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FROM THE PRESIDENT'S DESK My Dear Alumni and Alumnae, I am writing this letter to you on Memorial Day, Monday, May 29, 2017. Unfortunately for many picnicking and celebrating families, it is a very chilly and rainy day on Long Island. It has been a very long weekend for our students: Ascension on Thursday, Ascension Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and now Monday. On Tuesday, the underclassmen continue with a few days of school and then begin their exams in June.

habituation, not to mention the bullying and hostility that it can transmit to other people.

Many years ago, the media industry developed a public service announcement either on radio or TV, an announcement that sounded like this: “It is ten o’clock; do you know where your children are?” That was an attempt to have parents exert more vigilance on the activities of their children late at night. It was considered a public service announcement. Maybe we should have a similar public service, stating: Our Senior class has completed their last ““Do you know what is on your child’s iPad at the year. Their time at Disney was a very happy moment?” The IT revolution has come upon us and enjoyable experience. The weather was in a very fast manner and actually has taken perfect: a little chilly for me, but ideal for them, over so much of our conscious interaction. One with sunshine every day. Our Graduation is of the limitations is that it has replaced personal next Sunday, the Feast of Pentecost. We will try relation. It is not unusual to see a table of to bring down the Holy Spirit upon them all as young people each with their iPhone texting or they change to a new stage in their lives! communicating with other people through their devices. This summer, as usual, our Information Technology Department will spend a great deal I had a very sad of time renovating the iPads that have been experience a year ago used during this year. This coming September, when Brother Donald all levels of students from sixth grade to Seniors and I were in a Chinese will be on iPads. I am very grateful to all the restaurant up near teachers who have worked so hard to create Founder’s Hollow. A their texts and to make the transition from a couple with a five year textbook to the iPad such a success. I also want old son came into the to thank those teachers (including myself!) restaurant and took a who had little knowledge of the technology of booth directly in my line the iPad, but who generously joined the fray of sight. The young boy and made this transition not only a success, sat next to his father across from his mother. but a very increased academic opportunity. If Throughout the meal, the father watched you really want to learn, it is all there for you constantly on his iPhone. His young son tried – text, reference, exams, etc. For my own Latin to communicate with him dozens of times, but 12 class, my entire textbook is on the iPad with there was no response from the father. Finally an addendum of my previous Comprehensive the young man left that side of the booth and Exams and a large number of previous Regents sat next to his mother. I felt sorry for the young Exams. Also on each student’s iPad is a full boy because I am sure he felt it as some form English dictionary and a full Latin dictionary. of rejection. I was angry at the father (but as What a boon! a Christian I should have felt more sorrow for him) because he was missing out on the great As you know, there is no scientific advancement joy and role of being a father to a young son. that does not have a shadow side, often There is no substitute for personal interaction introduced by misuse or malevolent use of the and esteem. new technology. The expansion of IT apparatus has put the whole world at the fingertips of a six As many of you know, we took a part of year old – for better or for worse. Many studies our Library, under the direction of Brother have been conducted on the misuse of the Kenneth, and made it into a Help Desk for iPhone, in some cases, it is becoming addictive all our electronic equipment. The electronic

department, under the direction of Mr. James Campbell ’91, keeps us all electronically alive. My heart is a little torn when I enter the rest of the Library. It is a very good high school Library. It has an excellent reference section. But it is all obsolete! I am a died-in-the-wool bibliophile, and I do not know what to do with all these works of art. We have sent down to Archbishop Chris in the Solomon Islands a whole series of encyclopedias – one box of which was dropped in the water! However, they are advancing technologically so rapidly that all the written material will soon be obsolete for them.

“There is no substitute for personal interaction and esteem.”

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There is also another concern that IT brings up for school administrators and that is the question of finances. First of all, it was thought that electronic technology would eliminate the use of paper. Not so! We are using more paper now than ever. Secondly, this equipment is evolving so quickly, that its own obsolescence is judged in a matter of months, not years. There is new equipment coming out, better applications, and more extended results. This means that your school budget must contain a large assignment of finance to keep it moving in the right direction. IT is not cheap. We are very grateful to Brother Nigel and his assistants for their work with the Science Olympiad and the Quiz Bowl. As an educator, I have seen what the Science Olympiad has done for the actual teaching of Science. It has made Science teaching on the secondary level something of interest and not of fear. It has demonstrated to students the joy of learning how nature works in the physical world and being able to participate in it by following its continued on page 35

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0 4 T H E G R A D UAT I N G C L A S S 0 8 DAY O F G I V I N G 10 SCHOOL NEWS 1 2 C E L E B R AT I O N S O F FA I T H 1 3 E Y E O N T H E L AT I N S C H O O L 14 SPORTS 1 6  S T. M A R T I N D E P O R R E S N E W S 17 MARIA REGINA NEWS

1 8 C OV E R S T O R Y: S T E M E T S A P I E N T I A 2 2 K A PA 2 3 FAC U LT Y I N T E RV I E W: MR. DENIS MURPHY 24 ALUMNI SOCIAL S 26 CLASS NOTES 3 4 BENEFIT GOLF OUTING 35 IN MEMORIAM

Heart & Mind, the magazine of Kellenberg Memorial High School, is published twice a year and distributed to all alumni, parents, alumni parents, faculty, administration, and friends of KMHS.

Day of Giving

KAPA Welcome Party

Alumni Socials

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A D M I N I S T R AT I O N President Rev. Philip Eichner, S.M. Principal Bro. Kenneth Hoagland, S.M. A DVA N C E M E N T Director of Advancement Mrs. Denise Miles Director of Alumni Mr. Thomas Huggard A L U M N I B OA R D President James McBrien ’89 Vice President Hilary (Cunningham) McDevitt ’93 Vice President Patricia Kearney ’97 Vice President Kelly (Agostinacchio) Forquignon ’99 Vice President John Scatamacchia ’00 EDITORIAL Editor in Chief Mrs. Erin (Byrne) Cicalese ’98 Editorial Advisor Mr. Thomas Huggard Editorial Assistant Mrs. Beth Campbell Creative Director Mrs. Trista Harnisch PHOTOGRAPHY Jordan Bernhardi ’17 Nicholas Boffardi ’14 Mrs. Erin (Toscano) Citrano ’03 Mr. Eric Harnisch Mr. Jeff Harris ’03 Harrison Keller ’18 Mr. Brendan Narell Anthony Ort ’18 Brother Roger Poletti, S.M. HEART & MIND

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CLASS OF '17 CELEBRATES GRADUATION On Sunday, June 4th at Hofstra University, the members of the Class of 2017 celebrated their Baccalaureate Mass, followed by the 30th Commencement Exercises of Kellenberg Memorial High School. A plethora of awards and honors were given out, with Thomas Greco receiving the Father Francis T. Keenan, S.M. Valedictorian Award and Amanda Greco receiving the Father Francis T. Keenan, S.M. Salutatorian Award. The class of 2017’s 472 graduates collectively received 2,256 scholarships and grants.

A.

General Excellence Award Gerard DeAngelis & Juliana Cosenza Brother Richard J. Hughes, S.M. Service Award Jordan Bernhardi & Dana Livingston Academic Excellence Award Maximillian Calleo & Justina Henein B.

Edward J. Dunn Student-Athlete Award Steven Hoffman & Alyssa Boll

C.

Father Francis T. Keenan, S.M. Salutatorian Award Amanda Greco Father Francis T. Keenan, S.M. Valedictorian Award Thomas Greco Joe Ferriso Memorial Scholarship Award Kelly Kenny Total Numbers 472 2,256 311 438

D.

Class of 2017 Graduating Class Scholarships and Grants Members of Class of 2017 receiving one or more Scholarships Members of Class of 2017 involved in at least one sport or activity

F.

E.

A. The General Excellence Award Winners Juliana Cosenza, Gerard DeAngelis with Father Philip Eichner, S.M. B. Maggie Westerman, Matt Werny, and Mary Weissler patiently wait to be called. C. Kaila Frith processes into Commencement. D. The Award Winners for Individual Subjects. E. The Award Winners for Special Activities. F. Graduates place hands over their hearts during the National Anthem. 4

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CARRYING ON THE TRADITION

A.

B.

D.

E.

F.

G.

H.

I.

J.

K.

L.

M.

The Class of 2017 and their siblings, graduates of years past. Once a Firebird, Always a Firebird! C.

A. John Howfield, with his mother and sisters Megan ’23, Kaitlin ’12, and Jackie ’14. B. Jeremy Capuder, with his sister Kim ’14. C. Michael A'Hearn, with his parents Sheila and Mr. Kevin A'Hearn. D. Thomas Paulich, with his brother Matthew ’14. E. Bridget Sullivan, with her sisters Erin ’15 and Colleen ’15. F. Jack McLaughlin, with his sisters Kaitlin ’11 and Taylor ’14. G. Peter Gillette, with his sisters Nicole ’16 and Diana ’11. H. Emma Wollweber, with her sister Grace ’16. I. Ryan Barrett, with his brother Connor ’12 and sister Katelyn ’14. J. Cullen Kircher, with his sister Sable ’15. K. Morgan Staab, with her sister Caitlyn ’15. L. William Ilardi, with his brothers Patrick ’19, Thomas ’15, and Ryan ’13. M. Kyle Waibel, with his brother Andrew ’14. K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

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BACCALAUREATE MASS

Before donning their caps and gowns, the members of Kellenberg Memorial's Class of 2017 and their families gathered to celebrate their final Mass together. The Baccalaureate Mass took place on June 4th at Hofstra University and featured a special Candlelighting Ceremony. Graduates and their families, as well as Kellenberg Memorial faculty and staff, enjoyed having the opportunity to worship through prayer and song prior to graduation. A.

B.

C.

D.

F. E.

G. H.

A. Joseph Ciorra processes during the Candlelighting Ceremony. B. Keon Whyte sings the Offertory Song with Gregorian Consortium. C. Liam Casey lights his candle with Mr. Michael Tahany. D. Natalie Murray and Kidist Allonce are thrilled to be together on this special occasion. E. Joshua Santosh gives Father Philip Eichner a chalice for Communion. F. Seniors during Candlelighting Ceremony. G. Mark Fariello lights his candle. H. Bridget Gunn lights her candle. 6

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SENIOR SEND-OFF & SENIOR TRIP

The last few weeks of senior year were made special by the annual Senior Trip to Disney World from May 4th to May 7th, and the Senior Send-Off on June 1st. While at Disney, the group stayed at Port Orleans Riverside Resort and visited Disney Springs, Typhoon Lagoon, Magic Kingdom, Hollywood Studios, Epcot, Fantasia Gardens, and Harry Potter World at Universal Orlando's Islands of Adventure. Just a few weeks later, the class of 2017 gathered at Hudson River Park’s Pier 40 to board a cruise ship to sail around Manhattan. The sunset cruise featured dinner, dancing, and spectacular views. A.

B.

C.

D.

F.

I.

G.

E.

H.

J.

