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Art Changes Lives! 2003-2013

AO Parents Magazine Out of the box Ad.indd 1

Out of the Box is sponsored by Julian Roberts Haynes in memory of Dr. Lucile McGehee Haynes and Grace K. and David E. Johnson. Additional support provided by the Susan Phillips Education Gift Fund.

8/6/13 8:55 AM


October2013

Volume 4 Number 8

30 Columns

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Publisher’s Note Kendra Sumner

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Living With Children John Rosemond

Fright Night Eight ways to help your child beat nightmares and get a good night’s sleep.

10 Ways to Enjoy Autumn Outside

New ideas for fall outdoor fun, plus some old favorites!

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Kids Health Watch sponsored by Pediatric Associates of Auburn

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Get This! Gerry Paige Smith

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Dave Says Dave Ramsey

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A Page in a Book Gerry Paige Smith

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Fall Festivities and Halloween Fun

Find Lee County events for the season in our extensive guide.

Find an Extra Hour Each Day

The FlyLady helps you better manage your time.

On The Cover Second grader Christopher Floyd II and 3-year-old Chloe are the children of Christopher and Camille Floyd of Opelika. Christopher enjoys reading, playing drums and sports. Chloe enjoys dancing, playing dress up and photography. They both enjoy traveling, singing in the children’s church choir, and activities on the iPad. Thanks to Parkway Farmer’s Market for all the pumpkins!

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The FlyLady Marla Cilley

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Parenting on the Plains Polly Dunn, Ph.D.

Departments 6

Bits and Pieces 12

School Bits 44

Family Calendar 52

Movie Reviews www.facebook.com/auburnopelika.parents


Publisher’sNote “There’s someone walking around the house!” Seems like a normal statement until you couple that with it coming from me at 3 a.m. after being woken up from a deep sleep. These six words spoken to a snoring husband can elicit a response worthy of an Academy Award nomination! You would think that he could literally fly down the hall with his super hero cape flapping behind, leaving all evil doers running for their lives! However, being a mom of four, hearing all those things that ‘go bump in the night’ just comes with the mommy territory. It is like we have a sixth sense about us for hearing even the quietest movements and noises that relate to our children, home and environment. So, when I said that I heard those footsteps in the hallway, I knew it was our oldest son sleepwalking again. I just did not want to get out of my warm and cozy bed and thought I would send the super hero to swoop in and save the day (and my R.E.M. cycle). Parker, my nine-year-old son, has always talked in his sleep and has nightmares that could wake the house, and ultimately, these result in occasional sleepwalking. Some conversations last only a word or two, but others could go on for ten minutes at a time. The family has adjusted to the talking after hours, however, the night terrors were scary at times. He would just scream out in the middle of the night and wake the whole house. Even after turning on lights, waking him up and reassuring him he was safe, it would take a few minutes to calm and convince him that it was only a dream and he could go back to sleep. After the first few spooky nights of hearing the loud screams, the family understands the source and knows that mom or dad is on the way to comfort. The sleepwalking can be the most creepy. We have intervened before Parker walked right out the back door at 2 a.m., backpack in hand, and “heading to school”. Other times, he just goes up and down the hallway. It can be chilling to wake to the sound of footsteps outside your bedroom door! In the feature article, Fright Night: 8 Ways to Beat Nightmares, Malia Jacobson suggests that while nightmares can be a normal childhood experience, if too frequent, they can cause a disruption in daily functioning, cause children to be irritable, anxious and even depressed. Life transitions, like a new school, moving into a new house, or an upcoming trip can cause stress and invoke bad dreams at night. A sure way to calm those fears is to have your children talk about things that might be bothering them. As for the staying-up-too-late kids, that Boogeyman can creep into their dreams. Children need their sleep and setting a bedtime that gives them their much needed rest can keep the nightmares away, too. The fall festival and Halloween season can bring on different kinds of spine-chilling experiences. Or, as my kids like to call it, daytime nightmares! Who doesn’t like a few eerie front porches, hair-raising costumes or horrifying hayrides? Or, for those little ones, fun on the farm, trunk-or-treats and bobbing for candy apples? Check out this month’s Fall Festival Guide for all the local Halloween events, pumpkin patches, arts and craft shows and more! Each of your weekends can be packed with fall fun perfect for the entire family. Whether you are looking for more goose bumps and tricks or are trying to avoid the scary screams at night, from one parent to another, Happy October!

Kendra

kendra@auburnopelikaparents.com

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

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Auburn Opelika Lee County’s Foremost Parenting Source

Auburn Opelika Parents Magazine is founded on the principle that parenting is an exciting, diverse, challenging, and significant role in our community. Auburn Opelika Parents Magazine is a community advocate for families and the parenting process.

Publisher Kendra Sumner kendra@auburnopelikaparents.com Editor DeAnne Watson deanne@auburnopelikaparents.com Associate Editor Kelly Watson Contributing Writers Katie Beltramo Marla Cilley Polly Dunn, Ph.D. Malia Jacobson Dave Ramsey John Rosemond Ellen Royal, M.D. Gerry Paige Smith Cover Photography Candy Avera www.pictureperfectbycandy.com

President Jason Watson Director of Sales Justin Sumner justin@auburnopelikaparents.com (334) 209-0552 Ad Design Tim Welch

Visit us online at www.auburnopelikaparents.com Auburn-Opelika Parents magazine is published monthly by KeepSharing, LLC. Mailing address: 1204 Owens Road Auburn, Alabama, 36830. The phone number is (334) 209-0552 and fax is (334) 826-7303. Auburn-Opelika Parents is copyrighted 2013 by KeepSharing LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Opinions expressed in Auburn-Opelika Parents magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the owners, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products and services herein.

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LivingWithChildren by John Rosemond

Dealing with a Lazy Student in Your Home Q: Our 9-year-old son Bobby is very intelligent and capable of doing good work in school when he wants to, but he is generally just downright lazy. As a result, he makes mediocre grades and we have to monitor his homework to make sure he does it. Even then, 30 minutes of homework takes him a couple of hours, during which time he finds every possible way of dawdling. Believe it or not, despite his lazy ways, Bobby’s in the gifted program. He’s about to enter fourth grade and we’d like to nip his lack of motivation in the bud, if possible. By the way, a psychologist who tested him last year said Bobby’s only problem is laziness. What can we or his teacher do to get him to step up to his school responsibilities? A:

First, the fact that the school has identified your son as “gifted and talented” may be part of the problem. My finding is that a good number of children who’ve been so identified seem to feel that their mere participation in G&T programs entitles them to good grades no matter how much effort they put into their schoolwork. So they do just enough to get by and no more. The further problem is that schools will not, generally speaking, lower the boom on these kids. Teachers continue giving them

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

decent report card grades even though they don’t complete assignments or turn in work, do poorly on tests, and so on. And once a child’s been promoted to G&T status, demotion is virtually out of the question. These kids are smart all right. They’re smart enough to figure out that the only consequence of their lack of effort is that adults get upset. As things stand, your son has no reason to change his ways. The emotional burden of the problem is being borne by you. In effect, this is your problem, not his. For him to solve the problem—and he is the only person who can solve it—it has to belong to him. It has to upset him, not you. You, therefore, need to take the monkey off your back and put it on his. If the monkey causes him enough discomfort and distress, he will figure out a way to tame the monkey. On day one, send him to school with a folder full of daily report cards—half-sheets of paper on which you’ve printed “Bobby turned in all of his homework today, finished all of his classwork on time, and all of his work was B or better.” Underneath this goal statement are printed Yes and No and the teacher’s name beside a place for her teacher’s signature. At the end of every school day, Bobby takes the DRC to his

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teacher, upon which she circles either Yes or No (Make sure you emphasize to her that it’s all or nothing) and signs her name. Bobby brings the card home. On a daily basis, at-home privileges—television, video game, outside play, having friends over, and regular bedtime) require a Yes. If he loses privileges more than once through the week, they are lost on the weekend as well. That means that on any given day, Bobby will be working for both a short-term and relatively long-term goal. Obviously, you should arrange all of this with his teacher in advance. This is an example of what I call the Agony Principle: Adults should not agonize over anything a child does or fails to do if the child is perfectly capable of agonizing over it himself. In other words, the person who experiences the emotional consequences of a problem will be motivated to solve the problem. If my experience in such matters holds true, Bobby will tame his monkey in a few weeks. At that point, however, for the improvement to “stick,” you and the teacher must continue to enforce the new system for at least three more months. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents’ questions on his website at www.rosemond.com.

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bits & pieces The City of Opelika Parks and Recreation's Fall Festival & Children's Carnival

Auburn Downtown Trick-or-Treat

Join us on Tuesday, October 29th, from 6:00-8:00 PM at the Opelika Sportsplex: W. James Samford Soccer Complex, for a safe alternative to trick or treating for children ages 12 and under. Children, wear costumes and bring a treat bag. Visit with local mascots and check out new features this year! Hayrides, prizes, games, rides, entertainment, inflatable slides, special booths and exciting events! Bring the whole family out for a night of food, fun and fellowship.

