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Volume 5, No. 6

June 2013

Business

Connection

Kelso Longview

Chamber of Commerce

Strong showing and support for 2013 Chamber award winners

N

o one at the Pillars of Strength: Business and Education Awards was more surprised to see Cindy Wardlow receive the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce’s Lifetime Achievement Award than Cindy Wardlow. “I’ve always been the one to nominate,” said the Kelso High School Career and Technical Education Coordinator, who is part of the awards committee. “It was quite a surprise. They totally kept it from me.” She said the award currently has at the school, but will relocate to her fireplace mantel when she retires in June.

Business Person Diana Loback, last year’s 3 award to of the Year, hands the 201 Marlene Johanson.

Wednesday

June 5 – 4 p.m. Ribbon Cutting Chase Bank 600 Triangle Center

The Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce handed out 13 awards to local businesses, educators and individuals and awarded $7,000 in

scholarships at its annual Pillars of Strength: Business and Education Awards May 15th at the Cowlitz Regional Conference Center. Before a packed house of 265 attendees, the ceremony recognized and celebrated those Kelso High’s Cindy Wardlow w as the 2013 Lifetime Achieve in business and ment Award W inner. education that have excelled this year. Wardlow was not the only one surprised to be a winner. Heritage Bank Branch Manager Marlene Johanson was named Business Person of the Year.

Please see Awards, page 2 Photos courtesy C’s Photography

Calendar Tuesday

June 11 – 5:30-7:30 p.m. Business After Hours Columbia Bank 1225 Washington Way

Monday

June 10 – 7 a.m. Legislative Briefing Breakfast Millennium Bulk Terminals

Register for events at www.kelsolongviewchamber.org

Monday

June 17 – 1 p.m. Tee Off Chamber Golf Classic Longview Country Club 41 Country Club Drive

Thursday

June 20 – 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. State of the Counties Quarterly Luncheon Cowlitz Regional Conference Center 1900 7th Avenue $25 in advance/$35 at door


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Awards, from page 1 “I was a little shocked to say the least,” Johanson said. “I do a lot of things, but so do a lot of people. When they announced I had won I was just floored. They had so many nominees. I knew in my mind who I wanted to win. I was floored. I was floored. “I don’t like to be recognized. I like to do what I do and keep going, but I do appreciate the award.” In addition Wardlow and Johanson, the Chamber celebrated all of its Business and Crystal Apple Education nominees and recipients of the year. The 2013 Pillars of Strength Business and Education Winners are:

Hahli Parvey gave Jay Opgrande Administrator of the Year honors.

Business Person of the Year: Marlene Johanson (Heritage Bank) Large Business of the Year: Fibre Federal Credit Union

Carrie Medack was an Ambassador of the Year

Small Business of the Year: Copies Today Speedy Litho Non-Profit Business of the Year: Lower Columbia CAP Administrator of the Year: Jay Opgrande (Columbia Heights Elementary) Teacher of the Year: Sean Scattergood (Beacon Hill Elementary) Higher Education Teacher of the Year: Dawn Draus (LCC) Support/Classified Role of the Year: Renee Carney (LCC) Workforce Education Best Practice: Red Canoe Credit Union Workforce Education Individual Achievement: Lynell Amundson (LCC)

Fibre Federal’s Angie Rising Star Award: Jason Meunier (Twin City Bank) Leppert accepted Large Business of the Year honors “Walt Naze” Ambassadors of the Year: Carrie Medack (Prime Lending) & Jeni Quiriconi (Heartsong Massage) from Dave Spaulding.

Keith Larson presented LCC’s Renee Carney with a Crystal Apple for Support/ Classified Role of the Year.

Lifetime Achievement Award: Cindy Wardlow (Kelso High School) “We congratulate all of the 2013 nominees, winners and scholarship recipients for your wonderful achievements and contributions to our community,” said Brooke Fisher, Chamber project manager.

Pat Palmer picked up Small Business of the Year for Copies Today Speedy Litho.

Also at the Pillars of Strength ceremony, the Chamber’s Education Foundation Committee and Lower Columbia Professionals Committee awarded scholarships to selected graduating seniors. The Education Foundation Committee awarded four Maria Harris Scholarships worth $1,000 each. The recipients were: Abbie Hanson, R.A. Long High School, Colleen Reynolds, Kelso High School, Selena Zepeda, R.A. Long High School, and Hailey Colwell, Mark Morris High School.

Please see Awards, page 3 Photos courtesy C’s Photography 2

Nick Lemiere shakes hands with Twin City’s Jason Meunier, 2013 Rising Star.


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Awards, from page 2

for attending LCP monthly events where all proceeds go toward the LCP Scholarship fund,” Fisher said.

The Chamber’s Lower Columbia Professionals Committee awarded three seniors with $1,000 scholarships as well. Recipients of this year’s LCP scholarships were: Sofie Shulda, Mark Morris High School, Kennedy White, Kelso High School, and Mackenzie Hastings, Mark Morris High School. On the night, the Chamber awarded $7,000 in total scholarships. “The Chamber would like to thank its members for voluntary contributions to the Education Foundation scholarship fund, and

The Chamber awarded Hailey Colwell, Colleen Reynolds, Abbie Hanson and Selena Zepeda with scholarships. Photos courtesy C’s Photography

MacKenzie Hastings, Sofie Shulda and Kennedy White earned Lower Columbia Professional Scholarships. Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce Team Bill Marcum, CEO Amy Hallock, Bookkeeper Brooke Fisher, Project Manager Kelso Longview Business Connection is published monthly by the Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce. 1563 Olympia Way • Longview, WA 98632 • 360-423-8400 To advertise, call Brooke Fisher, 360-423-8400 ext. 16 or email bfisher@kelsolongviewchamber.org. Ad Deadline: 20th of each month.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Port of Longview State’s Third Largest Port Operating revenue tips $33 million in 5th record year

The Port of Longview has announced its 2012 year-end results showing continued momentum – posting a new record for operating revenue for the fifth year in a row. The strong year elevates the Port to the third largest port in Washington State by operating revenue only behind the Ports of Tacoma and Seattle, and now leading the Port of Vancouver, Wash.

climb at the Port since 2008 despite global economic pressures that have slowed growth in most business sectors. Operating expenses meanwhile were held very low, slightly rising from $25.6 million in 2011 to $25.8 million in 2012. Total tonnage at the Port grew exponentially from 2.2 million to 6.3 million metric tons, growth largely contributed to by the Port’s new export grain facility EGT, LLC.

