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Volume 6, No. 5

May 2014

Business Kelso Longview

Connection Chamber of Commerce

Calendar Friday

May 2-June 6 – 7:30 to 9 a.m. Small Business Bootcamp Human Resource Series Lower Columbia College, Heritage Room Six Pack: $100; Individual Sessions: $25 each Register at www.kelsolongviewchamber.org

Wednesday

May 7 – 5:30 p.m. Pillars of Strength: Business and Education Awards Cowlitz Regional Conference Center $35 per person/$280 for a table of eight Register at www.kelsolongviewchamber.org

Thursday

May 8 – 4:30 p.m. Ribbon Cutting Guild Mortgage 1225 Broadway Street, Longview

Friday

May 9 – 4:30 p.m. Ribbon Cutting Kelso Longview Elks Three River Golf Course 2222 S. River Road, Kelso

Tuesday

May 13 – 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Business After Hours Stageworks Northwest $15 advance/$20 at door Register at: www.kelsolongviewchamber.org

Closest to the pin winners can come down to inches during the Chamber Golf Classic.

Golf tournament measures up to hype

Dave Taylor is hesitant to say how long he’s either been participating in, or helping put on, the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce’s Golf Classic, but it’s safe to say it was around the time Richard Nixon was President. “The history of that tournament goes way back. It’s a premiere event here,” said Taylor, who sits on the hard-working Golf Classic committee along with Dr. Clay Bartness, Russ Chittock, Scott Fischer and Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce CEO Bill Marcum. “It’s a lot of fun to play in and network with other

people – fun and fellowship.”

This year’s Golf Classic is set for June 16 at the Longview Country Club. Competition, or play, begins at noon and continues through the day, concluding around 6 p.m. with a barbecue dinner and awards ceremony at the clubhouse. Entry fee, before June 1, is $500 for a team of four, or $125 for an individual. That price includes 18-holes of “fellowship,” lunch, some time, if you need it, at the driving range, entry into a $10,000 putting contest, attendance at the awards

Please see Golf, page 2


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Golf, from page 1

Not Too Late

ceremony, the barbecue dinner, a $10,000 hole-in-one opportunity and two carts per team.

Interested in donating a raffle or auction prize, sign a team up to golf, or sponsor a hole, please call Bill Marcum at 360-423-8400. You can also register your team at www.kelsolongviewchamber.org.

“There use to be a waiting list,” Taylor said. “You have to be quick and get your entry fee in early. It fills up fast.” The committee is planning for 100 golfers, lining up more than 40 sponsors like longstanding Chamber member and Premier Sponsor Stirling Honda. Committee members have also been busy garnering more than 50 raffle prizes donated by Chamber members and finding sponsors for each of the 18 holes. Hole Sponsors provide snacks, products and even chances to win great prizes at their booths.

feet, 5 inches, while Eddy captured that top honor for Hole 7, landing within 13 feet, 11 inches. Taylor said the Longview Country Club provides the perfect backdrop for the day’s event and it’s a great way to have fun and raise money for a great cause. “It is a fundraiser,” he said. “It’s the biggest non-dues revenue event we have.”

Organizers are planning to use a shotgun and four-person scramble format – all play the best shot, each player must have three drives during the round. All teams will be assigned a starting hole with play scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. for all teams.

According to Marcum, funds raised during the tournament are used for several chamber programs and to assist with scholarships.

Prizes will be awarded to the three low net and three low gross teams. Hole-in-one, closest to the pin and long drive will also be awarded. “It gets us re-acquainted with the business people,” Stirling Honda General Sales Manager Jerry Gee said. “I’m a golfer, several of our people are.” Not just any golfers, the Stirling Honda team has won the past two years. Last year’s team of Gee, Gary Martin, Virginia Palmer and Dennis Eddy scored (gross) 61 on their way to first place. Palmer took top honors for closest to the pin on Hole 3 at 22

Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce Team Bill Marcum, CEO Amy Hallock, Bookkeeper Kelso Longview Business Connection is published monthly by the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce. 105 N. Minor Road • Kelso, WA 98626 • 360-423-8400 To advertise, call Bill Marcum, 360-423-8400 or e-mail bmarcum@kelsolongviewchamber.org. Ad Deadline: 20th of each month.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

2013 Chamber Golf Classic

A little luck never hurts before teeing off for big prize money. Below, Twin Star Credit Union reps hoop it up, while Nick Lemiere of Edward Jones invites folks to take a look.

Joe McGraw and Jason Reetz of Pacific Tech Construction fire up for a fierce day of compeition.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Cowlitz Economic Development Council

Relationship with China takes a step forward with agreements By Ted Sprague President – Cowlitz Economic Development Council

enter into a Sister City agreement with the Qishuyan District of Changzhou City, an area which represents about 120,000 people. Gregory said the City of Longview and Quishuyan District agreed to make concerted efforts to promote friendly peopleto-people contacts and economic cooperation and trade. They agreed to actively carry out exchanges and cooperate with each other in the fields of science, business, technology, culture, sports, health and education. “Though Changzhou and the District were drivers in wanting to establish this relationship, I was impressed with the District’s sincerity in wanting to explore potential economic cooperation,” Gregory said. “Our citizens are beginning to recognize the value of global relationship to broaden our understanding of the Chinese people, both their culture and the Chinese impact on our economy. Our City and many of our community leaders understand the need to create a global awareness for our citizens. I think a sister city relationship provides us a direct link and network to a Chinese city and District that shares our exchange interests and that this will provide our local government, businesses, and education system a conduit to further our interests in cultural, educational, and economic diversity. “I felt the trip was very successful from the standpoint of beginning to establishing ties to the City of Changzhou and the Changzhou Technical Institute of Tourism and Commerce,” he said. “I am confident the agreement with CTITC will result in international students attending LCC next fall. These relationships take time to cultivate and I hope we made a great first step in a long term relationship.” In order to continue to advance the economic and cultural future of Cowlitz County, we need to pursue every opportunity to enhance our global reach. Successful missions to other countries and welcoming guests from across the globe are the best way to further our mission of improving lives in all of Cowlitz County.

