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torch John F. Kennedy High School 4545 Wenig Rd. NE Cedar Rapids, IA 52402 Volume 45, Issue 3

editorial board Editor-In-Chief Rachel Gilman and Riley Galbraith Managing Editor Jessica Rowan Photo Editor Sarah Sickles Feature Editor Allie Sindlinger Online Editor Darcey Altschwager

editors Norm Althoff, Amy Brause, Mo Cheetany, Annie Feltes, Hanna Krivit, Steph Mercer, Tara Mittelberg Bailey Zaputil

mission The Torch staff and adviser are committed to producing a top quality student newspaper applying high standards of writing, editing, and production. The Torch seeks to fairly serve the Kennedy High School faculty, students, and staff, showing no favoritism to decisions about content are the responsibility of the individual editors and the Editorial Board.

writers

Michael Abramson, Hannah Botkin, Hannah Bruns, Ethan Divis, Ben Feltes, Zach Goodall, Spencer Grekoff, Terin Kane, Jordan Lauderdale, Jordan Lunsford, Lydia Martin, Isabel Neff, Davis Sutton, Mackenzie Teare

photographers Ben Feltes, Sam Nordstrom

artists Nick Appleget, James Kern, Peggy Wang

copy editors Grace King, Kelsey Rindfleisch, Stephanie Wenclawski

adviser Stacy Haynes-Moore


Editorial 04 05

Letters from the editors Editorial

News 06 07 08

Race against the clock A soldier’s homecoming Metro High School

Profile 10 11

Cheering on Early kick to college Model behavior

Arts & Entertainment 13

In review

Feature 16

Who will be the last man standing?

Photo 18

Just b’caucus we can

Health 14

All eyes on Iowa

21 22 23

Zombie matter The dreary days The scorching truth

Sports 25 26

Missing in action Weighing in


Editorial

Letters from the editors

You’ve almost returned to your classroom, just a single hallway away from a successful bathroom break. You’ve taken care of your business, done your duty, when suddenly it happens; there you are again, just you, the hallway, and the stranger who has stolen your awkward-free walk back to class. You search for an alternate route, nothing; you reach in your pocket for your phone, iPod, whatever, but nada. All possible distractions are gone and now your hallmate is right in front of you. Suddenly eye contact is made. There is no hello or what’s up, not even a smile; instead just the sound of footsteps to break the silence of an empty hallway. How awkward. Situations like these have become more and more frequent in recent years; it’s like everyone has forgotten how to converse (maybe that’s because everyone has forgotten to do anything that does not include tweeting or texting). Kids these days… But it’s time to turn things around, so here are seven tips (because it’s too difficult to think of 10) that will help get conversations going. 1. When your hallmate gets close enough try to cough or sneeze on him. You will then be forced to apologize. 2. Give your hallmate a compliment, and follow by asking her what she likes about you (force hallmate to be specific). 3. Give your hallmate a wink and a “haayyyyy.” Then follow until the gesture is returned. 4. Go in for a high five. Ten if you’re feeling lucky. 5. Ask if your hallmate is ticklish. If no answer, go ahead and find out for yourself. 6. Give your hallmate a suggestion on how to better their appearance. Everybody appreciates some help. 7. Begin to take off your sweatshirt. When you get caught inside, ask for assistance. Using any of these icebreakers is guaranteed by me to get the conversation going. What you do with the rest of the conversation, however, is in your hands.

4

Happy New Year, Torch readers. With the New Year comes an expectation of new beginnings, changes, and a fresh start. When I think of the New Year, I can’t help but think of a song by one of my favorite artists, Death Cab for Cutie entitled, “The New Year.” The song’s chorus goes, “So this is the New Year? Well I don’t feel any different.” Although this view upon the New Year is seemingly cynical, I see it to be a somewhat accurate representation of what the New Year feels like to me. New Year’s resolutions come January 1 are all too prevalent. While yes, the concept of bettering yourself as a person through such ways as becoming healthier or vowing to swear less are admirable, we shouldn’t just choose to do so just because of the New Year. These small traits that lead to the common conception of what make a better person should be strived to be attained every day of our lives. Why does it matter if it’s January 1? We should always do all we can to be gracious, healthy, and respectable people. The New Year is not a refresh on our lives. Like Death Cab says, I don’t feel any different come 12:01 January 1. I am still the same person. If the New Year is what it takes for one to make an important change in their life, so be it. I encourage people to make needed alterations on their lives in order to be the person they want to be. This being said, it is not the New Year that changes a person. It is the people themselves. Take the responsibility to be who you want to be, to make the change that betters yourself. The changing of year does not change our past or who we are. We have to change our mindset and choose not to dwell on the past but rather take initiative to be proactive. But then again, it’s 2012. The hell with the rest of the year and being a “good person”, it won’t matter come December. Let’s just live our lives via Nostradamus’s looming prophecies; they’re bound to be accurate.


