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WOODS BAGOT: PEOPLE ARCHITECTURE ISSUE

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WOODS BAGOT: HUMAN CENTRIC DESIGN | NEW LIFE FOR OLD CITY LANDMARK | DESIGN DELIVERS SENSE OF PLACE MOOOI FLOWER POWER | SCHIAVELLO TERRIFIC TRIO | LASVIT STUNNING LIGHTING SCULPTURES | GIORGETTI A LIVING DREAM

FEB - MAY | 2017

SINGAPORE | HONG KONG | MALAYSIA | INDONESIA | THAILAND | VIETNAM

HRDESIGN.ASIA


NETBOX


publisher’s note

BETTER LIVING BY DESIGN Be it buildings or furniture, the objective remains the same for designers and architects everywhere: a design imbued with meaning - one thoughtfully crafted around context as well as the lives of its individual users or inhabitants.

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his is, naturally, easier said than done. With countless factors and influences at play affecting the process at any given point, good design really functions as a platform for different possible outcomes. It means observing and listening rather than dictating. It means people coming together and relationships being successfully established between humans, space and things. Putting together H+R magazine, we are consistently drawn to creative practices that give prominence to human-centric design and look forward to showcasing more global firms with this mandate. In this issue, we turn the spotlight on Woods Bagot, an innovative firm with Australian roots and a boldly international approach. Its recent expansion in Southeast Asia will see it bringing its special brand of global expertise to the region and working closely with partners on the ground to bring about projects that respond with heightened sensitivity to cultural and environmental situations. I’d like to express my appreciation to Woods Bagot for gracing our pages with its impressive portfolio and offering its insights. In our humble opinion, this is most ambitious edition of H+R to date, owing to the calibre of the featured projects. Drawing on our experiences in the past year, we are continually making small tweaks to the magazine over time, refining our content as we grow in readership. To keep up to speed on what we’ve been doing, feel free to subscribe our newsletter at subscribe.hr@kennethmedia.asia for regular updates. We’re looking forward to hearing from you! Kenneth Khu k@kennethmedia.asia

APSARA designed by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba GIORGETTI

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OFFICE CONCEPT V10N1 FEBRUARY EDITION 2017

THE NEW LONELY PLANET HQ IN MELBOURNE MANIFESTS A SENSE OF TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE

A CREATIVE FORCE PRIVILEGED TO BE RECOGNISED BY LEADING INDUSTRY EXPERTS TO CELEBRATE SW1’S DESIGN EXCELLENCE. SOCIAL STRUCTURE AT HOME OR AT WORK, NOTHING BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER BETTER THAN GREAT CONVERSATION AND A COZY COMMUNAL NOOK. MODERN, TECH-FRIENDLY AND VERSATILE, THE SETTLE SEATING SYSTEM OFFERS A MORE PROGRESSIVE ALTERNATIVE TO THAT LONELY OFFICE CUBICLE.

FREE DIGITAL VERSION OF OC MAGAZINE WHEN YOU SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER AT SUBSCRIBE.OC@KENNETHMEDIA.ASIA.


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DO-MARU Designed by Doshi Levien B&B ITALIA

ALMA Designed by Pamela Amine GIORGETTI

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AGAVE Designed by Antonio Citterio FLEXFORM THECA Designed by Marcel Wanders POLIFORM


team & partner

editorial MANAGING EDITOR Kenneth Khu DEPUTY EDITOR Pang Yin Ying EDITOR Christine Lee design ART DIRECTOR Eric Phoon SENIOR DESIGNER Sandy Liew contributors WRITERS Adele Chong, Dorothy Lung, Giovanni Lee DESIGN ARCHITECT Woods Bagot

credits PHOTOS: Except otherwise noted, all photos and drawings are owned by Woods Bagot. acknowledgement COVER: South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) Adelaide, Australia.

sales & marketing SENIOR SALES MANAGER Edward Chen SALES EXECUTIVE Kelvin Ong publication PUBLISHER Kenneth Khu enquiries ADVERTISING advertising.hr@kennethmedia.asia SUBMIT EDITORIAL get.featured@kennethmedia.asia CONTRIBUTOR join.us@kennethmedia.asia SUBSCRIPTION subscribe.hr@kennethmedia.asia website www.hrdesign.asia | www.kennethmedia.asia contact KENNETH MEDIA SDN BHD 1002 Block D Tiara Kelana Jalan SS7/19 Kelana Jaya 47301 Petaling Jaya, Selangor Malaysia. T: +603 7887 4525 printer PERCETAKAN IMPRINT (M) SDN BHD No.538, Jalan 20 Taman Perindustrian Ehsan Jaya, Kepong 52100 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. permit number KDN PP18850/09/2015(034307) MCI(P) 044/01/2017 magazine H+R | HOSPITALITY+RESIDENTIAL is published three times a year and is circulated throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Opinions expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. copyright notice All rights, including copyright, in the content of this publication are owned by Kenneth Media Sdn Bhd, Malaysia. You are not permitted to copy, broadcast, download, store in any medium, transmit, show or play in public, adapt or change any in any way the content of this publication for any other purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of Kenneth Media Sdn Bhd, Malaysia.

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PUBLISHED BY


mélange | product

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ARMOUR AMOUR

RAW STYLE

TRACE OF YESTERYEAR

Doubling as a work of art, the Do-Maru’s highly structured body takes a visual cue from the ancient armour worn by Samurai warriors. Emulating the thick leather plates that covered and protected the hero’s body, this distinctive armchair by Doshi and Levien also features soft padding upholstered in fabric or leather and set against the tubular metal of the anterior. The conical back profile is a highlight, rendered in cast aluminum for greater emphasis.

What’s not to love about the GEA chair? Endowed with a no-frills elegance, this pared back design by Italian luxury furniture brand Giorgetti complements just about any setting. Perched on a stainless steel base powder painted in neutral carob, the stunning contours of its birch plywood seat and backrest are further underscored by the rippled appearance of the raw wood finish. Sturdily built with an artisan’s touch, it’s a classic in the making.

Evocative of the glamourous 1940s, the Agave is a modern armchair with a posh retro appeal. Yet another sophisticated design by Antonio Citterio for Flexform, Agave’s timeless allure owes a great debt to its refined materiality; its slender curved wood framework with graceful armrests is met by a natural woven wicker pattern, hinting at the texture of Vienna straw. A new bergère with a high, upholstered back proffers outstanding support, complementing its chic appearance.

BEBITALIA.COM

GIORGETTI.EU

FLEXFORM.IT

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TELLING IT STRAIGHT

ENFOLD AND ENRAPTURE

BOX FRESH

When a sofa for everyday use looks this good, it’s likely that Fritz Hansen is behind it. Renowned for cool, minimalist wares that don’t compromise on utility, the Danish furniture brand pulls no punches with the sleekly understated Lissoni. Created by Piero Lissoni, the piece, available as a two- or threeseater sofa, perfectly exemplifies the Italian design heavyweight’s signature approach. Versatile and practical, Lissoni’s symmetrically elegant structure sits on a matt polished stainless steel frame.

Hankering for a sofa you can truly make your own? Look no further than the AGIO. Featuring a range of sophisticated functions that don’t detract from its dapper look and feel, this highly convertible design by Rolf Benz ensures that all your lounging needs are met when it comes to an intimate sit-down for one or two. Its foldable quilted components are nicely offset by AGIO’s air of weightlessness, bringing home an enduring appeal.

A departure from Marcel Wanders’ hallmark extravagance, the Zliq sofa turns the focus on form, simplicity and sumptuous materials. A notable highlight from Moooi’s Zliq collection, this wonderfully robust piece was created as a tribute to relaxed moments in the comfort of one’s home. Constructed from a steel box frame covered in foam and Dacron, Zliq’s starkly rectangular framework is brought to the fore with a removable cover made of faux, arredo or cervino leather and matching back pillows.

FRITZHANSEN.COM

ROLF-BENZ.COM

MOOOI.COM


mélange | product

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THE BEST SORT

IN GOOD TRIM

STANDOUT SILHOUETTE

Made with function explicitly in mind, the design of most storage units can seem a little monotonous. Not the Theca. This dynamic number by Marcel Wanders rises above to deliver a cohesive system that simultaneously makes a statement. Characterised by a technically researched internal system and showcasing a strategic combination of full and empty spaces, Theca’s streamlined appearance is given an aesthetic boost thanks the presence of differing attractive surfaces.

A versatile addition to living spaces, the Rolf Benz 965 brings oomph to even the smallest rooms. Available in a round or oval version in flattering shades of oak or dark walnut with an oiled surface, the solid wood tabletop and filigree structure of the underframe is perfectly offset with the design’s lightweight air. Simple yet endlessly charming, the 965 is the ideal fit with the new Rolf Benz 650 chair range.

When Verner Panton conceived of his namesake chair in 1960, he envisioned a game-changing design that would last. Eventually developed for serial production with Vitra, Panton’s all-plastic work is now a widely regarded twentieth century icon. Garnering multiple awards and showcased in international museums, the chair’s popularly is showing no signs of waning, even after a fifty-year winning streak. Panton’s swerving shape and a range of on-trend colours keeps it ever in vogue.

POLIFORM.IT

ROLF-BENZ.COM

VITRA.COM

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A REMARKABLE SHIFT

GAME ON

COVER STORY

Getting into shape is pretty much an imperative in the case of the Shift lounge chair. Designed by Swedish designer Jonas Forsman, this transformative piece is more than the sum of its parts. Informed by Forsman’s fascination with shape-shifting options, Shift is endowed with the deft ability to adapt to different situations, achieving a user-friendly flatness to facilitate shipping and storing and acquiring a rounded, three-dimensional shape for the comfiest sit-down.

Those with a yen for Tetris might feel right at home with the Cognito. A handsome new range by Flexform, this stellar small table design sets the stage for stylish living room conversations or chic nights in. Featuring an unusual base composed of interlocking blocks of solid wood and L-shaped metal parts, the Cognito is topped with a square, fully transparent glass top, bringing out the arrangement to dazzling effect.

Looking to inject a bit texture to your living space? It doesn’t get any easier or more sophisticated than Shibori. An elegant new offering by Giorgetti, this modular decorative wood covering lends depth, character and value to any room in a cinch. Rendered in solid Abonos oak, walnut Canaletto wood or ash wood in five quietly spectacular finishes, Shibori’s triangular 3D motif is thoroughly customisable. You can’t go wrong with this luxurious add-on.

MOOOI.COM

FLEXFORM.IT

GIORGETTI.EU


mélange | product

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GETTING EVEN

FORGET ME KNOT

TIME TO UNWIND

A gourmand’s playground, the Arthena spices things up with a state-of-the-art design that celebrates the art of cooking at home. Part of the Varenna collection, this thoroughly modern kitchen is all about simplicity and ease; doing away with cumbersome handles, Arthena’s cupboard and cabinet door open by way of a special processing of the edges framing the door panels. This detail also functions as an aesthetic feature, lending well to Arthena’s deliciously seamless feel.

Be it home designs big or small, Kettal can be counted on to make a memorable impression. The go-to choice for connoisseurs of smart, contemporary domestic wares, the Spanish furniture design brand puts a new spin on the standard planter with Zigzag. Composed of impeccably woven rope, this fetching planter gives ordinary potted plants a dose of rustic flair. Its shapely form is simply irresistible, coming in several earthy tones and two different sizes.

Thought all beach loungers were made equal? Think again. A sumptuous offering by Giorgetti, the GEA’s winsome configuration will have you dreaming about sunny days by the pool. Fashioned with protected carob-shaded stainless steel and birch plywood as well as Abonos oak, this lovely lounger features wheels at the top end for easy portability. A manual mechanism facilitating varying levels of incline for the back and footrest is an extra thoughtful touch, offering hours of carefree relaxation.

VARENNACUCINE.IT

KETTAL.COM

GIORGETTI.EU

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BLEND RIGHT IN

A SUAVE SCRIBE

SHINE FORTH

At Fritz Hansen, every piece of furniture is distinct, defined by its own set of distinguishing characteristics. Combining unexpected textures, components and colours, the Pair chair, designed by Benjamin Hubert for the Danish brand, brings this sensibility to the fore. Poised on a sturdy, powdered steel base, this unique modular chair gives rise to over 8,000 mix and match possibilities, setting a new standard for adaptive pieces that correspond with their given settings.

Envisioned by Pamela Amine for Giorgetti, this sophisticated writing desk trumps all with its highend materiality and refined design. Available in three dashing versions, the Alma aims to please, whether your wont is a minimal, pared down desk or one with all the frills. Made with walnut Canaletto wood, users may pair the Alma with saddle leather upper sections or a chest of drawers plated with bronze-toned metal for an ultra-luxe effect.

Embodying modern elegance, Demeter was conceived as a nod to strong lines, sleek materials and purity of vision. Emulating the look of the scales typically associated with its namesake - the Greek goddess of the harvest - Demeter’s lean structure is evocative of balance through economical means and engineering. Rendered in bronze or brushed brass, this desk lamp from Roll and Hill is made ever more striking owing to its white veined marble base.

FRITZHANSEN.COM

GIORGETTI.EU

ROLLANDHILL.COM


mĂŠlange | lighting

FLOWER POWER Designed by Dutch designer on the rise Rick Tegelaar for Moooi, this quietly spectacular piece makes a splash on so many levels. Defined by a dainty network of wires, Filigree gives off the semblance of fine jewelry, hence its charming moniker. The LED light at the lamp’s heart is shielded by a translucent screen which, encircled by the outline of an ornamental filigree flower structure, leaves spaces softly and whimsically aglow.

MOOOI.COM

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mélange | tables & work benches

TERRIFIC TRIO

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LIGHT, ADAPTABLE AND BRACINGLY STYLISH, SCHIAVELLO FANS WAITED WITH BATED BREATH ON THE BRAND’S LONG ANTICIPATED AIRE COLLECTION - FOR GOOD REASON. PAIRED WITH THE BAFFLE LIGHT BY DOSHI LEVIEN, THE COMBINATION IS SIMPLY UNSTOPPABLE.

THIS PICTURE: Showcasing an industrial aesthetic, the Aire collection was designed to make collaborative processes a breeze.


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TOP: Adhering to Schiavello’s belief in holistic living and work environments, pieces from the Aire range function seamlessly as a unit.

BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Set on rolling casters, the Aire Work Bench and Meeting Table introduce a streamlined and comfortable way of working face-to-face.


“THE INDUSTRIAL AESTHETIC OF AIRE REFLECTS THE FUNCTIONAL NEED TO SUPPORT THE TABLES AND THE SYSTEM, BUT, AT THE SAME TIME, THIS LANGUAGE IS TREATED IN A SOFT WAY, SO IT IS A VERY COMFORTABLE AND VERY LIGHT DESIGN WHICH DOESN’T MAKE “NOISE”. ALL THIS IS ABOUT USING THE LESS VISIBLE ELEMENTS TO GET THE MAXIMUM IN FUNCTION AND AESTHETICS.” MARIO RUIZ, DESIGNER

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he creative force behind some of the most innovative office and living environments and products in the world, Schiavello is one of the most revered brands in the industry. With half a decade of successful projects under its belt, the inspirational Australian furniture company continues to push the envelope. Its latest endeavour happens to the Aire collection, a series of impressively wrought tables and work benches that move well beyond the run-of-the-mill office stand-bys. In light of the changing dynamic of the modern-day workplace, Spanish designer Mario Ruiz devised three distinct pieces – Aire Fold, Aire Work Bench, Aire Meeting - hinged on flexibility and purpose. Endowed with varying functions as well as the ability to adapt effortlessly to any work environment in flux, this stunning trinity, according to Ruiz, was envisioned as a holistic unit. As corresponding pieces, the Aire collection promotes group work and interaction through a combination of aesthetics and function; its ‘light’ design pares down unwanted visual noise while deft engineering and optimal materials such as high quality aluminum enhances productivity by making every work session count. Sleek and minimal, Aire presents an elegant solution for meeting, training and work settings. For an extra-cozy touch, the Baffle light by British design duo Doshi Levien comes as the ideal companion to the Aire range. Available in two sizes, this statement suspended light with 100% fluted wool-felt canopy assists in dampening sound levels, consequently giving rise to more effective work scenarios involving both individuals and groups. Exuding softness and warmth, Baffle’s appealing structure also makes it an ideal fit for a home office.

TOP: Solo work is also a viable option, thanks to the collection’s focused yet relaxed design sensibility.

BOTTOM: Designed by Doshi Levien, the sound-dampening Baffle suspension light proves to be a pretty – and acoustically beneficial – addition.

SCHIAVELLO.COM


mélange | lighting architecture

AT THE SPEED OF LIGHT AS THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY EVOLVES, LIGHTING DESIGNERS BEGIN TO OFFER TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA INTEGRATION AS PART OF THEIR SERVICES. BUT A HANDFUL FEW REMAINED FAITHFUL TO CRAFTING BEAUTIFULLY-LIT SPACES WITH ARTISTRY. ILLUMINATE SHARES THEIR URBAN HOTEL PROJECTS AND THE EVOLUTION OF LIGHTING DESIGN.

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THIS PICTURE: ‘Wireless’ wall at Indigo Bangkok is an allegorical feature wall pointed to the hotel’s historical contex.


