHEL PORTER TORY STEPHENSON ABBEY TEMPLEMAN AKHIRA UMAR BAILEY VANDIVER LEANNA WILLIAMS

SAMMY ARMATO NICK BRESLIN KAMAN CAMARA ISAAC COUCH OLIVIA DAVIS PRESLEY DOSS ALAINA EVERHART EMAN GHONEIM MACEY HAMMOND SHELBY HATCHETT BROOKE ICHINOSE PAIGE ISAAC BRYAN JACKSON DYLAN JOHNSON SYDNEY KAINE EMILY LINDON BRITTANY LYDEN COLLEEN MCKNIGHT ANDY MOUNTAIN MINA NAZIRUDDIN HOPE NOLAN TABITHA OLATOYAN KELLIE PATRICK RACHEL PORTER CODY POTTER TORY STEPHENSON EMILY TURNER MARSHALL WASHINGTON BECKY WANG LEANNA WILLIAMS KALEAH WILSON JACKSON YOUNG NEHA YOUSUF

PHOTOGRAPHERS ARDEN BARNES SYDNEY CARTER MICHAEL CLUBB HANNAH D’ERAMO ISAAC JANSSEN JORDAN PRATHER TORY STEPHENSON EMILY WRENN

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SPONSORS KRNL SPONSORS ATHENIAN GRILL 165 AVE OF CHAMPIONS LEXINGTON, KY 40508 859-327-8163 WWW. ATHENIANGRILL.COM

CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM 953 EDEN PARK DR. CINCINNATI, OH 45202 513- 721-2787 WWW.CINCINNATIARTMUSEUM.ORG

JAMESC BOUTIQUE 836 EUCLID AVE. #107 LEXINGTON, KY 40502 859-469-9374 WWW.JAMESCBOUTIQUE.COM

POP’S RESALE 1423 LEESTOWN RD. LEXINGTON, KY 40511 859-254-7677 POPSRESALE.COM

UK DENTISTRY UK CHANDLER HOSPITAL, DENTAL WING 800 ROSE ST. LEXINGTON, KY 40536 859-323-3368 WWW.UKHEALTHCARE.UKY.EDU/DENTISTRY

IN-KIND SPONSORS AJ’S CASUALS COTTON PATCH FREE PEOPLE LOGAN’S OF LEXINGTON

MACY’S MAHAN STUDIOS ONENESS STREET SCENE

Offering comprehensive dental services including: Dentures, Dental Implants, Invisalign, Urgent Care, Veneers, Whitening & More.

UKDENTISTRY.ORG 859.323.DENT

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A DIVISION OF KERNEL MEDIA UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY 338 MCVEY HALL LEXINGTON, KY 40506 KRNLMAGAZINE.COM FOLLOW US ON INTSTAGRAM @KRNL_LF LIKE US ON FACEBOOK @KRNLLF CONTACT US KRNLMAGAZINE@KYKERNEL.COM 859.257.6524

Profile for Kentucky Kernel

KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion • Volume 1 Issue 1 • Spring 2019  

The first volume of KRNL's new Lifestyle + Fashion magazine.

KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion • Volume 1 Issue 1 • Spring 2019  

The first volume of KRNL's new Lifestyle + Fashion magazine.

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