Editorial

HAMburger. This picture was drawn for a series of artwork depicting compound words through literal drawings. In this picture, I have taken a hamburger to its raw meaning, a pig between two slices of bread. Prisma colored pencils were used to draw the image in order to blend the colors together. Illustration and commentary by Nick Appleget

PAGES BY Rachel Gilman and riley galbraith

5


News

Race against the clock Though the attendance policy hasn’t changed this year, students at Kennedy, like Ricky McSpadden, may find it harder to get away with absences and tardies. That’s due to new management from Jay Goodlove, the new attendance facilitator. “The policy is the same. What may be different is that I’m more active in pursuing students with attendance issues,” Goodlove said. Already, there have been about 20 reinstatements

6

this term, following the 93 reinstatements during the fall. Goodlove said that it takes about two or three days to get to a student about an unexcused absence. If a student has more than three unexcused absences, this can call for a reinstatement. Extreme cases of truancy call for a truancy procedure, called the Pyramid of Interventions. The Pyramid of Interventions is when the school does a series of mediation steps and interventions, and where students and their families and school officials meet with the District Truancy Officer, which can ultimately lead up to the parents having to go to tendance was because he could never get court in front of the County Attorney. a ride because of his family’s work schedThe Pyramid of Interventions is made ule. This issue was resolved, as he now of four tiers that build rides the bus to school. To motivate him up by the number of to get to school, McSpadden said that his excused and or dad made a plan: to not be late, or he gets unexcused absences. grounded. In every tier, there are Even though McSpadden said he required steps that was at first scared [of the attendance pol must be completed in icy], he said that it has helped a lot. “They case the students reach just wanna make sure I get here on time the next tier. With these steps, like everybody else, so I don’t miss out and there is also a list of suggested interven- get what I need. Because they really do tions, which are ways to help out coun- want to see everyone graduate.” Goodlove selors/attendance facilitators with the re- said it’s important for students to go to quired steps. Already, some families from school because “if you’re not there, you’re Kennedy have been taken to court. not learning.” For students having probRicky McSpadden, so., admits that he lems getting to school he said that he and has had a history of bad attendance, and the student work with the counselors and says that he has already missed about two administrators to come up with different weeks of school this year, and has even plans, like adjusting schedules and helping more tardies. Even so, he says that last out with transportation. year his attendance was even worse. Having bad attendance doesn’t mean “[The attendance policy is] way more someone is necessarily a bad student, strict … I had a lot more tardies last year, Goodlove noted. “I see every level of stuand no one really confronted me about it dent. Some because they have some conexcept for my teachers,” McSpadden said, cerns that they need some help with. Oth“and I didn’t even really know that we had ers are unaware that the policy is being an Attendance Facilitator last year.” Mc- enforced,” he said. Spadden admitted that he has been pulled bailey zaputil out of class five times already for his attendance. McSpadden said his problem with at

Running Late. Ricky Mcspadden, so., scrambles to get to class on time. photo by Steph Mercer

“The policy is the same. What may be different is that I’m more active in pursuing the students with attendence issues,” - Jay Goodlove

A


news

Bravery. Roger and Katie Ferguson hug their father, John, before he left for Iraq.

A Soldier’s Homecoming Photo Provided by Katie Ferguson.

United States troops withdrawn from Iraq

President Obama made a speech stating that all troops would be there for a large portion of her life, such as driving, swim meets, home for the holidays. On Oct. 21 he said that the plan was still and her 16th birthday. She is happy her father is home, but knows on track. The president seems to have made progress as the war in that her dad feels pride in being in the service. “My dad feels he is doing the right thing by going overseas. Iraq officially came to a close in December, He picked his career in the military and and his recent success was withdrawing the knew the risk of getting deployed,” Fergutroops in Iraq back home. son said. Soldiers have been stationed at Kuwait Like the Fergusons, many families are until it is their turn to come home. looking forward to being united. Anderson “It’s always a good thing when troops thinks a lot of the troops that get released come home, always,” George Anderson, from Iraq will probably be given a brief social studies teacher said. With his experibreak. ence of being in the military, he has been in “I’ve already talked to some who are geara position where he had to leave his family. ing up to go to Afghanistan. With things Katie Ferguson, so., finds comfort in knowing that her dad, John, will not miss Dog Love. The dog tags of John Ferguson. heating up in other areas of the region, I Photo by Steph Mercer unfortunately don’t think it’s going to be a the important things going on in her life long stay at home,” Anderson said. anymore. She was in third grade when her He feels that the service is not easy and comes with a price. “It’s dad was first deployed. “It was really hard. I cried because it was so sad. Having him tough. You don’t know what’s going on a lot of times. I did nine gone was also very hard for my mom because my brother Roger months sea duty and it’s hard. You just miss being home and beand I didn’t understand what was happening. We just knew that ing around,” Anderson said. “It’s funny because you get so far behind on things like cable. You really do miss out on a lot of little our dad was gone,” Ferguson said. Although she was 14 the next time her father was deployed, it details when it comes to family which is one of the harder things.” steph mercer was still difficult. She felt that because of his career he was not

Pages By Bailey zaputil

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J

ustin Hess, jr., attended Kennedy his freshmen and sophomore years, but transferred to Metro for his junior year. Hess’s mother pushed for him to attend the alternative high school after his grades fell in both language arts and science. Hess is glad he transferred to Metro because he hardly receives any homework and his classes are easier than at Kennedy. Metro High School, the only alternative high school in the Cedar Rapids School District, is home to about 365 students who struggled or who are struggling in high school. Some students who attend the alternative high school find it beneficial while others cannot wait until they can get out. “It is the same thing but slower,” Hess said. Hess takes the same basic core classes at Metro like he would at Kennedy, however this term he is also taking an extra language arts class to catch up on credits as well as theater. He enjoys all of his current classes and teachers. “You get to know [the teachers] a lot better than you do at other schools because your classes are a lot smaller,” Hess said. He enjoys the individualism that the small classes promote and the close bonds that form between the teachers and students.