Text: Giovanni Lee Photo Credit: Hotel Jen Singapore – BTR Workshop Indigo Bangkok – Limelight Studio NUO Beijing – Kylie Hood

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rban hotels cater to very specific demographics. Twenty years ago, hotels were developed for business or luxury leisure travellers with a ‘standard’ look and feel. Then a global design fatigue set upon travellers as they sought out bespoke experiences. Yet a legacy left by those urban hoteliers was the vibe and movement for the next generation hospitality industry to follow. Simon Berry, partner of Illuminate, said, “An urban hotel in the early morning is all about movement the beginning of the day, the drive and enthusiasm (or sometimes not) to get out and make a start, so the lighting has to compliment this and work with the guest whose energy and feelings change as the day progresses.” Illuminate is one of those lighting design firms whose history has evolved along with the hospitality industry. Their photogenic portfolio included Indigo Shanghai and Bangkok, The Raffles Hotel Istanbul, Jen Hotel Singapore and many more of similar calibre. Within a short span of a decade from the day Illuminate opened its door in Singapore, they have expanded to 7 other global cities and counting over 400 projects - believing in the power of lighting to influence emotion and feelings. Consider Hotel Jen Tanglin in Singapore that was launched last year. This new chain was a complete transformation from the old Traders’ Hotel with a design goal to give a fresh and energetic vibe associated to the brand. The lighting was designed to reflect this. Instead of warm white lighting used

“YOU NEED TO CREATE A STORY WITH LIGHTING THAT COMPLEMENTS THE INTERIORS. LIGHTING CAN WEAVE THROUGH EACH SPACE WHILST GIVING A SUBTLE NOD TO A PREVIOUS SPACE AND HELP TO ANNOUNCE FUTURE SPACES.” SIMON BERRY, PARTNER OF ILLUMINATE

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LEFT: A transitional space at NUO Hotel where light invites users to explore through a series of ‘moongates’.

in most hotels, Illuminate went for a slightly higher temperature that mimics daytime to create fresh and active ambience. “Going through the space, guests will experience the hierarchy of light from a cosy café through the welcoming lobby to the brightly lit all day dining area. The all-day dining is a 10-metre high space, but instead of mounting copious downlights at such a high level we worked with the interior design team to create canopies above buffet counters. Then we installed spotlights at low level as accents to the food display. By doing so, the amount of downlights installed at the high ceiling can be reduced which is beneficial for future maintenance,” said Rebecca Wong, Senior Project Designer of Illuminate. The changing world of design requires also lighting designers to be nimble and focus on the design story, warranting closer collaborations between designers. EXPECT A NARRATIVE Feeding travellers’ thirst for authentic experiences, designers and architects endeavour storytelling with varying degree of success. Some hotels offer historical location with cultural anecdotes as canvas for creativity. The challenge is to appropriately unfold the narrative within the many spaces that make up a hotel. Hotel Indigo, for example, has been successful at integrating local context into design as part of its strategic differentiator. Their first property in Southeast Asia was launched at Bangkok in 2015. Then, the designers were primed with historical context of its location at Wireless Road, the site of Bangkok’s first radio tower in the 1940s/50s. The interior and lighting designers collaborated to offer branded spaces that require different treatments whilst maintaining a cohesive story. “We refer to this as flow. You need to create a story with lighting that complements the interiors. Lighting can weave through each space whilst giving a subtle nod to a previous space and help to announce future spaces. This can be done through integration, arrangement, brightness, colour temperature even down to how the actual fitting looks are they of a similar language,” explained Simon Berry, whose team also worked on Hotel Indigo Shanghai back in 2009.


TOP: Hotel Jen Tanglin offers a fresh and energetic vibe by avoiding warm whites usually used in hotel projects.

BOTTOM LEFT: Hotel Jen’s All Day Dining is filled with bright light to enliven the space.

BOTTOM RIGHT: A cosy cafe at Hotel Jen Tanglin, where light enhances the overall mood of the space.


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TOP: Lighting complemented the ‘floating tea gallery’ feature wall at Yuan Tea House a NUO Hotel.

BOTTOM LEFT: Warm and inviting atmosphere at NUO Hotel, Beijing, crafted with layers of light.


“THINK OF LIGHT IN ITS NATURAL FORM: SUNLIGHT, MOONLIGHT… THEY PLAY A STRONG PART IN OUR LIVES... THIS EFFECT CAN BE ACHIEVED WITH ARTIFICIAL LIGHT IN A MANNER OF HOW WE INTRODUCE, USE AND CREATE LIGHT WITHIN IN A SPACE. THE ARTISTRY AND PURPOSE ARE OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE TO CREATE A POSITIVE IMPACT,” SIMON BERRY, PARTNER OF ILLUMINATE

For Indigo Bangkok, colour was used dramatically throughout the public spaces from colour washes to cast iron stairways through to infinity mirror portal lighting to the mezzanine bar, providing a fun and dramatic atmosphere. At 22 Steps Bar, a gentlemenstyled bar at Hotel Indigo Bangkok, one could find a dramatic light-simulated radio wave wall, allegorically pointed to the historical location of the hotel. “Here, lighting was individually addressed to create frequency waves and this effect can be synchronised with music for special occasions and events,” said Simon. The technology behind this feature wall was simple; however, realised in a warm, inviting atmosphere the colour synergy and dynamism played a vital role in energising the space. QUEST FOR WELLNESS As operators seek new ways to influence users’ behaviour, many observe the nascent of wellness design. The driver to this trend was innovation in lighting technologies such as circadian-rhythm lighting fixtures. With that said, the technology is still costly and not commonly available. Lighting designers, however, have long endeavoured to influence our emotions with light. “Think of light in its natural form: sunlight, moonlight… they have always played a strong part in our lives. It is scientifically proven to have an effect on our emotions and wellbeing. This effect can be achieved with artificial light in a manner of how we introduce, use and create light within in a space. The artistry and purpose are of utmost importance to create a positive impact,” explained Simon. A good example is Illuminate’s work for NUO Beijing in China that was launched in 2015. The lighting challenge was monumental to create an emotional resonance between service, art, and space that transcends the hotel’s grand shell. By focusing on the human experience, the lighting designers applied bold layers in areas that required crowd engagement and kept the scene discreet in personal spaces.

One of the most prolific spaces in the hotel is the lounge that links the grand reception to other areas. The space was created as a transitional area for guests to rest and calm down, but lighting managed to influence the energy level by forming a serene experience on the subconscious level. “From public to private spaces, light quietly leads the way through a series of glowing ‘moongates’ that connect the bar and library lounges. Each gate was detailed with internally diffused light that created a romantic silhouette of the moon-shape smoky glass. Collectively, these glowing gates extend a visual invitation for guests to explore further into the space,” said Yanchoo Yeo, Senior Designer for the Project. One may argue that, with the advances of technology and changing hospitality trends, lighting design has an exciting future to look forward to. But it is also one of the hardest disciplines to keep up with since the practice needs to evolve along with products. When asked about which is more important, lighting technologies or techniques, Simon answered, “Both have always played a strong part, if we were to look 20 years ago I would say the ratio between technique and technology would be around 70:30 but now with technology continually evolving especially since the introduction of LED this ratio would be more like 50:50, because sometimes you had to use a technique to create a desired effect this can now be created with technology.” With the industry continues to demand more from design, there will be plenty more to expect from lighting. As for Illuminate, the team’s quest has always been to give projects a soul and to create an emotional connection between space and users, which has been proven successful by their track record. Recently, they charted a new path to Indonesia with a historical renovation of the nation capital’s landmark, Grand Hyatt at Plaza Indonesia, Jakarta.

RIGHT: Each lighting fixture performs a specific purpose as part of the design narrative.

ILLUMINATELD.COM


showcase | woods bagot - profile

“IT’S ABOUT BRINGING WHAT’S RELEVANT TO OUR INDUSTRY, OUR SECTORS AND DISCIPLINES FRONT AND CENTRE FOR OUR CLIENTS TO ACCESS WITH EASE AND SIMPLICITY, ALLOWING THEM TO GAIN AN UNDERSTANDING OF OUR VISION OF PEOPLE ARCHITECTURE AND EXPLORING OUR HUMAN-CENTRIC DESIGN METHODOLOGIES.” NIK KARALIS, WOODS BAGOT CEO

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GLOBAL STUDIO REDEFINING THE NOTION OF A GLOBAL COMMUNITY ACROSS BOTH PHYSICAL AND DIGITAL CHANNELS, WOODS BAGOT RELIES ON COLLABORATION AND COLLECTIVE INTELLIGENCE TO DELIVER DESIGN EXCELLENCE. PUTTING THEIR VISION OF PEOPLE ARCHITECTURE AT THE FOREFRONT OF THE DESIGN PROCESS, THE PRACTICE IS COMMITTED TO INVESTING IN GLOBAL COMMUNITIES AND LOCAL CULTURE.

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oods Bagot is a People Architecture company that places human experience at the centre of the design process to deliver engaging, future-oriented projects that respond to the way people use space. A global design and consulting studio with a team of over 850 experts working across 17 studios in six regions, the practice works collaboratively across time zones and borders, using the latest technology to share design intelligence and strengthen its knowledge base around the world. The global studio model allows the practice to work dynamically across time zones, harnessing the integrated network to operate collaboratively and to never stop thinking. By 2050, it is projected there will be 2.4 billion new urban inhabitants in developing regions across the globe, creating an incredible opportunity within the built environment. These new inhabitants will be demanding social, ecological and economic sustainability within the cities, communities and spaces that they occupy. Woods Bagot tackles this opportunity with a very simple approach: People Architecture is both the process for design as well as Woods Bagot’s philosophy of a global practice. At its heart, People Architecture is a people-centric design approach that allows for each project to be underpinned by deep analysis of user experience. It is delivered through the confluence of cross-sector knowledge informed by human behaviour and community mapping. People want spaces that are more tailored to how they live, shifting the focus of design to a more human-centered experience. People Architecture is supported by three enterprise functions; Urban Systems, SuperSpace and Brand Studio. The vision of the firm culminates in projects that are built around the needs of users. A diverse project portfolio around the world, each project creates experiences made possible via the design of spaces that respond to client needs, informed by data and delivered through enterprise partnerships.

WOODSBAGOT.COM


sharing | woods bagot - portrait

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F

ounded in Adelaide in 1869, Woods Bagot is a global architectural and consulting practice, with 17 studios in six regions worldwide. The firm recently ranked in the top 10 global practices for the third consecutive year, according to Building Design magazine’s 2017 World Architecture Top 100 list, an annual survey of the world’s largest companies ranked by the number of fee-earning architects employed. Woods Bagot’s Chief Executive Officer Nik Karalis said the 2017 WA Top 100 rankings reflected the company’s year of consolidation and expansion, with new teams added in Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Auckland. “Woods Bagot has maintained a vigorous global presence in 17 studios worldwide,” Karalis said. “We have strengthened our alliances with local partners, established key relationships and explored new ventures in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America, and we have engaged with thought leaders in these regions to bring design and innovation to the next level.” “We foresee the convergence of physical and digital communities creating limitless user experiences that reflect the ways people want to live, work and play.”

Here, Mark Mitcheson-Low, Global Development Officer; Matthew Gaal, Associate Principal, Director of Development – Southeast Asia; and Ken Anderson, Senior Associate and Singapore Studio Chair, share with H+R magazine the global studio’s process, people-centric design philosophy and growth plans in Southeast Asia.

THIS PICTURE: A pop-up style co-working village in Melbourne, the NAB Village Customer Innovation Centre is a relaxed space for collaborative working, with design by Woods Bagot. The centre provides a destination for users and NAB customers to meet, share ideas and connect in a space that is relaxed and informal.


“WE SEE OUR EXPANSION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA AS A MEANS OF CHANNELLING THE WOODS BAGOT GLOBAL EXPERTISE INTO THE REGION AND PROVIDING WORLD-CLASS DESIGN SOLUTIONS TO LOCAL CLIENTS.” MARK MITCHESON-LOW, DIRECTOR, GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, WOODS BAGOT PERTH STUDIO

Mark Mitcheson-Low Director, Global Development Officer, Perth Studio

Matthew Gaal Associate Principal, Director of Development – Southeast Asia, Kuala Lumpur Studio

Ken Anderson Senior Associate, Singapore Studio Chair, Singapore Studio

Mark holds an expansive portfolio of major projects in all sectors across Australia, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. Continuing to expand the practice’s global network, Mark establishes and maintains relationships with key clients, building specialist design teams to design and deliver their projects. Joining Woods Bagot in 1998, Mark has overseen the development of new markets and the procurement and management of a diverse range of projects, while being instrumental in the establishment of a number of Woods Bagot studios, including Auckland, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. As the Regional Executive Chairman, Mark grew the Australian studios to be recognised one of the largest design practices in the region. In his recently appointed position as Global Development Officer, Mark is focused on the growth of all six regions with particular investment in Southeast Asia, North America and Europe with continuing development of work in the Middle East.

Matthew is a registered architect in Victoria, Australia, and specialises in large scale, complex projects across a range of sectors. Having worked in the United States, Malaysia, Europe, the Middle East and Australia, he brings an international perspective to all of his projects. Matthew leads the Kuala Lumpur studio and plays a key role in the expansion of the firm in Southeast Asia. He holds the position of Kuala Lumpur City Representative for the Council of Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), sits on the Board of the Malaysian Australian Business Council (MABC) and is the Chair of the MABC Property & Construction sub-committee.

Ken has worked extensively in the fields of architecture, interior architecture and strategic facilities planning. With over 32 years’ experience in Australia, the UK, Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia, Ken provides strong leadership, clear vision and a focus on design excellence. Ken is particularly interested in understanding how the relative synergies between strategy, design and economics may be combined to add sustainable value to organisations. His expertise in the visualisation, design and delivery of medium to large size projects via specialist input, strategic advice and masterplanning, has enabled him to provide a holistic and coordinated approach to directing clients, project teams and projects, making them lighter and faster on their feet. Ken is also responsible for developing opportunities across Southeast Asia, connecting the Perth, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur markets where the firm has enjoyed a number of significant wins over the past year.

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providing deep overhangs for passive shading and incorporating steep roofs to shed large volumes of water, the local vernacular in the region has a distinctive style. It is a style influenced by geography as well as the architectural precedents and cultural sensitivities. What is becoming more prevalent in modern buildings in the region, is a resurgence of these traditional methodologies a modern application. Drawing design influence from around the world, coupled with a local understanding of the environment is key. Operable, high performance facades, the consideration of breezeways for cross-ventilation, active and passive shading and a strong connection to the landscape are elements that we find really interesting and are exploring in our work. KA: Our vision for Kuala Lumpur and Singapore is to establish localised design studios that can respond to the local market and cultural nuances. In Southeast Asia, we are able to function and operate as we do across our global network, with the ability to expand and contract in accordance to demands of a specific project and client needs.

MML - Mark Mitcheson-Low MG - Matthew Gaal KA - Ken Anderson

WOODS BAGOT WAS RECENTLY NAMED AS ONE OF THE TOP 10 LARGEST ARCHITECTURE FIRMS IN THE WORLD. HOW DOES THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF THE ORGANISATION AFFECT YOUR APPROACH TO DESIGN?

as the key hubs for our work throughout the region. Our global studio model has delivered the best of our thinking and expertise to multinational clients around the world and we are excited to be able to cement our roots locally by continuing to operate studios there.

MML: As architects and designers, we have a rare opportunity to spearhead the world in implementing the key drivers of change by tapping into conversations around the future of cities, places and people. We are deeply committed to not only opening the dialogue on economic, ecological, social and liveability in large metropolitan areas but also in providing practical solutions that will have a positive impact on people in our global cities.

Geographically, we are unhindered because of the technology and systems we have in place. We are at the nexus point of Southeast Asia and this is very important to us. Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia present such a vibrancy and influence culturally, so from a design perspective it is an exciting time to be part of the growth in the region.

Our strategy in Southeast Asia is to bring our global experience and expertise in sectors such as Hospitality, Retail, Transportation, Education and Science to better inform design solutions, leading to successful outcomes for our clients via the creation of exceptional places and spaces for the users of our buildings. ASIA HAS CHANGED ENORMOUSLY IN THE PAST 30 YEARS. ARCHITECTURALLY, WHAT DO YOU THINK THIS MEANS FOR WOODS BAGOT AND THE FUTURE? MG: Woods Bagot has been operating in Asia for over 20 years now and we have identified that Southeast Asia in particular is a crucial market for the practice. We see Singapore and Kuala Lumpur

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE WOODS BAGOT’S APPROACH TO DESIGN IN SOUTHEAST ASIA? MML: We see our expansion in Southeast Asia as a means of channelling the Woods Bagot global expertise into the region and providing world-class design solutions to local clients. The key is that we can eliminate some of the barriers and inconvenience geography and time zones may present due to our local presence on the ground. Our approach locally is to bring our expert global knowledge to each of our projects, teaming with our local partners to ensure a contextual and cultural response that has a sense of place. MG: Being set in the tropics, traditional architecture responded to the environment through necessity. Utilising cross ventilation systems for cooling,

TOP: Paramount by The Office Space was Office category winner at the prestigious 2016 World Festival of Interiors (INSIDE) held in Berlin. The small-scale shared workplace in Sydney’s Surry Hills celebrates traditional joinery and artisan skills, while honouring the building’s heritage.

WHAT EXACTLY DOES THE “GLOBAL STUDIO” MEAN AND HOW DOES IT WORK? MML: What sets us apart is that Woods Bagot does not have a head office and our people, projects and capabilities are spread across the globe. While the breadth of our footprint is not necessarily unique, it’s our ability to work dynamically across geographic regions and time zones that sets us apart from our competitors. KA: Creating an experience for the client that offers the benefits of Woods Bagot’s international design intelligence with the convenience of a local practice, is a key point of difference to what other international architects who currently practice in the region offer. The global studio and sector leaders will continue to support the Southeast Asia studios and its growth plan. We are currently working and bidding on a number of major projects in Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Vietnam and Indonesia, collaborating with local architects on the ground. As our portfolio locally continues to grow we are actively recruiting local hires to become part of our global studio framework. MG: We already have a strong presence in Europe, North America and Australia where more and more of our global clients are investing. Having studios in Singapore and Kuala Lumpur allows us to build local relationships in-country and assist our clients globally.


“THE PREMISE FOR CHANGE WAS INSURMOUNTABLE – CITIES AND BUILDINGS WERE BEGINNING TO FAIL IN RESPONSE TO MASS URBANISATION. PEOPLE STARTED USING SPACE DIFFERENTLY TO WHAT AGENTS AND ARCHITECTS INTENDED FOR EXAMPLE, THE DIGITAL ERA HAS LED TO THE EMERGENCE OF WEWORK, CO-WORKING AND SHARED LIVING DEVELOPMENTS, PRESENTING NEW PATTERNS OF EMPLOYMENT, COMMUTING AND SOCIALISATION WITHIN TRULY MIXED-USE PRECINCTS.” MATTHEW GAAL, ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL, DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT – SOUTHEAST ASIA, WOODS BAGOT KUALA LUMPUR STUDIO

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THIS PICTURE: Woods Bagot designed the flagship home for the new University of Sydney Business School. Creating social glue for interactive learning, the campus design reshaped the conventional higher education triptych of teaching. In 2016, the project was shortlisted in the competitive Education category at the World Architecture Festival (WAF).