Halloween Movie Night: “Ghostbusters�

Join Auburn Parks and Rec, October 30, 6:15 PM, for a spooky night of Halloween fun at Town Creek Park. As the sun sets, gather around the outdoor movie screen for a night of family fun! Be sure to bring your lawn chairs and blankets. Free to the public. 501-2940.

w f a 13th Annual Downtown Trick-or-Treat will be held October 31 from 6:00-8:00 PM. Bring your monsters, rock stars, warriors and clowns to the best party in town! Join us in the excellent alternative to door-to-door trickor-treating. Downtown Auburn merchants will provide treats for the children and delightful sounds from our 'special' entertainment will fill the night air. Also, don't miss out on your chance to win the 'best costume' contest! Parents must accompany children to this even. Free to the public. For more info, dstewart@auburnalabama.org.

On The Tracks Food & Wine Festival

Come join us in downtown Opelika for great food, live music, and fun at the 16th biannual "On the Tracks" Food and Wine Event. The outdoor event will take place October 18, on 8th and Railroad Streets. The goal of the event is to raise funds for Opelika Main Street as well as promote local businesses in the Auburn/Opelika area. On the Tracks will begin at 6 PM and end at 11 PM. Food vendors from local restaurants will be serving food, live music will entertain, beverages will be served, and a food tasting trail will take place. Tickets, www.onthetracks.org.

The Great Pumpkin Splash

On October 25, the indoor, Opelika Sportsplex pool will be transformed into a floating pumpkin patch! Come pick your pumpkin! The event will be from 6:00-8:00 PM and is $3 per person. Limited to ages 6-12 years. Pre-registration is required by October 22. Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

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Pure in Heart Conference for Tween Girls

Do you want to have a stronger relationship with your daughter? What can you do right now to build bridges (not barriers) before she enters her teen years? The Pure in Heart Conference, October 5, at CrossPointe Church, Columbus, Ga. is an exciting one-day event that is uniquely designed for tween girls (ages 7-12) and for moms, grandmothers, and mentors of children. The conference not only teaches young girls practical, biblical wisdom to lay a foundation for making future choices for purity, but it also shares a message of hope and forgiveness for women who struggle with the memories of their past choices of impurity. During Tween Break-Out Sessions, girls enjoy a time designed especially for their age. Power-packed teaching themes and fun crafts focus on a girl's identity in Christ, God's love, and sharing His love with others. www.pureinheartconference.com.

42nd Annual Historical Fair and Syrup Sopping Day, Loachapoka

Loachapoka’s Historical Fair and Syrup Sopping Day will feature: weaving and cloth-making demonstrations, musical entertainment featuring hammered and mountain dulcimers, banjos and guitars, a doctor’s beautiful herb garden and crops garden, bread making, soap making, period pottery, fireplace and outdoor cooking, and other old time crafts. Our famous sweet potato biscuits, as well as camp stew, beans, collards, syrup from sorghum and ribbon cane and BBQ. Tour the two-story 140 year old Trade Center museum, watch the blacksmiths at work, visit the Log Cabin, and the Taylor Whatley agricultural implement collection. October 19, from 7 AM-4 PM, admission: $3 adults, children 12 and under free with adult. For more information, 334-887-2255 or www.syrupsopping.org.

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bits & pieces Lee County Fair: October 1-5

Fall Concert Series

The fair has come to town! Join families for a week of fall fun at the Lee County Fairgrounds in Opelika. Events include local entertainment, livestock, contests, rides, pageants and more!

The Klapp Family enjoyed an evening of free music in the park as Auburn Parks and Recreation presented the Fall Concert Series at Kiesel Park on Thursday, Sept. 5. The series features free performances by local and regional musicians every Thursday in September and October at 6 p.m. at Kiesel Park. Attendees are encouraged to pack a picnic, bring their chairs, and enjoy a relaxing evening under the shade trees. Complimentary lemonade is provided by CharterBank. A full line-up of artists is available online at www.auburnalabama. org/parks. Follow the City of Auburn on Facebook at www. facebook.com/CityofAuburnAL for weather updates and weekly concert announcements.

The Greater Columbus Fair: October 15-20

Celebrate the beginning of autumn in the Chattahoochee Valley. Come to the Greater Columbus Fair, October 15-20, for food, rides, games and more! Entertainment on the main stage and exhibitions in the Exhibit Hall located inside the Columbus Civic Center. Attractions include, Puppetone Rockers, The Torres Family Circus, The Tiger Encounter, Pageants and more! www. columbusciviccenter.org.

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KidsHealthWatch

Sponsored by Pediatric Associates of Auburn

Head Lice: A Common Problem A common complaint in the first weeks after school has resumed is head lice. These tiny parasites can cause itching and discomfort, but are generally harmless. Making the correct diagnosis, then treating and preventing the infestation, will be covered in this article. Being told your child has head lice can be greatly distressing to parents and the child. We will also address some of the myths and frequently asked questions about head lice. What are head lice? The head louse (pediculosis capitus) is a parasitic insect that lives on the human hair/scalp, eyebrows and eyelashes. Lice feed on the blood of the host they infest. It has a 3-stage life cycle beginning with egg (nit), which hatches and produces a nymph, which then matures to an adult. The adult is 2-4mm in size (about the size of a sesame seed) and can only crawl. It cannot hop or fly. All 3 stages require a human host to stay alive. Dogs and cats cannot be infested nor transmit the lice. The lice also require a human to feed on and so quickly die after being separated from the host. Adult lice can live only 1-2 days without feeding. Where does the infection come from? Head lice are transmitted from head to head contact primarily among school age and preschool age children. Rarely, sharing brushes/ combs or hats can also cause spread. What are the symptoms of lice infection? The primary symptom is itching scalp and the feeling that something is crawling on the scalp.

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

There are usually red bumps present at the nape of the neck or elsewhere on the scalp where the person has been bitten by the lice. Scratching, by the way, can cause these bites to get infected from bacteria on the skin. Nits are also present, usually located at the base of the skull and surrounding the ears. The nits are white/clear, small and oval shaped. They are tightly adhered to the hair shaft and can be difficult to remove. Active nits are typically close to the scalp (within ¼ of an inch) and so nits that are further down the hair shaft usually represent an old infestation, not an active one. How can I tell if my child has lice? Adult lice and nits can be seen with the naked eye, though magnification will help. Seeing an adult louse is the most obvious way to make the diagnosis. However, adult lice crawl very fast and avoid the light so are very hard to see. Seeing nits adhered to the hair shaft within ¼ of an inch from the scalp, as well as the symptoms of itching and bug bites to the scalp, will often be enough to diagnose head lice and begin treatment.

How to treat head lice:

1. Buy an over the counter pediculoside (Nix, Rid, Ovid) and use strictly according to the package directions. Remember as mentioned above that lice, though annoying, are harmless and over treating can be a problem for the child. 2. Wash any sheets, pillow cases, towels, hats and clothing that the child has come in

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contact with for the last 2 days in hot (>130 degree) water. Anything that cannot be washed can be sealed in a plastic bag and put away for 2 weeks. 3. Vacuum around the bed and the floor where the child has been lying down. There is no reason to treat furniture/carpets with pesticides. 4. Remove nits using a nit comb. 5. Retreat after all the eggs have hatched (typically 9 days) and inspect for evidence of on-going infection.

Common myths associated with head lice:

• Head lice do not come from being dirtyhead lice are only spread from head to head contact. • Head lice do not hop, jump or fly. • Head lice do not carry diseases. • Nits in the hair, if old and further than ¼ inch from the scalp, do not mean there is an active infection. Further information can be obtained from the CDC web site: www.cdc.gov. Dr. Ellen Royal attended the University of South Alabama College of Medicine for her medical degree and graduated in 1994. She returned to Alabama the summer of 1998 to join the pediatric practice of Dr. Richard M. Freeman. Dr. Royal is a member of the Lee County Medical Society, Medical Association of the State of Alabama, American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is board certified in Pediatrics. Dr. Royal is married to Dr. Kevin Royal who practices Internal Medicine in Opelika and they have three children.

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County Schools Wacoochee ElementaryAutauga Students Read During Summer

In an effort to encourage students to read over the summer, Wacoochee Elementary School held a "Summer Literacy Adventure". Students were required to keep a log that documented what type of literature they were reading and how many minutes were read. Pictured are (L to R): Mary Carol Graydon, 4th grade; Rena Long, 1st grade; Joshua Hayward, 2nd grade; Meagan Burkes, 4th grade; Kaleb Waller, 2nd grade; and School Librarian, Kathy Hicks.

OHS Friday Night Lights and Crowns

Look who was spotted at the Opelika High School season opener football game! It was Ms. America and two tiny Opelika Bulldog fans!

First Day at Wrights Mill Road

5TH Graders at Wrights Mill Road Elementary met for a “First Day of School Assembly”

Lee-Scott Academy Recognized for Athletic Excellence

Lee-Scott Academy is the recipient of the AISA Class AAA Chairman’s Award designation for the 2012-2013 school year. The Chairman's Award was established by the AISA for the specific purpose of recognizing member schools that achieve athletic excellence during the school year. This award also serves as a symbol of recognition to the individuals who have given unselfishly of their time to serve as Chairperson of the Alabama Independent School Association Athletic Committee. The criteria for winning the AISA Chairman's Award includes achievement in all areas of the school’s athletic programs: state champions in all sports, All-Star Selection, scholarship, participation in different sports, finishing in the top four in State Play-offs, sportsmanship, student-athlete award, and no eligibility problems.