Building relationships with our colleagues in China took a step forward in April as both Lower Columbia College (LCC) President Chris Bailey and Longview City Manager Bob Gregory signed agreements with their counterparts in Changzhou City. I had the privilege of traveling with Mr. Bailey and Mr. Gregory as well as Margit Brumbaugh, Lisa Matye-Edwards and Anna Davis of LCC to Changzhou, a city of nearly 6 million people located in the Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. We spent six days touring facilities, participating in presentations and meeting with representatives from local government, education and their industrial and manufacturing sectors. Bailey was able to sign an agreement with Changzhou Technical Institute of Tourism and Commerce (CTITC), which could bring up to 30 international students a year to study in Longview. CTITC is a five-year educational institution located in the Jiangsu Province of the City of Changhzhou. The partnership is part of the LCC’s effort to expand its international program, which will both bolster its enrollment and finances, but also expose students to global ideas and cultures. “Growth at the Port of Longview and the Port of Kalama, reflects the globalization of our region’s economy,” Bailey said. “Both the campus and our community will share the benefits of greater cultural understanding and a global perspective on business. We are excited for this excellent opportunity for these institutions, our students and the community.” On the trip, LCC representatives also visited Yellow River Nursing College in Zhengzhou City, Henan Province, and Huaqiao University and Xiamen University in Xiamen City, Fujian Province. Those institutions have also expressed interest in forming partnerships with LCC for student exchanges. In the second half of the trip, Gregory signed a letter of intent to

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Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Experience the magic of the stage at this exclusive Chamber member event! See a sneak preview of two numbers from the musical “9 to 5.� Tour the theatre facility, and enjoy food, beverage and a chance to win many fabulous prizes!

Location: 1433 Commerce Ave.

5:30-7:30 p.m.

Register:www.kelsolongviewchamber.org

$15 advance/$20 at door


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

CEO’s Message

Chamber Golf Classic hooks non-golfers too By Bill Marcum Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce CEO

Check out some of the photos taken last year by C’s Photography on page 3. This could be you having fun this year. To donate a raffle or auction prize, sign a team up for golf, or sponsor a hole, please give me a call at 360-423-8400. You can also register your team at www.kelsolongviewchamber. org.

The Chamber golf tournament will take place Monday, June 16, with more than 100 golfers, nearly 40 sponsors, and more than 50 raffle prizes donated by Chamber members, plus we are hoping for another “Chamber of Commerce Day” similar to last year. Our Premier Sponsor again this year is Stirling Honda and we greatly appreciate their wonderful support. We will have a $10,000 putting contest sponsored by Fibre Federal Credit Union, a $10,000 Hole in One prize on Hole No. 7 along with other hole in one prizes on the other par 3 holes.

Our years of experience add up to Consistent, Courteous & Complete Title & Escrow Services.

There will be 18 hole sponsors set up near the tee box handing out snacks, products and some even giving you a chance to win cool prizes at their booth. Keep this in mind... a large marshmallow does not fly well with a wood. You will not win. This is the major fundraiser for the Chamber each year. Funds raised during this tournament are used for several chamber programs and to assist with scholarships. The Chamber of Commerce plans to award $1,000 scholarships this year to local seniors from Mark Morris, RA Long and Kelso high schools. We also provide a $1,000 scholarship for a local student through the Lower Columbia College Foundation.

Connie Bjornstrom Lindsey McTimmonds

LeeRoy Parcel

The Chamber will use approximately 40 volunteers during the day, led by our Ambassadors who you will see in their red shirts and jackets assisting with registration, lunch, raffle tickets and an assortment of other duties. I can’t think of a better way to raise money than with a group of Chamber friends, enjoying a day on the golf course, a fun dinner, handing out a few trophies and seeing a lot of smiles. So, I invite you to come out and spend the day with fellow floggers and help us raise some funds for education.

Dennis Bird

Alison Peters

Phone: 360.425.2950 Fax: 360.425.8010

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Bonnie Woodruff

Joel Lengyel

1425 Maple St. Longview, WA 98632


2014

Business & Education Awards It is time to honor those in our business and education community who have excelled!

Wednesday, May 7, 2014 Cowlitz Regional Conference Center 5:30-6:15 Dinner Buffet 6:15 Program Begins $35 per person or Table of 8 @ $280 Registration (Deadline May 2nd) Register at: www.kelsolongviewchamber.org


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Local, local, local...it’s all about your local community

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By Chuck Nau Retail Consultant and Sales and Management Trainer Murray & Nau, Inc.

It’s an Investment in Your Community! Shopping and buying in your community is an investment. Your dollars spent locally for goods and services STAY IN YOUR COMMUNITY, helping to build schools, hospitals and fund essential services like police, fire, parks and recreation.