“CREATING AN EXPERIENCE FOR THE CLIENT THAT OFFERS THE BENEFITS OF WOODS BAGOT’S INTERNATIONAL DESIGN INTELLIGENCE WITH THE CONVENIENCE OF A LOCAL PARTNER, IS A KEY POINT OF DIFFERENCE TO WHAT OTHER INTERNATIONAL ARCHITECTS WHO CURRENTLY PRACTICE IN THE REGION CAN OFFER.” KEN ANDERSON, SENIOR ASSOCIATE, SINGAPORE STUDIO CHAIR, WOODS BAGOT SINGAPORE STUDIO

Unlike a lot of other international architects who fly-in and fly-out, we are able to offer a more personal service tailored to our clients’ needs. Basing senior staff permanently on the ground with a global support team allows our clients to have regular, face-to-face contact with the person responsible for delivering their project.

neighbouring studios and talent pools in Australia and China. Our global studio, including teams from North America, Australia and China have all been involved in major projects in the region. My role includes establishing Southeast Asia as a new focus region for the global studio and growing the business through our Singapore and Kuala Lumpur studios.

HOW WILL THE NEW SOUTHEAST ASIA STUDIOS FIT WITHIN THIS GLOBAL STUDIO FRAMEWORK OF WOODS BAGOT?

“PLACING USERS AT THE CENTRE OF EVERY DESIGN.” CAN YOU EXPLAIN THIS PHILOSOPHY?

MML: As a firm, Woods Bagot is adept at working across time zones, cultures and typologies. We thrive working in collaboration with local design firms on local projects. We see it as an essential part of creating architecture that is regionally responsive and locally relevant. We leverage our global studio model by tapping into the latest trends and transfer that knowledge to benefit local projects. We are able to bring the best and brightest minds from around the world to all our projects regardless of location.

MML: Our new vision emerged from a deep analysis of the historic elements of the body of our work. The majority of our successful projects are a result of the nexus between the interior, the architecture and the context of the city. How people use and experience space is determined by design and subconscious emotional influences. When design makes it more possible for humans to engage with space, while at the same time the constraints of hierarchical planning are released, the results are profoundly liberating and transformational.

KA: It is about connecting and integrating our studios in Southeast Asia to our global network, whereby clients have access to our wide-spread sector intelligence and computational design research methodologies such as SuperSpace. MG: Currently we have teams in San Francisco, Perth, Brisbane, Hong Kong, New York and Sydney all working on projects in Southeast Asia. It is these intrepid teams that are making the work we do at Woods Bagot such a success. There is such an appetite within our organisation to build the region and deliver world class projects here in Southeast Asia. MARK, YOU HAVE RECENTLY BEEN APPOINTED AS GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT OFFICER. HOW IS YOUR NEW ROLE INVOLVED WITH THE SOUTHEAST ASIA REGION? MML: Southeast Asia is a region that we have not yet totally explored as a market, despite having large

KA: People Architecture places users and communities at the centre of design allowing for big data to unlock the radical possibilities with a social and environmental focus. Creative design and the human experience are not mutually exclusive. MG: What has profoundly shifted is the ability to map and measure human behaviour in the form of computational intelligence. Fundamentally, it is an inverse approach to design. While most architects dictate how people use space, we observe, analyse and ideate from the perspective of the human dimension based on evidence-based reality. SO HOW IS SUPERSPACE HELPING TO CREATE A MORE HUMAN-CENTRED EXPERIENCE IN DESIGN? MML: For us, it is what we do with the information in the built environment that is critical, not the data in isolation. Ubiquitous big data by itself is no solution.

Understanding how to use it is the key. We have built a new architecture of computational modelling, digitally integrating multi layers of data to produce algorithmic models, for the first time accurately representing the complexity that has evaded planners. MG: The premise for change was insurmountable – cities and buildings were beginning to fail in response to mass urbanisation. People started using space differently to what agents and architects intended For example, the digital era has led to the emergence of WeWork, co-working and shared living developments, presenting new patterns of employment, commuting and socialisation within truly mixed-use precincts. We as designers have a responsibility to respond to these new parameters and develop means of providing intelligent solutions not only for our clients but for the end users. KA: It is about creating a new thesis of architectural design that does not eliminate the artistic or creative but provides a strong foundation to make the results more relevant. Using artificial intelligence to link design with big data based on human behaviour is key. Our goal is to perfectly sync design with user experience while assimilating the digital with the physical. FINALLY, WHERE DO YOU SEE THE FUTURE OF DESIGN HEADING OVER THE NEXT 10 TO 20 YEARS, PARTICULARLY IN THE SOUTHEAST ASIA REGION? MML: We believe that development in the region will lead to more sophisticated and integrated cities with a greater emphasis on more usable places and spaces attuned to the way people want to live, work and play. Green cities with highly integrated technology and more seamless transportation connections are imperative to the success of our cities and economies. At Woods Bagot, our specialist expertise and research along with the tools that we are applying to our work will be key to the practice facilitating transformational and human-centric design into the future.

WOODSBAGOT.COM


showcase | woods bagot - residential

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

ASSEMBLY APARTMENTS

CARVED INTO THE BLOCK

THE ASSEMBLY APARTMENTS DRAW ON THE ARCHITECTURAL VERNACULAR AND DNA OF NORTH MELBOURNE. REFERENCING THE MANY SAW-TOOTH ROOFED FACTORY BUILDINGS IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD, THE DESIGN BY WOODS BAGOT ‘CARVED INTO THE BLOCK’, DELIVERING FOUR SEPARATE BLOCKS WITH A WAREHOUSE-INSPIRED AESTHETIC. THIS PICTURE: A collection of buildings gives individual identity to residences.


“CAREFULLY CONSIDERED ELEMENTS AND DETAILS WERE BROUGHT TOGETHER; FROM THE WALLS, CLADDING AND WINDOW REVEALS TO THE CEILINGS: THE DESIGN PROVIDES A SENSITIVE HUMAN SCALE FOR RESIDENTIAL LIVING.” PETER MIGLIS, PRINCIPAL AND LEAD DESIGNER, WOODS BAGOT

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D

esigned by global architecture and consulting practice Woods Bagot, the Assembly apartments on the corner of Capel and Queensberry Streets draws on North Melbourne’s architectural vernacular and DNA. The starting point for Assembly came from the many saw-tooth roofed factory buildings in the neighbourhood. The area, primarily made up of lowrise buildings and sculptural roof pitches, offered Woods Bagot the opportunity to create a design which ‘carved into the block’, delivering four separate blocks with a warehouse-inspired aesthetic. Working with Cbus Property, a developer synonymous with high-end luxury residential developments, Woods Bagot has conceived an assemblage of individual buildings to create a villagelike environment featuring pedestrian laneways and a central courtyard. Through the crafting of raw, earthen materials, the individuality of each building is expressed via the

TOP: The building assemblage reflects a neighborhood rhythm and grain.

BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Raw concrete and machined metal come together in reference to the areas industrial heritage.


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THIS PICTURE: Laneways create a human scale environment focused on community connection and nature.


use of metal and zinc cladding, producing a lightindustrial aesthetic with a strong contemporary edge. Woods Bagot Principal and lead designer Peter Miglis said each apartment offered a level of intimacy and privacy as a result of splitting the site into four buildings. “Carefully considered elements and details were brought together; from the walls, cladding and window reveals to the ceilings: the design provides a sensitive human scale for residential living.” “Intimacy and privacy is often ignored in typical apartment projects; by carving up the mass the design encourages good cross ventilation as well as abundant natural light.” Exposed concrete ceilings complement rich timber floors, while the open plan kitchen and living areas are loosely defined by ceiling shifts. The finishes used on the balconies extend the periphery of living areas, blurring the division between indoors and out. Streamlined joinery ensures a pared-back contemporary aesthetic while a refined materials and colour palette comprising exposed concrete and porcelain tiles creates a simple canvas for bespoke bathroom fittings.

TOP & BOTTOM: Blackened steel plate sun-hoods create punctuated openings and framed vistas.


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THIS PICTURE: Ground Floor Plan. Four separate forms are linked by laneways that converge to a central meeting court.


THIS PICTURE: Elevations illustrate roof pitch bias to conceal services and integrate roof top gardens.


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TOP: Raw concrete ceilings, limed timber floors and metal framed vistas continue the light- industrial aesthetic.

BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Concrete benchtops and oak timber cabinetry divide kitchen and dining spaces.


PROJECT DETAILS

The windows and balconies are expressed as a series of punctuated openings within each apartment working to provide framed views towards the Melbourne CBD and surrounds. Drawing on the archetypal architecture of the area, Miglis said Assembly featured a series of laneways to ensure the buildings are permeable. “With this development we were able to divide the built form to create a more human scale environment, focused on community and a connection to nature.” Miglis added. A European-style courtyard at ground level creates a protective and private space for residents year round. while the roof terrace provides an extension of the residents’ living rooms overlooking the local neighbourhood and city vista beyond.

TOP: Generous window reveals act as shelves. Spaces are layered and loosely defined set for occupants to make their own.

PROJECT: ASSEMBLY APARTMENTS DEVELOPER: CBUS PROPERTY LOCATION: MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: JUNE 2016 TOTAL AREA: 9,000SQM NO. OF APARTMENTS: 137 PHOTOGRAPHY: TREVOR MEIN WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: SARAH ALESSI, GLEN CRAWFORD, KARL ENGSTROM, KATE FREAR, LISA JENNINGS, NIK KARALIS, KWOK LEE, PETER MIGLIS, CARL MITCHELL, IAN MUNROE, LAWRENCE NG, ALISHA RENTON COLLABORATORS: PROJECT MANAGER: PDS GROUP STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: 4D WORKSHOP SERVICES ENGINEER: AURECON LANDSCAPE DESIGN: JACK MERLO INTERIOR STYLIST: SIMONE HAAG


showcase | woods bagot - health & science

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THIS PICTURE: SAHMRI Entrance Plaza on the west, adjacent to the new Royal Adelaide Hospital.


ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (SAHMRI)

CUTTING-EDGE RESEARCH WOODS BAGOT WAS ENGAGED BY THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT TO DESIGN AND DELIVER THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (SAHMRI). NINE RESEARCH MODULES HOUSE UP TO 675 RESEARCHERS, FOSTERING INNOVATION AND IMPROVEMENTS IN COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES.


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TOP: South west night exterior view.

BOTTOM: West night exterior view from North Terrace.


C

utting edge architecture by Woods Bagot, including an innovative facade design, provides approximately 30,000 square metres of space in an iconic and sculptural form in the heart of Adelaide’s new medical and health precinct west of the city. Key to the success of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) is its central proposition: a new and liberating laboratory typology that promotes collaboration and medical discovery, attracting the best researchers from around the world. The co-location of research and hospital services creates synergies between researchers and clinicians, integrates health and medical research into practice and helps attract and retain key researchers and scientists to South Australia. The built form of the SAHMRI acknowledges its sense of place within the green belt of the Adelaide parklands, seamlessly interacting with its surroundings, including Adelaide’s public transport, cycling and walking networks. The architecture is lifted, creating an open ground plane in an integrated landscape, opening the building to the public as well as users and allowing for greater activation and porosity through the site. Its forecourt, adjacent to the new hospital, encourages interaction and exchange by staff, visitors and the general public. Woods Bagot Director Thomas Masullo said the SAHMRI’s sculptural, iconic form is characterised by a striking transparent facade that unifies the organic diamond-shaped plan while showcasing the two atria inside the building. “Inspired by the skin of a pine cone, the building’s unique triangulated diagrid facade responds to its environment like a living organism. Both functional and aesthetic in nature, the facade is designed to improve access to daylight, reduce heat and glare, and maintain vision for a healthy internal environment.” The interior palette is designed to breathe light and life into the working environment. A restrained selection of materials acknowledges the play of light created by the building skin and allows it to transform the spaces over the course of the day. Injections of

“INSPIRED BY THE SKIN OF A PINE CONE, THE BUILDING’S UNIQUE TRIANGULATED DIAGRID FACADE RESPONDS TO ITS ENVIRONMENT LIKE A LIVING ORGANISM. BOTH FUNCTIONAL AND AESTHETIC IN NATURE, THE FACADE IS DESIGNED TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO DAYLIGHT, REDUCE HEAT AND GLARE, AND MAINTAIN VISION FOR A HEALTHY INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT.” THOMAS MASULLO, DIRECTOR, WOODS BAGOT

BOTTOM: East atrium looking westward showcasing start of interconnecting spiral staircase.


MEETING 05.216

B

A

PLANT 05.123

SERVICE CORRIDOR 03.117

B

A A

STAIR 1 05.119

B

STAIR 1 03.116

A

A

FHR 03.118

ANTE ROOM 05.217

A

A/L 03.119 A

B

MULTIPURPOSE 05.215

ISOTOPE / FUME HOOD 05.214

B

A

EQUIPMENT 05.213

F

B

PCR / INSTRUMENT 05.212

SERVICES WALKWAY 05.122

POD 1 03.301

EQUIPMENT 05.209

FUME HOOD 05.211

TISSUE CULTURE 05.210

E

TISSUE CULTURE 05.208 D

EQUIPMENT 05.205

RESEARCH LAB 05.202

C

A

WRITE UP 05.218

A A

MULTIPURPOSE 05.206

STORE 05.204

FUME HOOD 05.207

B

A

OFFICE 03 05.222 A

OFFICE 02 05.223

CORE FACILITY A 05.203

A

B

B

A

GAS BOTTLE STORAGE 05.116

SERVICES 03.109

A

COMMS 05.114

A

A/L 03.105

B

B

CT ROOM 05.201

B

G

CLNR 03.114

MALE W/C 03.106

ELEC 05.115

D

CLOAK/ FUNCTION SUPPORT 03.103

A

MULTI PURPOSE SPACE 03.110

A

OFFICE 01 05.224

A

C

B

B

? ?

A

B

ACC. WC 05.117

WASTE HOLDING 05.113

A

FEMALE A/L 05.118

UTILITY 05.225

FEMALE W/C 05.120

CORRIDOR 05.121

C C

PC2 CORRIDOR 05.111

VOID

STAIR 6

A

A

ES: COMMS 03.104 PC2 CORRIDOR 05.111

OFFICE 01 05.320

LIFT LOBBY 03.108

A

LIFT LOBBY 05.101

A

UTILITY 05.319

OFFICE 02 05.322

VOID CORRIDOR 05.102

ENTRY 03.101

A

C

E A

SERVICE CORRIDOR 05.107

FEMALE W/C 03.113

A/L 03.112

LIFT 5

B

B

A

STAIR 2 05.161

A

VOID

A

B

ELEC 05.109

CR 03.230

A

A

CT ROOM 05.301

F

A/L 05.106

DEMONSTRATION AREA 03.237

B

A

STAIR 2 03.161

WRITE UP 05.318

OFFICE 02 05.322

OFFICE 03 05.321

B

CLNR 05.105

G

ACC W/C 03.111

MALE A/L 05.104 B

A

D

D

MALE W/C 05.103

WAITING 03.235

A

EGRESS CORRIDOR 03.120

A

D

A

CR 03.232

MP 03.227

W&H 03.203

A

A

A

MP 03.216

MP 03.226

FUME HOOD 05.307

A

ADMINISTRATION 03.234

STORE 05.304

EQUIPMENT 05.305

COMPACTUS 03.213

C

FUME HOOD 05.311

FREEZER 03.221

A

F

EQUIPMENT 05.309

FRIDGE 03.222

DEXA 03.206

A B

B

A

ANTE ROOM 05.317

A

A

A

WC 03.210

PCR / INSTRUMENT 05.312

CORRIDOR 03.212

COMMS 03.211

C

STAIR 3 03.152

ISOTOPE / FUME HOOD 05.314

EQUIPMENT 05.313

B

B

A

A/L 03.208

E

TISSUE CULTURE 05.310

FOOD PREP 03.223

A

WAITING 03.207

TISSUE CULTURE 05.308

A

STORE 03.220 A

D

A

A

A

IMAGE & ULTRASOUND 03.224 A

WAITING 03.202

ENTRY 03.201

C

MULTIPURPOSE 05.306

MP 03.218

CORRIDOR 03.214 POD 2 03.302

CORRIDOR 03.205

GAS BOTTLE STORAGE 05.110

A

A

MP 03.225

A A

CORE FACILITY B 05.303

CR 03.233

A

MP 03.217 RECEPTION 03.204

RESEARCH LAB 05.302

COMMS 05.108 C

A

CORRIDOR 03.214

A

CR 03.231

A

MP 03.228 MP 03.215

A

A

SERVICES WALKWAY 05.124

B

STAIR 3 05.152

MULTIPURPOSE 05.315

ACC WC 03.209

A

MEETING 05.316

A

PLANT 05.125 B

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TOP LEFT: PLAZA (LEVEL 3) TOP RIGHT: Typical Laboratory (Levels 5-8)

BOTTOM 1: East-West Cross Section BOTTOM 2: North-South Cross Section


TOP: East atrium looking westward showcasing start of interconnecting spiral stair and cafe.

BOTTOM LEFT: The highly articulated and transparent faรงade allows external views and borrowed daylight into the PC2 labs.

BOTTOM RIGHT: East atrium looking north towards the write-up spaces and interconnecting spiral stair.


colour are introduced though permanent walls and flexible furniture pieces that will be moved over time to suit the users’ needs. Intensive environmental analysis dictated the building’s form, allowing it to achieve its best solar orientation. Internal floor plate functions are arranged to allow maximum daylight in east facing write-up spaces while the enclosed solid lab support spaces located on the west provides protection from the harsh west sun. The SAHMRI has been certified as a LEED Gold building, a first for a laboratory building in Australia. The project’s commitment to ecologically sustainable development (ESD) includes the passive design of the floor plates that respond to the internal programme and provides maximum daylight where needed. In 2015, the SAHMRI won R&D Magazine’s Laboratory of the Year award. Feedback from the Lab of the Year judges noted the progressive approach taken towards flexibility and interactive spaces within the building. The judges also stated that they were impressed with the passive initiatives towards sustainability and acknowledged that the design of the building “demonstrates that a functional lab can still have stunning architecture”.

