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Course of Study 2014-2015

2014-2015


14-15

Course of Study Table of Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Upper School

Upper School Academic Policies and Requirements. . . . . . 29

Independent Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

The Writing Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Primary School

The Math/Science Tutoring Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Primary School Program Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

9th Grade Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Junior Pre-Kindergarten. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Cultural Leadership Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Pre-Kindergarten. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Ethics Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Kindergarten. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

English. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Grade 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Grade 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Grade 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Grade 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Grade 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Kent Place School Philosophy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Health and Wellness for Young Women. . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Physical Education and Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Middle School

Middle School Academic Policies and Requirements. . . . . . 15

English. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Health and Wellness for Young Women. . . . . . . . . . . . 18

History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Learning Strategies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Peer Mediation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Physical Education and Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Visual and Performing Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

World Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Visual and Performing Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

World Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

College Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Faculty and Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51


INTRODUCTION

KENT PLACE SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY

The Kent Place School curriculum reflects the mission of the School and the philosophies of each division. To ensure sequence and structure in the learning process, the administration and faculty are committed to ongoing assessment of the curriculum, to providing modifications in response to research and student needs, and to providing creditable college preparation.

We believe that the best education for girls and young women is a single-sex environment in which students discover their strengths and are empowered to reach beyond the constraints of gender roles. We are a community of enthusiastic and motivated learners and educators who value fair-mindedness, mutual concern, honesty and fairness. We energize a traditional curriculum with innovation and believe that girls meet their best potential in an interconnected environment that is proactive, responsive and flexible and that promotes self-confidence, self-advocacy and healthy risk-taking. We strive to meet the intellectual, emotional and social needs of our students through a rigorous curriculum that promotes curiosity, creativity and a growing sense of self-discipline.

Kent Place takes pride in its strong and unique curriculum. This guide serves two main audiences: • •

the enrolled student and family who seek an understanding of the course offerings and total academic program; the prospective student and family who are making decisions about school choice.

The Course of Study explains to Primary and Middle School students and families the content and goals of all the courses in a particular grade. For the Upper School student and family, the guide provides information necessary to planning the four-year course of study and to the annual review of that plan. The prospective Kent Place student and family will be able to consider their expectations of a preparatory school by •

reading the Mission Statement of the School. The purpose of curriculum from Junior Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 is to offer a “connectedness” to this mission. considering the content of courses offered within the division. Will the student learn best in the Kent Place academic environment? reviewing the totality of the curriculum. Can the student pursue individual interests in the arts, athletics or community service?

MISSION STATEMENT Kent Place is an independent, nonsectarian college-preparatory day school which, for over 100 years, has provided a superior education for young women who demonstrate strong scholastic and creative ability. Its mission is to offer students of diverse backgrounds, in Preschool through grade twelve, an academically rigorous curriculum in a caring atmosphere; to encourage them to contribute to and find success in this challenging program; to inspire young women to leadership; and to strengthen moral awareness. Committed to a liberal arts education that combines tradition and innovation, Kent Place provides the stimulus for each student to achieve her full academic, physical and creative potential; to love learning; to gain confidence; to live responsibly; and to develop respect for herself and others in the global community.

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Our curricula and programs are rich in opportunities for students to build decision-making, critical thinking and problem-solving skills. We promote integrity, respect and trust throughout all of the schooling years in our conversations, actions, reflective moments and commitment toward respecting and understanding perspectives that are different from our own. Our students take on increasingly profound leadership opportunities that foster cooperation, initiative and self-awareness while also cultivating compassion and caring. We believe that the lessons and values encouraged by our multi-talented faculty prepare each student to be an active contributor to the larger world beyond Kent Place.


PRIMARY SCHOOL

Primary School Program Overview

The Primary School, Junior Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 5, is best described as a small learning community that is academically rigorous, nurturing and developmentally supportive of educating the whole child – cognitively, socially, emotionally and physically. Students learn in child-friendly, technologically-infused classrooms where enrichment and acceleration are integral to the academic program, and teachers are responsive to the diverse learning styles, capabilities and needs of the students. The Primary School environment is an engaging, challenging and intellectually safe place for children to learn, achieve, and grow to their fullest potential. Beginning within the self-contained, coeducational Junior Pre-Kindergarten and Pre-Kindergarten programs and extending into the all-girls, full day Kindergarten through Grade 5 classrooms, students are exposed to a variety of academic, aesthetic and co-curricular course offerings that connect and prepare our students for the expectations and rigors of the Middle School program and beyond. The Primary teachers are well prepared to provide a strong academic base as generalists in the teaching of Language Arts Literacy, Mathematics and Social Studies. Science, World Language and aesthetic offerings such as Art, Theater, Physical Education, Music and Dance are taught by experienced specialists in their chosen field. The Primary School is an integral part of the overall curricular and instructional continuum of Kent Place. At its academic core is a balanced, comprehensive and challenging curriculum that is rigorous and robust, with opportunities for aesthetic, interdisciplinary and creative engagement. The Primary School portion of the Course of Study is designed to provide an overview of the teaching and learning components and expectations for Junior Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 5.

Mathematics Philosophy In the Primary School Mathematics Program, students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and skills as they build computational proficiency and efficiency. Students learn that mathematics is a sense-making endeavor developed through engaging problems, meaningful contexts and the use of hands-on materials and tools. Students think critically, make connections, develop a sense of inquiry and communicate mathematically, using appropriate symbols and terms. Ultimately students in the Primary School gain an appreciation of mathematics, and its value in their world, and the ability to use math across the curriculum.

Language Arts Literacy Philosophy The Primary School’s Language Arts curriculum lays the foundation for students to become fluent readers, writers, speakers and listeners. Students progress through the grades with increased independence and competency in oral and written language, comprehension and critical thinking skills. The mechanics of reading is taught systematically through phonemic awareness, phonics, sight word recognition and word study using multi-sensory techniques. Our program is literature based, including diverse cultures, traditions and historical settings. We strive to instill a lifelong love of reading in every student. Students write daily to develop fluency and appropriately

use spelling, punctuation and grammar conventions. In addition, manuscript handwriting is introduced in Pre-Kindergarten and cursive handwriting begins in Grade 3. Our goal is for our students to acquire the necessary communication skills required to live in a 21st century global community.

TECHNOLOGY PHILOSOPHY In the Primary School Technology Program, students learn to view technology as a natural extension of their learning. Students learn how technology can help them to create, communicate and collaborate. The students are introduced to a variety of 21st century learning tools that help them to think critically, problem-solve and make informed decisions. The students learn to not only use technology tools, but to use them as responsible digital citizens.

Progress Reporting In the Primary School, the Progress Report and Narrative serve to provide information about each student’s academic performance and progress, and social-emotional growth and development. Student progress is determined by multiple assessments including but not limited to teacher observations, homework, class assignment, demonstrated performance, quizzes, formal and informal assessments and participation. Proficiency levels are reported using a combination of rating indicators and narrative comments. The rating indicators are as follows: Junior Pre-Kindergarten: Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten: 1 = Secure 1 = Secure C = Consistently 2 = Developing 2 = Developing U = Usually 3 = Beginning 3 = Beginning S = Sometimes R = Rarely Grades 1 – 5 Academic and Specialist Proficiency Levels: 1 = Exceeds Grade Level Expectations 2 = Meets Grade Level Expectations 3 = Progressing Towards Grade Level Expectations 4 = Needs Consistent Support C = Consistently U = Usually S = Sometimes R = Rarely * = Not Yet Rated

GRADING SYSTEM Beginning in Grade 4, students receive letter grades in Language Arts, Math, Social Studies and Science. Performance criteria are clarified at the start of the school year by the appropriate faculty members.

A+ A A- B+ B B- C+

97 - 100 93 - 96 90 - 92 87 - 89 83 - 86 80 - 82 77 - 79

C C- D+ D D- F

73 - 76 70 - 72 67 - 69 63 - 66 60 - 62 Below 60 3


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Junior Pre-Kindergarten The hallmark of the Junior Pre-Kindergarten program is “social development” and “exploration” within a hands-on, manipulative-rich, experientially-based, developmentally-appropriate learning environment. Here play is regarded as child’s work. Surrounded by a print-rich environment, children are encouraged to participate in literacy activities in a warm, stimulating and creative atmosphere. Language development and self-expression are an integral part of the Junior Pre-Kindergarten curriculum. Children learn to express themselves verbally as they build their vocabulary through stories, books, dramatic play, singing and meeting time. Interactive read aloud opportunities are provided, inviting children to discuss and share their thinking. Children begin to absorb and recognize the print they see in their daily lives, and use this expanded knowledge to demonstrate understanding. Junior Pre-Kindergarten students become a community of learners who appreciate listening and telling stories, and are encouraged to demonstrate their learning in imaginative and innovative ways. As children navigate their world, they become natural problemsolvers. Child-initiated math questions provide insight into thinking, reasoning and interest. It honors children’s ability to invest in, make sense of and quantify their world. Opportunities to explore numbers, space and shape, and measurement, are the catalyst for further investigations and deep, meaningful learning. Children also engage in scientific exploration as they investigate their natural surroundings and the seasonal changes. Through activities such as nature walks, experiments and critical observations, and hands-on scientific observations, students gain powerful insight about nature and the world that surrounds them. In addition, Junior Pre-Kindergarten students participate in physical education, world language, and music classes, taught by specialists in their fields.

Pre-Kindergarten In Pre-Kindergarten, children come together as a community of learners, further developing their social skills and increasing their sense of responsibility. Students deepen their understanding of how to form friendships and work cooperatively. Children carry out specific classroom duties and develop life skills, which creates a sense of accomplishment and fosters independence. An essential aspect of the Pre-K program is learning through play. Play enhances the development of the whole child – cognitive, physical, emotional, social and communicative. Students also engage in activities that promote fine and gross motor development, while honing thinking and reasoning skills. Hands-on activities, such as cooking, block building, drawing, painting and writing, promote deeper discovery, and nurture children’s natural curiosity. The Pre-K literacy curriculum supports language and literacy learning through exploration and communication. Teachers model literacy strategies and foster a love of reading in both whole and small groups. Children dictate stories, make class books and engage in open-ended 4

literacy activities. Letter and sound recognition is formally introduced through carefully designed lessons and multi-sensory activities. Children develop speaking and listening skills during specific sharing activities throughout the year. Within this print-rich and joyful environment, children develop a love of reading and writing, which provides a strong foundation for future literacy skills. Mathematics concepts and skills are developed as students explore problems initiated through literature contexts and everyday interactions. Students then engage in purposeful activities designed to deepen understanding of the concept or skill. The curriculum focuses on beginning number skills, shape, classification, pattern, comparative measurement and spatial sense. Intentional opportunities and experiences empower children to think and reason mathematically, communicate their ideas, and develop a sense of inquiry and wonder. Students also engage in science, music, creative movement, theater, world language, library, and physical education classes taught by specialists in their field.

Kindergarten The major goals for Kindergarten are to develop self-confidence, self-awareness, independence and social skills along with the academic skills important for young students. They learn about themselves, each other and the world around them during daily Morning Meeting. A guided discovery and process approach helps students explore areas of the curriculum and build concepts. Children receive individual attention and work in large and small groups. Kindergarten children also learn to play cooperatively and interact socially. They are given several opportunities each day to make choices involving creative play, art activities, books, computers and listening centers. The class size is approximately 30 with four teachers.

DANCE Throughout the year, Kindergarten students develop motor skills and an awareness of creative movement. Subjects in dance class are aligned with the classroom curriculum. Many topics are explored through movement stories. Props are used to enhance specific lessons. As the year progresses, more focus is placed on proper stretching techniques in preparation for first grade Dance. At the end of the school year students perform in a Spring Program.

Language Arts Kindergartners enter a print-rich environment and are immediately exposed to a wide variety of fiction, non-fiction and poetry. They are encouraged to take classroom books home to enjoy with their families. Students engage in interactive read aloud, shared reading in the form of poetry and morning message, and guided reading. During guided reading instruction, students read in small groups at their own level with books that are a little bit more challenging, supported by their teachers. At the same time, students are taught the essential building blocks of literacy: letter-sound relationships, high frequency words, spelling patterns, vocabulary development and word-solving strategies. Teachers foster early literacy concepts including: left to


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s right directionality, use of spaces between words and the concept of sentence as a group of words that convey a single thought. The integration of reading and writing is the cornerstone of the Kindergarten program. The girls write daily in dialogue journals in which parents and teachers respond. During Writers’ Workshop, students create stories and books according to their personal interests. Teachers use picture books to show how authors express their ideas to tell a story or provide information. In this way, students have a wealth of resources from which to draw upon and apply when they are composing.

LIBRARY Students in Kindergarten attend library class once each week. The children are introduced to such skills as using a place holder and learning the parts of a book. The girls discuss a variety of fiction and nonfiction stories including books about holidays, fairy tales and libraries.

Mathematics The Kindergarten mathematics classroom is a busy place where students solve problems and explore ideas using a variety of hands-on material. They communicate thinking and reasoning, consider each other’s ideas, pose questions and understand that math is part of our everyday world. It is fun, important and it makes sense! Students develop a deep understanding of beginning number concepts. They count forward and backward, count-on and skip-count by two, five and ten, thus developing a basis for place value. Number skills also include comparison, order, decomposition and concepts of addition and subtraction. Students learn beginning addition and subtraction facts. Logic skills are developed through observation and description of objects, as well as sorting and classifying. Once grouped by similarities, data is organized using Venn diagrams and other graphic forms of representation. Students also explore the regularity of patterns and number sequences. They extend, translate and generalize both linear and growing patterns. Geometric ideas related to shape, position and spatial sense are used by students to describe their physical world. Students also measure various attributes including using countable units.

MUSIC In Kindergarten, students sing songs incorporating hand gestures and finger plays. They explore different kinds of vocal sounds, create rhymes, imitate rhythm and chants, and use percussion instruments such as rhythm sticks and tone bells.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Kindergarten girls enjoy Physical Education classes twice a week with the classes being taught by a physical education specialist. These classes help the children develop their fundamental motor skills and coordination through the use of skill themes. The skill theme approach is designed to provide experiences appropriate to a child’s developmental level. An emphasis on developing the Kindergarten community and each student’s social competence begins with “Be Kind, Be Gentle, Be Safe.” Activities for students of this age are designed to give them opportunities in which they learn to play together while developing and practicing respectful and safe behavior towards their classmates.

Science and Social Studies Much of the Kindergarten curriculum is thematic. In science, children learn about animals, seasons, plants, small machines and structures, musical instruments, water and sand, nutrition, dinosaurs and the five senses. In social studies, they learn about self, families, communities, occupations and other cultures, including holidays and geography. Teachers welcome families into the classroom to share their traditions and cultures. All themes are integrated with arts, reading, writing and math. Field trips, assembly programs and many hands-on activities complement these areas.

Technology The Kindergarten students are introduced to computer terminology and the proper care and use of the computers. The students use Pixie 3, an integrated software application that includes drawing, word processing and multimedia tools to stimulate creativity in young learners. Each student has a chance to lead the class by demonstrating a lesson in the computer lab. In the Kindergarten classroom, the students have a collection of iPads they can use to further enrich their learning.

WORLD LANGUAGE Students continue to study French and Spanish for one semester each. All class work is oral and play-based in order to nurture enthusiasm for learning a second language while encouraging confident and uninhibited expression. Material is presented in meaningful communicative contexts through activities using manipulatives, music, games, dance, drama and other media. Basic communication is an ongoing part of every day’s classroom activities.

Grade 1 Grade 1 builds on skills gained in Kindergarten. Each child continues to progress at her own speed in small- and large-group instruction. The girls begin their studies of science and art with specialists from those fields. A calm environment and daily routine allow students to thrive intellectually, emotionally and physically.

ART First Grade begins a child’s journey in the Primary Art Studio. In this first year of specialized art instruction, the students are asked to think about the question, “What do artists do?” Children experience a wide variety of media including sculpture, painting, ceramics, printmaking, photography, drawing, fiber arts and collage. Artist studies allow children to see the world through a variety of viewpoints. Creative thinking skills are honed and basic understanding of the visual world is fostered through each activity.

DANCE Many areas of dance are covered in first grade. Some of the topics include basic ballet technique, exploration of locomotion and axial movements, imagery, characterizations, and storytelling. Students then move on to create collaborative class dances such as a fairytale 5


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ballet. There are three scheduled informal showings of the students’ work throughout the year.

Language Arts The Grade 1 reading curriculum emphasizes phonological awareness, word-solving strategies, vocabulary development and comprehension both through small and whole group instruction. A print-rich environment through shared reading of poetry, big books and other fiction and non-fiction texts surrounds students. The girls read with a teacher in small, flexible, guided reading groups at their own reading level to foster fluency, expression and understanding. Effective comprehension strategies are taught, which enable students to read more challenging texts independently. Also, students have many opportunities to buddy read and to read independently for their own enjoyment, fostering a love of reading. Reading is enhanced through readers’ theater, listening centers, poetry, songs and technology activities. During Writers’ Workshop, students write in journals and create stories, which are personally significant. As students develop their writing skills and habits, they learn to apply appropriate spelling, punctuation and grammar. Spelling is taught in weekly lessons and is connected to the phonics work the children are pursuing.

LIBRARY Students in first grade attend library class once each week. The children are encouraged to explore encyclopedias, and they utilize alphabetical order to find and organize picture books. Students discuss a variety of stories throughout the year, several of which tie in with their classroom studies of Japan and Mexico.

Mathematics The mathematics classroom in Grade 1 nurtures problem solving and sense making. Students continue to think critically, test ideas, make connections, communicate and represent their thinking. They gain a greater understanding of number with increasing magnitude and spatial sense using various hands-on materials and tools. Students develop number sense and intellectual flexibility as they explore number relationships and number combination patterns. Students focus on fact strategies and properties as they increase fluency with addition and subtraction facts. They learn problemsolving processes and strategies as they encounter both routine and non-routine problems. Students skip-count by a variety of numbers and build a solid foundation for beginning place value skills. They form and count groups of ten and leftovers, identify the ones, tens and hundreds place, and compare numbers based on place value. Numbers are decomposed and written in expanded form in multiple ways. This provides a solid foundation for later work with addition and subtraction of multi-digit numbers. Concepts of measurement include the use of basic metric and U.S. Customary standard units of measure for length. Students tell time to the half hour and count sets of coins. Data is collected and organized using a variety of graphic representations. Data comprehension includes literal, comparative and inferential analysis techniques. Students learn about fractions as they explore shapes, attributes and spatial sense. 6

MUSIC First Grade music students are introduced to the convention of group participation through singing and playing instruments. They learn rudimentary music vocabulary, which sets a foundation for classroom and concert performances. Grade 1 students are also introduced to fundamental exercises that help them to become aware of a healthy singing process. They learn about proper posture, breathing for singing, good tone production and how to use their voice expressively. The singing process is reinforced throughout the Primary School and the philosophy of healthy singing continues throughout the Middle and Upper School Choral Programs. During the first grade year students begin to develop their rhythm skills as they learn to read, write and perform basic note values and rhythmic patterns. In this grade students develop their tonal memory using solfege syllables and by singing multicultural songs.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The first grade students move using a variety of locomotor and nonlocomotor skills, some of which they will be more proficient at. They move to rhythm, demonstrate balance, and have the ability to jump, climb and roll. They can manipulate objects in a variety of ways. In first grade, students begin to understand the effects of physical activity on the body and how being physically active contributes to their overall health and wellness. They participate in activities of various intensities and can describe the changes these activities produce within their bodies such as an increased heart rate or an increased rate of respiration. Students begin to learn and apply behaviors that demonstrate an understanding of rules and directions, safety practices and working cooperatively with others.

Science Science instruction in Grade 1 is hands-on and inquiry based. Students predict outcomes, observe, experiment, investigate and communicate their findings. Indoor lessons as well as those outdoors in the garden encourage the students’ natural sense of wonder about the world around them and provide an organic format for questioning. Students also begin to think scientifically: they hypothesize, test and validate conclusions or observations. Finally, they begin to develop environmental awareness through experiments, class activities and discussion. Science instruction is integrated with Grade 1 art, social studies, math, and language arts curricula. It fosters excitement and ignites a lifelong interest in science. Students also learn about and use the tools of the scientist from thermometers and magnifying glasses to microscopes and computers. Both fiction and nonfiction picture books are used for content and reinforcement of concepts as they relate to each area of scientific study.

Social Studies In Grade 1, students expand their study of the relationship of the self to family. They begin the year writing a mini-biography and then explore diverse ethnic and cultural heritages through a comparative study of children and families in Mexico and Japan. Simple research skills are acquired by having each child learn and write a paragraph


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s about an important African American. An introduction to map skills lays a firm foundation for the Grade 2 geography-based curriculum.

Technology Grade 1 students use Pixie 3, an integrated software application that includes drawing, word processing and multimedia tools to stimulate creativity in young learners. The students learn the importance of file management as they become proficient at saving and retrieving their work from our school’s server. The students develop their word processing skills as they learn how to format text and create booklets. The students also use iPads and interactive whiteboards to further enrich their learning.

WORLD LANGUAGE In first grade, students choose either French or Spanish to study for their remainder of their time in Primary School. Class work continues to be mostly oral in nature, but word recognition and writing single words begin at this level. Teachers strive to nurture enthusiasm for learning a second language while encouraging confident oral expression among our students. Material is presented in meaningful communicative contexts through activities using manipulatives, music, games, dance, arts and crafts, drama and other media. Listening comprehension and basic communication are an ongoing part of every day’s classroom activities. Students are asked to respond to simple questions, as well as describe themselves and things with basic details. Elements of the cultures of the target language countries are woven into the curriculum to further engender students’ appreciation for the world language they study.

Grade 2 The Grade 2 curriculum consolidates skills learned in Kindergarten and Grade 1 and moves children on to a new level of understanding in all areas. The social studies theme of world geography and cultures blends diverse topics. Children at this level increase their number of weekly science classes. They continue to strive toward mastery of language arts and math concepts.

ART The second grade art curriculum is directly tied to the social studies curriculum. In social studies, the girls study one culture from each continent. In art the students learn about the art from each culture studied. Each studio experience allows the children to cement their understanding of how different cultures express ideas and beliefs. Students work in a wide variety of media, including quilting, painting, drawing and mixed media.

DANCE Second grade begins with a review of proper warm-up exercises and the introduction to jazz dance technique. The students convert their knowledge of the seven basic locomotion movements into jazz vocabulary and also explore different movement qualities. Utilizing jazz dance vocabulary, the students co-choreograph a class dance. Toward

the end of the year, students create solos based on interpretations of their own drawings. The class shares their work with others three times within the year. To broaden the student’s dance and performance experience, students are welcome to join the Tap Ensemble.

Language Arts The Grade 2 reading program builds on the strategies of effective readers presented in prior grades. Phonemic awareness, word-solving strategies and vocabulary development are taught in both small and whole groups to increase fluency, expression and understanding. Students read in small flexible guided reading groups, whole group author or thematic studies and individually during silent reading times. Students are exposed to various genres including fairy tales, fantasy, realistic fiction, biographies, mysteries, poetry and informational texts related to the social studies curriculum. As the girls make a natural transition from learning to read to reading to learn, teachers provide skills, which help them become independent readers. Guided listening is taught weekly to enhance students’ auditory comprehension skills. Students listen to various oral directions, poems and stories and are asked to recall, draw and write down specific information. The girls are given many opportunities to write and respond to what they’ve heard. During Writers’ Workshop, students are encouraged to develop their writing facility through journals and stories. Students are expected to apply conventional spelling, punctuation and grammar skills to their writing. Students participate in weekly spelling lessons and writing conventions are explicitly taught during Writers’ Workshop.