As the economy struggles, your local retailers, service providers and small businesses in the Kelso-Longview area continue to find themselves in an ongoing battle to keep their customers, both old and new, at home, in town, rather than going down the road or online! These local retailers, service providers and small businesses know that LOCAL awareness to ‘who they are’ and ‘what they do’ will grow and enrich their local business, service or small company AND the Kelso-Longview community. That LOCAL awareness, the information and guidance about their business and themselves happens through a LOCAL advertising and marketing investment in their LOCAL media. That LOCAL media provides and creates the information resource and marketplace for your community through LOCAL news and advertising. You kow, as a local business professional, the importance of investing in your LOCAL hometown or community. What about your customers and clients? What about your community’s retailers, service providers, small businesses, and shoppers (and buyers)? Why should you, your associates, your friends and your neighbors shop locally? Good question! Here are five responses and five community benefits to share with your associates, your customers, your vendors and your friends and neighbors about the importance and value of shopping at home...shopping in your local Kelso-Longview community...shopping with your hometown retailers and service providers.

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It Fosters Ecomonic Growth Today and Tomorrow! Shopping dollars spent locally help small businesses, owned and operated by your neighbors and friends, GROW. New businesses, both retail and service providers, start up when encouraged by the local ecomonic vitality. Business growth and new business start ups increase variety offering a broad assortment of goods and services...All COMPETITIVELY PRICED.

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It's Giveback! When you shop and buy locally you’re helping your community's business men and women support a wide range of needed community services and charitable projects...senior centers, local food banks, day care facilities...with time, talent and money.

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It's FUN and It's Personal! Local merchants and service providers know YOUR COMMUNITY, know YOU and are AVAILABLE to meet your day to day needs helping to solve life's little problems. The best advice and the best value...always come from someone you KNOW!

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What Goes Around...Comes Around! Investing in local businesses with your shopping dollars fosters growth in your community...adding additional employment opportunities for your family, friends, neighbors and maybe even YOU! Shopping dollars invested locally stay

Please see Nau, page 9

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Nau, from page 8

Fibre Federal: A Vehicle for Success “Fibre Federal has been our choice for banking since our beginning in 1982. From business and equipment financing to marketing advice, their services have proved

in your community, funding essential services, while possibly REDUCING your tax dollars. Helping the retailers in your community create a public awareness of ‘who they are’ and ‘what they do or sell’ helps your community, your retailer, your business, your family and you GROW. Local advertising and marketing dollars invested in local media best represent your community through a Local Environment of news and advertising, creating an information source and marketplace for your community. © Murray & Nau, Inc. Chuck Nau of Murray & Nau, Inc. is a Seattle area based consultant and sales and management trainer. He is a 25year veteran of advertising, sales, media and management, who knows and understands the everyday challenges of starting up, growing, and surviving in today’s ever changing retail climate. He has spoken to and conducted workshops for a number of local retail and chamber organizations, national publishing groups, national retailers and manufacturers, state press associations, and newspaper groups. Comments and questions are welcome and may be directed to Chuck via e-mail: murnau@nwlink.com or at 425-6030984.

invaluable to our success.” - Les “Spike” Maupin, owner Auto Tech

360.423.8750 1.800.205.7872 www.fibrecu.com

Federally insured by NCUA

Banking made easy

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Lower Columbia College

Lower Columbia Business and Industry Center to grow economy with entrepreneurial solutions By Chris Bailey President – Lower Columbia College Lower Columbia College (LCC) has a broad vision “to be a powerful force for improving lives in our community.” This vision is not viewed only as enhancing the lives of individual students seeking degrees and certificates through our academic programs, but also as a broad statement that reflects our goal to be a major partner in improving the overall economic health of the community. Cowlitz and Wahkiakum counties have long lagged behind state averages in both employment rates and wages. With the development of the Lower Columbia Business and Industry Center, LCC has made a commitment to increase economic prosperity in the region through corporate training programs that serve incumbent workers in our local workforce. This is in addition to college initiatives to: • produce greater numbers of graduates with two-year degrees and certificates, • increase the number of adults with baccalaureate degrees (currently at half of the state average) through creation of a University Center, • connect with our area's international partners through a more robust International Student Program, and • provide additional access to education through rural outreach centers offering a full plate of online learning courses and services. The benefits of the Business and Industry Center Initiative are many. First, it gives both new and incumbent workers the skills necessary to be successful in the workplace, to qualify for promotions and to become economically valuable. Second, it allows companies to close skills gaps that make local businesses and industries more competitive. Third, local access to flexible and timely training will reduce employer training costs. Finally, a local and effective corporate training center provides an ad-

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vantage in recruiting new businesses and industries to the area. The idea is to meet the specific needs of individual businesses and industries based on their requested outcomes – they tell us what they need and we create it for them. LCC then contracts for those services and delivers them when and how the company wants them. The individual business or industry sets the time, place and outcomes through negotiation. This is a contract-based, entrepreneurial approach where we meet the individual demand of employers. The Lower Columbia Business and Industry Center can provide incumbent worker training and professional development in a wide range of skill sets, such as: Workplace Communication • Communication Essentials • Small group communication theory and benefits • Effective small group dynamics and problem-solving • Powerful Business Writing Organizational Culture • Organizational culture and communication • Managing conflict in groups or interpersonal relationships • Motivating yourself and others • Conflict fundamentals Leadership • Skills for New Supervisors • Going from Co-Worker to Supervisor • Talent Management and Succession Planning • Time Management and Delegation

Please see LCC, page 11


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

LCC, from page 10

Longview Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation and a

Technology • Website design, creation and maintenance • GIS / CAD / Solid Works • Adobe Product Suite A concentrated focus on economic development is critical at this time as our community continues to recover from the recession and to bring more diversity to the region’s business and industrial base. The Lower Columbia Business and Industry Center is designed to serve the specific needs of incumbent workers, regional employers and future industry.

committee member with the Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council, Hahli has gained knowledge of the educational needs faced by local business and industry. A graduate of Mark Morris High School, Lower Columbia College and Chaminade University of Honolulu, she understands and values the benefits to her community of a strong regional economy and local opportunities.