PROJECT DETAILS

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PROJECT: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE CLIENT: SOUTH AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT LOCATION: ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: NOVEMBER, 2013 TOTAL AREA: 25,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID SIEVERS, PETER CLARKE, TREVOR MEIN

COLLABORATORS: LABORATORY SPECIALIST: RESEARCH FACILITIES DESIGN STRUCTURE, CIVIL, FAÇADE ENGINEERS: AURECON BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERS: NORMAN, DISNEY & YOUNG PROJECT RISK MANAGEMENT: DEPARTMENT FOR TRANSPORT, ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE COST MANAGER: RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANT: CUNDALL LANDSCAPE CONSULTANT: OXIGEN

WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: MICHAEL ANDREW, LESLIE ASHOR, NICK BENDYS, HARRY CHARALAMBOUS, GLEN COLLINGWOOD, SURESH DHILLON, KEITH DOUGAL, JAMES (JIM) HICKERSON, GAVIN KAIN, ROSINA DI MARIA, THOMAS MASULLO, ANOOP MENON, PETER MIGLIS, CRAIG ROGERS, JEREMY SINGER

AWARDS: R&D MAGAZINE LABORATORY OF THE YEAR; AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS AWARDS 2015 - COMMENDATION, PUBLIC ARCHITECTURE; SOUTH AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE AWARDS 2015 – WINNER; DIA PRESIDENT’S AWARD – FINALIST; MIPIM FUTURE PROJECT AWARDS 2011

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TOP: East atrium looking down into the cafe and interconnecting spiral stair.


THIS PICTURE: West atrium looking southward showcasing interconnecting glass-enclosed bridges connecting upper-level laboratories.


showcase | woods bagot - hotel

FORMER WATER BOARD OFFICE TRANSFORMED

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SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

PRIMUS HOTEL

WOODS BAGOT HAS CONVERTED A 1939 HERITAGE ART DECO OFFICE BUILDING INTO A CONTEMPORARY DESIGN HOTEL, DELIVERING AN INTRICATE BALANCE OF TRADITION AND MODERNITY. THE PRIMUS HOTEL’S RE-FIT IS BOTH RESTRAINED AND ELEGANT, LETTING THE RESTORED ORIGINAL ELEMENTS SHINE.

THIS PICTURE: Dramatic eight-meter red scagliola columns cast a rich lustre over the maroon, emerald green and bronze colour palette of the ground floor lobby area.


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39 Pitt Street is a building that once served as the offices of the Sydney Metropolitan Water Sewerage and Drainage (M.W.S & D.) Board. The building has now been transformed into an opulent hotel for guests. Woods Bagot was appointed to lead the re-fit of the heritage building, repurposing the space as a contemporary design hotel, with restaurant, bar and rooftop pool. The design preserves and showcases the building’s landmark heritage values, creating an intimate atmosphere via the considered application of materials and finishes. The design has accommodated the building’s change of use with the aim to create a destination which is sophisticated, accessible and engaging with the hotel guest, the heritage fabric of the building and the City of Sydney. Woods Bagot Principal and Global Hotel Sector Leader Wade Little said the design focused on the idea of looking back to look forward. “The challenge of the design was to transform the

space into a contemporary hotel while retaining and celebrating the beauty of its heritage. Key to refurbishment of the building was to protect its legacy, paying homage to its essence of functionality and conserving decorative detailing” said Little. “It was about bringing a sense of repurpose to the property that once stood as a significant public operating space.” A modern interpretation of Art Deco-style materials and motifs, new elements have been incorporated within the design to complement the heritage building. Creating a shift from traditional fine-scale geometric patterns and forms, the insertion of larger scale detailing into the heritage fabric demonstrated sensitivity and definition between the old and the new. The design of the ground floor spatial arrangement has been carefully considered, with consultation with both local and state heritage consultants. The design maintains the original spatial volumes and features, including grand guest reception foyer, a 120 seat restaurant (The Wilmot) and Lobby Bar.

TOP: Ground floor lobby bar - a new insertion referencing original heritage stone finishes and detailing.

BOTTOM: Detail of the feature heritage skylight which was restored to its former prominence after having been encapsulated since 1965.


TOP: The Wilmont restaurant dining room, featuring restored white scagliola and dado timber panelling.

BOTTOM: Rooftop pool bar and terrace.


HSBC FH

HSBC

BUILDING

BUILDING

FH

PLANT LG.24

FFL 25.06

LG.20

LG.27

LG.26

LG.25

COOL ROOM

FREEZER

TYP.

LG.29

A

M

A

LG.28

LG.30

B

FFL 25050 SSL 24960

DRY STORES

LG.21

DDA

BAR BOH

SERVICE LIFT

F

LG.22

COMMERCIAL KITCHEN

LG.19

LM.18

BOH LOBBY LM.20

LM.19

LM.16

SERVICE LIFT

STORE

LM.21

DDA

LM.23

LM.17

M

LM.24

WEST CORRIDOR FFL 30310

FFL 30310

LM.26

TOILET LOBBY

F

LM.27

LM.36

FH

FH

LG.38

STORE

KITCHEN

LG.41

WEST CORRIDOR

LM.15

LM.31

ABOVE

LG.17

SSL 26050

FURNITURE STORE

ABOVE

1300H ABOVE

BAR OFFICE

BAR SERVICE

LG.31

1300H

1300H

SOUTH FIRE STAIR

LM.37

LG.23

BOH LOBBY

STORAGE

SOUTH STAIR LOBBY

SCOPE OF WORKS

SOUTH FIRE STAIR

A

RETAIL LG.32

BUSINESS LM.28

FHR

UP

LG.18

A

RISER

KITCHEN CORRIDOR

LG.39

LG.40

ABOVE

FEATURE STAIRS

HOTEL SCOPE OF WORKS

PUBLIC STAIR

B

LG.33

RESTAURANT LG.16

UP

GROUND FLOOR LOBBY

LM.35

TOWER FUNCTION ROOM LM.14

UP

NORTH CORRIDOR LM.34

? ?

2

MAIN ENTRY

HA3101

_ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___

5

SIM.

HA3105

FUNCTION ROOM

_ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___

A B

LG.34

NORTH LIFT LOBBY

GROUND

FFL 25050

WILMOT

GUEST LIFTS

FFL 25050 SSL 24960

LG.01

DR:11

A

DR:11

CONCIERGE

CHECK-IN

LG.12

HYD

LG.13

LM.30

DR:11

LG.02

XFFL 25050 SSL 24960

LG.37

ELEC LG.35

SERVICES LM.04

WILMOT

MECH FFL 25070

DINING

TOWER BUILDING INTERFACE

STREET

FFL 25070 SSL 24960

PRE-FUNCTION

LM.13

STREET

B

FUNCTION ROOM

FFL 25.05

LG.05

LG.03

LG.09

SAFE

UP

LG.15

UP FFL 24.55

FRONT OFFICE MANAGER

STAIR TELEPHONISTS LG.14

NORTH FIRE STAIR

EAST CORRIDOR LM.33

LG.11

MARKETING MANAGER

MARKETING DEPT

LG.08

GENERAL MANAGER

LG.07

NORTH ENTRANCE

UP

LG.04

LG.06

LG.10

FH

3

HA3103

_ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___

LM.38

FUNCTION

LM.11

FUNCTION

LM.10

LM.09

LM.08

4

HA3104

L01.11

MAID ROOM

MEETING

L01.15

L01.14

L01.16

L01.13

L01.12

BUSINESS SUITE

WEST CORRIDOR

TYPE 02 RM01.21

FFL 34680 SSL 34590

L01.08

FFL 34680 SSL 34590

SOUTH FIRE STAIR

STORE L07.15

L07.13

BOH

CORRIDOR L07.14

BUILDING SERVICE LIFT

BOH LOBBY

L07.17

STREET

SCOPE OF WORKS

HR DIRECTOR

SERVICE LIFT LINEN

SCOPE OF WORKS

L01.10

UP

IN HOTEL SCOPE OF WORKS

HSBC

HR DEPARTMENT

LM.07

_ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___

BOH LOBBY

L01.09

LM.03

FUNCTION PANTRY

PITT

SOUTH FIRE STAIR

NORTH FIRE UP STAIR

LM.06

FH

PANTRY

TK

1

HA3100

_ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ____ ___ ____ ___

FFL 24592

AV ROOM STORAGE

TOWER SCOPE OF WORKS

LUGGAGE

LM.01

LM.02

LM.12

LG.36

BACK OFFICE

FH

GUEST LIFTS

NORTH LIFT FFL 30310 LOBBY

FH

L07.20

L07.18

SERVERY L07.16

PLANTER

PLANTER

FH

FH

B

PLANTER

POOL PLANT

TYP

L07.19

KING

KING

PLANTROOM L07.24

TYPE 01 RM01.20

TYPE 02 RM01.01

KING

DDA

TYPE 08 RM01.22

TWIN

TWIN

TYPE 01 RM01.30

TWIN

TYPE 01 RM01.29

TYPE 01 RM01.28

PLANTER

KING

UP

TYPE 01 RM01.19

TYPE 02 RM01.02

FIRE STAIR L07.21

UP PLANTER

TYP

KING

KING

TYPE 02 RM01.03

UP

TYPE 01 RM01.18

KING

TYPE 07 RM01.23

TWIN

TYPE 02 RM01.04

NORTH CORRIDOR

NEW GLAZED SKYLIGHT

A

L01.05

KING

UNDER

TYPE 01 RM01.17

RESTAURANT

SOUTH CORRIDOR

POOL

L07.10

L07.11

L01.07

POOL DECK

TRAFFICABLE ROOF

VOID

L07.12

L07.22

SCOPE OF WORKS

KING

KING

TYPE 02 RM01.05

TYPE 07 RM01.24

TWIN

TYPE 01 RM01.16

NEW GLAZED SKYLIGHT

SCOPE OF WORKS

PLANTER

SKYLIGHT BELOW

A

TWIN

TYPE 02 RM01.06

DDA SUITE

KING

TYPE 02 RM01.15

TYPE 06 RM01.25

A/B

PLANTER

TYPE 04 RM01.26

TYPE 05 RM01.27

TYP

PLANTROOM L01.04

NORTH LIFT LOBBY

GUEST LIFTS

L01.02

L01.01

FFL 34680 SSL 34590

TWIN

TYPE 02 RM01.08

EAST CORRIDOR

TYP TYP.

L01.06

TYP

FFL 34680 SSL 34590

FFL 57960

FFL 58470

MECH RISER

KING

TOWER BUILDING INTERFACE

TWIN

TYPE 02 RM01.07

BOH BAR

PLANT

L07.08

SHALLOW POOL

L07.04

L07.23

PLANTER PLANTER

A

FRL2

PLANTER

FRL2

NORTH LIFT LOBBY

GUEST LIFTS L07.01

L07.03

FFL 57750

A

FRL2

PLANTER

TOWER BUILDING INTERFACE

FFL 59000

KING

FH FH

BAR

L07.09

KING BUSINESS SUITE TYPE 01 RM01.09

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TWIN

TYPE 03 RM01.10

KING

TYPE 03 RM01.31

TWIN

TYPE 03 RM01.12

KING

TYPE 03 RM01.13

HRDESIGN.ASIA

TYPE 04 RM01.14

NORTH FIRE STAIR L01.03

ACC WC/CH L07.07

PLANTER

TOP LEFT: Ground floor plan - concierge lobby, bar and restaurant. TOP RIGHT: Mezzanine plan - function/meeting rooms.

PLANTER

PLANTER

PLANTER

F WC/CH L07.06

M WC/CH L07.05

NORTH FIRE STAIR L07.02

BOTTOM LEFT: Level one plan - typical floor. BOTTOM RIGHT: Level seven plan - roof top pool terrace and bar.


New build elements within the ground floor lobby create divisions within the space as a contemporary take on the original layout. Materiality references the original stone and timber veneer dado with the intention to reflect the original aesthetic. The lobby features eight red scagliola-clad columns which connect the ground floor and mezzanine via a double height void. The polished plaster marble finish of the columns complements the glazed ceramic tiling and timber veneer panelling. A new stair connects the ground floor with the mezzanine level. The mezzanine level will perform as the hotel functions and events floor, housing a large meeting room which is divisible into three separate spaces for smaller groups. Upstairs, interiors of the 172 hotel rooms draw reference from Art Deco materials in a contemporary way, featuring simple luxurious finishes such as glazed ceramic tiling, fluted glazed internal walls between bathrooms and sleeping areas and timber veneer joinery. Finishes include a combination of terrazzo and patinated metal trims. Once a rifle range for returned servicemen following World War II, the rooftop level provides the amenities for hotel guests, with a marble bar and 20-metre pool crafted around the intelligent use of green terracing and indoor-outdoor spaces. Lightweight roof canopies provide weather protection, with the forms respecting the existing heritage parapet along the Pitt and Wilmot Street frontages. Immediately surrounding the hotel, the second phase of the refurbishment will deliver connectivity of the ground plane of the building via a series of new pedestrian laneways for use by retail tenancies. A doubleheight glazed façade will link the hotel to the pedestrian laneway, reinforcing a sense of light and transparency throughout the lobby and mezzanine floors. The hotel design balances a blend of tradition and contemporary touch points that help to deliver Sydney’s most prestigious accommodation offering.

“THE CHALLENGE OF THE DESIGN WAS TO TRANSFORM THE SPACE INTO A CONTEMPORARY HOTEL WHILE RETAINING AND CELEBRATING THE BEAUTY OF ITS HERITAGE. KEY TO REFURBISHMENT OF THE BUILDING WAS TO PROTECT ITS LEGACY, PAYING HOMAGE TO ITS ESSENCE OF FUNCTIONALITY AND CONSERVING DECORATIVE DETAILING.”

ABOUT 339 PITT Constructed in 1939, the original building at 339 Pitt St by H.E. Budden and Mackey is of local cultural and architectural significance. The significance lies in the building’s 116 year association with Sydney Water (and its predecessors) and its presence as a fine example of a late 1930s Art Deco-Style commercial building, exemplified in the quality of its exceptional finishes which can be found throughout the building. The current design and subsequent construction works provided Woods Bagot an opportunity to refurbish the existing heritage building fabric, while reinstating significant detailing demolished or removed during the building upgrade works in 1965.

WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: MAHSA ALAVI, LINDA BORONKAY, JEFF CHANG, CHRIS D’ONOFRIO, JO DWYER, AMANDA GORE, SARAH KAY, NIK KARALIS, HANNAH KO, SOPHIE LA, NICK LAPTEV, WADE LITTLE, ALAN LIU, JOHN METTAM, JOHN MORRIS; JOHN NORMAN, KATHRYN ROBERTS, NISHANTH SAHA, JENNY SAUL, YANG XUAN, GLENDA YIU

WADE LITTLE, PRINCIPAL AND GLOBAL HOTEL SECTOR LEADER, WOODS BAGOT

PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: PRIMUS HOTEL CLIENT: GREENLAND LOCATION: SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: DECEMBER 2015 TOTAL AREA: 14,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: STEPHEN PIERCE, TREVOR MEIN

COLLABORATORS: HERITAGE: GBA HERITAGE PTY LTD BUILDER: GANELLEN LANDSCAPE: ASPECT MECHANICAL/ ELECTRICAL/ FIRE: WSP FAÇADE: ARUP STRUCTURAL: ROBERT BIRD GROUP COST CONSULTANT: RIDER LEVITT BUCKNALL BCA/ACCESSIBLE CONSULTANTS: PHILIP CHUN & ASSOCIATES / CITY PLAN SERVICES

TOP: Rooftop pool deck.


showcase | woods bagot - transportation

CELEBRATING THE ROMANCE OF TRAVEL THE OPENING OF PERTH AIRPORT’S T1 DOMESTIC TERMINAL FOR VIRGIN AUSTRALIA REPRESENTS THE NEXT PHASE OF THE AIRPORT’S EXPANSION PROGRAM THAT COMMENCED IN 2009. A LANDMARK PROJECT IN AUSTRALIAN AVIATION, WOODS BAGOT HAS SET A NEW BENCHMARK IN GLOBAL AVIATION DESIGN.

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PERTH AIRPORT, AUSTRALIA

VIRGIN T1 DOMESTIC TERMINAL

THIS PICTURE: View of the overhanging pier end roof, designed to provide shading for the boarding gates.


“THE TERMINAL TAKES ADVANTAGE OF THE EXTRAORDINARY WEST AUSTRALIAN BLUE SKIES TO PROVIDE A REAL SENSE OF PLACE. FLOODED WITH LIGHT AND MAXIMISING VIEWS TOWARDS THE CITY, WE WANTED TO CELEBRATE THE ROMANCE OF AIR TRAVEL BY PROVIDING DISTINCTIVE AND MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE FOR GUESTS.” JAMES BERRY, DIRECTOR AND GLOBAL TRANSPORTATION SECTOR LEADER, WOODS BAGOT

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THIS PICTURE: View from the runway of MARS stands looking back toward the control tower.


D

elivering lead architectural design services from concept to completion, Woods Bagot had a clear ambition in mind for the Virgin Australia Domestic Terminal 1 at Perth Airport. The new facility is positioned at the western end of the terminal and replaces a time consuming, cross-airport commute. The Virgin pier terminal features 28 domestic check-in kiosks and bag drop technology while doubling the airline’s aerobridge departure gates to 12, including three capable of taking its bigger A330s. There are seven service pods where Virgin Australia ground staff personnel can help passengers needing assistance and service desks to assist with traditional check-in boarding passes and general inquiries Woods Bagot Director and Global Transportation Sector Leader James Berry said the innovative design response was about creating an extraordinary passenger environment for travellers. “The terminal takes advantage of the extraordinary West Australian blue skies to provide a real sense of place. Flooded with light and maximising views towards the city, we wanted to celebrate the romance of air travel by providing distinctive and memorable experience for guests,” “One of our main goals was to ensure that the passenger route from check-in to the plane was as calm and intuitive as possible, reducing visual clutter and reliance on signage,” The T1 Domestic Terminal and international expansion works included providing two A380 swing gates, additional space for the international departures lounge and an extension to the existing terminal building to complete facilities for Virgin Australia’s operations at Perth Airport. The expanded terminal incorporates four distinct security zones, two separate passenger experiences, flexible multi-aircraft stands and swing gates which will see the number of passengers boarding more than quadruple. The design has introduced a civic quality in terms of the scale and expanse of the space, yet is easy to navigate with intuitive way finding integrated throughout.

TOP: Glazing to the fixed links provides views of the airfield. Perth’s city skyline is also visible from the pier end.

MIDDLE: Filtered daylight and specialist lighting have been carefully balanced to enhance the atmosphere.

BOTTOM: The material palette is made up of muted colours to provide a calm backdrop to the passenger journey.