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Girl Scouts Earn Bronze Star

Junior Girl Scout Troop 7355 earned their Bronze Star this past June (the highest award a Junior can receive). Their project was designing and creating puppet backdrops for the Auburn Public Library Children's department to be able to use with their new puppet theater. This was a small troop of girls that have been together for two years. Pictured left to right in the photo are Lauren Hancock, Taylor Harwell, Mikayla Watson, Hawley Marshall, Emily Simpson, Ashley Simpson, and Haley Simpson.

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Color Me Auburn 5K

Students, faculty and families gathered on the Auburn Campus for a day of running while being painted orange and blue. As the runners began the 5K run, each participate threw their Auburn colors into the air and covered the crowd with a blast of paint. More color was splattered throughout the run.

BSOFN!

[Big Smile On Face Now]

Razz and Laura Cross Rail Champions at Westminster

334.705.8655 www.bracesbyallen.com

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The 2013 Auburn HighAutauga SchoolCounty SchoolsBoy Scout Marching Band Receives National Certificate of Merit

Ted was awarded a National Certificate of Merit from the National Court of Honor of the Boy Scouts of America for an act of service

Wacoochee Elementary Gets New Principal and Assistant Principal

Wacoochee Elementary School has new leaders! Mrs. Tammy Senn, Wacoochee’s former assistant principal, is the new Principal. Carol Richards, a former kindergarten teacher at Wacoochee, is the new Assistant Principal. Together they have a combined 43 years in education as classroom teachers and administrators. The Wacoochee Elementary School faculty-staff family congratulate Mrs. Senn and Mrs. Richards, and look forward to a very successful year! Pictured Left is Mrs. Senn and Right is Mrs. Richards.

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New friends are now best friends. New experiences are now the best times ever. No wonder it’s so easy to tell others about it and include them in the fun.

Welcome to Riverview Camp for Girls!

We’ve do put Itogether everything you’re looking for in a perfect“I saw camp onemy of Why choose Riverview each summer? mysetting! first river Recognized on a mountain,as I rode Golf,times Dance, Dance, Outdoor Sports, Soccer,use Beach Volleyball, Basketball, “As go,Stomp it was one of the BEST.”Skills AndClass, what child couldn’t some of that these days?

Riverview Refinement, Program, Campfires night,Recognized optional trips and more! We’ve put together everythingCIT you’re looking for in a perfect every camp setting! as one of the Southeast’s best all-around summer camps for girls, Riverview is an oasis of fun, friends and happiness. Spring and Fall &available 2 week Sessions ages to 16... Mother-Daughter Weekends1are also! Registeredfor Nurses and6 Physician on Staff. Entire full-summer staff is First Aid andand CPRFall Certified. Camper/Counselor Ratio 5:1 Spring Mother-Daughter Weekends...

waiting lists start early...sign up soon!... Waitingwww.riverviewcamp.com! lists start early...sign up soon!...

Only 1 /Mountain 2 hours from Huntsville Located on top of Lookout in Mentone, AL. Only a 3 hr drive. 1

Call for FREE DVD and catalog 1-800-882-0722 Accredited by American Camping Association • Members of Christian Camping International

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Dr. Larry & Susan Hooks, Owners/Directors • Donna Bares,Asst. Director

1 & 2Week Sessions for Ages 6-16

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first I had campfires every night. Icamps felt close to God. giggled a lot is with friends and counselors. time flew by! thehorse. Southeast’s best all-around for girls,IRiverview annew oasis of fun, friends andThe happiness... I Exciting felt safe and secure. Iinclude: gained confidence in myselfPool,Tennis, through the world around me.” activities Riding, Heated Canoeing, Ropes Course, Climbing Tower,

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FLAG TWIRLING • CHEERLEADING • RIFLERY • ARCHERY • TRIP DAY • GOLF

We don’t wonder anymore how it happened, that one summer could bring such happy memories.

B ASKETBALL • S OCCER • A RTS

• H ORSEBACK R IDING • S WIMMING • T ENNIS • C ANOEING • D ANCE • A EROBICS • G YMNASTICS • B EACH V OLLEYBALL •

• R OPES C OURSE • C LIMBING T OWER • O UTDOOR L IVING S KILLS • C AMPFIRE F UN • C OUNSELOR -I N -T RAINING •

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Pirate Day at Wrights Mill Road Elementary

5th Graders at Wrights Mill Road Elementary enjoyed Pirate day. They buried boring words at the bottom of the sea and let the great new vocabulary sail to the top.

Auburn Cheerleaders Meet the Fans at Academy Sports

Pictured are Auburn Cheerleaders with their new friend, Stella, at the Academy Sports & Outdoors AU Kickoff Throw Down. Academy is the Official Sporting Goods Retailer of the Auburn Tigers. War Eagle!

Build and Grow Event at Lowe’s

Andrew hammered his way through the local Lowe's Build and Grow class and designed an airplane project from the Disney “Planes” movie.

B ASKETBALL • S OCCER • A RTS

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SEEDS of LEARNING! Technology program for ages 1 & up

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Solid Rubber Playground Surface reduces injuries

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Healthy menu with fresh fruit and whole grain foods

Our Character Education program teaches values Sign Language for all ages Lower Child:Teacher ratios Video monitoring in all classrooms Infant curriculum customized for your baby Infants through School-Age | Care available from 6:30am to 6:30pm

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Transportation available to most Auburn schools

644 North Dean Road, Auburn, AL | 334.501.2044

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Autauga County Schools

Week 3 at Wrights Mill Road Elementary

Summer Camp Kids Cheer at Auburn High School Game

Mrs. Callahan’s 3rd grade class at Wrights Mill Road Elementary is looking great on the third week of school!

The first Auburn High School game included special guests... youth cheerleaders from this summer's AHS Cheer Camp. The little girls performed the cheer techniques, chants, and routines they learned during June's mini-camp sponsored by the Auburn High School Cheerleaders. It was a night of spirit and pride!

dinner doesn’t have to feel like homework ea m o h e k a ’n h T t om y! lil’ s H toedra co S c u E a FR pands @cu

casseroles entrees salads bread catering Goodness to go! 120 S Ross St. Auburn 334.209.4558 Tues-Fri 11-5:30 or order online @ www.thecupandsaucer.biz Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

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Lee-Scott Academy Sees Record Enrollment

Lee-Scott Academy had a great start to the 2013-2014 school year with a record enrollment of 703 students.

Building Friendships at Lego Land

Kirby, Ryley and Jenna visit Lego Land in Atlanta where they toured the factory and learned how Legos are created. During the tour, they walked through a mini Lego city with replicas of many Atlanta landmarks and attractions. Then, the day was filled with hands on learning and Lego building, exploring and playing. These friends built memories and a lasting friendship!

Bright Beginnings for Preschool Students

It was a great first day of school for all the preschoolers at Bright Beginnings of First Baptist Church Opelika. Porter and Dylan were all smiles as they entered their 3 year old classroom on the first day! It is going to be a great year of learning ABCs and 123s!

Where Learning Begins

From the moment you enter our million dollar, state-of-the-art facility, you realize that Milestones Learning Center is more than a daycare. Established in 2007, we are proud to offer our award-winning services to the children and families of the Auburn/Opelika area. As a private academically focused program that specializes in early childhood education, we cater to those families that want the best for their child. We offer year round educational programs for full and part-time childcare for children six weeks to Pre-Kindergarten. In addition we provide a full menu of enrichment classes onsite which saves our parents valuable time. Come by today and tour our facility and see the Milestones difference.

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Autauga County Schools Richland

Elementary Students Attend Event at Auburn

Richland Elementary School attended Ready Alabama Day which was hosted on September 11th at Auburn University. Left photo, students pose with the eagle at Ready Alabama Day. Right photo, Aubie saves the day with Mrs. Wynn’s class at Ready Alabama Day.

They're Kickin It!

It was a night of kicks as the newest soccer team players took to the Opelika SportsPlex Soccer fields for the first practice! Please send your school news and photos by the 20th of each month to: kendra@auburnopelikaparents.com.

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Local Teen Wins Crown and Title

Auburn High School Student Receives National Honor

The National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS) announced Auburn High School student Jordan Marquez has been selected to become a member of the esteemed organization. The Society recognizes top scholars who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, scholarship, and community commitment. The announcement was made by NSHSS Founder and Chairman Claes Nobel, a senior member of the family that established the Nobel Prizes. “On behalf of NSHSS, I am honored to recognize the hard work, sacrifice, and commitment that Jordan has demonstrated to achieve this exceptional level of academic excellence,” said Mr. Nobel. “Jordan is now a member of a unique community of scholars – a community that represents our very best hope for the future.” “Our vision is to build a dynamic international organization that connects members with meaningful content, resources, and opportunities,” stated NSHSS President James W. Lewis. “We aim to help students like Jordan build on their academic successes and enhance the skills and desires to have a positive impact on the global community.” Membership in NSHSS entitles qualified students to enjoy a wide variety of benefits, including scholarship opportunities, academic competitions, free events, member-only resources, publications, participation in programs offered by educational partners, personalized recognition items, and publicity honors. For more information about NSHSS visit www.nshss.org.