A. Ryan Troy, Thomas Dompkowski, Julia Iacoviello, Erin Archbold, Patrick Graham, Maggie Drogalis, Thea Mundy, and Gerard DeAngelis enjoy the view of the Statue of Liberty. B. The seniors wait for their bus to the next event with their moderators Mrs. Christine Rodney, Mr. Ryan White, and Miss Erin Ronan. C. Ryan Dempsey, Robert Baillie, Brother Kenneth Hoagland, Michael Grant, and Andrea Goodman are all smiles for the cruise. D. 9H Marianist Mentors Sean Crosby, Emma Fenton, Liam Von Elm, and Reah Thomas-Hill are excited about their evening at Hollywood Studios. E. Kayra Theodore, Breea Williams, Sarah Diaab-Schneider, Jael Thomas, Briana Elysee, Maesha Thermogene, Taylor Rodriguez, Lindsey Morisseau, and Kidist Allonce love visiting Magic Kingdom. F. Stephanie Medrano and Austin Graham enjoy the view. G. Caija Clarke and Kaitlyn Knoblach look forward to the cruise. H. Christen Patalano, Sarah Squicciarini, Ryan Mullaly, Jack Delaney, Thomas Paulich, Olivia Brennan, and Juliet Villanueva. I. Ian Nalepinski, Brianna Rubenstein, Kailyn Kobs, and Alex Ellis. J. Class of 2017 after a day at Epcot. K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

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DID YOU MISS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE? EVEN THOUGH THE DAY OF GIVING IS OVER, YOU CAN STILL MAKE A GIFT TODAY: KELLENBERG.ORG/SHEPHERDSFUND THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

Students expressed their gratitude throughout the day at the Day of Giving photo booth. Find more images on our website! 8

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Day o f G i v i n g

SUCCESSFUL 2ND ANNUAL DAY OF GIVING HONORS 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF KELLENBERG MEMORIAL The Kellenberg Memorial community celebrated a successful 2nd Annual Day of Giving on Thursday, March 30, 2017. The day, which was dedicated to honoring the 30th Anniversary of the founding of the school, featured live broadcasts throughout the day which were produced and directed by student members of ETV. The live shows highlighted the topics of Giving Back, Prayer Life, Alumni Programs, STEM, Faith/Vocations, Athletics, and “Future Firebirds” ranging in age from under one year up to nine years old. The shows featured students, as well as current and past faculty members. Alumni seminarians John Crozier ’11, Rev. Mr. Mike Plona ’07, Kieran Maelia ’13, and Paul Clores ’11 supported the day by returning to campus (with Matt Browne ’11 joining the conversation via Skype from Catholic University!) to discuss how their faith and vocations were shaped by their time at Kellenberg Memorial High School. The shows were hosted by the incredibly spirited and talented Jordan Bernhardi ’17, who reflected on his participation in the day, saying, “Having the opportunity to be a part of the Day of Giving was an amazing honor for me. It would not have been possible without the hardwork and dedication of the ETV crew. The Day of Giving truly embodies the Kellenberg spirit of giving back and service over self. I have been blessed with the most amazing opportunities at Kellenberg, and it's thanks to the entire Kellenberg family. Giving back to Kellenberg is so important because you're supporting the future of the Firebird. With your support, you're fostering the faith and academic opportunities that students receive each day at Kellenberg Memorial.” Last year, over $75,000 was raised on the first Day of Giving for the Shepherd’s Fund, Kellenberg Memorial’s annual unrestricted fund which affords our school the opportunity to enhance a variety of initiatives that directly affect all of our programs each day. This year, K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

the goal for the 2nd Annual Day of Giving was based on participation. In honor of the 30th Anniversary of Kellenberg Memorial, the day’s goal was to attract more than 30 donors each hour for ten hours, therefore completing the day with over 300 participants. Thanks to the generous support and enthusiasm of the Kellenberg community, the participation goal was met and more than doubled, with 745 donors contributing $111,261.58! Thank you to all who participated in the 2nd Annual Day of Giving by sharing time, talent, or treasure. The continued generosity of the Kellenberg Memorial family ensures that a Marianist education of the heart and mind

will be available for countless generations of “Future Firebirds.” Special thanks to the following students for their outstanding contributions to the success of the day: ETV - Andrew Ammazzalorso ’17, Jordan Bernhardi ’17, Nick Castelli ’17, Joe Ciorra ’17, Alex Cruz ’17, Eddie D'Atri ’17, Kelly Kenny ’17, Brandon Wainwright ’17, Craig Wallace ’17, Shane Jackson ’18, and Gavin Williams ’18. Photography - Harrison Keller ’18 and Anthony Ort ’18. Social Media Club - Brianna Hartmann ’18, Madison Keller ’18, Meagan Kimick ’18, Amaya Montalvo ’18, Maddie Oliver ’18, and Maria Paradiso ’18.

A.

B.

C.

A. Alex Cruz ’17, Kelly Kenny ’17, and Eddie D'Atri ’17 set up the day-of studio on the Auditorium stage. B. Future Firebirds close out the Day of Giving programming with their host, Jordan Bernhardi ’17. C. John Crozier ’11, Paul Clores ’11, Jordan Bernhardi ’17, Rev. Mr. Michael Plona ’07, and Kieran Maelia ’13 discuss how their faith was shaped by their time at Kellenberg Memorial.

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MARCH FOR LIFE On January 27th, 44 juniors proudly donned their Kellenberg Blue and Gold gear to fight for the rights of the unborn by taking part in the March for Life in Washington, DC. The mission of the March for Life is to provide all Americans with a place to testify to the beauty of life and the dignity of each human person. It is held annually on or near January 22nd to commemorate the solemn anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the infamous court case that legitimized abortion. Following their experience at the March for Life, Nicolas Castelli ’17, Joseph Ciorra ’17, Jordan Bernhardi ’17, Harrison Keller ’18, Alex Cruz ’17, and Brandon Wainwright ’17 created a powerful documentary reflecting on the importance of the annual event. You may view the documentary by visiting Kellenberg Memorial’s YouTube page, which can be found at kellenberg.org/youtube.

Left: Kaelin Gillis ’18, Jamie Kellenberg Students attend Mass

Alter ’18, Lauren at the Basilica of

Lettieri ’18, the National

and Maeve DeGennaro ’18. Right: Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Before the March, in Washington, D.C.

30TH ANNUAL COMMUNION BREAKFASTS The Kellenberg Memorial community came together on two separate occasions - April 2nd for sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth grades, and April 9th for tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grades - to celebrate the school’s 30th Annual Communion Breakfasts. These immensely popular events offer the opportunity for parents, grandparents, students, and faculty to celebrate Mass and enjoy breakfast together. The guest speaker for the April 2nd Communion Breakfast was Dr. James McBrien ’89, who serves as President of Kellenberg Memorial’s Alumni Association Board. Dr. McBrien and his wife, Dr. Cathy McBrien, are proud parents of Firebird alumna, Audrey ’15, current student, Aidan ’20, Cavan (9), and Evelyn (7). Dr. McBrien commented on his experiences as President of the Alumni Association Board, saying, “Our experiences are similar or different to greater degrees depending on which time period we came through Kellenberg, but all of us are committed to the success of our alma mater which provides an outstanding experience for those seeking a rigorous college prep curriculum in harmony with a practiced and living faith in Jesus Christ and His Church.” The guest speaker for April 9th Communion Breakfast was Mr. Joseph Campo, who is the Director of Saint Francis House, a Christ-centered and structured home designed to help young men who need a second chance in life. For many years Joe served as a drug and alcohol counselor and now fulfills the role of “surrogate father” to the young men who live at St. Francis House. He is a Third Order Franciscan and the producer of Grassroots Films. Among some of the more popular films produced by his filming company are The Human Experience and Outcasts. 12

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A.

B.

A. Brother Kenneth Hoagland with Dr. James McBrien '89 and his family. B. Mr. Joseph Campo.

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Eye on the Latin School

MATH BEE On April 25th, the Latin School gathered for their annual Math Bee. Out of 32 talented contestants, one student emerged victorious over all: Julia Lawless ’21! Julia was able to answer every question with remarkable mental acuity. Kerrin O’Grady ’21 took the second-place win. Congratulations to all participants who did an outstanding job! Pictured left to right: Julia Lawless ’21, Assistant Principal for the Latin School, Miss Maria Korzekwinski, and Kerrin O’Grady ’21.

SEVEN EARN PERFECT SCORES Each year, Latin scholars around the globe sit to take the National Latin Exam, a formal assessment which includes questions on grammar, comprehension, mythology, derivatives, literature, Roman life, history, and geography. Nearly 75 percent of the Squires who took the test earned some type of award, with 38 students earning gold medals. Of the 135,000 students to take the exam across the globe, only 813 earned a perfect score. The Brother Joseph C. Fox Latin school is proud to have seven students earning perfect scores. Congratulations to Squires Anabella Ginebra, Veronica Tadross, Carmella Musso, Bridget Cody, Molly McGoldrick, and James DeMaro, as well as Tyro Vincenza Julian for earning such an exemplary honor!

SQUIRE BBQ

On May 24th, eighth graders in the Brother Joseph C. Fox Latin School gathered for the annual Squire BBQ. The fun-filled day featured outdoor activities and games, as well as a delicious BBQ lunch. Students were given t-shirts as mementos of the day which said, “God is good all the time.” A. Liam McNicholas ’21, Brendan Lavarra ’21, Jake Binkley ’21, and Noah Muroff ’21. B. Gabriella Scheer ’21, Taylor Sanders ’21, and Ryan Titus ’21. A.

B.

TYRO BRONX ZOO TRIP

Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! The seventh graders enjoyed the annual Tyro trip to the Bronx Zoo on April 28th. Eye on the Latin School continues on page 32 K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

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S P O R TS

For the first time in the school’s history, the Kellenberg Varsity Cheerleading team competed in the UCA (Universal Cheerleaders Association) National High School Cheerleading Championship this February in Disney. Despite making it to the semi-finals and having a near-perfect performance, the team did not make it into finals. They ranked 13th out of 138 teams in the nation.

CHEERLEADING

GIRLS VARSITY BASKETBALL On May 13th, attendees packing the Hofstra Arena were treated to yet another entertaining Blue & Gold show. The Blue Team’s theme this year was “Blue You Want to Build a Snowman?”, and the Gold Team’s theme was “The Wizard of Gold.” While both teams displayed impressive creativity and talent, it was a #GTV (Gold Team Victory) for 2017. Gold Team Captains Juliet Villanueva ’17 and Olivia Brennan ’17.

After beating Buffalo-Sacred Heart, 53-44, in the girls basketball CHSAA Class A final game on March 11th, the Kellenberg Girls Varsity Basketball team went on to compete for its first state Federation title since 2009. Despite a 62-31 loss to JamesvilleDewitt at the Glens Falls Civic Center on March 25th, the team came away from the season excited to build upon this year’s successes. Guard Clare Calabro ’18 drives towards the hoop.

BLUE & GOLD VARSITY GOLF

The Girls Varsity Golf team won their fourth NSCHSGAA League Championship in five years. Both Ashley Harding ’18, the defending champ, and Emmah Federman ’18 then went on to compete at States and the NYS Public High School Federation Champs. The Boys Varsity Golf team had a successful season as well, with Ryan Mullaly ’17 and Mark Roder ’18 taking third place in the NSCHSAA League Champs and moving on to compete in States. Left: Emmah Photo courtesy of James Escher for Newsday.

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Federman ’18. Right: Ryan Mullaly ’17. A K E L L E N B E RG M E M O R I A L FA M I LY P U B L I CAT I O N


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The Kellenberg Varsity Baseball team defeated No. 3 St. John the Baptist, 1-0, on May 29th at Hofstra University to win their second consecutive championship. This is the first time the baseball program has won back-to-back league titles. Pitcher Chris Cappas ’17 was named the CHSAA player of the year and pitcher of the year.

VARSITY BASEBALL

Photo courtesy of James Escher for Newsday.

On May 30th, the Kellenberg Boys Varsity Lacrosse team defeated St. Joseph’s Collegiate of Buffalo, 12-5, to win the CHSAA class AA lacrosse state championship. Although the Firebirds made it to the CHSAA AA Intersectional Championship last year, this is the first time the team has competed for a state championship title.