A significant element of the work undertaken by Woods Bagot sits within the existing terminal building, including a refurbished baggage hall. Woods Bagot Senior Associate Patric Przeradzki said the baggage system and passenger collection point was expanded ‘in-situ’ as part of the works. “As the height available within the baggage hall was limited, the coordination of lift and escalator pits with the baggage screening system was complex.” Przeradzki said. Services, flight board displays and lighting have been integrated into the building envelope. Specialist lighting further supports a curated passenger experience by assisting with intuitive way finding as well as utilising colour temperature and lux levels to create ambiance. The terminal building design is intentionally directed toward the outward movement of travel. Using a single curved geometry, the roof of the terminal is reminiscent of the form of an aircraft. The overhanging eaves, with its rounded roof edges, also take cues from the wings and aero-foil geometry. A signature statement from afar, the dynamic 15m-wide cantilevered roof functions as a tribute to flight and ‘taking–off’. The materiality of the roof was designed to meet rigorous thermal, acoustic and weather performance requirements, utilising a double-deck methodology not typically used in Australia. This application allowed for speed of installation and provided protected area for work to commence below. The coordination of services was also carried out to conceal all rooftop services in roof wells in order to keep the form of the roof as uninterrupted as possible.

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PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: VIRGIN T1 DOMESTIC PIER CLIENT: PERTH AIRPORT PTY LTD LOCATION: PERTH AIRPORT, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: JUNE 2015 TOTAL AREA: 16,500SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: TREVOR MEIN WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: JAMES BERRY, GRANT BOSHARD, NATASHA BOSHARD, LUCIANA BOUDOU, SOLE FERREYRA, FRANZ HEIN, EUGENE LEONG, JOHN LIDDIARD, TATIANA PRIEST, PATRIC PRZERADZKI, LINDA RANDALL, MUHAMMAD REZA, RICHARD SPENCER, ANDREW TANG-SMITH, YOW VOON-CHOONG COLLABORATORS: PROJECT MANAGER: APP CORPORATION STRUCTURAL AND CIVIL ENGINEERING: ARUP SERVICES CONSULTANT: AURECON COST PLANNER: RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL


TOP: The concourse has been generously sized, with filtered daylight providing intuitive wayfinding to the boarding gates.


showcase | woods bagot - workplace architecture

DESIGN FOR A CLEANER WORLD EMPLOYING A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO DESIGN, WOODS BAGOT CREATED A HIGHLY-SUSTAINABLE COMMERCIAL OFFICE BUILDING WITHIN THE ENVIRONMENTALLY-CONCIOUS CITY OF MASDAR IN THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES, SETTING A BENCHMARK FOR GREEN DESIGN AROUND THE WORLD.

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MASDAR CITY, ABU DHABI, UAE

IRENA HEADQUARTERS

THIS PICTURE: Located within Masdar City, IRENA HQ is the first ever awarded Four Pearl Estidama PBRS rating for both design and construction.


C

“THE FOCUS OF THE DESIGN WAS TO CREATE A HIGHLYSUSTAINABLE FOUR PEARL ESTIDAMA-RATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING WHICH EXEMPLIFIES THE OVERALL DEVELOPMENT OF MASDAR CITY AND EMBODIES THE ESTIDAMA ‘FOUR PILLARS OF SUSTAINABILITY’ – SOCIAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL.” RICHARD FENNE, PRINCIPAL, WOODS BAGOT

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TOP: Passive design strategies included an enhanced thermal performance of the building envelope.

ompleted in 2015, Woods Bagot designed a grade A commercial headquarters building for the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in Abu Dhabi. The focus and priorities of the building was the use of passive design strategies, including enhanced thermal performance of the building envelope, an integrated shading strategy and maximum daylight and views. Developed by the Masdar organisation, the company responsible for delivering Masdar City as a low-carbon, sustainable city, IRENA includes commercial space which, combined with the space occupied by IRENA staff, offers a total floor area of 32,000sqm. Woods Bagot Principal Richard Fenne said the team relished the opportunity to conceive a landmark project within Masdar City that could become a model for sustainable, commercial buildings around the world. “This project provided us the opportunity to build on our wide-ranging experience of designing sustainable buildings to operate in challenging climates, both in the Middle East and across the Asia Pacific,” “The focus of the design was to create a highlysustainable Four Pearl Estidama-rated commercial building which exemplifies the overall development of Masdar City and embodies the Estidama ‘four pillars of sustainability’ – social, environmental, economic and cultural” said Fenne. “Through a truly integrated design process with both the client and the project team we have been able to realise a commercially viable, exemplar office building with the highest Estidama rating awarded to date for a commercial project in Abu Dhabi.” The building achieved the first ever awarded Four Pearl Estidama PBRS rating for both design and construction and a reduction in energy demand by 42% compared to global energy efficiency standards. It features 1,000sqm of rooftop photovoltaic solar panels generating around 9% of the building’s annual

BOTTOM: The triangular footprint of the building provides legible entrance points at the junctions between the floor plates.


TOP: The envelope materials include high-performance tinted glass and high-efficiency insulation, as well as aluminum panels with recycled content.

BOTTOM: Early design sketches exploring floor plate principles and facade language.


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THIS PICTURE: The IRENA HQ building will sit at the heart of the realised Masdar City masterplan.


energy requirements, reduced water use by over 50% through the utilisation of high performance flow and flush fixtures. The design took a holistic approach, ensuring integration of the building systems and the incorporation of green building best practices. The exterior faรงade is characterised by a gently curving form, incorporating either horizontal or vertical shading devices depending on the specific orientation of the elevation. The envelope materials include high-performance tinted glass and high-efficiency insulation, as well as aluminum panels with recycled content. The early stages of the design used the ZERO-E tool, which was co-developed by Woods Bagot and BuroHappold, to enable the project to meet challenging targets for energy, water, materials and waste reduction. The process involved a series of multi-disciplinary workshops using rapid assessment tools to identify the optimum building fabric and form to achieve the reductions whilst providing a space with high levels of daylight to optimise interior comfort levels for occupiers. The plan design of the IRENA HQ building established an equilateral triangle form, providing efficiency in the floor plate and allowing the three atria to act as connecting elements for the whole building. The triangular form of the building evolved

TOP: The plan design established an equilateral triangle form, providing efficiency in the floor plate and allowing the three atria to act as connecting elements for the whole building.

BOTTOM: The building was documented in BIM which ensured a high degree of design coordination and honing of the environmental performance.


from the testing of multiple thermal modelling options and conducting parametric analysis to optimise the building shape and façade performance. A desire to respond to the unique plot shape within the masterplan, led to the development of both an important public plaza and key transport node. The building’s three atria house the main entrances, two of which accommodate glass-sided staircases aimed at encouraging occupants to use stairs rather than elevators. At the heart of the building lies a sevenstorey-high main shared atrium space that encourages social interaction between the building’s users connecting the occupants both visually and physically. The central atrium is directly accessed via the three building entrances and flanked by a food and beverage outlet which draws staff and visitors into the space to create an animated and vibrant communal environment. Perimeter offices with glazed frontages and a generous ceiling height of three metres allow daylight to penetrate into the centre of the floor plates. The open plan office areas utilise low-height cubicles to maintain views to the external environment. The landscape design was driven by the ultimate objectives of: conserving water; promoting biodiversity; creating thermally comfortable and attractive external spaces. The design of the courtyard within the central atrium is seen as a green oasis and the selection of the materials and planting are intended to evoke the experience of an outdoor space. Delivering an attractive, livable an attractive, livable and inspiring environment for occupiers, Woods Bagot drew upon a wide range of expertise from urban planning to workplace and education design, harnessing its global network capacity to produce an innovative and award-winning project.

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PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: IRENA HEADQUARTERS DEVELOPERS: MASDAR (ABU DHABI FUTURE ENERGY COMPANY PJSC) LOCATION: MASDAR CITY, ABU DHABI, UAE SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: 2015 TOTAL AREA: 32,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: LYNDON DOUGLAS PHOTOGRAPHY WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: RICHARD FENNE, CAROLYN MCLEAN, MONICA PALMER, MARCIN PANPUCH, PHILIP PARSONS, ALFRED ANTON SEELING, JEFFREY TILL COLLABORATORS CLIENT REPRESENTATIVE: MUBADALA CMS STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS: BUROHAPPOLD ENGINEERING SERVICES ENGINEERING & SUSTAINABILITY: BUROHAPPOLD ENGINEERING AWARDS: SHORTLISTED FOR WORLD ARCHITECTURE FESTIVAL – OFFICE (COMPLETED BUILDINGS) CATEGORY (2015); CITYSCAPE EMERGING MARKETS – COMMERCIAL (BUILT) + SUSTAINABILITY CATEGORIES (2015) – HIGHLY COMMENDED EMIRATES GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL – GREEN BUILDING OF THE YEAR (COMMERCIAL) (2015); BIG PROJECT ME – GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR (2014); CONSTRUCTION WEEK – SUSTAINABLE PROJECT OF THE YEAR (2014) – HIGHLY COMMENDED; MEED QUALITY AWARD (2016) – NATIONAL WINNER; ARABIAN PROPERTY AWARDS (2016) – BEST OFFICE ARCHITECTURE, DUBAI - WINNER

TOP: At the heart of the building lies a seven-storey-high shared atrium space that encourages social interaction between the building’s users and connects the occupants.


“THE PLAN DESIGN OF THE IRENA HQ BUILDING ESTABLISHED AN EQUILATERAL TRIANGLE FORM, PROVIDING EFFICIENCY IN THE FLOOR PLATE AND ALLOWING THE THREE ATRIA TO ACT AS CONNECTING ELEMENTS FOR THE WHOLE BUILDING.”

THIS PICTURE: Feature stairs within the connecting atria promote wellbeing through the use of these stairs over elevators.


showcase | woods bagot - mixed use

SUSTAINABLE INNOVATION PRECINCT

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ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA

TONSLEY MAIN ASSEMBLY BUILDING (MAB) AND PODS

THE TONSLEY REDEVELOPMENT WITH DESIGN BY WOODS BAGOT REPRESENTS A LANDMARK PROJECT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA THAT IS WORLD CLASS IN ITS AMBITIONS, SETTING A NEW BENCHMARK FOR SUSTAINABLE URBAN REGENERATION. CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT THAT FOSTERS INNOVATION CO-LOCATED WITH INDUSTRY, UNIVERSITIES, TAFE AND SME’S, TONSLEY IS A SYMBOL OF THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY.

THIS PICTURE: Refurbished eastern facade.


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THIS PICTURE: Key Entry adjacent to Flinders University.


W

oods Bagot was appointed by the Government of South Australia to develop a masterplan to transform the former Mitsubishi Motors manufacturing site, a state icon, into a vibrant, mixed-use employment precinct. Whilst respecting the existing structure of the MAB in its current form, Woods Bagot & Tridente Architects worked closely with Renewal SA to create a comprehensive design for the adaptive re-use project which celebrates the industrial heritage of the building and creates a unique destination and contemporary public space. Part of the brief for Tonsley was about moving South Australia forward, from being a manufacturing economy, towards being a knowledge based economy focused on research, innovation and startup initiatives. Woods Bagot achieved this by delivering a structure that would support the community in a vibrant mixed use precinct that will evolve over time while maintaining connectivity to the past. Woods Bagot Director Thomas Masullo said Tonsley will continue to raise the State’s profile globally. “The Tonsley redevelopment represents a landmark South Australian project that is world class in its ambitions, setting a new benchmark for sustainable urban regeneration. Tonsley has created an environment that fosters innovation co-located with industry, universities, TAFE and SME’s – it is a symbol of the knowledge economy.” The design took a transformative approach, repurposing the MAB as the hub of an innovative living and working community. Within the MAB, the tenancies use a ‘pod’ approach that is adaptable, flexible and highly functional. Senior Associate Milos Milutinovic described Tonsley MAB as an exemplar interconnected and intelligent mixed use precinct under an ‘umbrella’ of the existing structure. “Combining social and economic opportunities with education, renewable energy and world class community facilities, the site has become a hub for innovative companies working in research, environmental industries, sustainable technologies and advanced manufacturing.” Sustainability was paramount throughout the design, with a planned 3 megawatt solar array on the roof producing affordable, sustainable energy for tenants and communications infrastructure providing connected technology as a basis for a smart grid

“THE DESIGN TOOK A TRANSFORMATIVE APPROACH, REPURPOSING THE MAB AS THE HUB OF AN INNOVATIVE WORKING COMMUNITY.”

energy system. Four urban forests inside the MAB provide naturally shaded green spaces, cool the air and reduce the sun’s thermal load on the roof. Woods Bagot’s decision to retain and rejuvenate circa 50,000m2 of existing roof structure saved approximately 90,000 tons of carbon, equivalent to taking 25,000 average cars off the road for one year. The design has been derived through scientific environmental analysis, which informed the approach to internal planning. Computer modelling was carried out to align appropriate daylight levels, thermal and acoustic performance by allocating a specific ratio of solid panels, transparent panels and openings to each space typology. The project team also utilised computational fluid dynamics modelling to derive façade and roof permeability for optimal cross ventilation for user comfort throughout the year. In 2015 Woods Bagot and Tridente Architects were awarded an international World Architecture Award for Adaptive Reuse. In 2016, the Australian Institute of Architecture (AIA) awarded the project team the David Oppenheim Award for Sustainable Architecture at the 2016 National Architecture Awards.

TOP: Landscaped forests.

BOTTOM: Town square/ central forest.


FLINDERS UNI. TENANCY

PROPOSED ETSA SITE

FLINDERS UNI. TENANCY

PROPOSED ETSA SITE

BOILER HOUSE

BOILER HOUSE

FLINDERS UNI. TENANCY

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approx. 4200m2

BOILER HOUSE

approx. 1200m2

FOREST

PRIMAR

approx. 1500m2

Y CIRC UL

ATION approx. 3000m2

FOREST approx. 6200m2

approx. 6800m2

FOREST

approx. 5200m2

FOREST approx. 2200m2

TIER 5 TENANCY

TIER 5 TENANCY

REST AREAS TAFE

TIER 5 TENANCY

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BOILER HOUSE

MAJOR COMPARTMENTS TAFE TENANCY FLINDERS UNI. TENANCY

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retail

retail

BOILER HOUSE

545m2

3254m2

TYPE 2 - 366 m2 cluster nla 1600m2

cluster nla

AATION

2550m2

545m2

tenancy 1240m2

retail

TYPE 3 - 491 m2

TYPE 4 - 146 m

TYPE 4 - 146 m2

TYPE 5 - 293 m2

TYPE 5 - 293 m2

6000m2

large tenancy zone

large tenancy zone

3600m2

6600m2

large tenancy zone

cluster nla 5000m2

2700m2

cluster nla 1900m2

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398m

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TYPE 3 - 491 m2

cluster nla

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TYPE 1 - 497 m2

398m

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retail

BOILER LEGEND

tenancy

retail

SECOND

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TENANCY ZONING TAFE TENANCY


LEFT & RIGHT: Main assembly building diagrams & pods design methodology.


PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: TONSLEY MAIN ASSEMBLY BUILDING (MAB) AND PODS CLIENT: RENEWAL SA LOCATION: ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE, MASTERPLANNING STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: MAY 2015 TOTAL AREA: SITE 61HA, BUILDING 47,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: BY SAM NOONAN WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: YEUNG CHENG, KEITH DOUGAL, TODD HISLOP, GAVIN KAIN, THOMAS MASULLO, MILOS MILUTINOVIC, NICHOLAS NG COLLABORATORS: DESIGN PARTNERS: TRIDENTE ARCHITECTS MANAGING CONTRACTOR: LENDLEASE PUBLIC REALM AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE: OXIGEN STRUCTURAL AND CIVIL: KBR INC SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE: WSP / PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF COST CONSULTANT: RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL (RLB) SURVEY CONSULTANTS: ALEXANDER SYMONDS AWARDS: WINNER, AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS (AIA) DAVID OPPENHEIM AWARD FOR SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE 2016; WINNER, WAN ADAPTIVE REUSE AWARD 2015; 6-STAR GREEN STAR - COMMUNITIES ACCREDITATION (AUSTRALIA’S ONLY URBAN RENEWAL DEVELOPMENT TO ACHIEVE THIS LEVEL OF CERTIFICATION)

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TOP: Central forest/ town square.


“COMPUTER MODELLING WAS CARRIED OUT TO ALIGN APPROPRIATE DAYLIGHT LEVELS, THERMAL AND ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE BY ALLOCATING A SPECIFIC RATIO OF SOLID PANELS, TRANSPARENT PANELS AND OPENINGS TO EACH SPACE TYPOLOGY.”

THIS PICTURE: Northern boundary MAD: retail precinct and breakout landscaping.


showcase | woods bagot - education

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BERKELEY, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA

NAN TIEN INSTITUTE AND CULTURAL CENTRE

BUDDHIST TEACHINGS INSPIRE ARCHITECTURE A CONCEPTUAL REFERENCE FOR WOODS BAGOT WHEN DESIGNING THE NAN TIEN INSTITUTE AND CULTURAL CENTRE WAS THE LOTUS FLOWER: A PRISTINE, BEAUTIFUL BLOOM THAT ARISES FROM THE MUD. IN THIS CASE, THE CURVING CONCRETE WALLS OF THE BUILDING SOAR FROM THE FORMERLY CONTAMINATED INDUSTRIAL SITE. THIS PICTURE: Sense of place and identity were key aspirations for Nan Tien Institute, whilst also portraying reverence to their existing temple setting and historical architecture through materiality and tonal qualities.


T

“THE FIRST BUILDING ON THE INSTITUTE’S SITE, THE IDEA WAS TO CREATE A MINI CAMPUS WHICH WOULD CREATE A COLLEGIATE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR STUDENTS. CONNECTING USERS TO THE ENVIRONMENT, THE STRUCTURE OF THE BUILDING WAS FORMED BY GROUPING SPACES INTO FOUR DISTINCT PODS, CREATING AN INVITING AND OPEN PUBLIC SPACE IN BETWEEN.” 92

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TOP: In keeping with Buddhist traditional values, the building is a welcoming gesture that accommodates multiple activities from collaborative learning environments to cultural and ceremonial events as shown.

he Nan Tien Institute and Cultural Centre is a tertiary education facility based in Wollongong, Australia. The Institute is situated opposite the Nan Tien Temple, the largest Buddhist temple in the Southern Hemisphere. In keeping with the Humanistic Buddhist teachings of Fo Guang Shan, the architecture avoids hierarchy, is of the now, values the void and provides a neutral environment devoid of excess and materialism. Woods Bagot modelled the design of the building on the Buddhist symbol of the lotus flower, a pristine, beautiful bloom that arises from the mud. The lotus flower was chosen to reflect the origins of the site, a former garbage tip, bought by the Institute from the local council for one Australian dollar. Using the lotus as a metaphor, the design team cultivated the architecture from the characteristics of the site, including contaminated land, views, connections and the masterplan. The first building on the Institute’s site, the idea was to create a mini campus which would create a collegiate learning environment for students. Connecting users to the environment, the structure of the building was formed by grouping spaces into four distinct pods, creating an inviting and open public space in between. The pods are linked by active pedestrian bridges, allowing movement throughout the building to become a journey comprised of moments, destinations and thresholds. Curved walls and window openings have created a distinctive aesthetic for the building, with precast concrete used to create the signature form of the building. The sculptural forms of the pods were made by pouring concrete into custom-made steel and timber molds to form unique shapes, with the imprinted texture of the timber boards visible in the detail of the final pod facades.