The annual report was presented to the Port’s commissioners and revealed a significant increase of nearly 20 percent in operating income over 2011, which was also a record year. The numbers showed continued strength in the Port’s diversified portfolio, with bulk grains and agricultural products, calcined petroleum coke, logs, steel and wind energy cargo helping drive more business through the Port’s facilities, and more jobs in the region.

“Our diversification has been key to our sustained success,” Kalhagen added. “It’s a testament to Longview’s strong staff and local labor force that have made us a leader in cargo handling here in the Northwest.” About the Port of Longview The Port of Longview is the first full-service operating port with strategic transportation connections on the deep-draft Columbia River shipping channel in southwest Washington State. The Port is located just 66 river miles from the Pacific Ocean, 120 driving miles from Seattle, Washington, and 40 driving miles from Portland, Ore. Port facilities include eight marine terminals and waterfront industrial property with direct connections to main-line rail and interstate highway systems. Cargo handling specialties include all types of bulk cargos and breakbulk commodities such as steel, lumber, logs, pulp, paper, project and heavy-lift cargo. For more information, visit www. portoflongview.com.

“We’re very proud of what we accomplished with the help of our customers and strategic partners in 2012,” said Geir-Eilif Kalhagen, Chief Executive Officer for the Port of Longview. “We’ve worked hard to mitigate our risks during the recent global economic downturn and as we see the broader shipping markets coming back to life, we’re positioning ourselves to capitalize on the new opportunities we see on the horizon.” In 2012, the Port’s operating income rose to $33.8 million from 2011’s $28.3 million. Operating revenue has been on a steady

Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors Anne O’Connor onthemark associates

Bianca Lemmons Cowlitz County Title Co.

Michael Julian Kelso Theater Pub

Chris Bailey Lower Columbia College

Clayton J. Bartness, DC Longview Chiropractic Clinic

Chet Makinster Longview City Council

Frank V. McShane, Past President Cascade Networks, Inc. Jerri Henry, President Futcher-Henry CPA Group

Dennis Weber Cowlitz County Commissioner Joel Hanson, President Elect KLOG/KUKN/The Wave

Michael Claxton Walstead Mertsching

Ted Sprague Cowlitz Economic Development Council

Sarah Cave PeaceHealth

Steve Taylor Kelso City Manager

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Diane Craft, Vice President Koelsch Senior Communities Linda DiLembo Three Rivers Mall Julie Rinard Community Home Health & Hospice Neil Zick, Treasurer Twin City Bank


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Mount St. Helens’ stunning vistas and activities creating new memories By Lisa Romano Community Engagement Specialist Forest Service

a free concert series last summer at the Johnston Ridge Observatory, the Monument’s most visited attraction. With the new outdoor amphitheater as the venue, bands played evening concerts with the Mount Margaret peaks to their left, the Toutle River Valley to their right, and the gaping crater as their backdrop. The most stunning music venue in the northwest!

Although Mount St. Helens has a way of making herself known, to many people in Southwest Washington she remains a bit of an unknown.

Prior to a major eruption in 1980, Mount St. Helens was a popular recreation area for The partnership with the neighboring communities. Families in the area, espe- The Music on the Mountain concert series returns to Mount CEDC made the Music on the Mountain series a huge cially from Cowlitz County, St. Helens this summer. success. Through their local vacationed along the shores of Spirit Lake, others fished up in the High Lakes, and hardy business connections they were able to secure several sponsouls climbed the lush mountain. In 1980, however, the land- sorships to cover the costs of the bands and sound equipscape was dramatically altered. What was once a green para- ment. And their involvement in planning the series gave it dise seemed in a flash to become desert. While a fascinat- an element of credibility in Cowlitz County that the concerts ing landscape, many felt it was simply a sad reminder of the weren’t simply for the day’s visitors to the mountain, but were people and places they lost, and it dropped off their radars. meant for local families to enjoy as well. The amphitheater Thirty-three years later and the landscape is again changing verged on standing-room-only at each of the three concerts, dramatically. Wildlife is thriving, alders and willows flour- and dancing was not unheard of. ish, and in spring it glows violet with blooming lupines. Recreational opportunities abound, from mountain biking and hiking to climbing and fishing. The Forest Service has been making an effort to reintroduce and reconnect local communities with this beauty in their backyard, while helping raise its profile as a tourist destination. In 2012, the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument entered into a partnership with the Cowlitz Economic Development Council to help meet these goals.

The Monument and CEDC received lots of praise for the inaugural Music on the Mountain series, from the bands, local families, tourism advocates, and the media. Plans are in the works for another series for summer 2013, with expanded volunteer support (thanks to CEDC recruitment efforts) and the addition of food and drink options so families can make a night of it. Though untraditional, this partnership between the Forest Service and CEDC has quickly advanced our mutual goals of connecting communities with this special place while advancing economic development efforts. And watching families enjoy the music, only sweetened by the view, it was not hard not to think that new memories may be taking the place of some of the old, and that maybe Mount St. Helens is worth getting to know.