BOYS VARSITY LACROSSE

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Kellenberg distance ace Maureen Lewin ’19 placed second in the Eastern States Championships 800 meter race on June 4th at Iona Preparatory School. Maureen took an amazing five seconds off her previous best, finishing with a time of 2:14:20. Maureen’s time is the third fastest performance in Firebird history, behind 2010 NY State 800 meter champion Kim MacKay ’11, and current NCAA Collegiate record holder, Jazmine Fray ’15’s, high school performances. HEART & MIND

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S t. m a r t i n d e p o r r es

SPRING HIGHLIGHTS AT ST. MARTIN DE PORRES MARIANIST SCHOOL A.

B.

D.

E.

F.

C.

G.

I. H.

A. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss! The kindergarten students enjoyed celebrating the author of one of their favorite books, The Cat in the Hat. B. Second grade students in their finest on their First Holy Communion day!​C. St. Martin's kindergarten students enjoyed a beautiful spring afternoon at Eisenhower Park. D. A pirate's life for me! Fourth grade students performed the play, Peter Pan. E. Sixth grade alto saxophone player, Jennifer Montalvan, helps create beautiful music in the Junior High Band. F. Sixth grader Josephine Rizzuto receives ashes during the Ash Wednesday Prayer Service. G. Fifth grader Emily Molina dressed as Amelia Earhart in the Fifth Grade Biography Parade. H. Father Tom and members of Kellenberg Memorial's XLT Band visited on April 5, 2017 as SMMS students spent time with the Lord through quiet adoration, prayer, and song. I. It's all smiles in the St. Martin's Daisy Girl Scout Troop! Kindergarten students, Leila Antoine and Kaelyn Jean-Raymond, await their turn to complete the Girl Scout friendship circle! 16

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ANNUAL CROTTY CLASSIC A SUCCESS On Saturday, January 28, 2017, Kellenberg hosted the Tom Crotty Classic Basketball Tournament. The annual event commemorates the life of Thomas G. Crotty, a member of Maria Regina’s Class of 1977 who was tragically killed at the age of 42 during the 9/11 attacks. During his youth, Tom was recognized as an outstanding student athlete, having enjoyed running, tennis, golf, and water sports. However, his true passion was basketball. He was recognized as an "All Long Island" basketball player. He also played college basketball at Marist College for four years, starting as a walk-on and earning a scholarship his senior year. This year’s tournament featured a double header of Varsity Boys Basketball featuring Chaminade vs. Rockville Centre’s Southside High School and Kellenberg vs. Cathedral Prep. Kellenberg won 61-24, with a great game all around. Tournament MVP Mike Geisweller ’17 scored 20 points with eight rebounds and five assists.

Thomas G. Crotty's Graduation Photo, 1977.

The basketball games were followed by a social event in the Millennium Room to celebrate the life of Tom Crotty. The gathering was attended by Tom’s family, friends, and former teammates, as well as the boys from the current basketball team and their families.

m a r i a r e g i na

By: Eddie Augustin '18, adapted from article originally published in The Phoenix

Please update your contact information by emailing alumni@kellenberg.org. Be sure to include your current email address to ensure you receive updates about Maria Regina alumni events. Find us online at MariaReginaAlumni.com or facebook.com/MariaReginaAlumni.

DELURY '06 RECEIVES FULBRIGHT Congratulations to Melissa DeLury ’06, who has received a Fulbright U.S. Student Program award to India in Education from the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board! Melissa will conduct research and support the teaching of English at the Indian Institute of Technology at Indore as part of a project to explore the effectiveness of the Indian Right to Education Act and assess possible barriers to accessing schools. She is one of 1,900 U.S. citizens who will conduct research, teach English, and provide expertise abroad for the 2017-2018 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and leadership potential in their respective fields. K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

When asked to reflect upon the role Kellenberg Memorial has played in her life, Melissa said, “Kellenberg provided a very encouraging atmosphere for me to explore and deepen my faith. Since graduating, I used this strong foundation to practice my faith by participating in service trips, both domestic and international, and professional experiences that sought to improve livelihoods through education. I also developed a strong work ethic that enabled me to succeed both at Saint Anselm College for my undergraduate studies and Trinity College Dublin for my graduate studies.”

interned at No Peace Without Justice, which is based at the United Nations, and the International Crisis Group, a think tank working on the prevention of deadly conflict worldwide. Fulbright alumni have achieved distinction in many fields, including 57 who have been awarded the Nobel Prize, 82 who have received Pulitzer Prizes, and 37 who have served as a head of state or government. Congratulations, Melissa!

Melissa holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Saint Anselm College and a Master of Arts degree in International Peace Studies from Trinity College, Dublin. She most recently worked as a Program Assistant at City University of New York’s School of Professional Studies. Prior to that, Melissa H E AR T & M I N D

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cov e r st o ry

STEM Sapientia

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics

ET

T

he acronym STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) has become commonplace in educational vernacular and with good reason. The 2016 U.S. News/ Raytheon STEM Index findings report that STEM jobs have increased 28 percent since 2000, clearly trumping the modest 6 percent increase reported for all other jobs. Additionally, U.S. Department of Commerce’s Office of the Chief Economist reports that STEM degree holders enjoy higher earnings, regardless of whether they work in STEM or non-STEM occupations. As part of Kellenberg Memorial’s commitment to providing an unparalleled Catholic education of the heart and the mind, the ever-evolving liberal arts curriculum has been carefully crafted to strike a healthy balance among disciplines. There is one important skill, though, which Kellenberg alumni possess whose mastery is almost always credited to their alma mater: writing. President Father Philip Eichner, S.M. says, “Your native language is the most important academic subject in secondary education to master it, to speak it, to read it, to write it, and to interpret it. Even if you are in the fields of science or business, you are going to be speaking, writing, and reading all the time.” 18

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[n., Wisdom, Prudence, Good Sense, Discernment] By: Erin (Byrne) Cicalese '98

The importance of the mastery of writing at Kellenberg is just one piece of the academic puzzle. In keeping with the Marianist model of education, the time-tested liberal arts curriculum at Kellenberg Memorial uses a combination of religion, English, history, mathematics, science, world language, physical education, and enrichment courses to prepare students intellectually and emotionally for success in college and beyond. Mindful of the education of the heart, apostolic activities serve as the lifeblood of Kellenberg Memorial’s education. Masses, prayer services, Eucharistic Adoration, and retreats are just part of the beautiful mosaic of worship and faith exploration offered to the student body. Although the traditional, liberal arts curriculum offered at Kellenberg has been proven effective in producing successful, faithful, and compassionate graduates, the school’s administration is always exploring opportunities which might further enhance the educational experience. During the 20142015 academic year, iPads were introduced to the class of 2018 with a new grade level receiving iPads each subsequent year. As of this upcoming fall, every student and every faculty member will have an iPad. Faculty

members are currently creating unique iBooks which will present meticulously curated content created in concert with the members of each department. The integration of the iPad allows students and teachers to utilize digital tools such as eBackpack, Google Drive, Notability, and Google Classroom, providing unlimited access to information, organizational tools, and content area applications, while also allowing for students to engage in multimedia activities that support improvement in reading, writing, research skills, and critical thinking. In keeping with this practice of encouraging healthy enrichment within the curriculum, STEM-related enhancements continue to be added, with additional clubs and activities available to those wishing to deepen their knowledge within the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math. Since its inception, Kellenberg Memorial has required every student to successfully complete four full years of science and math, far surpassing local secondary education standards.. Assistant Principal for Academics, Mr. Kenneth Conrade, explains, “Students who exhibit a passion for STEM related topics can pursue these interests as much as they desire through the multiple extra and co-curricular

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activities we offer in the STEM Cluster. Just like an aspiring actress can spend every afternoon in the Drama Club, or a future lawyer can spend hours in Mock Trial, the aspiring scientist or engineer can dive into STEM specific experiences at KMHS.” Mr. Anthony Wevers, a faculty member and STEM coordinator at Kellenberg, offers an overview of the STEM-oriented programs students can take advantage of, saying, “What some people may not realize is that Kellenberg has offered numerous STEM learning opportunities for many years now, including Science Olympiad, Lab Squad, Environmental Club, Computer Club, Amateur Radio Club (KM2ARC), CSI, Woodworking Club, Math Club, Boy Scouts, ETV, and Social Media Club. We recently developed a Health Science Club and a Robotics Club to offer additional opportunities for students to further explore STEM. Additionally, the Kellenberg STEM Talk Series has brought professionals from a wide range of STEM careers to campus to speak with students about pursuing careers in engineering, nursing, pharmacy, veterinary science, safety science, emergency medicine, neuroscience, game design, and more.” Kellenberg also offers a variety of STEMfocused trips throughout the year, including the Cradle of Aviation, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Underwriter’s Laboratory, and iFly. These unique, hands-on experiences offer students the opportunity to expand upon lessons they learn in the classroom. Additionally, seniors are offered the opportunity to take part in the NYS EMT Training program twice per week. This program imparts invaluable, life-saving A.

lessons which past students have used effectively in emergency situations to help provide medical care.

“STEM, inside and outside of the classroom, helps build confident learners who are not afraid to search for their own answers.”

Kellenberg is truly a place where STEM and sapientia, which is the Latin word for “wisdom” or “prudence,” are not at odds with one another, but, rather, merge together to create a stronger curriculum. Mrs. Anne (Staudt) Masiulis ’02, chairperson of Kellenberg’s biology department, explains how STEM is yet another piece of the puzzle when it comes to shaping successful, faithfilled students, saying, “It’s important to stress that one should not view liberal arts and STEM as separate entities. STEM subject matter is critical to a sound liberal arts program, as there are immense academic opportunities when used together. We focus on appealing to our students’ multiple intelligences and realize that it is equally important to link our classroom content across the various disciplines. STEM is where curiosity and creativity meet to open new doors. STEM is about wanting to solve problems and being persistent. All of these things are enhanced by knowledge from diverse disciplines and curricula. STEM, inside and outside of the classroom, helps build confident learners who are not afraid to search for their own answers. These are attributes that we want our students to have no matter their future educational paths or career choices. We are uniquely privileged at our private Catholic institution to be able to challenge our students to reach their fullest intellectual potentials, while at the same time B.

promoting and instilling a desire to understand their Catholic faith. We have the ability to teach across curricula and help our students make connections between scientific content and their faith. There is simply no better way to help students cultivate a strong moral compass that will guide them throughout the rest of their lives.” It is with great prudence and wisdom that Kellenberg Memorial adopts any pedagogical method or technique. Kellenberg students will always be instructed in the lingual precision which has become a hallmark of the school’s educational experience, just as they will always be immersed in the JudeoChristian values that gave birth to Western Civilization. Kellenberg’s commitment to providing a faith-filled, liberal arts education in the Catholic tradition means that students will never be denied Shakespeare for STEM, nor Vergil for volts and vacuums. STEM is incorporated not to replace any part of our curriculum, nor to replenish any deficiency. The incorporation of STEM is simply what sapientia dictates. It is prudent and wise to prepare students for success in a changing world by providing them with a sound moral foundation paved with intellectual knowledge and emotional competence. C.

A. Paul Bartolemea ’20 makes contact with "Hams" around the world during an Amateur Radio Club meeting. B. Sara Rutkowski ’19 conducts an experiment during a STEM field trip to Brookhaven National Lab. C. Students in the EMT Training program learn essential life-saving skills. K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

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FATHER PHILIP EICHNER, S.M. REFLECTS ON 50 YEARS OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION develop the skills, the talents, the maturity, the socialization of children into adolescence and into early adulthood. A school is always a fluid situation, given the fact that it is made up of many objective elements as well as subjective choices, not to mention the quality and character and behavior of the students themselves. It is generally taken for granted that the individuals who choose the content of these institutions, who run them and judge their effectiveness are people of goodwill and with competent understanding. However, as we all know, there are some schools which are poor in effect and others which are successful in their role as developmental matrices for young persons.

to teach four Senior Religion classes at Chaminade High School. For these classes there was no curriculum, no textbook, no formal exams. When I asked how was I to teach these classes, I was told that I was to teach them as Jesus did. Okay, but didn’t Jesus get crucified? (The road to re-establishing a stable curriculum took another ten years.)