BOTTOM: Shown here during the opening ceremony, the solar protection to the façade emulates the movement of traditional prayer flags as they catch the breeze passing through the valley.


TOP: As daylight moves around the building, the main entrance is illuminated by the western sun in the evening, creating moments for individual contemplation and reflection.

BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: The eastern perimeter is connected to a generous outdoor learning environment and social space which is designed to cater for a multitude of settings from small groups to larger gatherings.


Screens

Object

Roof Gateway

Level 2 Campus

Level 1 Connected

Gallery Library Classroom Support/Amenity Informal Learning Cafeteria Cafe/Gift Store Foyer/Gallery Office

Ground Level

Stairs & Lifts Building Parti

Feature Walls

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THIS PICTURE: Created as a campus within a single building. The ground plane includes the cultural gallery and retail spaces with access from the central gathering space.


EY RL VE WA

IVE DR

LADY

N LA NO

PENRH

IVE DR

YN

DRIVE

LADY

SITE BOUNDARY

FUTURE MASTERPLAN BUILDINGS SHOWN HATCHED

AVENUE

INGS BUNN OUSE EH WAR

DOYLE

NOLAN

BERKELEY

STAGE 1 BOUNDARY

SURFACE CARPARK

STREET

RTA UNANDERRA

WOLLONGONG DETENTION CENTRE

ROAD

PENR HYN

PRINCE OF WALES AVEN UE

DRIVE

ET RE ST

OR AT TIG ES INV

PROPOSED BUILDING PHASE 1

TNT EXPRESS WAREHOUSE OSD

SOUTHERN FREEWAY

WALL FUTURE BRIDGE CONNECTION

G KIN PAR G KIN PAR

LILLY POND

M OR N D G) TIE IN N IST NA (EX

NAN TIEN TEMPLE (EXISTING)

0 10m 20m

WOLLONGONG CITY MEMORIAL GARDENS & CREMATORIUM

PARKING

PAGODA

50m

LOCATION PLAN

STAGE 1 BOUNDARY

LEGEND E AG ST

XX SITE BOUNDARY

Y AR ND OU 1B

NOLAN

PROPOSED TEMPORARY FENCE LINE FOR CONSTRUCTION BY CONTRACTOR FHB

0 1m 3m

FIRE HYDRANT BOOSTER BY CONTRACTOR

5m

SIT EB OU ND AR Y

1. PEDESTRIAN GATEWAY 2. PEDESTRIAN PROMMENADE 3. LOTUS POND 4. VEHICULAR ENTRY GATE 5. BUS WAITING 6. DROP OFF 7. DONATION WALL 8. MAIN SURFACE CAR PARK 9. ENTRY FORECOURT 10. FOYER / GALLERY 11. LOADING DOCK 12. BASEMENT CARPARK ENTRY 13. SECONDARY SURFACE CARPARK 14. SERVICE ROAD 15. SUBSTATION 16. GARBAGE ENCLOSURE 17. VEHICLE ACCESS FOR NOLAN STREET 18. ON SITE DETENTION BASIN 19. FUTURE BRIDGE CONNECTION 20. FUTURE PLAZA

10m

SITE PLAN

8

(92 Spaces)

(27 Bicycle Spaces)

STREET FHB

VEHICLE ENTRY/EXIT

4

7

17

3

10 6

20

9

5

2 PEDESTRIAN ENTRY/EXIT

11 18

14 13 9 Spaces)

FALL

1

15

12

16

SITE BO UNDARY

19

TOP & BOTTOM: The building addresses the western entry to the campus and allows physical and visual connections to the surrounding landscape, including Mount Kembla and the nearby Nan Tien Temple.


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THIS PICTURE: The Great Hall is created from the space in between the concrete pods, which sail through the central timber ceiling and frame the central oculus illuminating the space below.


PROJECT DETAILS

Terracotta tiles and screens were used on the north-east and west facades, linking back to the roof at the Nan Tien temple and pagoda. The undulating wave pattern of the screens create a sense of movement while providing environmental shading to the interiors. The design of the building reflects the Nan Tien Institute’s vision aims to foster a holistic education. The first campus building will cater for 300 students and is designed to provide an environment conducive to teaching and learning in the 21st century by creating a setting for community interaction, education and cultural exchange.

PROJECT: NAN TIEN INSTITUTE CLIENT: FO GUANG SHAN INTERNATIONAL BUDDHIST ASSOCIATION LOCATION: BERKELEY, NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: SEPTEMBER 2014 TOTAL AREA: 6,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER BENNETTS WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: DANNY CHAN, ALAN J DUFFY, KENN FISHER, KATE GILLIES, CHANG LIU, JOHN PRENTICE, GEORGIA SINGLETON COLLABORATORS: BUILDER: RICHARD CROOKES LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS: 360 DEGREES SERVICES: MEDLAND METROPOLIS STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING: BROWN CONSULTING PROJECT MANAGERS: APP CIVIL ENGINEERING: CARDNO SITE REMEDIATION: DOUGLAS AND PARTNERS

TOP LEFT & RIGHT: Interior spaces are visually connected through a sequence of thresholds and bridges, creating a diverse spectrum of spaces suitable for quiet and personal activities to larger public events.


showcase | woods bagot - workplace interiors

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THE PALACE, PERTH, AUSTRALIA

WOODS BAGOT PERTH STUDIO

NEW LIFE FOR OLD CITY LANDMARK CONSIDERED TO BE A SIGNIFICANT PART OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA’S ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE, THE PALACE HOTEL IS A PROMINENT REMINDER OF THE EXTRAVAGANT OPULENCE AND GROWTH OF THE STATE DURING THE 1890’S GOLD BOOM. THE LANDMARK THREESTOREY HERITAGE LISTED BUILDING, HAS NOW BEEN TRANSFORMED INTO WOODS BAGOT’S OWN PERTH STUDIO.

THIS PICTURE: The Level 1 Studio is a visually and functionally rich space offering a diversity of settings for any mode of work.


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TOP: Coined ‘The War Room’ - a highly flexible, tactile and tech-enabled space is easily reconfigurable with relaxed modular lounging, mobile whiteboards and writable walls to facilitate collaboration.

BOTTOM LEFT: The corner lounge provides a signature moment and outlook over St Georges Terrace providing a setting for impromptu meetings. BOTTOM RIGHT: Studio level 1


“WOODS BAGOT REALISED ITS NEW STUDIO WAS AN OPPORTUNITY TO DEMONSTRATE THE PRACTICE’S ABILITY TO DESIGN, DELIVER AND OCCUPY A WORKPLACE THAT LEAD BY EXAMPLE, BLURRING THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN WORKPLACE, HOTEL AND HOME.” STIRLING FLETCHER, WORKPLACE INTERIORS LEADER - PERTH, WOODS BAGOT

W

oods Bagot has transformed the iconic Palace Hotel into its new Perth Studio, delivering an agile workplace for the 70-person strong team. Positioned on the corner of St Georges Terrace and William Street in the Perth CBD, the new studio fit-out enables a highly flexible work environment that supports new modes of work, with wireless mobile technology and no allocated seating for staff offering freedom of movement and choice. In a first for the practice, the move to a fully-agile studio model demonstrates Woods Bagot’s commitment to and deep understanding of the workplace of the future. A combination of free-seating desks, fixed standing work settings, lounge areas and semi-enclosed meeting spaces introduce a sense of dynamism and autonomy. The design rationale was to reflect and facilitate the evolving paradigm of work to support the workforce of the future. For Senior Associate Ken Anderson, the key driver for the design concept was about creating a workplace where freedom of choice and movement were key ingredients to the project’s success. “Responding to the fact that today’s workforce spends more time at work than at home, the Perth Studio design has successfully delivered a tailored experience that supports agile working while enriching the firm’s values and culture.” Creating a diversity of spaces, the refurbishment provided Woods Bagot the opportunity to demonstrate its ability to design and deliver a non-hierarchical contemporary workplace environment with a distinctive hotel-like aesthetic in a nod to the building’s previous function. Perth Studio’s Workplace Interiors Leader Stirling Fletcher said the new studio led by example, blurring the boundaries between workplace, hotel and home. “It was about bringing these things together in a new way, creating an eclectic mix of hip hotel and high performance contemporary work environment,” Stirling said.

The main circulation stair and lift well run from the ground floor to the second floor increasing connectivity and fluidity of movement throughout the building and its multiple zones. Both the heart of the building and a central meeting place for Woods Bagot staff, clients and guests, the mezzanine level atrium provides an integrated breakout zone while offering the opportunity to host industry and community events. Woods Bagot Associate Tenille Teakle said the design approach was to blend the experience of a hip hotel with a contemporary workplace while distinguishing between the original heritage elements and the new. “Applying a timeless palette, we wanted the shell of the building to read as a purist white canvas, with reflective polished concrete floors, white exposed ceilings and original balcony doors and architraves in respect of the significant history of the building.” The monolithic black storage system locker wall was designed to simplify the tenancy outline and balance the white shell. The workstation system is finished in a whitewash timber veneer which adds subtle warmth throughout the studio and links back to the lime-washed original timber flooring through the lift landings. The studio’s work spaces are softened by sheer curtains that divide the informal meeting settings while maintaining sightlines. “It was about bringing the necessary elements together in a way to create an eclectic mix of work settings and social breakout zones to support truly agile working,” Teakle said. The restorative design solution respects the original architecture of the building by architects Porter and Thomas and built by prominent American mining entrepreneur and real-estate investor John De Baun. The fit-out has retained original elements and celebrating the structure’s original high ceilings, flooring and heritage features.

TOP: The rooftop terrace is the social heart of the studio where staff, clients, visitors and friends can all come together in a social setting.

BOTTOM: ’The Glowery Suite’ is named after John Thomas Glowery a former proprietor of the hotel. A contemporary abstraction and homage to the original drawing room for hotel guests, it now acts as a relaxed lounge experience for meeting.


PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: WOODS BAGOT PERTH STUDIO CLIENT: WOODS BAGOT LOCATION: THE PALACE, PERTH, AUSTRALIA SCOPE: BASE BUILDING WORKS AND INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: MAY 2016 TOTAL AREA: 1025M2 + 270M2 MEZZANINE PHOTOGRAPHY: DION ROBESON WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: KEN ANDERSON, DANIELLA CATALANO, KAILA CICCHINI, ADELYN CURTIN, STIRLING FLETCHER, JANIE GREEN, GRANT HOPWOOD, JOHN LIDDIARD, ANDREW TANG-SMITH, TENILLE TEAKLE COLLABORATORS: BUILDER: CDI GROUP HERITAGE: PALASSIS ARCHITECTS SERVICES ENGINEER: ALPHA ZETA LIGHTING: WOOD & GRIEVE PROJECT MANAGER: DCWC COMPLIANCE: CODE GROUP DDA: O’BRIEN HARROP ACCESS LANDSCAPING: TIM DAVIES LANDSCAPING

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TOP: Ground floor plan and grand heritage staircase.

BOTTOM LEFT: Level 1 Studio BOTTOM RIGHT: Level 2 Studio


THIS PICTURE: ’The John de Baun Boardroom’ experience is that of a high end hip hotel dining room - ambient, moody and reminiscent of the opulence of the original Palace Hotel.


showcase | woods bagot - workplace architecture

REDEFINING THE RIVER APPOINTED TO DESIGN THE CHONGQING GUOHUA FINANCIAL CENTRE SITUATED IN THE HEART OF THE CITY, WOODS BAGOT ASSIMILATED THE BUILDING’S FUNCTION WITH THE URBAN CONTEXT AND LOCAL CULTURE, DELIVERING AN INNOVATIVE AND PRACTICAL DESIGN SOLUTION FOR TENANTS.

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LEFT & RIGHT: Chongqing Guohua Financial Centre is located on the riverbank opposite Chongqing Peninsula.


CHONGQING, CHINA

CHONGQING GUOHUA FINANCIAL CENTRE


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THIS PICTURE: The dual towers are connected with a sky bridge and a terrace podium.


“DESIGNED TO ACHIEVE LEED GOLD CERTIFICATION, THE SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGY WAS DRIVEN VIA THE UNIQUE FACADE DESIGN. THE RESULT IS AN ELEGANT AND EYE-CATCHING FACADE WHICH MAXIMISES DAYLIGHT AND SUN EXPOSURE.” PEARL HUANG, DIRECTOR - CHINA, WOODS BAGOT

P

ositioned on the riverbank opposite Chongqing’s famous peninsula, the Chongqing Guohua Financial Centre features two towers connected via a sky bridge and a terraced podium. The project has provided the city a premium-grade office space and community thoroughfare in the heart of the financial district. Comprising a dual tower form, the architecture embodies elegance and simplicity while maximising river views. The design encourages easy pedestrian access to both the central garden to the north and the riverfront park to the south. Woods Bagot Director Pearl Huang said the constraints of the site led to an innovative design solution. “The biggest challenge was the 36m height difference on our plot, as a result of municipal infrastructure limitations and strict fire protection regulations.” “Our design team mediated this by delivering a smart design solution that is empathetic of its surrounds.” Designed to achieve LEED Gold certification, the sustainability strategy was driven via the unique facade design. The final skin consists a variety of materials including stone and glass. The result is an elegant and eye-catching facade which maximises daylight and sun exposure. Creating a timeless interiors scheme, a series of spaces inspired by nature and enhanced with natural light are connected through a restrained and mature palette of primarily natural materials. The interior design of the office tower intelligently utilises the void between the 3rd to 7th floors, bringing a sense of space for distinguished guests on arrival. Through materiality and detailing, lobby spaces appear connected, integrating the building’s functionality. The main entrance to the towers is a hive of human activity, designed to be a calming space finished with warm, natural materials and softened geometry. Chongqing Guohua Financial Centre has delivered a dynamic and sustainable offering for the city of Chongqing. A landmark building, it completes the continuous skyline of Chongqing, attracting world-class tenants and connecting the vibrant CBD to the waterfront.

TOP: The main lobby is a calm space flooded with natural light.

BOTTOM: The building maximises viewpoints to the river via an elegant glazed facade.


enerated: 1/11/2013 7:10:20 PM

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A31004

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A31002

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10,700

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3

10,800

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10,700

5

20,700

6

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8 1/8

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RL 149.60 m

RL 149,600 Helipad

A31003

HeliPad

300

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RL 146.70 m

3,000

4,800

5,100

3,000 设备用房 MEP

5,200

RL 144,500 FP - ROOF LEVEL 2 RL 139,300 FFL ROOF LEVEL 1

5,000

4,950

RL 139.250 (结) Roof level 1 SSL 护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

5,000

RL 134,300 LEVEL 31

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

5,000

RL 129,300 LEVEL 30

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

保温上人屋面

MEP

Insulated roof

办公

办公

Office

Office

办公

办公

Office

Office

办公

办公

Office

Office

RL 123.45 m

RL 123.90 m

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

Office

Office

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

避难层

避难层

Refuge

Refuge

4,300

RL 71,300 LEVEL 17

Office

Office

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

Office

Office

Office

4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

办公

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Office

Office

4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

5,000 5,000

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RL 31.20 m

办公

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办公

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Office

Office

4,800

RL 26,400 LEVEL 07

RL 62,700 LEVEL 15 RL 58,400 LEVEL 14 RL 54,100 LEVEL 13 RL 49,800 LEVEL 12

避难层

Office

Refuge

RL 45,500 LEVEL 11

办公 办公

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RL 41,200 LEVEL 10

Office

RL 36.20 m

银行

230.70 m

银行

大堂 Lobby

Bank branch

男厕所

大堂

办公

Male WC

Lobby

Bank

Retail/F&B

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 67,000 LEVEL 16

办公

零售/餐饮

RL 31,200 LEVEL 08

RL 71,300 LEVEL 17

办公

RL 36.10 m

RL 36,200 LEVEL 09

Office

RL 31,200 LEVEL 08 4,800

4,300 4,300 4,300 4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 41,200 LEVEL 10

RL 75,600 LEVEL 18

123,450

办公

RL 45,500 LEVEL 11

4,300

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 79,900 LEVEL 19

87,250

办公

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 84,200 LEVEL 20

4,300

Office

办公

Office

RL 49,800 LEVEL 12

RL 36.30 m

办公 Office

办公

办公

RL 54,100 LEVEL 13

+230700

办公 Office

Office

RL 58,400 LEVEL 14

RL 88,500 LEVEL 21

办公

办公

RL 62,700 LEVEL 15

RL 92,800 LEVEL 22

办公

Office

RL 67,000 LEVEL 16

RL 97,100 LEVEL 23

Office

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 101,400 LEVEL 24

4,300

4,300 149,600

4,300

RL 75,600 LEVEL 18

RL 105,700 LEVEL 25

4,300

4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

4,300

办公

4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 110,000 LEVEL 26

4,300

Office

4,300

办公

4,300

办公 Office

4,300

办公 Office

RL 84,200 LEVEL 20 RL 79,900 LEVEL 19

Office

4,300

Office

4,300

RL 88,500 LEVEL 21

办公

Office

4,300

4,300

RL 92,800 LEVEL 22

办公

4,300

4,300

RL 97,100 LEVEL 23

RL 115.050 (结) LEVEL 27 SSL 办公

4,300

4,300 4,300

RL 101,400 LEVEL 24

RL 119,600 LEVEL 28 Tower B

4,300

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 105,700 LEVEL 25

避难层

Refuge

Refuge

RL 26,400 LEVEL 07

办公

Kitchen

Office

4,200

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

办公

办公

Office

Office

4,200

护窗栏杆 办公 balustrade Office 1100mm

办公

4,200

办公

办公

Office

Office

办公

RL 13,800 LEVEL 04 RL 9,600 LEVEL 03

4,200

RL 22,200 LEVEL 06 36,200 Exhibition

RL 13,800 LEVEL 04 RL 9,600 LEVEL 03 4,200

Exhibition

大堂

Office

RL 18,000 LEVEL 05 4,200

展室

Office

展室

RL 5,400 LEVEL 02

194.50m = RL ± 0.00 m

+194500

5,400

Lobby

5,400

RL 5,400 LEVEL 02

RL 0 LEVEL 01

Exhibition

4,200

RL 18,000 LEVEL 05

4,200

4,200

厨房

4,200

展室 护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

RL 22,200 LEVEL 06

一号变电房

展室

Electric Substation

Garage entrance

+194.50 RL 0

RL -20,000 B05

Parking

车库 Parking

Parking

地下人防

地下人防

Civil air defence

Civil air defence

用地红线

4,400

车库

Parking

3,800

车库

3,800

Parking

20,000

车库

Parking

3,800

4,400

车库

车库

Building Setback Line

Site Boundary Line 用地红线

Building Setback Line

RL -4,400 B01 RL -8,200 B02 RL -12,000 B03 RL -15,800 B04

4,200

Site Boundary Line

3,800 20,000

RL -15,800 B04

Parking

3,800

RL -12,000 B03

车库

Parking

4,200

RL -8,200 B02

车库

3,800

LEVEL 01

RL -4,400 B01

RL -20,000 B05

建筑控制线

建筑控制线

1 1

2

1

______________________________________________________

A31002

3

4

5

6 1

______________________________________________________

A31004

______________________________________________________

A31003

Description 描述

DD Approval DD Approval Column deleted, Floor to Floor Height amended. Issued for Structure, other things Approval Coordination Preliminary

HRDESIGN.ASIA

13/07/12 11/05/12 29/12/11

11/01/13 26/10/12 25/08/12

App'd App'd App'd

App'd App'd App'd

Date 日期 App'd 审核

ASIA AUSTRALIA MIDDLE EAST EUROPE NORTH AMERICA

THIS PICTURE: Chongqing Guohua Financial Centre was completed in Revit.

