KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion Fall 2022 Magazine

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KRNL L I F E S T Y L E + FA S H I O N

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 1 | FALL 2022 FALL 2021 | 1


ON THE COVER PHOTO BY SYDNEY TURNER “LUCIDITY” VENDOR CALYPSO


KRNL OUR MISSION

The mission of KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion is to promote the individuality, creativity and uniqueness of storytelling by University of Kentucky’s students utilizing all of our publishing platforms. KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion strives to bring awareness to the stories that inspire us — through art, human interest, enterprise, investigative, health and well-being or recreation — on and around campus and throughout our community. Whether through words or pictures, our diverse staff invites, welcomes and embraces all perspectives, allowing us to bring to life a variety of stories that we want to tell. Produced and distributed in the fall and spring semesters on the campus of the University of Kentucky and throughout the city of Lexington, KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion aspires to be an important voice for our community.


KRNL L + F FALL ‘22 PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER 4 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


EDITORS’ NOTE W

hen we look back at the process of creating this semester’s issue of KRNL, one word comes to mind: drive. A drive to produce breathtaking fashion shoots that showcase the beauty and diversity of the Lexington community. A drive to tell the most interesting stories accompanied by eye-catching artwork to help you feel as immersed as possible. A drive to show off all the hard work and talent that this staff holds and to experiment with new ideas and techniques, because KRNL is always evolving and adapting as time moves forward. In this particular issue, experimentation was an important element that we dove into consistently. Our senior shoot “Cut it Out” plays heavily with design which highlighted our talented team of designers’ skills and gave them an opportunity to have fun. We also produced KRNL’s first ever photoshoot in black and white, which

was such an interesting project to work on that allowed us to approach our fashion process in an entirely new way. With all the experimentation that was done this semester, we are excited to be able to pave the way for future issues to continue this journey and to find new and unique ways to tell the stories of our community. As always, the staff of KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion has put their all into these 100 pages that you are about to dive into. To all of our readers, old and new: thank you. Thank you for taking the time to appreciate the work that we have put into this magazine and for supporting our creative endeavors. We hope that you feel driven, as we do, by the stories we tell and the artwork we produce enough that you explore your own creative side, or even the parts of the Lexington community with which you were unfamiliar before so that you get to know the beauty of this city in all its facets. This is truly our best issue yet!

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Allie Diggs

Gray Greenwell

Martha McHaney

Riley Hostutler

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LEAD PHOTO EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR

LIFESTYLE EDITOR

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16 ISABEL LADD’S LIFE IN COLOR Featured in Southern Living, HGTV and Better Homes & Gardens, Lexington-based designer Isabel Ladd shares her perspective on interior design.

42 ROBERT BEATTY AND THE PURSUIT OF WEIRD Lexington-based artist Robert Beatty, known for producing artwork for names such as Tame Impala, The Weeknd and Kacey Musgraves, discusses his passion for art and highlights his creative process.

50 HEAR ME ROAR

A mobile photo studio at Lexington Pride Festival highlights some of the faces and stories of the city’s LGBTQ+ community.

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34 LUCIDITY

Simplistic, classic and timeless were the themes for KRNL’s first photoshoot shot entirely for grayscale.

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8 CUT IT OUT

KRNL says a bittersweet farewell to our graduating seniors with a playful arts-and-crafts-esque photoshoot.

82 BELOW ZERO

The weather in Lexington may not be ideal for wintertime fashion quite yet, but who said that has to stop us?

KRNL L+F

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH UK COACHES

UK Athletics coaches reflect on their roles and experience with leading their exceptional Division I teams.

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THE HEALTH HUBB

Meet UK student Lindsey Hubbard and learn about her journey into naturopathic medicine.

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BREAKING BARRIERS AT NITROSONIC STUDIOS At NitroSonic Studios, a womenowned recording studio in Lexington, paths toward comfortable spaces for women in music are being forged.

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PLANTING THE SEEDS OF SUCCESS AT WILSON NURSERIES

Jennifer, Ella and Mary Catherine Wilson, co-owners of Wilson’s Nursery, explore how their late father’s legacy influences their drive to succeed in the plant business.

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CUP OF KRNL

THE PROOF IS IN THE DISTILLERIES

Discover four of Lexington’s many coffee shops and learn about their specialty drinks created in collaboration with KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion.

Stakeholders in Kentucky’s distillation, wine and brewing industry discuss the impact their businesses have had on the state.

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MORE THAN A MARKET: SUSTAINABLE FARMING FROM THE WOMEN OF APPALACHIA How three women found life through sustainable farming in Eastern Kentucky.

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MICRO-TRENDS, MAJOR IMPACT ON FASHION Fashion minds discuss speedy trend cycles and the state of fashion today.

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it

WRITTEN AND DESIGNED BY ALLIE DIGGS, ABBEY PURCELL & EMME SCHUMACHER “Cut it Out” challenged our design team to showcase our seniors uniquely. It was a balance of not distorting the photos too much but also playing with design in a shoot like we haven’t done before. It took a lot of trial and error and late nights to create our vision. Senior shoots have become a significant part of KRNL, and this is a kind sendoff and thank you to all their hard work over our issues. We also would like to thank the photography department at SA/VS for allowing us to use their space for this shoot. Cheers to these members who are graduating this semester. We will miss you!

PHOTOS BY LILY FOSTER AND SYDNEY TURNER

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PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER

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STREET SCENE EARRINGS WEARHOUSE BLAZER TROUSERS 60’S FAUX LEATHER PURSE BRA CALYPSO HEELS

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STREET SCENE ELECTRIC BLUE BODYCON DRESS EGG NECKLACE CALYPSO FEATHERED CROPPED BLAZER ‘JESS’ CHAIN HANDLE PURSE PLATFORM BLACK HEELS

PHOTO BY SYDNEY TURNER

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PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY WEARHOUSE LIGHT BLUE HAGGAR MENS TROUSERS VTG WOOL IZOD LACOSTE CARDIGAN

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PHOTOS BY OLIVIA FORD


LEFT CALYPSO PLATFORM BLACK HEELS GREEN BUTTON DOWN BLACK PLEATHER CORSET STREET SCENE ACCORDION BLACK MAXI-SKIRT RIGHT CALYPSO BLACK MINI COWGIRL BOOTS WYOMING BLACK VEST STREET SCENE SATIN CREAM MIDI SKIRT

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PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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Isabel Ladd reviews an outdoor fabric sample she recieved of her first custom pattern in on Monday, Aug. 22, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

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ISABEL LADD’S LIFE IN

WRITTEN BY OLIVIA SANDERSON | PHOTOS BY SYDNEY TURNER

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rom what once started out of a closet to now being a showroom and office space, 36-year-old Isabel Ladd has shown her dedication to her art and her design work, right here in Lexington. Ladd’s love for arts and crafts began in school during her art classes and has yet to waver. Starting at a young age, she was dedicated to school, saying she “never missed a homework assignment.” Ladd was also business-minded from a young age, starting two businesses out of her parents’ closet, “Arts and Asks” and “Crazy for Color.” Ladd has always appreciated a clean and organized space. She described how she would clean her room and change her sheets in her childhood home before the cleaning service would come and then leave a note asking them not to touch the room because it was “already perfect.” From that drive for an appealing aesthetic came a blossoming business

of interior design in Lexington. Ladd opened her current showroom in March 2022. She now works with contractors and her own employees to completely transform clients’ spaces. Prior to opening her own business, Ladd earned a degree in textile design from Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles. While living in her college home, she experimented with maximalist design ideals as she found personal ways to decorate her space. “I’ve always gravitated towards bright prints and colors, even when I was in college when my friends and I moved into a rental house. I asked if we could paint the walls… it was sunshine yellow, like marigold yellow with hot pink polka dots and then just crazy layers of stuff,” Ladd said. Ladd draws from her Brazilian roots and gravitates toward an array of colors, patterns and organic materials like raff and seagrass in her designs.

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“If you were to spend your budget on [a] room, the room you use the most, it could become like your most joyous and happy room,” Ladd said. Despite her maximalist style, she still maintained minimal clutter in her home. Her aspirations for a “clean” home carried into her adulthood when she had two children, Oliver and Theo. For her two years as a stay-at-home mother, she would present her home in a way that would have people question that she had young kids because it was so clean and put together. After seeing Ladd’s home, her friends began calling and asking for help with their own spaces. Ladd described her eye for design as “innate” and enjoys pushing the boundaries of the normal eye to see something more than a typical color scheme. In that way, she also stressed how having children should not deter anyone from decorating how they like, especially with bright colors and patterns, no matter how eccentric. “I think it’s about having a beautiful space that you love, that makes you feel good, that makes your family feel good,” Ladd said. Going from being a full-time mom, Ladd started by doing small projects as a designer. In the beginning, she used her mom’s credit card to buy things for her clients and even had them write checks to her mom, paying her back as she grew her client base. Having hired business coaches and listened to podcasts about the design field in the early years of her career, Ladd has improved her business as she grew in experience.

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Ladd continued to expand and hone in on her design style. She started her business by going with what the client wanted, and nine years later she’s more comfortable. Abiding by her three mantras, “More is more, less is a bore,” “Mix and don’t match” and “Beige is not a color,” Ladd continues to strive for the best for herself and her clients. Using a process to assess her clients’ goals for a space, she uses her specific style to meet and exceed their expectations. A multitude of vibrant hues, patterns and materials is a tell-tale sign a room is designed by Ladd, whether it be pink grasscloth wallpaper and a large white heron art piece or striped walls with toile pillows on the couch. •

I think it’s about having a beautiful space that you love, that makes you feel good, that makes your family feel good.” - ISABEL LADD

LEXINGTON-BASED DESIGNER


Isabel Ladd poses in her downtown showroom in on Monday, Aug. 22, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

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Isabel Ladd shows off one of her favorite pieces in her showroom space on Monday, Aug. 22, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

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BEHIND THE SCENES WITH

UK COACHES

WRITTEN BY JUSTICE McKINNEY | PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN BRANHAM

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eing a coach at the University of Kentucky goes beyond winning games and conquering championship titles. UK’s various sports teams are brought up by men and women who have committed their all into building the Big Blue Nation and shaping the best possible student athletes. Kentucky’s athletics has a reputation decadeslong for being a Division 1 sports program. UK’s new stunt team head coach, Blair Bergmann, holds high honor for being a member of the athletics department. “To be a Kentucky team, there’s a certain standard to be at, and that’s the best. No matter the sport, we all strive to have the greatest teams,” Bergmann said. Coaches not only see their players develop from start to finish of their respective seasons, but they see the dedication that is put into aiming to win. “Being at UK has given me the privilege to be a part of the best gymnastics conference in the country and having those challenges day in and day out and working against the top,” said Kentucky’s gymnastics assistant head coach Chad Wiest. Wiest is entering his second year of being a coach at UK and is anticipating their upcoming season. When he became part of the Big Blue Nation, Wiest had the opportunity to witness the difference Kentucky has from any other university. “Coming to UK as a new coach was exciting. I was able to feel the environment and rush the girls had even at practice and the culture that has been created,” Wiest said. The fan base the University of Kentucky has built over the years hasn’t ceased to amaze him. “You don’t see that at every university or with every team, and it was something I couldn’t wait to be a part of.” The reputation UK sports has doesn’t deter the coaches whatsoever. They have learned to embrace the challenges that are accompanied by their roles and expectations. Bergmann said, “Pressure’s a privilege. If people don’t expect the best from you, then they’re not expecting success.”