“I like that teachers are friends.” Although Hess is enjoying the atmosphere at Metro he misses attending Kennedy and seeing his friends on a daily basis. “After this term I can go back but I want to stay here another term to earn more credits,” Hess said. He plans on returning to Kennedy for his senior year and graduating with the class of 2013. After high school Hess wants to attend Kirkwood for two years and then transfer to a small college out in California to pursue business. Martise Thomas, sr., transferred to Metro for the spring trimester of his junior year because of poor attendance, and low grades in language arts and math. Although Thomas did make up the credits he needed while attending Metro, he did not enjoy it. “It just wasn’t the environment for me,” Thomas said. “It wasn’t the school I was used to. Teachers didn’t push me hard enough and teachers were friends and not teachers.” His day was similar at Metro as it was at Kennedy. School started at 8 a.m., with a lunch shift in the afternoon, shared by all students in one tiny cafeteria. Students are also given the lunch shift option

“I like that teachers are friends.” -Justin Hess, jr.

to go outside and shoot hoops while others choose to smoke a short distance away from school grounds. Thomas transferred to Metro with the understanding that if he completed all the necessary credits, he would be able to return to Kennedy his senior year. This was the motivation for Thomas to do well. The Metro course credit system functions differently than at Kennedy. Kathy Green, principal at Metro, explains that all classes are ungraded, and minimal homework is given in all classes. “We want to ensure that students understand the key concepts so we want that work to be completed in class to support that,” Green said. Students are awarded credits based on attendance, completion of work, and following behavior guidelines. Students earn between zero and five credits based on how well they follow all three requirements. Metro may not be the best choice for some, but it can be a supportive way to get back on track after struggling in school. “I think that Metro offers opportunities for a wide range of students,” Green said. “Certainly I think that we provide support for students that may not have felt connected to high school.” darcy altschwager Photo by Darcey Altschwager


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Profile

Cheering on

Kennedy junior works through obstacles to realize her cheerleading dreams

A major part of the high school experience is getting involved with extra activities. For one student, this means the opportunity to do something she only dreamed of: being a wrestling cheerleader. Jenna Erceg, jr., is in the Best Buddies program. She tried out for cheerleading last spring but didn’t make the squad. However, some squad members asked the coach if she could just be involved somehow and after going through the administration she was able to cheer with the team. “I tried out because I wanted to meet the new girls and have fun,” Erceg said. “I’ve made a lot of new friends.” Erceg likes spending time with the team and her favorite cheer is the JFK Fight Song. “I was so happy when I made cheerleading,” Erceg said. “I was telling everyone.” Even her teammates can see how Erceg feels about cheerleading. “I was so happy when Jenna made the team,” Miranda Stewart, sr., said. “I know Jenna loves cheerleading. Her hearts in the right place, she’s determined, and she’s having a lot of fun. Practice is always a blast when Jenna’s there.” Even though she doesn’t cheer at every

meet, she still wears her varsity jacket with pride. “She’s so happy to wear her varsity jacket every Thursday,” Stewart said. “It means the world to her, she flaunts it.” Erceg picks up on the cheers really well but has trouble remembering them. “If she doesn’t get the cheer right away she keeps focusing and doesn’t let herself get frustrated and keeps pushing her way through it if she’s not catching on,” Sara Mackey, cheer coach, said. Cheerleading has made a definite impact on Jenna’s life. “I feel different,” Erceg said. “I feel a part of the Kennedy team.” Stewart agrees, “I’m sure she’s going to look back on this experience 20 years down the road and say ‘hey that really made my high school career; I was a cheerleader at Kennedy High School.’” “A lot of people just judge Jenna and her classmates but those perceptions are wrong and I think that people just need to get to know people before they judge. If people get the chance to know Jenna they definitely should, she represents Kennedy well,” Stewart said. Isabel Neff

Left: Rah rah rah. Jenna Erceg, jr., practices one of her cheers for wresPhotos by Darcey Altschwager


Profile

An early kick to college Gabe Christianson graduated early this year from Kennedy and left his friends and family in Iowa to play soccer and get a head start on his academic career at Northern Illinois University (NIU). Christianson played on Kennedy’s varsity men’s soccer team last year as a mid-fielder for the first half of the season. During the second half, he switched with his brother, Garet, and played forward. Christianson was contacted last year by NIU’s soccer coach, Eric Luzzi, to attend NIU and play on their soccer team. He

gladly accepted the offer. He finished high school earlier this fall in order to practice with NIU’s soccer team this coming spring. Northern Illinois wants new recruits to experience soccer at the collegiate level before the season begins. “Gabe always worked hard in practice like it was a game,” Kennedy varsity men’s soccer Head Coach Mike Robertson said. Robertson continued to say that Christianson was always fully committed and would always show up to practice. Christianson was a great of-

fensive player on the team. Last year, he and his brother accounted for a large percentage of the team’s goals. Christianson did get the opportunity to meet the players on NIU’s team before he left. He also knows Charlie Oliver, another recruit to NIU’s team. Christianson left for NIU on January 12 to start his college career. When he talks about leaving Kennedy he says “It’s not bad to be missed.” Michael Abramson