LIBRARY Students in second grade attend library class once each week. The children utilize reference sources including animal encyclopedias to complete their science research projects, and they study the organization of fiction books and biographies. The girls learn about Caldecott and Coretta Scott King Award winning books, and also discuss books from different countries to tie in with their classroom studies of the continents.

Mathematics The Grade 2 mathematics classroom is a place full of activity. Students use hands-on materials and tools, and meaningful contexts to explore routine and non-routine problems, apply strategies and develop ways to represent and communicate their thinking. Grade 2 students fine-tune fact strategies and achieve fluency with all basic addition and subtraction facts. They refine their understanding of place value with numbers of increasing magnitude. Students develop numeration and estimation skills as well as apply number sense through mental math techniques. Multi-digit addition and subtraction processes are developed as an application of place value. Strategies for solving problems include the use of multiple diagrams such as the “bar model,” which has been popularized in the Singapore Mathematics program. In addition, concepts of multiplication and division are explored. Decimal notation is used as students solve money problems that involve making change. They tell time to the minute and solve basic elapsed time problems. 7


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Measurement attributes explored in Grade 2 expand to include area, perimeter, weight and capacity. In Geometry students recognize and draw two- and three-dimensional shapes having specific attributes. Students employ spatial skills as they combine and subdivide shapes and fill a plane. Shapes provide the context for beginning development of fractions and notation.

more aware of the importance of healthy habitats and biodiversity. Their sense of environmental concern and responsibility for all living things is guided through discussion, observation, reading and writing. IPad apps, nonfiction and fiction, picture and chapter books are used to enhance these areas of study.

MUSIC

World geography and cultures is the theme for this exciting year of exploration. Children study one culture from each of the seven continents and also learn about landforms and waterways. Map skills are emphasized as children explore the communities of the Australian Aborigines, the Maasai tribe of Kenya and Tanzania, the French, the Tibetans, the Peruvians and the Amish. In addition, the girls learn about the temporary scientific communities of Antarctica. Children do comparative studies of these cultures and begin to understand the interconnectedness of peoples across the globe and see themselves as members of a broader global community.

Second Grade music students review and expand on the concepts learned during Grade 1. They sing seasonal songs, play musical games and prepare for concerts. To continue developing their skills in rhythm and music reading they learn about the half note, the half rest and the significance of a 2/4 time signature. Also, they learn melodic notation for the tonal pitches they learned in Grade 1. In addition, students learn to locate these pitches on a music staff, play them instruments and sing them.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The second grade students are refining their fundamental movement skills to a more mature level. By the year’s end they will be able to combine locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills, demonstrating more advanced forms of movement in their physical activities. They are able to progress to vigorous and fun activities for longer periods of time and at higher intensity levels. Students learn about and begin to understand not only the physiological benefits of physical activity but the social and psychological benefits as well. They continue to learn and apply acceptable behavior which demonstrate an understanding of rules and directions, safety practices and working cooperatively with others. They are able to apply understanding and respect for individual differences when acting in a team environment. The second grade girls also experience an expanded unit on Physical Activity and Fitness as they participate in pre- and post-testing on five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility and speed. The girls learn how to improve their fitness levels through a wide spectrum of exercises practiced throughout the year.

Science Grade 2 science also uses hands-on, inquiry-based based instruction. Students continue to investigate and experiment as they improve their scientific skills. They further develop the ability to ask meaningful questions, collect data, and communicate their findings. Their natural curiosity for the world around them is nurtured, and they are encouraged to think deeply and critically. The Grade 2 science curriculum is closely aligned with the social studies, math, art, and language arts curricula. Students study each of the seven continents on earth. In science they will conduct research, investigations, and experiments about the environments and living organisms on the different continents. Students also create models of structures and learn about the engineering design process. Second grade concludes with students creating a viable structure for a habitat of choice and they plant a “three sister’s garden” which they will harvest as third graders. Through these studies, using technology where appropriate, as well as through field work done in the garden, students become 8

Social Studies

Technology Grade 2 students receive weekly technology instruction in the computer lab. The students are introduced to proper keyboarding techniques, and their keyboarding skills are strengthened throughout the year. The students use their word processing and drawing skills to create stories, riddles and comics that are saved on the school’s server. The students use Web 2.0 tools such as Google Earth and Storybird to reinforce the core content areas. The students also use iPads and interactive whiteboards to further enrich their learning.

THEATER This theater workshop introduces students to various ways of telling and sharing stories, and may include very simple improvisations, dialogue exercises, stage movement, mime and, time permitting, puppetry. Students are encouraged to find ways to use body and voice to animate and share a story, and are also exposed to simple theater terminology: stage positions, blocking, scenery, lighting and character. At the conclusion of the trimester, students participate in an informal sharing of some of the games and exercises they have used to explore the story-telling process.

WORLD LANGUAGE In second grade, students continue to study either French or Spanish. Class work continues to be mostly oral in nature, but reading and writing simple words begins at this level. Teachers continue to strive to nurture enthusiasm for learning a second language while encouraging confident and increasingly spontaneous oral expression. Material is presented in meaningful communicative contexts through activities using manipulatives, music, games, dance, arts and crafts, drama and other media. Listening comprehension and basic communication are an ongoing part of every day’s classroom activities. Students are asked to respond to simple phrases and questions, as they describe themselves and things with minimal detail. Elements of the cultures of the target language countries are woven into the curriculum to further engender students’ appreciation for the world language they study.


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s Grade 3 In Grade 3, students begin to think more abstractly, and they begin to understand their connection with the past. Thus, the curriculum is able to address more complex aspects of language, social studies and math. Students continue the study of foreign language and increase the number of science lab classes. The theme, Native Americans, connects various fields of study.

ART The third grade art curriculum complements the social studies curriculum. The students learn about the first North Americans and study art forms related to four different tribal regions. Students learn about artifacts from pre-Columbian times, then study the impact contact with Europeans had on Native art and craft forms. The study of contemporary Native American artists helps children to understand the ways cultures change while maintaining important traditions.

DANCE During this trimester course, third graders continue to develop their skills in jazz technique and begin learning about compositional forms. Choreographic forms explored are: theme and variation, beginning-middle-end, and ABA. After exploring these compositional techniques, the students create solos. Their work is shown at the end of the trimester. To broaden the student’s dance and performance experience, students are welcome to join the Dance Ensemble.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS In third grade students explore the idea of change that can occur in families. They review basic health and safety concepts: covering such topics as nutrition, fitness and healthy decision-making. Students also learn how to build strong friendships, and how to handle conflict appropriately.

Language Arts As students gain fluency in reading, they are able to focus on content in literature. The Grade 3 reading curriculum focuses on skills such as making connections and predicting, visualizing, inferring, selecting the main idea and analyzing the author’s intent. The girls examine a variety of genres, from legends to biographies, as well as books relevant to the social studies curriculum. Students are encouraged to delve deeply into these books, reading like a writer: noticing and appreciating elements in the writer’s craft. During the Philosophy and Literature study, students explore key ideas including: bravery, honesty, freedom, language, aesthetics and identity through the reading of picture books. Participation in Socratic circles deepen the girls’ understanding of the world around them. Students write daily to reinforce the importance of expressing ideas in a clear, organized manner. Teachers use mentor texts to develop awareness of writers’ craft and to help students develop their own style and voice. The girls are encouraged to develop both the creative and formal aspects of writing during Writers’ Workshop. In this setting, the girls craft their own topics, confer with peers and teachers, revise for organization

and clarity and edit for spelling, punctuation and grammar. Writing conventions are regularly and explicitly taught and are embedded within the workshop process.

LIBRARY Students in third grade attend library class once each week. The children hear stories about Native American Indians and research various tribes to tie in with their classroom studies. The girls also discuss a variety of stories throughout the year including trickster tales, biographies and fairy tales. Third graders are introduced to the Dewey Decimal System and the organization of nonfiction books.

Mathematics The Grade 3 mathematics class is one where the teachers create a nurturing, meaning-making environment in which students explore and test ideas. Students discuss their involved mathematical thinking, question ideas and help each other clarify their thoughts. Students continue to expand their understanding of place value as they explore numbers through the millions period. The structure of place value is connected to a beginning understanding of decimals. Students fluently estimate, add and subtract multi-digit numbers and apply computation skills and problem-solving strategies to various situational problems. Attaining fluency with multiplication and division facts is a focal point for Grade 3 students. Building on the conceptual framework established in Grade 2, fact tables are learned systematically as students apply multiplication properties, strategies, patterns and relationships. Facts are extended using multiples of 10 and 100. Students continue to develop understanding of fractions as well as make connections that develop decimal concepts. Measurement involves metric and U.S. Customary units for length, weight, capacity and temperature. In Geometry, students analyze, describe and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes. They decompose, combine and compare shapes to recognize congruence and symmetry.

MUSIC Music learning in Grade 3 becomes increasingly more rigorous and exciting as students are offered extra-curricular opportunities to develop music aptitudes. In class, students continue to develop rhythmic skills as they explore and contrast the difference between duple and triple meter. Also, they add more tonal syllables to their aural vocabulary, and they learn the notes of a major C scale. During this year students also learn about texture and counterpoint in music as they improvise with instruments and listen to various music in rondo form. In addition to music class students may choose to learn to play an orchestral instrument. After achieving a certain level of mastery students are encouraged to participate in the Primary School Instrumental Ensemble. Additionally, beginning in third grade, students who enjoy singing may join the Primary School Chorus, which is open to all enthusiastic singers in Grades 3-5.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION In the third grade, the students have developed mature locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills. They begin to practice these skills and adapt and refine them to be used in a variety of situations. 9


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They are able to explore movement concepts that allow them to adapt to changes in their environment. Students are actively involved in activities that produce higher levels of fitness. They are able to identify the cause and effect of eating healthy and staying active. The girls are continuing to develop cooperative skills that have a foundation in the first grade. They are well aware of right and wrong and safe and unsafe and are able to self monitor these behaviors. Third grade students begin to recognize differences that set people apart. They demonstrate a need to understand these differences and an interest to know more about people who are different from themselves. The third grade girls continue to participate in the pre- and post-testing on the five components of physical fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility and speed. The girls develop an awareness about the kinds of activities that are health related, and begin to choose more of these activities to participate in during their free time. The third graders are able to identify levels of exertion and how that affects their overall health and well-being.

Science The Grade 3 study of Native American cultures is woven throughout the science curriculum. Grade 3 science begins with an exploration of how the school garden has changed over the summer with a focus on accurate observations and scientific inquiry. Students harvest the Three Sisters garden and investigate why these plants were historically grown together. Students explore soil, rocks and minerals, then apply their knowledge during a hike through the Watchung Reservation. Through inquiry and student-designed experiments, the laws of magnetism are revealed. Students embrace the engineering design process and apply this method to plan, construct and present a prototype of their own useful invention. Students end the year with an in-depth study of the ocean, including habitats, animal adaptations, chemistry and an introduction to scientific classification. The culminating experience of a trip to the NJ Sea Grant Consortium at Sandy Hook allows the girls to capture, identify and analyze aquatic species by participating in a field study of salt marsh and beach habitats.

Social Studies Grade 3 social studies investigates the interaction between people and the land. Children begin with a question: “Who were the first peoples of the Americas?” After studying the ancient basket-maker and pueblo societies, the girls begin a comparative study of Native Americans by region. The geography of North America is emphasized and the element of time is introduced through use of timelines. Later, students learn about European explorers and study the collision of two vastly different civilizations. Through report writing and presentations, Grade 3 students begin to develop specific research and study skills.

Technology Grade 3 students receive weekly technology instruction in the computer lab. The students receive individual accounts to our school’s server where they save their work. The students also receive 10

accounts for an online keyboarding program that they use to track their progress from home and school. The students further develop their word processing skills as they learn to use editing features such as spell check and design features such as page layout, clip art and page borders. The students use PowerPoint to create multimedia slideshows complete with animation and effects about a topic from their classroom studies. In addition to the technology in the lab, the girls also have an interactive whiteboard and MacBooks available for use throughout the day.

THEATER This class invites students to take some of the vocal and physical capabilities they’ve explored in the second grade program and apply those strengths to the process of creating and telling more involved stories. Through improvisation and theater games, students explore the way stories are developed for theater, and examine how theater artists employ various techniques to assist them in telling stories. Students participate in some very simple story presentations, and may share these presentations with each other at the end of the session.

WORLD LANGUAGE In third grade, students continue to study either French or Spanish. Students’ time in class is balanced among the four major skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers continue to strive to nurture enthusiasm for learning a second language while encouraging confident and increasingly spontaneous and uninhibited oral expression. Material is presented in meaningful communicative contexts through activities using manipulatives, music, games, dance, arts and crafts, drama and other media. Listening comprehension and basic communication continue to be an ongoing part of every day’s classroom activities. Students engage in asking and answering questions in the target language, describing themselves and things with greater detail, and writing simple letters. Elements of the cultures of the target language countries are woven into the curriculum to further engender students’ appreciation for the world language they study.

Grade 4 The Grade 4 program continues to build skills in abstract thinking. Students are given more responsibility and are provided with many opportunities to learn about and discuss the importance of cooperation, integrity and self-esteem.

ART In fourth grade, the students begin a two-year study of art history. The girls learn about the paintings in the caves of Lascaux, France and try to imagine what the artistic experience was like for the earliest humans. Each subsequent unit touches on one aspect of art from Ancient cultures through the Renaissance. Hands on experiences in a variety of media help to cement a basic familiarity with historic styles and icons.


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s DANCE During this trimester course, the fourth graders review and enhance their jazz dance technique. As in third grade, compositional forms are the focus with additional lessons in music phrasing, canons, symmetry and asymmetry. With this knowledge, the class works in small groups to choreograph dances for a performance. To broaden the dance and performance experience, students are welcome to join the Dance Ensemble.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS In fourth grade students continue to discuss personal growth and development. They will learn about the physiological changes of puberty. They will understand the importance of appropriately using prescription medicines and why smoking is harmful to their health. They review what good nutrition looks like. They begin to advocate for themselves and to understand the influence mass media has on girls’ self-esteem. Issues of conflict resolution and bullying are addressed in more depth.

Language Arts As students gain more sophisticated literacy skills, they progress to more complex reading and writing tasks. The Grade 4 curriculum focuses on abstract thinking and strong communication skills: inference, analysis, speaking, writing and listening. Students read and study novels, short stories and poetry that correlate with the social studies program. The girls are asked to take on diverse perspectives and are exposed to fiction that requires content knowledge. Students are asked to make comparisons, interpret and analyze information and explain what they’ve learned from various texts. They engage in small group literature circles when discussing both fiction and non-fiction, which allows students to practice thinking and speaking skills. Vocabulary and writing skills are developed across the curriculum as students write research reports, essays, and personal response journals. Grammar instruction continues, formalizing the understanding of parts of speech, sentence construction, spelling and punctuation. During Writers’ Workshop, students develop their voice within various genres including: personal narrative, realistic fiction, historical fiction and poetry.

LIBRARY Students in fourth grade attend library class once each week. The girls are assessed on their ability to locate books in the different sections of the library, and they learn to use both print and online resources to complete their research projects. Students discuss a variety of books during the year including stories told in poetry and Aesop’s fables.

Mathematics Grade 4 students experience problems that interest, challenge and engage them in thinking about important mathematics. Students reflect on and communicate their thinking as they make sense of the ideas that are developed. Teachers create experiences for students that utilize hands-on materials, tools, and meaningful contexts to foster

rich connections. Emphasis is placed on number sense and application of decimals. Grade 4 students focus on computational fluency with multi-digit addition and subtraction with decimals as well as multi-digit whole number multiplication. Students use parentheses and solve open number sentences and are introduced to variables. A connection is formed between fractions and decimals through conversions. Work with proper and improper fractions include: equivalence, comparison, order, decomposition and the concept of addition and subtraction. Students collect, organize and analyze data as well as explore concepts of probability. Geometry and measurement unite as students not only continue work with attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes but also quantify them through measurement. Students measure area, and derive and apply formulas for various types of shapes. Angles are measured and classified. Students continue to develop spatial skills using transformations.

MUSIC Fourth grade music students explore the concept of dividing the beat by pairing eighth and sixteenth note combinations. During this year students learn to perform syncopated rhythms and they continue to develop rhythmic memory by taking rhythmic dictation. Also, grade four students add the pitch syllables “fa” and “ti” to their aural vocabulary, and they discover why these two pitches are very useful to the melodic scale. Students will also write key signatures in C, F, and G diatonic scales. In addition they will listen to, create, play and sing three and four part harmonic canons and chaconnes.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION In fourth grade the girls begin to work toward mastery in locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills. Variations of motor skills are combined to form more complex patterns of movement. These combinations are then implemented in sport specific activities. The students continue to apply basic concepts of movement to improve their individual performance. They continue to develop cooperative skills that have a foundation in the first three years of Primary School. Periods of independent, self-guided activities are progressively increasing in duration. The fourth grade students continue to understand the cause and effect relationship of physical activity and health. They participate in the pre- and post-testing on the five components of physical fitness and are able to analyze assessment data and develop simple fitness goals. They can identify many physical activities that influence health related fitness. They make healthy nutritional decisions based upon their knowledge of the five food groups and how to get what they need to stay active and healthy. The students in the fourth grade can list physical activities that they enjoy. understanding that their enjoyment is dependent upon their competence in the activity. They willingly participate in new activities and relish opportunities to learn new skills.

Science Grade 4 science students further develop their inquiry skills and abilities to utilize scientific equipment. The topics they explore as budding, scientifically literate young women include biology, chemistry and the physical sciences. During the muscle and skeletal 11


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system units, they are introduced to the methods of dissection as they investigate the form and function of the body. They continue the engineering design process during their study of static and current electricity by constructing numerous circuits. A trip to a planetarium to discuss the solar system with a astronomer and participation in a gardening citizen scientist project sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency culminates their study of Space. Students practice investigative science as they explore natural resources, climate change and current environmental topics. They utilize classroom technology to research and create a digital project centered on issues specific to New Jersey. By the end of Grade 4 they have explored global connections and applied critical thinking skills to a variety of situations.

Social Studies Continuing an emphasis on geography from Grades 2 and 3, the Grade 4 program highlights the different regions of the United States. With the mastery of concrete facts attained in earlier grades, the students are now ready to explore the interrelationship between geography, culture and economics. Research skills are reinforced through independent study projects and oral presentations.

Technology Grade 4 students receive weekly technology instruction in the computer lab. The students receive their own KPS Google accounts and learn how to create, organize and share their work from their KPS Google Drives from school or home. Computer Literacy and digital citizenship skills are emphasized in Grade 4 as the students learn how to effectively use Internet to search, evaluate websites and to cite sources. In addition, students learn basic programming skills using Scratch, a child-friendly programming application developed by MIT. Grade 4 students also have interactive whiteboards and MacBooks available for use in the classroom throughout the day.

THEATER This trimester workshop provides students with an opportunity to participate in the development of a performance piece. The piece may be adapted from an existing story, may incorporate multiple stories, poems or excerpts from larger works, and may include original material developed by students. The focus of the work is ensemble in nature, and may include group/choral work for the entire team, narrators and character roles. All students are encouraged to find ways to become actively engaged in all aspects of the performance work, and a performance of the work will be shared with the primary school at the conclusion of the trimester.

WORLD LANGUAGE The goal in fourth grade World Language class is to continue to develop enthusiasm for learning a second language while encouraging confident expression. Time in class is balanced among the four major skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. The Integration of the five Cs: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Communities is essential in the World Language class. The communicative competence of the students in the World 12

Language by means of cultural awareness with activities that focus on listening, reading and writing skills. Students will develop skills to prepare them for the more rigorous expectations of fifth grade World Language instruction.

Grade 5 Grade 5, the culmination of the Primary School experience, looks to the past and to the future. An emphasis on responsibility, selfsufficiency and conscientious work habits help the girls become independent and assertive learners. Study skills are woven into every aspect of the curriculum, providing a solid foundation for the middle school years. Grade 5 students also explore the field of computer programming as they learn the LOGO language using MicroWorlds EX.

ART The fifth grade art curriculum begins with a study of Architecture. Students experiment with engineering and design and create models of various styles of homes. Subsequent units include the Baroque style, Realism, Impressionism and a variety of Modern and contemporary arts. Each unit builds on creative thinking skills and visual understanding while also introducing the students to a variety of media experiences.

DANCE During this trimester course, fifth grade students begin by reviewing jazz dance technique and compositional forms. Improvisational techniques are introduced and explored. A final performance piece is created based on choices made during the improvisation classes. They perform in the Theater at the Primary Spring Dance Concert. To broaden the dance and performance experience, students are welcome to join the Dance Ensemble.

HEALTH & WELLNESS In fifth grade students learn more about puberty and the female body. The menstrual cycle is reviewed in greater depth and student concerns are normalized. The learning goals for this culminating year in Primary School include further development of self-advocacy skills, deeper self-understanding, being able to use an assertive voice, understanding the difference between conflict and bullying, becoming a critical consumer of media and understanding the difference between communicable and non-communicable diseases as well as recognizing some issues surrounding substance dependency.

Language Arts Literature study in Grade 5 focuses on comprehension and interpretation, as well as the understanding of important literary terms and the narrative structure of the plot. Students read widely from contemporary fiction to poetry to Shakespeare. They engage in literature circles and whole group discussions. Literature is also tied to the social studies curriculum and students are exposed to topics that go beyond their personal experiences. They begin to critically examine the quality and accuracy of texts, extending their


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s understanding to incorporate new ideas and content. Word study and vocabulary development are embedded within the study of literature. Students respond to literature through a variety of class activities, from response journals to creative writing projects and formal essays. Through dramatizations, oral reading and artwork, students use literature as a springboard for creative expression. In Writers’ Workshop, the girls further develop their voice by composing texts that are personally compelling. Students apply their growing knowledge of grammar, punctuation and spelling to their own work. Close attention is paid to these mechanics as students improve their critical-thinking skills and their creative abilities, develop an effective writing style and share their work with others.

LIBRARY Students in fifth grade attend library class once each week. The girls are introduced to different resources, in print and online, to complete their research projects. They read and discuss a variety of books from different genres including poetry, science fiction and short stories. They also learn about Newbery Award winning stories and participate in a Newbery Party.

Mathematics Problem solving is the cornerstone of the Grade 5 mathematics program. Students grapple with complex problems, and reason, represent and reflect on the mathematics content that is developed. The math teacher facilitates lessons utilizing hands-on materials, tools and meaningful contexts that intentionally challenge students to think and reason critically. Students are encouraged to discuss and question ideas as well as create ways to further enrich their learning. As students study number theory they classify numbers based on factor attributes. Students achieve fluency with multi-digit multiplication and division with both whole numbers and decimals. They apply concepts of fractions as they link this understanding to decimals, percents and ratios. They learn fraction multiplication and division through concrete models and situational problems. Students reason algebraically as they solve balance problems, write expressions using parentheses, brackets, symbols and exponents, determine functions and connect to graphs. In geometry/measurement, students learn about angle relationships and measure and construct angles using tools. Students hone spatial skills as they explore and create tessellation designs. They develop and apply area formulas to various shapes, and determine the volume of rectangular prisms. Concepts of probability are reinforced as students perform experiments and determine possible outcomes.