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Kentucky has opened the door for all their sports teams to compete with the best of the best. When teams aim to prosper by building their strength, in playing against universities within their division, Wiest sees this as “iron sharpens iron.” Coaching at UK has proven not to be all about aiming for perfection in performance, but molding young adults along the way. Kentucky alumna Dawn Walters is the head coach of the dance team. With her constant dedication to the members of the team, Walters has opened a new perspective of her career. “Coaching is not a 9-to-5 job. It’s not a profession where you can just come and go that allows you to leave your work life separate from your personal life. It’s a 24-hour commitment,” Walters said. Spending the amount of time with the dancers on her teams, she couldn’t help but develop a “motherly style of coaching.” “I tell my kids all the time, this is a life venture, not just a dance experience. Lessons will happen that won’t have a thing to do with dance but affect your lives in the strangest of ways.” Niya Butts, the associate head coach of the women’s basketball team, finds her life being altered by her players as much as she changes theirs. “If you’re allowing yourself to be fully invested as a coach in what’s happening on and off the court, it’s pretty much impossible to not be affected by the players around you,” Butts said. Considering the amount of time and energy that has been dedicated to the players of the team and even possible recruits, Butts can’t help but be impacted as well. “I’m constantly experiencing personal growth and different outlooks on life by witnessing some of the challenges these players go through,” she said. Regardless of the sport, every coach shares a universal experience. Kentucky’s dance team head coach Dawn Walters confirmed, “[My team is] my rock just as much as I am theirs.” •


“Coaching is not a nine to five job. It’s not a profession where you can just come and go that allows you to leave your work life separate from your personal life. It’s a 24hour commitment.” - Dawn Walters UK Dance Team Head Coach

“To be a Kentucky team there’s a certain standard to be at, and that’s the best. No matter the sport, we all strive to have the greatest teams.” - Blair Bergmann UK Stunt Team Head Coach

“If you’re allowing yourself to be fully invested as a coach in what’s happening on and off the court, it’s pretty much impossible to not be affected by the players around you.” - Niya Butts UK Women’s Basketball Associate Head Coach

“Being at UK has given me the privilege to be a part of the best gymnastics conference in the country and having those challenges day in and day out and working against the top.” - Chad Wiest UK Gymnastics Assistant Coach

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BREAKING BARRIERS AT

NITROSONIC STUDIOS WRITTEN BY AVERY SCHANBACHER | PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY

Studio owners Danielle Barkman, Abbi Buettner and Leah Arrington pose for a group photo at NitroSonic Studios on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

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here are around 30 women-owned recording studios in the United States, and one, NitroSonic Studios, happens to be right here in Lexington. The three owners, Danielle Barkman, Abbi Buettner and Leah Arrington, share their perspectives on women in the industry and music-making in the Bluegrass. “It’s long been an old boys’ club,” Arrington said. Buettner said that women make up only two percent of the sound engineering business. Common explanations for this gender imbalance vary from a supposed lack of female interest in sound engineering to familiar social barriers that can amplify inequality in competitive fields. Regardless, the three owners of NitroSonic share a passion for the recording industry, and together they help musicians to realize their hard work. Arrington has played guitar and recorded her own music since she was in high school. She recalled playing into fourtrack cassette recorders and working her way up to producing a CD with her band. Today, said Barkman, “you can get started on next to nothing.” She cited resources like GarageBand and video calls that allow artists to collaborate across distances as examples of how accessible making music has become and how technology has opened new possibilities that would have been “crazy to think about 20 years ago, with a studio.” “We were all recording with whatever we could get our hands on over the years, wishing we had access to this kind of thing. When that absolutely insane idea of buying the music studio in 2018 pops up, I didn’t even have a choice,” Barkman said. She is a drummer as well as a producer. rt

We are constantly pushing each other and lifting each other, and I want other people to be able to find homes like that in the industry.” - ABBI BUETTNER STUDIO MANAGER

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For sound engineers everywhere, local artists are not only clients but inspirations as well. “You can’t throw a banjo without hitting a good musician in this area,” Barkman said. The team lamented the lack of venues and audiences for the abundance of talent that calls Lexington home, the latter of which could be partially due to a lull in concert-going caused by the pandemic.

Chromosomes don’t have a lot to do with sound.” - DANIELLE BARKMAN STUDIO MANAGER

But they also acknowledged the ways in which they hope to serve those local music communities by providing access to more advanced recording technology and connections to artist-focused record labels. “You don’t get this eclectic of a mix of music anywhere I’ve ever been or lived. You can go from one bar to the next all night and just see different styles, different things, and it’s amazing,” Barkman said. “I would love to see more inspired women coming into the industry,” Buettner said. “I’m so

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inspired to have a team like Danielle and Leah. We are constantly pushing each other and lifting each other, and I want other people to be able to find homes like that in the industry.” She also explained that the shared struggle between female sound engineers and recording artists to get where they helps develop a sense of compassion within the industry which fosters collaboration and understanding. “For some of our artists we’ve created a space that they feel safe and comfortable enough in to be the most vulnerable versions of themselves because that’s what music is,” Buettner said. “It’s a constant exchange of trust and emotion and vulnerability and just strength to put this stuff out together.” The owners agree that no matter what obstacles face them, they are committed to having a presence in the recording industry, and not letting anything get in the way of their passion and drive to make music and help others do the same. “We’re small but we’re mighty,” Buettner said. It’s a phrase that’s applicable to many people in fields they may feel outnumbered in. “Stick your feet in doors and don’t take them back out again,” she added. Worn out ideas of who should and shouldn’t be doing something aren’t stopping any of these trailblazing female-led studios. Barkman said, “Chromosomes don’t have a lot to do with sound.” •


NitroSonic Studios, located on the second floor of a newly-renovated historic building, houses recording equipment for incoming clients on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, in Lexington, Ky. FALL 2022 | 27


MORE THAN A MARKET: SUSTAINABLE FARMING FROM THE WOMEN OF APPALACHIA

WRITTEN BY HALLIE LINTNER | PHOTOS BY CARTER SKAGGS

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lex Petit begins each morning with a ritual. Consuming medicinal mushrooms and milky oats, Petit prepares for a day of farming herbs with reverence. Petit is one of several female farmers tucked away within the hollers of East-Central Kentucky, using plants to empower and engage community members. The Red River Gorge Farmers Market (RRGFM) provides these farmers with a space to meet consumers face-to-face and form connections. The market, open from May to October, hosts several small businesses from surrounding counties and provides goods ranging from fresh vegetables to herbal tea. It is located at the Slade County Welcome Center on Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Petit is a familiar face at the market and can be found set up next to Sarah Barney, owner of Among the Oaks, a medicinal herb farm located in Beattyville, Kentucky. Petit and Barney want to continue the rich history of herbal medicine within Appalachia and provide people with an alternative to pharmaceuticals. Petit is a self-described “hippie” who centers her life around holistic health and spirituality, but it was not always this way. In 2008, two days after graduating high school, Petit started basic training at the United States Air Force Academy. After graduating, Petit spent four years stationed in Mountain Home, Idaho. Following this, she spent two years at the Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. After being in the military for 10 years, Petit retired on June 17, 2018. Reveling in her newfound freedom, Petit said she began backpacking around the world, traveling everywhere from Nepal to Nuevo León.

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Red River Gorge Farmers Market vendors Emily Foster, Whitney Hamblin and Alex Petit pose for photos behind Hamblin’s flower stand on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2022, in Slade, Ky.

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The selection of vegetables and herbs from Revival Ridge Farm was bought out by the farmers market goers on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2022, in Slade, Ky.

Revival Ridge Farm owner Emily Foster sells her vegetables at Red River Gorge Farmers Market in Slade, Ky. every Saturday during the season. 30 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

“I was really enjoying the adventure of travel but realized it was not filling my cup completely. These same things kept following me no matter how exotic my life got. I didn’t feel complete fulfillment,” Petit said. At the start of 2020, rock climbing led Petit to the Red River Gorge where she instantly fell in love. Petit said she began her “plant journey” by foraging wild ginger, chanterelles and morels from the forest floor. It was then that she noticed how healing plant medicine could be. Shortly after, Barney needed another set of hands at Among the Oaks, and Petit was hired. Among the Oaks provides dried herbs, teas and tinctures. They believe that plants hold the key to health and strive to provide high-quality herbs ethically- and sustainablysourced. Emily Foster, owner of Revival Ridge Farm, holds true to these same values, selling highquality, locally grown produce. Foster, Petit and other female farmers can be found laughing and sharing plant knowledge on sunny market mornings. They have even joked about getting matching leather jackets for their “big girl squad,” Foster said. Foster, with a zeal for sustainable agriculture and social justice, said she always had her heart set on having a farm. After attending Miami University and graduating with a degree in environmental science and sustainability in 2017 and working on several farms, Foster said she was more than prepared for her own agricultural endeavor. In 2020, Foster began her first growing season on half an acre within Muir Valley.


Among The Oaks Herb Farm booth manager Alex Petit serves homegrown, homemade tea at the stand at the Red River Gorge Farmers Market on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2022 in Slade, Ky.

I feel like I can say with confidence, for the first time in my life, I think I will wake up every day excited about this.” - WHITNEY HAMBLIN

OWNER OF HOLLER HOME FLOWER FARM

Foster named her farm Revival Ridge due to its geography and history as well as her personal journey. “Our property is located on Tar Ridge Road, a gorgeous ridge line filled with magical forests, bedrock streams, waterfalls and dreamy old barns. The field where we grow was most likely a tobacco field until the ‘80s and hayed ever since,” Foster said. “Moving to Eastern Kentucky and starting my garden was in many ways a personal revival. My love for the land and growing things was restored at such a deep level.” Outside of selling at the market, Foster currently has a 15-person community-supported agriculture program, or CSA. Individuals can sign up for a weekly subscription of vegetables and other garden goods. Foster hopes to continue expanding this program in future years. Largely supported by the prominent climbing community within the gorge, Foster said she believes there is no lack of enthusiasm or demand.