Juggling it all. Gabe Christianson practices for his soccer debut at NIU Photo by Ben Feltes

Model Behavior Marie Treangen,sr., is not your average Kennedy student, or even teenager. On top of theater, show choir and her schoolwork, 17-year-old Treangen is a model. At the end of her sophomore year, Treangen decided to attempt modeling. “I’m tall, so I might as well try it,” said Treangen. Treangen now travels throughout the country for castings, shows, and meetings. On average, she misses two or three days of school per month. Modeling didn’t come easy to Treangen at first. She was turned down her first time at an agency, but didn’t give up. Soon she was picked up by Ford Modeling Agency. “It’s nothing personal, though.” The castings she attends consist of her walking in, taking a headshot, and then it’s over. Even when not in castings, Treangen says she likes to stand out. Her wardrobe consists of leather leggings, dresses, her beloved combat boots, and even sweatpants. She doesn’t receive any free clothes but says she receives good discounts.

Treangen works to constantly beat the model stereotypes about eating disorders. “Just because I’m a model doesn’t mean I don’t eat.” She is pressured to stay “toned”. Often, Treangen comes across peers asking her if models are taking drugs at shows, and she does her best to get those ideas about models out of their heads. If caught under the influence, Treangen’s contract would be ended with her modeling agency. “You just have to stick with the right crowd,” she said. After high school she plans to attend college in Chicago while still building her modeling career. She’s met some of her best friends while modeling, most of them living in Chicago. It is for this reason she plans to live there, so she won’t be alone in the big city. In her free time she loves to hang out with her friends. Her friends describe her as a very talkative, happy person, who always tries her best. Hannah Bruns

Strike a pose. Marie Treangen, sr., practices her facials to further her career. Photo provided by Sarah Sickles

PAGE BY AMY BRAUSE 11


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PAGE BY Spencer Grekoff

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Arts and entertainment

wer ed by To id v o r p Photo bsite Heist we

In Review Watch

Tower Heist

Tower Heist is a comedy dealing with hotel workers seeking revenge on their hierarchy boss who dwindled them out of their money. Much like one of the largest financial frauds known to U.S. history, the Ponzi Scheme, Tower Heist portrays the defrauding of thousands of investors. The hotel manager, Josh, played by Ben Stiller, and sidekick coworker, Slide, played by Eddie Murphy, mischievously work together and target the penthouse of their previously titled boss to steal back their money that was sneakily taken from them. Alan Alda plays the shady billionaire named Arthur, who gloats about his special Ferrari held captive in his living room. The chemistry between the talented cast definitely shows within the movie characters. It remains consistent throughout the movie and allows you to put yourself into the movie yourself and feel the adventure alongside these humorous actors and actresses. Tower Heist is directed towards a middle aged audience and above, causing it to be rated PG-13. Throughout the movie, there are few scenes and lines scattered throughout that may lead some to find them offensive. Vulgar and foul language pops up quite often, but no more than any other movie hot on the billboards these days. Although it is quite easy to predict what the main character’s moves will be throughout the movie, it is a great laugh and a wonderful attention stealer. Jessica Rowan

Read

City of Thieves St. Petersburg native and firefighter, the young, skinny, Jewish, and talented chess player Lev Beniov is thrown in jail after looting the body of a dead German paratrooper. There, he meets the handsome and charismatic Kolya, a young soldier on desertion charges who is obsessed with literature and women. Set during the historic, bloody Siege of Leningrad, Kolya and Lev are given an ultimatum: to find a dozen eggs in a week for the Colonel’s daughter’s wedding, or die. In a city cut off from all supplies and goods, they must deal with broken cities, starving children, cannibals, prostitutes, enemy and friendly soldiers, and the assassination attempt on a chess-frenzied German commander. And more importantly, they must be able to do this while worrying about food, girls, and the fact that neither of them have been able to defecate in days. David Benioff ties the horrors of war with a dark humor that both brings out the starkness of the brutality while highlighting the humanity. The book is unpretentious about the reader’s knowledge of World War II giving the reader a touch of intelligence and immersing them more into Beniov’s world, with all of its stereotypes, racism, sexism, and hard-learned truths.  Lev and Kolya’s relationship is natural, witty, and dysfunctional, with straightforward and honest insights that can only come from teenage boys, such as the facts about sex, girls, writing, music, and what it means to be a man.