Executive Director Hahli Clark

% 20 OFFIDE STOREW

Leading the new Center will be Executive Director Hahli Clark. Hahli is familiar to many area employers in her previous role as Manager of Career Pathways and External Outreach. She has worked with local businesses to support career-related learning Hahli Clark experiences for students and with companycollege partnerships such as High Tech U, the Mount St. Helen’s Institute and Family STEM Night. Through her service leading the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Workforce Development Consortium, serving as the chair of the Kelso-

Take your relaxation seriously. Authorized Lazyboy Dealer

FREE LOCAL DELIVE RY

1413 Commerce Ave. 360-575-9804 www.elamshf.com

Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors Anne O’Connor onthemark associates

Bianca Lemmons Cowlitz County Title Company

Michael Julian Kelso Theater Pub

Chris Bailey Lower Columbia College

Clayton J. Bartness, DC Longview Chiropractic Clinic

Chet Makinster Longview City Council

Jerri Henry, Past President Futcher-Henry CPA Group Joel Hanson, President KLOG/KUKN/The Wave

Dennis Weber Cowlitz County Commissioner Bob Crisman Gallery of Diamonds

Michael Claxton Walstead Mertsching

Ted Sprague Cowlitz Economic Development Council

Lance Welch PeaceHealth

Steve Taylor Kelso City Manager

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Diane Craft, Vice President Koelsch Senior Communities Linda DiLembo Three Rivers Mall Julie Rinard Community Home Health & Hospice Neil Zick, Treasurer Twin City Bank


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Council of Governments

Assistance abounds for local small business community

By Melissa Taylor Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Council of Governments

ects. For more information, contact Tani Gunn at The Lend-

ing Network, 360-749-6960 or e-mail Tgunn@lewisedc.com or

During a recent Vancouver business forum we heard that demand within the Cowlitz County business community for Small Business Administration (SBA) loan products declined 33 percent between 2009 and 2014. With reauthorization for the SBA 504 program pending in Congress, Senator Maria Cantwell hosted a week-long series of field hearings across the state to hear from small business owners about critical issues. Senator Cantwell was appointed chairwoman of the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship in February. Cantwell noted that economic recovery in Southwest Washington has been markedly slower than the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan region. The committee took testimony from Southwest Washington small business owners, lenders and economic development leaders about their challenges and successes in getting loans for local business expansion. Problems highlighted during the session included a lack of information about existing programs, community sourced capital, and “triple bottom line” lenders. Several alternative sources of business capital, financing and technical assistance are available within the Cowlitz region: • Longview Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) offers loans from $10,000 to $100,000 for real estate, buildings, construction/reconstruction, expansion and modernization, equipment, and working capital at below-market interest rates. For more information, contact Dave Campbell, assistant city manager, at 360-442-5004 or david.campbell@ci.longview.wa.us • The Lending Network is a community-based corporation serving Cowlitz, Lewis and south Thurston counties with below market rate term loans of $25,000 to $250,000 that can be used for land, machinery and equipment, working capital and inventory, and infrastructure development. Businesses in Longview may qualify for loans to establish a new business, expand an existing business, create employment opportunities or to retain existing jobs, and for community development proj-

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visit http://www.lewisedc.com/lendingnetwork.html • Craft 3 is a nonprofit community development financial institution with a mission to strengthen economic, ecological and family resilience in Pacific Northwest communities. Craft3 specializes in helping businesses, nonprofits and individuals who cannot get needed financing from traditional sources and provides a wide variety of loans ranging in size from $10,000 to $15 million. Business loans are available for financing commercial real estate, energy efficiency upgrades, start-ups and expansion of businesses needing working capital, acquisitions, inventory, fixtures, equipment and related business property. For more information, call 360-455-4879 or e-mail portfolioadmin@craft3. org • Evergreen Business Capital is the Northwest’s leading SBA 504 Loan Program expert, with more than 30 years in the industry. They partner with lenders to provide loans that allow businesses to purchase commercial real estate and equipment using the SBA 504 loan. The 504 loan offers low down payments and low fixed interest rates for terms of up to 20 years, with no balloon payments and no refinancing. For more information, contact the Portland office at 800-878-6613 or visit http://www. evergreen504.com/ • Small Business Administration (SBA) offers debt financing, surety bonds, and equity financing. For more information, visit: http://www.sba.gov/content/what-sba-offers-help-smallbusinesses-grow • Crowd funding resources are available at many on-line sites, such as Crowdfunder, Seederalla, SoMoLend, CircleUp, Fundable and IndieGoGo.


2014

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FOR TICKETS, CALL OR ORDER FROM OUR WEBSITE 360-703-3195 WWW.COWLITZBLACKBEARS.COM


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Building Bridges

Longview Urology spent the day gunning for business.

Making Connections Red Canoe Credit Union representatives work the showroom April 18 at the Chamber's Building Bridges event. The regional business showcase provided local business leaders the opportunity to connect with other leaders and to create new friendships. The event drew hundreds to the Cowlitz 足足足Regional Conference Center.