Revival Ridge is also open to visitors. Individuals who stop by the farm are often encouraged to pick what they desire for free or at little charge. Foster said she hopes to continue making farm-fresh food accessible to people within Appalachia by accepting Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits at the market, implementing a sliding scale option for her CSA program, opening a donation-based farm stand, and more. Whitney Hamblin, owner of Holler Home flower farm, explained how Foster and other seasoned RRGFM sellers have made her first market experience a pleasant one. “This will be their second season working the market and they have been super welcoming, kind, and generally helpful. During the market, if you are struggling to do something, like set up your tent, they just stop what they’re doing and come over and help you, you don’t have to ask,” Hamblin said. FALL 2022 | 31


Moving to Eastern Kentucky and starting my garden was in many ways a personal revival. My love for the land and growing things was restored at such a deep level.” - EMILY FOSTER

OWNER OF REVIVAL RIDGE FARM

In her childhood, Hamblin said she fell in love with the film and novel “The Secret Garden.” Little did she know, she would grow up to sow seeds of her own. Tucked away in Irvine, Kentucky, lies Holler Home — a one-acre flower farm owned and managed by Hamblin. Hamblin said she has always loved being outside. In 2016, Hamblin completed the Appalachian Trail — a 2,000-mile hike beginning in Georgia and ending in Maine. Two years later, Hamblin set off for Brazil, where she finished a 21-day survival challenge broadcasted on the television show “Naked and Afraid.” Throughout all of this, Hamblin said the thought of flowers lingered in the back of her mind. “I always kept finding myself dreaming about them or looking for some way to incorporate them into what I was doing,” Hamblin said. She moved to Irvine in March 2021 to act as a caretaker for her parents and their 122 acres. “The opportunity presented itself and I realized that I had all of the space I could ever want to make things grow. So I just decided, okay, let’s do it. Let’s throw some seeds in the ground and see what happens,” Hamblin said.

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From there, Hamblin broke ground on Holler Home, growing a variety of flowers such as zinnias, sunflowers and black magic scabiosa. “I feel like I can say with confidence, for the first time in my life, I think I will wake up every day excited about this,” Hamblin said. Hamblin sells at the Red River Gorge Farmers Market but has plans of expanding to multiple venues in 2023. She also offers cut-your-ownbucket opportunities on-site as well as arranging services. Within the next couple of years, Hamblin said she would like to offer bespoke arrangements for weddings. She would love to see bridal parties come and pick their own bouquets. Hamblin hopes to aid brides in moving away from commercialized aspects of weddings and refocus the experience on love and connection. “What’s something we can do together that’s meaningful and creates memories and teaches people things and gets them outside? That’s what I want. I want to get people outside with the bugs in their face and the sun in their hair and remind them that they are very much a part of this,” Hamblin said. •


Holler Home Flower Farm owner Whitney Hamblin puts together a handpicked bouquet for a Red River Gorge Farmers Market customer on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2022, in Slade, Ky.


luciditY WRITTEN BY MARTHA McHANEY In my second semester as Lead Photo Editor and Photographer, I had high hopes of continuing to challenge the artistic possibilities of KRNL’s conceptual output. Through fine arts education, black and white storytelling has consistently been a staple in my practice; it strips the subject matter from all distraction with the intent of highlighting form, texture and humanistic simplicity. I wanted to incorporate this timeless, intimate approach into the collaborative force of our brilliant creative teams, and I am endlessly proud of the result. It is with great honor that we introduce KRNL L+F’s “Lucidity,” the magazine’s first ever black and white print content. Loosely inspired by photographer Stef Mitchell’s approach to capturing his subject matter, the overall production leans into the aesthetic of zine styles; abstraction, angularity and repetition are presented with the help of its layout and beautifully simplistic subject matter. This shoot perpetuates intentionality with wearable material, the relationship between human and space, and the softness of realistic capture. Thank you to our beautiful models for sharing their time and to our staff for the tireless work in helping bring this vision to fruition: incredible design, styling and coordination went into this concept that speaks through the photos. Thank you to Kristen Tatem at LightBox Studio for graciously allowing the KRNL team to utilize their space for this project. Lastly, I want to give a special thanks to our photo team. I am always taken aback by their talent and dedication to their craft, and this shoot in particular really speaks to their skillset and artistry. I hope you, the viewer, will find delicate meaning in this cover-worthy shoot just as much as we do.

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CALYPSO DRESS TANK TOP TROUSERS

PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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CALYPSO MATCHING SET CORSET

PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY

CALYPSO SHIRT VINTAGE THERAPY PANTS

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PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER


PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY

PHOTO BY OLIVIA FORD

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PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER FALL 2022 | 39


VINTAGE THERAPY BUTTON DOWN JEANS

PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER

VINTAGE THERAPY BLAZER PANTS

PHOTO BY SYDNEY TURNER 40 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


STEEL MILL & CO. DRESSES

PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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Robert Beatty poses for a portrait in his home studio on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022 in Lexington, Ky. 42 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


AND THE PURSUIT OF WEIRD WRITTEN BY GRAY GREENWELL | PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY ART PROVIDED BY ROBERT BEATTY

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obert Beatty described attending The Weeknd’s sold-out concert at Los Angeles’ SoFi Stadium in early September 2022 as “absolutely surreal.” Though The Weeknd’s show was cut short when the singer lost his voice, Beatty still spent the evening awestruck — he stood among tens of thousands sporting “Dawn FM” merchandise that featured his artwork. Beatty saw his designs on sprawling stadium screens as well as T-shirts sold by bootleggers on LA streets, the latter of which he joked was much cooler than it was alarming. “I’ve never been in a situation where so much of my artwork was just staring at me,” Beatty said. While his art hasn’t ever confronted him head-on quite like it did that night in LA, Beatty and his work are no strangers to international attention. The 41-year-old Lexington, Kentucky-based artist and musician has spent the past decade growing more and more indemand after being commissioned by music industry titans like Tame Impala, Kesha, Kacey Musgraves, as well as bands and acts like The Flaming Lips, My Morning Jacket and Oneohtrix Point Never in addition to lesser-known and independent acts to create album and single covers, posters, merchandise designs and tour visuals. Beatty’s illustrations have also appeared in publications like The New York Times, The Atlantic, Surfer Magazine and The New Yorker. Raised in Nicholasville, Kentucky, not far from Lexington, Beatty aspired to become an artist and create comics as a kid, but didn’t necessarily grow up around art. Aside from his art classes in school and an aptitude for drawing, Beatty said much of his early exposure to art was limited to watching his mother make dolls and paint knickknacks, using a wood burner that he would occasionally tinker with. FALL 2022 | 43


Robert Beatty’s home studio on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

In a pre-Internet era, Beatty was without today’s limitless connectivity but said he developed his taste and found inspiration by watching cable TV, citing MTV’s uncanny, experimental animation showcase “Liquid Television” and the public-access stations that plugged him into various artistic and musical niches as driving influences. “[These stations] were totally different, just this weird window into another world that is easy to take for granted now because you have access to pretty much everything, but back then it was pretty important,” Beatty said. As Beatty grew older, Lexington became a source of creativity. After graduating high school, Beatty and his friend Trevor Tremaine started volunteering at the University of Kentucky’s student-run radio station WRFL, which Beatty said he had listened to for several years prior to joining. At WRFL, Beatty said he and Tremaine met the hosts of radio shows that played the so-called “weird music” they were both into, and eventually, they all started to play music together. Enter Hair Police — the experimental noise band started by Beatty, Tremaine and their fellow radio show hosts in 2001. Just as inspired by the inspiring weirdness of Japanese noise and free jazz bands as they were Van Halen, Beatty said, Hair Police was born out of the friends’ desire to merely enjoy themselves, though their moderate success would eventually follow. 44 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

“We were just trying to make the most fucked up music we could, just [creating] chaos … We were trying to mash everything together and do something that was fun more than anything,” Beatty said of Hair Police. Armed with their distorted, eerie sound that incorporated traditional rock instrumentation in addition to electronics and tape manipulation, Hair Police released several albums under various labels which garnered the band a cult following and sent them on multiple tours across the United States and Europe playing in bars, clubs and houses, including a spell opening for noise rock pioneers Sonic Youth. Beatty quipped that “people did not like” Hair Police when they opened for Sonic Youth. Be that as it may, the artist still credits touring as a gateway into his career now. “[Touring] was how I started meeting people. I’ve been in Lexington this whole time, but getting out and traveling and meeting like-minded people was really important and directly responsible for what I’m doing today,” Beatty said. “There’s people I still work with today that I met touring noise music.” Along with Hair Police, Beatty played with Tremaine and their friend Spencer Yeh in another experimental noise band, Burning Star Core, on top of creating and releasing his own music under various monikers like Three Legged Race. It was during this time of touring and releasing, from 2001 to 2006, that Beatty’s career as an artist began to take shape. Because of his graphic inclination, Beatty


said he did most of the artwork for whatever Hair Police was putting out, whether it be cassette or small CD and vinyl releases. Additionally, Beatty would create flyers for WRFL as well as art for Burning Star Core. It wasn’t until 2009 that Beatty began doing artwork for projects he was not directly involved with. These included artists who had previously heard of Beatty’s work along with bands and musicians he met through touring and at shows — most notably Daniel Lopatin (Oneohtrix Point Never), who would be the one to connect Beatty with The Weeknd over a decade later, he said. In 2015, Beatty’s career reached new heights when he was commissioned by psychedelic alternative act Tame Impala to create the now instantly-recognizable, mind-bending artwork for their landmark third studio album “Currents.” Beatty’s work for “Currents” was his first done with a major record label. “[That artwork] was kind of the one where I was like ‘Oh, I could make a living doing this if I do it the right way,’” Beatty, who had formerly worked as a janitor and construction worker to support himself while touring, said. Two years later, in 2017, Beatty was commissioned to do the album artwork for Kesha’s GRAMMY-nominated album “Rainbow” and The Flaming Lips’ “Oczy Mlody.” In the time since, Beatty has arguably become one of the most sought-after figures in the realm of art and music, known for his airbrushed, unearthly style, which he said is inspired by the likes of Alan Aldridge and Japanese graphic designer Tadanori Yokoo. Beatty’s home office, acting as a source of creative inspiration itself, is lined with art prints, old monitors and sound equipment, shelves of records (many of which he designed the covers for) and a plethora of books. He pulled a large one off his shelf — “Codex Seraphinianus” by Italian artist and designer Luigi Serafini, an illustrated encyclopedia written in an imaginary language, which

Beatty said has had a significant impact on his work. “That book was a huge influence on me … it definitely gave me a kind of direction,” Beatty said. “It was a miracle that crossed my path.” He pulled another book off the shelf — his own, “Floodgate Companion,” a monograph of his art originally published in 2016, though since out of print. Beatty described the book as “something that feels like it’s from another world” and said he’s been trying to get it back in print. In fact, “otherworldly” is a word that Beatty uses to describe all of his art. “Across all of the things that I’m doing, that’s a little bit of the goal, to make it feel like it’s from some other time or place,” he said. To transport viewers and listeners to said worlds, Beatty uses a combination of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, and while his creative process has evolved over the years, he said his work always starts with drawing.