The Age of Aquarius Back to the 60s. There were many things that were challenged in the 60s, as if anything that had structure or Certainly those times discipline had a very strong impact A. A yearbook photo of Father Philip from demanded on education.As an 1977 when he was President of Chaminade. was deemed oppressive, aside, let me distinguish B. Father Philip celebrating Mass in 1972. hostile, and bad karma. Needless to say, this had education from schools. a very strong effect on Education is a generic term – one that expresses abstractly a process school morale, curriculum, discipline, and that involves many practical repercussions. general academic atmosphere. The new age Education as a generic term means all of Aquarius wanted freedom from any type those particular influences which develop of structure or discipline whether it be in human persons – from parents to personal grammar, spelling, grades, tests, requirements, experiences, to tragedies, to successes, and homework, etc. Some of these changes or to schools. The latter term is a specific term challenges had some merit to them. However, in the educational world. A school is not a many of them were destructive and often figment of nature; it is not natural. When I short lived, leaving gaps in what once had tell that to my students, they heartily agree been a stable institutional framework. I will and are overjoyed that someone finally told give only one instance of this confusion from the truth! A school is a work of art, composed my experience (there are thousands of pages of different elements that are chosen by a written on this educational era that can be group of adults, elements that are used to found elsewhere.) In 1966 I was assigned

Not Just Exposure, But Mastery Over the years from 1967 to 1977, the Chaminade faculty redeveloped a program of classical academic character, depending on the six disciplines of traditional learning, based on the Greek Trivium and Quadrivium. Also instituted was a series of exams that tested not only to the exposure to academic material, but to its mastery, a distinction which is very important in an educational program. Exposure is not the same as mastery. Much of the so-called acceleration programs in modern educational situations are rushing ahead to expose the child to the next level, without requiring that the previous level be mastered. I can’t emphasize enough the consequences of that difference. We put in Comprehensive Exams which imitated the Regents, covering the whole year with the value of one-half of the final grade.

The Early Years I began my teaching career in the fall of 1957 at the Marianist-run High School, St. Joseph’s, in Cleveland, Ohio, at the end of the Eisenhower A. years, which were filled with self-confidence and contentment. Ten years later in 1967, I was appointed President of Chaminade High School. While it was only a decade, ten years in the twentieth century, the difference was millennial. The baby-boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, came on strong, even though they were a generation that suffered very little deprivation. The times were a changing, and not always for the better. Great pots B. of ink have been spilled on trying to understand the phenomenon of the 60s. It still eludes full understanding because of the intensity of the rebellion, the reaction, and the anger. Everything was up for grabs.

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One of the things that has changed in the course of these sixty years is the parental involvement in a student’s educational career. The involvement is much more hands-on, critical, and often defensive. A previous generation let the school do its work and let the children fend for themselves. That changed in the early 70s when parental involvement took on a different character, often challenging the decisions of the school administration and particularly of student’s grading. However, there are certain aspects of parental involvement which remain the same – one being that parents were very concerned about the quality of their children’s education. They did not want their child to be subjected to unproven theories of education or esoteric curriculum. They were often very leery about these new thrusts of formlessness and choice.

It was a demanding program, but with good teachers and a consistent effort, student’s thrived on this type of operation. There were the six basic disciplines of a classical

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by raising standards. Anybody can raise standards. Educational progress consists in understanding the learning patterns of the human mind in a better fashion and learning how to establish programs that fit the human mind in its absorption of knowledge and attitudes. “Deep reading” is a noble concept, but you don’t achieve it in the third grade. It takes fifteen to eighteen years of education to develop that skill.

A skilled homilist, Father Philip engages the student body when celebrating Masses.

curriculum with no options. One may ask how did the administration determine the curriculum? How did they know what was best for these adolescent students? Where did they get the wisdom to make these decisions? All of these are very important questions. The teachers and administrators often ask themselves these questions - what are the criteria which they use in setting up a school, a curriculum, or an educationally social environment. First of all, there is the basic tradition of the western world derived from the ancient Greeks and Romans, the Latin tradition of the West and continuing through the advent of the Judeo-Christian ethic. But the judgement also comes from something that is much more practical and pragmatic. Our curriculum is not derived a priori, that is from somebody’s concept of what they think education should be. Our philosophy is a posteriori, that is, we judge by the results that are obtained, such as how does this academic ladder prepare these young people for their future education, for their life, for their self-confidence. It is very pragmatic. How do we determine this? Our K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

first question when any alumnus or alumna comes back, and many of them do come back while they are in college, we ask them this famous question: “Were you prepared?” The response is always very positive. In fact the “oppressive” twenty-four Comprehensive Exams they have taken in our program prepared them for any of the demands that they met in college. We want their college experience to enable them to swim and not to drown, to be able to have time for thought, reflection, and not to be always trying to catch-up to meet their requirements of modern college education. Striking the Right Balance Since no educational program is set in concrete, at least in the minds of the academic community, there are different programs that come down the pike, as we say, in the course of time. Again some of these changes work to better the educational process, but also many have a short life and disappear, like a piece of fireworks that has a flash in the sky and then disappears. An example of this would be in these past years that we have had many “new” programs of mathematics, approximately a dozen of them. They have been superseded one after another, promising to make the teaching of mathematics more effective and more userfriendly. At this point, I would like to mention two new programs, that of Common Core and that of STEM. Both of these are programs that have been proposed not from the academic community, but rather from outside sources with very little educational philosophy in mind. Briefly speaking, Common Core is an attempt to establish higher educational goals in a very short time by demanding better performance at an earlier age. The end is noble, but the psychology is very faulty. You don’t necessarily improve education

The other innovation that has come into educational circles is STEM which means Science-TechnologyEngineering-Mathematics. This thrust in the educational scene does not come from educators, but from business. They want to emphasize technology so that we have competent technologists for our technical superiority. My fear is that this thrust is an attempt to turn our high schools into institutes of technology rather than humanistic institutions, such as Rensselaer Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Case Institute of Technology, etc. It is somewhat ironical that the Marianist Educational Community at Chaminade and Kellenberg have always insisted on four years of Science for every student for the past fifty years, a rare phenomenon in American high schools. We believe that Science is not only technology, but also a humanistic endeavor, helping the human person to understand the phenomena and mysteries of environment, biology, chemistry, and matter and motion. We are concerned that we do not substitute “TECHNE” for the development of the human mind and heart which is the most important part of classical education. Technical skill is not the same as humanism. The Birth of the Phoenix We experienced a great educational challenge in 1987 when we were asked to assume responsibility for the establishment of Maria Regina/St. Agnes, two schools that succeeded each other but were closed by the Diocese. It was a process of testing out our educational philosophy, now in a co-educational experience that had some previous history that did not parallel the program that we intended to establish. Over the past thirty years, we have put in place a program similar to that at Chaminade with our dependence on the traditional understanding of humanism and on the modern need particularly for literacy. We, too, ask our alumni and alumnae continued on page 33 HEART & MIND

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KAPA WELCOMES CLASS OF '17 PARENTS While the members of the Class of 2017 were enjoying their Senior Trip in Disney, their parents were invited to attend a KAPA (Kellenberg Alumni Parents Association) Welcome Party. KAPA Board Members and the newest alumni parents gathered in the cafeteria and the Queen of Apostles Courtyard on May 6th to celebrate their children’s collective accomplishments at Kellenberg, while also enjoying the camaraderie of other Kellenberg alumni parents.

DAY OF RECOLLECTION On March 5th, members of KAPA gathered for a Day of Recollection in the Emmanuel Retreat House. The day began with a faith testimony by Robert Kuppelmeyer (KAPA and current parent). The group then viewed the movie, “The Way,” a powerful and inspirational story about family, friends, and the challenges we face while navigating this ever-changing and complicated world. After the movie, there was a group discussion, as well as the opportunity to receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation. The day ended with Mass, followed by dinner.

KAPA SAVE THE DATES 2017-2018

September 14, 2017 Triumph of the Cross Prayer Service 9:30AM

September 30, 2017 Parents Club/KAPA Food & Wine Expo 6 - 9PM

October 28, 2017 KAPA's Halloween Costume Party 6:30 - 10:30PM

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November 18, 2017 Kapa Dinner Theater 6:00PM

KAPA Day of Recollection 1 - 7PM

April 21, 2018

December 9, 2017 Parents Club/KAPA Christmas Social 5 - 8PM

March 4, 2018

KAPA

Night at the Races 5:30 - 10PM

May 23, 2018 May Crowning Prayer Service 8:30AM

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A FEW MINUTES WITH MR. DENIS MURPHY When and how did you end up teaching at Kellenberg? I began teaching here in 1990. I taught seniors my first year and it was the first class that was a complete Kellenberg class. I had applied and interviewed with Brother Mark Ormond the prior year and unfortunately they didn’t have anything at that time. Then I was doing summer stock theatre on Nantucket when I got the call from my mother that they wanted to hire me. Somebody had left at the last minute so I was actually teaching history my first year until November. At that point, someone else left and they switched me to English. The Marianist connection runs deep for me. Brother Richard Hughes taught me freshman algebra, and his ability to excel in many different areas inspires me to this day. I had Brother Mark in high school at Chaminade as a moderator. My first year at Chaminade, Father Tom was still a Brother and it was Brother Kenneth’s first year as a Brother. Brother Kenneth’s first year at Kellenberg was also my first year at Kellenberg. What do you remember about the early years at Kellenberg? I remember my first day being at a new teacher meeting with Brother Mark Ormond and Brother Joe Bellizzi. They explained a lot of the methodology behind managing a classroom. I think sometimes when we think of teaching when we’re young, we think, “I can’t wait until I can teach Macbeth!” But your bosses are saying, “Do you know how many kids to have in a row and how to keep them quiet?” You don’t realize that there is all this protocol. It was all very enlightening. At the end of the meeting, Brother Joe said to everyone, “Oh, and you have to love the kids.” It was really, to me, a very important thing to realize. As you get older you find yourself saying things to the kids that are more paternal. At the time I started, I think I was five years older than the kids I was teaching, so you’re more focused on trying to make sure they are doing their tasks and so forth. Even in those days, Father Tom was always doing something innovative, and our school had a very strong sense of spirituality.

influence on me. At Fordham University, I was president of Mimes and Mummers, which is the college’s dramatic society, and was named the recipient of the Rev. Alfred Barrett, S.J. Memorial Award for theatre upon graduation. I also used to do summer theatre at my parish, St. Aidan’s in Williston Park.