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Taylor Jones, of Opelika, won the overall Miss Model America award. Congratulations!

Richland Students Get Settled

Students in Mrs. Gilmore's class at Richland Elementary School get settled into a new school year. These students are exploring and learning during center time in their classroom.

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AutaugaCoed County Schools Miss Alabama Jr. Teen American Ogletree Elementary PTO Visits Governor Hosts Boosterthon Fun Run

Alli Shaddix, Miss Alabama Jr. Teen American Coed, is pictured with her parents Tim and Christie Shaddix, brother Will Shaddix, Gov. Robert Bentley, State Sen. Tom Whatley, and AL Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard.

Combining a healthy way to raise funds for the school with a character program for students, the Boosterthon Camp High Five was hosted at Ogletree Elementary in September. Students, being encouraged to treat everybody as a friend, supported the school by seeking pledges for their participation in a Fun Run. Pictured are Lange Johnson and Cara Herring, fifth graders at the school.

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Congratulations to the Liles Smiles no cavity winners! Aaron Kincaid Aaron Spivey Abigail Chandler Adaih Banks Addyson King Aerieal Smith Aidan Garcia Aiden Neman Aiden Nolan Aiden Thomas Akashia Knight Alex Mendoza Alexia Schwadron Alexis Boswell Ali Gilmore Alicia Peralta Allie Reese Thompson Alonzo Fluellen Jr Alyssa Ennis Alyssa Park Alyssa Ruff Amaurius Avery Amir Word Amori Word Amrtay’vious Avery Andrew Alsobrook Andrew Finley Andrew Jones Andrew Spratlin Aneri Patel Anet Mendoza Anna Alsobrook

Annabella Fowler Annalee Adams Anne Katherine Corley Anthony Ransom Anthony Upshaw Antonio Turner Asher Rudd Ashley Wright Asim Abdelaziz Hamid August Zuanich Auston Hodge Autumn Bracknell Ava Adkins Ava Barron Ava Garcia Avery Beard Avery Dunnam Avery Spratlin Bailey Klapp Barrett Moore Baylor Williams Ben Eskridge Ben Harman Benjamin Darnell Benjamin Ray Bentlee Mann Bladon Brown Brady Forbus Brantley Clegg Brayan Ramirez Brayden Kirk Brent Park Jr.

Breyona Kirk Bria Thomas Brianna Spencer Brittani Tinsley Brody Craft Bryan Saenz Brylee Householder Bryson Striblin Bryston Atkins Caden Walker Caiden Pevehouse Caleb Kent Cameron Turner Camille Hoffman Camryn Griggs Caroline Crum Caroline Turochy Carson Ward Carson Yawn Carter Porter Carter Wilson Chance Pinkston Chloe Gross Christian Ransom Christien Exum Christopher Mark Bazzell Christopher Reyes Sanchez Christopher Ring Christopher Rodgers Claire McKay Clarke Ivatt Coleman Griffith

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

Cordai Stone Courtney Wynn Dakarey DuBose Dakota White Dakota Zarbaugh Dalton Ruth Bendinger Danika Sutton Davian Walton David Nelson Rhyne Dayanara Monterubio De’Unte Curtis DeJon Avery Derick Reap Destiney Thomas Diver Reap Donovan Sparks Dylan Landreth Dylan Tapley Elley Parker Elley Parker Ellie Prewett Emily Biaz Emily Haze Ward Emma Childs Emma Grace Hagan Emma Kate Bearden Emma Kate Penton Emmalyn Griffin Emmie Rudd Emunah Weaver Ephraim Thornton Eric Maxwell

Ethan Campbell Ethan Doughtie Ethan Neman Ethan Robinson Ethan Walker Eva Finnegan Farryn Robinson Gabriel Thomas Garrett Rodman Garrett Waller Gavin Yawn Georgia Galloway Geraldine Leiva Gracie Rudd Gracin East Gray Carson Greer Prewett Haley Sawyer Hannah Thrash Harris Adams Heaven Brooks Helen Jimenez Vidal Henry Vaughan Hollis Jones Hunter Rasnick Hunter Tomblin Huntley Marshall Hutch McClain Imri Clardy Isabel Schwadron Isaiah Durr Issaiah Bordenave

Ivanah Hourizene Ja’Quavious Holloway JaBrien Taylor JaCarius Gullatte Jack McKay Jackson Mathis Jackson Ruff Jacob Evans Jacob Kent Jacob Machen Jacsiri Lopez Jaden Hayes Jaden Jackson Jaden McKelvey Jai’A Burton Jake Weldon Jamarcus Lynch James Enos James Hayes James Ward Jamie Collins Jr. Jamie Reyes Jamiya Maxwell Jasmine Morgan Jasmine Stokes Jason Rodenbach Jasper Banks Jasper Rogers Jayda Wilson Jayla Fears Jayla Moore Jayna Raines Jeffery Bazzell Jeremiah Arenas Jeremiah Stribling Jeremy Sorrells Jermandrenique Blue Jerry Ambrocio Joanna Sorrells John Christopher Waters John Hendricks Rhyne John Reynolds Hare Johnny Mendoza Jonathan Mackey

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Jonathon Raines Jordan Devoes Jordyn Morris Jose Sanchez Joshua Fowler Joshua Rudd Joshue Saenz Josiah Hawkins Juan Montoya Julian Fitzpatrick Julie Hall Justin Williams Kaden Zimdahl Kadyn Culligan Kaitlyn Stapler Kalebb Hayes Kaliah Cowan Kamari Scott Kancherla Williams Kannon Fetner Karissa McCoy Kate Campbell Kate Jones Katelynn Vick Kathleen Bess McClain Kayden Cochran Kayden Moody Kayden Scott Kayla Stribling Kaylee Byrd Kaylee Park Kaylei Tucker Kelly Harman Kendall Durr Kendarius Bailey Kennady Fetner Kensley Carter Kerwin Bravo Kevin Jimenez Vidal Kim Harman Kinzlee Foster Kolbri Crowell Kolton Kirby Kourtney Dowdell

Kyle Harman Kylen Jernigan La’Zyriah Harris Lacey Kayser LaDell Towns Landon McGregor Landon Yawn Laney Futral Lange Johnson Layla Anabell Gomez Laymon (Lee) Powers Lee McCall Levi Foster Levi Franklin Lexi Mims Lexzoria Gray Lila Calhoun Lila McCoy Lillian Fario Lillian McKee Lillian Welcher Lillie Rudd Lily White Lily Young Locker Langley London East Londyn Edwards Lucy Huff Luke Gonzalez Luke Langley Luke Turley M’alee Galloway Mackinzy Taylor Maddison Berry Maddox Beard Madeline Giles Madeline Marshall Madisen Pruitt Madison Durr Madisyn Stapler Maimanah Abdelaziz Hamid MaKayla Kaltreider MaKenzie Black

Makenzie Lee Malakiy Dix Malekai Calloway Malik Benford Malik Exum Mar’Quasia Harris Marcus Sanchez Marcus Wynn Margaret Rodman Maria Riveria Mark Bullock Marques Raines Marshall Anderson Mary Elizabeth Hadley Mason Kinard Mason Spratlin Matthew Mottern Mattie Dunnam Mattie Grace Mullins Maya Henry McAuley Parker Meagan Kirby Megan Giles Megan Harman Melissa Ixmay Melony McCall Memshalyah Weaver Meredith McClain Michael Holloway Michaela Knowles Michaela Malik Miranda Correia Morgan Collins Moriah Henry Nadia Carter Nathan Foster Noah Houston Nora Ramsey Chandler NyAsia Chambers Olivia Tidwell Owen Vaughan Paige Spraggins Parks Myers Paul Storrs

Takious McGhee Perri Hovey Takira Lockhart Peyton Mathis Tanner Woolley Peyton Williams Taylor Fields Pierce Griffith Taylor Johnson Preston Hunt Thomas Young Qua’Shawn Harvey Timothy Jackson Jr. Quaniyah Byrd Toby Forbus Rachel Morales Trace Berry Raegan Brooks Tre Redden Rebecca Turochy Reem Abdelaziz Hamid Trendon Bordenave Trevor Jernigan, Jr Reese Hansell Tristan Tatum Riley Johnson Troy Futral Robert Pack Tyler Brock Taylor Rose Robinson Tyler Bullock Rosemary Parker Tyler Coleman Rumi Heredia Tyler Rasnick Ryan Henry Zapp Tyler Ruff Ryan Littleton Tyler Williams Ryder Lowery Vernicia Evans Rylan Lowery Victoria Redden Rylee George Wheeler Garrett Sabrina Dart Whit Young Sam Turley William Barron Samantha Reyes William Marshall Sarah Perez William Pack Sarah Ruff William Zuanich Sawyer Mathis Wilson Foster Semaj Cowan Wyatt Myers Serena Enos Xavi Daniel Ramirez Seth Garcia ZaCameron Hayes Shamiya Fears Zacyon Fulton Sharonda Durr Zaniyah Bailey Shelby Chandler Zephaniah Stuart Shelby Hawkins Zion DuBose Shelby Smith Zonnon Pinkston Shicari Cook Zy’Keria Moody Silas Turley Zykeriah McGhee Sophie Walls Stacy Presley Stella Curtis Stuart Keesee Summer McKelvey Sydnee Elizabeth Seaborn

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Yarbrough Students Rewarded for Summer Reading and Math

Yarbrough students who recorded their reading and math progress over the summer were rewarded with celebrations at the start of school. Students who completed their math cards enjoyed eating lunch in the YES Pizzeria, complete with Italian music, tablecloths, and mustaches. Those who filled in their reading cards literally danced in the rain as the Auburn Fire Department provided the ultimate sprinkler with their hoses. Hard work paid off with a lot of fun for these students!