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“Everything I’m doing kind of goes back to art for his “Dawn FM” album cycle — the artist has at drawing in some way,” Beatty said. When he started times found navigating the requests that hit his inbox out, he drew on paper then scanned those pieces into difficult and the pitches bands and musicians make his computer or drew in Illustrator and Photoshop for commissioned art unappealing. “I think it’s nice when you can tell [an artist] has a with a mouse, humorously saying, “What was that? How did I do that for so long?” It was only a few years slightly deeper understanding of what I’m doing and ago when Beatty transitioned to using a Wacom what I’m interested in,” Beatty said. Today, over half a decade after the release of drawing tablet for his art. Beatty said his airbrushed style involves building “Currents,” Beatty said potential clients still request up shapes and making the composition, then similar art for their own music, and while it remains going through and working on shading and color. one of his most famed works, he has no interest in He explained this isn’t too different from physical replicating its style nor does he think he’d be able. “There’s a lot of people that come to me and airbrush art, which is made by masking off shapes they’re just like, ‘I love the Tame Impala album cover,’ and spraying shading and color. Regardless of his methodology, though, Beatty’s and I’m like ‘Cool, but I did that already, and I’m not philosophy surrounding the creation of album covers going to do it again,’” Beatty said, laughing. “That came together in just the remains the same, no right way, and I couldn’t do matter the musical I’m always going to be making that again if you asked me to.” genre. Beatty said one perk “Make [record art whether I’m making money of being an in-demand covers] that’ll invite doing it or not or if anybody artist is that he’s able to be you in, where pays attention or cares.” more selective about his you’ll have some work, passing on major expectation of what it’s going to sound - ROBERT BEATTY label musicians because he like or that make you LOCAL ARTIST AND MUSICIAN didn’t feel confident about the commission and turning curious as to what it down bands who ask for sounds like,” he said. Beatty cited the cover he did for indie folk artist album cover art in two weeks. “How long did you work on this album? Two, Christian Lee Hutson’s 2022 album “Quitters” as a prime example of this. He said it’s “one of the best three years?” he teased. When Beatty is racking his brain for ideas for an covers I’ve done in the past couple of years” because it nails the dark but humorous emotion of the record album cover, he said it’s nice to be able to take a break and play music for a couple of hours or work and its somber sound. But as Beatty’s clientele has grown further with a different graphic technique. “There’s so many different styles that I have that I outside of the small niche in which he began creating — with pop giants like Kacey Musgraves enlisting him can switch gears and do something that’s a little more for her “star-crossed: unveiled” tour visuals and The automatic than drawing or trying to come up with an Weeknd commissioning Beatty for nearly all of the album cover,” he said.

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A 2019 illustration by Robert Beatty for The New York Times.

Robert Beatty performs with Jeanne Vomit-Terror in support of Eastern Kentucky flood relief on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2022, at Al’s Bar in Lexington, Ky.

An illustration by Robert Beatty for Tate Etc. Magazine’s Autumn 2019 issue.

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Across all of the things that I’m doing, that’s a little bit of the goal, to make it feel like it’s from some other time or place.” - ROBERT BEATTY

LOCAL ARTIST AND MUSICIAN

Promotional poster by Robert Beatty for The Weeknd’s “After Hours Till Dawn” tour.

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Additionally, the easygoing pace of life in Lexington has proven itself fruitful for Beatty, who said there’s plenty here to immerse himself into when he’s not creating art for commission. “I’ve never felt like [Lexington] was a cultural wasteland,” he said. “There’s always enough to keep me entertained.” The artist said he prefers working in the background, and in the relatively quiet Lexington, he’s able to do so. “I like [the idea of] the Wizard of Oz behind the curtain, turning the dials but nobody sees,” he said. Beatty’s comfortable life in Lexington has afforded him the opportunity to not only pursue art but also music here, which he said he missed when COVID-19 closed down venues. When he’s not working on graphic art, Beatty enjoys performing his experimental noise music under the name Ed Sunspot at locales like Al’s Bar and The Green Lantern. “Most of the time I’m playing to 20 people,” he laughed. “But I love doing it and I love playing music with my friends, and I can’t imagine not doing that.” Looking forward, Beatty said he would like to try to do more for himself after finding tremendous success in creating art for others. “I’d like to put out a new record. I haven’t released any new music in a long time, and I’d like to make another book and some videos or do art shows,” he said. “[I’m] just trying to get back to doing more stuff that feels like my art instead of part of someone else’s art.” Reflecting on the past decade, Beatty said he never thought he’d be able to make a living with his art, nor did he ever plan for this to eventually become his career. “I never really had a goal in mind other than making the coolest, weirdest thing I could,” Beatty said. “I’m always going to be making art whether I’m making money doing it or not or if anybody pays attention or cares.” •


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HEAR ME ROAR

WRITTEN BY AMANI KAJTAZOVIC | PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY KRNL set up a mobile photo studio at the 2022 Lexington Pride Festival to highlight queer voices in the local LGBTQ+ community. Our pride piece is a reflection of KRNL values which aim to promote inclusivity and diversity at the University of Kentucky and in Lexington.

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Brownie the dog poses for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022.


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ith a lion’s head backpack, glitter decorating their naked chest, and a white tank with cutoff blue jeans as an attempt to cool down in the dreadful heat, Brian Neal and their pack of friends share a similar fashion and reason for being together. “Pride is love,” Neal said. At the end of every June, Lexington hosts the annual Pride Festival at the Courthouse on North Limestone. On this beautiful yet sweltering day, there is a moment when it seems that all of Lexington has come together in celebration. The local businesses and small vendors are filled to the brim with customers clamoring to quench their thirst and hunger with wine and tacos, and singers and dancers are performing on a stage that overlooks the entire festival. In their small groups, the people of Pride chatter amongst themselves, playing music on the sweet summer grass and laughing while kissing each other’s open mouths. People at Pride felt a sense of freedom, and a true, genuine one, that allowed for playing guitar on the grass or walking bare-chested in the street without the worry of being asked to cover up in modesty and leave in shame. With wild hair, sweaty bodies and glittery faces, they were a community who wanted to share their stories. Jay Johnson, sitting on the grass next to their cousin, was new to the Lexington queer scene and was surprised at the festival’s turnout compared to what they have experienced in their hometown. “In Henderson, people ask for your pronouns in a sarcastic way. They make fun of you, whereas here in Lexington, people are genuine. They really want to know,” Johnson said.

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Justin Thompson, Makeveionia Woodall, Ty Carpenter and Brian Neal pose for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022. Myann Davidson, a young straight woman wearing a matching yellow crop top and skirt set, shed some light on why Pride is so well-attended in Lexington. “It depends on which part of town you are in, but there is a united queer community,” she said. “Nobody wants to be left out, so they all include each other within themselves. Pride is including everyone, making everyone feel like they have a purpose and making everyone feel loved. Everything is a spectrum, and Pride makes them aware that they don’t have to conform to what someone else tells them to do.” 52 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION

Pride is including everyone, making everyone feel like they have a purpose and making everyone feel loved.” - MYANN DAVIDSON


If you accept me, then I love you; if you don’t, I hope we will meet at another time when you do.” - SEAN AYER

Nick Miller and Sean Ayer pose for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022.

Neisha Hunter made a point that she also enjoys the event as a straight and cis-gender woman. “Pride is a celebration! For me, celebration from afar, I want to share this space, but I understand this a safe space that is not directly made for me, but it still is accepting of me, and that is what pride is all about,” Hunter said. Pride is a reflection of the queer community in Lexington, said Burley Thomas, office manager for the Lexington Pride Center. Thomas said that LGBTQ+ people are part of the Lexington’s overall scene, not just the Pride celebration, something he has noticed while working at the center. “We have disability groups that are queer-focused, anti-racist groups that are queer-focused, outreach groups that are queer-focused, and we facilitate space for queer groups looking for a space to share a space,” he said. Thomas said that he can see this attitude taking hold in other communities, albeit more slowly. “I’m from Harlan, and it’s not somewhere I think of accepting or supporting, but they had their first Pride parade today. We don’t even have that! And I’m sure it was 50 people, but courageous people who demanded space.” Thomas said this can strengthen queer communities so they don’t rely on Pride Centers to exist. “We have queer musical festivals, open bars here in town, queer art shows, downtown is very queer eccentric. There is queer space.” FALL 2022 | 53


Pride is community. Pride is friends. I have friends that are closer than my own blood. That is just the way it is. Just because they are your blood doesn’t mean they are necessarily the best part of your family.” - KELLY KING

FORMER LEXINGTON PRIDE FESTIVAL BOARD MEMBER AND COORDINATOR

Burley Thomas poses for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022.

Lavender Black walked around Pride with platinum purple highlighted hair and a purple bodysuit to match, and said it was nice to be able to be herself. “I am from Greenup, and there is barely any diversity there,” Black said. “When I first came out, I didn’t have anybody to talk to, and here in Lexington, I can be myself. We shape our reality. In the last 50 years, we have come so far in gender expression — not just in Lexington, all over.” She looked around her with open arms, gesturing to everyone passing by. “I can go outside and see a guy in makeup, and I can see myself in him.” Young attendees of Pride spoke of the older generation needing to catch up to the times. “As much as we respect our parents, we could definitely educate them more about contemporary issues. They need to be responsible and more aware of what has changed, what is different from when they

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were growing up,” said Joseph Stuart, who was wearing holographic sunglasses while he bobbed his head to the music, surrounded by his friends. Kelly King, former Lexington Pride Festival board member and coordinator, said sometimes Pride events and gatherings of like-minded people can be comforting for those whose family just doesn’t understand. “Pride is community. Pride is friends. I have friends that are closer than my own blood. That is just the way it is. Just because they are your blood, doesn’t mean they are necessarily the best part of your family,” King said. Having friends and a shared experience doesn’t necessarily make people the same. Nick Miller sat on a communal white couch, watching a musical duo’s acoustic performance. His arm was wrapped around his ex-boyfriend, Sean Ayer, who swayed his head to the music.


Kelly King poses for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022. FALL 2022 | 55


Melinda Spaulding poses for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022.

When I first came out, I didn’t have anyone to talk to, and here in Lexington, I can be myself.” - LAVENDER BLACK

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“We are many common people in a diverse group, and it is a demanding thing to try and pigeon hole into one person to speak for all of us,” Miller said. Ayer had a similar philosophy. “That’s why we are queer. That doesn’t make us different; that just makes us our own person. We are not trying to push it on other people,” he said. “If you accept me, then I love you; if you don’t, I hope we will meet at another time when you do.” •


Lavender Black poses for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022. FALL 2022 | 57


Jay Johnson and Robin Almestica pose for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022. 58 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


Jaylynn Garner, Isaiah Clinkscale, Neisha Hunter and Myann Davidson pose for a portrait at Lexington Pride Festival on Saturday, June 25, 2022.