I always felt that I wasn’t a teacher, but instead that I, “worked at Kellenberg.” I felt like I was part of the fabric. There wasn’t a hierarchy. You had administrators who actually taught, and it’s not always like that at other schools. And now, I can really see why. They want to teach; it’s what they do. They want to be accessible and know what the kids are going through, and then that makes them better administrators. What have you taught and moderated during your time here? I taught history very briefly, as well as music for a short period. Pretty much the rest of the time here I’ve been teaching senior English and involved with the Drama Club. I was the assistant of the Drama Club beginning in fall of 1991, and then in fall 2002 I became moderator. What are your roots in theatre? I began doing theatre in my junior year at Chaminade. My mother actually used to take me to Chaminade shows in the 70s when I wasn’t even in high school yet. Every Saturday night, we’d listen to a cast album on the radio. My uncle was an actor. My mother’s family is very much into the arts, and they were a big

What has been the most meaningful moment you’ve experienced thus far relating to the Drama Club? One thing that made a great impression on me was during Hurricane Sandy, we were doing Oklahoma, and the show is all about finding a new state, new beginnings. We were interrupted by the hurricane, so we only had about a month of rehearsals with a big break in between. When we got back to school, Brother Kenneth gave us the okay to go on with the show. I gave the kids the option, and they all wanted to still do it. It was really a study in perseverance. Brother Kenneth had invited some people who had lost their homes to stay at the school and I would greet them in the lobby on those dark November afternoons and listen to their stories. We had great success with the show, because after hearing these stories the kids just would not settle for anything else. That was a real metaphor for what it means to be here - you don’t give up, you persevere, you keep the faith. The prayer I always read to the kids at the show is from 2 Timothy, Chapter 4, “I have competed well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith.” You can’t fail if you believe all that. I say to them, “You might not be the greatest actor in the world, but we want you to realize that when you are part of this program you are just as important as everybody else.” The lyrics in the last song of that Oklahoma are, “Oh, what a beautiful mornin', Oh, what a beautiful day.” Those words symbolize rebirth and what we all had to go through after the severity of that storm. What has been the best part about teaching at Kellenberg? It has to be the relationships with both the students and the faculty. Oftentimes, you see your colleagues’ children grown up, including continued on page 32

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FIREBIRDS RECONNECT AT CLUB & TEAM SOCIALS

There were many Alumni Club and Team Socials held this year for Firebirds to gather and reconnect. From large alumni gatherings like the Juniper Bar Social in NYC on April 17th, to smaller get-togethers with former teammates, coaches, and moderators, all the socials were successful in creating opportunities for catching up, networking, or even worship. One highlight from the most recent socials was the presentation of the Michael DiMaria ’05 Lacrosse Award at half-time of a Boys Varsity Lacrosse game against Saint Dominic High School on April 7th! Tim Galligan ’05 and his wife, Alyssa, were on hand to present the award to Matt Desio ’18, a member of the Lacrosse team. Lacrosse Alumni were also recognized on the field. If you are interested in helping organize an alumni social for a club, team, or activity you were a part of while at Kellenberg, please reach out to Alumni Director, Mr. Thomas Huggard, at (516) 292-0200 x375 or alumni@kellenberg.org.

A.

B.

D.

C.

E.

F.

G.

H.

I.

J.

A. Tim Galligan ’05 and Alyssa Galligan with Matt Desio ’18 and Mr. and Mrs. DiMaria at Boys Lacrosse Social on April 7th. B. Nicole Gillette ’16, Brigid O’Keefe ’16, Peter Gillette ’17, Mr. Sean Vegas, and Christopher D’Auria ’06 at Band Alumni Social on May 19th. C. Alumni Christmas Social at Seasons 52 on December 22nd. D. Natalie Prophete ’12, Mr. Clark Blanton, and Samantha Wilson ’12 at Firebird Swing Alumni Social on May 19th. E. Girls Basketball Alumnae Social on December 27th. F. Wrestling Alumni Social on January 14th. G. Blue & Gold Alumnae Social on May 13th. H. Juniper Bar NYC Alumni Social on April 17th. I. Cheerleading Alumnae Social on February 8th. J. Alumni XLT on May 20th. 24

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ALUMNI COMMUNION BREAKFAST A.

On Sunday, March 12th, over 300 Firebird alumni and their parents, grandparents, and children returned to campus for the 1st Annual Alumni Communion Breakfast. This wonderful event was co-chaired by Dr. James McBrien ’89 and Mrs. Ann-Marie (Batule) Woodruff ’93. The day began with a Mass which was concelebrated by Father Albert Bertoni, S.M. and Father Philip Eichner, S.M., while the Gospel was proclaimed by Deacon Michael Plona ’07. Following Mass, attendees enjoyed a full breakfast in the cafeteria and listened to an address by Father Philip, who is celebrating his 50th Anniversary of school administration. Father Philip reflected on his 60 years in the classroom, saying, “Our Gospel today talked about being on top of the mountain with Jesus, and I feel that way; I feel like Peter, James, and John, when I go into a classroom. It’s awesome... to be there standing before a group of students, young people, who are in the process of becoming adults. Sometimes it’s so awesome you’re almost paralyzed. These are all unique souls, minds, and hearts with fears and anxieties. The privilege that a K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

B.

teacher gets to deal with the human mind, with human personalities, is awesome.”

C.

Father Philip went on to say, “Here at Kellenberg, we are blessed with our faculty. They are people who really love what they do... Teaching is like parenting - it’s very personal. The quality of the person is what catches the attention of the student. At Kellenberg we say that atmosphere educates. Many things are caught, not taught. They catch it in the atmosphere. And I’m grateful for the faculty that we have because they do create quite an atmosphere.” Kelly (Agostinacchio) Forquignon ’99, a member of Kellenberg Memorial’s Alumni Board, enjoyed the event with her family, saying, “I was fortunate to attend the Alumni Communion Breakfast with my parents, four siblings, our spouses and children, and I was pleased to see so many other tables that also spanned multiple generations of Kellenberg families. What a great opportunity for alumni families to return to our school, reconnect with faculty and friends, and have the privilege of hearing Father Philip speak!”

A. Standing, from left to right, Lauren Doodian ’12, with her parents, Carolyn and Thomas, and Annie Rohrecker ’10, with her mother, Karen. Seated: Meg (Doodian) White ’08 and her husband, James. B. Rev. Mr. Michael Plona ’07 proclaims the gospel at this year's Mass. C. Maria Piuggi ’11 and Meghan Von Elm ’11 reconnect at the breakfast.

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C L A SS N O T ES

c lass notes

Glenn O'Kane ’90

Kerwin Young ’88

’88

Young, who has been a member of the rap group Public Enemy since his junior year at Kellenberg Memorial, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with the famed group in 2013. He is currently composing his fifth symphony, and has been awarded a residency with the U.S. State Department for 2017-2018 as a cultural ambassador. Kerwin’s music can be heard in such feature films as Sister Act 2, Do the Right Thing, Dirty Grandpa, and Star Trek Beyond. His music has also been featured in the television series Fresh Off the Boat and New York Undercover, as well as on radio on the KCPT weekly news broadcast, Ruckus. Kerwin holds a Master of Music degree in Composition from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance.  Kerwin

’89

Chris Johnson is a Director in the Equities Division at Wells Fargo Securities and lives in Rockville Centre with his wife, Tara, and his daughters, Lauryn and Rylee. In his free time, Chris is busy coaching CYO basketball and playing golf, tennis, and platform tennis. He travels the country to enjoy Lauryn's swimming competitions and Rylee's rowing regattas. Chris also serves on the Board of Governors at the Atlantic Beach Club. Steven Lincoln and his wife, Janet, have been married since 2011. Steven is a Nassau County Police Officer currently assigned to the 5th Precinct. Their daughter, Keara ’12, 26

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is attending Fordham University for a Master of Social Work degree. Their son, Patrick ’16, attends University of Rhode Island, while daughter, Caitlin Gaine ’16, attends Rhodes College. Their youngest daughter, Katie ’18, is looking forward to her senior year at Kellenberg Memorial.

’90

O'Kane returned to Kellenberg Memorial to serve as a STEM guest lecturer on January 5, 2017. Glenn, a former Kellenberg faculty member who is now a pharmacist, informed students about the various career paths in the field of pharmacy, as well as the professional skills necessary to succeed in the field. Glenn also attended the annual Career Night for juniors on May 2, 2017 to discuss careers in pharmacy.  Glenn

’91

Alicia Victoria Domingo is proud to report that her youngest son has received an athletic scholarship to play football at LIU Post in the fall. Day Peñaflor returned to Kellenberg Memorial as guest lecturer this past November. She published her debut novel, Unscripted Joss Byrd, with Macmillan in August 2016. The young adult novel has been met with rave reviews and was recently named a Junior Library Guild Selection. For the past 10 years, Day has served as a private academic teacher for young Hollywood stars. Her students have included cast members of Gossip Girl, Boardwalk Empire, and I Am Legend.  Lygia

Lygia Day Penaflor ’91

’92

Tina (Manzo) Caliendo has been a pharmacist for the past 20 years. After working many years as a Community Pharmacist, she went on to receive her Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 2013 and graduated Summa Cum Laude. She became dual certified as a Geriatric Pharmacy Specialist and an Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Specialist. She currently works as an independent Consultant Pharmacist in various nursing homes throughout Long Island. She is also an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at St. John's University in Queens, NY. She currently lives in Whitestone, NY, with her husband of 15 years, Jack, and their four children, Giuliana (11), and triplets Luigi, Sofia, and Valentina (10). Stephanie (Eschenauer) Makar is starting her 9th year at UConn Health as one of the administrative managers in hospital administration. She has been appointed to additional new roles, including hospital safety officer and the environment of care manager, in addition to remaining the clinical project manager for hospitalbased projects. Steph also has taken on working per diem in management for CVS Health. Steph, her husband, Joe, and dog, Nova, recently moved to New Britain, which is not only closer to work but her Long Island home as well. When spare time arises, they continue to enjoy the NY Yankees and the minor league New Britain Bees. Steph enjoys visiting her family, especially their two nieces in New York. She looks forward to continuing being team captain for "Kellenberg Supports Team Matteo" at the Nicholas Pedone 5K this September.

Anne Marie (McBrien) Raneri graduated from Molloy College in 1995 with her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. She worked as a Registered Nurse for several years before becoming a mom to Matthew, Katherine, Josianne, and Lola. Anne Marie and Stephen, her husband of 21 years, live in Syosset. Anne Marie is looking forward to seeing fellow alums at her 25th reunion in September. Lori (Drugan) Valdez graduated LIU Post with a second Master of Science degree in Educational Leadership in January 2017. Carolyn Wesolek is currently working as an EHS Manager at the WR Grace Chemical Plant in Albany, Oregon. She is married to David Richardson and they have a 13 year old son, Cole. The family is also blessed with two dogs, Rosie, a schipperke, & Kota, a wolf hybrid; one eclectus parrot, Neo; and one Spanish Andalusian horse, Romancero. Carolyn carriage drives and rides dressage with Romy. When not riding horses, Carolyn and family can be found traveling the world, riding their Harleys, or chilling at home.

’93

Joseph Chojnacki continues to work at CNN in Manhattan as a Studio Operator. In 2015, he was honored to win the Community Impact Award by Time Warner for his volunteer work with the Fire Department and Knights of Columbus. In October 2016, he won the "Knight of the Year" award for his Knights of Columbus Council. He is a volunteer assistant coach at St. John's

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C L A SS N O T ES

Erica (Lambert) Ferretti ’95 University for the women's volleyball team. He and his wife, Jean, have been married for four years and just bought a co-op apartment in Rockville Centre. Sharonne Navas is the co-founder and executive director of the nonprofit Equity in Education Coalition. The organization is a statewide coalition of parents, leaders, teachers, and community members working to close gaps in achievement for low-income students of color. The coalition was recently featured on the front page of The Seattle Times. Toi Robinson-Trice is married with four children: Jalen (14), Angel (8), Caleb (6), and Cyndi (9 months). In October 2016, Toi and her family relocated to Charlotte, North Carolina, where she teaches sixth grade in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System.