7

8

9

10

11

1/8

CONTRACTOR MUST VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS ON SITE BEFORE COMMENCING WORK OR PREPARING WORKSHOP DRAWINGS. DO NOT SCALE DRAWING. 施工承包廠商在施工或準備施工製造图前, 須至工程現場測量 確認所有尺寸. 不可只參用或丈量图面尺寸.

E D 1

C B A

Client 客户

Rev 修订

Project 项目名称

CHONGQING PINGHUA PROPERTY SERVICES 重庆平华置业有限公司

TM

As indicated

Scale 比例

@ A0 sheet size

E

Revision修订

CHONGQING JIANGBEIZUI OFFICE TOWER 重庆市江北嘴 B19-2/03地块国华天平大厦

Drawing title 图纸名称

Approved 审核

RD

Drawing number 图纸编号

SECTION – SECTION A-A A-A剖面图

Checked 校对

AL

Status 阶段

50mm on original 原尺寸的50mm

Project number 项目编号

DD 初步设计

10-08-0050 A31001

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RL 123,450 LEVEL RF Tower B

4,300

4,300

RL 110,000 LEVEL 26

MEP

5,000

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

3,850

Office

4,500

办公

Office

5,100

办公

5,000

5,000 4,300

RL 114,300 LEVEL 27

护窗栏杆 balustrade 1100mm

5,050

5,000

设备用房

RL 119,300 LEVEL 28

RL 36,200 LEVEL 09

设备用房

Insulated roof

850

RL 124,300 LEVEL 29

保温上人屋面


图纸版权属设计单位所有

备注

施工承包廠商在施工或準備施工製造图前, 須至工程現場測量確認所有尺寸. 不可只 參用或丈量图面尺寸.

金沙路 主要出入口

控制指数 Control Index

建筑控制线 实地绿地B

高架集中绿地 500.00

高架绿地

6辆

电话亭 坡道下 RAMP DN

电缆箱涵

车库出入口

办公入口

高架绿地

八层通向越洋地下连廊

用地红线

银行入口

用地面积 (m²) Site Area

10893

占地面积 (m²) Footprint

5796.15

建筑总面积 (m²) 140335.2 Total Area 建筑计容面积 (m²) 87143.86 Total GFA 吊层不计容 建筑面积 (m²) 25380.51 Podium Area not in GFA 地下建筑面积 (m²) 27810.83 Total Basement Area 建筑密度 53% (%) Plot Coverage 绿地面积 890.5 (m²) Landscape Area 绿地率 (%) 8.17% Green Coverage 集中绿地 (m²)

通往力帆的 高架平台

消防高架平台

车库出入口

塔楼B

排污管退界线

500

地上车位(辆) Above-ground Parking 吊层车位(辆) Podium Parking 总车位(辆) Total Parking 塔楼A建筑高度 (m) Tower A Building Height 塔楼B建筑高度 (m) Tower B Building Height

给水管道 裙房 A

挡土墙

10893

挡土墙

87144

60%

5%

500

12 430 610

898 149.60

123.45

天桥屋顶花园

塔楼A 停机坪 排污管控制线

车库出入口 裙房屋顶花园

C B A

Approval Coordination Preliminary

13/07/12 App'd 11/05/12 App'd 29/12/12 App'd

合作设计院

自行车位120辆 修订

描述

日期

审核

客户

业主名称 重庆平华置业有限公司

化粪池20平米

项目名称

办公入口 项目名称 重庆市江北嘴B19-2/03地块国华天平大厦

6辆

建筑控制线

实地绿地A 地下室范围线

次要出入口

图纸名称

日期

服务出入口

北滨路

校对

审核

比例

原尺寸的50mm

项目编号

图纸编号

阶段

方案设计

PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: CHONGQING GUOHUA FINANCIAL CENTRE LOCATION: CHONGQING, CHINA CLIENT: SUNLINE REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT GROUP SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE, INTERIOR DESIGN STATUS: COMPLETE COMPLETION DATE: OCTOBER 2016 TOTAL AREA: 86,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHER: QING AI WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: RODGER DALLING, SOPHIA GE, FABIAN GRAF, PEARL HUANG, RITA JIN, CALVIN KWAN, GODFREY LAM, STEVEN LEE, ALAN LIU, ADRIAN MIGNOT, BRETT SIMMONDS, MICHAL SUCHANEK, MARK UNGER, CHARA YANG, XIAODONG XIANG, YINHAO XIE COLLABORATORS FAÇADE ENGINEERS: AURECON LEED-CS CERTIFICATION CONSULTANT: ERM

TOP: Masterplan of Chongqing Guohua Financial Centre.

BOTTOM: The design of the precinct encourages easy pedestrian access to both the central garden and riverfront.

修订


showcase | woods bagot - convention centres

DESIGN DELIVERS A SENSE OF PLACE A LOCALLY-DRIVEN DESIGN INTENT HAS DELIVERED A BUILDING THAT NOT ONLY RESPONDS TO THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT, BUT HAS BECOME PART OF A WIDER PLACE MAKING SCHEME. WITH DESIGN BY WOODS BAGOT, THE NEW ADELAIDE CONVENTION CENTRE IS PART OF A LARGER INVESTMENT STRATEGY IN THE DISTRICT, PROVIDING CRITICAL LINKS TO THE CITY’S SURROUNDS.

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NORTH TERRACE, ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA

ADELAIDE CONVENTION CENTRE

THIS PICTURE: The bold shape of the West Building twists over a pedestrian boulevard, providing fantastic views from the upper level ballroom.


A

delaide Convention Centre’s West Building is the first stage in a multi-million-dollar expansion which provides a distinctive, regional experience, with architecture that draws inspiration from local topographical and geologic elements. Situated on the northern boulevard of Adelaide’s central business district, the new building provided a significant opportunity to reconnect the city with its lake and parklands. Bringing extensive knowledge of the site gained from the previous Adelaide Convention Centre (ACC) expansion in 2001 and global expertise in convention centre design, Woods Bagot in conjunction with Vx3 has designed a centre that will provide international delegates with a reference to local culture as a catalyst to promote tourism for the state. The ACC is designed to operate as a single, unified facility or as three stand-alone venues with dedicated arrival points and distinct identities. Stage 1 (West) expands the facility over active railway lines to create a new city edge, while the design references regional geological forms, stratification and colours. The centre has been designed to interface with the city on all frontages; a game-changing approach for the design of convention centres that are traditionally dominated by loading and utility functions. Instead, an innovative solution positioned the loading infrastructure within the building resulting in a building with a public address to all aspects. The expansion is constructed to bridge 76 metres over the main terminus railway station and has returned a pedestrian promenade to the lake that was lost to the city in 1856. The form of the building and the materials used allude to the colours and textures and forms found in the South Australian outback, features that vary during the day according to the direction and intensity of sunlight that they reflect. The façade features an orange hue that tints to brown at sunset, accented by grey and black layers reminiscent of the quartz and siltstone of the local tourism drawcard, the Flinders Ranges. The manner in which layers of rock in northern South Australia are folded and fractured is also

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TOP: The new building spans over a railway station and has transformed a road bridge into a new entrance into the centre.

BOTTOM: The fractured façade of the building reference local ancient landscapes whilst marking an important entrance into the city.


“THE FORM OF THE BUILDING IS CHISELLED DOWN, WARPED, AND WEATHERED; ANALOGOUS WITH THE ANCIENT LANDSCAPES OF ITS REGION. THE INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE CONTINUES THESE DESIGN DEVICES IN A MORE DELICATE MANNER TO BUILD ON THE UNIQUE VISITOR EXPERIENCE.”

THIS PICTURE: The extension is a dynamic addition to the city setting, connecting international visitors to Adelaide’s beautiful lakeside park.


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THIS PICTURE: Clever use of glazing and protected balconies focus views out of the building whilst a reduced proportion of glass has drastically improved the thermal performance of the faรงade.


referenced in the façade with dramatic shapes that show evidence of the supporting structure. The form of the building is chiselled down, warped, and weathered; analogous with the ancient landscapes of its region. The interior architecture continues these design devices in a more delicate manner to build on the unique visitor experience. The centre incorporates an array of technological innovations to assist operational efficiency, including a world-first motorised 3D modular ceiling that can change the height and shape of 4200sqm of multifunction halls whilst fully occupied. Further enhancing the flexibility of the centre are rooms that swing from foyer to ballroom use, and a loading dock that converts seamlessly into the exhibition space. Dedicated relocatable seating systems allow the same exhibition halls to function as an auditorium with raked seating for up to 3500 persons, or two individual auditoria; each with a seating capacity of 900 seats. In addition to the switchable halls, 14 fully serviced meeting rooms can be further divided to support multi-mode functionality. The expanded facility has built on the existing centre’s reputation for environmental sustainability, further reducing potable water consumption by 70% through the use of recycled wastewater and low-flow sanitary fixtures. By increasing the efficiency of the building fabric and implementing smart and low energy systems throughout the new building, the building has grown by 32% without the need to expand its existing electrical infrastructure. A system of segregation of clean water catchments contributes to reducing sediment and bacterial concentration inflows from the adjacent lake. State of the art mechanical systems manage 10,000L/s of airflow through 29 possible modes of operation to cater for the flexibility required in the expanded centre. A central district cooling plant is housed on the 8000sqm roof, a key part of improving the precinct’s civic environment. The selection of indigenous and low water plants blend the public realm into the architecture, resulting in a centre that will become part of the local landscape and a key component of the redevelopment of the wider Adelaide Riverbank precinct. Also with design by Woods Bagot, Stage 2 of the centre is currently under construction and is due for completion by mid-2017. The dramatic shape of the Stage 2 building will complete the postcard view of the city and reinvigorate key public plazas creating new meeting spaces for city workers and the wider public.

“BY INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE BUILDING FABRIC AND IMPLEMENTING SMART AND LOW ENERGY SYSTEMS THROUGHOUT THE NEW BUILDING, THE BUILDING HAS GROWN BY 32% WITHOUT THE NEED TO EXPAND ITS EXISTING ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.”

TOP: The East, Central and West buildings showcase the “postcard view of Adelaide” and provide three separate venues or a single, combined facility.

BOTTOM: All loading, infrastructure and logistics have been concealed inside the building to ensure an unmatched integration with the city.


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TOP: The centre has an unrivalled location at the intersection of the financial, entertainment, institutional and municipal districts.

BOTTOM: The facility can seat up to 3600 and provides multiple levels of meeting and a vast array of configuration options.


PROJECT DETAILS PROJECT: ADELAIDE CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING CLIENT: DPTI, ADELAIDE CONVENTION CENTRE LOCATION: NORTH TERRACE, ADELAIDE SCOPE: ARCHITECTURE STATUS: COMPLETED COMPLETION DATE: MARCH 2015 TOTAL AREA: 26,000SQM PHOTOGRAPHY: TREVOR MEIN WOODS BAGOT DESIGN TEAM: MICHAEL ANDREW, YEUNG CHEN, GLEN COLLINGWOOD, ROSINA DI MARIA, KEITH DOUGAL, ANDREW FOX, TODD HISLOP, KIRSTIN JENKINS, GAVIN KAIN, PAT MACRI, THOMAS MASULLO, ANTHONY ORLANDO, CRAIG ROGERS, TROY THOMAS, GORDANA TICAK, SIMON TOTHILL, STUART UREN COLLABORATORS: MANAGING CONTRACTOR: LEND LEASE PROJECT MANAGEMENT: THINC LANDSCAPE: OXIGEN CIVIL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS: AURECON BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERS: BESTEC COST MANAGER: RIDER LEVETT BUCKNALL ACOUSTIC ENGINEERING: AECOM RISK MANAGEMENT: DPTI

THIS PICTURE: Currently under construction, once complete the EAST building will make Adelaide Convention Centre one of the most adaptable facilities of its type in the world.


> LIGHTING SCULPTURES BY LASVIT > APSARA BY GIORGETTI > I’PIETRA BY NIRO GRANITE > WORLD WOVEN™ BY INTERFACE

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THIS PICTURE: The Beacon lighting sculpture.


LASVIT.COM


goods | lasvit - project

STUNNING LIGHTING SCULPTURES LASVIT IS THE CUTTING–EDGE CZECH COMPANY THAT COMBINES GLASS-MAKING CRAFT WITH INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY. IMPRESSIVE INSTALLATIONS FOR MANDARIN ORIENTAL JAKARTA ARE AMONG THEIR LATEST PROJECTS.

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THIS PICTURE: The main dining area features Across the Sea, a stunning 10 meter long glass installation.


“WATER SURFACES ARE REPRESENTED UPSIDE DOWN, USING HAND-MADE TURQUOISE GLASS COMPONENTS IN THE CONTOURS OF WAVES. THEIR SPECIAL CRACKLED TEXTURES CREATE A SPARKLING SEA-LIKE EFFECT.”

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M

andarin Oriental, Jakarta is located in the financial and diplomatic district, overlooking the iconic Welcome Monument and the city’s skyline. Renowned for its Indonesian hospitality and service, the five star luxury hotel offers exemplary personalized service in luxurious surroundings. A new addition to its award-winning restaurants and bar concepts is Li Feng, a fine Cantonese restaurant located on the second floor, offering a main dining area, as well as three elegant and distinctive private dining rooms. Designed by Hong Kong-based LRF Designers Limited, the restaurant’s interior is inspired by the voyage history and spices-trade between China and the old Jakarta, Batavia. The sailing theme is incorporated into its glass art and paintings as well as a ceiling lighting sculpture made in the Czech Republic by LASVIT, a sought-after glass design and production company. The main dining area features Across the Sea, a stunning 10 meter long glass installation. “The concept is derived from merchant voyages when junk sails cruised the seas,” LASVIT designer Michaela Mertlova explains, “Water surfaces are represented upside down, using hand-made turquoise glass components in the contours of waves. Their special crackled textures create a sparkling sea-like effect.” Amber-colored glass elements evoke stylized ancient junk sails with a sense of sunset. A black metal frame reflects the whole scene, creating a mysterious and dreamy atmosphere. The private dining areas are adorned with two more designs by Mertlova, each distinct, yet remaining thematic. The opal and amber Chinese Lanterns reference the simple shape of classic paper lanterns

LEFT & RIGHT: The Across the Sea glass installation by Lasvit; The opal and amber Chinese Lanterns reference the simple shape of classic paper lanterns.


“THE BEACON LIGHTING SCULPTURE IS ELEGANTLY PLACED OVER A ROUND DINING TABLE FOR NINE GUESTS. THE INSTALLATION IS COMPOSED OF OVERSIZED CUT-CRYSTAL RODS WITH A PATTERN HIGHLIGHTING THE PRISMATIC EFFECT OF FINE CUT CRYSTAL.”

with an elegant vertical cut that provides intriguing glass reflections. Their warm glow, along with a black metal frame, are enhanced by LED retro lightbulbs. Thus a purely traditional shape acquired a contemporary feel, while keeping its natural warmth. The Beacon lighting sculpture is elegantly placed over a round dining table for nine guests. The installation is composed of oversized cut-crystal rods with a pattern highlighting the prismatic effect of fine cut crystal. The designer explains, “As with many artworks, there were several inspirations blending a final result. I thought of the sunlight and moonlight that accompanied sailors across the seas, as well as the symbol of a crown and idea of a lighthouse, a beacon of refracted light that guides sailors home.” These lighting sculptures are only one component drawing guests to Li Feng. Just as its unique and high-end cuisine, impeccable service, crisp staff uniforms, luxurious furnishings and original artwork, these glass installations are taken to the highest levels of perfection. While the restaurant serves authentic yet contemporary Cantonese dishes, LASVIT’s glass lighting sculptures are based on traditional craft

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LEFT & RIGHT: The Beacon lighting sculpture.

interpreted through a modern design vision. From a kitchen led by two talented chefs, Li Feng’s menu presents a delightful blend of traditional dishes and a creative rendition of classics, including the beautifully presented Deep-Fried Swan Dumpling with Black Pepper Duck Meat and Sweet and Sour Chicken with Pineapple and Bell Pepper. Chef Fei, one of China’s most notable young chefs, was the man behind the celebrated Jiang restaurant in the Mandarin Oriental, Guangzhou. Chef Loy brings the refined atmosphere of Li Feng more than 12 years of experience in fine-dining restaurants in various destinations, such as Bali and Dubai. Li Feng is the first Chinese restaurant in Jakarta to partner with a renowned chef from Mainland China. Maximilian von Reden, General Manager of Mandarin Oriental, Jakarta says, “We believe Li Feng will become a coveted gastronomy destination in the city that offers an authentic yet contemporary Cantonese dining experience.”