The CEDC now works closely with Monument staff to find creative ways to connect the community with the mountain. Thinking that it was time to help families build new positive memories of Mount St. Helens, the CEDC and the Monument, along with the Mount St. Helens Institute, launched

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Monday, June 17th Longview Country Club

Shotgun 1pm

$600 per 4 person team $150 individual.

Make your reservations NOW!

Entry Fee $600 per team of 4 or $150 individual. Includes: Lunch, driving range, $5,000 putting contest, awards ceremony, BBQ dinner, 18 holes of fellowship $10,000 hole-in-one opportunity and two carts per team. We do not need your teams players today. We will give you a call to secure the people playing on your team.

Register your Team at

kelsolongviewchamber.org


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Veterans bring leadership and skills to workplace By Darcy Hoffman Southwest Business Liaison WorkSource As Memorial Day recently passed, we thought it would be a great time to highlight veterans, what they have to offer employers, and the benefits that come with hiring a veteran.

successful and they easily understand their place within an organizational framework. 7. Hands on experience with technology and globalization. Today’s military uses cutting-edge technology, from communications technology to the security of computer networks and hardware.

First let’s look at some statistics. Did you know that as of 2011, 10,804 veterans lived in Cowlitz County and a total of 601,507 statewide? Veterans account for 10 percent of the Cowlitz County population. For veterans age 18 to 24, the 2012 unemployment rate was 20.4 percent; that’s more than 5 percent higher than nonveterans in the same age group nationally.

8. Strong personal integrity. Military training demands that individuals not only abide by a strong Code of Ethics, but that they live it each and every day

Now here are the top 10 reasons to hire veterans and wounded warriors:

9. Strong sense of health, safety and property standards. Service Members are aware of health and safety protocols both for themselves and the welfare of others.

1. Ability to learn new skills and concepts. While in the military, Service Members undergo rigorous training programs to become experts in a wide-range of skills and concepts that can easily be transferred to a civilian work environment.

10. Triumph over adversity. In addition to dealing positively with the typical issues of personal maturity, Service Members have frequently triumphed over great adversity.

2. Strong leadership qualities. The military trains Service Members to lead by example as well as through direction, delegation, motivation and inspiration in some of the toughest situations imaginable.

When employing a veteran you are hiring an individual who will be an asset to your organization… and did you know there are also financial incentives? The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is available for hiring targeted groups that include veterans who have faced barriers to employment. The VOW to Hire Heroes Act of 2011 expanded the tax credit for hiring certain qualified veterans, up to $9,600. There is also the possibility of up to $5,000 in On-the-Job Training funds for new hire veterans that qualify. Training is provided by you, the employer, and allows you to train your new hire to your standards of a qualified employee. WorkSource will reimburse half of the new hire’s gross wages for up to six months (not to exceed $5,000).

3. Flexibility to work strongly in teams or work independently. Military training teaches Service Members to work as a team by instilling a sense of a responsibility to one’s colleagues. 4. Diversity and strong interpersonal skills. Service Members have learned to work side by side with individuals regardless of race, gender, religion, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds, economic status, and geographic origins as well as mental, physical and attitudinal capabilities.

The following are examples of just three outstanding veterans that are ready to go to work today:

5. Ability to work efficiently and diligently in a fast-paced environment. Service Members have developed the capacity and time-management skills needed to know how to accomplish tasks correctly and on time, in spite of limited resources and immense pressure.

Auto Mechanic: Navy veteran who recently graduated with his AS degree in Auto Technology (six times Dean’s List); completed all testing for ASE certifications; versed in brakes, electrical, engine rebuilds, basic welding; steering/alignments; has current

6. Respect for procedures and accountability. Service Members know how policies and procedures enable an organization to be

Please see WorkSource, page 11 7


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

What are Washington voters saying about STEM? By Mary Brown Director of Strategic Initiatives Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council

have more opportunities if they have strong STEM skills. • 83 percent agree an increased focus on STEM education will improve the state’s economy. • 79 percent agree more companies will move to or expand to Washington if the state had a reputation for workers with great science and math skills. • 78 percent agree STEM skills are in increasing demand in Washington’s economy. • 42 percent think the quality of STEM education in Washington is high. • 56 percent think Washington colleges and universities are doing a good job of preparing students for careers in STEM fields. • 77 percent agree computer science should count as a math or science credit rather than an elective course. • 80 percent support Common Core State Standards. • 68 percent support adopting Next Generation Science Standards. The statewide survey of 600 Washington state voters was conducted by Strategies 360 from Jan. 24-31; it has a margin of error of four percent.

What are Washington voters saying about STEM? More than 90 percent of Washington voters think students will have more opportunities if they have strong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) skills, while nearly 70 percent of Washington voters think schools expect too little of students in these areas, according to a new poll. The survey found an almost universal perception that STEM skills enhance opportunity and economic vitality. The poll also offers a call to action to families, businesses, schools, and policymakers to help prepare and inspire every student in STEM. “Washingtonians want their kids to learn the science, technology, engineering, and math skills that will prepare them for the jobs of the future,” said Patrick D’Amelio, chief executive officer of Washington STEM. “They know that STEM education supports and drives our economy.” Poll respondents also strongly supported the new Common Core State Standards and the upcoming Next Generation Science Standards. The Common Core, developed by 46 states, are standards that provide a deeper understanding of key concepts in math and English-language arts and require practical, reallife application of knowledge that prepares students for success in work and life. The Next Generation Science Standards are similar but focused on science. Gov. Jay Inslee has embraced improving STEM education as a part of his plan to create jobs in Washington state, which ranks first in the country in the concentration of STEM jobs but lacks the homegrown candidates to fill many of those positions. An estimated 30,000 STEM jobs will go unfilled in the next five years due to a lack of qualified candidates. Bipartisan leaders in the state legislature, led by Rep. Marcie Maxwell and Sen. Steve Litzow, have rallied around the governor’s call to action. (The accompanying bills are SB5755 and HB1872.) Key findings from the statewide survey include: • 92 percent agree the next generation of Washingtonians will