’94

Arika Easley-Houser has been teaching high school at Rutgers Preparatory School since 2014 after having graduated with a Doctor of Philosophy degree in History from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, and given birth to her son, Tyler. Arika had previously worked in college administration and taught college-level classes for over 10 years, and has enjoyed the shift to working with younger students. She is often nostalgic about her days at Kellenberg Memorial and shares her high school experiences with her students, as she is trying to positively influence them. One story that Arika constantly recalls is about Ms.

K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

Patrick Brady ’97 & Patricia Kearney ’97 Purcell, whom she had when she began in the Latin School in seventh grade and whom she had again in ninth grade. She was handing back a test, and Arika did not get a good grade. Ms. Purcell gave her a look and told her that she could do better. Arika will never forget that moment because it transformed her from a student trying to be a more "social" ninth grader to realizing that her academics should continue to be her top priority. Arika salutes Ms. Purcell for that teachable moment, and hopes that she, too, can be a "Miss Purcell" (or Dr. Houser) to her own students. She says, “Teaching is such a rewarding profession and I feel blessed to be able to shape the minds of young people.”

’95

(Lambert) Ferretti and her husband, Bryan, have been married for eight years and have three little girls: Grace (8), Paige (5), and Mia (3). They recently celebrated Grace’s First Holy Communion at their parish, Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal. The family resides in Point Lookout, where Bryan practices as a Certified Public Accountant. Erica is a teacher in the Long Beach Public Schools.

’96

 Erica

Mario Calderón is putting positivity into the world with his social media posts. You can find him @MeesterMario on Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat. He has an international following and has been featured on Ellen DeGeneres’ website. He is also looking forward to hosting a music festival in Bali in the fall.

Amanda (Rances) Wang was recently named the recipient of the Fountain House Humanitarian Award for her work raising awareness about borderline personality disorder, a mental illness. Along with working at Columbia University Medical Center, she is also working on a startup to build a mobile app to help prevent suicide and self-harm behavior.

’97

Brady and Patricia Kearney were married on April 29, 2017. They were friends during their time at Kellenberg and attended the senior prom together. They were reconnected by a fellow Firebird about three years ago and were engaged October 21, 2016. The Nuptial Mass, which was celebrated by Father Thomas Cardone, S.M., was held at St. Mary of the Isle Church in Long Beach. A reception followed at Bridgeview Yacht Club and included many Firebird alums.  Patrick

John Muenzen currently serves as the Manager of Facility Projects for LaGuardia Airport in Queens, where he oversees the technical and operational compliance review process for both the Port Authority's Redevelopment of the Central Terminal Building and the Delta Airlines Airfield Reconfiguration Program. John lives in Plainedge with his wife, Amy (MacEwen) Muenzen ’98, and their two children. Teresa (Kurz) Rynkar and her husband, Chris, celebrated the birth of their third child, Patrick, this spring. Big brother Christopher (3) and big sister Amelia (1) were excited to meet their new sibling!

Kristen (Wynn) Stellfox received a Master of Public Administration degree from Villanova University in December 2016. She recently began a position at Lehigh Valley Health Network as a Major Gift Officer in the Office of Philanthropy. Kelly (Eaton) Wardlow and her family recently spent six weeks in South Africa to bring home Carsten, the most recent addition to their family.

’98

Kristine (Poyer) Albano welcomed her daughter, Abigail Rose, to the world on February 22, 2016. Brian Huber recently moved to West Bay Shore, NY with his two boys, James (7) and Owen (6). Brian is still heavily involved in basketball on Long Island and is a territory manager for a medical device company in the ENT field. He would also like to see more updates from the class of 1998! Robert Kelly, a Board Certified Family Practice Physician, was recently named New Hampshire’s 2017 CDC Childhood Immunization Champion. Dr. Kelly is a strong immunization clinical resource, as well as a highly acclaimed speaker on childhood immunizations. Additionally, he also serves on the New Hampshire (NH) Vaccine Selection Committee, responsible for the review and recommendation of vaccines for the NH Immunization Program.

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’03

departments for her employer, while also managing several subcontract jobs for the Governor’s Office of Storm Relief (GOSR). In her spare time, she is working on the complete renovation of her first home, where she focuses her energy towards her true passion, interior design. Courtney also recently launched a women's apparel retail business.

’00 (Brennan) Schwartz and her husband, Mark, welcomed their first child, Margaret Rose ("Maggie"), on April 1, 2017. Maggie was 7 lbs, 20 inches. Mom and Dad could not be more thrilled.

Danielle (Anglade) Crookes and her family relocated to Atlanta, GA so that she may continue her work with her academic adviser at Emory University. Danielle is currently pursuing her Doctor of Public Health degree in Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

’99

’01

 Sharon

Michael Cammarata and his wife, Mary, have a daughter, Olivia, and a son, Michael. Kelly (Agostinacchio) Forquignon was recently promoted to Assistant Chief Financial Officer of a Long Island law firm and its affiliated companies. Additionally, she has greatly enjoyed serving as Vice President of the Kellenberg Alumni Board. She lives in Massapequa with her husband, Dwight, and two daughters, Madelyn and Julianna. Jennifer (Maddaloni) Prykuta and her family welcomed twin girls in June 2016. They are now a family of five with three beautiful daughters; Natalie (4) and twins, Lindsey and Melanie (1). Joseph Rossi has been married for 10 years and has two children. He recently began working as manager of HVAC Operations at Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus. Courtney (Candiano) Suriano is currently spearheading an internal communications overhaul and directing the administrative 28

HEART & MIND

Patrick Bradley was awarded the Spring Coach Award for Fairfield County high schools at the end of the year award ceremony on June 14, 2016. He also received the award for Coach of 2015-2016 for Fairfield County.

’02

Kerri (Gallagher) Blumenstetter and her husband, Dave, welcomed their second child, a son, Connor, in September 2016. He joins big brother William (4). Michael Franzone was married in March 2015 and welcomed his first child, Sophia Briella, on April 26, 2016. Michael works as a Personal Banker for Chase Bank in Arizona. The family plans to move to Southern Illinois this year to buy their first house. Allison (Aguece) Hoover has been working as a Pre-K teacher at St. Martin de Porres Marianist School for nine years. She got married in May 2016 and is expecting her first child in June 2017.

Thomas DeRosa and his wife, Laura, were overjoyed to welcome Ezekial Thomas to the world on January 27, 2017. Daniel Naughton began a career in the oil and gas industry in 2012 after serving for five years as a Marine Corps Officer. He and his wife, Julie, welcomed their fourth child, Nicholas Thomas, on April 10, 2017. The family resides in Houston, TX.

(Wiley) Keller and her husband, Jonathan, welcomed a baby boy, Andrew Jonathan Keller, on March 27, 2017. Baby Andrew is pictured above with his proud uncle, Bill Wiley ’05!  Bridgette

Jermaine Lee recently earned a Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from Touro College.

’04

Laura (Hammond) Bonventre and her husband, Stephen, recently welcomed their first child. Laura is a teacher at Far Brook School in Short Hills, New Jersey. Christine Canonica became engaged to her fiancé, Patrick, earlier this year. They will be married next September in their new hometown of Nashville, Tennessee.

John McNeal is a Branch Manager for Chase. He and his wife, Andrea, have a 1.5 year old daughter, Mary Rose. Kerry (Kranz) Schiffer and Casey Schiffer, along with their two children, Ethan and Eva, welcomed their third baby, Audrey Joan, in August 2016.

 Pierre

Touissant (Alan) Guiteau, C.F.R., who is a Franciscan Brother, was recently ordained to the transitional diaconate. He hopes to be ordained to the Holy Priesthood in May 2018. Smith and his wife welcomed their second child, Elaina, on December 20, 2016 and celebrated her Baptism on March 26, 2017. Her big sister, Emma, was born April 13, 2014.  Eric

Kathryn (Dionysiou) Troy is pleased to have released two books this year, The Specter of the Indian: Race, Gender, and Ghosts in American Seances, 1848-1890 and A Vision in Crimson. Both books are dedicated with love to her husband and two children.

’05

 Anthony

Carotenuto proposed to his girlfriend, Lisa, at the top of Mt. Washington in the summer of 2016. She said yes!

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Marielle Segarra, a reporter for American Public Media’s Marketplace, returned to Kellenberg Memorial as a guest speaker on March 29, 2017 at an event celebrating the work accomplished in the area of Catholic journalism at a student level. Marielle spoke about how journalism (and storytelling, in particular) can be a public service.

Jessica (Badillo) Modica and her husband, Douglas, welcomed their daughter, Ashley Marie, on December 15, 2016. Brian Sheridan is engaged to be married and is currently living in Washington, DC. Kelly Sullivan recently relocated to a middle school in South Ozone Park to teach sixth and seventh grade math. She completed her fifth year as an Elite Obstacle Course racer, finishing 24th female in the country and 28th in the world. In the Spartan Stadium Series, she was the fourth Elite Female. Kelly was also cast on the fourth season of Steve Austin's “Broken Skull Challenge” and was an alternate for the “Spartan Ultimate Team Challenge” television show.

Photo courtesy of Gregory A. Shemitz, The Long Island Catholic

(Klimkowski) Frarey and her husband, Christopher, welcomed a daughter, Schuyler Joan, on November 28, 2016. She joins older brother, Christopher Jr. (2). The family currently resides in Suffolk, Virginia. Timothy Fuchs recently moved back to the United States from London. He and his fiancée have bought a home in Wellington, FL and will be getting married in July 2017 on Long Island.

’07

Cook became engaged to be married to her fiancé, Matt Mahony, on October 9, 2016.  Sheila

’08

’06

Meghan Droge has been adjunct teaching an Introduction to Public Relations course at her graduate school alma mater, Iona College, since January 2015. (McKenna) Rohrs and Teddy Rohrs, who were high school sweethearts, were married on July 3, 2016. They are both teachers in Brooklyn and currently reside in Mineola.

K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

Hangley returned to Kellenberg Memorial to guest lecture in Mr. Blanton’s chorus classes on December 19, 2017. Mary is a successful professional musician who has distinguished herself as a past participant in the Merola Opera Program, a highly competitive opera training program which accepts just 23 singers out of over 800 applicants. She is now a first-year Resident Artist with the Minnesota Opera.  Mary

 Mary

Elnick and his wife, Kelly (Corva) Elnick ’07, welcomed their first child, William Thomas Jr. (“Billy”), on August 16, 2016 at 3:01am. Billy weighed 4 pounds, 14 ounces and was 18.5 inches tall.

Plona took an important step in his journey to the priesthood when he was ordained to the transitional diaconate on November 5, 2016 by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio at St. Joseph’s Seminary in Yonkers, NY. He is to be ordained a Catholic Priest for the Diocese of Rockville Centre by Bishop John O. Barres on June 24, 2017. Dcn. Mike also had the honor of proclaiming the Gospel at the Diocese of Rockville Centre’s Mass of Installation for Bishop John Barres on January 31, 2017. Dcn. Mike is pictured above with fellow Kellenberg Memorial alum, Paul Clores ’11, who served as acolyte at the Mass.  Michael

 Margaret

Paul Viscuse is currently training as an internal medicine resident physician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

 William

C L A SS N O T ES

Mikel Dambreville and his wife welcomed their first child, Anthony Chase Dambreville, to the family on March 11, 2017.

Meghan Schiffer and Jimmy Riegel became engaged to be married this past winter. Meghan works as an optometrist on Long Island. Jimmy is working in finance at a hedge fund in Manhattan. They will be getting married in the spring of 2018.

Meaghan Leahy has enjoyed a five year career in the television production industry. She is now looking forward to starting graduate school in September at Bank Street College of Education, where she will be studying to become a child life specialist.