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T he

bb Hu

alt h e H

Holistic wellness through the lens of 20-year-old Kentucky student Lindsey Hubbard

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WRITTEN BY NIKKI EDDS | PHOTOS BY ABBEY CUTRER

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indsey Hubbard sits in the corner of her living room and lights incense before opening the caps on her supplements for the day. She makes a neat pile of the Vitamin D, B-12 and Wellness Formula before swallowing them all in one fell swoop with her chai tea latte with flax milk. While the 20-year-old is studying business management at the University of Kentucky, she spends her free time preparing herself to someday become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine. Hubbard said that further formal education will train her as a primary care provider that treats a patient’s disease or ailment by encompassing all aspects of the mind, body and spirit. Her supplements are just one aspect of all that Hubbard said she does each day to nurture her well-being. While on her journey into naturopathic medicine, she said she has greatly shifted not just her diet and fitness but also her views on education, the world around her and what it truly means to be healthy. “Naturopathic medicine focuses on treating the root cause of illness or disease in a patient by using alternative remedies powered by the wisdom of nature,” Hubbard said. “Overall, we use patient wellness as the main principle in treating the patient in order to promote disease prevention and a healthy way of living.” However, what it means to be well can vary from person to person. Hubbard described wellness as being able to walk through each day feeling strong, energized and prepared to leave a positive impact on the world by the end of it. “To me, it’s living in ease and flow and feeling abundant in my life. Feeling happy, feeling content,” Hubbard said. When this sense of wellbeing is disrupted, whether that be in the form of physical, mental or spiritual illness, Hubbard said traditional medicine aims to directly address a patient’s unwanted symptoms to heal them. Naturopathic medicine attempts to do the same while also focusing on prevention throughout this process, she added. For example, Hubbard said she recently had what she presumed to be an ear infection that she treated with garlic oil and a massage therapy technique called reflexology. Her goal was to use this course of treatment as a way to boost her immune system as opposed to taking an antibiotic that may kill any present bacteria, including the helpful kind that our bodies need. In addition to treating her external symptoms, Hubbard said she has found that at times like these, it is crucial to hone in on caring for herself, even if that means tuning out distractions from the outside world.

Left: Lindsey Hubbard does yoga in her backyard Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022 in Lexington, Ky. FALL 2022 | 61


Lindsey Hubbard washes bell peppers for a meal in her home on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022 in Lexington, Ky.

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“I think in this country, and especially at our age, it’s very easy to get distracted and have a lot of noise around us. Social media is always knocking at your door, people can text you, contact you, just like that. So, it’s easy if you’re sick to just pop a pill and continue with your life,” she said. Across from her table of supplements lies a stack of books that Hubbard describes as her current favorite reads. The titles include “How Not to Die” by Michael Greger and “Anticancer” by David Servan-Schreiber. Most of her knowledge on this lifestyle is self-taught through resources such as these and educational podcasts like “The Doctor’s Farmacy with Dr. Mark Hyman, M.D.’’ and “The Sakara Life Podcast.” Hubbard said she credits these physicians-turned-mentors for paving the way for students like her to learn more about how adopting this lifestyle can greatly impact an individual’s health and well-being.

If this is something you care about, then it’s worth the investment.” - LINDSEY HUBBARD

STUDENT OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE

Hubbard said that despite her focus on natural remedies, she fully recognizes the benefits, impacts and influence of Western medicine. “As someone who wants to be a naturopathic doctor, I’m very grateful that if I do have a patient who I am trying to treat naturally and it’s just not working or it has become high-level acute, meaning their condition is life-threatening, then great, we have antibiotics, steroids, the best medical technology in the world to care for them,” she said. Hubbard’s path into naturopathic medicine started in 2019 as a senior in high school. She had always been active throughout her adolescence, so it was natural for her to stop at a drivethru to get something quick and easy that was accommodating to her busy schedule. It wasn’t until she watched “What the Health” on Netflix, a documentary about the factory farming of animals and other conventional farming processes, that she became vegan.

Her vegan lifestyle, which cuts out all animal meats and byproducts, only lasted for a month due to the restrictive nature of the diet. From there she moved towards a pescatarian diet, eating fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, whole grains, dairy and fish but staying away from meat and poultry. Today, she said she strives to limit consumption of anything conventionally farmed and instead shifts her focus to solely whole foods. This means more organic items, high-quality, grass-fed meats and farm-fresh eggs. Hubbard said she believes eggs can be more nourishing when you get them from the farm versus the grocery store. “Those chickens have been raised terribly and in disease, so it’s likely they have been pumped full of antibiotics. And your food notices that. What you’re eating came from that animal, so when it goes into your body, with it comes disease,” she said. Hubbard said that shopping organically does come with a higher price tag. “If this is something you care about, then it’s worth the investment,” she said. She said she does the majority of her grocery shopping at local markets like Good Foods Co-Op, Misfits Market and Thrive Market. Hubbard said she believes that the way you look on the outside can directly reflect the work you are doing on the inside. Using this principle, Hubbard also uses nutrition as her primary form of skincare. She said that eating whole foods has allowed her to go through her late teens and early twenties without suffering from acne or other skincare concerns. “My number one philosophy, the No. 1 thing that brings me back, is thinking about how humans were brought up on things from the land,” Hubbard said. “If it hasn’t grown from the ground, humans shouldn’t be eating it.” This doesn’t mean that the young student never allows herself any flexibility when it comes to food. Instead, she follows the 80/20 rule: healthy and on track 80% of the time while saving that extra 20% for going out with friends or honoring cravings through the occasional treat — her favorite being dark chocolate. Above all, Hubbard said she values intentionality when it comes to what she puts in her body.

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“I think that is what makes you feel satisfied and happy with the food that you are eating. When you cook your food with intention and you consume that food, it gives you the energy to live a life of purpose,” Hubbard said. In 2021, Hubbard participated in a 200-hour yoga training program to become certified as an instructor. This program consisted of indepth classes every other weekend in which all prospective students must attend two hours of practice in the morning and an additional four hours of lecture in the afternoon. The lectures covered topics such as the philosophy of yoga, business practices, anatomy, how to come up with a class style and so on. Hubbard deems her experiences and the time spent with her fellow students as incredibly rewarding. “In a sense, they’re my community. Even if I didn’t come out of the course as a teacher, I came out of it with a community,” she said. Be as that may, Hubbard already has quite a considerable community through her social media and especially her Instagram, @thehealthhubb. Through sponsored posts and stories, she has partnered with large brands like GoMacro, GEM and Sakara Life, using her platform to share how these products can be used to benefit the well-being of her followers. Hubbard said she hopes to attend a naturopathic medical school like the University of Western States after graduation. She is looking to do a two-year program in which she can receive a Master of Science in human nutrition and functional medicine. Courses in this program will include topics like herbalism, reflexology and meditation while also still maintaining a focus on subjects one would expect from a traditional medical school, like physiology, anatomy and pathology. Hubbard said the more she learns, the more her perspective changes, and while she thinks these findings are valuable to share with the world, she aims to educate and experience things for herself first before leading others down the best possible path. “Maybe one day I’ll write a book or open a store or have a website when it’s time for me to actually have a career. But right now, I’m a student,” Hubbard said. “I mean we are all students. Students of school, students of life, and we are all learning and growing, and I want to know my place.” •

When you cook your food with intention and you consume that food, it gives you the energy to live a life of purpose.” - LINDSEY HUBBARD

STUDENT OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE

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Lindsey Hubbard does yoga in her backyard on Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

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PLANTING THE SEEDS OF SUCCESS AT

WRITTEN BY EMMA REILLY | PHOTOS BY CARTER SKAGGS

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he plant business represents a world of contradictions. Between observing the delicate growth of their plants and completing the arduous labor it takes to help them thrive at Wilson Nurseries, co-owners Jennifer, Mary Catherine and Ella Wilson understand how their hard work can pay off in the form of natural beauty. “I’m not surrounded by ugly every day. Far from it, right? I think people desire to work in this type of environment, but I think most people are surprised to find out how hard it is. It’s heavy, hard, hot, cold…” said Jennifer, mother of Mary Catherine and Ella. Wilson Nurseries was opened 43 years ago by Charlie Wilson, Jennifer’s husband and Mary Catherine and Ella’s father. After his passing in 2003, he left his family and his burgeoning business, establishing the three women as co-owners. Now, the company has over 135 employees and consists of not only its flagship location in Frankfort but also the Sage Garden Cafe, the Butterfly Greenhouse, a second branch in Lexington and plans to expand further. From cultivating the life skill of growing and caring for plants to promoting healthy gardening practices like pollinator gardens that aid in butterfly migrations to remaining open as an essential component of the food supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic, the company has provided an avenue for the community to help their health as well as the natural environment. During the pandemic, “We packed that greenhouse full of things you could eat, and not just because that’s what we could sell at that time, but because people wanted it and needed it. Everybody kind of had this panic, in a sense, about, ‘Where is our food coming from?’ There wasn’t enough food in grocery stores,” Jennifer said.

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Now more than ever before, the women understand the indispensable nature of their business. Besides selling plants that add beauty and liveliness to their customers’ homes, their long hours and fresh ideas played a crucial role in encouraging their perseverance, happiness and physical wellbeing during the pandemic when there were no other options. “I always make this joke with my mom that she never stops,” Ella, a current digital media and design student at the University of Kentucky, said. “She always says, ‘If you’re not moving forward, you’re moving backward,’ so that’s a big lesson. Our most rewarding part is just seeing it evolve.” Though Charlie’s vision must be carried on by his family, the business that he began has taken root in the lives of many Central Kentucky residents, several of whom enjoy the nursery so much that they invite out-of-town visitors to witness its splendor, creating a new community of plant lovers that understand the history and significance the location brings.

“There are still people here that knew my father, and this is his legacy. I think that’s the root of all my memories — my dad was here and his spirit is here,” Ella said. Those fond memories at the nursery began when Ella and Mary Catherine were extremely young, as both grew up watching and learning about the plant business from their mother and her employees.

There are still people here that knew my father, and this is his legacy. I think that’s the root of all my memories — my dad was here and his spirit is here.” - ELLA WILSON

CO-OWNER, UK STUDENT

Co-owners Mary Catherine, Jennifer and Ella Wilson on Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky.

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Wilson Nurseries employee Lauren McCabe waters large monsteras inside one of the greenhouses at the flagship location on Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky.


This is the foundation of our family. Not only does it support us, but it’s our passion, so everything in our family revolves around this place.” - ELLA WILSON

CO-OWNER, UK STUDENT The Sage Garden Cafe, which is on the property of Wilson Nurseries in Frankfort, even began as the Wilsons’ home. Mary Catherine recalled the fun she would have with her sister while exploring the property, including when they got a golf cart stuck in the mud. She said customers would constantly see her on every type of wheel they had access to, from strollers to tricycles to scooters to golf carts and finally to their own cars. “We would make jumps out of brooms to keep ourselves busy,” she said. “All of my friends thought it was so cool when they would get to come here after school.” The girls would spend time shadowing employees in different departments, gradually absorbing knowledge and a love for plants as they worked. The experience has come full circle with Mary Catherine and Ella now getting tasked with showing employees’ young kids the nursery’s features, including house plants, rare and non-native plants, trees, bushes, herbs and vegetables. “I was really fortunate to have a situation where I could bring my kids to work. They grew up here and did all kinds of things they shouldn’t have been doing, like riding a canoe into a pond, and in the snow, all of that. Those were some of the hardest years but probably some of the most memorable years. And now it’s really fun to see both of them working in it, especially when we have a day when it’s all of us,” Jennifer said. The women and their different interests have come together to help the nursery flourish. Mary Catherine and Jennifer attended school to study the sciences, and Mary Catherine even intended to work in a research lab after graduating college. “When I was trying to decide if I wanted to work in a lab forever or work here, a part of me would have been lost if I worked in a lab forever because I would have lost the creativity that I get here most of my day. So I would say it’s inspiring, and it’s really hard, but it’s beautiful,” she said.