MUSIC The fifth grade year in music is very exciting as students expand and integrate all prior knowledge and skills learned in previous grades. Students continue to develop and explore more advanced rhythmic skills by reading, writing, singing, and playing dotted eighth note and sixteenth note combinations. Also, students now explore changing the beat between 3/8 and 4/8 meters and they are introduced to 6/8 time signature. During this year students learn to identify “la” as the tonal center in a diatonic melody, and they learn about “a” minor mode in music. In addition, students increase their understanding of

music texture and they learn about themes and variations in music by improvising pieces that integrate expressive contrasts.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION In the fifth grade the students are beginning to achieve maturity with most locomotor, non-locomotor and manipulative skills. They begin the process of integrating these skills into a variety of individual and team sports and activities that have been modified to their developmental level. They begin to demonstrate and understanding of proper movement forms. They are able to self analyze their own skills and that of their classmates and discuss methods for improving performance. The students begin to understand the relationship between lifestyle and health. Through observation they begin to develop an awareness of the physical, social and emotional importance of physical activity. They choose to participate in activities out of school that are healthy and will produce a desired level of fitness. As their fitness levels improve, students participate in moderate to vigorous activity for longer periods of time. They are able to describe how high levels of fitness are achieved, and identify what their age appropriate physical fitness goals should be. The fifth grade students continue to understand the cause and effect relationship of physical activity and health. They participate in the pre- and post-testing on the five components of physical fitness and are able to analyze assessment data and develop broader fitness goals. The students begin to show competence for working independently and cooperatively, in pairs and small groups. They demonstrate an evolving appreciation for positive class conduct in accordance with rules and policies. Their ability to solve problems increases with their understanding. They are able to find activities that they enjoy in class and apply skills learned to activities outside of the physical education class.

Science Grade 5 is the culmination of the Primary School general science program. Increased independent use of the scientific design process leads students to be closely involved with the world around them. Students explore ecology and the environment as they prepare for their overnight trip to the NJ School of Conservation. Through STEM projects, students investigate sound and light, and continue their study of the human body. They delve into the history of space exploration and current NASA projects through a simulated mission to the Moon. Another focus is the important role women have played throughout history in advancing science. A highlight of the Grade 5 program is the opportunity for students to design and conduct a small group project. The girls utilize the scientific design process to carry out a short-term, quantitative investigation. The project culminates with the students showcasing their scientific leadership skills by presenting their findings to parents, peers and Kent Place faculty at the annual Grade 5 Science Fair.

Social Studies With human rights as its core, the Grade 5 social studies program examines the history of the United States through many different lenses. Beginning with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the students examine what it means to have economic, political and 13


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religious freedom using literature, history books, primary sources, film and photographs. The units of study span the founding of our nation and our Freedom Documents through the structure of United States government. The compromises of our Civil War, the changing nature of immigration, civil rights and women’s rights, and the Holocaust are all content areas through which the principles that helped create our nation are discussed, debated, researched and written about. Activities are designed to help students develop strong skills in reading both fiction and nonfiction text. Throughout the year, active discussion on current events expands students’ critical-thinking skills and reminds us of the importance of human rights for everyone.

Technology Grade 5 students receive weekly technology instruction in the computer lab. The students receive their own e-mail via a KPS Google account. The students learn about e-mail “etiquette” and the responsibilities and privileges of having a school e-mail and Drive account in KPS Google. The students explore more of Google’s tools as they learn how to create Google Docs, slideshows and spreadsheets based on their core content areas. The students also learn more about Web 2.0 tools such as Prezi, Voicethread, Scratch programming and Lego Robotics. Grade 5 students also have interactive whiteboards and MacBooks available for use in the classroom throughout the day.

THEATER: THE SHAKESPEARE UNIT This workshop offers students a more advanced opportunity to participate in the development and performance of a play. Students will be working with a scripted adaptation of a play by Shakespeare, and will be memorizing lines and staging. Props, costumes and scenery are kept very simple, so that the focus of the work will be on the interactive, ensemble nature of the performance. A full performance of the adaptation is presented to the Primary School at the conclusion of the trimester.

WORLD LANGUAGE The fifth grade World Language class aims to give opportunities to the students to apply previously learned material and demonstrate proficiency in the second language while encouraging confident expression. The Integration of the five Cs: Communication, Culture, Connections, Comparisons and Communities are essential in the World Language class. Students strengthen their communicative competence in their World Language by means of activities that focus on speaking, listening, reading and writing skills, while also raising their awareness of the target culture. Students will develop strategies to make a smooth transition to the World Language program of the Middle School.

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LeaDS (Leadership, Diversity and Study Skills) The LeaDS course has been designed to help prepare fifth graders for their transition into Middle School by exposing them to an expanded method of thinking about, reasoning with and analyzing their identity and role within the community and the world. Learning to lead requires that one is organized and goal-focused, ethical and effective, and inclusive and responsive to oneself and others. The three LeaDS components are integrated across the fifth grade curriculum, and cover both semesters.

Leadership This component has been designed to allow students to investigate traditional and non-traditional definitions of leadership, and to showcase their knowledge and development as young leaders through collaborative projects, individual and team problem-solving, real-life applications and a variety of hands-on activities and discussions. Topics to be covered include: General and Personal Leadership Styles; Effective Leadership Skills; Leadership Applications; and Influences on Everyday Attitudes and Behaviors.

Diversity This component focuses on understanding the value of multiple perspectives in relationship to one’s own individual identity and culture, and on building trust and respect within a community. Skills to be covered include: Empathy and Listening; Consensus-building; Investigative Analysis; Cultural Competence and Responsiveness; Friendship Dynamics; and Inclusion and Anti-bullying and Character-building.

Study Skills This component has been designed with a focus on assuring that students possess effective and applicable work habits and study skills. Content to be covered include: Organization Skills; Creating a Study Space; Time Management; Active Listening; Note-taking; Memory Strategies; and Test-taking Skills.


MIDDLE SCHOOL

Middle School Academic Policies and Requirements

Through a carefully planned curriculum, students develop the academic skills and independent study habits essential for a demanding college preparatory program.

Course Load The school year is divided into trimesters, and Middle School students take the following courses: • • • • • • • •

• •

English Language Arts History/Social Studies Learning Strategies Mathematics Physical Education Science Technology Visual and Performing Arts Art Music Dance (elective in Grades 7 and 8) Theater (by audition in Grades 7 and 8) Health and Wellness for Young Women World Language

Electives Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. Students in Grades 7 and 8 have the opportunity to take two trimester elective courses each year. These courses supplement the curriculum by providing students with an introduction to a new discipline that is not covered in the regular curriculum. All electives are graded on a high pass, pass or fail basis.

Work EFFORT Rating System 1 - consistently exceeds expectations 2 - consistently meets expectations 3 - usually meets expectations 4 - frequently does not meet expectations

Eighth Grade Distinction This distinction is awarded to a student who has earned a 95 or above average for the year in a particular course. Distinction is always awarded at the discretion of the teacher for extraordinary accomplishment.

Trimester Reporting of Grades There are three marking periods, each approximately 11 weeks long. All students receive written comments at the mid-terms for annual courses, and written comments at the end of the trimester for electives and trimester courses.

Requirements for Passing/Promotion If a student earns a D+ or below in a single course, the school will determine if the student will need to repeat the course or fulfill a summer equivalent in order to return the following year. To continue at Kent Place, a student may receive no more than one yearly course average below a C- and must demonstrate, in the opinion of the faculty, acceptable effort, attitude and citizenship. There may be times when the administration and faculty of the School conclude that the educational program at Kent Place may not be one that best serves the educational needs of a particular student. In such situations, the School will hold conversations with families to discuss educational alternatives that may be better suited to the learning style of their daughter.

Grading System

A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F

97 - 100 93 - 96 90 - 92 87 - 89 83 - 86 80 - 82 77 - 79 73 - 76 70 - 72 67 - 69 63 - 66 60 - 62 Below 60

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Required Courses and Electives by Grade Course Department

Grade 6

Electives

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Grade 7

Grade 8

3 trimesters required (see offerings below)

3 trimesters required (see offerings below) Young Narrators & Their World

English

Character & Community

Plot & Place

Health and Wellness for Young Women

1 trimester required

1 trimester required

1 trimester required

History

Ancient & Classical Civilizations

World Cultures & Geography

Portraits of Leadership

Learning Strategies

1 trimester required

Thinking Outside the Box (1 trimester required)

Math 7: Abstractions and Understandings or Algebra (based upon teacher recommendation)

Algebra or Geometry (based upon teacher recommendation)

Music

Choral, Instrumental or General Musicianship (required)

Choral, Instrumental or General Musicianship (required)

Choral, Instrumental or General Musicianship (required)

Physical Education/ Athletics

3 trimesters required of Physical Education (no KP Athletics available in Grade 6)

3 trimesters required of Physical Education or KP Athletic Team

3 trimesters required of Physical Education or KP Athletic Team

Science

Structure & Function

Energy

Systems & Interactions

Mathematics

Math 6: Operations and Variables

English Expression (1 trimester required)

Tech 7 Technology

Tech 6

Documentary (1 trimester required) Tech Skills (required for new students)

Dance (1 trimester) Visual & Performing Arts

Theater (1 trimester) Studio Art (3 trimesters)

Tech 8 Tech Skills (required for new students)

Dance Elective (see offerings below)

Dance Elective (see offerings below)

Theater Elective (see offerings below)

Theater Elective (see offerings below)

Studio Art

Studio Art

Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish

Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish

Chinese, French or Spanish World Language

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Intro to Latin (1 trimester required)  

The Grade 7 and 8 Elective options include (subject to change): 3D Design and Sculpture (Visual Art), Acting Workshop (Theater), 7th Grade Play (Theater), 8th Grade Play (Theater), Dance, Creative Writing (English), Engineering Marvels (Science), Ethics I & II (History), It’s News to Me (History), Let’s Face it (Visual Art), Mathematical Expeditions (Math), Open and Shut (Visual Art), Peer Mediation (Health and Wellness for Young Women), Public Speaking (English), Robotics I & II (Technology), The Play’s the Thing (English), and Soundings-Yearbook (English)


Courses of Study in the Middle School English The English Department focuses on building and refining skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students read for enlightenment and for pleasure. Novels, stories and poems provide insight into other eras and other cultures while allowing young students to see their own thoughts and experiences reflected in classic and contemporary readings. The Department encourages girls to become writers, drawing on literature, their personal experiences, and their own imaginations. Students frequently share their work with both peers and teachers as they work on grammar and craft. They learn to read, write and think critically and bring increasing sophistication to their understanding of literature. Students become prepared for communication in the 21st century through lively class discussions, public speaking, collaborative learning and engagement with technology. The English classes encourage students to appreciate the joy of reading, the power of language and imagination, and the significance of self-discovery and self-expression.

Grade 6: Character and Community In this course, students continue to develop their skills in reading, writing, critical thinking and public speaking. The concepts of character and community are explored through reading novels and short stories, with a major, continuing focus on empathy in literature and in real life. One guiding question throughout the year is, How can community and society norms affect character and behavior both negatively and positively? The reading selections offer different perspectives of the world and encourage the students to analyze and understand diverse points of view. The course focuses on providing a foundation for literary analysis through the study of characters, setting, plot, symbol and theme. The writing process is explored and practiced in all its phases: brainstorming, pre-writing, writing, revising, publishing, and grammar is studied in conjunction with writing. During the short story unit, each student writes a short story on a topic of her choice. Critical thinking and effective communication of ideas are major goals throughout the year, and each student is challenged to become a more skilled and confident reader, writer, thinker and speaker.

Grade 7: Plot and Place In Grade 7 English, students grow into more mature readers, fluent writers and effective communicators. Selections in classic and contemporary young adult literature uncover the maturation process through the lenses of history, race, class, age and gender, and cultural assumptions and stereotypes are discussed as functions of society. Students analyze authors’ writing styles and the development of literary elements, such as plot, character and theme. Comprehension strategies and essential questions support students as they develop their abstract and critical thinking skills. One example of a recurring essential question is: What happens when a member of a group thinks differently from her peers? Students develop their critical writing skills through the use of models and organizers. They learn to write for a specific audience and to provide relevant and credible

evidence to support their argument. Creative writing focuses on “showing instead of telling.” Students also practice every stage in the writing process and engage in peer review. Throughout the program, students continue to develop skills in grammar, vocabulary and study methods, as they are taught in context. As students continually reflect on what works best for them individually, they also find themselves growing into lifelong learners.

Grade 8: Young Narrators and Their World This course emphasizes the development of critical thinking in discussion, reading, and writing through the analysis of literature and through original thematic and guided student writing. Students read a variety of texts dealing with identity and personal journey, including novels, non-fiction first person narratives, a Shakespeare play, short stories and poems. As students pursue greater self-reflection in relation to course readings, the overarching essential question becomes, “How does my journey shape who I am?” In addition to producing formal compositions about the reading, they also engage in informal writing to develop their thinking. The study of literary terms and techniques further enables students to appreciate the craft of writing while enjoying the pleasures of reading. Augmenting their work in literature, the class also concentrates on grammar and vocabulary. Grammar study focuses on developing problem-solving skills and improving sentence structure and precise expression. Through vocabulary work, students continually reinforce and develop both written and spoken language skills.

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English Expression All students in Grade 8 take this course, which focuses on improving writing skills. The purpose of this course is to develop students’ creative and critical writing skills. Students are exposed to various forms of composition, which include creative writing, original narratives, research and persuasive essays. The course uses a writing workshop method, and students receive individual guidance throughout the process of pre-writing, drafting, revision and peer review. In small groups or with the teacher, students immediately receive positive feedback and suggestions. The course emphasizes effective articulation and makes demands that are stimulating and rewarding.

Public Speaking j Public speaking is a one-trimester elective designed to help Grade 7 and 8 students develop the ability to give an effective oral presentation, a skill that they will use in other courses and also in leadership roles throughout their lives. The art of public speaking is demystified as delivering a good speech and is broken down into its component parts: choosing an appropriate topic for the audience; knowing its purpose; collecting information and details; and organizing the information into an engaging introduction, a clear body and a memorable ending; practicing the speech; and finally giving the speech. After presenting a speech, the student identifies the strengths and weaknesses in her speech and formulates personal goals that she will consciously work on achieving in her next speech. The audience members utilize their best listening skills and evaluate their classmates’ Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 17


speeches, an important requirement of the course. Each student becomes more confident about giving speeches after practicing public speaking skills in this cooperative and supportive environment.

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Creative writing is designed to allow students who love to write to continue to explore writing in a supportive workshop environment. Students may choose to write short stories, plays, monologues or poetry, either independently or collaboratively. They are invited to share their work with the class in both draft and final form. It is intended that students will learn how to provide constructive feedback to their peers and how to incorporate constructive feedback in their revisions. The purpose of this elective is to provide an opportunity for writers to nurture their creative voices and to share them with fellow writers.

The Play’s the Thing j Offered Trimester III If you think Shakespeare is boring or impossible to understand, think again. In one play alone, he tackles teenage crushes, the betrayal of best friends and what happens when rumors spread. And four hundred years later, he is still considered the greatest writer of the Western world. Come challenge your ideas, and learn why we study Shakespeare. Students in this course will be introduced to several of Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets, as well as the man himself. They will gain exposure to the arts and culture of Elizabethan England. Through dramatic play and hands-on activities, students will crack the code of early modern English and develop skills in verbal and non-verbal communication. By the end of this class, you might find yourself composing a sonnet in iambic pentameter.

Soundings j Offered Trimester III This Grade 8 leadership opportunity allows for multiple editor positions. Soundings, the Middle School “yearbook,” offers participants the opportunity to learn about leadership and teamwork, theme development, digital photography, graphic design, news writing, online publishing, marketing and advertising. While there is no “traditional” homework, everyone will be assigned work to complete outside of class (e.g., photographing a sports game). Students will be evaluated on positive participation, assignments and meeting deadlines.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS FOR YOUNG WOMEN The Grade 1-12 curriculum explores issues that affect the physical and psycho-social development of women throughout their lives. Using a team teaching model, students learn from faculty in the areas of ethics, diversity, nutrition and health. Through class discussion, group activities and role play, emphasis is placed on the development of skills in problem solving, decision making, values clarification, coping and communication. In addition, relevant topics generated from students’ concerns and current events are addressed. Parent involvement is an essential part of the curriculum at each grade level. 18

History History in the Middle School is a dynamic encounter between the ideas and events of the past and constantly changing landscape of the present. Learners are challenged to extend their global reach by becoming explorers as they navigate through the cultures of the ancient world in Grade 6; then consider how geography, ethnic and religious diversity and political conflict converge to shape the modern world in Grade 7. The journey continues in Grade 8 as the focus shifts to leadership and the quest for rights. Middle Schoolers become both engaged and passionate as they invest in the historical narrative.

Grade 6: Ancient and Classical Civilizations Students intellectually journey to the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Greece and Rome through an examination of geography and culture. The course incorporates the five themes of geography throughout the year leading to a basic understanding of how civilizations are shaped by their physical settings. Students examine why people shifted from a nomadic way of life to settled communities. The course provides a comparative study of the ancient and classical periods, as well as an understanding of early civilizations’ contributions to the modern world.

Grade 7: World Cultures and Geography The goal of the Grade 7 course is to create knowledgeable global citizens as students study the geography, culture and history of four major regions of the world: Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin America. Through case studies and current events, technology and video, classrooms become laboratories for multiculturalism. Stereotyping and ethnocentrism diminish as students try to walk in the shoes of others; they learn about cultural patterns, world religions and contemporary issues that broaden their world view.

Grade 8: Portraits of Leadership The Grade 8 curriculum in history is designed around the themes of leadership and the human struggle for voice, justice and equality. The course begins with a study of rights and authority and continues chronologically, tracing events from the fall of the Roman Empire to the 20th century from the perspectives of use and abuse of power. The lives and ideas of great leaders are examined for their influence. The challenge of this course is to integrate and master information from a variety of sources: readings, lectures, videos, websites and discussions. There is an interview project which requires students to practice the art of questioning an experienced leader in person. This unique history course was developed at Kent Place.

Ethics j The purpose of this one-trimester elective course is to strengthen each student’s moral awareness while helping each student to develop respect for herself and others in a global community. Participants discover the definition of “values” by exploring their own personal values, the values of their school community and the values of their greater community, along with the values that are learned through religion, home and other institutions. The foundations of ethical


thought and decision-making are taught in order to guide the students through ethical dilemmas discussed in class. Students who take this course have the option of taking a second Ethics elective, Ethics II, where they will further develop their ability to utilize the ethical decision-making process with more complex issues.

It’s News to Me j Focused on current events, this course is intended to assist students in using a quality framework to understand social issues associated with current local, national and global news stories. Lessons are designed to equip students with the necessary skills to apply that understanding when forming an opinion. Group discussions, debates and activities are facilitated to emphasize the importance of highlighting essential issue factors to promote informed decisionmaking. Many resources are used to take the students through the key fundamentals of recognizing bias that often exists in news writing and reporting, including newspapers, magazines, websites and web.

LEARNING STRATEGIES Learning strategies are integrated into the Middle School curriculum. Within the various subject areas, students in Grades 6 through 8 learn skills that help them become independent learners. The program emphasizes organization, use of time, note taking, outlining, essay writing and reading techniques. Additionally, regularly scheduled learning strategies classes for Grade 6 formalize the process.

Mathematics Our program emphasizes the content and skills that promote longterm mathematical growth and achievement. We encourage students to imagine, play with ideas and try multiple approaches, and foster habits of curiosity, initiative, organization and reflectiveness. Students develop their abilities to make connections in order to apply ideas in new settings. Students collaborate to discuss conjectures and make sense of ideas, learning how to construct and analyze logical arguments. Problems, extended tasks, projects and investigations are chosen to emphasize the roles of creativity, practice, and persistence in math. Students learn and communicate using a variety of mathematical tools, methods, forms, and technology. In all our courses, our goal is to develop students’ abilities in multiple dimensions of mathematics. Procedural fluency, conceptual understanding, adaptive reasoning and strategic competence are all essential. Equally important are productive dispositions and interest in math as a subject. Numerical operations, number theory, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics form the core course content in Grades 6 – 8, with balanced attention to procedures, concepts, reasoning and problem solving. In class, students work on tasks that can be extended into individual challenges within and across disciplines. Math Labs and the Math Studio offer opportunities for individualized study, contest preparation and recreational mathematics. All students take Algebra by Grade 8, allowing progression to AP Calculus by Grade 12.

Math 6: Operations and Variables Students work with fractions, decimals and integers, along with ratios and rates, to develop conceptual understanding of variables and their

uses. Students solve problems in number theory, geometry, statistics and probability using operations and variables to develop their ability to reason with algebraic expressions. Special attention is given to reading mathematical explanations, interpreting the meaning of variables and writing justifications. To determine the appropriate course for students in Grade 7 (Math 7 or Algebra) the department uses Grade 6 standardized test scores, in-class assessments during the year and an end-of-year examination.

Thinking Outside the Box Required for Grade 6 This one-trimester elective, which meets four times each A/B week cycle, consists of a series of non-routine and open-ended problem solving tasks from across the core middle school content. With each task, students focus on developing their ability to invent and test strategies and evaluate their own results. Students consider tasks individually and collaboratively, working to develop their ability to communicate their ideas and solutions verbally and record their own reasoning in written form. The course is pass/fail.

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Math 7: Abstractions and Understandings In this course, students solve problems in number theory, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability, using ratio and proportion, linear equations, exponents and irrational numbers. Through such work, students accelerate their development of the abstract reasoning skills that are needed to construct and interpret algebraic equations and write mathematical justifications. Special attention is given to representing algebraic relationships in numerical, graphical, symbolic and verbal forms.

Algebra Prerequisite: Math 7 or recommendation of the Department In this course, students study operations with variables and methods of solving equations, with an emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students learn to perform and explain the reasoning behind procedures involving systems of equations, inequalities, exponents and polynomials. Students use verbal descriptions, equations, tables of values and graphs to solve problems and model real-world situations. Geometric figures are used to explain algebraic results and problems from geometry serve as contexts for algebraic work. Students write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems, provide justifications for conclusions, and gain insight into the behavior of functions.

Geometry (3 credits) Prerequisite: Algebra In this course, students study relationships and establish results involving measurement, shape and position. Content includes similarity, congruence, coordinates, trigonometric ratios, two- and three-dimensional figures, area, volume and circle. Students use variables and geometric relationships to model real-world phenomena. Students study algebraic functions that arise in geometric contexts and use algebra to understand geometric relationships. Logical Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 19


reasoning is a focus of the course; students examine assumptions, evaluate conjectures and determine the validity of conclusions using various forms of proof. Dynamic geometry software is used for investigative work, to develop understanding of results, and as one of a variety of tools for developing and confirming proofs.

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Looking for more math? We will step off the beaten path and journey deeper into the lands of number theory, geometry, algebra and probability seeking mathematical treasures. Expect to exert yourself on expeditions through challenging mathematical terrain that may last hours, days and even months. In this course, you’ll learn how to do research in math and where that research can take you. You’ll enjoy the process of asking your own questions, getting stuck, moving forward and reaching the top of a mathematical mountain - to find an even higher peak ahead of you!

PEER MEDIATION j Students from Grades 7 and 8 are selected through an application process that is reviewed by the Middle School faculty. Peer Mediators participate in training during the fall elective. The program mission is to assist students in identifying and addressing peer conflict in a pro-social and solution focused manner. Students in Grades 7 and 8 will be trained as Peer Mediators and will gain the skills to facilitate conflict resolution with their Middle School peers.