Courtney (Kenney) Bernstein married her husband, Joshua, on January 18, 2017. Lauren Handy began working for 1-800Flowers.com in October 2016 as a Performance Coaching Manager and has traveled to Ohio and the Philippines to provide additional support to those sites. She is currently planning her wedding for Pi Day 2018 with her fiancé, John, with whom she's adopted two dogs and a cat. Marie Hasbrouck is engaged to be married in July 2018. Sarah Kropek graduated from Queens College with a Master of Science degree in Education with a concentration in Literacy in May 2017. She has also been teaching for two years at St. Thomas the Apostle Elementary School. HEART & MIND

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’10

Michael Brodnansky is a medical student (OMS-I) at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is an ensign (O-1) in the US Navy, as well as Captain in the Glen Cove EMS. Christine DiGregorio recently graduated Summa Cum Laude from Touro Law Center.

O'Connell was recently honored by the Nassau County Legislature and the Police Benevolent Association with a “Top Cop” citation, which recognized his efforts in saving a child locked in a sweltering car last summer.  Nathan

’09

Rebecca Christel recently graduated from Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine. She will be moving to Lexington, Kentucky to intern at Park Equine Hospital. Aileen (Johnson) Gesner and her husband, Tim, celebrated the birth of their first child, Owen Reilly, on April 4, 2017. She graduated with her medical degree from Rocky Vista University in Parker, Colorado in May and will be moving back to Long Island this summer to complete her residency at a local hospital. Amanda Iorio recently graduated from Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine and will begin her residency specializing in orthodontics at Montefiore Medical Center in July. Michael Marsigliano received a Bachelor of Arts degree in May 2013 from Hofstra University, where he majored in History and minored in Political Science. He then obtained his Master of Education degree from Fordham University's Graduate School of Education. Michael currently works at Brooklyn Prospect Charter School as a sixth grade Learning Specialist Resident Teacher in an integrated coteaching classroom.

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HEART & MIND

Julia Galea returned to Kellenberg Memorial to serve as a STEM guest lecturer on January 5, 2017. A recent graduate of the School of Pharmacy at Northeastern University, Julia educated students about the coursework and clinical rotations required to complete a six-year degree in pharmacy. Julia is currently a first-year pharmacy resident at North Shore University Hospital. Karen Goldburg has spent the past two years expanding into the environmental field. Last year she cofounded a nonprofit organization, Dig In Community, that brings watershed restoration and education programming to K-12 students throughout the Portland, Oregon Metro area. She is currently completing a year-long position with the School for Field Studies, an environmental studies abroad program in Far North Queensland, Australia. In September, Karen will move to Ann Arbor, Michigan to pursue a Master of Science degree in Environment and Sustainability. Megan Kuzniewski received her Juris Doctor from St. John's University School of Law on June 4, 2017. She will take the New York bar exam this summer and will begin working as an Associate at Clyde & Co. US LLP in the Fall. Tayler Mollitor is a Licensed Real Estate Salesperson at Douglas Elliman Real Estate. She is a graduate of Salve Regina University and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance and Business.

’11

Elizabeth Hehir graduated from Stony Brook University in May 2017 with a Master of Social Work.

Mary Keenan graduated from Sacred Heart University with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy this May. Kim Mackay graduated from UCLA this June with a Master of Social Welfare (MSW) degree and is launching her career as a psychotherapist for disadvantaged children, adolescents, and families. Annemarie Shaw has been pursuing an international MBA from St. Mary’s College in London, UK. For the first year, she worked full time in London at one of the world’s top investment banks and studied part time. The fall of 2016 was spent conducting research and finalizing her dissertation in Bangkok. Annemarie received the Director General’s Award for Academic Excellence, which is given to the student with the best written assignment excluding dissertation. Through her participation in the program, she has been able to travel to 13 different countries and numerous cities, both in Europe and Asia.

May 2016. Starting in July 2017, she will be attending the S.I. Newhouse School at Syracuse University as a candidate for a Master's Degree in Public Communication with a specialization in Television, Radio, and Film. James Pusterino graduated from Hofstra University in 2016 with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, as well as a Master of Science degree in Taxation. Katrina Schmidt moved to Maryland following her graduation from York College of Pennsylvania. She is now engaged to be married and a new homeowner. Richard Schreiner was recently promoted to Staff Sergeant in the United States Air Force.

’12

Kathleen Ackert graduated from Siena College Cum Laude and is now attending medical school at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Nicholas Adamo graduated Magna Cum Laude in Civil Engineering from Manhattan College in May 2016 with a GPA of 3.81. He completed his 12 season, 4 year, Division 1 athletic career, competing in the sports of Cross Country & Indoor/Outdoor Track & Field as a team co-captain and shining star on the team. Upon graduation, Nicholas received a full time job as a civil engineer with STV, Inc., one of the leading engineering and construction firms in New York City. Nicholas was recently accepted to and enrolled in Columbia University, where he is currently working towards his Master of Science degree in Civil Engineering. Kristin O'Grady graduated from Fordham University with a Bachelor of Science degree in General Science in

’13

 Deanna

Marie Curato welcomed a future Firebird, Nickolai James Curatolo (1). Ava Mack graduated Magna Cum Laude from Boston University in May with both her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in Political Science. She will be moving to Boston permanently to work for Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker. Theresa McKenna graduated from St. Thomas Aquinas College in May 2017 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Graphic Design. She is participating in the Disney College Program in the fall.

CapriAnna Pappalardo recently participated in the Brooklyn Half Marathon and ran as a member of Hofstra University’s Division 1 Cross Country team. She also took part in

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Kristen Schapowal recently graduated Summa Cum Laude from High Point University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in International Relations and History. In the fall, she will begin graduate school at the George Washington University, where she will work toward a Master of Arts degree in Middle East Studies with a specialization in International Security Studies. Melissa Walsh recently graduated from Adelphi University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English with honor cords from the English, Italian, and Education National Honor Societies. She was also a member of the Dean's Circle for four years. Melissa will attend Adelphi for one more year of graduate school to receive her Master of Education degree.

Walsh, who recently graduated from Amherst College, was awarded the Friends of Amherst Coaches Award for his contributions to the football team as an inside linebacker. Rory's brother, James Walsh ’11, who is a faculty member at Kellenberg Memorial, was on hand to celebrate the honor.

Services, and has been accepted into the accelerated Clinical Mental Health graduate counseling program. She has been selected to go on an international service trip for one week to Guatemala.

’14

Boylan, is currently in the transition of becoming a First Class Cadet (senior) at SUNY Maritime College. He says, “One thing that has followed me to college from Kellenberg is service to others before oneself. I have involved myself within student government, the Newman Club, and countless other clubs and committees that have been organized to help improve community life on campus.” Through the help of the Platoon Leaders Class, which is a program run by the Marine Corps for current college students and college graduates, Thomas will be attending Officer Candidate School this summer in Quantico, Virginia. It has been a competitive selection process in order to be considered for the chance to become a United States Marine Corps Officer. He left for Officer Candidate School on June 3rd and looks forward to the chance to prove himself as a leader. He hopes to graduate from college as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps and says, “Earning that title will be one of the greatest honors I could receive, especially in the service to my country, just like the men and women who have gone before me. Thank you and wish me luck!”  Thomas

 Rory

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Cannatella had the privilege of shaking Pope Francis’ hand during the Papal Audience at the Vatican on February 1, 2017. A.J. spent the spring semester in Italy, while taking part in St. John’s University’s study abroad program.  A.J.

right, a junior at James Madison University, was pleasantly surprised to reconnect with Mary Hearon, left, a junior at Mount Saint Mary’s University, when they were both leading “alternative spring break trips” for Habitat for Humanity in Atlantic Beach, Florida this spring! Kristen writes, “We both agreed that our time at Kellenberg, from teachers to coaches to clubs, strongly influenced who we are and why we want to continue to give back to different communities. We hope that one day Kellenberg can have it's own chapter of Habitat for Humanity!”  Kristen Flynn,

Rose Haslbauer is finishing her junior year at St. John's University, where she is studying Theology with a double minor in English and Psychology. In February, she attended a service trip with SJU to go to the Give Kids the World Village in Florida, helping give families with terminally ill children a cost-free and stress-free weeklong vacation. Rose has been inducted as one of seven members into the prestigious Skull and Circle Society for St. John's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences within SJU for exemplifying academic excellence as well as extensive involvement on and off campus, as well as been awarded the Silver Key for the Theology department. She serves as the Vice President elect for the SJU Students for Life organization on campus as well. This summer Rose is participating in a program called LeaderworX, in which she will be helping middle and high school students learn about social justice and engaging in service projects with them. Adrian Laudani currently attends the University of Scranton and spent a semester abroad in Rome, Italy last spring. Upon returning, she has been inducted into the honor society for her major, Counseling and Human

Marianna Scarallo is going into her senior year at SUNY Delhi and will graduate next spring with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Hotel & Resort Management. This summer she is interning at the Sagamore Resort in Lake George and plans to pursue admittance to a management training program there upon graduation.

’15

 Fresh

off running the fastest 1000 meters by a U.S. female collegian this year, Jazmine Fray (Texas A&M University ’19) put in a workout at Kellenberg in December 2016 with former Firebird teammates, Deirdre Lewin ’16 (College of William and Mary ’20), Bridget McNierney ’15 (Saint Joseph's University ’19), and Ashlin Conroy ’12 (LIU Post ’16). Cara Lee is attending Fairfield University, where she works as an editor for the school's newspaper, The Mirror. She is also a Communications and Media Relations intern at MakeA-Wish Connecticut.

’16

Erin Leghart was recently selected as the America East Women’s Lacrosse Defensive Player of the Week after helping University at Albany win a pair of one-goal games. The freshman goalkeeper helped her team produce their first-ever victory over a top-10 program at Cornell University and a league contest against University of New Hampshire, securing a spot for University of Albany in the 2017 America East Tournament.

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C L A SS N O T ES

research at Yale University’s Infant Cognition Center, served as president of Hofstra’s Neuroscience Club, and also volunteered with Shooting Stars, a special needs athletic program. This summer, Capri will pursue her dreams by beginning her studies at Stony Brook University to become an occupational therapist.


C lass Notes

Continued from Eye on the Latin School on page 13

NEWSDAY FEATURES L.S. WRITERS

 Bridget

Newsday’s “Kidsday” section selected student writers from the Brother Joseph C. Fox Latin School to be featured in the June and September 2017 editions. Nicholas Cortese ’23, Andrew Galligan ’23, Jared Valluzzi ’21, & Colin Richards ’21 had the privilege of interviewing NY Yankee Aaron Judge. Emily Carroll ’23, Isabel Connolly ’23, Elizabeth Musso ’22, and Elizabeth Mooney ’22 interviewed Canadian-American author, Gordon Korman, who has written over 50 popular children's and young adult fiction books.

Simons, who is currently

attending the University of Notre Dame, was named Academic AllAmerican

(All-Academic)

by

US

Lacrosse for the 2016 season. This is the first time in Kellenberg Memorial Girls Lacrosse history that a player has been awarded this honor. Former Coach Mrs. Anne (Staudt) Masiulis ’02 and Assistant Coach Ms. Caroline McTiernan presented the certificate to Bridget when she visited campus for the Thanksgiving Eve alumni festivities on November 23, 2016. Steven Torre has committed to play basketball at Molloy College. This choice has reunited him with his big brother, Mike Torre ’15. This reunion brings big promise to the Molloy Lions Men's Basketball program. Mike and Steve played together at Kellenberg and were an unstoppable pair.

 Beth

Ulicny, Samantha Laurelli,

and Liz Perrone, all former Phoenix Emporium staffers, stopped by the store to visit Mrs. Rizzuto and Mrs. Willi during the Thanksgiving Eve alumni festivities on November 23, 2016.