Though her sister and mother have an interest in science and business, Ella has found her role in creativity and art. She spends most of her time focusing on floral design, nursery layout, marketing, graphic design and photography. Her time at the nursery has taught her that the methodical process of producing plants and the creative mindset it takes to sell them are far from mutually exclusive. “As I’m about to graduate, I’m realizing that they can come together quite nicely, actually,” Ella said. “The design part and the agriculture can form something really cool, and I think now maybe I do have something to add to the company.” There are always new lessons for the women to learn about owning and operating a growing business. “The number one thing that I would tell a business owner, woman or not, would be that you control the finances. It doesn’t mean that you do the finances, it’s that you first and foremost understand the finances. You have to run a business from a financial perspective before anything ­— you can’t take care of the people in your business if you’re not taking care of the finances,” Jennifer said. Ella added that her mom has taught her to “dream big but be practical first.” Ideas are easy, she claims, but the amount of time, focus and dedication that it takes to make those ideas blossom are what sets successful ones apart. “Your work just becomes your life. It’s your passion, too, your passion is plants, and your work is planting, so your plants become your life,” Ella said. “When we go on vacation, we are going to plant places to get inspiration for when we go back to work.” On a recent trip to Florida, for example, the women returned home with a bay plant, a better alternative, they decided, to purchasing a bottle of bay leaves for a recipe. The impact Wilson Nurseries has had on the Central Kentucky community, Jennifer believes, is crucial. “We’re kind of this carved-out piece of green space for over 20 years that is not going to become a factory or building anytime soon, as long as we’re there. That matters to us,” she said. The success of Wilson Nurseries means that Jennifer, Mary Catherine and Ella can stay incredibly close and continue to share their father’s legacy with the world. “This is the foundation of our family. Not only does it support us, but it’s our passion, so everything in our family revolves around this place. All of us working together, we’re just a unit. I think the significance would be how closely knit it’s made us over the decades,” Ella said. •

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Wilson Nurseries’ flagship location in Frankfort, Ky. FALL 2022 | 71


Micro-Trends,

Major Impact on Fashion

WRITTEN BY DANI GUGINO PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY

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rends are constantly evolving and replacing one another. The trend cycle is sped up due to several factors, including the introduction of social media, online fashion “influencers” and even the shipping time of items today. Social media’s constant scrolling, tapping and liking could affect the attention span of users, hence why trends may come and go at a faster pace. Apps including Instagram, TikTok and Pinterest contain loads of fashion content. The instant availability of clothing trends can lead to constantly changing fashion trends. By simply swiping down the phone screen, the page refreshes with newer content. Influential fashion is brought to our fingertips with the use of these social platforms. Beyond movie stars, models and those the public has long thought of as celebrities, the internet has given rise to social media influencers who post photos of themselves in certain styles of clothing. The clothing we see these influencers in can result in a trend.

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Abrielle Hodge, a merchandising, apparel and textiles major at the University of Kentucky, shows off her 90s-inspired outfit on UK’s campus on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

Each decade has its own distinct style and trend that can easily be recalled; for example, ‘60s miniskirts,‘70s bellbottom and wide-leg pants, and ‘90s tiny tops, bomber jackets and baggy pants. These pieces of clothing seem to correlate to these specific decades, while in today’s age, there may seem to be more items of clothing that go in and out of style. “I definitely think [trends are] a lot faster now, like fast fashion. It’s kind of like with TikTok and stuff you see one thing, and then it’s like everyone’s on it and then like 10 days later you see something else and then everyone’s on that,” said Abrielle Hodge, a merchandising, apparel and textiles major at the University of Kentucky. On “Anything Goes,” a podcast by internet celebrity and fashion icon Emma Chamberlain, an episode of the three-part series titled “There is a cultural shift coming” is dedicated to the topic of trends. In the episode, Chamberlain focused on how today the trend cycle is speeding up and ending quicker.

“Ordering online has sped up the trend cycle single-handedly probably by 50% — no, maybe even more,” Chamberlain said. “Not only can you now order things pretty much from anywhere as long as you have your phone on you, but also things come so quickly. You can get something to your house sometimes as fast as 12 hours.” Through social media there seems to be a race to get the “it” item; however, once everyone else has it, it’s time for the next best thing. “I feel like it’s kind of making creativity die,” Hodge said. Recent trends that have come and gone extremely fast have included beaded iPhone case straps, chunky plastic rings and the bleaching or dyeing of the front pieces of your hair called “money pieces.” These specific styles, which were once seen all throughout social media, were short-lived.

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Trendsetters and followers in the past did not have the luxury of these advances and relied more on other types of influence. Dr. Scarlett Wesley, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Retailing and Tourism Management, said, “Everyone got information from fashion magazines, which came out once a month, and there was nothing on television that shared fashion trends. There were movie stars and celebrities and athletes, but even with that you didn’t get exposure like we do today.” Fewer items were available for purchase even if you did see them on TV. This likely extended the duration of fashion trends in past decades. When comparing decades, there are differences in societal and cultural influences. Wesley used her mother as an example. “I know talking with my mom, because she grew up in the ‘60s, you know, it was so rigid. Like, she grew up in the miniskirt decade, and I think back then women’s fashion

influenced more.” Wesley said that women who did not adhere to the trends at the time were judged. Fashion in past decades had stricter rules than current fashion. “I think back in the day, they’re trying to prove their social status,” Hodge said. The world today appears to have an open-minded and accepting shift in culture which may explain why fashion has more freedom behind it. When using social media, for example, people post their lives for all their followers to see. The availability of information about what other people are doing, feeling and wearing has contributed to a freer culture. Fashion acceptance can be seen through TikTok and Instagram as users more openly wear what makes them feel comfortable — often breaking gender norms and being open about their style choices. People may feel they can relate to others or branch out after seeing someone else doing the same. “...For the first time, I feel like fashion should be defined as freedom. Because I feel all of us are freer to express whatever we want with fashion,” Wesley said. As for current trends, there is a large audience participating in the business casual style of this current decade. Hodge said, “I feel like business casual, like blazers, big pants, suit and tie or a pantsuit are in.”

For the first time, I feel like fashion should be defined as freedom. Because I feel all of us are freer to express whatever we want with fashion.” - SCARLETT WESLEY ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES OF RETAILING AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT


Scarlett Wesley, the associate professor and director of graduate studies in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Retailing and Tourism Management, poses behind Memorial Hall on Monday, Sept. 12, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

Abrielle Hodge, a merchandising, apparel and textiles major at the University of Kentucky, shows off her ‘90s-inspired outfit on UK’s campus on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2022, in Lexington, Ky.

As trends usually reflect what is happening within society during that time, business casual could represent the empowerment of the women’s rights movement. The “girl boss” and “it girl” aesthetic has been seen a lot on social media. These terms are titles used to describe the modern independence, confidence and freedom of women. We constantly see the recycling of trends. The articles of clothing that Hodge mentioned as coming back in style included the ‘70s-inspired flare pants and bright colors along with the 2000s-era mini skirt and Capri pant look. She described it as “a mixture of ‘70s and 2000s.” Similarly, Wesley said the bell bottom and wide-leg pants were styles she had noticed revolving in and out of fashion. In an article by Vogue Magazine titled “Why Not Consider a Pant with a Bit More Flare?” published on Aug. 3, 2022, writer Laura Jackson discussed the re-introduction of this trend. “Unlike its disco-fever ancestors of the past, flared pants today are sleek and elegant — a go-to everyday wardrobe essential or a special occasion standout. Many thanks to designers like Prada, Saint Laurent, and The Row, flared pants, wide-leg trousers and bell-bottoms on the market now remind us of hemlines circa 1970 but are elevated enough to fit in with our modern closets,” wrote Jackson. Wesley and Hodge shared their favorite decades of fashion. “Honestly, I feel like the ‘90s. I’m definitely more of a baggy girl. I feel like I’m more masculine street style. So, the ‘90s with the teeny tops and the big cargo pants and big jackets — like bomber jackets are my favorite thing,” Hodge said. Wesley said she admires current fashion styles. “Honestly, what I love that’s going on right now is the fact that to me, more than any other time that I’ve lived through, people are allowed to do more. I feel like we’ve gotten a lot more freedom.” It is only so long until whatever is in style now falls out of trend and new pieces appear. As the speed of these trend cycles continues to increase, more will be seen of these past decade staples. The speed of trends varies based on external factors, so the next era of trends may change based on the future influences to come. •

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KRNL CUP OF

A TOUR OF LEXINGTON’S COFFEE SCENE WRITTEN BY CLAIRE OSTERFELD | PHOTOS BY CARTER SKAGGS

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offee shops give people a place to assemble, exist, connect, talk, learn, relax, refuel and so much more. At a coffee shop, customers can grab a drink to kickstart their day, reconnect with old friends, spend a few hours cramming for an exam, or even unwind and lose their heads in a book for a while. KRNL knows the influence coffee shops have on the Lexington community. There are plenty of cozy spots around town that have paired with KRNL to create a special “KRNL Drink.” Stop by any of these shops and taste what they have created!

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Chocolate Holler Chocolate Holler is a specialty chocolate shop with a full coffee bar menu. The shop opened in 2017 and has been a strong addition to the Lexington coffee scene. According to their website, Chocolate Holler’s mission encompasses three key ideas: embrace community, serve others and create culture. The shop itself has a homey environment with plenty of seats to accommodate customers and is located on Vine Street in downtown Lexington. Head over to test out their KRNL White Chocolate Cold Brew Shaker — a drink with Magic Beans Cold Brew, milk of choice, and white chocolate sauce, all shaken in a cocktail mixer. Lolo Peak Coffee Co. Lolo Peak is a coffee trailer that opened in September of this year. After moving to Lexington from Montana, the owners said they noticed a want for local coffee businesses. From there, Lolo Peak was born. Their motto is “Big Sky Flavors in the Bluegrass.” They do their part for the community, using locally roasted beans and locally purchased milk. The truck serves quality coffee and handmade whipped cream daily. You can find their current location on their website, Facebook or Instagram. Find the truck and try the KRNL drink — a s’mores-style coffee served iced or hot, with toasted marshmallows, milk chocolate, hazelnut and a hint of white chocolate. It is topped with graham cracker crumbles on homemade whipped cream. Manchester Coffee Co. (Third Street Location Only) Manchester Coffee Co. is a shop located on the East End. They roast their own coffee right here in Lexington, never adding artificial flavors. According to one of their managers, all of the coffee they purchase is “green coffee” and comes directly from farms and very small trade companies. Beyond the physical shop, they offer an online selection of merchandise, coffee and other accessories featuring their logo in various designs. The website even includes blog posts with tips on the best coffee practices. The interior has a minimalistic design, a space that allows for focus and trying out new drinks.