Physical Education and Athletics In a non-competitive instructional program, Grade 6 students apply fundamental sports skills and strategies to modified games. The introduction and development of the basic skills are used in sports played in the Middle and Upper School levels. The international sports of cricket, rounders, netball, rugby and badminton are introduced to expand the student’s multicultural awareness of sports played around the world. In Grades 7 and 8, students have the opportunity to enroll in a physical education class for each trimester. This class will run daily during the Middle School PE/Athletic Block from 2:15-3:15 p.m. Through the use of technology, students use pedometers to measure their daily exertion levels. Teachers also use a self-rating chart so that students may rate their own exertion levels and attitude during class activities. The program varies each trimester but may include the following: • Recreational games (ultimate Frisbee, flag football, badminton, roller blading, rock climbing) • International games (netball, rugby, rounder’s, cricket) • Fitness related programs

Athletics All Grade 7 and 8 students are eligible to join a school athletic team; practices are held during the Middle School PE/Athletic Block (2:15-3:15p.m. daily). The objective for these athletes is to gain experience, fundamental sport skills and basic strategies to develop an understanding of teamwork and team participation. When participation numbers are high and there is appropriate competition available (B level teams at other schools), A and B teams may be selected. A 20

and B teams are selected by skill, ability, attitude and sportsmanship. Team level is not contingent on the grade level of a student. Teams may also be organized into smaller squads, within the teams, to ensure maximum participation in competitive play. Playing time will vary from player to player, although the goal is for wide participation. Middle School team members must make a commitment to the game schedule. The expectation is that the student will attend every game scheduled. All games are played after school.

Physical Education Exemption Please refer to the Athletics Overview page on the school website or MyKPS for the most up-to-date version of the Physical Education Exemption policy. Physical Education is a required course for all Kent Place students. Students in the Middle School are eligible to apply for Physical Education Exemption on a trimester or yearly basis. Physical Education consists of two components: physical activity and physical education. Students receiving exemption are exempt from the physical activity requirements only and will be required to participate in Project Adventure based workshops at the beginning of each trimester. Determining exemption eligibility is a four-part process. Part One – Determining Exemption Eligibility Criteria for outside training MUST: 1. Demonstrate a major commitment and high-level training for a sport that KPS does not offer or is currently not in-season. 2. Meet a minimum of 10 hours per week or have a metabolic equivalent of task (MET) assignment of 7.0 or higher. A compendium of physical activities chart (Taylor Code) available on MyKPS. 3. Include the following: Fitness and Specific Skill Training. These hours do not include travel time. 4. Include meaningful competitions and/or performances in the sport throughout the exemption period 5. Occur under the direct supervision of an adult coach Part Two – Complete the Online Exemption Application Form 1. Students who participate in an outside athletic program may petition for an exemption on a single trimester or yearly basis. 2. The online form is located on the Athletics Overview page of the school website or on MyKPS. 3. The “View our PE Exemption Policy” button contains information that explains the most up-to-date version of the exemption policy. MS Application Dates: Fall: September 12, 2014 Winter: November 7, 2014 Spring: February 20, 2015 Part Three – Final Evaluation Process Upon approval, exemption students will be required to submit a final report and journal describing what she has achieved throughout the trimester. Yearly exemption students are expected to complete the online form each trimester and submit the signed journal in the spring.


Online Report Form: The online report is located on the exemption policy page. Journal: The journal should be maintained for the season and include self-reflections using the three goals established during the application process. The journal should also include a final reflection of the overall season. The journal must be signed and dated by the instructor and submitted by the specified due dates. MS Report Due Dates: Fall: December 19, 2014 Winter: February 20, 2015 Spring: May 15, 2015 Part Four – Exemption Expectations Middle School students are expected to report to the Middle School Office on the first day of the exemption period. Students will be assigned to a study hall. Sign-in and study hall attendance are required to maintain exemption status. Students are required to remain on campus until the end of the school day. Exceptions must approved by the Middle School Office. Failure to fulfill the criteria of the Exemption process may result in consequences. If a student wishes to pursue the exemption for more than one trimester, she must select the full year option and complete the online report form for committee review. The trimester updates should reflect any changes in the training and competitive schedule. Students approved for trimester or yearly exemption are required to notify the Physical Education Department Chair of any changes in training schedule or competitions that occur during an exemption period. All exemption decisions are made by the Exemption Committee which includes the Athletic Director, the Middle and Upper School Division Directors, the Physical Education Department Chair and the Director of Studies. Additional questions regarding the exemption policy should be directed to the Director of Studies.

Science The goal of the Science program is to foster an excitement and enthusiasm for learning about the natural world in an atmosphere of scientific inquiry. Through the process of independent research, lab practicals and demonstrations, students learn to manipulate the tools of a scientist and to observe, record, analyze and draw conclusions as they examine scientific questions. By the end of Middle School, students have learned both investigative laboratory skills and a body of scientific knowledge in a broad range of scientific disciplines that will serve as a solid foundation for future laboratory research courses.

Grade 6: Structure and Function How does the structure of a water bottle relate to the function of the water bottle? Grade 6 science emphasizes an inquiry-based approach to learning that invites each student to be actively involved in the learning process. This integrated course weaves a discussion of structure and function as a theme throughout the exploration of life, earth and physical sciences. Atomic structure, diversity of life, the rock cycle, and body mechanics are incorporated into this theme. In sixth grade, students are encouraged to ask, how does science studied

in class connect to the world around them? The largest laboratory project culminates at the annual Science Expo. This major project focuses on successful execution of the scientific method and conducting high-level research to question the validity of consumer claims. Students learn the technology skills necessary to record, catalog, and present data for laboratory projects using both traditional and digital equipment. Speaking skills are strengthened by oral presentations of projects, current science events, and Expo results.

Grade 7: Energy What are the different branches of science within the study of planet earth and energy? In Grade 7 we investigate the basic concepts of geology, chemistry, environmental science, meteorology, and life, all within the lens of energy. Students relate and apply their classroom experiences to current events in order to develop an understanding of the global connections. Through inquiry-based and directed learning processes, students are challenged via lab work, projects, collaborative classroom activities, and a variety of technology infused investigations. The course continues to develop student problem solving and decision making skills, with a focus on the engineering process, through the creation and completion of sustainable research projects. These projects are designed entirely by student teams, culminating at the annual Science Expo. Students’ critical thinking skills are further developed and reinforced by doing research and presenting reports that focus on analyzing data and drawing conclusions. Speaking skills continue to be strengthened through oral presentations of written projects and current science events.

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Grade 8: Systems and Interactions How do scientists explore the interactions within particular systems? In Grade 8 students will study the behavior of matter, heredity and genetics, chemistry, and astrophysics. The latter unit culminates in an integrated STEM project applying laws of motion to amusement park rides. Throughout the year, the students delve into the course concepts through classroom activities, independent research and projects, online simulations, and lab work. Inquiry and experimental design are emphasized during the annual Science Expo. The students practice their problem solving and decision making skills as they design and conduct an original experiment focused on a topic of their choice. As the students analyze and interpret data, emphasis is placed on the application of algebraic skills. Critical thinking skills are challenged and reinforced through written reports that focus on drawing conclusions from data analysis. Student’s use of technology and digital equipment enhances the presentation of data for research and lab projects. Speaking skills are also practiced as students present their projects, experimental findings and current science reports.

STEM Elective: Engineering in Our World j In this interdisciplinary elective course, students will build real world architectural models that demonstrate Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), while discussing historical events relevant to these models. Example models include the Eiffel Tower and Big Ben. Throughout the course, students will strengthen Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 21


and apply problem-solving skills in order to model, test, evaluate and modify their engineering models. Practical problems will be solved using science and technology concepts as the students work in teams, culminating in a final project. Assessment will be based on a student’s class participation, leadership abilities and collaborative skills.

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The Middle School computer curriculum builds skills and confidence using computer technology through the completion of increasingly complex and sophisticated projects. All three grades participate in a 1:1 Laptop Program which provides access to a multitude of software programs. Students utilize their laptop to enhance classroom instruction in all content areas through the use of MyKPS and Google Apps. Students are offered a dual platform environment as the computer lab provides access to iMacs with built-in CD and DVD drives, as well as laser printers, headsets, digital cameras, digital video cameras and scanners. Digital Citizenship is addressed in each grade in the Middle School to ensure that students are always considering the ways to stay safe and to protect their privacy online.

Grade 6 The Grade 6 Technology class begins the year with an intense introduction to the laptop. We review basic skills and troubleshooting, as well as best practices and care and handling of the laptop. Responsible behaviors are identified through a review of the KPS Acceptable Use Policy. We identify how to use Kent Place technology including MyKPS, KPS Google applications, and how to back-up files to our Academy server. A focus on understanding and using software is taught as these applications are utilized throughout the disciplines. Research skills including evaluating sources, citations and paraphrasing are taught in a joint unit with the librarian. Software programs utilized during this course include the Microsoft Office suite, Inspiration, Comic Life, SMART Notebook, Cyberlink Youcam Webcam and Windows Live Movie Maker. In addition to software, troubleshooting and problem solving skills necessary for participation in the 1:1 Laptop Program are focused on throughout the year. Students complete a Digital Citizenship unit focusing on the importance of being smart, safe and using online etiquette.

Grade 7 In Grade 7 Technology students utilize various software programs to take their technology skills to the next level. They expand their knowledge of troubleshooting and problem solving with the laptop. One trimester collaborates with the Health and Wellness curriculum. Students create public service announcements, billboards and podcasts that counter messages from the media. Projects involve using the webcam, Movie Maker, Photoshop and GarageBand. During a trimester students gain an introduction to programming. They explore various programs including Google Blockly, Scratch and App Inventor. In addition a trimester dedicated to the infusion of digital art. The goal is to introduce students to digital editing software as a tool for art creation.

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Grade 8 The Grade 8 curriculum focuses on 21st century tools, Web 2 .0 and the digital world we live in today. We spend a trimester identifying the ways we communicate today and how technology has provided so many additional ways to communicate almost instantly over long distances. Students create a website, a podcast, a blog and a vodcast (video) as they evaluate the pros and cons and rules of use for each of these tools. During a trimester we collaborate with the Health and Wellness curriculum. Students create a digital self-portrait and consider the role of technology in their lives. We address the trustworthiness of content found online and how easy it is to manipulate images, create websites and post false information. We investigate how digital editing tools are used to alter images to send messages and set expectations. In addition, a third trimester dedicated to the infusion of digital art. Projects are centered around Adobe Photoshop, a digital editing software, as a tool for the creation of art.

Documentary j Grade 7 students research, direct and produce their own documentary examining a local, national or global issue. Taught in conjunction with the librarian, the students gain experience in defining their research task, evaluating online and offline sources, and using an online tool to cite their sources and organize their notes. The students then create a storyboard for their video, interview various experts using a digital video camera, narrate and edit their documentary using iMovie.

Technology Skills for New Students j Offered Trimester 1 Required for students in Grades 7 and 8 new to the Middle School This is a fall-trimester course designed to introduce seventh and eighth grade students new to Kent Place to the various software programs and equipment used in the classrooms. The students learn about the network and file management. They are trained on the use of our KPS Google system so that they can communicate electronically with teachers and students and transfer documents between home and school. Students review the basics of software packages such as Microsoft Office suite, iMovie, GarageBand and the creative Adobe suite. In addition, they are introduced to Kent Place’s library and the online catalog and databases to which every student has access.

Robotics Engineering I j Offered to Grades 7 and 8 This elective uses Lego NXT robotics kit and programming software. The goal of Robotics Engineering is to introduce students to the variety of mechanical, electronic and control issues raised by the design and construction of autonomous mobile robots. Students build and program robots to perform the necessary actions to solve real world problems and situations. The curriculum is based on the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy.


Robotics Engineering II j Offered to Grades 7 and 8 The goal of the Robotic Engineering II elective is to continue to build upon student experiences with a variety of mechanical, electronic and control issues raised by the design and construction of robots. Students build and program their robots to utilize touch, light, ultrasonic and sound sensors to move forward, backward and turn left and right using a Lego NXT robotics kit and NXT programming software. The Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy curriculum is continued in this course.

Visual and Performing Arts The fine and performing arts play a vital role in the life of Kent Place Middle School students. In the art studio, students work in a variety of media, and areas of the Middle School corridor serve as a gallery for their work. Our Performing Arts Departments offer classes and performance opportunities in music, dance and theater. Students participate in both vocal and instrumental music performances at school events and at other locations in the greater metropolitan area. Our professional arts staff supports the continued development of creativity and imaginative expression in our students and provides a variety of opportunities for their individual exploration of the arts.

Dance 6th Grade Dance Building upon their study of dance as an art form in Primary School, sixth-grade students explore the principles of modern dance technique and composition, and acquire an awareness of the body as an instrument for personal expression. In addition, this course also helps to foster collaborative creative movement and critical skills when viewing dance. As a means to this end, they are exposed to improvisation, movement exploration, and basic dance composition. The class presents their work in an informal setting at the end of the trimester. To enhance the program, students view a dance film and attend an Upper School dance performance.

Dance Makers j This elective course is open to all interested seventh and eighth grade students. Each class begins with a modern dance or improvisational warm-up to work on technique, followed by a choreography session. The students create collaborative dance studies.

Middle School Dance Ensemble j This intermediate to advanced level elective is open to students in the seventh and eighth grades by audition only. Students begin each class with a modern dance or ballet warm-up, followed by a choreography/rehearsal session. The students create and/or learn repertory dances that they perform at the end of the trimester.

Music The Middle School Music program has three clearly defined areas of participation. All students are given the opportunity to participate in the choral and instrumental ensembles. The performing groups

are not auditioned and include the Girl Choir and the Instrumental Ensemble. If students elect not to perform with at least one of these ensembles, they will continue their music education with a general musicianship class. This course provides complementary skills, enhancing the overall music education of the student.

Choral Performing with the GirlChoir gives students an opportunity to sing with a large group. They develop stronger musicianship skills, experience reading a score, and sing in two and three-part harmony. It is also an environment in which students can extend their singing skills as well as their aural skills. Many students from the GirlChoir are also encouraged to audition for participation in the NJ State, Eastern Division and National Honor Choirs.

Instrumental The Instrumental program provides students with opportunities to grow individually as well as learning to work together in ensemble experiences. Individually, students have access to artist teachers for private and small group instruction on their instrument. Performance recitals are held during the year for students studying privately and who are involved in the ensemble program.

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General Musicianship j The General Music course is designed to cover topics that are aligned with the Middle School curriculum such as American music, world cultural music and lessons on classical music. Through the use of various media, students participate in classroom musical experiences and explore new dimensions in music through the use of technology. They have the opportunity to listen to authentic musical performances, analyze music and learn about music from an avid listener’s perspective.

Theater 6th Grade Theater All Grade 6 students participate in twice-weekly trimester workshops in creative theater. These workshops provide students with an active experience in improvisation, simple theatre games and ensemble performance work. The focal point of each workshop is the development of a group performance project based upon a theme selected by the class. Students are asked to contribute original ideas and suggestions to the work-in-development, and an informal presentation of the project is offered on the stage at the end of each trimester workshop.

7th and 8th Grade Theater Workshop j This trimester acting workshop is included among the elective offerings presented to middle school students each year, and is designed for a variety of experience levels. The workshop develops skills and confidence as students analyze and rehearse scenes and monologues. Character development is explored through theater games, acting techniques and improvisational exercises. Students participate in an informal sharing of their work at the conclusion of the trimester. Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 23


7th Grade Playmakers j Seventh grade students who are interested in participating in the full development of a play are encouraged to audition for the 7th Grade Playmakers. This elective offering provides time for the preparation and rehearsal of a fully staged play, which is then presented on the stage at the end of the trimester. Plays are given two full performances: one evening performance for parents and invited guests, and one afternoon performance for the Middle School. Past productions have included Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, How to Eat Like a Child and the world premieres of Sleepaway, How I Got That Part and What Andy Warhol Never Told Me.

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Eighth grade students who are interesting in participating in the full development of a play are encouraged to audition for the 8th Grade Playmakers. This elective offering provides time for the preparation and rehearsal of a full staged play, which is then presented on the main stage at the end of the trimester. Plays are given two full performances: one evening performance for parents and invited guests, and one afternoon performance for the Middle School. Past eighth grade productions have included The Taming of the Shrew, 15 Reasons Not To Be in a Play, and the world premieres of Fly Away, Coaster and The House on Maple Street.

The Middle School Musical j Every three years, the music, dance and theater programs combine to offer a musical at the middle school level. Auditions for the musical are open to all students in sixth, seventh and eighth grades. Past Middle School musical productions have included The Little Mermaid, Once Upon a Mattress, Little Shop of Horrors, Annie and The Wizard of Oz.

Visual Art Grade 6 All sixth grade students take a year-long art course that introduces them to the tools for creating, for communicating and understanding others’ communication and for making informed judgments. This is achieved through a nurturing studio environment where imagination and creativity can manifest themselves freely in the works produced. The students are exposed to a variety of artistic approaches in drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. Additionally the students are introduced to issues of two dimensional and three dimensional designs.

Grade 7 All seventh grade students expand upon and refine their artistic skills in trimester-long course. The students continue to work in and to refine skills in the traditional media of drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. In addition the students are introduced to Photoshop and Sketch-up software as a tool for artistic creation. The students will use a variety of approaches that will include working will photography and using digital scans of artworks created in the student traditional media as source material.

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Grade 8 All eighth grade students take a trimester long course in the visual arts during which they continue to hone their artistic skills in both traditional and digital media. Students work across media divide utilizes both digital and traditional techniques and approaches in creating artworks. Additionally the students are encouraged to think about how visual arts can be used for expression and communication.

3D Design/Sculpture j In this elective course, students will work in a variety of mediums and techniques to create art in three dimensions. They will explore different subject matter and themes while working in paper, wire, clay and found materials.

Let’s Face It j This elective class will be focused on observing and creating portraits based on a variety of ideas from art history as well as contemporary culture. Course projects will include drawing, collage, painting, digital imaging and sculpture.

Open and Shut j “Things are not always what they seem.” This elective course explores the art of what is seen from the outside as well as within. Secret compartments and hidden messages will be explored while working with books, boxes and other materials.

World Language As a student enters the Middle School in Grade 6, she is given the opportunity to study French, Spanish or Chinese. All students also study Latin for one trimester in Grade 6. In Grade 7, students may switch from Chinese, French or Spanish to take Latin. Upon completion of Grade 8, students are prepared to enter either an Upper School Level II in Latin or Level III in Chinese, French or Spanish.

Grade 6: French, Spanish and Chinese Students study French, Spanish and Chinese in an international context, reinforcing a major school goal of multicultural awareness. Technology is widely used in all World Language classes to enhance and support the learning process. The goal of the French and Spanish courses is to develop communicative skills, through a variety of methods, in the target language. In both languages, our contentbased approach takes advantage of a Middle School student’s natural inquisitiveness. Some aspects of the curriculum include geography, art and history along with the study of basic grammar and vocabulary. In Chinese, students will learn both the language and rich cultural heritage of China. As they progress, they gain knowledge of character interpretation and the art of writing in both pinyin and characters. All classes are taught in the target language.


Grade 6: Introduction to Latin This one-trimester course is required for all Grade 6 students. The goal of this introductory course is to experience the Latin language by examining vocabulary and translation, to appreciate the rich culture and history of the ancient Romans, and to become aware of the influence of Latin on English vocabulary and literature.

Grades 7 and 8: French, Spanish and Chinese In Grades 7 and 8, students may continue with French, Spanish or Chinese. The study of language progresses with a communicative approach in a program oriented to provide ample opportunities and situations for students to develop conversational and listening comprehension skills. At the same time, writing skills and grammar are emphasized with the goal of mastery. Technology is integrated as a learning and global communication tool. As they develop their linguistic skills, the girls continue to develop an awareness of, and an appreciation for, the cultural aspects of Francophone, Spanishspeaking and Chinese culture throughout the world. Based on authentic situations, students develop their language skills through the use of creative activities appropriate to the Middle School student.

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Grades 7 and 8: Classical Language Latin I The Latin I course uses the Ecce Romani program with the express purpose of bringing students quickly to the point where they can read and translate Latin with confidence. Equally important goals of the course are the strengthening of vocabulary skills in English through the study of derivatives and cognates and the studying of Latin grammar. Upon completion of the Grade 8 class, students are prepared to enter Latin II in the Upper School. All Grade 7 students have the option of switching to Latin I for Grades 7 and 8 or continuing with Chinese, French or Spanish.

Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 25


NOTES

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UPPER SCHOOL

Upper School Academic Policies and Requirements Academic Plan Each student’s academic plan generally guides her course selection throughout the Upper School years. Designed when the student enters the Upper School, the plan gives consideration to all aspects of the School’s requirements and should provide challenge, diversity and pleasure to her program. The plan may be modified to reflect changes in interests, academic aspirations and possible changes in course offerings. Each student meets with her advisor to work out the plan, to register for the next year’s courses and to make any agreed-upon changes.

Course Load All students are required to take five courses a trimester; four of the five courses must be in the following disciplines: • • • • •

English History Mathematics Science World Language

Assignment of Credits Courses receive one credit per term and three credits for a full year. Credits accumulated prior to Grade 9 may not apply toward the total. An exception to the distributive requirements may be allowed only by joint agreement of the administration, department, parents and student. Summer study must be approved by the department chair of the appropriate discipline before a student registers for the summer courses. She must complete all expectations determined by the department for advancement in the discipline.

Grading System All credit courses required for graduation, except Pen to Paper, are graded.

A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F

97 - 100 93 - 96 90 - 92 87 - 89 83 - 86 80 - 82 77 - 79 73 - 76 70 - 72 67 - 69 63 - 66 60 - 62 Below 60

Electives Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. The school reserves the right to cancel courses for insufficient enrollment.

Credits Required for Graduation (1 credit for each trimester) 13 English 9 Mathematics 9 World Language 9 History 9 Science 6 Visual or Performing Arts 5-9 Electives 60 TOTAL

4 full years 1 trimester of Pen to Paper in Grade 9 with some exemptions 3 years during Grades 9, 10 and 11; must include Algebra, Geometry and Advanced Algebra 3 years during Grades 9, 10 and 11 3 years including History 10 and History 11 (or AP U.S. History) 3 years including Biology I and Chemistry I and one additional year Grade 9 arts electives and 3-4 other trimester electives. Total varies according to required language credits and exemptions from Pen to Paper Required credits for graduation

Non-Credit Requirements • • • • • • •

Physical Education: all four years Peer Education: Grade 9 Seminar: Grade 9 PREPARE/Project Adventure: Grade 10 Health and Wellness for Young Women: one trimester, Grade 10 Ethics Seminar: one semester, Grade 11 Junior Cultural Leadership: one semester, Grade 11

Requirements for Passing A student who earns a final grade below a C- in a requisite trimester or yearlong course may be required to repeat the course, take another course in the same area or complete summer work approved by the department concerned. Failure in an elective course results in no credit, and the course will be recorded on the transcript. Specifically, in a student’s first year in the Upper School, she may earn no more than two final grades below a C- and no more than one F for her yearly average in a yearlong course to continue at Kent Place. After a student’s first year, she may earn only one grade below a C- for her yearly average in yearlong courses to continue in the Upper School. No senior may graduate if she fails a trimester or year course necessary to fulfill department requirements or to meet the required total number of credits.