Washington STEM; February, 2013

STEM Fest: “A community event designed to help students explore their passion, pursue their vision and determine their own success.” In September, the Southwest Washington Workforce Development Council (SWWDC) will host the area’s first annual science, technology, engineering and mathematical festival. STEM Fest connects K-12 youth directly to the local STEM industry through fun-filled, career exploration activities hosted by local businesses. Students, their parents, and teachers will be invited to travel to local companies to participate in one- to two-hour

Please see STEM, page 11

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Business Toolbox

Which customers are promoting your business? How do you know? By Jerry D. Petrick Certified Business Adviser Washington Small Business Development Center Seems like social media is on virtually every business owner’s mind and most marketing strategies incorporate some form of social media campaign which requires the business collect and use customer contact information. One aspect of these campaigns that is underutilized and not emphasized is gathering data about who your customers are and how they feel about your business. To the degree that businesses survey their customers they commonly ask too many questions – reducing the response rate – and/or the questions asked don’t really enable the business to follow up or take action in any meaningful way. I don’t know about you, but I seem to get surveys and questionnaires coming across my voice mail or email constantly. I usually don’t bother to respond to those from large companies – those impersonal, automated, non-caring invasions of my email or voice mail. I do tend to respond on those rare occasions that a small, local business cares to ask me what I think of my experience at their business. I may be rare, however, I tend to notice not only what businesses do; I pay more attention to what they don’t do! How many seminars or workshops about customer service or sales and marketing have you attended where the presenter encourages you to spend time and money to develop elaborate surveys to send to your customers to ‘hear the voice of the customer’? Have you done it? What difference has it made in your business? Increased sales? (As Dr. Phil would ask – ‘how’s that working for you?’) So what do you do to grow sales and profits? There is a very powerful body of research done by Bain & Company more than 10 years ago that attempted to find a “simple, practical and actionable indicator of what customers were thinking and feeling about the companies they did business with.” They wanted to develop, “a number that reliably linked these attitudes both to what customers actually did and to the growth of the company. We wanted, in short, to provide a basis for linking improvements in customer loyalty to business outcomes,” according to Bain. Bain, along with their data partner Satmetrix Systems, tested

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questions with thousands of customers across multiple industries and found that the way customers responded to one question consistently predicted behavior. The one question, the ‘Ultimate Question’ is: “How likely is it that you would recommend Company X [or Product X] to a friend or colleague?” Researchers found that the answers to just this ONE question consistently predicted: customer retention, repeat purchases, referrals and other indicators of customer loyalty, profit and passion. Just as importantly, this question is quick, respectful, and easy for both customers AND businesses. Okay, so how do you implement this strategy? The preferred way to set up your process is to use the common 0-10 rating scale where 10 = Extremely Likely and, 0 = Not at All Likely to recommend you to a friend or family member. The responses tend to cluster into three groups Promoters (9 or 10) – These are your loyal, enthusiastic fans. Passives (7 or 8) – They are reasonably satisfied but are not nearly as likely to remain loyal or refer their friends. Detractors (0-6) – Detractors are unhappy customers and account for upwards of 80 percent of negative word-of-mouth. A very simple way to use this input is to calculate (and pay attention to) what Bain calls a ‘Net Promoter Score (NPS)’, which is easy to calculate. The most successful businesses using this technique measure and share their NPS with all team members and even tie performance incentives to the NPS. Calculate the percentage of responders that were Promoters and subtract the percentage of responders that were Detractors: Net Promoter Score (NPS) = % Promoters - % Detractors This single metric can serve as an easy, powerful customer scorecard for your business. The only follow-up question you need to learn to ask is…’Why?’ Then LISTEN!!! No matter how

Please see Petrick, page 13


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

WorkSource, from page 7

STEM, from page 8

CDL-A.

activities including tours, contests, experiments, excursions, and talks to raise their interest level in and knowledge of the local STEM industry. Businesses will be able to choose the age group of the students they’d like to attend (elementary school, middle school, and high school), the number of participants, the day of their activity (Sept. 20, 21, and 22), the time slot, and type of activity.

Forklift Driver: Army veteran with more than 20 years of forklift experience in an industrial environment and an exceptional employment history; certified on CPR, OSHA, fire watch and first aid. Warehouse Specialist: Air Force veteran who managed 20 associates for shipping, receiving, delivery, offload and product assembly at a major home products retailer; oversaw four departments with an annual income of $21 million.

If you are interested in hosting an activity or just participating in the event, please visit the STEM Fest website at http://stem-fest.com or contact Mary Brown at mbrown@ swwdc.org.

If you are interested in hiring one of the three veterans featured here, or if you would like to find a veteran that meets your needs, contact WorkSource and we can help you put one of our country’s finest to work! Contact Marc Ogata or Donna Hughes at 360-578-4219. To get connected to a Business Services Consultant whose expertise lies in your industry, contact Darcy Hoffman, Business Services Manager at 360-735-5038 or dhoffman@esd.wa.gov.