More than 60 businesses participated again this year.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

SWWDC

In 2014, Collective Impact is the name of the game By Tim Foley Director of Employment and Training Services Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council The Great Recession taught us that none of us can do it alone. In the nonprofit and social service communities, partnerships are far more common today than they were five or 10 years ago. The accepted method of organizational survival has shifted from competition, to “co-opetition” (cooperating and competing simultaneously), and finally to authentic collaboration that creates a collective impact. The concept of Collective Impact is commonly defined as the commitment of a group of actors from different sectors to a common agenda for solving a complex social problem. Done right, it offers a strengths-based approach to organizational partnerships and results in outcomes that could not be attained by any one partner. According to a study published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, successful collective impact projects tend to share five conditions: 1. A common agenda 2. Mutually-reinforced activities 3. Shared measurement systems 4. Continuous communication 5. A “backbone” organization to coordinate efforts With these things in mind, the Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council (SWWDC) has embarked on an effort to engage local organizations that provide employment services. The objective is to create a collective impact within our community by coordinating and streamlining the process of connecting employers with job candidates who are qualified and ready to work. Our partners in the effort are Lower Columbia College, Longview Goodwill, Wahkiakum Community Center, Vancouver Community Library, Vancouver Housing Authority and WorkSource in Kelso and Vancouver. We want our employers to have great employees and our people to have

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great jobs; this is our common agenda. This can look a number of different ways. If, for example, a resume workshop is being taught at different times by different people at different partner locations, could we have one person teach the class and offer partners the opportunity to connect their customers to the workshop via Skype? This would free up staff time to focus on other things, perhaps things more closely

Please see WorkSource, page 17

Jean Chase Has Joined Our Property Management Team!

She has the “bases covered” for our “home team”. Go Mariners and Black Bears!

Commercial and Residential Management • Qualifying and screening tenants • Collecting and disbursing rents • Ongoing inspections of property • Monthly reports to owners • Order repairs and inspect upon completion

“We treat your property like our own”. 1700 Hudson St., Suite 101 Longview, WA 98632 360-578-9922 jchase@pnwr.com


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Business Toolbox

What are your customers telling you? What questions are you asking them? By Jerry D. Petrick Certified Business Adviser Recently, I was traveling for business and I noticed that I seemed to get surveys and questionnaires constantly – during my trip and subsequently via text and e-mail. I usually don’t bother to respond to surveys from large companies – those impersonal, automated, non-caring invasions of my e-mail, text, or voicemail. I do tend to respond on those rare occasions that a small, local business cares to ask me what I think of my experience at their business. Perhaps I’m rare, (maybe it’s an occupational hazard), I tend to notice what businesses do; I pay more attention to what they don’t do! How many articles, ads, seminars, or workshops about customer service or increasing sales have you come across where the message encourages you to spend time and money to develop elaborate surveys to send to your customers to ‘hear the voice of the customer’? Have you done it? What difference has it made in your business? Increased sales? Do you know…? What does it cost you? There is a very powerful body of research done by the consulting firm, Bain & Company, more than 10 years ago that attempted to find a “simple, practical and actionable indicator of what customers were thinking and feeling about the companies they did business with.” They wanted to develop, “a number that reliably linked these attitudes both to what customers actually did and to the growth of the company. We wanted, in short, to provide a basis for linking improvements in customer loyalty to business outcomes,” according to Bain. Bain, along with their data partner Satmetrix Systems, tested questions with thousands of customers across multiple industries and found that the way customers responded to one

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question consistently predicted behavior. The one question, the ‘Ultimate Question’ is: “How likely is it that you would recommend Company X [or Product X] to a friend or colleague?” Researchers found that the answers to this question consistently predicted: • customer retention • repeat purchases • referrals and other indicators of customer loyalty • profit and passion Just as importantly, this question is quick, respectful, and easy for both customers AND employees. The preferred way to set up your process is to use the common 0 to10 rating scale with the scale where 10 = Extremely Likely and 0 = Not at All Likely to recommend you to a friend. The responses tend to cluster into three groups: • Promoters (9 or 10) – These are your loyal, enthusiastic fans. • Passives (7 or 8) – They are reasonably satisfied but are not nearly as likely to remain loyal or refer their friends. • Detractors (0-6) – Detractors are unhappy customers and account for upwards of 80 percent of negative word-ofmouth. A very simple way to use this input is to calculate (and pay attention to) what Bain calls a ‘Net Promoter Score,’ which is easy to calculate. Calculate the percentage of responders that were Promoters and subtract the percentage of responders that were Detractors: Net Promoter Score = % Promoters - % Detractors This single metric can serve as an easy, powerful customer scorecard for your business. The only follow-up question you need to learn to ask is…’Why?’ Then LISTEN!