Please send your school news and photos by the 20th of each month to: kendra@ auburnopelikaparents.com. It’s FREE! 21

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Autauga County Schools Wrights Mill Road Elementary New School Year News

Luke F. (left photo) was excited about meeting his new 3rd Grade Teacher Mrs. Bennett on meet the teacher night. Right photo, 3rd Grade Mrs. Collards class has started the year off great!

A group of 5th graders from Wrights Mill Road perform their movement dance piece at Adventures in Art.

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Pictured is the first school-wide assembly at Wrights Mill Road. Students learned their team colors and we announced the new Eagle mascot!

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

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Wrights Mill Road students Elaina W. and Daphne C. enjoyed Adventures in Art. In this station they created artwork inspired by Wassily Kandinsky.

Wrights Mill Road students work on their movement piece inspired by the artist Wassily Kandinsky. Adventures in Art was held at the Jan Dempsey Center for the arts.

5th Graders at Wrights Mill Road elementary are burying old words at the bottom of the sea and using new exciting words, on Pirate Day.

5th Graders create an all-about-me tree using their hands and describing themselves with their artwork.

Please send your school news and photos by the 20th of each month to: kendra@ auburnopelikaparents. com.

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Carry Along for Camping

Recommending the Best Toys and Products for Kids

Little hands are often too small to help assemble the tent, build a campfire or launch the boat, but there are ways that they can make the most of a camping adventure. Equipping them with tools they can use and toys for their down time ensures that camp time is a success from roll up to tent strike. With gear and toys designed especially for kids, the littlest campers can make their own outdoor experience the most fun ever – rain or shine. From in-tent entertainment to wilderness exploration, help the younger set get into the great outdoors in style with the following recommendations!

by Gerry Paige Smith

Mickey Mouse Camper’s Playset

National Geographic Starry Night Lantern

Taking along the best toys to entertain very young campers should be an important part of the planning and packing for family camping trips. Little legs can’t hike all day, and there’s usually an expiration hour for toddlers and tykes when they just get ‘camped out’ and need some toy time. The Mickey Mouse Camper’s Playset lets little ones continue their camping adventure on familiar pretend-play turf as they mirror their outdoor adventures on a small scale. With a cool camper that opens up into a campsite with all the essentials, Mickey and his pal Pluto can enjoy rafting, cookouts, stargazing and more with all the included accessories that guarantee a great camping experience. The vehicle closes up with the gear stowed inside, ready to get back on the road to the next campsite!

For the littlest campers, nighttime in the great outdoors is often when the real adventure begins! And every parent knows that no child is immune to the desire to hold a flashlight or lantern in the darkness. The Starry Night Lantern offers kids two ways to control the light in the night! It carries and functions like a normal lantern, ideal for carrying on nighttime walks and navigating the campsite. But once back inside the RV or tent, the illumination doesn’t end. With the flip of a switch, the light projects through a star field dome on the lantern top to cast the constellations on the walls and ceiling. Kids don’t have to miss starry nights even in overcast or rainy weather. Illuminating in more ways than one, the Starry Night Lantern is a brilliant tool for lighting up overnight camping!

(Fisher-Price)

(Uncle Milton)

Backyard Safari Cargo Vest

Camp Board Game (Education Outdoors)

When the family hike is over, the fish and camp stew are cooking and the fireflies are joining the sunset crowd, it’s the perfect time to roll out the Camp Board Game. Loaded with fun facts about the great outdoors, the wilderness adventure continues with friends and family around the campfire (or tent lantern)! Designed with a broad age range of players in mind, this board game offers four different skills levels on each playing card with the easiest questions for very young children to more challenging tasks for teens and adults. Rolling the dice and navigating the footprints along the trails with the goal of getting to “Camp” first, the Camp Board Game is the first thing to unpack when the chores are done!

(Summit)

You never know what you’re going to need on a wilderness journey. Flashlight, whistle, magnifying glass, compass, field guide, fishing line and a snack all deserve a place on the hiking list. But taking a backpack on and off to fish out what you need in the moment takes time away from the real adventure. Rugged and adjustable for size, the Backyard Safari Cargo Vest features roomy cargo pockets (plus six D rings and two shoulder straps) to hang, stow, and carry every kid’s camping and trail-blazing gear. Taking the adventure way beyond the back yard, the Backyard Safari Cargo Vest keeps a kid’s outdoor essentials right at their fingertips!

Paige Smith is a freelance writer and syndicated columnist living in Alabama. More on GET THIS! at www.PageBookMedia.com. Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

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8 Ways to Beat Nightmares

by Malia Jacobson Bad news for parents of school-age kids: the early school years are a prime time for nightmares. For many children, nightmares peak between ages 5 and 8, thanks to an increasingly active imagination, fantasy play, and newly acquired social awareness. Nightmares are a near-universal childhood experience, and up to half of young children experience recurring nightmares at some point. That’s not necessarily a bad thing; according to clinical psychologist Matt Woolley, Ph.D., of the University of Utah Department of Psychiatry, nightmares may serve a developmental role. “Parents want to rid their child of nightmares entirely,” he says. “But that’s not necessarily possible or desirable. Occasional nightmares are a normal experience.” While nightmares are normal, some children seem to get more than their share, and their sleep can suffer as a result. Kids who experience excessive nightmares (more than two per week) can Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

become sleep-avoidant, sullen, irritable, and show signs of depression. Thankfully, experts say that some nightmares can be prevented or minimized. Parents can pave the way for sweeter dreams by learning about the top “nightmare triggers:” events or situations likely to bring on bad dreams. Nightmare triggers run the gamut from social (adjusting to a new school) to physical (having a high fever) to experiential (riding a roller coaster for the first time), and they may surprise you.

Tricky Transitions Starting a new school or daycare, beginning a new class or sport, or being away from a parent or other caregiver can contribute to a child feeling a temporally helpless. These feelings can bring on nightmares, says Woolley. “When children have a lot of nightmares, it’s not uncommon that there are a lot of changes going on at home,” he says. How to help: Discuss life transitions with your child, preferably in advance. 26

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Encourage your child to talk about things that may be bothering him or her.

Dream danger Scary or unsettling experiences like car accidents, injuries, or other real-life traumas can be nightmare fodder for children. The death or a relative of pet or a divorce in the family can also cause emotional distress that plays out in the form of bad dreams. How to help: After scary or traumatic experiences, encourage creative expression in the form of journaling or drawing. Art and creative play can help children communicate and process troubling emotions, says Woolley.

Rated N for ‘nightmare’ Media research firm Nielsen reports that elementary-school age children watch 28 hours of television per week. All of those hours clocked in front of the boob tube can contribute to nightmares, especially if kids watch intense or troubling www.auburnopelikaparents.com

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content. “The central themes of many children’s stories—separation from or loss of parents and friends, or evil people hurting innocent ones—are very commonly upsetting,” says Jan Drucker, Ph.D., professor of psychology at Sarah Lawrence College. How to help: Don’t allow your child to view troubling, intense scenes on television, particularly before bedtime.

Under pressure Music or dance recitals, tests at school, and sports games can bring on excitement, worry—and nightmares. Dreams are often an opportunity to relieve pressures of the day, says Drucker. When there are big demands placed on a child, dreams become a time to replay anxiety or stress over the event. How to help: Any time your child is facing a transition, special challenge, or new experience, stick to an earlier bedtime and spend extra time winding down and relaxing before bed.

New places, new faces A trip on the amusement park ride; a long-awaited airplane trip; a longed-for visit with faraway cousins—new experiences, even enjoyable ones, can trigger nightmares. “The first time a child does something, it’s nearly always stressful,” says Woolley. “The brain reprocesses that stress at night in the form of a nightmare.” How to help: Limit new-experience stress by following an exciting “first” with a familiar, comforting activity—after a child’s first roller-coaster ride, wind down with a

leisurely walk or relaxing tunes.

Late-bedtime boogeyman

When kids stay up too late, nightmares can come calling. That’s because sleep deprivation results in the fitful, poor quality sleep that can trigger bad dreams. How to help: Ensure that your child gets enough sleep—most children aged 5-8 need between 9 and 11 hours per night.