Check out their KRNL drink — an Orange Blossom Mocha, a latte made with chocolate, a house-made orange blossom syrup, and a dehydrated orange wheel. A Cup of Common Wealth (Cornerstone Exchange Building Only) A Cup of Common Wealth is another neat Lexington coffee spot. According to their website, they encourage sustainability by offering coffee from earth-conscious farms as well as providing a discount for those who bring in cups from home. The menu offers an array of foods and pastries along with coffee and other drinks. A Cup of Common Wealth is located on campus in the Cornerstone Exchange Building. The shop offers plenty of seating so students can grab a drink and get some work done in between classes. Stop by for their KRNL Lavender Vanilla Latte — a drink with Magic Beans Espresso, milk of choice, housemade vanilla syrup and house-made lavender syrup. Brevede Coffee Co. Brevede is a shop in Lexington’s Distillery District. They opened in September 2020. According to their website, the name “Brevede” comes from the word brevity. They know how quickly time passes, and wanted to create a space where people could spend their small amounts of time doing things they enjoy. The interior is rustic and comfortable. In addition to their selection of quality coffee and baked goods, they offer space rental, catering and design services to help plan events. Consultations can be scheduled on their website. Try their KRNL Latte with peach, thyme and pink lady syrup. Note: The businesses featured in this story may discontinue the sale of their drinks created in collaboration with KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion at any time, but customers can continue to order them using their respective recipes.

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DISTILLERIES

THE PROOF IS IN THE

Kentucky’s distillation, wine and brewing industry’s impact

WRITTEN BY HOPE ROWLAND PHOTOS BY ABBEY CUTRER

Rows of grapes overlook the barn on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2022, at Talon Winery in Lexington, Ky.

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W

For individuals like Bishop and Floan, who wished to hen two former University of Kentucky students, Andrew Bishop and Brandon Floan, acquire insight into the alcohol industry while pursuing recognized their shared passion for brewing, their undergraduate degrees, the University of Kentucky they immediately began planning ways they could turn has invested in faculty, resources and farmland in order to establish its own distillation, wine and brewing studies. their hobby into a business. As Kentucky-based distillation, winemaking and “We saw each other at a party one day and we had a six-pack of beer that we both had made, and I was like, brewing has continued to have a significant economic ‘Oh, you brew too? Do you want to do this together?’” impact on the state, the program emphasizes potential Bishop said. “So we did. We were really just in it for the career opportunities for students planning to stay in fun of it… we wanted to see if we could make a Pale Ale, Kentucky after graduation or program completion. Sierra Nevada, and so we did.” “Kentucky is the No. 1 distilling state in the Bishop and Floan said they realized they had the United States for bourbon, whiskey and now an emerging opportunity to participate in the rapidly growing craft wine industry with around 70 wineries in the state,” said beer industry. They began developing their own recipes, Seth Debolt, program director. looking into the nitty-gritty of the beer-making process in Since its founding, the program has undergone hopes of turning their hobby into a business. significant evolution, as an undergraduate certification in “We had a lot of regrets about our major choices distillation, wine and brewing studies became available because we had to start learning a lot of biology and for students upon completion of the program in 2015. chemistry because that’s what is involved in making beer. In 2019, the program became fully accessible to online So we had to spend a lot of time reading books and things students, expanding its reach to those off campus. like that to learn the science behind everything that we Debolt said the benefit of pursuing the program should’ve just gone ahead and taken at UK,” Bishop said. can be integrated into several other areas of study. As soon as they Becoming certified One night, I was drinking with my brother in distillation, wine found an optimal location for their and we just remarked, ‘Man, isn’t it crazy and brewing can brewery, they began leverage students there are still no distilleries in Bourbon production as quickly across a wide range as possible. of disciplines, County?” “As we got from business - JEREMY BUCHANAN closer to the time of and marketing to CO-FOUNDER, HARTSFIELD & COMPANY when we could open, students from STEM we were getting backgrounds. equipment in, we’ve got the ball rolling, but you can’t just Since Prohibition, the alcohol industry in Kentucky has start selling stuff. The beer takes anywhere between 10 to grown significantly, becoming one of the most prevalent 22 days to go from grain to glass, so you have to build up industries in the state. However, since the overturning of your inventory before you can open, but we didn’t have the Prohibition Act in 1933, several counties in Kentucky the budget,” Bishop said. have yet to allow legal distribution and distillation While the brewery was still in its infancy, Bishop and of alcohol. Floan worked separate jobs to keep themselves afloat. Two brothers, Jeremy and Andrew Buchanan, Floan worked for Kentucky Ale Taproom in hopes of recalled the irony that despite being raised in the learning how to organize a larger brewery system, and birthplace of bourbon whiskey, the county had no active Bishop worked as a server. distilleries selling or producing whiskey. But this wasn’t “I got an air mattress so I could stay at the brewery always the case. Jeremy said that prior to prohibition, because it saved me 40 minutes’ worth of driving home the economy of Bourbon County, Kentucky, was largely to sleep. I would wake up at about 4:35 in the morning supported by the bourbon production of the 26 active and I’d get the first brew going. Then right around distilleries in the county. seven and eight o’clock Brandon would get off work “One night, I was drinking with my brother, in the morning and he would come to tag me out,” and we just remarked, ‘Man, isn’t it crazy there are still Bishop said. no distilleries in Bourbon County?’ In January of 1920 Ethereal Brewing officially opened in November on a Saturday, the sale of alcohol was legal, and then 2014. The Lexington natives have made over 400 different the following Sunday it was illegal and none of those beers and have developed an in-house lab where they are distilleries came back. That just really stuck with my able to perfect every aspect of their brewing process. brother and I,” Jeremy said.

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At the time, Andrew had some experience with brewing by making moonshine in his basement. The brothers then decided to be the ones to bring bourbon back to Bourbon County by opening their own “little brewery” called Hartsfield & Company. “We put together some investors and started with two little 26-gallon stills down on Main Street in Paris and we brought back bourbon to Bourbon County. It had been 95 years since whiskey had been legally distilled in Bourbon County,” Jeremy said. Since its official opening in 2014, Hartsfield & Co. has been dedicated to preserving the tradition of spirits crafted before prohibition. “We just have a super unique product; we call it pre-prohibition style bourbon. We really wanted to pay homage to the kind of spirits that were being made before prohibition,” Jeremy said. To preserve the pre-prohibition taste profile, the brewery emphasizes precision in its brewing technique, producing about a barrel a day. Each batch is intentionally and carefully created from natural ingredients. Hartsfield & Co. generates a significant amount of traffic as it is among one of the many stops in the Bluegrass Region of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. Jeremy described the personal and hands-on experience his brewery offers customers. “With my dad, brother and I around, people just like to interact with the folks that started the company, those who poured in their blood, sweat and tears,” said Jeremy. “When you go to bigger breweries, you’re interacting with a tour guide, someone who has basically memorized a script, which is fine. But for Hartsfield, we really pride ourselves on letting people get up close to the still and if we’re distilling that day, sometimes we let people taste right off the still, which you aren’t going to get at a larger production facility.” Despite Kentucky being widely known for its distillation and brewing, the first winery in the country was established in Kentucky, and according to Kentucky Proud, there are currently 76 operating wineries in the state. Talon Winery was founded in 1999 on 300 acres of farmland, surrounded by horse farms that Lauren Rutherford, the marketing director for the winery, described as providing the ideal scenic southern country atmosphere. “It gives people a really nice escape to come out here. It feels like you’re on vacation but you’re really not that far. We have a lot of locals coming in, buying a glass or a bottle

and hanging out for the day. It had turned into more of an experience than a stop along the way,” Rutherford said. The founder of Talon Winery, Harriet Allen, was one of 14 siblings. Rutherford said that at the time, Allen’s family had a long history of heart disease. Allen had heard red wine had been linked to supporting heart health, thereby inspiring Allen to enter into the wine business with little to no knowledge of the industry. Allen and her husband went on to open the first winery established in Fayette County. “It all just kind of came together for her. She is very on the go, she has the most energy of anyone I’ve ever met,” Rutherford said. Talon Winery has been fully family-owned and -operated since its opening. Rutherford said the women in the family have made the winery what it is today, as Talon has become the biggest winery in the county.

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I actually got an air mattress so I could stay at the brewery because it saved me 40 minutes’ worth of driving home to go to sleep.” - ANDREW BISHOP

COMPANY CO-FOUNDER, ETHEREAL BREWING

“Harriet had two daughters and they started working here in different capacities. One of them does HR, one of them does bookkeeping, but it is a family business where you do whatever needs to be done. I am the third generation, one of the three daughters, and then I have two daughters. We’ve done numerous things in the industry. Whether it be tastings off-site, bookkeeping, events, you kind of have your hand in every pot when you’re in a family business,” Rutherford said. While Kentucky might not be widely known for its wine production compared to other regions in our country like the West Coast, Rutherford said that the Kentucky climate supports specific grape varieties extremely well, making the state’s wine blends rather uncommon and unique. Distillation, wine and brewing studies continue to provide students with firsthand insight into the complex world of alcohol production. The success stories of several Lexington local businesses serve as a further reminder of the potential prosperity in the multi-billion-dollar Kentucky alcohol industry. •

The processing room overlooks the grounds on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2022, at Talon Winery in Lexington, Ky.


Grapes grow at the vineyard on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2022, at Talon Winery in Lexington, Ky. FALL 2022 | 83


BELOW

ZERo WRITTEN BY LEANNA MARJI

As the months get colder we instinctively begin to dress for warmth and comfort. In doing so, it’s easy for your personal style to get buried underneath layers of outerwear and snow boots. I wanted this shoot to show not only the equilibrium of fashion and comfort in the presence of an external influence, such as the weather, but how you can use it to your advantage by allowing your style to flourish year-round. The initial dilemma we had with this shoot was the obvious lack of snow within a 100-mile radius. Instead of shutting the idea down entirely, we used this minor inconvenience to our benefit. As much as we would have loved to take a trip to Aspen, we decided it would be slightly more time- and cost-efficient to create the frosty environment through fashion itself, which simultaneously referred back to the original concept of limitlessness. Rather than shooting in a studio against a plain white backdrop, we decided to take it a step further by fully embracing the satirical aspect of a winter-themed photoshoot in the hot weather. We grabbed our sheets, blankets, cotton balls, snowboards and sleds and headed for the nearest park. Although it was 80 degrees and sunny, our models kept their cool and showed off some sick ski styles. We were naturally drawn to the bold colors, vibrant puffer jackets and chunky cable knits that emerged from ski fashion of the ‘70s. We focused on giving each look our own touch by incorporating exaggerated layering, futuristic glasses and color blocking. This winter, whether you’re hitting the slopes or making a quick grocery run before a snow storm, remember that you shouldn’t have to let your personal style hibernate. There are no limits to fashion, even in subzero weather.