Withdrawal from a Course A student’s transcript normally bears a “W” for any course from which she has withdrawn after the deadline of 15 school days from the start of the course. If, however, this withdrawal is jointly recommended by the advisor, teacher and department head, in consultation with the Director of the Upper School, and with the approval of the Upper School faculty, no record of this withdrawal will appear on the transcript. 27


Required Courses and Electives by Grade Course

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

English

English 9 Pen to Paper

English 10

English 11

English 12

Health and Wellness for Young Women

Peer Education

Foundations in Health and Wellness

History

History 9

History 10

History 11 or United States History

Elective

Mathematics

Algebra

Geometry

Advanced Algebra

Precalculus

Calculus or Statistics Elective

Functions & Trigonometry

Precalculus or Statistics Elective

First course in sequence determined by student’s prior studies.

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Physical Education

Required

Required PREPARE/ Project Adventure

Science

Biology

Chemistry

Elective

Elective

Visual and Performing Arts

2 Trimesters

Electives

Electives

Electives

Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish

Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish

World Language

Chinese, French, Latin or Spanish

Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 28

Required

Required

Elective: Second Language Elective: Second Language

Elective to continue language Elective to continue second language


Courses of Study in the Upper School

Kent Place is committed to college preparation, and the Upper School curriculum has been designed to fulfill the admission requirements of the most competitive colleges. Recognizing that not all young women have the same college preparatory needs, faculty advisors assist each student in making a course selection appropriate for her, and then, when the student is a senior, in reaching a college choice consistent with her strengths and interests. The School encourages challenge and enjoyment in course selection. Emphasis is on the development of reading, writing and analytical skills with a broad course of study in math, sciences and the humanities, enriched by experiences in the visual and performing arts and athletics. The academic year is broken into trimesters. Students receive comments from their teachers at mid-trimester and grades at the end of each trimester. Final exams are given in late May and early June to Grades 9 through 11. Final Exams in AP courses are determined at the discretion of the department. Each faculty advisor considers with her/his advisee the appropriate course load. The student should consider her extra-curricular involvement – specifically athletics, drama, music, other arts interests, volunteer commitments and family commitments – before registering for more than five courses. The quality of the total program, both academic and extra-curricular, is more important than the number of courses a student takes.

Independent Study j The opportunity to participate in an independent study at Kent Place School is reserved for seniors. This opportunity allows students to develop a course of study that extends beyond course work already taken. It also provides opportunities for students to pursue interdisciplinary work and to apply knowledge and skills in venues beyond their individual classrooms. Examples of recently accepted proposals include the following: Art through the 19th century and its Influence on Modern Art; Musical History; and Theory, A Survey of French Theater; and Statistics and Statistical Research. It is not unusual for students to take courses in a subject area that is the focus of their independent study at the same time as they are engaging in independent study course work. If an independent study proposal is approved, students may then receive academic credit for their work. The amount of academic credit a student receives corresponds to the number of trimesters for which the independent study has been approved. Certain types of requests will not be approved for independent study. Proposals to pursue AP courses or general courses not currently offered at Kent Place School will not be considered. Neither will requests to substitute for current course or departmental requirements be considered. In addition, proposals centered on private, weekly music instruction in voice or instrumental work will not be eligible.

Independent study proposals are reviewed annually by the Upper School Academic Committee in late April. Members of the committee include the Director of Studies, Upper School Director and Department Chairs. Students submit proposals to the Director of Studies by April 1 of their junior year. Students are notified as to the status of their proposals by the middle of May. Submissions must include a cover sheet along with the actual proposal. Guidelines for cover sheets and proposals are listed below. The committee takes into account a student’s past and current academic performance, course load, and school and outside commitments as they consider proposals. The committee discusses the extent to which a student has shown herself to be a self-starter, organized, able to follow through on commitments, passionate about the subject area or areas and motivated to complete independent work. All of these factors are discussed in conjunction with the proposal. Interdisciplinary proposals are encouraged. Involvement in an independent study is dependent on the availability and interest of a teacher in facilitating a student’s work in this area. Independent study proposals are written expressly by students with the input and oversight of a particular teacher. It is incumbent on the student to develop the independent study proposal and, if approved, to complete all assignments documented in the proposal. The teacher who facilitates the independent study is responsible for assessing a student’s independent study work and any culminating performance. Cover sheets must include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Independent study course title Student name Advisor name and signature Independent study teacher name and signature Department Chair name and signature Upper School Director name and signature

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Proposals must include the following: 1. Independent study course title 2. Course description, including course readings, assignments, due dates and other items relevant to course completion 3. Teacher’s name 4. The number of trimesters over which the independent study will take place 5. The type of culminating assessment that will provide evidence of course completion (e.g., public performance, presentation)

The Writing Center The Writing Center provides a positive environment in which individuals or groups of students may obtain help in all steps of the writing process. Students may initiate conferences to accomplish specific goals, and teachers may recommend and require that students attend the Center. As a resource for all Upper School students and teachers, the Writing Center monitors the various expectations for format and content according to each discipline. Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 29


The Math/Science Tutoring Program

English

Peer tutors in math and science are scheduled to be available throughout the day. They are student members of our math and science honor societies. This program supplements the times that teachers are available to meet individually or in group sessions with students. In both cases, schedules are posted so that students may select a specific time or drop in for extra help.

The English Department faculty strives to inspire and guide students to become independent learners, critical thinkers, conscientious communicators and joyful lovers of literature. The curriculum – created around guiding essential questions – is designed to develop students’ ability to read with enthusiasm, discrimination and curiosity; to engage students in the exploration of literary works from a variety of periods, global perspectives and genres; to cultivate clear, accurate and effective expression; and to foster sensitivity to the structure and function of language across a variety of media, including everevolving technological resources. Through participation in lively class discussions, opportunities to hone public speaking, research, technology and writing skills, and collaborative endeavors, students become increasingly prepared for communication in 21st century higher education and the global workplace.

9TH GRADE SEMINAR Entering the Upper School includes academic and social transitions from the understanding of the daily schedule to managing scheduled free time to navigating building new relationships. Seminar works to integrate both transitions on a consistent basis. Specific goals include building grade level community in preparation for class elections, being able to interact in small and large group discussions, becoming self advocates and knowing which resources to use when needed. Students will also work on developing their learning and studying strategies, enhance their test taking skills and practice relaxation techniques to better access their understandings. Technology skills/ tools like digital citizenship, digital footprints, problem solving with computers and selecting and using the most effective and efficient technology tools to achieve academic goals link many of the sessions together. Ultimately, we strive for students to move towards being more independent with regard to space, self and time while working to towards being a part of the great Kent Place community and the larger world.

CULTURAL LEADERSHIP SEMINAR

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This course is designed to allow students to reflect on the core components of culture in our society, with a focus on gender, sexual identity, race, ethnicity, religion, nationality, socioeconomic class and education. The definition and concept of cultural competence will be expounded upon with regards to the aforementioned identifiers. Specific attention is given to how these aspects of identity influence individual, interpersonal and group relationships in our society. The primary goal of the course is to expose students to specific multicultural topics and give them the tools to reflect on how their own culture influences their role as global citizens. The power of this course design is in creating a space for students to explore their own cultural beliefs and that of others in their local and global community. All Grade 11 students participate in bi-weekly sessions.

Ethics Seminar The goals of this seminar are several: to acquaint students with the philosophies of key thinkers in the field of ethical decision-making; to engage students in discussions and debates centered on these philosophies; and to assist students in applying their growing understanding of these philosophies and ways of thinking to specific global, career and personal case studies and dilemmas. All Grade 11 students participate in biweekly sessions that include pertinent readings, discussions, activities and assessments.

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English 9 (3 credits) Required The goal of English 9 is to develop engaged listeners, articulate speakers, discerning readers, confident writers, independent thinkers and proficient users of technology. This course provides students with a genre approach to literature through close reading and interpretation of a variety of texts, including The Odyssey, a Shakespeare play, short stories, poetry and novels. Class activities foster the development of skills that enable students to read, discuss and write about sophisticated literature skillfully, analytically and critically. Through discussion, class presentations, projects and essays, students formulate ideas; make comparisons; perceive connections across centuries, geographical locations and cultures; and draw conclusions based on their reading. They develop self-knowledge and sensitivity to others’ points of view in order to become more responsible world citizens. Students also learn a variety of study techniques and test-taking strategies in preparation for both objective and subjective assessments. A general study of grammar and vocabulary occurs throughout the course. The ultimate lesson to be gleaned from the literature is the awareness that despite our human limitations, confronting life’s adversities will allow us to emerge as stronger and wiser individuals.

Pen to Paper (1 credit) Offered each trimester Pen to Paper, a pass/fail course for Grade 9 students provides concentrated training and practice in the writing of expository prose. The curriculum focuses on the logical organization of ideas, the means of effective sentence construction and the techniques of successful paragraph and essay structure. Instruction in grammar, usage and mechanics occurs throughout the term.

English 10 (3 credits) Required What is the nature of evil? How and where can humor and serious commentary intersect? Where do women, the impoverished and the illiterate fit into a caste system topped by a monarchy and a small group of educated, male religious leaders? These are among the


exciting essential questions that drive the Grade 10 English curriculum, which focuses on British literature in its historical context. In exploring answers to such central questions, students continue to develop the skills introduced in Grade 9: close reading, textual analysis and critical thinking and writing. Students proceed chronologically through works by authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Austen and Orwell, and class activities include performancebased study of texts, student-led discussions, informal journal writing and small group exercises. Students hone their composition skills through practice of the writing process, which culminates in a variety of final products ranging from traditional forms such as essays and objective tests to more imaginative forms such as original satire and performance.

English 11 (3 credits) Required What is the American dream? How does this dream shape our values and perspectives? Grounded in these and other essential questions, students delve into the study of American literature through fiction and non-fiction texts. Building on skills learned in Grades 9 and 10, students hone close reading, analysis and synthesis skills, and develop appreciation for authors’ styles; at all times, students are challenged to consider the significance of historical context while simultaneously encouraged to enhance their learning with technological tools such as Google Docs, discussion groups and collaborative sites. We strive to include a balance between classic and contemporary texts including authors such as: Douglass, Fitzgerald, Hawthorne, Morrison, Salinger, Steinbeck and Williams. Additionally, students are inspired by a variety of essayists and speakers who voice their diverse experiences and explore their identity as Americans. To complement the study of style, students also practice rhetorical strategies and develop their own voices and literary style. Composition work emphasizes the principles of organization and logical development in writing expository essays and provides opportunities for writing creative, original essays and stories. Juniors also write a longer, independent research essay based on a self-selected text. Learners designated as AP English 11 students take the AP examination in Language and Composition.

English 12 Program Required To fulfill a final year (3 credits) of English, each senior must select three courses, one from each trimester’s offerings. Final decisions about course enrollment rest with the Department. All senior electives emphasize independent thinking and analysis and the development of critical writing skills; all electives are demanding and rigorous and qualify as preparation for the AP examination in Literature and Composition, given in May. Students participate in reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature, specifically in the genres of poetry, drama and the novel. Students not recommended for AP Designation who are interested in taking the AP examination should consult the English Department Chair. All seniors must select three elective courses – one each trimester – from the courses listed below:

Dramatic Literature j (1 credit) Offered Trimester I “The play’s the thing…” Dramatic literature is literature that is written to be performed. It is the beginning of the creation of a work of art, rather than the end. Dramatic literature offers unique insight into the culture and prevailing ideologies of the era in which it was written. In this course, we investigate the work of the playwright through the study of plays from different eras and of different genres. The course will cover works of Tragedy, Comedy, Realism and Absurdism, analyzing the way in which meaning is conveyed to an audience.

Conscience and Consequence j (1 credit) Offered Trimester I One’s inner beliefs may come into conflict with the demands of society. In such a case, we might say the “conscience is on trial.” Confucius once posed the following question: “If you look into your own heart and find nothing wrong there, what is there to fear?” On the other hand, and in opposition to such a sentiment, Henry James offered the following viewpoint: “You can let your conscience alone if you’re nice to the second housemaid.” What do these quotations imply about the relationship between a person and his or her conscience? Between a person and his or her society? In this class we explore stories from across the ages and around the world in which the individual is challenged by questions of his/her conscience. Whether reading and writing about ancient Greece, 20th century Dominican Republic or contemporary Afghanistan, we discuss universal and timeless conflicts between self and world, between freedom and justice, between actions and their consequences.

Poetry j (1 credit) Offered Trimester I

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Poetry is designed to prepare students for the AP exam in English Literature and Composition as well as for college level work, but most importantly, the course aims to increase students’ joyfulness and confidence when it comes to poetry. Through close reading and study, students will work on understanding the ways poets use language. The focus will be on mastery of the skills involved in literary analysis and interpretation. Students will examine and analyze structure, diction, tone, detail, point of view, figurative language, symbolism and other elements of style. Because this is an academically rigorous course, students must be able to work on more than one assignment during the same part of the term.

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Women’s Studies j (1 credit) Offered Trimester I Introduction to Women’s Studies is a discussion-based course that is reading and writing intensive. The goal of the course is to examine such essential questions as: How do you know what you know? How are beliefs socially-constructed? How do categories such as race, class, and gender (among others) inform and intersect with one another? What is feminism? What is patriarchy? Who or what comprises a Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 31


dominant culture? What are the cultural and historical contexts that give rise to theories and ideologies? How can learning about women’s lives contribute to the creation of a secure and sustainable future for everyone? Students will blog and also write more formal, analytic papers. The culminating task of the course is the Gender Action Project, which will be of the individual student’s design based on her particular interests.

Women in Literature j (1 credit) Offered Trimester I Images of and attitudes towards women, as both characters and writers, have changed significantly from the mid-19th century to contemporary times. This course explores the conflicts between women and their roles, the relationship between women and society and the individual woman’s realization of her own potential. Students read works from various genres, including contemporary feminist essays, canonical novels and short stories. Texts may include works by Virginia Woolf, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sandra Cisneros and Zora Neale Hurston.

Identity and Graphic Novels j (1 credit) Offered Trimester II

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Literacy in the 21st century extends beyond decoding written words. In our ever-increasingly, complex society, visual literacy must also be addressed. Postmodern texts extend the role of the reader as interpreter. Using graphic novels, students will explore how identity and environment shape experiences. Just as with more traditional texts, students will analyze conflict, character and theme; the challenge will be to understand how authors convey the same themes through the style choices of color, texture, image, text boxes, frames and camera angles. More so than ever, students will understand how form enhances content and vice versa. Texts may include works by Mat Johnson, Frank Miller, Josh Neufeld, Marjane Satrapi and Art Spiegelman.

Shakespeare from Page to Stage j (1 credit) Offered Trimester II One of the essential questions that we address in Shakespeare from Page to Stage is: Why does Shakespeare’s popularity endure? One reason is the bard’s incomparable facility with language. Another reason for his universality is in the kinesthetic appeal of his works. Shakespeare’s plays facilitate each director’s ability to “Suit the action to the word, the word to the action.” Still another reason for Shakespeare’s popularity is his profound understanding of human behavior, his ability to “hold the mirror up to nature,” his unparalleled ability to illuminate and interpret our human experience. This course gives students an opportunity to appreciate Shakespeare’s genius, to enact scenes from the plays, and to become film critics in order to ascertain if filmed versions remain faithful to the spirit of the written works. Our greatest hope is that students will truly enjoy Shakespeare and understand why his plays can still leap into life on the stage, in film, and in the classroom. 32

Contemporary Fiction j (1 credit) Offered Trimester II After three years of studying the cornerstone texts of literary development, graduating seniors will have the opportunity to examine truly contemporary literature. Students explore how the texts in question reflect the social, ethical and global themes of contemporary life. In addition, this course highlights how the development of modern and postmodern literature continues to influence current writers. Texts rotate regularly and may include works by Philip Roth, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham, Amy Tan, Michael Ondaatje and Barbara Kingsolver.

Black and Blue: Examining Race in American Cultural Forms j (1 credit) Offered Trimester II This class explores the origins of racial identity in the United States. We pursue answers to slippery essential questions such as “What is race?” and “How and why did ‘whiteness’ become a racial/ethnic identity in the United States?” The literature spans American history with special concentration on reactionary literature of the Harlem Renaissance. Literary forms include novels, folklore, poetry, short stories, essays, songs and documentaries. The discussion centers on (but is not limited to) African American, Native American and “white” racial identities, and the writing assignments ask students to regard texts as artifacts, focusing on what can be said about a cultural or societal trend based on the popular literary and artistic forms of the time.

The Books They Told You Not to Read j (1 credit) Offered Trimester II What motivates censorship? Who censors? How do criteria for censorship differ globally? What are the effects of censorship? These are some of the essential questions students confront in this course. The history of censorship is long and ongoing; consequently, the list of works that have been or are being banned or challenged is extensive and growing. Students explore literature that has been or currently is being removed from academic and public bookshelves. Authors may include Aristophanes, Jonathan Swift, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Allen Ginsberg, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, Isabel Allende, Alice Walker and Maya Angelou. In addition, students examine selected works by poets, short story writers, political writers, comic strip artists, painters, musicians and filmmakers who have been officially censored. Through analytical and imaginative writing, class discussion, debates and individual and group presentations, students will come to grips with issues and forces that continue to impact us all.

Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop j (1 credit) Offered Trimester III This class is devoted to developing students’ creative writing skills. We read texts with a writer’s lens, examining and drawing inspiration from authors’ stylistic and structural choices. After introductory work in fiction and poetry writing, students propose to develop a novella, a collection of short stories, a book of prose poems or a collection of


poems. Class consists of literature discussions, small-group feedback on individual writing projects and time to write.

Revisionist Literature j (1 credit) Offered Trimester III This course examines multiple perspectives and the way narrative shifts when told from a new angle. What untold stories exist beneath a narrative? What if Frankenstein were narrated by The Creature? What happens when The Odyssey’s Sirens have their say? Students look at pairings of texts that deal with similar themes, including children’s stories, short stories and poems, modern retellings of ancient tales and novels both new and familiar.

Short Story j (1 credit) Offered Trimester III What could be more satisfying than a well-written short story? As a form, it characteristically focuses on a single incident, a bit of dramatic action that ends in some sort of revelation – a flash of irony, comprehension or insight. What visibly happens, quickly and abruptly, is crucial. Writer Irving Howe has said, “If a story is to make a strong impression on us, it will do so not merely through the intensity of its concentrated action but also through the implications that event suggests.” In this course, we read, analyze and write several short pieces in response to a wide range of short fiction from various time periods and locations in order to glean all that we can about character and storytelling from the masters of the form.

Legal Fictions j (1 credit) Offered Trimester III Law and Order has enjoyed a decade of television popularity. Shylock’s trial in Merchant of Venice has absorbed centuries of theatregoers. As a topic for fictional dramatization, the law offers perfect creative fodder: violence, adultery, punishment, language, persuasion and a public setting for displaying and challenging a culture’s deepest values. In Legal Fictions, students will explore the unique intersection between literature and law, examining both literary works that hinge on specific legal debates and the literary elements of real-life legal events. They will learn to identify and appreciate the complexities and ambiguities inherent in narrative framing and use of evidence – all the while having to determine a specific and concrete “right” outcome in controversial issues. Students will learn to assemble a powerful argument, dramatize an argument through questions and colorful presentation of facts, and skillfully address a rational opponent’s counterargument. They will have public speaking opportunities as well as traditional essay writing, and the course will culminate in a group project to create legal fiction of students’ own interests. Topics will include: formalism, law and ethics, the letter vs. the spirit of the law, and law and tragedy. Texts may include: Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, Andre Dubus’ House of Sand and Fog, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Moises Kaufman’s Gross Indecency and William Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS FOR YOUNG WOMEN This Grade 1-12 curriculum explores issues that affect the physical and psycho-social development of women throughout their lives. Through class discussion, group activities and role-play, emphasis is placed on the development of skills in problem solving, decision making, values clarification, coping and communication. In addition, relevant topics generated from students’ concerns and current events are addressed. All Grade 9 students participate in the Peer Education program, and all Grade 10 students take a one-trimester course.

Foundations in Health and Wellness Required in Grade 10 This one-trimester course is a requirement for all Grade 10 students. It covers a wide range of health-related issues affecting women’s lives today. Topics include female emotional, sexual and social development, the influence of the media on body image, eating disorders, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections and their prevention, drug addiction, alcoholism and the family, abusive relationships, suicide, grief and loss, stress management and recognizing when and how to access professional help.

Health and Wellness Peer Education Offered to Grade 12 Students are selected as peer educators through an application process that is reviewed by the Upper School faculty and the Middle and Upper School social workers and health educators. Peer educators are required to attend an intensive training session before the senior year begins, and they meet throughout the academic year with the program director. Peer educators are trained to facilitate discussions with Grade 9 students on selected topics, such as coping with family, friendship, school-related problems and responding to peer and cultural pressures.

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History Understanding history empowers our students to make sense of the past, engage with the issues of today’s world, and develop their future leadership. Students investigate societies that have become increasingly interdependent, and come to envision their roles as global citizens. Our Upper School courses promote this perspective by creating excitement about the study of history and its related subjects through reading, writing, discussion and research. Grades 9 through 11 guide students on a journey through human achievements and challenges over time, encompassing both World and United States History. AP courses are offered in the junior and senior years. Seniors may choose among five different full-year electives.

History 9 (3 credits) Offered to Grade 9 History 9 uses a global perspective to understand the interconections of human history. Students examine the interaction of peoples and governments from The Renaissance to 1914. Key themes include: Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 33


conquest, cultural exchange, trade, technology, and political, religious and social reforms. Students explore these topics through reading, writing, guided discussion/analysis, and creative projects, while building essential skills in critical thinking, interpreting primary sources, and examining historical works of art.

History 10 (3 credits) Required in Grade 10 History 10 both completes the survey of World History begun in Grade 9 and initiates the survey of U.S. History to be continued in Grade 11. From September through January students focus on 20th century events and themes from 1914 through the Cold War to key issues in the modern Middle East, Africa and Asia. The remainder of the year focuses on studying the origins and early history of the United States, from European colonization through the American Revolutionary era to the Constitution and the new republic. History 10 provides students with a framework for the further academic study of history, while helping them better understand and engage with current events. Through regular research and writing workshop participation, students develop a portfolio for presentation on appropriate historical topics they may select.

History 11 (3 credits) Required in Grade 11

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History 11 provides students with knowledge of the nation’s history from 1800 to the present. Students analyze ideas central to understanding the political, economic and social structures of the United States, and examine the nation’s diversity as well as the forces that bring Americans together. History 11 emphasizes essay writing, dialogue and class discussion. Readings include primary and secondary sources. In collaboration with the English Department, students develop a Cumulative Humanities Project, featuring a research paper and oral presentation.

AP U.S. History (3 credits) Offered to Grade 11 by recommendation of the Department This course covers the same material as History 11. A distinguished sophomore history record, proficient thinking and writing skills and a desire to undertake an ambitious program are factors considered by the Department when selecting students. The course features college-level texts, essay writing, debate and historical simulations. All students must attend review sessions, take a practice AP examination and sit for the AP examination in May. In collaboration with the English Department, students develop a Cumulative Humanities Project, featuring a research paper and oral presentation.

Decision, Consequence and Remembrance j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 12 Students begin the year evaluating several infamous, influential leaders of the 20th century and tackle tough questions: What makes a leader successful? Does contemporary historiography judge the leader accurately? Has the evolving role of the media affected the evaluation of leaders? Each leader is presented in the context of the 34

atmosphere surrounding him or her; students examine and analyze decisions made and the outcomes rendered. Students provide informed comments and opinions in group discussion, debate and presentations. The study culminates in a student critique of a current leader. Beginning in January, students explore the ideas of genocide, ethnic cleansing and terrorism. Who and what defines terrorism and genocide? Students study the Holocaust as the basis of genocide and use that rubric to examine and evaluate debated genocides. Readings from survivors are included. Woven throughout the curriculum is the idea of remembrance. Students explore the concept of commemoration and its influence of how we understand past events through technology, the media and popular culture.