Please see Petrick, page 17


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Petrick, from page 16 So, the new and improved way to understand what your customers think goes something like this: “Thank you for doing business with us, how likely is it that you would recommend ABC Company to your friends?” Then…ask the key open-ended question: “Why?” This is easy, inexpensive, respectful and a true gift to and from your customers. I encourage you to step back from your business for a moment and ask yourself how loyal, happy, satisfied etc. are your customers? How do you know? What are you doing to improve your customer loyalty and likelihood to promote your business? If you want to learn more about the Net Promoter system I suggest you read the book: “The Ultimate Question 2.0” by Fred Reichheld. This article was prepared by Jerry Petrick, MBA, CGBP, SPHR,

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PMP and Certified Business Adviser with the Washington State University Small Business Development Center (SBDC) in Longview. Jerry provides no-cost, confidential business advisory services by appointment. He can be reached via e-mail jerry.petrick@wsbdc.org

WorkSource, from page 15 aligned with each partners’ primary mission. The project highlights each partner’s unique strengths, organizational goals and staff expertise. By playing to our strengths we believe we can offer exceptional services while also going further to achieve our individual goals. Rather than each of us doing some version of the same thing, we are making efforts to combine and streamline services. In other words, the project is built on mutually-reinforced activities. A shared measurement system takes time to develop, but the group is committed to this aspect of the project and has begun discussions. Continuous communication includes singular points of contact among partners to address immediate challenges, regular touch points between partner leadership, and quarterly group meetings to discuss progress and make adjustments, if necessary. The SWWDC has assumed the role of backbone organization for several reasons. One, the role fits with our strategic plan mission and goals. Two, we have the staff capacity and expertise to coordinate such a project. And three, as a funding intermediary we are well positioned to attract additional state, federal and foundation grant funds to support this work in the future. Authentic collaboration is difficult work that often crosses sectors, geography, jurisdictions and funding streams. In an era of high need and scarce resources, a collective impact approach is worthy of consideration. It presents an opportunity to maximize every dollar while also enhancing services based on unique partner strengths. While it may be challenging, it’s worth the effort if it gives our community the best we can collectively deliver. Tim Foley is the Director of Employment and Trainings Services at the SWWDC. Reach Tim at 360-567-1076 or tfoley@swwdc. org.


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Kelso

Longview

The beautiful Cowlitz Valley

Realignment end is in sight

By City Councilman

By Mayor David Futcher

Ken Botero

The West Main realignment, often discussed and sometimes misunderstood, is coming to an end over the next month. I think one thing we can all agree on is that it will be nice to get back to normal, even though discovering what that means with a new traffic pattern might take a while.

Today's society is so busy and so full of excitement and I wonder if we may have lost the vision of what it really means to live in a “Quality of Place”. As we take a step back and take a deep look at the beautiful Cowlitz Valley, do we really see the assets that are provided for all citizens and visitors?

While Catlin Street enjoys a new coat of asphalt, the folks on West Main are concerned with the impact that reduced traffic counts may have on their businesses. For the last couple months, representatives have come to the council to see what we can do to help mitigate these possible impacts.

At times I feel that we follow in the thought process of our ancient civilizations and dwell on the negative issues. Why? Explanation has it rumored that negative creates excitement and a way for us to find fault with someone other than ourselves. Remember the old saying, “when you point the accusing finger at someone, notice that three of those finger's are pointing directly at you.”

The immediate request was for the council to expand the program used in the downtown core to loan businesses funds to improve their façade. After reviewing the current program, staff found that it was put in place to help downtown businesses meet design standards that the city put in place to help downtown have a consistent look. Basically, the city said, we want you to look a certain way, and here’s a loan to help you do it.

In our fast paced society today we have several very positive assets. First of all we have a positive watchdog that shows us where we are in need of community support, Pathways 2020. When we see figures that we need to look at our standing in the State of Washington for health concerns, do we blame our community leaders, as the Romans did, or do WE as the citizens of our community find the solutions? We have a positive asset in our Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber works with our local businesses to provide positive opportunities to succeed in the economic agendas of our communities while working with the Association of Business and our legislators as well as local leaders and business professionals. We have the positive asset of having the efforts of our Economic Development Council, Lower Columbia College, the Longview Downtown Partnership, and yes, even your own City Council and County Commissioners, who by the way

The design standards that we helped downtown properties meet came about through an extensive public process. The folks on West Main, on the other hand, are telling us to throw taxpayer money at whatever the owner wants to do to improve their visibility. While it might provide an immediate impact to the business, it might not. Instead of a process that involves public input and discussion, the owners are basically telling us to pay up and trust them. Unfortunately, that’s not what we do in government. Roads change, and traffic patterns will, too. The changes help some, and may hurt others. We sympathize with the affected West Main businesses, but can’t give public funds without making sure it’s best for the public.

Please see Longview, page 19

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Longview, from page 18 were hired by the citizens. I believe that our positives really do outweigh the negatives in the beautiful Cowlitz Valley. As stated in earlier columns I believe our successes are created by you and I, the citizens of Cowlitz County, and I invite you to participate in creating our Quality of Place by putting negative situations in the smaller file folder and opening our folder of positives. When was the last time you attended your community planning commission meeting, commissioners meeting, or a city council meeting? Friends, this is our home, you can make it enjoyable, just participate.

The Sky is the Limit! We started in a garage in April 2007. Twin City Bank has provided us the necessary funding to grow our business into a multi-million dollar company. By early fall Twin City Bank will help us move into our new 15,000 square foot facility with room to continue our growth. Jon Hansen, General Manager Sid Somers and Steve Norby Fabricast Valve