Bailey Zaputil

For more reviews on books, movies, and music check out our website at kennedytorch.org

PAGE BY Steph Mercer 13


All eyes on Iowa Race for Republican bid begins O

n Jan. 3 the eyes of the nation were on Iowa as the first in the nation caucus for the 2012 presidential election took place. Votes for the entire state were being calculated in the capital Des Moines. Two of my fellow Torch staff members and I road tripped to Des Moines to get a first impression of the Iowa caucus. We started our evening by going to Hotel Fort Des Moines, Mitt Romney’s election night headquarters. We arrived there early in the evening, long before Romney gave his speech. The crowd of Romney supporters was overwhelming. There were Romney supporters from around the country, along with many television, radio, and newspaper reporters from all over the USA. There were even some journalists from foreign countries. We also had the opportunity to visit Ron Paul’s election night headquarters. I was struck by the enthusiasm of all his young supporters, including college students from many states. Later that night, well after midnight, when we departed from Romney’s headquarters to head home, votes were still being counted and the winner had not yet been determined. Republicans Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum were battling the entire night, each ultimately getting 25 percent of votes cast. Texas Representative Ron Paul was close behind with 21 percent. The evening was filled with press conferences, rallies and speeches for each presidential candidate. This year’s Iowa caucus will be in the record books, for the top two contenders ended up being separated by only eight votes. Both Romney and Santorum came

out winners. Romney won the vote tally by the slimmest of margins, while Santorum’s late surge from the back of the pack was considered a major victory for him. At the other end of the spectrum, Michele Bachmann, Jon Huntsman, Newt Gingrich, and Rick Perry did not have the top three finishes they had hoped for, and as a result these candidates are reassessing their campaigns. Michele Bachmann has already formally suspended her campaign, which is the political way of saying she has dropped out of the race. The presidential campaign moved on to New Hampshire on Jan. 10, a week following the Iowa caucuses. It was expected Romney would easily come out ahead. The next real contest takes place in South Carolina on Jan. 21 where there is currently no front-runner. In New Hampshire’s primary election, voters simply show up, cast their ballots and leave. Caucus states like Iowa, on the other hand, are more like town meetings where candidates and other election related matters are discussed before any informal polling of people’s preferences for president takes place. At a caucus, supporters of the various candidates have an opportunity to speak to the group and attempt to persuade them to support their candidate. While the winner of the Iowa caucus does not always go on to be the actual candidate of the party, winning in Iowa, or at least being in the top two or three candidates, is an important step toward obtaining the party’s nomination this fall. Allie Sindlinger

The Results The following percentages are the results of the votings during the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 3, 2012. Mitt Romney

24.6%

Rick Santorum

24.5%

Ron Paul

21.5%

Newt Gingrich

13.3%

Rick Perry

10.3%

Michele Bachmann 5.0% Jon Huntsman

0.6%

Upcoming Events January 21 January 31 February 4 February 7 February 28

South Carolina Florida Nevada Maine Colorado Minnesota Arizona Michigan


Photo by Rachel Gilman


Mitt Romney

Newt Gingrich

Ron Paul

Age: 64

Age: 68

Age: 75

Birthplace:Detriot, Michigan

Birthplace: Harrisburg,

Birthplace: Pittsburgh,

Family: Ann Romney (wife);

Pennslyvania

Pennslyvania

Children: Tagg, Matt, Josh,

Family: Callista Gingrich (

Family: Carol Paul (wife);

Ben, and Craig

wife)

Children: Ronald, Lori, Ran-

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s de-

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s

dal, Robert, and Joy

gree, Brigham Young Univer-

degree, Emory University,

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s

sity, 1971; master’s degree,

1965; master’s degree, Tulane

degree, Gettysburg College,

Harvard Business School,

University, New Orleans,

1957; medical degree, Duke

1975; law degree, Harvard

1968; doctoral degree, Tulane

University, 1961

Law School, cum laude

University, 1971.

Religion: Baptist

Religion: Mormon

Religion: Roman Catholic

Current job: U.S. Congress-

Current job: Keynote

Current job: Chairman,

man

speaker, GOP fundraising

American Solutions for

Previous Experience: Ran

Previous Experience: Presi-

Winning the Future; college

for president in 1988 as a

dential candidate 2008

professor

Libertarian and in 2008 as a

Gun Control: An advocate of

Previous Experience: First

Republican

the Second Amendment to the

time as presidential candidate

Gun Control: An advocate of

Constitution, which provides

Gun Control: An advocate of

the Second Amendment to the

for the right to bear arms

the Second Amendment to the

Constitution, which provides

Pro-life: An advocate against

Constitution, which provides

for the right to bear arms

abortion

for the right to bear arms

Pro-life: An advocate against

Capital Punishment: In

Pro-life: An advocate against

abortion

favor of the death penalty

abortion

Capital Punishment: - Not

Legalization of

Capital Punishment: In

in favor of the death penalty

marijuana:Against legaliza-

favor of the death penalty

Legalization of marijuana:

tion

Legalization of

Consider it to be a decision

marijuana:Against legaliza-

made by each state

tion


Rick Santorum

Rick Perry

Jon Huntsman

Age: 53

Age: 61

Age: 51

Birthplace: Winchester,

Birthplace:Paint Creek, Texas

Birthplace:Palo Alto, Cali-

Virgina

Family: Anita Thigpan Perry

fornia

Family: Karen Garver Santo-

(wife); Children: Griffin and

Family: Mary Kaye Cooper

rum (wife); Children: Eliza-

Sydney

(wife); Children: Mary Anne,

beth, Richard, Daniel, Sarah,

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s

Abigail, Elizabeth, Jon, Gracie

Peter, Patrick, and Isabella

degree, Texas A&M University,

Mel, Asha Bharati

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s

1972

Alma Mater: Bachelor’s

degree, Penn State, 1980;

Religion: Methodist

degree, University of Pennsly-

master’s degree, University of

Current job: Governor; chair-

vania, 1987

Pittsburgh, 1981; law degree,

man, Republican Governor’s

Religion: Mormon

Dickinson Law School, 1986

Associaton; college professor

Current job: Former U.S.