Do you have Summer Jobs for College Students or New Graduates? We can help you easily fill those

positions! Call today. 360.414.1200 • www.expresslongview.com 11

Chamber JUNE 2013


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Petrick, from page 10

gram – knowing who is likely to promote your business to others you can take advantage of their influence over others to grow your business at virtually no cost. It’s kinda like knowing who is likely to vote for you and encouraging their friends to vote. We all have limited resources; why not use these simple tools to: improve your customer experience AND increase sales? Let’s work together on you strategies to grow your business sales and profit. This article was compiled by Jerry D. Petrick, Certified Business Adviser, MBA, SPHR, PMP Director of the WSU Small Business Development Center in Longview. Jerry Petrick can be contacted ETSvia TICK R email at jerry.petrick@wsbdc.org. O F r

busy your business is or what your product or service is YOU CAN DO THIS! So, the new and improved way to understand what your customers think and feel about your business goes something like this: “Thank you for doing business with us, how likely is it that you would recommend ABC Company to your friends?” Then…ask the key open-ended question: “Why?” This is easy, inexpensive, respectful and a true gift to and from your customers. I encourage you to step back from your business for a moment and ask yourself how loyal, happy, satisfied etc. are your customers? How do you know? What are you doing to improve your customer loyalty and likelihood to promote your business? If you want to learn more about the Net Promoter system I suggest you read the book: “The Ultimate Question 2.0” by Fred Reichheld. Once you have identified who your Net Promoters are you can implement (effectively and efficiently) your customer loyalty pro-

FAMILY FUN!

2013

Lo CAL FROM TUNE IN every Wednesday ER E ORD EBSIT W Your Chamber Connection OUR KEDO AM 1400 – 3 to 4 p.m. Contact the Chamber to HOME 1 schedule YOUR 10-minute GAMES business spotlight 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Don’t tell, instead coach and A-S-K!

By Chuck Nau Retail Consultant and Sales and Management Trainer Murray & Nau, Inc.

tening), probing (asking), and feedback. Preliminaries are typically icebreaker in nature and help to put individuals at ease. They also open the conversation to a give and take by identifying the reason or goal for the meeting. Probing or Always Seeking Knowledge (Asking) works to narrow the focus, review the situation, identify the problem and its potential impacts, elicits your employee’s or staff ’s input and ideas, and encourages your employee or staff to develop and review various solutions. Feedback helps to clarify new learning, develop and gain consensus on needed action steps, and reinforce your confidence and support of the plan. The need and benefits for coaching on a one on one basis are numerous. Coaching the individual calls for personal contact. On a daily basis, with all the demands on your time, personal contact with your staff can suffer. It’s important to remember that your personal contact with your staff members is vital to them. Personal contact conveys a sense of importance, and with the personal contact comes a sense of identity (“congratulations on your service call to...”), which in turn is an entree for positive reinforcement and individual motivation. Coaching affords YOU the opportunity to LISTEN, and foster an atmosphere of open communication. Your people are not the only ones to benefit from coaching (listening). You also get the benefit of free information, which, again, has the added benefit of building your sales, management or operations team. Coaching gives your people a regular barometer on their progress, and in some cases, may break their job into various components for reflection, review, revision, and growth. Failure demoralizes an individual and threatens your team and YOU. Coaching enables you to offer direction and guidance and the opportunity to model behavior that BUILDS on successes rather than learning from MISTAKES. Most importantly, it gives emotional support and reinforces

“How Am I Doing?” Remember those moments earlier in your life when you may have asked that question or a similar one of a teacher, friend, or confidant? In many instances, those questions were being asked to open a dialogue, and gather some outside information to confirm that your assessment of your current situation was accurate. In these challenging, tough and, at times, frightening economic times are you being asked these same questions today by your staff or an employee? Then again, do you model and encourage your staff to ASK (Always Seeking Knowledge) you questions? How are they doing, coach? “Coaching” or conversations with your staff are important, particularly in these rapidly changing times, as you develop a concept of team and teamwork. Fostering an “asking” rather than “telling” environment will give support and encouragement to your team. “Coaching” is not talking to your employees or staff. Rather it is a two-way dialogue or discussion looking at performance, identifying performance obstacles or problems, and developing solutions and action steps. Coaching helps to clarify goals and priorities; minimizes misunderstandings; increases the sense of teamwork through involvement in planning, problem solving, and increased responsibilities; and develops creativity and innovation while enhancing productivity. All of your staff, both those who are performing well and the rookies, those who are anxious to move to a position of increased responsibility or those who have performance related issues will benefit from coaching. Remember, too, that coaching occurs at a variety of times, in the work environment, in meetings or other group dynamics, in the field, and, of course, one on one. “Coaching” or opening that two way dialogue with your staff involves three action components – preliminaries (lis-

Please see Nau, page 18

14


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

LCP Night

Strike! Lower Columbia Professionals Bowling Night May 23 at Triangle Bowl was a big hit. Chair Lonnie Knowles and Jason Meunier, Brooke Fisher and Pat Palmer took time to strike a pose. Proceeds from the night’s festivities benefit the Chamber’s LCP scholarship fund.

The Sky is the Limit! We started in a garage in April 2007. Twin City Bank has provided us the necessary funding to grow our business into a multi-million dollar company. By early fall Twin City Bank will help us move into our new 15,000 square foot facility with room to continue our growth. Jon Hansen, General Manager Sid Somers and Steve Norby Fabricast Valve

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twincitybank.com


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

CEO’s Message

Marketing Boot Camp offers leg up By Bill Marcum Kelso Longview Chamber of Commerce CEO

Sept. 25 Sales People – Value, expectations, inspection of those expectations

June, really? Hard for me to believe we are already into the month of June 2013.

Oct. 2 Sales 101 – Bring your salespeople. This session is for them. Facilitator: Chuck Nau, Murray Nau, Inc.

We have almost completed our second session of the Small Business Boot Camp and 15 businesses have taken part in the Human Resource Series. Again, thank you to Southwest Washington Workforce Development for sponsoring the HR series. Their donation and assistance help us keep Boot Camp registration at a minimal cost. Starting in September we will have our final series for the Boot Camp… Marketing and Sales.