A trip on the amusement park ride; a long-awaited airplane trip; a longed-for visit with faraway cousins— new experiences, even enjoyable ones, can trigger nightmares.

Pills and chills Parents are often surprised to learn that medications intended to improve their child’s health can have a detrimental effect on sleep. Mood altering medications, including anti-depressants and medications for ADHD, can negatively impact sleep or trigger nightmares, particularly when taken over a long period of time. How to help: Talk to your doctor about any medications your child takes and ask how you can minimize any negative effects on sleep.

Discomfort drama When kids toss and turn because of a too-hot bedroom, ill-fitting PJs, or an old, saggy mattress, bad dreams are more likely to happen, says Woolley. Fortunately, the most common discomfort-related

nightmare trigger—sleeping too hot—is easily remedied by removing a child’s socks, switching to lighter-weight pajamas, or removing a heavy blanket. How to help: Keep the bedroom quiet, dark, and cool—between 60 and 68 degrees is ideal. During warner months, switch to lighter-weight pajamas and remove heavy blankets. If your child has more than two nightmares a week for over a month, a visit to a doctor or psychologist is in order. And take heart: like teddy bears and footie pajamas, bad dreams are often a passing childhood phase. In the meantime, healthy sleep habits mean sweeter dreams, fewer nightmares, and happier mornings. Malia Jacobson is a freelance writer and mom of two who specializes in children’s sleep and health topics.

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Q.

Should a budget change every month?

A. Yes, it should. Your life changes every month, and your budget should reflect the ebb and flow of your life. Now, some things will stay the same. Your house payment or rent should fall into this category. If you have a car payment, which I hope you don’t, that would be the same, too. There shouldn’t be a big difference in the amount you spend on food most months though. You might spend more in this category during November and December thanks to the holidays, but overall it should remain pretty steady. The biggest fluctuation you may see is in your utilities. I heat my house with natural gas, so the bill is much higher during the winter months. It’s just the opposite during the summer. We burn electricity to run the air conditioner, so the electric bill is higher in summer. This is part of the reason I urge people to do a budget on paper, on purpose before the next month begins. You may look at the upcoming month

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

and realize the kids have soccer pictures scheduled. There may be a school trip planned, or they may need back-toschool clothes and supplies. When it comes to a budget, there’s no easy out. Things change from month to month, and you need to think, plan ahead, and itemize so your budget is an accurate reflection of your life!

Q. How do you make sure you don’t spoil your child when you’re wealthy? A.

I know this will sound mean to some people, but you simply explain to them that they are not wealthy. I remember a time years ago, after we’d gone broke, that we managed to scrimp and save and finally had a little bit of wealth. We bought a nice car and my son piped up from the back seat, all smug and satisfied, “We’re doing pretty good, huh?” I’ll admit it was kind of funny, but it was also a teachable moment. I looked at him and said, “I’m doing pretty good, but you’re broke!” That was a pretty consistent message around the Ramsey household as the

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kids were growing up. If you’re not working and making your own way, you’ve got nothing. The second thing we taught them, from a very young age, was to work. That can start with simple things like kids cleaning up their rooms or doing the dishes after dinner. It should carry over to the teenage years as well. Every able-bodied child should be working and earning money, whether it’s their own entrepreneurial idea, at a store in the mall or babysitting. The third thing we did was based in our faith. As evangelical Christians, we taught our kids that we don’t really own anything. It all belongs to God, and one of our jobs is to wisely manage the things He entrusts to us. The first rule is to take care of your own household— the important stuff. After that, it’s okay to have some nice things, but it’s not all about pleasure. It’s also about giving and extraordinary levels of generosity. Teach them to work. Teach them to be givers. And gently remind them once in a while that they’ve got nothing until they go out and earn it.

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Ways to Autumn Enjoy Outside by Katie Beltramo At our house, something happens in the fall. As the days get cooler, children migrate inside. Even on sunny days, my daughters burrow into our basement playroom as instinctively as squirrels gather nuts. It makes me crazy, especially since kids who play outside are healthier, happier, and do better in school. Luckily, there are plenty of activities beyond jumping into a leaf pile that will lure kids outside to enjoy the great outdoors.

Build a campfire in the evening.

Being outside after dark is magical, and with sunset arriving earlier each day, you won’t have to stay up past bedtime like you would have during the summer. Roast marshmallows, tell stories, or just bask in the cozy warmth on a cool night.

Go letterboxing or geocaching. Kids love a treasure hunt, and both activities will give you a workout for body Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

and brains. Letterboxing involves landmark-based clues that lead to a unique, often hand-made stamp, while geocaching focuses on using a compass or GPS to find a hidden cache. Check letterboxing.org, atlasquest.com, or geocaching. com for more information.

Walk or bike to school. Studies show that kids who walk to school cope with stress better, and built-in daily activity is great for the whole family. Join with neighbors and adults can take turns chaperoning if you’re concerned about kids on their own. If the route between home and school is not safe, consider dropping kids at a nearby walk-friendly location. Observe creatures around you as they prepare for winter. Take young naturalists outside with binoculars and a clipboard to observe birds, squirrels, or other animals. Experiment by leaving out foods, observe how and where animals move, draw pictures, and look for 30

characteristics to distinguish individuals from each other. Find great tips from handbookofnaturestudy.blogspot.com or check out books on your quarry from the library.

Let kids loose in the garden. Autumn is time for garden pruning, and it’s difficult to do too much damage to plants at this stage. You can teach kids to use pruning shears properly and assign them a task, or have them help you gather gorgeous plants like hydrangea and let them dry naturally to bring the outdoors inside during the winter. Harvesting seeds will teach kids about nature and the seasons.

Pick apples. It’s a classic for a reason. Looking for a great orchard? Ask if cider and donuts are made on-site, what sort of spraying policy is in place (fully organic orchards are fairly rare), and if there are additional activities for the kids. Our family loves a local orchard that allows visitors to climb their ladders. If you www.auburnopelikaparents.com

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Go on a playground tour. School playgrounds are often spruced up for the new academic year, so this is a perfect opportunity to try fresh destinations. Make a list of places to visit. You can even rank the playgrounds or ponder awards in different categories, like Best Climbing or Fastest Slide. Document the changing landscape. Take photographs and draw pictures of any local natural landscape, whether it’s your favorite hiking spot or your front lawn. Come back to the same spot every week to observe and document the changes. Kids can even make a seasonal landscape scrapbook or write a picture book based on the changing setting.

Enjoy fall sports. Even if you’re child isn’t registered to play, take in a game and root for your neighbors or your local high school. It’s a great community builder, and the older role models might inspire your kids to try something new. Grab a playground ball and teach kids classic games like 4-square. Build a fort or fairy house. With a little push of inspiration, you’ll be surprised how engrossed kids get. As they build, kids learn creativity, engineering, and negotiating skills with their fellow builders. Find a spot with plenty of raw materials, and if you need ideas to get you started, check out fairyhouses.com or search on Pinterest for images. Finally, all of these activities are great ways to start outdoor play, but if your kids get excited about playing something else outside, step back. By guiding your kids outdoors, you’ve already taken the first step to happier, healthier kids. Give them space to play independently, and you’ll be amazed by what they come up with next. Katie Beltramo, mother of two, blogs at www.capitaldistrictfun.com and is editor at KidsOutAndAbout.com.

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& Halloween Fun Halloween Events City of Auburn 13th Annual Downtown Trick or Treat

October 31, 6:00-8:00pm. Free to the public. Ages 12 years and younger (Parents must accompany children at this event.) Bring your monsters, rock stars, princesses, and clowns to the best party in town. Join us in this excellent alternative to door-to-door trick-or-treating. Downtown “Monster Merchants” will provide treats for the children and delightful sounds from our “special” entertainment will fill the night air. Also, don’t miss out on your chance to win the “Best Costume” contest and bring your favorite four-legged friends and enter them for a chance to win the Best Pet Costume Contest! More information, 501-2930.

City of Opelika Parks and Recreation

Fall Festival & Children’s Carnival- W. James Samford, Jr. Soccer Complex Sportsplex. October 29, 6:00-8:00pm. Children 12 and under invited. Safe alternative to Trick or Treating. Children wear costumes and bring your treat bags. Come for hayrides, prizes, games, rides and entertainment, inflatable slides, mascots, special booths and exciting events. Fall Treats- October 17. Enjoy making and eating your favorite fall treats. 3:30-4:40pm. Ages: 5-9 yrs. Fee: $15. 705-5560. Halloween Treat Bags. October 30. Make the perfect bag for your treats. 3:30-4:30pm. Ages: 4-11 yrs. Fee: $15. 705-5560. The Great Pumpkin Splash- October 25. 6:008:00pm. $3. Ages 6-12yrs. Pick your pumpkin from the pool! Kids enjoy harvest relay races, pumpkin roll, prizes and more! Pre-register by Oct 22. Call 705-5560 for more info.