Religion: Roman Catholic

Previous Experience: First

Ambassador to China

Current job: Attorney

time as presidential candidate

Previous Experience: First

Previous Experience: First

Gun Control: An advocate of

time as presidential candidate

time as presidential candidae

the Second Amendment to the

Gun Control: An advocate of

Gun Control: An advocate of

Constitution, which provides

the Second Amendment to the

the Second Amendment to the

for the right to bear arms

Constitution, which provides

Constitution, which provides

Pro-life: An advocate against

for the right to bear arms

for the right to bear arms

abortion

Pro-life: An advocate against

Pro-life: An advocate against

Capital Punishment: In

abortion

abortion

favor of the death penalty

Capital Punishment: No

Capital Punishment: No

Legalization of

position

position

marijuana:Consider it to be a

Legalization of marijuana:

Legalization of

decision made by each state

Consider it to be a decision

marijuana:Against legaliza-

made by each state

tion

Ron Paul photo by Rachel Gilman Photos provided by iowacaucus.org Information gathered by Allie Sindlinger Graphic by Rachel Gilman


Photo

Just b’caucus we can

Three members of the Torch staff ventured to Des Moines on Jan. 3, 2012 to experience the Iowa Caucuses. Sarah Sickles, Allie Sindlinger and Rachel Gilman visited Ron Paul’s public event and later attempted to breach the Mitt Romney security for coverage. Though the Romney attempt failed because it was a private event, the overflow of supporters made for an entertaining experience. An Occupy Wall Street activist was escorted from the Romney event while screaming, “Mitt Romney represents the one percent! Do not vote for him! I am going to jail now!” The Ron Paul rally was filled with reporters and supporters in the Des Moines Ankeny Courtyard Marriot. Paul’s speech stirred many emotions in the crowd. Contrary to popular belief, there were supporters of all ages. Flags waved and pictures snapped as the night drew to a close. Sarah Sickles

Five seconds of fame. Supporters cheer as the live cameras are Photo by Sarah Sickles pointed on them.

Above: Unsatisfied. A Mitt Romney supporter expresses his discontent. Right: Recgonition. Ron Paul recgonizes his volunteers for their work on his behalf.

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To check out more photos from the caucuses go to kennedytorch.org

Photos by Sarah Sickles


Photo

PAGES Sarah Sickles

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Photo

Ray of hope. To some Americans, Ron Paul is the hero America needs. Cheers erupt from the crowd as he gives his speech. Photo by Sarah Sickles

Cheers. There were approximately 122,555 voters at the caucuses Photo by Rachel Gilman this year.

Framed. Rick Perry looks grave as he discusses Americas future at Photo by Sarah Sickles The Blue Strawberry in Cedar Rapids.

PAGE Sarah Sickles

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Health rn Ke s e

am

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Torch investigates drug craze “M

ost people don’t die from smoking marijuana, but peo- you don’t need to take a drug test, smoke regular pot,” they warn. Rumors have been circulating that smoking Zombie can “burn ple are dying from this,” Kennedy police officer Sara holes in your brain” and while there is no proven truth to those Lacina said. Zombie matter or simply “zombie” is a form of synthetic mari- rumors, Zombie can still be very harmful to your body. “It’s injuana that is showing up in the lives of high school students cense; it’s not made for your body to ingest,” Lacina said. “Would around Kennedy. It is described by the official website as “a spe- you go drink a glass of gasoline? No, so why would you put that cial blend of organic herbs and potpourri.” Although it was legal in your body?” The testing process for this drug is very long. last year, the law has now changed and it “As of right now, what we have to do is send it is now illegal for everyone. If one is caught “Would you go drink a [Zombie] off to the lab before we can charge with the substance, it would have the same glass of gasoline? No, so an individual. So we have to go through a lot legal consequences as if you were caught wth why would you put that in of work, for a marijuana charge.” Lacina said. marijuana. “We have drug test kits so I can take a little “It gives you a really intense high,” one your body?” packet and some marijuana and then there are anonymous Kennedy student said, “It makes -Officer Sara Lacina two tubes, kind of like glow sticks and then you you hurt for a couple of days after you try crush them and shake them up and if it turns a it, but when you are doing it, it makes your body feel like it’s moving really fast. I liked the feeling while I was color than it is positive for marijuana. However, then we have to doing it, but it sucked after you were done.” send it off to the state lab and wait for results.” This person used Zombie for a while because it does not appear There have been many injuries and even deaths in the past on a standard drug test, but has now chosen to quit because of the year involving the usage of synthetic marijuana in Iowa. Many of negative side effects, like headaches, that they experienced while these incidents occurred from teen usage. using this drug. Many of the individual’s friends have continued “I know that we can’t test for it, but it still definitely is dangerto use Zombie because they are looking for jobs but tend to have ous,” Lacina said. Amy Brause and Annie Feltes the same reaction to the product as the anonymous student. “If