Oct. 9 Customer Service – How to answer the phone to working with difficult customers. Facilitator: Chris Bailey, President Lower Columbia College Bring any and all of your employees, this involves the entire business. And don’t forget if you have signed up for any one of the sessions, all six camps during the session, you are invited at no charge to our final camp of 2013…

This series features Chuck Nau, our only professional speaker/ facilitator/trainer. Chuck Nau of Murray & Nau, Inc. is a Seattle area based consultant and sales and management trainer. He is a 25-year veteran of advertising, sales, media and management, who knows and understands the everyday challenges of starting up, growing, and surviving in today’s ever changing retail climate. He has spoken to and conducted workshops for a number of local retail and chamber organizations, national publishing groups, national retailers and manufacturers, state press associations, and newspaper groups. I have known Chuck for nearly all those 25 years and find him to be an excellent presenter, with information that can help you and your business immediately.

Oct. 23 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving – Utilize your own think tank to solve Critical issues Facilitator: Chris Bailey, President Lower Columbia College On the fun side of June comes the Chamber Golf Classic Monday, June 17. We have more than 35 businesses sponsoring everything from registration, golf holes, tee prizes, putting contest, hole in one prizes to lunch, dinner, dessert and your photos. A very sincere thank you to our presenting sponsor Stirling Honda for their generous contributions to the Golf Classic for the second year in a row. We are shooting for 27 teams or 108 golfers. As of this printing we still have a couple openings so if you are interested in a great day of food, beverage, golf and fellowship contact me right away.

Here is the list of topics and speakers for the series of six camps. Sept. 4

Marketing – Behind the scenes, analysis, budgeting and understanding

Facilitator: Chuck Nau, Murray Nau, Inc.

Facilitator: Bill Marcum, Kelso Longview Chamber

June 20 we will have our Membership Quarterly Lunch featuring our County Commissioners presenting the “State of the County”. The event will take place at the Cowlitz County Conference Center from 11:45 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance and $35 at the door. Visit our website www.kelsolongviewchamber.org to register.

Sept. 11 Marketing – On stage, strategies, tactics, implementation Facilitator: Chuck Nau, Murray Nau, Inc. Sept. 18 Social Media Marketing – What is it really and why do I need it? Facilitator: Norma Davey, KLOG, KUKN and the WAVE 16

I also want to give a HUGE thank you to Brooke and Amy with the Chamber of Commerce. Both are celebrating one year this month and I think you all would agree they have both done an incredible job this past year and have been a real asset to the Chamber and to each and every member. THANK YOU.


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Nau, from page 14

“Fibre Federal is part of our continued success.” “Fibre Federal has been our advocate from our very first coffee date. They offer us online options, convenient locations and personalized business teller services, and even call us directly if there are any questions regarding our daily banking. Having a credit union available to us 24 hours a day is a huge part of our continued success.” - Barb Sudar and Kim Schlais, Owners of Estetica Day Spa At Fibre Federal, we advocate for every business we serve. Call or visit us to learn more about the

the importance of the individual to you and your team. Last but not least, coaching helps YOU. Coaching empowers employees to build their skill level, operate independently, enhance their performance (due to a clear understanding of goals, expectations, and needed action steps), work as a team, and take risks. “Coaching”. As the coach, you are the leader. How you work with each ‘team’ member, the team as a whole, the day-to-day problems and setbacks, are watched closely. When you handle all these in a resilient, productive, and healthy manner your team will admire and duplicate that attitude with your small business’ customers, clients, vendors and suppliers. © Murray & Nau, Inc. Chuck Nau of Murray & Nau, Inc. is a Seattle area based consultant and sales and management trainer. He is a 25-year veteran of advertising, sales, media and management, who knows and understands the everyday challenges of starting up, growing, and surviving in today’s ever-changing retail climate. He has spoken to and conducted workshops for a number of local retail and chamber organizations, national publishing groups, national retailers and manufacturers, state press associations, and newspaper groups. Comments and questions are welcome and may be directed to Chuck via email: murnau@nwlink.com or at 425-603-0984.

business services we offer, and let us help you put your business’s best face forward.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Business Briefs

Household Hazardous Mobile Collection June 1 The next free monthly Household Hazardous Waste Mobile Collection Event will take place June 1 in Cathlamet at the PUD parking lot on Division Street behind the Wahkiakum County Courthouse. The collection site will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. If you are unable to attend this event, the Permanent Collection Facility at the Waste Control Transfer Station, 1150 3rd Ave., Longview, is open every Tuesday and Saturday from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Remember the Permanent Collection Facility and the Household Hazardous Collection Events are only for the collection of hazardous waste generated at a residence; do not bring any business-generated waste. In addition to business waste, the events and the facility will not accept unlabeled products, leaking containers, containers larger than 5-gallons, explosives, radioactive material or biological and infectious waste. For easier identification, please keep products in their original containers; if a container is damaged, you may wish to place it inside another container to contain any leakage. When transporting the waste, place it in the trunk or rear of your vehicle in a manner which would prevent it from

tipping over and spilling.

franchise can come together for one great cause to help the community,” said Lisa Straughan said. “In celebration of the company’s 30th anniversary, Brand It Blue Day is a chance for Express offices to honor the communities that have supported us through the years by giving back.”

This collection event is sponsored by Cowlitz County in conjunction with Wahkiakum County and the Washington State Department of Ecology with appreciation to the Wahkiakum County PUD for volunteering the use of the parking lot. Volunteers providing educational information and traffic control are members of Washington State University Cooperative Extension’s Master Composter/Recycler and Master Gardener programs.

On June 8, local Express Employment Professionals volunteers will be at WalMart stores to collect food items for the BackPack Buddy’s program. An organization that helps feed hungry kids in our own community. Other ways you can support the cause; pick up a tote bag at your local Express office along with a list of items that are needed and drop it by the office, 1208 Washington Way, Suite 140, in Longview, any time prior to the event.