LASVIT.COM


goods | giorgetti

A LIVING DREAM

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SYNONYMOUS WITH QUALITY AND ARTISTRY, GIORGETTI’S PENCHANT FOR PRODUCTS THAT DEFINE REFINED COSMOPOLITAN LIVING IS GIVEN RENEWED EMPHASIS WITH THE EVER-SO-CHIC APSARA SEATING SYSTEM.

THIS PICTURE: At once urbane and rustic, the Apsara is a seating system that covers all the aesthetic bases.


“FEATURING A WARM, SULTRY PALETTE, WATERPROOF ECO-LEATHER AND A CHARMING BASE COMPOSED OF AFRORMOSIA WOODEN SLATS, THE APSARA SEATING SYSTEM WAS DESIGNED TO MAKE A SPLASH, BOTH OUTDOORS AND INDOORS.”

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THIS PICTURE: Made for leisurely lounge sessions, the versatile design by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba is both cozy and functional.


F

ounded well over a century ago in Brianza, Italy, Giorgetti has come a long way from its humble origins as a quaint little furniture shop manned by only eight employees. The established furniture brand continues to hit its stride as a global purveyor of luxurious products created explicitly with the Good Life in mind. But while the company has grown exponentially over the years, some things haven’t changed, specifically Giorgetti’s long-term dedication to craftsmanship and extraordinary materials. Designed by Ludivica and Roberta Palomba, the Apsara is a modular seating system that stuns upon first glance and positively brims with Giorgetti’s signature elegance. Fitted with a protected aluminum base and powder painted a warm carob hue, the system comes available in two depths. Afrormosia wooden slats play up the framework, allowing for a rustic yet modern feel. Apsara’s casual-chic vibe is reinforced by its understated palette, as well as armrests and backrests fashioned in marine plywood and powder painted steel. Sheathed in fabrics from the brand’s Open-air collection and waterproof eco-leather piping, the backrest cushions, seat and armrests showcase a durability that makes Apsara ideal for the outdoors. In addition, a set of matching rectangular steel table complement the overall arrangement. Topped with peltrox or grigio oriente, these round or square pieces add a touch of flair while lending utility thanks to the possibility to position them at different depths and affix them to the aluminum base. Whatever your preference, one thing’s for sure: the Apsara turns your living area into the most stylish spot in the house.

TOP: Paired with the charming wood base, Apsara’s sumptuous cushions are upholstered in pretty fabrics from Giorgetti’s Open-air range.

BOTTOM: Assembled Afromosia wood slats give way to a sturdy yet fashionable base.

GIORGETTI.EU


goods | niro granite

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HOMAGE TO NATURE THE I’PETRA SERIES BEARS TESTIMONY TO THE FACT THAT WHEN ART MEETS NATURE, THE RESULT IS A WIN-WIN ALL ROUND. THIS PICTURE: Inspired by soft calcareous stone, the soothingly calm and elegant Borgogna White gives this bathroom a clearly clean and contemporary aesthetic.


D

igital printing technology and new firing and glazing techniques have afforded tile manufacturer Niro Granite the opportunity to mimic natural stone properties in its porcelain tiles, which have the added practical benefits of versatility and durability coupled with ease of maintenance and affordability. Making vivid design statements about the unrivalled beauty of natural stone, the impressive I’Pietra line-up is truly unique in that each design emulates the colour variation, grain, and texture you’d expect from the original stone to create a one colour per design collection. • The Borgogna White simulates the soft calcareous stone native to Northern France with its speckled white appearance, which will lend a calm soothing sensation to any interior. • The Java Crema is inspired by Indonesian marble, and features a very soft, creamy background which resembles limestone quarries. It is bound to create an unmistakably pristine and natural environment in any modern home. • The Beola Grey, masquerading as Italy’s igneous granite stone, evokes the archaeological past, and is sure to ignite an ancient awareness of nature in any space. • The Alpine Grey mimics the robustness and masculinity of natural slate of Northern Italy and won’t fail to take a home to another level with its strikingly artistic appearance evocative of the Swiss Alps. • The Limestone Beige, incorporating varied patterning to mimic the movement found in the sturdy and rugged limestone native to Bosphorus, can effortlessly confer the pureness of nature to high-traffic areas. • The Riviera Black echoes the mystery, power and elegance of Spanish marble. Flecked with the presence of white veins, it can be mixed and matched with other white or grey I’Pietra designs to accomplish an exquisite design masterpiece in any architectural concept. The tiles are available in the three surface finishes – matt, lappato and structured – and come in large sizes. Go all out by covering an entire floor or wall with one of these appealing designs, and you may well have your dream of the perfect surface come true.

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TOP: Inject a chic and contemporary look in an interior with the rugged, textured appearance and dark, modernistic atmospheric shade of the Alpine Grey.

BOTTOM: The Riviera Black can be teamed with other white and grey I’Pietra designs to imbue a retail showroom with sophistication, drama and mystery.


“MAKING VIVID DESIGN STATEMENTS ABOUT THE UNRIVALLED BEAUTY OF NATURAL STONE, THE IMPRESSIVE I’PIETRA COLLECTION IS TRULY UNIQUE IN THAT EACH DESIGN EMULATES THE COLOUR VARIATION, GRAIN, AND TEXTURE YOU’D EXPECT FROM THE ORIGINAL STONE TO CREATE A ONE COLOUR PER DESIGN COLLECTION.”

THIS PICTURE: Featuring a rich, warm background colour and subtle quartz veins, the Limestone Beige which emulates the sturdy and robust stone native to Bosphorus, ensures a practical solution for walls and floors in areas of high traffic.

NIROGRANITE.COM


goods | interface

A TRADITIONAL CRAFT THE NEW WORLD WOVEN™ COLLECTION BY INTERFACE

THERE’S SOMETHING INVIGORATING ABOUT THE UNEXPECTED. PARTNERING CONTRASTING TEXTURES AND STYLES CAN OPEN UP NEW FRONTIERS.

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THIS PICTURE: Autumn shades and hand-woven qualities add to the World Woven’s artisanal essence.


THIS PICTURE: The tartan design of Scottish SettTM invites a homely atmosphere to any space.


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THIS PICTURE: Collins CottageTM from the World Woven Collection; a traditional houndstooth pattern presented in classic black and white.


“THE BEAUTY OF HAND WEAVING IS THAT IT’S CLOSER TO NATURE THAN THE SYNTHETIC UNIFORMITY OF THE MODERN, MACHINED PRODUCTION. THESE PRODUCTS LEND THEMSELVES TO A WIDE RANGE OF POSSIBILITIES, THEY CREATE A DIVERSITY AND MOVEMENT THAT ECHOES THE NATURAL WORLD.” DAVID OAKEY, INTERFACE’S EXCLUSIVE PRODUCT DESIGNER

A

dding traditional hand-crafted design features to interior spaces creates a more subtle connection with nature than elements that are directly inspired by plants, wood or stone. David Oakey, Interface’s exclusive product designer, explains: “The beauty of hand weaving is that it’s closer to nature than the synthetic uniformity of the modern, machined production. These products lend themselves to a wide range of possibilities - from a simple, neutral background to a composition of multiple textures, they create a diversity and movement that echoes the natural world.” This spirit of traditional craft is the foundation of Interface’s sustainable World Woven™ Collection, which gives designers the opportunity to connect contemporary spaces with the past and add a distinctive, handcrafted feel to interior projects. Inspired by some of the world’s most beloved woollen textiles, the floor covering pays homage to age-old crafts, from Scottish tweed to Saori hand-weaving. World Woven consists of six Skinny Planks™ and three coordinating squares, each with eight colours and made from 100% recycled nylon. All nine styles are inspired by some of history’s most enduring, uncomplicated and elegant patterns that give comfort and help to lift our spirits. The colours bring to mind undyed wool with just a hint of contrast. As in nature, each colour is made of many hues mingled together to create a vivid, handmade effect. Whether used as a simple, neutral background or combined to create diversity and movement, World Woven gives you an exciting new world of options.

TOP: The subtle patterns of World Woven work together to provide a sophisticated floor design.

BOTTOM: The World Woven Collection features a variety of textile textures that play to the senses.


atelier | ode to art

INDONESIAN ART THE EVOLUTION OF INDONESIAN ART IN CONTEMPORARY ART

138 | H+R | ISSUE 05

HRDESIGN.ASIA

THIS PICTURE: Y Indra Wahyu - Juvenile In Last Supper, acrylic on canvas, 150x250cm


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he Indonesian arts scene has seen many changes since its beginnings in traditional crafts and arts, which centred around the culture, legends and agricultural life in the country. Though still retaining its artistic roots, Indonesian art has since evolved and transformed as the world progresses, incorporating new art techniques and exploring new concepts and ideas. The country has also experienced numerous reforms, having witnessed political turmoil and environmental disasters which has left its mark on the nation and the artists. Social, political and environmental activism has risen significantly in the light of such events, influencing artists to intrigue our thoughts and opinions on such matters, enhanced and immortalised by their works. Despite the changes that have rocked, reinvigorate and reformed society and the art of the new generation, these artists continue to portray their hopes and dreams, recalling the idealism, optimism and resolute pursuit of a peaceful and harmonious present and future. Their works continue to inspire viewers to continue the efforts in pursuing a better society, a better world, illuminating and impressing the intrinsic human spirit on us, and spurring us to unite with them in their pursuit. Some of these artists explores and challenges social and environmental issues through their art, bringing us to dreamy worlds or keeping us grounded to reality, all with the intent of stirring us to realise and resolve to act on such issues. Vani Hidayatur Rahman’s works received acclaim for his distinctive and realistic style, upholding important and powerful beliefs and messages in his works, and reflecting his ultimate dream for us to live in a peaceful and harmonious world His works has since made its impression in the Indonesian arts scene by participating in group exhibitions across Indonesia, and has been the recipient of numerous prestigious awards, particularly the UOB Painting of The Year 2013, Silver Award. Another notable artist is Y Indra Wahyu, who blends reality and surrealism, as well as elements from pop and street art, to create imaginative worlds rooted in realism. His works reveals the challenging and stressful environment of the everyday life, imbued with the hopes and dreams of his subjects in their efforts to reverse the expectations that society has for them. His works are bound to inspire, excite and encourage any audience, breathing optimism and imagination into their lives. Other artists choose to divert their attention to magnifying the beauty and significance of human relationships. Stefan Buana is renowned for his

innovation in art techniques, expanding further than the realm of traditional art to express the diversity and overall unity of the human race. He prefers to practice diverse and unique art techniques and mediums, uniting together to form visions of harmony and peace, grounded by the use of organic colours. Through his works, he demonstrates his regard on the importance of human closeness and unity, ordinary and extraordinary in our daily lives. Viewers will also be intrigued by the works of Dedy Sufriadi, delving deep into the stories and minds of individuals and using a myriad of defiant strokes, bold colours and abstract imagery to create lasting impressions on audiences. His works reveals the different facets of an individual by traversing into realms of imagination, subconsciousness and social perception, leaving audiences to admire his works visually, while pondering the concepts and stories behind his works. Agriculture and respect for the natural world continues to be rooted deep in Indonesian culture, and are continually celebrated and honoured by artists. Adi Gunawan’s works are a reflection to his cultural background, having lived in an agrarian society in his younger days. His works carry symbolism in the depiction of motions, gestures and expressions, connecting personally with the audiences with the characters’ warmth, affection and contentment in each other’s company. The cultural representation in his works awarded him the honour of representing his country at the Beijing Olympics 2008 Fine Arts Exhibition, and his works have been exhibited across Asia, Europe and USA. Tjokorda Bagus Wiratmaja incorporates the bull, an important symbol in Indonesian culture into his paintings, creating abstract and expressive visuals that inspires passion, vitality and wild animation in audiences. His expressive works are inspired by the culture, social and political conditions in his daily life, captured by the powerful motions, strokes and strong colours that stimulates, re-energise and reanimate the viewers’ senses. The abstract renditions of the subjects transition between complexity and simplicity, interpreting the elusiveness nature of animals to humans.

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VANI HIDAYATUR RAHMAN Vani Hidayatur Rahman gained acclaim for his distinctive and realistic art style, allowing us to connect almost immediately with his works. His highly complex paintings are imbued with powerful concepts and messages that addresses numerous social and environmental issues, reflecting Vani’s advocacy of world peace, harmony, unity and progression, and denouncing the problems that tears us away from such values. Aside from paintings, he also experiments with a diverse range of materials and mediums, and is part of the Batu Asah group, a group of five other artists who experiments with unique medium to create conceptual art.

Y INDRA WAHYU N Y Indra Wahyu N creates visual worlds that blends reality and imagination, presenting to us the inner spirit and beliefs of humans that lies beneath the material reality. Elements and symbols taken from popular art styles and culture are incorporated into his works, mingling with surreal strokes and colours to produce illusory and imaginary scenes that impress in composition and colour. The dreaming subjects of his works traverse deep into the heart of the claustrophobic pressures plaguing the modern society, and bringing hope and optimism in their continued strive to reverse their worlds and realise their dreams.

140 | H+R | ISSUE 05

HRDESIGN.ASIA

TOP: (from left to right and top to bottom) - Teks Yang Tak Terbaca(Typewriter series),120x150cm - Change The World, 130x150cm - Unity#9, 150x200 cm acrylic on canvas

BOTTOM: (from left to right) - Camouflage #1, 120cmx120cm - Camouflage #2, 120cmx120cm - Coloring Dreams, 165cmx125cm


STEFAN BUANA Renowned for his innovation in art techniques, Stefan Buana expands further than the realm of traditional art to express the diversity and overall unity of the human race. His works on canvas are not limited to acrylic, collage or oil paint, never hesitating to innovate in the use of art techniques to create unique textures and forms. The diverse art techniques are in harmony with one another, coming together to form visuals of peace and harmony, grounded by the natural colours of his works. It is synonymous with Buana’s views of art as a representation of our daily lives as social being, presenting the beauty in the interaction and amity in our ordinary lives.

DEDY SUFRAIDI Dedy Sufriadi presents the workings of the inner mind in his expressive strokes, bold colours and abstract shapes gains immediate attention, arresting audiences with contrasting, violent colours, further assaulting their sight and mind with expressive strokes, texts and numbers inlaid with symbolism and meaning. Sufriadi’s works documents his ventures into the conscious and subconscious mind, taking viewers with him into the depths of human emotion, imagination and human nature and leaving them to ponder upon the boundaries between intellectual awareness and free-flowing expression.

TOP: (from left to right) - Bersatu Bukan Berseteru #1 130cmx150cm - Curhat Paripurna #2, 100x100cm - Curhat Sama Dengan Night Party, 100cmx100cm mixed media on canvas

BOTTOM: (from top to bottom and left to right) - Homage series GrRc 2 140x150cm acrylic on canvas - World And Words 2014 mixed media on canvas - Great Shopper, 190x400cm


ADI GUNAWAN Adi Gunawan’s bronze sculptures immortalises the mystical relationships between man and animal, portraying the different subjects in peace and contentment with each other. Growing in an agrarian society, Gunawan witnessed scenes of harmony and peace residing in the co-existence between man and animal, inspiring him later on to magnify and bring to the world the warmth, affection and comfort that man and animals can find in each other. After graduating from Institut Seni Indonesia, he has participated in numerous exhibitions across Indonesia, and his growing reputation of his works eventually awarded him the honour of representing Indonesia at the Beijing Olympics 2008 Fine Arts Exhibition, where he was also presented with the Olympic Torch Award.

142 | H+R | ISSUE 05

HRDESIGN.ASIA

TOP LEFT: Chased by Bulldogs(35x25x189cm) MIDDLE LEFT: Fighting(26x28x80cm)

TOP RIGHT: Ladder of Success(80x25x30cm) BOTTOM RIGHT: Berbisik (Whisper) 26x20x43cm


TJOKORDA BAGUS WIRATMAJA Intensity, energy and passion; these are the words one would use to describe the vibrant paintings of Tjokorda Bagus Wiratmaja. Fearless in expression and colour, Wiratmaja explores the complexities and simplicities of nature and animals in his abstractions, where animals transition between nothingness and materialism. The freedom of his subjects are expressed through lines, textures and colours, saturated with animation and vitality that translates to audiences. Has displayed his works in Indonesia and Singapore, and won a number of accolades for his vibrant works, including the the Best Sketch Award at the FSR Seni Murni Insititut Seni Indonesia Yogyakarta and second place in the Pekan Seni Mahasiswa Nasional (Peksiminas)

BOTTOM: Unbeatable, 120cmx150cm

TOP LEFT: The Light of Life 120 x 120cm acrylic on canvas

TOP RIGHT: Uncompromising 100 x 100cm acrylic on canvas


event | schiavello

theme:

Schiavello Singapore Celebrating 50 years of creating

venue:

Lewin Terrace Restaurant, Singapore

website:

schiavello.com


choice | ode to art

POP SENSIBILITY W

u Qiong describes his work as “a dialogue with viewers, introducing scenarios that would provoke thought or trigger memories and experiences”. Evident in his works, they transport us to realms of dreams and nostalgia, using concepts of Pop Art to portray the many layers that lie beneath the mysterious expressions of his characters. His cartoonish style incites a spirit of playfulness and humour, invoking personal recollections of the imaginations and dreams of our youth. His characters are an enigma, possessing an air of sensibility as they embrace their situations with a maturity that resonates deeply amongst viewers. Upon first glance, his characters are endearing and humorous, yet carrying a queer sense of familiarity. As we peruse his works further, we discover the reason for that strange sense of recognition. Through the many adventures of his characters, Wu Qiong reveals that his characters are in fact visual recreations of social issues that exist amongst the bulk of society. These characters, though appearing naïve and childish, traverse past fantasy to appeal to reality. Endless possibilities awaits the characters in his works, all dependent on the impressions that viewers make upon them. Their enigmatic expressions have the power to invite any kind of impression one can make of it, yet retaining a charm characteristic to the artist himself. This is the crux of Wu Qiong’s works, the dialogue that he creates with us about the realities of our lives, our joys and sorrows, our dreams and tribulations. By creating such a dialogue, he questions existentialism, providing us with a simpler outlook of the world as we venture onwards in our lives.

146 | H+R | ISSUE 05

HRDESIGN.ASIA

THIS PICTURE: Here and Now, 33 x 13 x 26 cm, Bronze

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H+R Issue 05 | Hospitality & Residential - Architect | Design | Interiors  

WOODS BAGOT: People Architecture

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