729 Vandercook Way Longview, WA 98632 1-800-319-2265 | 360-414-4101 Creating products to fuel the world

www.knifegates.com

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twincitybank.com


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

PeaceHealth

Choose local for a healthy start By Tori Bernier Manager PeaceHealth St. John Birth Center Business often patterns life and getting off to a great start in life or in business is vitally important for a healthy future. Choosing local services builds a healthy business community and choosing local medical services builds a strong health care environment close to home. When it comes to getting a healthy start, your local birth center at PeaceHealth St. John is one of the best. We’re not just boasting about our baby care, we’ve got the data to back it up. As Greg Wolgamott, MD, PeaceHealth Medical OB/GYN and associate medical director for the hospital shares, “Ideally every expectant family within our community would understand just how good our labor and delivery staff is. There is a fantastic culture of caring amongst the nursing staff that has contributed to the great strides we have made in reaching the top tier of performance measures statewide. In fact our most recent data review suggests that we exceed Washington state expectations in all categories. In several of these categories we are in the top quartile in the state.” This includes rates above the state benchmark for VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean). In addition, the PeaceHealth St. John Birth Center follows Washington State Hospital Association Roadmaps for Safety. You and your family also have access to some of the most advance technology available to you close to home such as telemetry monitor units usually found in much larger hospitals, telemedicine with Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) neonatologist and a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) partnership with PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center to transfer babies under 35 weeks or needing an increased level of care. The birth center’s environment of care was designed first and foremost with mother’s baby in mind with LDRP rooms to encourage labor, delivery, recovery and post partum in the same room. Rooming in of support person and the mother and baby is encouraged for a family experience. The Peace-

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Health St. John Birth Center also gives one-on-one training and guidance in the care of the newborn and family. During labor walking, position changes and creative support during labor are encouraged with the telemetry electronic fetal monitoring to encourage movement during labor. Families also have access to ongoing classes and support such as Preparing for Childbirth with an online option, Infant feeding and Care, Big Sister, Big Brother (for siblings of newborns) and monthly birth center tours are available to families through our YOU 101 wellness program. With progressive, highly skilled, caring professionals, advanced technology and proven quality of care available right in our own community, you and your baby are off to a great start at PeaceHealth St. John. We hope you’ll choose to deliver your baby close to your home and loved ones without the additional time and stress of going out of town for care. Thank you for choosing your local birth center for delivery of care which further supports our entire community.

Facilitating Growth Through Leadership and Action

We are a membership based not-for-profit organization. Join us today! Resources • Access • Partnerships

1452 Hudson St. • US Bank Building Suite 208 • Longview, WA 360.423.9921 www.cowlitzedc.com


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Business After Hours

Kapturing the Moment Attendance for the Chamber's Business After Hours at Longviewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s KapStone Paper and Packaging plant April 8 was amazing, more than 130 people enjoyed exciting tours, incredible food and great prizes. Thank you KapStone for a wonderful event.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Community News

Weyerhaeuser, NORPAC business managers plan briefing for community leaders

CPAs, PS since January 1991, and a former tax specialist with Price Waterhouse.

Local business managers from Weyerhaeuser Company and NORPAC invite you to attend a Spring Community Leader's Briefing from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. May 22 at the Cowlitz Regional Conference Center.

Lower Columbia College Foundation welcomes new board members The Lower Columbia College Foundation welcomes four new board members who bring a wide range of business, financial and professional expertise to assist in its mission. Established in 1976, the mission of the LCC Foundation is to provide financial assistance to students, to encourage public support for the college, and to strengthen the teaching, learning and cultural environment of the college and our community. The Foundation is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors composed of professional, business, and community leaders who are committed to advancing and strengthening the important educational opportunities that Lower Columbia College provides for the region. Joining the Foundation Board are: Rich Gushman, President of Gibbs & Olson, Inc., is a registered professional engineer in Washington with more than 25 years of experience in planning, design and construction management of public infrastructure. The Kelso High School graduate attended LCC for two years and then transferred to Washington State University graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering in 1987. The married father of four joined the LCC Foundation to pursue his interest in helping to “improve our community through increasing educational opportunities.” His community involvement has included serving on the City of Kelso Planning Commission from 1995 through 2010, as a member and board member of Longview Early Edition Rotary Club since February 2013, as a board member of the Cowlitz Economic Development Council since 2012, and on the finance and pastoral councils of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church. Linda Davis brings extensive expertise in finance to the LCC Foundation Board as a shareholder with Davis & Associates

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She graduated from the University of Southern California with a Master of Business Taxation and earned her Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Loma Linda University. She served as a board member and treasurer for United Way of Cowlitz County for 12 years and is a board member and finance committee chair for Columbia Adventist Academy in Battle Ground. Davis and husband Scott, also a CPA/shareholder in Davis & Associates, have two daughters, both in graduate school at WSU Pullman. Debbie Sweet, owner of SweetSpot Frozen Yogurt and president of DCK Wallace, Inc., is a successful entrepreneur with expertise in nearly all facets of business including operations, strategic marketing and event coordination, product development and client relations. Her company designs and develops board games and toys with sales to major retailers. The Longview resident is a board member with the Lower Columbia CAP Foundation and a board member with the Red Hat Thrift Store. Heather Snyder brings more than 20 years of professional experience in marketing and communications to the LCC Foundation Board. Currently a graphics and communications specialist with Fibre Federal Credit Union, she has worked with credit unions in the Lower Columbia region and Spokane as well as managing her own marketing and communications agency serving that industry nationwide. She is a 1991 graduate of Eastern Washington University with a BS in Organizational and Mass Communications and a minor in Technical Writing. Snyder served as an executive committee member with the Lower Columbia CAP Foundation Board. She has also volunteered with Habitat for Humanity, Mt. Solo Middle School and Robert Gray Elementary and with Cowlitz County diversity marches. “Lower Columbia College is an innovative institution, continually growing and changing to better suit the needs of the Lower Columbia region,” Snyder said. “LCC and Fibre Federal have a history of partnering with one another, and I am excited to take that partnership to the next level.”


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Ribbon Cuttings

Fixin' for Greatness Chamber Ambassadors helped Cole's Applicance Repair with its ribbon cutting April 4 at their new location at 4545 Ocean Beach Highway, Longview.