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The dreary days Health

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he days grow shorter; sunlight disappears from our lives for minutes upon minutes every day. Moods change, depression sets in: it’s Seasonal Affective Disorder. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is often described as episodes of depression that occur at a certain time of the year. SAD can occur at any given time of the year, most commonly known to commence during the winter months. Dr. Jacob Christenson, a local therapist working at Mount Mercy College in Cedar Rapids, estimates about one-third of his patients have been or are currently diagnosed with SAD. “(SAD) occurs, from what I have observed, usually around daylight savings time; in February they tend to come out of it. The daylight lasts longer and the temperatures start to warm up a bit,” Christenson said. Side effects that tend to arise with SAD during the winter months include a specific individual having difficulty waking up in the mornings, isolation from their everyday sources of happiness, oversleeping and overeating which coincides with weight gain, and often suicide. An individual that is diagnosed with SAD in the spring and summer months tends to have side effects that include anxiety, decreased appetite and weight loss, social withdrawal, and sometimes suicide. “When people become depressed, they reduce the activities they find enjoyable. I help them do the things they used to enjoy to bring them back happiness. I find ways to increase amounts of exposure to life,” Christenson said. The most common way to help one come out of their seasonal depression during the winter months is to sit them near a light source for at least 20 minutes a day-- bright light therapy. The exposure to light provides the depressed with a feeling of sunlight which literally helps to brighten their day. If bright light therapy is not an applicable treatment or it is not effectively helping the patient to become less depressed, therapists often focus on figuring out what is meaningful within the life of the depressed individual. Therapists then focus on helping the individual client to identify a close support group that can help them to achieve the goals that are set forth to helping them become a happier, healthier person. Jessica Rowan

When people become depressed, they reduce the activities they find enjoyable. I help them do the things they used to enjoy to bring them back happiness. I find ways to increase amounts of exposure to life.” 22

-Dr. Jacob Christenson

Photo by Rachel Gilman


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The scorching truth T

oo pale, too pasty. Too tangled, streaks and orange residue on their hands not perfectly straight. It helps them to too frizzy, too curly. Let’s take a and feet.” To avoid having orange streaky have more control. look at two wildly popular trends: skin after a spray tan, Worley suggests exUsing a flat iron has a few benefits. It tanning and hair straightening. foliating your skin before you get the tan. helps smooth the condition of your hair, First, tanning. The ultraviolet lights Right after the tan, towel down like after helps avoid tangles, and makes it look from tanning beds have the ability to a shower, from the legs up, to stop the so- shinier. Unfortunately, if you straighten cause premature wrinkles, your hair a lot, you will notice some brown spots, and many negative effects. types of skin cancer. A “It’s a high, excessive amount of lot of people realize this heat,” Renee Ellsworth, stylist at Bella and take advantage of Capelli Salon said. “Cookies bake at a healthier alternative350 degrees, and people straighten spray tanning. their hair at 400 or higher.” Your hair “People spray tan bewill get even more damaged if your flat cause it’s quicker. It’s good iron doesn’t have a thermostat. Thick if you want results that hair can handle heat better than thin day, or the next day,” Lindhair, so if your hair is thin, and you say Worley, Planet Beach don’t turn down the default heat setemployee said. “Spray tanting on your flat iron, you will harm ning has other benefits as your already fragile, thin hair. well. It doesn’t produce One of the best ways to avoid the the harmful UV rays tanharmful effects of blazing hot flat irons ning does, so much less is by using a heat protectant. “Thermal risk is involved.” protectant acts as a barrier between A spray tan at a salon, the heat and the hair. They’re imporlike Planet Beach, costs tant to use on all hair types,” Ellsworth about $25. When you go said. Heat protectants change the flexto get the tan, an employibility of your hair, and some contain a ee asks you to stand in a Scorched to the max. Teenage girls are taking tanning and styling aid, to make styling easier. hair styling to the next level. spray room, a lot like a Also, if you’ve noticed your hair Photo by Annie Feltes tent. The worker airbrushlooking drier than usual, you can es you, with a tanning blame the change in season. “Winter solution. The active ingredient in the so- lution from dripping down. weather dries out your hair, just like your lution is dihydroxyacetone (DHA) which Spray tanning is most popular in the skin,” Ellsworth said. Ellsworth suggests does not harm your skin. Spray tans usu- fall and winter months. People spray tan switching your shampoo as it helps really last five to ten days, depending on before homecoming and Halloween in the store your hair in the winter. your skin type. fall and throughout the winter, especially So if you’re feeling a little white or your Although spray tanning is much health- during the holidays, for holiday parties. hair is looking a bit too curly or frizzy, go ier than tanning in a tanning bed, there Now on to hair straightening. Hair- out and take advantage of the great cosare definitely drawbacks. Many girls have styles come and go like clothing styles, metics offered to girls. But proceed with had orange streaky spray tans near home- and straight hair is the major trend right caution, so you don’t damage your body coming. “You can definitely tell if the tan now. Many people who straighten their or hair. Hannah Botkin was done wrong,” Worley said. “You’ll see hair have hair that is not super curly but

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sports

Missing in action

Photo by Rachel Gilman Focus. During a time out, players (from left) Darius Fuller, sr., Riley Fergus, jr., Derek Jacobus, so., and Joe Coleman, sr., focus on Coach Fontana.