8th Annual Howl-oween Costume Contest and Dog Parade

October 28, 5:30 pm: Photos and Canine Trick or Treat. 6:00pm: Costume Parade. Downtown Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

Opelika. For your pet to participate, register at Canine American, 108 South 8th Street, Opelika. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Rescue K911. 745-0466 12th Annual Uptown Spooktacular Halloween Festival- October 26, 5:00-7:00 pm. Downtown on Broadway, Columbus, Ga. Sign up for the costume contest which will take place at 6:15 pm and First and Second place winners will be awarded in each category. Spooktacular provides a safe environment for the children of Columbus to enjoy the holiday. So wear your best costume and come to Spooktacular for a haunting night of ghosts and goblins, spooky activities, candy and lots of fun!!! 25th Annual Great Pumpkin Carve- Auburn University School of Architecture and Design, Dudley Court, Campus. October 25. 9am-10pm. Come out and watch the students carve amazing designs into pumpkins. As night falls, see the pumpkins turn into glowing jack-o-lanterns! Dress the kids up for a costume contest, games, and more! www.facebook.com/AIASAuburn

Auburn Public Library Annual Halloween Party

October 24, 6:00pm. Children ages 3-11 are to wear costumes, make crafts and enjoy fun activities at the Auburn Public Library. For more information, contact Auburn Public Library Youth Services at 501-3196.

Creepy Wonderful Critters ‘Snakes’

The Forest Ecology Preserve, Auburn. www.auburn.edu/preserve; October 19. 10:00am. Come learn about Alabama’s venomous snakes! Snakes, spiders, lizards, and other creepy critters will be on display. $4 non-members, $3 members, 3 yrs and under free.

Halloween Movie Night: Ghostbusters Town Creek Park, Auburn. 501-2940. Join us on Wednesday, October, 30, 6:15pm, for a spooky night of Halloween fun. As the sun sets, gather around the outdoor movie screen to watch Ghostbusters! Bring your lawn chairs and blankets for the nighttime movie showing. Free and open to the public. 32

Fall Farms Cotton Pickin’ Pumpkin Patch

Lazenby Farm, 11546 Lee Rd. 54, Auburn. 321-7946, www.lazenbyfarm.com; Friday and Saturdays, October 1-31; Fridays and Saturdays,10:00am-6:00pm. Open during the week for field trips. Hayrides, pick a pumpkin/ cotton, corn maze, corn crib, pony rides, country store and more. Call to schedule your group, schools, daycare, or parties!

Dream Field Farms

6376 Highway 82, Union Springs, Al. 334-534-6976. www.dreamfieldfarms.com; Pumpkin patch-pick in the field, train rides, corn maze, child-sized haybale maze, corn cannon, tractor-pulled hay rides, inflatables, gift shop, snacks and refreshment stand, farm animals and more. September 28-October 31; MondayWednesday 9:00am- 2:00pm; Thursday- Saturday 9:00am-6:00pm; Sundays 1:00-6:00pm. Hero Appreciation Day- September 28. Half price admission to all military and first responders. Fan Day- October 5. The first 100 facebook fans receive a free upgrade to a season pass. Home School Day- October 8. Home school parents admitted for $5.00 and home school children receive a free small pumpkin. Columbus Day- October 14. In honor of this holiday, the farm is open to the general public all day. State Employees and Teachers receive a 50% discount off general admission.

Jack-O-Lantern Lane at The Oaks L.L.C.

18151 Veterans Memorial Parkway, Lafayette, Al. 334-864-0713. www.jackolanternlane.com; Pumpkins, pumpkin patch-pick in the field, tractor-pulled hay rides, wagon rides, petting zoo, inflatable park, train rides, gift shop, snacks and refreshment stand, face painting, and more. Open September 28-October 31. Friday 1:006:00pm; Saturday 9:00am-6:00pm; Sunday 1:00-6:00pm. Also available by reservation Monday-Friday for school, church, daycare field trips and more. www.auburnopelikaparents.com

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Paradise Pumpkin Patch

910 County Road 79 South, Eufaula, Al. 334-695-2258. www.paradisepumpkinpatch. com; Corn maze, pumpkin patch, sunflower and cotton fields, giant inflatable park, petting zoo, playground, cow train, hay rides, pony rides, covered wagon rides pulled by a team of mules, giant corn box and hay bale mazes, concessions, and gift shop. September 21-November 1. Saturdays 9:00am-6:00pm and Sundays 12:00-6:00 pm. Special event dates and field trips available Monday-Friday. Teacher Day- September 21. All teachers with school ID are free! Free Paradise for Special Children- September 30. Free field trip for special needs children. Home School Day- October 14.

The Grand Old Pumpkin Patch

12-13, 19-20, 26-27. Train boards and departs Saturdays 10:00am, 1:00pm, and 3:00pm; and Sundays 1:00pm and 3:00pm. Enjoy an autumn train ride aboard the Pumpkin Patch Express that lasts approximately 1 1/2 hours, including our time at the Pumpkin Patch. At the Pumpkin Patch, riders will deboard to enjoy a hayride, jumpstation, coloring, and temporary tatoos (all activities are included in the price of your ticket). Snacks and soft drinks are available for purchase. Pick the perfect pumpkin from the patch for an additional fee. Reservations recommended.

Backyard Orchards

6585 Hwy 431 North, Eufaula, AL. 334-370-6490. U-Pick It Farm with fresh fruits, veggies and pumpkins!

1901 Lay Dam Road , Clanton, Al. 205-755-4553. www.alabamagrandolepumpkinpatch.com; Acres of fresh-off-the-vine pumpkins, covered wagon rides, pony rides, face painting and hay rides, bungee trampoline, sheep shearing presentations, helicopter rides, twacter train, petting zoo, inflatable park, Kiowa presentations, concessions, and more. October 1-31. Monday-Thursday, 8:00am-5:00pm; Friday and Saturday 8:00am-dark; Sunday 1:00pm-dark. Call for weekday reservations for groups, schools, daycares and more!

Butts Mill Farm

The Pumpkin Patch Express Heart of Dixie Railroad Museum

Farmer in the Dell Pumpkin Patch

Calera, Al. www.hodrrm.org; October 5-6,

Pine Mountain, Ga. 706-957-7601. www.buttsmillfarm.com; Pick your own pumpkin, take a hay ride, sip some apple cider, and much more.

Corn Dodgers Farm

1555 Knowles Road, Headland, AL. www.corndodgersfarm.com; September 28October 31. Corn field maze, pumpkin barn (pick your own), cow train ride, corn cannon, pony rides, corn box, sunflower path, hay rides, pipe maze, farm-sized tic-tac-toe, and more! Lee Country Road 61, Auburn. Located 6 miles west of Toomer’s Corner off of Hwy 14 near

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Pumpkin Patch at The Farmhouse

469 Farmhouse Road, Ellerslie, Georgia. 706-561-3435. Friday/Saturday in October. Hayrides, bonfires, s’mores, crafts, scarecrow contests, music, and more. Jump on the tractor and take a ride to pick out the perfect pumpkin for your family to carve.

The Pumpkin Patch at Barber Berry Farm 2362 Alabama River Parkway, Millbrook, Al. www.barberberryfarm.com; October 4-30. Hayride, pumpkin patch, pick your own pesticidefree fruit and veggies.

Arts & Crafts Festivals 4th Annual Hot Strings! Birmingham’s Blazin’ Bluegrass Festival

Colonial Brookwood Village, Hoover, Al. www. hotstrings.org; October 6, 12:00-6:00pm. Featuring some of the best names in Bluegrass including Matthew Mayfield, Act of Congress, Mandoline Orange, Three On a String and others. Great food, art, kid’s zone, fiddlin’ contest, jam sessions, farm demonstrations, and more!

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Loachapoka School. 334-750-3792. Pumpkin patch-pick in the field, pumpkin patch- already gathered from the field, corn maze, child-sized haybale maze, tractor-pulled hay rides and more. Monday-Friday, 3:00-6:00pm; Saturday, 9:00am-6:30pm.

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Hayride and Pumpkin Patch $8 Hayride Only $4 • Corn Maze $9 BUNDLE: Hayride, Pumpkin and Corn Maze $12

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hayrides • pick a pumpkin • corn maze pick cotton • corn crib • educational tours go to www.lazenbyfarm.com for more information and directions 11546 Lee Road 54 • Auburn Lazenby Farm exists to glorify God by acknowledging Him in His provision of food, fiber and life. We have a passion for precision agriculture and strive to educate the public on the modern working farm.

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6th Oktoberfest & Arts Festival

Historic Stone Mountain Village, Stone Mountain, Ga. www.stonemountainvillage.com; October 12-13. 12:00-6pm. Authentic German polka dancing, music, and food festival, beer, kid’s activities, hayride, arts and crafts, and more.

18th Annual Arts on the River

1100 Block of Broadway, Columbus, Ga. October 19. 10:00am-5:00pm. The fine art show and sale includes paint, photography, hand-thrown pottery, and sculpture, with some artists performing live demonstrations. Free.

21st Annual Alabama Cotton Festival

October 12. 8:00am-til. Eclectic, Al. Arts and crafts, flea market items, concession- booth spaces are free. 5K Cotton Run, Alabama Rook Tournament, local talent contest, children’s activities, antique cars and tractors, performances by Shenandoah, The Keith Moody Band, Fire Mountain and more.