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Continued from "A Few Minutes with Mr. Denis Murphy" on page 23:

my own son. I remember when Elizabeth Huggard was born and now she’s a junior in high school and an important member of the Drama Club. That’s something that stays with you. I would have to say the relationships with the students that continue, even though you may not see them until they are a teacher themselves. I even teach children of students that I taught! What do you hope to instill in your students? I want them to be prepared not only for college, but also for them to be prepared for life. I want them to be compassionate; I want them to persevere. I want them to realize that life is not always happy moments. There will be trying times and difficulties. I want them to remember Kellenberg as a place that prepared them for the challenges of life, not just a place where they took tests and quizzes. We really educate the head and the heart here and want our students to be good people. I want my students to be complete people who realize that their lives matter and their lives are meaningful. We want to see them and we want them to come

back as alumni! Our reunions and alumni events really seem to be taking off, which is great. Do you have any advice for students or alumni who are facing obstacles in their lives? The greatest thing that they can learn going into a situation like that is that they are not alone. Everything that you have learned is in you. The philosophy curriculum we teach junior year with Dr. Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning is a profound thing. You are not alone and you should have confidence in yourself. You have to face your challenges; they’re not going to just go away. You have to reach out. You can always reach out to us. I have always found with the Marianists, when you have a birth, a marriage, a death, that’s when they are at their best. When my mother got sick, Fr. Tom told me that if I needed a priest any time of day or night to just let him know. Where else can you get that at work? What does the phrase, “Kellenberg Family,” mean to you? Everybody has mentors, and you maintain those mentors whether

you are younger or older. Mr. Buckley and Mr. Solosky inspired me with their humor and wisdom. They made me realize that you had to be yourself; you can’t be somebody else. I believe that to be a tenet of Marianist education; you don’t just take somebody’s notes and then you’re a teacher. You have to eventually make your own path. You are present for your students. If they’re going through a rough time, you work with them. I always tell my students, “Everything can be cleared up with a conversation. I don’t want your mother calling me. I want you to come to me.” Life is difficult and things happen, but we are part of a family and the students do their part and I do my part. I realize there’s more to life than English class sometimes… that’s part of being a good family member - to educate the whole person as opposed to just teaching verbal and English skills. I don’t always get there, but I try to emulate people like Mr. Blanton, Mr. Buckley, Mr. Huggard, Mr. Benintendi, Mrs. von Schoenermarck. I don’t try to be them, but I learn from them and try to better myself.

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C ov e r St o ry

Continued from "Fr. Philip Eichner Reflects" on page 21:

when they come back if they feel prepared. We are not hesitant to change our curriculum to fit their needs. Atmosphere Educates One of the things that we have learned at Kellenberg, which we took for granted at Chaminade, was the role of atmosphere in the success of an educational program. We say, “Atmosphere educates.” Or we say, “Many things are caught, not taught!” There is a truth in this statement. Example, attitude, selfconfidence, meaning, and all the humanistic virtues that are part of a Christian education are things that are hard to pin down, but you know them when you experience them. Part of that atmosphere is Civility, Order, Respect. Part of it is the quality of the school’s physical appearance. Part of it is the approach of teachers to respect the individuality and the uniqueness of each person. Part of it is to have many social and creative activities that engage a student in extra-curricular work. These develop students in social skills, in finding out areas in which they have talent or interest, and in giving them a sense of their own creative potential. Faith Instruction: Our “Raison d’etre” One of the challenges that a Catholic School has faced over these past sixty years is the role of faith instruction. This is a question on the familial level, on the elementary level and on both secondary and college levels. Faith instruction is the raison d’etre of any Catholic School. The Catholic intellectual tradition puts all knowledge as means of approaching God. It takes Jesus as the Word as a paradigm of all learning. It puts faith instruction at the center of this circle of knowledges. How do we do it? In a culture that has leaned away from formal religion - “I am spiritual, but not religious” K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

- is the mantra, one cannot take instruction in the faith for granted. How do we deal with students who have been sacramentalized, but not evangelized? That takes a very creative response on the part of our faculty, a knowledge of their own faith, and the ability to share it with enthusiasm with the modern generation. We hope that we are doing so.

There has been a great change in our expectations of the 1950s and of our now millennial age. Many of these changes are psychological or philosophical. I would like to point out a few of these changes. One of the challenging philosophical shifts has been the emphasis on the subject, as opposed to the object; the self as opposed to

A.

the other. We have seen the self becoming the center of the universe: the earth does not revolve around the sun, but the sun revolves around the self. “Selfie” is a common slang term, but it is one of tremendous philosophical consequence. The other shift in our consciousness is our dependence and even our obsession, with informational technology. The marvel of the Internet as with all modern inventions, has a shadow side. A. Father Philip celebrates Mass at It has made all information Founder's Hollow. B. Father Philip gets in available at our fingertips, in the Disney spirit while celebrating Mass seconds we get knowledge that it might take us days to during the Senior Trip. research. It gives us such Education of the Heart a vast opportunity to research There are many other things that and to know. However, it has I can say that have changed over made our human interaction these past years in education into meaningless gibberish in and generally in our modern most cases and often bullying consciousness. The latter comes or salacious repartee. I am not to us from our media and from approaching this as a Luddite our experience as a culture. (someone who is opposed to B.

any modern invention), but as a caution to the diminution of true interpersonal interaction, for which there is no substitute in human development. This is an ongoing question and has not reached its apogee of challenge. Another aspect of human development that is often neglected in educational theory and practice is “education of the heart.” Since this veers on value systems and on spiritual legacies, many educational programs steer clear of any understanding of good or evil, right or wrong, just or unjust, acceptable or not acceptable, etc. The Christian understanding of education necessarily includes the education of the heart, of that inner person who is often challenged by the forces of evil in the world and the negative proclivities in their own person. Trying to be good is not an easy task. Since it is so difficult, many philosophies abandon that challenge and substitute self-judgement for the ultimate criterion of what’s good or what’s bad. If you like it, it is okay; if it fits your needs, it’s okay. You are the ultimate arbiter of what is good or bad. A few years ago, one of our Supreme Court Justices made this outstanding statement. Really never before was it expressed so clearly about this modern phenomenon of substituting oneself for reality. He said, in effect, that the great philosophy of the United States is that one can create their own value system according to their own needs, wants, and judgements. For a Catholic School, this education of the heart is a major proposition, one that is challenged by our own inner limitations and also challenged by our culture. Ultimately, it is the quality of our hearts that counts the most, not our intellectual or personal skills or material achievements. T HEART & MIND

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Benefit Golf Outing

26TH ANNUAL ONE HEART-ONE MIND BENEFIT GOLF OUTING On Monday June 5th, stormy skies cleared just in time for over 350 golfers to participate in Kellenberg Memorial’s 26th Annual One Heart-One Mind Benefit Outing. Golfers teed off at three of Long Island’s premiere courses: The Seawane Club, Rockaway Hunt Club, and Lawrence Yacht and Country Club. Under the direction of Mrs. Jill Mollitor and Mrs. Eileen Vogel, the event was enjoyed by all. After the golf portion of the day concluded, nearly 500 gathered back at The Seawane Club for a lively cocktail hour and delicious dinner with live and silent auctions. A.

B.

C.

E.

D.

G.

F.

A. Once a Firebird, Always a Firebird! Alumni at the Benefit Outing gathered for an impressive group shot. B. Elizabeth Killian ’16 and her mother, Carol Ann, catch up with Mr. Joseph Beyrouty ’92. C. Tim Sullivan ’96 sets up his shot. D. Joseph Veneroni ’11, Robert Kuppelmeyer, Michael Henneborn, and Mr. Aaron Codling ’11. E. Mr. Bill Masiulis ’01, Paul Masiulis, Robert York, Mr. Bobby York ’01. F. Event Coordinators Jill Mollitor and Eileen Vogel. G. Hannah Gaudioso ’17, John Howfield ’17, Kathleen Carroll ’17, Mr. Kevin A'Hearn, and Michael A'Hearn ’17 gather at the Gala Reception. 34

HEART & MIND

A K E L L E N B E RG M E M O R I A L FA M I LY P U B L I CAT I O N


In Memoriam

The souls of the faithful departed in the Kellenberg community remain in our prayers. Below are the names of those members who passed away from November 2016 until May 2017. Eternal rest grant unto them O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May their souls, and all the souls of the faithful departed, through Your mercy, rest in peace. Amen. Charles Bergin, father of Erin Bergin ’20 Tom Borruso, father-in-law of Susan Borruso, KMHS faculty Virgilio Cannatella, grandfather of A.J. ’14 and Maggie ’18 Cannatella James Carew, father of Steve Carew ’93, former KMHS faculty George Costello, father of Grace ’18 and George ’19 Costello Francis Darcy, father of John Darcy ’96 Ann Esposito, KAPA McDara Folan, grandfather of Jacqueline Folan ’10, Mark Folan ’12, and Erin Pederson ’19 Daniel Martelly, father of Saralee Martelly ’11, SMMS Faculty John Naughton, father of Katie ’98, John ’01, Danny ’03, and Tom ’05 Naughton Elizabeth Walsh, grandmother of James Walsh ’11, KMHS faculty, and Rory Walsh ’13 Continued from "The President's Desk" on page 2:

rules and its laws. Brother Nigel also moderates Quiz Bowl, a competition based upon extensive knowledge in particular areas. Both of these activities require intense preparation and extended trips. One of the side effects of these types of competitions is that they get to meet new people in new contexts, often people of their own age who have great intellectual interests. Brother Nigel has taken on leadership in both of these National Activities. It is interesting to see that often alumni come back to help Brother Nigel in moderating these groups. Our spring athletic season was very successful and enthusiastic, in spite of the fact that the weather was unusually cold and that there was an enormous amount of rain, making scheduling a nightmare for our athletic director, Mr. John Fechtmann. As you can see on our website, they all had a successful season. In fact, the Boys Varsity Baseball and Boys Varsity Lacrosse are still in operation, contesting tomorrow, Tuesday, for ultimate championships. Both of them have very eventful seasons this year. We wish them the best of luck tomorrow. (Breaking news K E L L E N B E RG .O RG

before going to press: both teams won their respective championship!) As you know, we have our Athletic Banquets back at Kellenberg Memorial, a move that was welcomed by all – better parking and better banqueting! I want to thank Mrs. Patricia Shepland for always putting on a banquetlike presentation for the meal that centers our athletic awards. For the past 150 years, the formal American educational system has grown both in numbers and in pedagogy. The term used was “Universal Education,” that is, education not just for the elite, but for everybody. The American system has been very successful in creating opportunities for learning for all levels of society as well as prioritizing this type of formal education by very strong legislation. Also, during this period, it has gone through many ups and downs, new theories that are successful and new policies of educational technique that lead us down a dead end. Sometimes these novelties are fads that promise an easy road to education, but

wind up elitist. The history of these 150 years is very fascinating and very important for an educator to understand which doors to open and which doors to close. Most recently, we have seen the arrival of Common Core, about which we have spoken previously, and now we have STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics). Sensing the exclusivity of these four areas of knowledge, some have changed the acronym to STREAM – adding Religion and the Arts. Historically, any new thrust in the educational scene tends to takeover beyond its relative place and then fades back to where it should have stayed in the first place. (Please see Mrs. Erin Cicalese ’98’s article in this issue.) In my educational experience, there have been about eight different approaches to teaching Mathematics. They had their heyday and then either fizzled out, or returned to their relative positons. A Blessed Summer to all!

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Heart & Mind - Summer 2017  

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