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n November two members of the Kennedy men’s basketball team, Josiah Coleman sr. and Darius Fuller sr., were ruled ineligible for a violation of the good-conduct policy. They had to sit out 10 games spanning form Dec. 2 to Jan. 10. “It’s painful watching our team on the bench, but it is a life lesson,” Coleman, who started on last year’s varsity squad, said. “I’ve been told that I have to learn from it,” Fuller said. Fuller also played a key role for last years varsity squad. “I was very disappointed. I’m always disappointed when someone of high school age gets caught doing things like that,” Bob Fontana, head men’s basketball coach, said, “I think our team has handled it very well. I hope it makes our team stronger.” Despite losing both players

the Cougars have started out at them there is going to be in5-2 this year. They are looking consistencies. Having them up to make it to state this year for with us and playing some, it’s the first time since the 2009 not only helped us in games season. “As always we want to and in practices, but hopefully get to Des Moines,” Larry Wil- it will help us down the road,” Fontana said. liams, assistant “It’s painful watchThe team has coach, said. “All helped we’re looking for ing our team on the also is to make it to bench, but it is a life Coleman and Fuller, by givstate,” Coleman lesson.” ing them adsaid. “There Players have - Josiah Coleman, sr. vice. is a lot of enstepped up to fill co ura gement their void in the lineup. “They have played very to keep my head up and make well. We’re really impressed sure I kill it when I make it with the way that the kids back on the court,” Fuller said. have stepped up,” Williams “The team has been very supsaid. “Our team has done pret- portive,” Coleman said. Coleman and Fuller have ty well,” Fuller added, “They’ve played without us just fine.” been working hard to help the The Cougars had to call up two team during their suspension. sophomores to varsity, Derek “They’ve been working very Jacobs and A.J. Carter, to fill hard in practice. Our problem the roster. “Any time you bring now is getting that to carry up sophomores and take a look over to ball games for 32 min-

utes,” Williams said. “(We) push them every day in practice,” Coleman said. Coleman and Fuller were being recruited at the time and still are despite the suspension. “They’re not really focused on what happened, they’re more focused on how I will recover from it, so I will just have to bounce back and make my team the best they can be.” Coleman said. “The coaches haven’t shied away, they’re still recruiting me as much as they were before.” Fuller said Coleman and Fuller return to action for the first time all year on Jan. 14 against Des Moines North. “(When we return) we’ll click, it’ll just be like sophomore year,” Coleman said. “I’m looking to prove a lot of people wrong,” Fuller said. Ethan Divis

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Weighing in:

A day in the life of a varsity wrestler

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ince 2002-03 the number of wrestlers has grown by over 30,000 in the United States. They endure grueling workouts, the extreme diets and the painful injuries. Wrestling isn’t an easy sport to play. How do they do it? The Torch takes a look into the daily life of a wrestler. Iowa is home to one of the best collegiate wrestling programs in the nation. The University of Iowa wrestling program won a total of 23 national championships. The state of Iowa is considered to be one of the toughest in the nation in terms of wrestling. Wrestling is all about maintaining weight. There are a lot of ways for wrestlers to lose weight, which include working out and dieting. “I don’t eat a lot and I also work out a lot,” Nathan Waterhouse, so, said. “I usually work out two to three hours a day, every day of the week.” Waterhouse also set the record for fastest pin his freshmen year on varsity. “My diet [typical during the season] consists of a protein shake in the morning, a granola bar during period two, another 8 ounce protein shake for lunch, going to practice and then have another shake,” Ryan


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Rodriguez, sr. said. The toll during the season on the health of the wrestlers comes at many costs especially dehydration, starvation as well as many injuries. “You just kind of have to watch what you consume, everything has weight, the more you have the heavier you’ll be and you pretty much just have to sweat it out and be careful.” Wrestling has a large toll and with that can come many injuries. Waterhouse recently suffered a torn menicius, a tendon in the knee, and was out of action for two weeks. For most wrestlers, it’s the sense of accomplishment that they get when they win a match or get done with a grueling workout. “I look for a challenge in life,” Waterhouse said. “It’s definitely the toughest thing I’ve ever done.��� Through much of the suffering that the sport causes it teaches a lot of values and gives pride for the sacrifice. “It really teaches you hard work and dedication and it really helps you become a better person,” Rodriguez said. Throughout the winter wrestlers not only sacrifice

their health for the sport, but often put a lot on the line terms of their lifestyles. “It’s just hard because during the winter you can’t really be a normal person for those three months because you’re always trying to lose weight for the next weigh-in, it really just isn’t a normal life,” Rodriguez said. The long hours, emotional and mental toll on the body often affect the schoolwork of wrestlers and change their lifestyles, especially in terms of health. Regardless of the negative effects wrestlers have to face, over 10,400 schools sponsor high school wrestling programs. The increasing number shows that the hours of dedication and the many sacrifices truly pays off. “The feeling you get when you go out there and face someone exactly equivalent to you and you physically dominate them and they couldn’t do anything better pays off,” Rodriguez said. Ethan Divis & Mohammad Cheetany Pictured above (from left): Sean Knox, fr., Keanan Nosek, sr., Ryan Rodriguez, sr.

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John F. Kennedy High School 4545 Wenig Rd. NE Cedar Rapids, IA 52402

“The torch has been passed to a new generation.” - John F. Kennedy www.twitter.com/KennedyTorch www.facebook.com/KennedyTorch

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Kennedy Torch: January 2012