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WEARHOUSE WHITE DICKIE VINTAGE THERAPY SKI PANTS SKI JACKET

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WEARHOUSE BLACK SPYDER SKI OVERALLS VINTAGE THERAPY COLUMBIA JACKET

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WEARHOUSE CREWNECK PANTS VINTAGE THERAPY PARKA

PHOTO BY CARTER SKAGGS


PHOTO BY SYDNEY TURNER

PHOTO BY LILY FOSTER

PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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WEARHOUSE SWEATER BOMBER JACKET WINDBREAKER PANTS

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PHOTO BY SYDNEY TURNER


PHOTO BY MARTHA McHANEY

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WEARHOUSE MONTGOMERY WARD SKI/ SNOWSUIT

WEARHOUSE SKATER PANTS PUFFER VEST VINTAGE THERAPY SWEATER 90 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


PHOTO BY OLIVIA FORD

WEARHOUSE AGUSTA SWISH PANTS CREAM RIBBED TOP VINTAGE THERAPY VEST JACKET

WEARHOUSE GRAY DICKIE CREAM KNIT SWEATER PANTS VINTAGE THERAPY VEST YELLOW JACKET

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@KRNL_LF

@KRNLTALKS @STYLEDBYKRNL

OUR SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS STRIVE TO BUILD A COMMUNITY OF CREATIVES THAT ARE PART OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. THROUGH LOOKBOOKS, MOOD BOARDS AND TREND ALERTS, FOLLOWERS GET DAILY FASHION ADVICE. BY PROVIDING PLAYLISTS, POP CULTURE UPDATES AND DAY-IN-THE-LIFE STORIES OF WHAT EXCITING THINGS UK STUDENTS ARE INVOLVED IN, OUR FOLLOWERS CAN BE INSPIRED BY THE LIFESTYLE OF OUR STUDENT BODY. MEET OTHER STUDENTS WHO SHARE THE SAME HOBBIES AND INTERESTS BY FOLLOWING KRNL ON SOCIAL MEDIA. 92 | KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION


#

TITLE

1

CUFF IT Beyoncé

3:45

2

GIRL The Internet, KAYTRANDA

6:55

3

SUNSHINE Steve Lacy, Fousheé

4:53

4

BIRDS DONT SING TV Girl

3:28

5

CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’ The Mamas & The Papas

2:42

6

AMERICAN TEENAGER Ethel Cain

4:17

7

ARE WE STILL FRIENDS? Tyler, The Creator

4:24

8

ALL YOU DO Magdalena Bay

4:38

9

THE THINGS WE KNEW LAST NIGHT Circa Waves

3:28

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BURNING Yeah Yeah Yeahs

4:20

11

HOLLYWOOD WITCHES Woody and Jeremy

3:55

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LOVE’S TRAIN Silk Sonic

5:06

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POOLSIDE Tyler Cole, WILLOW

5:43

14

I THINK I LIKE WHEN IT RAINS WILLIS

4:37

15

PAIN PinkPantheress

1:39

16

23 Rejjie Snow, Caroline Smith

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CONTRIBUTORS

RANA ALSOUFI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

GRAY GREENWELL MANAGING EDITOR

RILEY HOSTUTLER LIFESTYLE EDITOR

ALLIE DIGGS CREATIVE DIRECTOR

MARTHA McHANEY LEAD PHOTO EDITOR

ABBEY PURCELL LEAD DIGITAL EDITOR ASST. CREATIVE DIRECTOR

EMME SCHUMACHER ASST. CREATIVE DIRECTOR

LUCIA SANCHEZ FASHION CO-EDITOR

SYDNEY WAGNER FASHION CO-EDITOR

LEANNA MARJI PHOTOSHOOT COORDINATOR

REAGAN NEWMAN LOOKBOOK COORDINATOR

JAYA DURRAH FASHION COORDINATOR

MICHA’LA HOOD MARKETING STRATEGIST

KARRINGTON GARLAND PODCAST ORGANIZER

NIKKI EDDS ASST. LIFESTYLE EDITOR

EMMA REILLY ASST. LIFESTYLE EDITOR

CARTER SKAGGS ASST. LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER

KENNEDI BEAM ASST. DIGITAL EDITOR

PAUL GAYLE ASST. PHOTOSHOOT COORDINATOR

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RAEGAN BALDWIN MAKEUP ARTIST

ALANA BLACKMAN STYLIST

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SYDNEY TURNER PHOTOGRAPHER

BROOKE WAGNER MAKEUP ARTIST

JUSTICE McKINNEY WRITER KENDALL COFFEY WRITER NATHANIEL LILLY PODCAST HOST FALL 2022 | 95


girlsgirlsgirls BURRITOS SPONSORED CONTENT WRITTEN BY OLIVIA SANDERSON PHOTOS BY MARTHA McHANEY

A grilled, golden brown burrito filled with locally sourced beef, beans, spinach and onions rolled with waffle fries and hot sauce adds a flavorful flair to a traditional burrito. Grilled kale, roasted carrots and green onions from Black Soil KY, charred jalapeno ranch, pickled red onion, pickled peppers and cilantro on chips and queso add a healthy twist to savory nachos. Located on the edge of the University of Kentucky’s campus since 2018, girlsgirlsgirls Burritos offers diverse and wholesome food choices for both the picky eater and the foodie alike. Owners and best friends Sara Wood and Wade Hancock opened the restaurant together in the Spring of 2016. At the time, the two rented the kitchen inside a bar that sat on the corner of Euclid and Woodland avenues. They began grilling burritos and frying chips with just a griddle and one deep fryer. The limited amounts of resources at the beginning never discouraged Wood, she said. She accepted the challenge and embraced the resources around her. She utilized her website and began an online delivery service. In a period of a financial bind, she decided to use the most costeffective option of delivering orders by bike. “Mentally and physically [the bike] was helping me stay healthy in a very stressful time in starting a business,” Wood said. “It is very humbling. I am grateful and proud to have bicycle delivery as our business model.” Wood said that bicycle delivery also helped the company uphold its environmentally friendly values. Along with biking, girlsgirlsgirls Burritos instills waste management in the restaurant by separating compost, recycling and landfill trash. The owners and employees are also conscious of not wasting their water usage and are energy efficient, Wood said. “I want to send as little to the landfill as possible. With that value set in mind, it makes us think about everything we do here in a really cool way,” Wood said. “We consider the food we bring in, the product we produce and everything within the restaurant in a really respectful and intentional manner.”

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All the ingredients used in girlsgirlsgirls Burritos’ recipes are locally sourced. The menu items are all made in-house as well. “The meals are made with love by your friends that love you,” Wood said. Wood also said that maintaining clean energy within the store also requires the staff’s mental and physical energies to be optimistic. “There are parties always happening in the kitchen, a lot of quality conversations are always going down and community building is happening,” Wood said. “Working with food is also an easy opportunity to get to meet people.” Team bonding is as much of a priority to the employees at girlsgirlsgirls Burritos as meal preparation and brainstorming new recipes, Wood said. The team participates in group gatherings on and off the clock, like sharing meals during their shifts and special event nights at the restaurant. Wood said she sees value in allowing her employees to express themselves in the work environment. “I’ve worked in restaurants my whole life, and I am grateful I have gotten to wear what I want to work,” Wood said. “I know that seems small, but it is really important in maintaining one’s humanity.” The atmosphere of girlsgirisgirls Burritos reflects the company’s value of self-expression. The upbeat music, artwork, murals on the walls and creative design of the furniture create a welcoming environment. Customers are told to seat themselves when entering the restaurant. Make sure to stop by girlsgirlsgirls Burritos to taste their menu, be encouraged by the staff and know that your food is wholesomely sourced and produced. The restaurant is open daily. Wood said to keep an eye out for upcoming events and live music opportunities. •

We consider the food we bring in, the product we produce and everything within the restaurant in a really respectful and intentional manner.” - SARA WOOD

CO-OWNER OF GIRLSGIRLSGIRLS BURRITOS

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POPS RESALE SPONSORED CONTENT WRITTEN BY KENDALL COFFEY PHOTOS BY CARTER SKAGGS

Records, prom dresses, comic books, old electronics, jewelry, army supplies — you name it, POPS will have it. In May of 1996, Daniel Shorr and his wife opened the doors of POPS Resale. Shorr previously worked in the electronics industry and as a manufacturing rep for over 20 companies. Daniel’s lifestyle was go, go, go, as he traveled from lower Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Kentucky and West Virginia. After having his first heart attack, he decided to take a step back and reevaluate. This time led him to the dream of opening his own retail shop. Having always had an interest in electronics, this was something he was passionate about. A second heart attack followed in January 1996, but Shorr bounced back quickly. He hit the ground running with POPS that May. Word traveled fast about this new shop, and people brought special items and collectibles to be sold straight within the store. Originally, Shorr divided up the store by a large army surplus parachute. He described cutting off the front from the back: “As we grew I just kept moving that parachute back. Now, I’ve moved it behind the whole store and could use another 2,000 square feet.” Shorr grew with the store and continued to get a variety of customers and products in his doors each day, with customers ranging from 5-year-olds buying rings to 85-year-olds interested in records; no matter the age, Shorr’s customers keep POPS’ business thriving today. The staff is more family as they have been with him from the start. They choose to spend days off together preparing for business hours. Perhaps what keeps Lexington locals coming back are the groovy finds and genuine atmosphere on 1423 Leestown Road. POPS’ motto is giving the maximum value for the dollar you spend on ”previously owned products.” That is exactly what Shorr plans to keep doing, so check POPS Resale out when you’re in need of a special old find. •

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SPONSORS KRNL SPONSORS POPS RESALE

1423 LEESTOWN ROAD LEXINGTON, KY 40511 859.254.7677 POPSRESALE.COM

GIRLSGIRLSGIRLS BURRITOS

395 S. LIMESTONE ST. LEXINGTON, KY 40508 859.285.6853 GIRLSGIRLSGIRLSBURRITOS.COM

MODELS CUT IT OUT

SENIORS (DETAILED IN SHOOT)

LUCIDITY

KALEB CHEEK KADIJA CONTEH ESTELLA DAVIS MADIE McMILLIAN VENDELA NORRIS ISAAC PECK JASMINE STURGEON CASEY TROWEL

BELOW ZERO

AUSTIN DAVIS HANNAH FYFFE BEREKET HADGU KIBIR HADGU KYNLEE HELTON ALEX PECKENPAUGH CONNOR PERRY VICKY ZESU

PHOTOSHOOT SPONSORS CUT IT OUT LOCATION

UK SCHOOL OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES (SA/VS)

VENDORS

WEARHOUSE CALYPSO STREET SCENE

LUCIDITY LOCATION LIGHTBOX STUDIO

VENDORS

CALYPSO VINTAGE THERAPY STEEL MILL & CO.

BELOW ZERO LOCATION SHILLITO PARK

VENDORS

WEARHOUSE VINTAGE THERAPY

BEHIND THE SCENES RYAN CRAIG DAVID STEPHENSON BRYCE McNEIL

All prices are subject to change without notice. While the KRNL staff makes every effort to provide the most accurate, up-to-date information, occasionally one or more items may be mispriced. In the event a product is listed at an incorrect price due to typographical, photographic or technical error in pricing information received from our suppliers, merchants have the right to refuse the sale of the product listed at the incorrect price.

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KRNL LIFESTYLE + FASHION VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 1 | FALL 2022

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