AP Macroeconomics j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 12 Through basic microeconomic and macroeconomic principles and the ideas of great economic thinkers, students investigate our contemporary economy from national and international perspectives. Discussion, simulation, essay writing, research and current economic and financial news are emphasized. Students visit a Wall Street firm, develop business plans as entrepreneurs and participate in a statewide stock market competition. All enrolled students will take the AP Macroeconomics examination; the AP Microeconomics examination is optional.

Contemporary History j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 12 This course is designed to help students understand the cause and nature of terrorism in our contemporary world. Topics lead to a discussion of the dilemmas of globalization, including the emergence of Islamic fundamentalism and the demands for social justice by the poor, immigrants and colonial people. Interwoven with the study of current events and based on the New Jersey curriculum on Terrorism and 9/11, there will be seven identified areas of study: (1) Human Behavior: Why Do People Do What They Do?; (2) From the Playground to the World Stage: Aggression, Hostility and Violence; What is the Definition of Terrorism?; (3) Development of a Historical Context of Terrorism; (4) 9/11/01: A Contemporary Case Study; (5) Consequences and Challenges in a Post-9/11 World; (6) Remembrance and Public Memory; (7) Building Better Futures: Narrative, Recovery and Responsibility. Each area will be examined in depth through the reading and discussion of primary and secondary sources, personal accounts and audio-visual offerings. The course will offer a variety of writing options suitable to each topic. Following each lesson or unit, the class will be asked, “What can we do to make this a better world?”

AP European History j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 12 This senior elective begins with the Renaissance and explores European ideas, individuals and events that continue to shape the contemporary world. Students examine the revolutions that transformed a weak and divided feudal continent into an industrial powerhouse of competing nation-states that have dominated the


globe for the past 500 years. Activities include debate, biographic research, role-play, use of technology and analysis of primary documents and historical writing. All enrolled students will take the AP examination in May.

AP Government and Politics: United States/ Topics in Law j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 12 This concentration provides students with an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. General concepts are used to analyze the U.S. government and its politics. Students study various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanation for various behaviors and outcomes during the political process. Topics to be discussed include civil liberties, public policy, political parties, mass media and the Constitution. Through study of the United States judiciary from the 1790’s into the 21st century, this elective traces the evolution of the judicial branch of the national government from obscurity to its present highly significant role in American life and law. With a focus on important Supreme Court decisions from the Marshall years to the current Roberts era, students read Court decisions and dissents, commentaries on the decisions and conduct individual research into key developments in Constitutional interpretation. Among other skills, students learn how to brief cases. All students take the AP Government and Politics: U.S. examination in May.

Mathematics Our program emphasizes the content and skills that promote longterm mathematical growth and achievement. Throughout Grades 9-12, we encourage students to imagine, play with ideas and become comfortable using multiple approaches. Students’ coursework builds habits of curiosity, initiative, organization and reflectiveness. Students develop their abilities to make connections in order to apply ideas in new settings. Students collaborate to discuss conjectures and make sense of ideas, learning how to construct and analyze logical arguments. Students learn and communicate using a variety of mathematical tools, methods, forms and technology. In all our courses, our goal is to develop students’ abilities in the multiple dimensions of mathematics that are needed for post-secondary and interdisciplinary studies. Procedural fluency, conceptual understanding, adaptive reasoning and strategic competence all contribute to students’ confidence and proficiency. In class, students learn standard methods through work with non-routine problems that can be extended into individual challenges within and across disciplines. Balanced attention is given to procedures, concepts, reasoning, and problem solving and modeling with mathematics. Problems, extended tasks, projects and investigations are chosen to emphasize the roles of creativity, practice and persistence in math. Each student is required to complete a three-year sequence of courses that builds on her previous studies, and is expected to complete a fourth course in Grade 12. AP courses are available to students who have demonstrated high achievement in the prerequisite courses.

Algebra (3 credits) Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra course or equivalent In this course, students study operations with variables and methods of solving equations, with an emphasis on linear and quadratic functions. Students learn to perform and explain the reasoning behind procedures involving systems of equations, inequalities, exponents and polynomials. Students use verbal descriptions, equations, tables of values, and graphs to solve problems and model real-world situations. Geometric figures are used to explain algebraic results, and problems from geometry serve as contexts for algebraic work. Students write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems, provide justifications for conclusions, and gain insight into the behavior of functions.

Geometry (3 credits) Prerequisite: Algebra In this course, students study relationships and establish results involving measurement, shape and position. Content includes similarity, congruence, coordinates, trigonometric ratios, two- and threedimensional figures, area, volume and circle. Students use variables and geometric relationships to model real-world phenomena. Students study algebraic functions that arise in geometric contexts, and use algebra to understand geometric relationships. Logical reasoning is a focus of the course; students examine assumptions, evaluate conjectures and determine the validity of conclusions using various forms of proof. Dynamic geometry software is used for investigative work, to develop understanding of results and as one of a variety of tools for developing and confirming proofs.

Advanced Algebra (3 credits) Prerequisites: Algebra and Geometry In this course students deepen their understanding of the uses of variables by modeling real-world contexts involving quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, logarithmic and exponential functions. Students use graphical, symbolic, verbal and numerical representations to describe and understand situations, and make predictions about functions and their graphs. Students lay a foundation for future mathematics coursework by using technology to conduct investigations, by reasoning with algebraic expressions and by communicating ideas in written sentences and reports.

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Functions and Trigonometry j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation of the Department This course is designed to strengthen students’ skill and understanding of variables and functions in preparation for a precalculus course. Students pose questions about and model real-world situations using a wide variety of functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, power, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. Students use technology to investigate situations, develop their graphing skills, analyze the graphs of functions and deepen their understanding of how to solve equations. By examining functions verbally, graphically, numerically and symbolically, students increase their ability to engage in independent problem-solving activities. Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 35


Precalculus j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation of the Department This course focuses on the study of the multiple meanings and uses of the functions used in college-level mathematics. Students study functions from geometric, numerical, verbal, graphical and analytic perspectives, and learn how to construct functions as models of realworld contexts. Students reason with polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic expressions, justifying conjectures and explaining the behavior of functions, in preparation for the study and application of rates of change in calculus. Students also extend their use of mathematical structure to study polar coordinates, complex numbers and vectors. Students use technology to pose questions, investigate situations and support their conclusions.

Applied Calculus j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Precalculus and recommendation of the Department This college-level course in calculus of a single variable focuses on the study of limits, derivatives, integrals and differential equations within real-world applications. Using contexts from business, economics, social science and the natural sciences, students learn how to pose questions that can be answered using the concepts and procedures of calculus. Situations are presented in the forms that they occur in context: graphically, symbolically, verbally and numerically, using units. Students answer questions using those same four approaches and write about their results in full sentences. Students use technology to investigate situations, solve problems and support their conclusions.

AP Calculus AB j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Precalculus and by recommendation of the Department

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This college-level course in calculus of a single variable is consistent with the College Board syllabus. Students examine questions presented graphically, numerically, symbolically and verbally, and use connections between different representations to answer questions using those same four approaches. Students study techniques and properties of derivatives, integrals, limits, but using approximation, applications, modeling and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus as unifying themes for understanding rates of change and accumulation. Students learn to use a graphing calculator, along with other technology to investigate situations, solve problems and support their conclusions. All students are required to take the AP examination.

AP Calculus BC j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Precalculus and by recommendation of the Department This course in calculus of a single variable is consistent with the College Board syllabus. BC Calculus includes all of the content of AB Calculus, with the same approaches and emphasis, but includes the additional topics of parametric and polar equations, vectors, convergence and divergence of infinite sequences, power series, differential equations and a selection of other techniques. Students learn to use a graphing calculator, along with other technology to investigate situations, solve problems and support their conclusions. All students are required to take the AP examination. Note: Students 36

who take this course after AP Calculus AB will repeat all of the content from that course.

Statistics j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra or by recommendation of the Department This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to statistics. Statistics is the branch of mathematics that deals with the collection, organization and interpretation of numerical data with the goal of making predictions about the population under study or to make comparisons between two groups. Students study random sampling methods for collecting data, various graphical techniques for organizing data and significance tests and confidence intervals to interpret the data. They also explore probability and the normal, binomial and geometric distributions. An emphasis is placed on real-world applications and writing; there are frequent projects throughout the year.

AP Statistics j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and by recommendation of the Department This college-level course in statistics is consistent with the College Board syllabus. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. The topics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability and statistical inference. Students use graphing calculators with statistical capabilities to model, explore, make discoveries and analyze data. All students are required to take the AP examination, and in accordance with the College Board course description, learn to express ideas using full sentences and paragraphs along with graphs, tables and equations.

Research in Advanced Mathematics j (1-3 credits) Prerequisite: Calculus AB, BC or recommendation of the Department In this course, students conduct research in a selected area of college mathematics (e.g. game theory, graph theory & networks, combinatorics, number theory, college geometry). Students learn about the cycle of research in mathematics: conjecture, investigation, datagathering, generalization, abstraction and proof. Students develop questions, approaches and results, writing definitions, justifying their conclusions and reading and writing mathematical proof. A primary goal of the course to is to develop students’ ability to initiate and carry out a long term research project to completion. Students are expected to write a complete mathematical paper at the end of the course using undergraduate math research standards.

Physical Education and Athletics The Physical Education requirement provides enjoyment of activity while fulfilling the needs for fitness, social interaction and knowledge of lifetime sports and exercise. When a student is participating in a Kent Place School sport or any Kent Place School dance class, the Department waives her physical education requirement for that trimester. If a student is a Varsity or Junior Varsity player, approved club sport/program participant, Chamber or Ensemble Dancer, in all three trimesters, she fulfills her physical education requirement.


Physical Education Classes Grades 9 - 12 Physical Education is an integral part of the total education process and consists of two components: physical activity and physical education. The goal of physical education is to develop physically educated individuals who have the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity. KPS Physical Education adheres to the six National and State standards and guidelines as described by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE). The Physical Education classes and workshops offered are designed to provide KPS students with the opportunity to meet and exceed the minimum established standards. Physical Education classes at the Upper School level focus on giving students the opportunity to develop fitness plans for life and to build an appreciation for lifetime sports. Fitnessgram, the fitness assessment tool developed by the Cooper Institute, and Polar heart rate technology will be used to provide a comprehensive assessment procedure as well as an individualized report and subsequent fitness program for every Physical Education student. Students are required to participate in two Physical Education classes per week, four classes in the 10-day block cycle. Three of the classes are designated as “physical activity”-focused and one is considered “physical education” or lab workshop-based. Lab workshops are mandatory for all students in order to receive Physical Education credit. Incorporated into the curriculum is an emphasis on wellness, which includes activities that improve cardiovascular endurance, flexibility and overall strength. In addition to school day Physical Education classes, optional early morning Zumba Fitness classes and AP PE (A Positive Physical Experience) circuit-based metabolic training classes are offered from 7:30-8:00 a.m. and fulfill the physical activity requirement allowing students to use the assigned school day Physical Education class as a study hall. Throughout the year, students attending the school day classes may be involved in the following programs and activities: team building, flag football, tennis, golf, badminton, tennis, yoga, meditation, relaxation, stress management, nutrition, lifetime fitness skills, college transition, volleyball, basketball, archery, core training and cup stacking. Project Adventure education is an opportunity for students to step out of their comfort zones and stretch and expand into areas that encourage emotional, social and cognitive development. Adventure education is offered at the beginning of each trimester and for a 10-session unit in conjunction with IMPACT/PREPARE and the Getting Ready… program during sophomore year.

IMPACT/PREPARE Grade 10 PREPARE is a training organization that offers an on-site personal safety program for all sophomore students. The five-session seminar class occurs every other week for one trimester. The goal is to empower students to make effective personal safety choices. In an emotionally supportive environment, students practice avoidance, awareness, verbal, and physical skills with a fully padded mock assailant. Training includes verbal self-defense strategies practiced

in role-playing scenarios in a wide variety of contexts (dealing with strangers as well as people the students may know) and learning how to spot manipulations and coercion. Students learn how to advocate for themselves, practice how to deal with the common “freeze response,” and how to manage fear, anxiety, and adrenaline during intimidating situations. Students also learn how to deliver full-force, full-contact, strikes to vulnerable areas on the padded assailant’s body in dynamic, interactive physical resistance scenarios.

Project Adventure Grade 10 The adventure-based experiential program is geared toward the development of responsible individuals and a sustainable community. The program will provide students with the tools necessary to challenge themselves to grow by overcoming perceived limitations. The program is supported by the core concepts of the Full Value Contract and Challenge by Choice, which encourage personal accountability and ownership of the participants individual experience. Classes occur every other week for two trimesters.

Interscholastic Athletics Competition with other schools is available in the following sports: Fall: cross country, field hockey, soccer, tennis, volleyball Winter: basketball, swimming, winter track, squash, fencing Spring: golf, lacrosse, softball, track and field Membership on a Varsity or Junior Varsity team fulfills the Physical Education requirement for that specific trimester. Please see Athletics section in Student Handbook for more information about the Athletics program.

Physical Education Exemption

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Please refer to the Athletics Overview page on the school website or MyKPS for the most up-to-date version of the Physical Education Exemption policy.

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Physical Education is a required course for all Kent Place students. Students in the Upper School are eligible to apply for Physical Education Exemption on a trimester or yearly basis. Physical Education consists of two components: physical activity and physical education. Students receiving exemption are exempt from the physical activity requirements only and will be required to participate in Physical Education workshops (in the classroom) at the beginning of each trimester. Automatic Exemptions In the Upper School, students who compete on a school athletic team or participate in the KPS dance program fulfill the physical activity requirement for the trimester in which their sport or dance program is in session. In addition, students participating in the Health & Wellness program (formerly WLS), fulfill the Physical Education component.

Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 37


Fulfilling the Physical Education Requirement In order to fulfill the Physical Education requirement Upper School exemption students are expected to attend three required workshops each trimester. Students will be assigned a Physical Education block and are assigned workshop dates during the trimester. Lab workshops for the 2014-2015 school year will focus on: 1. Stress Management 2. Relaxations Tools and Techniques 1. Nutrition Determining exemption eligibility is a four-part process. Part One – Determining Exemption Eligibility Criteria for outside training MUST: 1. Demonstrate a major commitment and high-level training for a sport that KPS does not offer or is currently not in-season. 2. Meet a minimum of 10 hours per week or have a metabolic equivalent of task (MET) assignment of 7.0 or higher. A compendium of physical activities chart (Taylor Code) available on MyKPS. 3. Include the following: Fitness and Specific Skill Training. These hours do not include travel time. 4. Include meaningful competitions and/or performances in the sport throughout the exemption period 5. Occur under the direct supervision of an adult coach Part Two – Complete the Online Exemption Application Form

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1. Students who participate in an outside athletic program may petition for an exemption on a single trimester or yearly basis. 2. The online form is located on the Athletics Overview page of the school website or on MyKPS. 3. The “View our PE Exemption Policy” button contains information that explains the most up-to-date version of the exemption policy. Application Due Dates: Fall: September 12, 2014 Winter: December 5, 2014 Spring: February 20, 2015

Report Due Dates: Fall: December 19, 2014 Winter: February 20, 2015 Spring: May 15, 2015 Part Four – Exemption Expectations Upper School students are required to remain on campus. Exceptions must approved by the Upper School Office. If a student wishes to pursue the exemption for more than one trimester, she must select the full year option and complete the online report form for committee review. The trimester updates should reflect any changes in the training and competitive schedule. Students approved for trimester or yearly exemption are required to notify the Physical Education Department Chair of any changes in training schedule or competitions that occur during an exemption period. Additional questions regarding the exemption policy should be directed to the Director of Studies.

Science The goals of the Science program are to foster awareness in all students of their biological and physical environments and to encourage their active and creative involvement with those environments. The curriculum enables each student to acquire a foundation in science that allows her to function as a responsible and judicious citizen. In addition, the Department encourages her to acquire the command of basic skills and knowledge that she will need for future study, stressing laboratory experience and problem solving. Departmental offerings include laboratory oriented courses in the traditional disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics, and others that allow students to explore specialized topics at an advanced level. Real-world connections are emphasized throughout the curriculum. Three years of a laboratory science are required for graduation, including Biology I and Chemistry I, required of students in Grades 9 and 10, respectively.

Biology (3 credits)

Part Three – Final Evaluation Process

Required in Grade 9; offered to new students in Grades 10 - 12

All exemption decisions are made by the Exemption Committee which includes the Athletic Director, the Middle and Upper School Division Directors, the Physical Education Department Chair and the Director of Studies. Upon approval, exemption students will be required to submit a final report and journal describing what she has achieved throughout the trimester. Yearly exemption students are expected to complete the online form each trimester and submit the signed journal in the spring.

Biology is a survey course that offers students an introduction to important topics in the study of life. These topics include scientific reasoning, observation and data collection, experimental design, molecular and cellular biology, genetics, evolution and ecology. All levels of life, from cells to ecosystems, will be covered. The course is designed to give students a broad background for further study in advanced science courses. Students will also participate in multiple laboratory activities. The purpose of the laboratory component is to introduce students to laboratory safety, data collection, analysis and a range of scientific procedures. Students will develop an understanding of biology and an ability to apply that understanding in the classroom and in the laboratory.

Online Report Form: The online report is located on the exemption policy page. Journal: The journal should be maintained for the season and include self-reflections using the three goals established during the application process. The journal should also include a final 38

reflection of the overall season. The journal must be signed and dated by the instructor and submitted by the specified due dates.


Chemistry (3 credits) Required in Grade 10; offered to new students in Grades 11 and 12 This course serves as an introduction to the basic principles of modern chemistry from both a descriptive and a quantitative perspective. The course includes such topics as units of measurement, atomic structure, periodic law and bonding, compound naming and formula writing, chemical equations, stoichiometry, behavior of gases and solutions, as well as introductions to thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibria. Both inquiry and traditional activities and laboratory work are used so that students can gain knowledge and experience through exploration and observation. Labs are typically conducted every two weeks, with shorter activities between labs. Applications and new technology are emphasized throughout.

AP Environmental Science j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 and by recommendation of the Department Environmental Science is a college-level course focusing on the study of ecology, energy, resources, population and pollution. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course uses basic concepts from the fields of biology, chemistry, physics and geology to examine environmental problems. Students study the scientific aspects of environmental issues and debate the ethical, economic and political ramifications of these topics. Laboratory activities such as water sampling, quantification of biodiversity, soil analysis, oil spill remediation and invertebrate inventories complement each segment of the course. Students research the current status of many environmental issues and discuss what strategies might be implemented to address these problems.

AP Biology j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I and by recommendation of the Department This college-level course requires extensive technical reading and builds on the concepts introduced in Biology I. Topics are presented in compliance with the College Board AP syllabus and focus on the major topics, which include molecules and cells, heredity and evolution and organisms and populations. Students must read several chapters of the textbook during the summer. Weekly lab periods provide time to complete the experiments in the AP lab manual and other relevant investigations. All students are required to take the AP examination.

AP Chemistry j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry I, Advanced Algebra and by recommendation of the Department. Precalculus is also recommended at least concurrently. This college-level course provides a rigorous, quantitative, in-depth presentation of topics introduced in Chemistry 1. These include stoichiometry, states of matter, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, molecular geometry, reaction kinetics, solutions and equilibria. Students explore the development of chemical theories as logical progressions from first principles. All students

are expected to review the first four chapters of the textbook and complete problems sets as a summer assignment. The classroom environment is collaborative and more discussion-based, rather than more traditional lecture and practice. Both traditional and guided inquiry laboratory work are integrated within this course to reinforce topics. All students are required to take the AP examination.

Human Anatomy & Physiology j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisites: Biology I and Chemistry I Anatomy and physiology is the study of the fascinating world of the human body. Whether you are planning a career in medicine, athletics, general science or preparing for the next tennis match, you will learn information pertinent to your goals in life. This class will show the precision of the interconnectedness of the human body systems and provide you tools to understand the amazing relationships that exist within your own body. Students will participate in numerous lab activities and dissections.

Physics j (3 credits) Offered to Grade 11, enrollment in Precalculus; Offered to Grade 12, completion of or enrollment in Functions and Trigonometry. This introductory physics course is designed to examine and discover the principles that govern the natural world. It covers topics that are both conceptual and quantitative in nature. Areas of study include mechanics, waves and optics and electricity and magnetism. Guided inquiry and traditional laboratory experiments foster collaboration and allow students to observe and analyze data and propose questions for further study. Students use additional technologies to access other experiments and to investigate topics not covered in class.

AP Physics j (3 credits)

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Offered to Grade 12 Prerequisites: Completion of Physics I, current enrollment in Calculus and/or recommendation of Department

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Physics I focuses on the big ideas in an introductory college-level physics sequence and provides students with enduring, conceptual understandings of foundational physics principles including kinematics, energy, sound and electricity. Students will be able to explain causal relationships, apply and justify the use of mathematical routines, design experiments, analyze data and make connections across multiple topics. A minimum of 25 percent of the class is dedicated to inquiry laboratory practices. All students take the AP Physics I examination.

Biomedical Issues j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 in 1st trimester Cloned sheep. Organ Transplants. Reproductive Technologies. Genetic Testing. Medical dilemmas. The aim of this course is to help students understand the science involved, explore the ethical and societal implications and develop a framework for making informed decisions regarding these and other controversial issues. Course work Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 39


includes discussions of current events, case studies, presentations of individual research on a related topic, guest speakers and field trips.

Student Designed Research j (1-3 credits) Offered to Grades 10 - 12 This course may not take the place of yearly science credits. This course gives motivated students a chance to delve into the world of scientific inquiry. Students accepted into this program will learn how scientists study the natural world while investigating a topic of their choice. Emphasis will be placed on scientific literature research, experimental design and implementation, data collection and data analysis. Each student will be expected to submit a formal scientific paper and present their findings in a public forum. This course may be taken as a single-credit one-trimester course and can be taken for up to three trimesters.

Bioethics Project j (2 credits) Offered to Grades 10-12; students selected through an application process Biomedical Science is advancing at an ever rapid pace. In many cases we need to discuss the ramifications of new technologies before they have even been fully developed or implemented. With these advances come complex ethical questions dealing with personal freedom, privacy, access to health care and fairness. Each year, the Bioethics Project will choose a broad theme to explore. Past themes have included The Medically Modified Human: Is Better Always Good? and Donor: What is the Value of the Human Body? This intensive two-trimester course with a summer internship component, pairs each participant with a biomedical ethics scholar as a mentor. Students will conduct research on a topic regarding a biomedical ethical issue related to our theme and present a paper on the findings. This course does not fulfill a science credit.

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Technology Technology Department courses are designed to develop problemsolving skills; to address how technology hardware and software interact; and to facilitate an understanding of how users interact with technology. Students receive a tablet PC laptop as part of the Kent Place School Laptop program. The laptop provides instant access to information from a variety of sources. In addition, all Upper School students are given a KPS Google and MyKPS account which allows them to better communicate with teachers and peers regarding the course of studies and school-related activities and events. All Grade 9 and new students are required to participate in a laptop orientation and 9th Grade Seminar. Please see the Student Handbook for more information about our Laptop program.