Moving In Reality Homes joined Chamber Ambassadors April 11 for their ribbon cutting and open house at 1905 Belmont Loop, Woodland.

Happy Anniversary Columbia River Carpet One in Rainier, Ore., celebrated more than 48 years in business with a Chamber ribbon cutting April 29.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Ambassador of the Month

Fierst earns Chamber honor for second straight month Pam Fierst has been named the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors of the Month for April. This is the second consecutive month, Fierst, a sales manager with the Kelso Red Lion Hotel, has received the honor. April's selection came down to the last day of the month. April Chamber Ambassadors, known as The Red Coats, are an integral part of the Chamber of ComPam Fierst merce. The Ambassador team is made up of active Chamber volunteers whose responsibilities Red Lion Hotel Kelso include meeting and greeting at Chamber events, welcoming new members and assisting at ribbon cuttings and community events. Ambassadors juggle busy professional careers while making time to assist the Chamber at a variety of events year long. If you would be interested in wearing a red coat and representing the Chamber, contact CEO Bill Marcum at the Chamber office.

2014 Small Business

BOOT CAMP 2014 Series begins Friday, March 7 Friday Mornings ★ Lower Columbia College

7:30 am - 9 am ★ Heritage Room at LCC - Admin. Bldg. Human Resources Six PaCk

Human Resources Six PaCk

Hiring the Right Person - Does the person fit the job? Company? Facilitator: Darci Hoffman, WorkSource May 9 Employee Handbook - Important? You Bet! Facilitator: Don Schilling, HR Director, Weyerhaeuser May 16 Most Common HR Mistakes - They could cost you money. Facilitator: Gary Parafinczuk, Sr. Director, Human Resources, Kapstone May 23 The New Marijuana Law - How to protect your business/ employees Facilitator: TBA May 30 Attract and Keep your best Employees - What the experts say. Facilitator: TBA June 6 Firing in an At Will State - Risks and Rewards. Facilitators: Lisa Straughan and Kari White, Express Employment Professionals

Marketing and Sales Six Pack

Starts May 2

May 2

Starts September 5

Now this is Truth in Advertising ‘Tools you can use to help you immediately’. The Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce hit the nail on the head with their most recent Business Boot Camp. As an administrator and business owner with over 25 years leadership experience, I walked away every week with new tools, inspiration, motivation and a desire to strive to improve my business by leaps and bounds. The courses were well planned, the content was interesting, relevant, informative, inspiring,, thought provoking and challenging. I can not say that I have ever spent so little and received so much. I can not wait until the next series. The best investment in my business I have ever made. Barbara A. Sudar • Administrator Longview Urology Owner/Partner: Estetica Day Spa

Pricing same as 2013! $

100 Members

360-423-8400 24

★ $160 Non-Members

www.kelsolongviewchamber.org


Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

New Chamber & Visitor Center

New Home It was an overflow crowd for the ribbon cutting ceremony and open house at the Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center's new location at 105 N. Minor Rd., in Kelso. Above, Kelso Mayor David Futcher took care of the ribbon cutting honors at the April 30 event, while, at left, Marlene Johanson and Julie Rinard bumped into Big Foot while exploring the spacious new office space. Below, the Red Coats turned out in full force to show their Chamber support.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

May 2014

Welcome New Members

Chamber membership has its privileges Celebrate new Chamber members with us *

Business Association with opportunities to promote trade through Chamber socials, special events and committee participation.

• Annual Meeting and Banquet • Networking Events • Committee Participation • Business Contacts • Quarterly Membership Meetings • Civic Representation • Monthly Business After Hours

Business Services include marketing for your business, referrals and access to Chamber publications and research data. • Mailing Labels • Membership Window Decals • Member Referrals • Ribbon Cutting • Web Site Links • Member to Member Discounts • Membership Directory • Tax Deduction

Lexi’s Pizza Pub * Quality Signs & Design * Hickory Hogs BBQ * U.S. Army Recruiting Center * McDonald’s (Ocean Beach Highway) * McDonald’s (38th Avenue)

Packages

• Newsletter • Business Card Display • Use of Chamber Logo

Basic Membership Package – $275 or $26 per month. Bronze Membership Package – $500 or $46.66 per month. Silver Membership Package – $1,000 or $86.33 per month. Gold Membership Package – $2,500 or $211.33 per month. Platinum Membership Package – $5,000 or $416.66 per month. Diamond Club Membership Package – $10,000 or $834 per month.

Representation through action committees, Candidate Forums and up-todate Action Alerts. • Legislative Representation • Issues Tracking and Information • Task Forces • Candidate Forums • Legislative Update Breakfast • Demographics Publication

Join today! Call 360-423-8400 Trusted.

Spring into action with us! On Saturday, June 14th, from 10am to 2pm join Express as we volunteer to help fight hunger with a food drive at local Walmart stores in support of the BackPack Buddy program—or drop off food items at our office before then. Thank you!

Whether you need title, escrow or property search information, come in for our exceptional service. Leave with the confidence that your real estate investment is properly insured and protected. Bianca Lemmons Vice President/Manager

1159 14th Avenue, Longview, WA 98632 Phone: 360.423.5330 ■ www.cowlitztitle.com

360.414.1200 • www.expresslongview.com Chamber May 2014

Since 1982, Cowlitz County Title has been the company the community turns to when buying, selling or refinancing a property.

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Klc may2014  

May 2014 Newsletter of the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce

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