For more information about the mobile collection events or the permanent Household Hazardous Waste Facility, contact Waste Control at 360-425-4302.

Brand It Blue Day fights community hunger

If you would like to volunteer, sign up at http://branditbluelongview.eventbrite.com. Volunteers will receive a free Express blue T-shirt to wear on Brand It Blue Day.

A company built on hope and known for helping people find good jobs, Express Employment Professionals is on a mission to put a million people to work annually. And while the largest privately-held staffing company in North America is busy matching job seekers with employers, the company is also setting aside a day of volunteerism known as “Brand It Blue Day.”

The Longview Express Employment Professionals franchise began operation in 1994 and serves the Cowlitz, Wahkiakum and Columbia county areas with temporary help and direct hire employees in a variety of fields. The Longview office is currently accepting applications. For information, call 360-4141200 or visit www.expresslongview.com.

“Brand It Blue Day is a day each Express

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Quarterly Luncheon Cowlitz Regional Conference Center 1900 7th Avenue, Longview Thursday, June 20, 2013 11:45a.m. -1:30 p.m.

Commission Mike Karnofski

Commission Dennis Weber

Commission James Misner

You are invited to attend the Kelso Longview Chamber’s 2nd Quarterly Membership Luncheon. Please join us as we hear from our county commissioners about everything from the budget, to parks to personnel challenges and how during these hard economic times they are working together to provide us with the quality of place within our county we are a custom to enjoying.

Cowlitz County Population

(Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Office of Financial Management )

Cowlitz County’s population was 102,410 in 2010. The county has grown slightly faster than the nation over the past decade, but slower than the state. As with many areas, growth slowed dramatically in 2010, as net in-migration was near zero. Longview was the largest city in the county, at 36,648, with adjacent Kelso the next biggest at 11,925.

$25 in advance/$35 at door (Price includes lunch buffet)

Register at www.kelsolongviewchamber.org


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Kelso

Longview

Let’s Live Up to a Top 10 Prettiest Town

Spring cleaning for city too By Mayor David Futcher You’ve probably heard of “urban renewal”. It’s one of those government euphemisms that really means, “Cleaning up the junk.” As the spring cleaning season is upon us, we’re working on our own cleaning project in Kelso.

By City Manager Bob Gregory Longview has the distinction of being designated by Forbes as one of the top 10 prettiest towns in America. I encourage all of our residents and businesses to get ready for our summer visitors by sprucing up our “curb appeal”.

Several years ago, the area between North Pacific, North 1st, and Redpath was operating as Terry’s Salvage, and had been listed as a hazardous site by the state’s Department of Ecology. Studies found all kinds of contaminants on the site, including lead, mercury, arsenic, and plenty of petroleum products. The city has worked to obtain grants to fund the cleanup of the site, and has more than $600,000 available to make the project a reality this year.

City street and traffic crews are busy cleaning, removing vegetation, and applying fresh striping/pavement markings along our major entry way corridors (Washington Way, Oregon Way, Tennant Way, 15th Avenue) to make a great first impression to our returning and new visitors this summer. Our Community Development Department is coordinating clean-up of our downtown parking areas and is working with local volunteer groups to remove vegetation and freshen up the bark dust and landscape in the lots. Our local downtown beautification enthusiast, Bill Kasch, has the downtown entryway signs and surrounding landscape areas looking awesome.

Once the property is no longer contaminated, it will become the newest residential development in Kelso. We’ve made arrangements with CAP for them to bring their selfhelp housing project to the location, which should result in eight new affordable homes being added in north Kelso. Adding quality homes to an area also tends to make other owners more likely to invest in improving their homes, impacting a larger area than just the project boundaries.

The Parks and Recreation Department has been busy with the onset of the growing season and has our Broadway, Oregon Way, and Beech Street boulevards and city parks, particularly Lake Sacajawea and all the blooms there, ready for another summer season of concerts and hosting Go Fourth and other great events. Our crew at Mint Valley Golf has the course in fantastic shape and ready for play.

I suspect renewal projects will become more common in Kelso’s future. We don’t have a lot of additional room to grow, but we certainly have areas that could be improved. I want to investigate the creation of a Redevelopment Authority that could identify blighted areas and work to improve them. That improvement would probably involve buying and demolishing properties in challenging areas, and working to develop better quality neighborhoods in their place.

I hope all of our businesses and residents will show our Longview pride and do your part to have an attractive and inviting curb appeal that welcomes our residents and visitors to the prettiest town in America – FIRST IMPRESSIONS ARE LASTING IMPRESSIONS!

We all know there are places that could use cleaning. It’s time to get the broom.

21


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Chamber Board Spotlight Ted Sprague – President, Cowlitz Economic Development Council

Broad knowledge of local area encourages expansion Not many people know Ted Sprague would have been a ringer on the game show “Name That Tune.” He has a knack for identifying a song after just a few notes, but that shouldn’t surprised anyone who knows him.

Where the Chamber’s focus concentrates on small business networking, the CEDC centers on industrial recruitment. Bringing new business to the area aids the economy. It brings more job opportunity, which flows money into every-day businesses like banks and grocery stores. It brings families who enroll their children in schools, which in turn leads to more employment opportunities. It generates more new business and broadens the tax base.

Facts about the Cowlitz County area roll easily off Sprague’s tongue. He’s familiar with its roadways and shipping ports. His knowledge regarding available land sites, natural resources, data and demographics in the area is extensive. He’s tuned into Kelso-Longview technology companies, manufacturing corporations and business leaders.

Sprague believes the economy is looking up and growth is on the way.

As President of the Cowlitz Economic Development Council (CEDC), it’s his job to know, grow and promote the Cowlitz County area.