Web Page Development j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 10 - 12 A web page is a dynamic tool for communication and presentation of personal work. First, students examine and research other web pages to discover what designs work and what makes a website “user friendly.� Secondly, students study HTML (Hyper-Text Markup Language) to create their own web pages. For the remainder of the trimester, students use Dreamweaver, a web-authoring tool, to create web pages. Students 40

start off with simple layers and eventually learn how to import graphics, insert text, use hyperlinks, create tables and use frames. The course also covers what it takes to post and maintain a website on the Internet. For the final web development project, students design and develop a website to be used in a real-world scenario.

Introduction to Computer Programming j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 10 - 12 Prerequisite: Demonstrated knowledge of computer applications The study of programming nurtures and develops problem-solving skills that can be applied to real world scenarios. This course provides an introduction to computer programming by creating interactive software applications such as games, science simulations, mathematical experiments and animated presentations. While working in the programming environments of Scratch and App Inventor and the programming languages of Python and Java, students discover what a programmer does to get a program to run, the programming environment, the people involved in application development and how to interact with different parts of the programming environment. Students use models and simulations to experience the programming process of giving a computer detailed instructions.

Computer Programming j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 10 - 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and recommendation by the Mathematics and Science Departments Computer programming is all about solving problems by giving instructions to a computer. The instructions coded in a programming language direct the computer to perform tasks that manipulate and produce data. The process of defining a problem, breaking it down into a series of smaller problems and finally writing a computer program to solve it is a valuable exercise in learning to think logically. Students use the tools of Scratch, Alice, App Inventor, and Greenfoot, and the versatile Python and Java programming languages to write computer programs. Throughout the course, students will design solutions and develop programs that solve real-world problems posed by simulations and case studies. In addition, the student is made aware of the capabilities and limitations of the computer and realizes that the programmer or human element is more important than the machine. This course is a prerequisite for AP Computer Science A, an AP-level course that prepares students for an optional AP Computer Science A examination.

AP Computer Science A j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: Computer Programming This course emphasizes programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in computer science. Students design, develop, implement and modify computer-based solutions to problems, use and implement well-known algorithms and data structures, develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures to solve problems, code in an object-oriented paradigm using the


programming language Java, identify and understand relationships between the major hardware and software components of a computer system and recognize the ethical and social implications of computer use. Students read and analyze large programs including the AP GridWorld case study. Throughout the course, students will design solutions and develop programs that solve real-world problems. AP Computer Science A will prepare students for the AP Computer Science A examination.

Painting j (1 credit)

Visual and Performing Arts

Printmaking j (1 credit)

Kent Place School believes that involvement with the visual and performing arts is essential for the intellectual and spiritual growth of the student. The goal is to provide a stimulating climate in which personal expression, imagination, creative endeavor and intellectual curiosity may thrive and in which students may learn to place the arts in their historical and cultural context. The four Departments in the arts – art, dance, drama and music – provide a wide range of choices for self-expression, performance and creativity. In keeping with a commitment to the intellectual and spiritual growth of the student, the School requires for graduation six trimesters of arts electives. Additional opportunities abound for the student to pursue her own particular artistic interests within the school community. In Grade 9, each student selects introductory courses offered by the Departments; then, she must complete additional credits before graduation. The Grade 9 component provides a rich introductory sequence and maximizes interdisciplinary connections. During additional courses, a student develops a mastery of skills and concepts. Together, these components ensure that all students leave Kent Place with a deeper understanding and appreciation of the nature and value of the arts in their lives.

Visual Art The studio art curriculum is a program of sequential learning with structured objectives providing an opportunity for individual student growth in understanding aesthetics, art history and the development of specific artistic skills. The Department emphasizes development of the student’s personal creative thinking and visual statement. One-trimester courses are offered based on demand.

Visual Art Workshop (1 credit) Offered as part of the Grade 9 requirement This Grade 9 course explores creative thinking and art making through a variety of media and techniques. Students learn about art movements and individual artists while making related work. Students are encouraged to experiment and explore the creative thought process.

Drawing j (1 credit) This course develops fundamentals through varied approaches to drawing. Students explore line, shape, space, form and perspective in still life, figure and architectural forms with pencil, charcoal, pastels and ink. Guest artists and gallery trips provide first-hand experience and inspiration.

This class offers the students the opportunity to explore concepts and methods of painting. Students learn canvas preparation, painting techniques and color mixing. Projects include still life, landscape, abstraction and mixed media. Through the use of exercises, slides, critiques and visiting artists, the students gain an understanding of the varied possibilities in painting.

This course enables students to explore a variety of printmaking processes (e.g., monoprint, block print, silkscreen). An emphasis is placed on developing effective visual ideas and personal expression. Visiting artists and gallery visits are included whenever possible.

Studio Art j (3 credits) Offered full year for Grades 10 - 12; admission by interview with instructor This advanced course provides a breadth of studio art experiences. Students explore possibilities of visual expression in a range of media including drawing, painting, design and mixed media. Students develop creative, analytical and introspective thinking through reference to important historical and contemporary art. Field trips provide first-hand experience and inspiration. This course is recommended for students interested in pursuing AP Portfolio.

Made in Africa: An Art Historical Investigation j (1 credit) Made in Africa combines art-historical inquiry with hands-on art making inspired by specific African cultures. An in-depth look at a few selected regions includes reading, viewing artifacts, listening to music and considering the ways these objects have been used, interpreted and sometimes misinterpreted. In each case the attempt to understand the background and context of the objects culminates in the creation of a hands-on project.

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Made in China: An Art Historical Investigation j (1 credit) Made in China combines art-historical inquiry with hands-on art making inspired by specific Chinese cultures. An in-depth look at a few selected regions includes reading, viewing art, listening to music and considering the ways these objects have been used, interpreted and sometimes misinterpreted. In each case the attempt to understand the background and context of the objects culminates in the creation of a hands-on project.

Architecture j (1 credit) This course combines lecture, slide presentation, discussion and hands-on experience as it interweaves the history and aesthetics of the architectural experience. It considers the historical, cultural and political traditions of architecture; draws comparisons between European and Eastern architecture; and establishes the relationship between architecture and significant social, political and economic Elective courses are marked by the symbol j.

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events. The course is open to all grades; there is no prerequisite. It is particularly recommended to those students who are, or will be, taking the AP Art History and/or AP Portfolio courses.

Portfolio j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 Prerequisite: One year of Studio Art and/or permission of the instructor

Using digital video cameras and video editing software, students develop and produce short films, beginning with pre-production and continuing to a premiere of the finished products. The creation of these films is informed by the viewing and study of an array of examples of documentary and narrative works from film history and short readings about film art and theory. During the trimester, the student filmmakers learn techniques of visual storytelling as they relate to screenwriting, directing, cinematography and editing. Emphasis is placed on the creative collaboration in filmmaking.

Art History j (3 credits)

Sculpture j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 10 - 12

Photography I j (1 credit)

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This introductory course explores the technical and aesthetic aspects of photography, using primarily digital media. Topics include using various types of cameras, image-editing software and presentation formats. Students are exposed to the history of photography and study the work of major fine art photographers. They engage in critical discussion and analysis of their own work in a critique setting. The work of the course culminates in the presentation of a portfolio of finished work. Students are encouraged to supply their own digital camera.

Photography II j (1 credit) Prerequisite: Photography I or equivalent as judged by Department This course continues the work of Photography I. Since technical knowledge of the camera and other digital tools is a prerequisite, a greater emphasis is placed on development of a creative artistic statement in photography. Students continue to refine technical knowledge while exploring a range of conceptual and aesthetic issues in contemporary photography. Students are encouraged to supply their own digital camera.

Picture/Book j (1 credit) This studio course uses a variety of media, including digital imaging software, collage, and bookbinding, to create a unique visual narrative. Students gain an understanding of basic elements of design 42

Filmmaking 1 j (1 credit)

This intensive studio art course is offered to juniors and seniors who want a college-level art experience. The focus of this class is working toward compiling an AP Portfolio for submission to the College Board. It is strongly recommended that students interested in submitting a portfolio take this class in both their junior and senior years. Students create a body of two-dimensional or three-dimensional artwork that focuses on quality, breadth and concentration. Students will be expected to produce approximately 24 pieces of finished artwork for their portfolios. Students may only submit a portfolio in their senior year. At that time, the course will be titled AP Portfolio.

This advanced course allows students to gain an understanding and enjoyment of painting, sculpture, architecture and other art forms from throughout history and from a variety of cultures. Emphasis is on looking at art in the context of history, geography, politics, religion and culture. Students look at art critically, towards developing a discerning, sensitive eye for its aesthetic and cultural messages. The visual insights developed through this analysis help students to understand the past. These insights offer vital clues to understanding the cultural challenges of the present and future. The curriculum follows the AP outline. Taking the AP examination is optional.

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in the creation of a hand-bound, illustrated book. After choosing a text, such as a classic short story, a poem or a myth as a subject, Photoshop software is used to manipulate images gathered from various sources. Original drawings and photos, other scanned images and images taken from the Internet will be transformed and smoothly combined to create a visual retelling of the chosen text.

Sculpture, a one-trimester art elective, introduces students to threedimensional thinking in an art context. Projects are developed in a variety of media, including clay, glass, assemblage and installation art. Some consideration of architectural space is given through model making. Projects encompass sculptural ideas as well as technique. For instance, students might investigate the question of how to catalyze space into an aesthetic experience through the use of art installations. Students might then look to the work of artists such as Christo and Jeanne-Claude or Fred Sanback for inspiration in this. Students are encouraged to use unusual materials and deepen their concepts of public versus private space to create these installations. Students consider the more traditional sculptural categories of assemblage and the additive and subtractive methods.

Dance Through rigorous exercise via modern dance and ballet technique, Pilates, creative movement exploration and dance composition, students in the Upper School develop an awareness of the body as an instrument for personal expression. An appreciation of dance as an art form is fostered through readings, film viewings, visits from guest artists and field trips. Students who wish to pursue the study of dance beyond the introductory level have the opportunity to strengthen technical skills, experiment with choreography and perform before the public. Chamber Dancers and Dance Ensemble are the performance-oriented courses open to all students through an audition.

Dance: From Ballet to Modern (1 credit) Offered as part of the Grade 9 requirement Dance exposes students to ballet and modern dance technique, improvisation and movement exploration. Examples of choreography from the 16th to the 20th centuries are integral to the curriculum; the trimester begins with Louis XIV and ends with Alvin Ailey. Assignments include selected readings and group choreography projects. Texts include Dance and 101 Stories of the Great Ballets.


Dance Ensemble (Intermediate) j (3 credits) The Dance Ensemble course is open to intermediate-level dance students through audition. This skill-oriented course is designed to develop technique in modern dance, ballet and Pilates. Students study improvisation, movement exploration, compositional forms and are challenged with duet and group choreography projects. The class presents its work for an audience in the first and third trimesters. Films and live performances of professional choreographers and dancers are included in the curriculum.

Chamber Dancers (Advanced) j (3 credits) Chamber Dancers is open to advanced-level dance students through audition. This performance-oriented course is concerned with developing solo, duet and small ensemble work. Students study ballet and modern dance technique, Pilates, improvisation, movement exploration and compositional forms to prepare for choreography projects and performance. The dancers perform for a variety of audiences throughout the year. Films and live performances of professional choreographers and dancers are included in the curriculum. Fundamentals of Dance Technique j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 9 - 12 This dance course is open to all students in the Upper School and focuses on developing skills in modern dance, ballet and Pilates. To broaden the student’s dance experience, they co-choreograph dance studies and watch dance films. Students receive arts credit and may take this course instead of a physical education class.

DRAMA AND FILM The Drama and Film program at Kent Place seeks to develop and encourage awareness of theater and film as living arts and as essential parts of contemporary culture. Through class study of literature and technique and through participation in a variety of performances, the Department encourages cooperative effort, self-reliance and a healthy respect for the process of creative self-expression.

Acting Workshop (1 credit) Offered as part of the Grade 9 requirement This course introduces students to basic work in acting and theater production through a variety of exercises and assignments in improvisation, performance, directing, script study and visualization. Assignments include short quizzes and performance assignments in monologue work, scene study and group acting projects. Texts include Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, additional monologue and scene study material, short readings and film excerpts.

Introduction to Film Study (1 credit) Offered as part of Grade 9 requirement This course introduces students to basic concepts in film and film production. Students explore the manner in which photography and the illusion of motion are joined to produce the modern motion picture and focus on the specific areas of cinematography, editing, art direction and production design. Short readings, quizzes and projects

in simple screenwriting directing and design assess the student’s growth as viewers of film media. All films are shown on THE BIG SCREEN in the theater! Films include, complete or excerpted, the following: The Age of Innocence, Empire of the Sun, Doctor Zhivago, Mildred Pierce, The Night of the Hunter, Citizen Kane, The Graduate, Cabaret, Alien, Julia, Carrie, Frankenstein, The Bride of Frankenstein, Dracula, Cleopatra, Lawrence of Arabia, Barry Lyndon, Schindler’s List, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Psycho, Fatal Attraction, The Shining, Sophie’s Choice, Saving Private Ryan, The Man Who Knew Too Much, The Cutting Edge Metropolis, Visions of Light: The Story of Cinematography, Goodfellas, The Godfather, Gone With The Wind and others.

Acting Seminar j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 10 and 11 and to Grade 9 by permission of the instructor This is an acting seminar course for students who wish to continue their performance work on a more advanced level. Students learn to develop their vocal and physical capabilities and explore basic aspects of characterization and interpretation through close study of several playscripts. Students are evaluated on assigned projects in acting and directing, participation in class discussion and critiques and the ongoing process of self-assessment. Formal performance projects, presented in January and May, require each student to be responsible for the preparation and rehearsal of individually chosen performance pieces. This is a performance-based course, and each student is expected to work thoughtfully, creatively and respectfully with all members of the class.

Performance Company j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 by permission of the instructor Students admitted to the new performance company become part of a small, selective performing ensemble. During the year, these company members work as a team to develop new and original work for performance during the school year. Work may be developed through theater exercises, improvisation and original writing assignments. At least three all-school performance presentations are offered by the company during the year, and company members may travel to other schools to present some of their work. Company members also participate in several theater field trips and work with selected guest artists throughout the year. Students selected to participate in the company must be prepared to work thoughtfully, creatively and respectfully with all members of the ensemble.

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Music The Music program at Kent Place School is a vital component of the total education a student receives. The Department offers many different opportunities for performance and artistic expression. Through an in-depth study of repertoire and technique, instrumentalists and vocalists can discover music as a unique form of communication, collaboration and self-expression. The Department also supplements performance with a curriculum that promotes understanding of music literature and history. The program is Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 43


designed to meet the needs of all students, from the dedicated musician, to those who are interested in exploring new creative endeavors, to those learning to play a new instrument or joining a choral group. The Department is dedicated to inspiring and encouraging students and helping them to achieve their goals. Independent study in music is reserved for those seniors who demonstrate competence in music theory, music history and, in exceptional cases, performances.

Music: A Historical Perspective j (1 credit) Offered as part of Grade 9 requirement Offered to Grade 9 students as a trimester art elective, this course presents music in a social context, as an essential ingredient of life in all time periods. Through readings and listening examples, students are encouraged to respond to a wide range of musical styles; to understand some of the social uses and values of music; and to recognize music as an important marker of its time and culture. Students are evaluated on assigned projects and presentations, as well as participation in class discussions. While both Music Theory I, II and The History of Western Music may be taken as self-contained, one-trimester courses, students who are preparing for the Music Theory AP examination must take Music Theory I and Music Theory II.

Music Theory j (1 credit per trimester) Offered to Grades 10 - 12

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This trimester course introduces students to the elements of music. These elements form the basic understanding of music theory that is needed in order to determine how music is played or constructed. The course includes the rudimentary skills of literacy with notation and a keyboard approach to ear training and the introduction of basic transposition skills. It progresses to rhythm and key structure and to basic harmony using primary triads and their inversions. This course is recommended as a supplement to performance as a way to strengthen music reading skills and to gain understanding of the music being performed.

Music Theory II j (1 credit per trimester) This trimester course builds on the material covered in Theory I. Students develop keen aural skills through dictation and music reading. An advanced study of theory and harmony continues, using primary, secondary and seventh chords and their inversions. Students learn to recognize modulations from relative and parallel keys. Composition techniques are introduced so that students come to understand the importance of form and structure in music. This course is a prerequisite for students considering AP Music Theory. AP Music Theory j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Music Theory II This yearlong course is taught to students who have a proven instrumental or vocal record in the Upper School. Students seeking to 44

pursue this course must first discuss their abilities and desire to study at this advanced level with the Music Department Chair. The scheduling of AP Music Theory class is based upon student course requests and availability within the master schedule.

The History of Western Music j (1 credit per trimester) Offered to Grades 10 - 12 This course allows students to gain an understanding and enjoyment of many styles of traditional Western music from the Baroque Period through Contemporary classical music. Emphasis is on the repertoire from each era. Classes are based on listening to recordings of different genres and identifying key elements that make up a style in music. This is an ideal course for both the performing musician and for those who seek to develop a real understanding for the music they will hear throughout their lives.

Chorale j (No credit) Offered to Grades 9 - 12 The Kent Place Chorale is the Upper School’s large singing group, which has an on-going reputation for quality performance. The three part treble choir, (SSA) performs throughout the year at school performances and in concert with Tenors and Basses from other independent schools. The repertoire is varied from the traditional choral mixed voice, (SATB) standards to more contemporary spirituals, world music in many languages and contemporary women composers. The mission of Chorale, through rehearsal and performance, is to achieve a high degree of learning and performance excellence, develop a love, understanding and appreciation of music and learn the skills and concepts necessary to successfully participate in a vocal ensemble.

Kent Place Singers j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 9 and 10 Students enter this select singing group through competitive audition. It is designed for the serious singer who would both benefit from and contribute to singing in three and four-part music. Some repertoire and performances are shared with the Chamber Singers. Kent Place Singers is preparatory for membership in Chamber Singers, and each member is required to participate in Chorale.

Chamber Singers j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 11 and 12 The Kent Place Chamber Singers is a smaller, more highly selective Upper School vocal ensemble. Singers audition annually and are placed in four vocal parts. Chamber Singers repertory is eclectic, focusing on a cappella singing. The group performs on campus in concerts and special events throughout the year and in special collaborations with other musical groups throughout the greater Metropolitan area. The focus of this group is the development of the most artistic and highest level of performance of each individual, stressing her importance as an individual as well as her contribution and obligations to the ensemble as a whole. Each member is required to participate in Chorale.


Orchestra j (1 credit) Offered to Grades 9 - 12 Membership in the School Orchestra gives students opportunities to grow individually as well as learning to work together in ensemble experiences. In both private and small group instruction with adjunct artist teachers, students learn correct breathing techniques, fingerings, music reading, articulation/bow technique, musicality and phrasing. The orchestra participates in performance recitals and concerts throughout the year. Students involved in the Orchestra program will prepare music for concerts from a variety of repertoire (e.g., classical, Broadway, jazz,) and time eras. Concepts that are taught include intonation, balance, blend, phrasing, dynamics and rhythm. For those students who are advanced instrumentalists, the option to audition for the select chamber orchestra has been introduced. After a successful inaugural year, this will be continued and candidates must first discuss their interest with the Orchestra Director.

World Language

The Upper School offers a rich, diversified program in modern and classical languages, the keystone of global education at Kent Place. All modern language classes are taught in the target language and use a wide variety of technology to support and enhance the learning experience. Students must complete at least three years of study of one language in the Upper School. Students are urged to continue in the language through advanced levels. The Department also encourages students to pursue a second world language for as many years as possible. In Chinese, French, Latin and Spanish, advanced courses allow for a challenging selection of literature to be read. In addition, students may take AP courses or study abroad. Local field trips to museums, theaters and lectures provide authentic opportunities for advanced students. The Department also offers a trimester class in Etymologies.

Latin The Classics program has one major goal: to teach our students how to read and interpret what is written in Latin. This goal leads to a number of secondary benefits: reinforcement of English vocabulary and syntax; acquisition of analytical and problem-solving skills; development of background in the culture of the ancient world; and analysis of Latin literature for content, style and rhetorical figures, which parallels studies in English literature. Many consider Latin to be a gateway discipline for future study in law, medicine, science, archeology and many other fields. This program has four levels that gradually introduce the students to the classical worlds of Italy and Greece.

more emphasis on syntax. Latin vocabulary and translation are the backbone of the course, and they are practiced daily. The memory part of this course is learning vocabulary; the skills part of this course is translating the Latin.

Latin II j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Latin I The students of Latin II continue their study of elementary Latin in the same manner as described above in Latin I. Latin I and II form a self-contained, complete program that is ideal for students of any grade who wish to build English vocabulary, learn about the culture of the classical world and study a second world language.

Latin III j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Latin II In Latin III, students begin the study of Latin prose through the works of Phaedrus, Martial, Pliny the Younger, Sallust, Ovid and Cicero. The course concludes in the third trimester with an introduction to poetry, through which the students enter the study of advanced Latin with the analysis of texts and literatures at the AP level.

Latin IV/V Lit j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Latin III In the advanced literature course, students translate, discuss and analyze the poetry of Catullus, Horace, Ovid and Vergil. The focus of the course is on examining how different poets can use similar material and meters in vastly different ways.

Latin IV/V j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Latin III This course is offered along with AP Latin for students not wishing to take the AP examination. The goals and content of the course are the same as those of the AP course, but students are not expected to translate or analyze the lines with the same depth and sophistication.

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AP Latin j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Latin III and by recommendation of the Department

Latin I j (3 credits)

This advanced course covers the lines selected by the College Board in preparation for the Latin AP examination. The goal of the course is to gain the skills and the ability to read, translate, understand, analyze, scan metrically and interpret selections from the works of Vergil and Caesar. The course also covers pertinent details of Roman cultural, social and political history. To enroll in AP Latin, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

Offered to Grades 9 - 11 Grades 10 and 11 students taking Latin I must also take Latin II

Etymologies j (1 credit)

The students in Latin I learn how to read and translate Latin. This elementary course is taught with the most advanced linguistic techniques available so that students of all abilities are able to make progress and translate with confidence. Grammatical and morphological forms are presented as an aid to translation and there is

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Offered to Grades 10 - 12 This one-trimester elective introduces students to a vast array of English words that are derived from Latin and Greek elements. Elective courses are marked by the symbol j. 45


Using a text based on Latin and Greek roots, the students learn Latin and Greek roots, prefixes and suffixes so they can dissect unknown words. These elements are the key to “cracking the code” behind English vocabulary and building more power within their written and spoken word.

CHINESE, French and Spanish The Department strives for student growth in the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening as well as an understanding of global cultures and literatures. The integration of skills provides students with knowledge for college, graduate school and beyond. Careers in medicine, law, international business, engineering, science, public relations and virtually every field in our global economy require the knowledge of a modern world language. Classes are conducted in the target language to best support the journey to fluency. To be accepted as an AP candidate, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

Chinese I j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 9 - 11 In Chinese I, students will learn about phonetics (pinyin), character strokes, basic greetings, self-introduction, daily routines and food. They will acquire a linguistic foundation through class practices and activities to master the phonetic system and tones. In order to learn conversational skills, students will study fundamental grammatical patterns, common vocabulary and standard usage. Writing and typing Chinese characters will also be taught. Chinese culture and customs will be introduced.

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Chinese III j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Chinese II This course serves as the transition from elementary to intermediate Chinese. Students will develop skills to produce longer conversations on a variety of topics in everyday situations, read paragraphs and short stories using authentic materials, and write appropriate letters and short essays. The course will also focus on the systematic reinforcement of grammar points, cultural awareness and critical thinking skills.

Chinese IV j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Chinese III and by recommendation of the Department This course aims to provide a foundation in grammar and pronunciation, and to expand the students’ ability to handle everyday situations and tasks in Mandarin Chinese. Students are encouraged to produce their opinions through both oral presentation and essay writing. They also will be able to compare the cultural differences by researching and reading authentic materials.

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Chinese V j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Completion of Chinese IV and by recommendation of the Department Continuing the World Language Department’s focus on global awareness, students take a closer look at literature, history, art and current events in Mandarin-speaking countries. Conversational, reading, writing and listening skills are enriched by a variety of authentic reading sources, such as literary pieces, newspaper articles, films and other multi-media materials.

AP Chinese Language and Culture j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Chinese V and by recommendation of the Department This course is designed for students who have reached an advanced level of linguistic development and are ready for an in-depth study of Chinese language and culture. It provides students with varied opportunities to further develop their proficiency in aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar and composition. The course also engages students in an exploration of both contemporary and historical Chinese culture. Course content includes family relationship, social customs, art and literature, philosophy and belief, history and politics and current issues. The course’s activities help students to prepare for the AP Chinese Language and Culture examination. To be accepted as an AP candidate, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

French I j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 9 - 11 This course gives the student a solid introduction to the French language. The objective of the course is to develop language skills through activities that focus on meaningful, personal communication. The acquisition of a second language takes time and practice; therefore, the vocabulary and grammar are introduced in context, and plenty of oral and aural practice is available in the classroom. As the student develops her language skills, she also learns about the diversity and uniqueness of the cultures studied. The instructor conducts the class in French, using English only when absolutely necessary. Students are equally expected to address the instructor in the target language.

French II j (3 credits) Prerequisite: French I While this course assumes a sound first-year preparation, it provides for an active review of basic grammatical structures of the language before it leads the student into the more challenging material of the second year. The emphasis of the course continues to be the development of the student’s language skills. The oral/aural exercises in the classroom continue with an increased provision for written and reading work. The class is conducted in French.


French III j (3 credits) Prerequisite: French II The objective of the course continues to be the development of the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a particular emphasis on oral/aural communication. Advanced grammatical structures are introduced at this level and short literary pieces are read and analyzed. All classes are conducted in French.

French IV j (3 credits) Prerequisite: French III and by recommendation of the Department The course accentuates spoken and written communication in French, presupposing a solid foundation in basic grammar and structure, which is reviewed and refined. French IV studies the Francophone world with cultural texts of selected Maghreb and West African countries, Indochina, Québec, Haiti and France. Poetry, short stories and film are also explored. Classroom participation is essential.

French V j (3 credits)

they practice speaking, listening, reading and writing about the Francophone world. To be accepted as an AP candidate, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

Spanish I j (3 credits) Offered to Grades 9 - 11 This course gives the student a solid introduction to the Spanish language. The objective of the course is to develop language skills through activities that focus on meaningful, personal communication. The acquisition of a second language takes time and practice; therefore, the vocabulary and grammar are introduced in context, and plenty of oral and aural practice is available in the classroom. As the student develops her language skills, she also learns about the diversity and uniqueness of the cultures studied. The instructor conducts the class in Spanish, using English only when absolutely necessary. Students are equally expected to address the instructor in the target language.

Prerequisite: Completion of French IV and by recommendation of the Department

Spanish II j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Spanish I

Continuing the World Language Department’s focus on global awareness, students take a closer look at literature, history, art and current events in French-speaking countries. Conversational, reading, writing and listening skills are enriched by a variety of authentic reading sources, such as literary pieces, newspaper articles, films and other multi-media materials.

While this course assumes a sound first-year preparation, it provides for an active review of basic grammatical structures of the language before it leads the student into the more challenging material of the second year. The emphasis of the course continues to be the development of the student’s language skills. The oral/aural exercises in the classroom continue with an increased provision for written and reading work. The class is conducted in Spanish.

French VI: Women’s Voices in Francophone Literature j (3 credits) Prerequisite: French V or by recommendation of the Department

Spanish III j (3 credits)

French VI is a literature course in the target language that studies important topics in women’s literature. Students will learn about the voices of women writers around the globe through reading the poetry, novels, and plays of many countries through a chronological approach. Topics to be discussed will include feminist theories and approaches to reading and writing, the social contexts of women’s literature, common themes in women’s literature such as marriage and motherhood, lesbian literature, and women’s roles as artists and writers. Authors will include writers from a wide range of Francophone countries.

The objective of the course continues to be the development of the four communicative skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a particular emphasis on oral/aural communication. Advanced grammatical structures are introduced at this level and short literary pieces are read and analyzed. All classes are conducted in Spanish.

AP French Language and Culture j (3 credits) Prerequisite: French IV and by recommendation of the Department This course teaches students to communicate effectively in French at an advanced level. Using authentic texts including podcasts, television and film clips, articles and more, students will study six themes: personal and public identities, global challenges, science and technology, families and communities, contemporary life and beauty and aesthetics. Students will hone their communication skills so that they are able to synthesize written and aural materials and discuss them orally and in written form. A formal review of complex grammar structures will support the students as

Prerequisite: Spanish II

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Spanish IV j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Spanish III and by recommendation of the Department This course offers the student the opportunity to further hone her oral and written expression while providing a deeper insight into Spanish culture. The instructor places increasing emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and advanced grammatical structures. Throughout the year, literary readings in the original version lead to class discussions. The student has opportunities to listen to and interact with guest speakers, to attend a play in Spanish and view movies in the target language.

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Spanish V j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish IV and by recommendation of the Department Continuing the World Language Department’s focus on global awareness, students take a closer look at literature, history, art and current events in Spanish-speaking countries. Conversational, reading, writing and listening skills are enriched by a variety of authentic reading sources, such as literary pieces, newspaper articles, films and other multi-media materials.

Spanish VI: Women’s Voices in Hispanic Literature j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Spanish V or by recommendation of the Department Spanish VI is a literature course in the target language that studies important topics in women’s literature. Students will learn about the voices of women writers around the globe through reading the poetry, novels, and plays of many countries through a chronological approach. Topics to be discussed will include feminist theories and approaches to reading and writing, the social contexts of women’s literature, common themes in women’s literature such as marriage and motherhood, lesbian literature, and women’s roles as artists and writers. Authors will include writers from a wide range of Hispanic countries.

AP Spanish Language and Culture j (3 credits) Prerequisite: Spanish IV and by recommendation of the Department

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This course is for students who have reached an advanced level of linguistic development and are ready for an in-depth study of Spanish and Latin American language and culture. The course includes a comprehensive review of grammar, vocabulary and Spanish syntax. This review is useful in the student’s preparation for the Spanish Language AP examination. To be accepted as an AP candidate, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

AP Spanish Literature j (3 credits) Prerequisite: By recommendation of the Department AP Spanish Literature is a Spanish and Latin American literature course in which students read, discuss and analyze poetry, short stories, drama and novels from different eras and literary styles. The student is expected to write both analytical essays and original creative pieces in Spanish. The course’s activities prepare the student for the Spanish Literature AP examination. To be accepted as an AP candidate, a student must have a minimum B+ average from the previous level along with departmental approval.

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College Advising

The Academic program at Kent Place School is designed to ensure that each girl who graduates is ready to succeed in a challenging college curriculum. College advising starts the minute a girl enrolls in the Upper School. Each year the Director of College Advising and the Director of the Upper School review course sign-ups to make sure that every student completes the courses needed for college admissions. Throughout their Kent Place experience, students are encouraged to work as hard as they can in the classroom, to explore their extracurricular interests and to search for ways to contribute to the good of their community. The process of identifying prospective colleges begins officially in winter of the junior year. Students and their parents work with the college advising office to develop a list of colleges that are appropriate for each student. Individual and group meetings with students to review the application process and prepare for college essay writing and interviewing take place in the spring of the junior year and the fall of the senior year. Emphasis is placed on self-assessment, thorough research and the development of mature decision-making skills. Kent Place prides itself on the quality and the wide range of colleges chosen by its graduates. All parents are encouraged to phone or e-mail the college advisors with any questions they have regarding the college admissions process.

Important Testing Dates in the College Admissions Process Registration deadlines for the ACT, SAT and the SAT Subject Tests are about five weeks ahead of the test dates. Registration can be completed at www.collegeboard.org for the SAT tests and at www.act.org for the ACT. Students should consult with the College Advising Office to devise an appropriate standardized testing timetable. The School recommends that students take the SAT and the ACT with writing for the first time in the spring of their junior year. Most students repeat the SAT and ACT once during the fall of the senior year. Please note that most selective schools may require particular SAT Subject Tests. Students who intend to apply early to colleges (November 1 or 15 application deadlines) should plan to have their testing complete by the October test date of senior year. Students may then elect to take or retake additional SAT subject tests in the fall of senior year. Please check www.collegeboard.org for future dates and information about registration.


2014

2015

January 25

SAT/Subject Tests

January 24

SAT/Subject Tests

February 8

ACT

February 7

ACT

March 8

SAT only

March 14

SAT only

April 12

ACT

April 18

ACT

May 3

SAT/Subject Tests

May 2

SAT/Subject Tests

June 7

SAT/Subject Tests

June 6

SAT/Subject Tests

June 14

ACT

June 13

ACT

September 13

ACT

October 11

SAT/Subject Tests

October 25

ACT

November 8

SAT/Subject Tests

December 6

SAT/Subject Tests

December 13

ACT

SAT: Subject Tests Guidelines To establish her Subject Test schedule, every student should first consult her subject teacher and then her academic advisor or the college advisor.

Test

Grade

Usual Date

Recommendation

English Literature

12

November

Upon consultation of College Advising Office

May or June

Upon completion of AP Biology, AP Chemistry or AP Physics or when recommended by the teacher

Sciences

11, 12

Mathematics Level I

9, 10, 11

June

Upon completion of Functions and Trigonometry or when recommended by the teacher

Mathematics Level II

10, 11, 12

June

Upon completion of Precalculus

World Languages

11, 12

June or December

Upon completion of at least four years of a language or when recommended by the teacher

American History

11

May or June

Upon completion of AP U.S. History with the recommendation of the teacher

u

s

49


NOTES

50


Faculty and Staff For a complete list of all faculty and staff, please see our Handbook/Directory. Larry Adebayo Network and Systems Administrator B.A. William Paterson College M.A. William Paterson College

Alice Barron KP Kids Assistant B.S. Boston University M.S. Simmons College

Dave Carty B.A. Colgate University M.B.A. New York University, Stern School of Business

Deborah Afir PS Librarian B.A. Smith College M.L.S. Rutgers University

Elisabeth Benthien Physical Education/Athletics B.S. Montclair State College M.S. Montclair State University

Ana Casas PS Spanish B.A. Washington University

Laura Albowicz Kindergarten B.S. East Stroudsburg University M.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University

Joseph Berdetta Director of Facilities B.S. Rutgers University

Adunni Anderson Director of the Primary School B.A. Simmons College M.A. Simmons College CAS Harvard Graduate School of Education Ed.D. Seton Hall University Ana-Maria Andrade US French/Spanish B.A. Universidad del Zulia, Venezuela M.A. University of Grenoble, France Ph.D. University of Grenoble, France Stephanie Andrews MS Chinese B.A. HeBei Teacher’s University, China M.B.A. The University of Findlay Amy Ashinsky PS Nurse B.S.N. SUNY Binghamton University M.A. New York University Heather Auerbach Human Resources Manager B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University Shaunna Banning Pre-Kindergarten B.A. Kean University Jennifer Barbosa PS Dance B.A. Marymount Manhattan College Lydia Barovero US Spanish B.A. Dickinson College M.A. Pennsylvania State University Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University

Amanda Berry MS English B.A. Duke University M.Div. Duke University Ph.D. Princeton Theological Seminary Henaz Bhatt Director of Diversity B.A. Barnard College Dipl.Ac. (NCCAOM) and L.Ac. Eastern School of Acupuncture and Traditional Medicine Judith Bianco US Instructional Technology Coordinator B.S. Lebanon Valley College M.A. College of St. Elizabeth Susan Bosland Head of School B.A. Denison University M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University Chris Brandel Systems & Support Specialist B.S. Seton Hall University Barbara-Jean Brees US Science B.S. St. Joseph’s University M.A. New Jersey City University Elizabeth Bugliari Director of Development & Alumnae Relations B.A. Smith College Suzanne Carreno US Math B.A. Douglass College, Rutgers University M.Ed. Rutgers University

Robert Cashel US Science B.S. Dickinson College M.F.S. Yale University M.S. Rutgers University Joel Chace US English B.A. Colgate University M.A. Syracuse University Rose Chaffee-Cohen US Science B.A. Tufts University M.S. Antioch University New England Shirley Chang MS/US Chinese B.A. National Taipei University M.S. Lawrence Technological University Robin Chase PS Learning Specialist B.A. University of Massachusetts M.S. Hunter College Catherine Cheetham Assistant Director of Admission B.Mus. Westminster Choir College Josefina Citarella US Spanish B.S. Marymount College Michelle Clarke MS Spanish B.A. Universidad Femenina del Sagrado Corazon M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University Kim Clary Director of Primary School Admission B.S. Ohio University M.S. Columbia University

51


Christine Clemens MS History B.A. University of Connecticut M.A. New York University M.A.T. Fairleigh Dickinson University Kimberly Coelho Ethics Institute Coordinator B.A. Saint Mary’s College M.A.R. Yale University Lisa Cohen US English B.A. Yale University Ed.M. Harvard Graduate School of Education Maura Crowe MS Science/Math B.A. Rutgers College M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University David Davis PS Music B.A. Rutgers University M.M. Mason Gross School for the Arts Maria Diamond Pre-Kindergarten B.S. Northeastern University M.A. Northeastern University Bonnie Diehl US Science B.S. Carroll College M.S. University of Massachusetts, Amherst Ph.D. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Holly Doyle MS Latin/History Co-Director, Girls’ Leadership Institute B.A. Tulane University M.A.T. Vanderbilt University Sheila Dunne Physical Education/Athletics B.A. Kean University M.A. Montclair State University Roy Eismann US Math B.A. Queens College M.S. C.W. Post College Lara Ellis Admission Associate B.A. Douglass College of Rutgers University M.A. Montclair State University

52

Joanne Emery PS Language Arts Coordinator B.A. Douglass College Ed.M. Rutgers University Marni Endlich MS Instructional Technology Coordinator B.A. University of Delaware M.S. New York Institute of Technology Lynn Evans PS Nurse B.S.N. University of Maryland C.S.N. Monmouth University Sara Every MS/US Counselor & Health Educator Department Chair B.A. Drew University M.S.W. New York University Elizabeth Fantagone US Science B.S. St. Thomas Aquinas College M.S. Villanova University

Vanessa Giles-Sheehan US History B.A. University of Richmond Christy Gillespie US Math B.S. East Tennessee State University Carol Gordon US English Dean of Students B.A. DePauw University M.A. University of Illinois Dora Gragg PS Spanish B.A. Universidad Regiomontana Donna Gulino MS/US Librarian B.A. Manhattanville College M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University M.L.S. Pratt Institute

Elizabeth Farshtey US Latin B.A. Barnard College

Douglas Haislip PS/MS/US Instrumental Music B.A. Rutgers College M.Ed. Rutgers University

Gina Ferraioli Grade 2 PS Afterschool Enrichment Coordinator B.A. Fordham University M.S.Ed. Fordham University

Wendy Hall MS/US Science Department Chair B.A. Indiana University, Bloomington M.S. Fairleigh Dickinson University

Anne Marie Ferriere Associate Director of College Advising B.A. Gettysburg College

Brian Hawthorne Maintenance B.A. Stonehill College

Brandalyn Gabel Pre-Kindergarten B.S. Arizona State University M.A.T. Montclair State University

Marie Hays PS Psychologist B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University Psy.D. Rutgers University

Carey Gates US Art Department Chair B.F.A. University of Pennsylvania M.F.A. Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Erin Hennessy MS English Department Chair Co-Director, Girls’ Leadership Institute B.A. Randolph Macon Woman’s College M.S.Ed. University of Pennsylvania

Julia Gentile Director of Studies B.A. College of the Holy Cross M.A.T. Brown University

Jose Hernandez MS French/Spanish B.A. University of Puerto Rico Ph.D. Université de Paris III

Karen Gerini MS/US Nurse Nursing Team Leader B.S.N. Rutgers University C.S.N. Caldwell College

Amy Heuer Grade 3 B.A. Brandeis University M.S. Bank Street College of Education


Kathleen Hone MS English B.A. Binghamton University J.D. University at Buffalo School of Law

Kathleen Lawson PS Reading Specialist B.A. College of St. Elizabeth M.A. Montclair State College

Jennifer Hrebin Grade 4 B.A. Montclair State University M.A. Montclair State University M.S. Bank Street College of Education

Eleanor Lear US English B.A. University of Pittsburgh M.A. Middlebury College

Kate Hunzinger Leadership Gift Officer B.S. Boston College

Chris Lee Media Specialist B.S. The College of New Jersey

Eileen Hutton Administrative Assistant, College Advising/Director of Studies A.B. Calvin College

Keri Lesnik PS/MS Drama B.F.A. Oakland University M.A. New York University M.S. Bank Street College of Education

Shonna Inggs Grade 3 Higher Diploma (B.A.) South Africa

Linda Leynor Administrative Assistant, Middle School B.A. Kean University

Molly James Kindergarten B.A. Drew University

Karen Libera Grade 2 B.A. University of Michigan

Leslie Jones-Wentz PS Science/Health and Wellness for Young Women B.A. Stephens College M.A. Sarah Lawrence College

Heather Lukeman US Science B.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Suzanne Kaplan Kindergarten B.A. New York University M.Ed. American InterContinental University Mary Keating Administrative Assistant, Primary School B.S. Syracuse University, Newhouse School of Communication Maureen Kroeger PS Mathematics Specialist B.S. State University College at Oneonta M.S. Ed Bank Street College of Education Sherri Lambert Grade 1 B.S. Louisiana State University M.Ed. Louisiana State University J.D. Loyola University Judy Lapides MS Art B.F.A. Pratt Institute M.A. Montclair State University

Nathan Lutz PS French B.A. Louisiana State University M.A. Rutgers University Katharine MacCornack US French/Spanish Department Chair B.A. Middlebury College M.A. Brown University Ph.D. Brown University Susan Mascioli Grade 5 B.A. Hofstra University M.A. Montclair State University Alice Miller MS Math B.S. Molloy College M.Ed. Rutgers University Caryn Miller US History B.A. Rutgers University M.Ed. Rutgers Graduate School of Education

Lori Brown Mirabal PS Music B.F.A. University of Memphis M.A. Manhattan School of Music Ed.D and M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University Amy Mockbee Junior Pre-Kindergarten B.A. Bucknell University M.S. Bank Street College of Education Francoise Moreau US French B.A. La Sorbonne M.A. La Sorbonne Richard Morey US History B.A. Colby College M.A. University of Delaware Judith Mulder US English B.A. State University of New York, College at Cortland M.A. Montclair State University Denise Mulry US Math B.S. Fairfield University M.S. University of Dayton Michelle Murphy US Math Dean of Students B.A. Hunter College M.Sp.Ed. Hunter College Rachel Naggar Director of Communications B.A. Brandeis University Rita O’Connor Chief Financial Officer B.S. Rutgers University Ugochi Oguh Assistant Controller B.S. Rutgers University M.Accy. Rutgers Business School Wendy O’Neal Director of Athletics B.S. Montclair State University M.A. Montclair State University Linda Ormont MS/US Learning Specialist B.A. University at Buffalo Ed.M. Teachers College, Columbia University 53


Ralph Pantozzi US Math Department Chair B.A. Rutgers College M.Ed. Rutgers University Ed.D. Rutgers University Latoya Parris Controller B.S. Caldwell College Neisha Payne MS Math B.A. Pennsylvania State University M.Ed. City College of New York Kimberly Pearson Director of Technology B.S. Bloomsburg University Mary Pembridge Junior Pre-Kindergarten B.S. Kutztown University M.A. Kean University Reba Petraitis US History B.A. Hunter College M.A. Seton Hall University Patricia Prave Receptionist B.S. University of California, Riverside Robert Pridham MS/US Drama Department Chair B.A. Dartmouth College National Theater Institute Sarah Quinn Clausen Assistant Director of Annual Giving & Special Events B.S. University of Delaware Donna Ray MS Dean/Director of Summer Programs B.A. Rider University M.A. Seton Hall University M.A. Marygrove College Krystal Reddick US English B.A. Duke University Ed.M. Rutgers University Karen Rezach Director of the Middle School Director of the Ethics Institute B.S. William Paterson College M.Div. Yale University Ed.D. Seton Hall University 54

Sharon Rich MS/US Nurse A.A.S. Middlesex County College Tracey Robinson PS Receptionist B.A. Rollins College M.A. Middlebury College Wilma Salinas Associate Director of Annual Giving & Database Management B.A. Drew University Paul Schackman US History Department Chair A.B. Princeton University Elaine Schwartz US History/Economics B.A. University of Pennsylvania Candace Selwyn Assistant to Head of School B.S. University of Arizona M.B.A. Rutgers University Mark Semioli MS History B.A. Stanford University J.D. The Santa Clara School of Law M.A. Mercy College Linda Senesky US Spanish B.A. St. Lawrence University M.A. Middlebury College Jennifer Simpson Director of College Advising B.A. Emory University M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University Aimee Bousquet Singer Associate Director of Development & Alumnae Relations B.A. Lafayette College Sara Sultanik Communications Associate B.A. Muhlenberg College M.S. Syracuse University Sally Snyder Grade 5 B.F.A. Ohio Wesleyan University M.A. New York University

Michelle Stevenson Physical Education/Athletics Department Chair B.S. Boston College M.S. Northeastern University Edel Thomas MS/US Music Department Chair B.Mus. University College, Dublin M.Ed. Trinity College, Dublin Victoria Tong MS Science/Math B.S. Emory University MS.Ed. University of Pennsylvania Suzanne Tracy PS Instructional Technology Coordinator B.S. The College of New Jersey M.A. Kean University Linda Ucciferri Junior Pre-Kindergarten/Pre-Kindergarten B.A. George Williams College M.S. Syracuse University Rebecca Van Ry PS Science B.A. Rider University M.Ed. Rutgers University Robin Versh Grade 4 B.A. Smith College M.A. New York University Julia Wall Director of Admission & Financial Aid B.A. Loyola College John Walz MS/US Head Librarian B.A. Earlham College M.L.S. Rutgers University Ken Weathersby US Art B.F.A. University of Southern Mississippi M.F.A. Cranbrook Academy of Art Robert Wiggins Systems & Support Specialist B.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University Jeneane Willyard Receptionist B.A. University of Colorado, Boulder Debbie Wilson Transportation Coordinator B.S. Centenary College


Joan Wilson MS/US Social Worker Health and Wellness for Young Women B.A. Yale University M.S.W. Hunter College School of Social Work Philip Wolstenholme Physical Education/Athletics B.A. Kean University Melissa Wood PS Art B.A. Wesleyan University M.A.L.S. Wesleyan University Elizabeth Woodall Director of the Upper School B.A. College of the Holy Cross LeAnn Yannelli MS/US Dance Department Chair B.Ph. Grand Valley State University M.F.A. Sarah Lawrence College Edee Zabriskie Grade 1 B.S. Black Hills State College M.A. Seton Hall University Katherine Zagorski Kindergarten B.Ed. University of Alberta M.Ed. Grand Canyon University

55


NOTES

56

Course of Study 2014-15  
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