“You can definitely see that the recession we’ve been in the last three years is over for us,” he said.

Established in 1979, the CEDC is a private nonprofit organization with the mission to recruit, retain and assist in expansion of business in Cowlitz County.

Recruiting industry to the Longview-Kelso area is much different than working as a recruiter on the “west side” for the Washington State University admissions office – that’s where Sprague started.

In its own words, the CEDC is a proactive, results-oriented public/private partnership working with more than 260 associates to assist businesses to relocate or expand in Cowlitz County.

He also used his WSU communications degree, public relations, to work for a state senator, on a political campaign and eventually up the interstate with the Lewis County Economic Development Council.

Sprague has been president for the past 12 years, the same amount of time he has spent on the Kelso Longview Chamber Board of Directors. The relationship is reciprocal – Chamber President Bill Marcum sits on the CEDC’s Board of Directors.

In addition to his CEDC and Chamber duties, Sprague is a member of the Longview Noon Rotary and a long list of other civic and professional organizations. Not to mention, the role he plays as husband and father.

Both share a common interest.

Sprague married his college sweetheart, Kendra, who is the Director of Human Resources and Legal Affairs at Lower Columbia College. They have three children ages 15, 13 and 11 that also keep him busy.

“We’re both trying to improve the quality of place of our community,” Sprague said. “We both want to expand business, in that we have a similar focus.”

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

2012 Golf Tournament

Chamber Golf Classic 2013 – June 17 “Come Join the Fun” See the ad on page 6.

Photos courtesy C’s Photography

23


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

2012 Golf Tournament

Golf Anyone? The Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic, sponsored by Stirling Honda, is set for June 17 at the Longview Country Club. Team and individual resgistration is available. For information go to www.kelsolongviewchamber.org or 360-423-8400.

Photos courtesy C’s Photography 24


Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Longview Downtown Partnership

Recently-elected President excited about city’s growth By Alice Dietz

ping centers and commercial strips. As a result of intense competition from category killers, large discount stores, and regional shopping centers, many small city downtowns face high vacancy rates and a poor mix of businesses.”

Longview Downtown Partnership President Greetings from your new LDP President.

We have to adapt to thrive in this environment. We are a strong community that has great pride in our history. I am honored and privileged to have the opportunity to serve as Longview’s downtown president. I have big shoes to fill but I will work hard to further the community.

On behalf of the LDP board, I would like to thank Janice Forbes for her hard work and dedication to the revitalization of Downtown Longview. Under Janice’s presidency Longview’s downtown has seen a number of growth opportunities. Holos Yoga studio brings in hundreds of downtown patrons weekly, we have had a huge increase in antique shopping opportunities, a successful criterium that has gained recognition from around the state and beyond and the most exciting is the new Cardon Development breaking ground in September of 2013. Janice has a strong business background that shined through with her contribution to our community as LPD President. Thank you Janice for all that you have done for Downtown Longview.

* http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/downtowns/ltb/index.cfm

CH A E B N AGE A E C O STOR SELF

I am a combination of honored, nervous and full of ideas as the newly elected president of the LDP. As a longtime downtown business owner and a lifelong downtown patron, I have a solid understanding of the struggles the downtown business owners have along with an understanding of what a downtown patron needs. As I began my position at the CEDC in January of 2012, I would walk up and down Commerce Avenue and visit the different shops on my lunch break. I would always finish with enough time to grab lunch. As the growth of downtown is increasing, I’m finding more and more stops along the way and no longer have enough time to do all my Commerce store visits. It is exciting to see and feel, first hand, all the growth that has happened in just a year and a half.

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What I would like to see at the conclusion of my term as president is the retention and expansion of retail, an increase of membership and a stronger relationship to the downtown business owners. Longview Downtown is not alone in its struggles.

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Kirkpatrick Family Care 2013 Summer Concert Series Lake Sacajawea Park Thursdays 6 to 8 p.m.

July 11 Abbey Road Beatles Tribute abbeyroadlive.com

July 18

Harmonious Wails

Gypsy Swing

wail.com

July 25

Max’s Midnight Kitchen

American Folk/Bluegrass

maxsmidnightkitchen.com

August 1

Stone In Love

Journey Tribute

stoneinlove.com

August 8

Joni Harms

Country & Western

joniharms.com

August 15

The New Iberians

Blue & Zydeco

newiberians.com

Major Sponsors Red Canoe Credit Union and Cascade Networks, Inc. Support Sponsor KLOG/KUKN/The Wave Radio

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Kelso Longview Business Connection

June 2013

Welcome New Members

Chamber membership has its privileges Celebrate these new Chamber members with us Business Association with opportunities to promote trade through Chamber socials, special events and committee participation.

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• Annual Meeting and Banquet • Networking Events • Committee Participation • Business Contacts • Quarterly Membership Meetings • Civic Representation • Monthly Business After Hours Business Services include marketing for your business, referrals and access to Chamber publications and research data. • Mailing Labels • Membership Window Decals • Member Referrals • Ribbon Cutting • Web Site Links • Member to Member Discounts • Membership Directory • Tax Deduction

• Newsletter • Business Card Display • Use of Chamber Logo Representation through action committees, Candidate Forums and up-todate Action Alerts. • Legislative Representation • Issues Tracking and Information • Task Forces • Candidate Forums • Legislative Update Breakfast • Demographics Publication

Packages

Basic Membership Package - $275 or $26 per month. Bronze Membership Package - $500 or $46.66 per month. Silver Membership Package - $1,000 or $86.33 per month. Gold Membership Package - $2,500 or $211.33 per month. Platinum Membership Package $5,000 or $416.66 per month. Diamond Club Membership Package $10,000 or $834 per month.

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June 2013 business connections