23rd Annual Christmas Made in the South

Columbus Convention & Trade Center, Ga. www.madeinthesouthshows.com; November 1-3. Amazing craftspeople, outstanding art, unique gourmet food, and diverse entertainment to whet and satisfy every demanding appetite. Handmade, one-of-a-kind designs populate the booths that fill the festival: silk wearables to fabric bags, glass jewelry to close-up photography of nature’s funniest and fiercest creatures all await and more! Adults $6.00, Children 12 & under-Free; admission good for all 3 days.

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

33rd Annual Oktoberfest

Charles E. Bailey, Sr. Sportplex, Alexander City, AL. www.alexandercityonline.com; October 12. Day-long celebration features local arts and crafts, great food, entertainment, Kid-Fest children’s activities, sports programs, antique car show and much more. A Native American Artifact show is our newest showcase.

35th Annual Alabama Tale Tellin’ Festival Presented by ArtsRevive

3 Church Street, Selma, Al. www.artsrevive. com; October 11-12. 5:30 p.m. The performers this year are Dolores Hydock, Carmen Deedy and The Dill Pickers. Art show, StreetFest, Ballet, Market Day, Pilgrimage and more!

House and free “make and take” crafts will be provided by Home Depot.

50th Annual Bluff Park Art Show

Bluff Park Community Center, 517 Cloudland Dr. Hoover, Al. www.bluffparkartassociation.org; October 5. 9:00am-5:00pm. Sponsored by the Bluff Park Art Association and includes more than 130 local and national artists displaying fine art for sale. Bring the kids to enjoy some hands on art fun. Free admission, parking and shuttles.

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42nd Annual Harvest Day Festival

Headland, Al. www.headlandal.com; October 12. 9am-4pm. Arts and crafts, children’s games and rides, wonderful food and entertainment.

Lion’s Fair Park, 2401 W. Dallas Ave. Selma, Al. www.centralalabamafair.com; September 30October 5. Fun-filled event offering a midway with rides, entertainment, beauty pageant, agricultural exhibits, livestock judging and a competition for local arts, crafts, canning, sewing, and more!

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42nd Annual National Shrimp Festival

59th Annual Cullman County Fair

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Gulf Shores, Al. October 10-13. Over 300 vendors that offer fine art, arts and crafts, a retail marketplace and of course, SHRIMP!!

www.cullmancountyfair.org; September 12-23. Thrilling rides, amazing exhibits, and the best in local and regional entertainment.

47th Annual Pike Road Arts & Crafts Fair

66th Annual Lee County Fair

Historic Marks House, Pike Road, Al. www.pikeroadartsandcraftsfair.com; November 2. 9:00am-4:00pm. Shop the arts and crafts and eat BBQ, sweets, and more! Special activities for the children too- face painting, a tour of the Pike Road Fire Department’s Mobile Fire Safety

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US 431 near Opelika High. 334-749-3353. October 1-5. Livestock shows, contests, exhibits, pageants, rides and much more.

70th Annual National Peanut Festival 5622 U.S. Hwy. 231 S., Dothan, Al. www.nationalpeanutfestival.com; November

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1-10. Headliner Easton Corbin and Need To Breathe. Livestock exhibits, competitions, demolition derby, crafts, food preservation, recipe contests, entertainment, carnival rides, sea lion show, and much more!

Alabama Gourd Festival

Cullman Civic Center. www.alabamagourdsociety. org; October 19-20. ‘Gourding In a Winter Wonderland’. Annual festival features gourd arts and crafts, such as birdhouses, musical instruments and decorated gourds. Dulcimer band performs.

Alabama National Fair

Garret Coliseum, Montgomery, Al. www.alnationalfair.org; October 4-13. Midway rides, main stage entertainment including Thompson Square, Keith Sweat and Lee Greenwood, food, information and commercial booths, kids area, livestock and other competition, family faith day, and more!

Alexander City Fall Festival

Russell Crossroads, Alexander City, Al. www.russelllandsonlakemartin.com; October 26. Join friends and neighbors for pumpkin painting, a costume contest, wagon rides and more, courtesy of Russell Lands on Lake Martin.

Boll Weevil Festival

Enterprise, Al. www.enterprisedowntown.org; October 19. Arts and crafts vendors, variety of music, food, children’s costume contest and activities, farmers market, car show, family entertainment.

Christmas Village Festival

Jefferson Convention Complex, Birmingham. www.christmasvillagefestival.com; November 6-10. The largest indoor arts, crafts, and gifts show in the south, this show draws exhibitors from over 30 states with products like clothing, jewelry, food, decorations and much, much more.

Cotton Pickin’ County Fair

Gay, Ga. www.cpfair.org; October 5-6. Return to 1910 where the Farmhouse, the Cotton Gin, and the Cotton Warehouse form a unique backdrop for a great day of 21st century fun. Amidst skilled artisans and antique specialists, the Fair shares remnants of farm life in days gone by. New talent keeps the festival fresh and interesting while returning artists welcome loyal customers seeking to add to individual collections.

Country Living Fair

Stone Mountain, Ga. www.stonemountianpark. com; October 25-27. Meet the editors of Country Living Magazine, Seminars & How-to’s, Artisan Demonstrations, Harvest & Gourmet Market, Children’s’ Activities & Fall Festivities.

Crafty Christmas

Opelika, Al. www.ourbighouse.org; November 23. Come support the BigHouse Foundation and local crafters/vendors, all the while checking off that Christmas list early! Admission is $5, kids 12 and under free.

Family Fall Festival

Columbus Museum, Ga. www.columbusmuseum.com; October 12. 11:00am-3:00pm. Free!

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Create a rad rhino, a terrifying tiger, and more! Stop by our Art Cart and pick up a passport to help you find animals in the museum! Play animal games, watch a creature feature film, and don’t forget to dress up for the Crazy Creatures Costume Contest!

Harvest Hoe Down

Warm Springs, Ga. www.warmspringsga.us; October 12-13. Enjoy this fall celebration with arts, crafts, good food, entertainment and more!

Hummingbird Festival

Hogansville, Ga. www.hummingbirdfestival.com; October 19-20. Main Street will be bustling with food, crafts, antiques, music, local artists, open storefronts, rides, and activities for the whole family.

Indian Festival & Pow-Wow

Antebellum Plantation & Farmyard inside Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark. com; October 31-November 3. Experience Native American culture through dance & drum competitions, music, authentic craft demonstrations, cooking samples and storytelling activities. Learn about primitive skills such as flint-napping, bow making, fire starting, open fire cooking and pottery. Find that one-of-a-kind holiday gift in our artists’ marketplace, where world-renowned Native artists and crafters demonstrate their skills and offer items for purchase.

Indian Summer Arts & Crafts Festival

Historic District- Eufaula, Al. www.eufaulachamber.com; October 12-13. Fine arts and handmade crafts, children’s activities, live entertainment and more.

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Merry Market

Callaway Conference Center, Campus of West Georgia Technical College, LaGrange, Ga. www.merrymarketlagrange.com; October 24-26. Thursday: Preview Party and Silent Auction: Enjoy this kick-off event and first chance to buy a variety of items. Your ticket $25 includes food, beverages, music and admission to the market for the entire time the market is open! Friday-Saturday: General Admission tickets $5.

Ole Chipley Town Fair

Pine Mountain, Ga. www.pinemountain.org; September 28. Join the crowd of Pine Mountain and enjoy local crafts, quilting, pottery, metalwork, woodwork, food and entertainment. Spend the day strolling down Pine Mountain’s picturesque streets or shopping in downtown Pine Mountain’s and Chipley Village’s shopping centers, each filled with unique shops and boutiques. You’ll find it all—from antiques to fine art to handcrafted birdhouses and other momentos.

Peanut Butter Festival

Brundidge, Al. www.piddle.org; October 26. 9:00am. A harvest and heritage celebration honoring the town’s proud heritage in the peanut butter industry. The free for all festival features a 5-K Peanut Butter Run, non-stop entertainment, contests, games, exhibits, recipe contest, Peanut Butter Kids Contest and the Nutter Butter Parade and food galore including everything peanut butter.

Syrup Sopping and Historical Fair

Pioneer Days

Pioneer Museum of Alabama, Troy, Al. www.pioneer-museum.org; October 11-12, 9:00am-5:00pm. Horse and wagon rides, trips on the Pioneer Express, Native American camps with demonstrations of candlemaking, spinning, weaving, quiltmaking, blacksmithing, drum, dance, etc. Friday is School Day.

Riverfront Market Day

Water Ave, Selma, Al. www.riverfrontmarketday. com; October 12. Various artisans and craftsmen market their wares, food vendors, entertainment, kids activities and more.

Seasonal Artist Showcase

Rumbling Water Studios & Gallery, Wetumpka, Al. www.facebook.com/RumblingWater; October 19-20. 9:00am-5:00pm. A showcase featuring the work of a guest artist, with woodcarving demonstrations held during the day.

Spinners 32nd Annual “Pumpkin Patch” Arts & Crafts Show

Spinners Park, Prattville, Al. www.spinnersprattville.com; October 26-27. Exhibitors of original art and crafts from throughout the southeast will display their wares. Food vendors, live entertainment, games, a coloring contest and many other activities for children and youth. Door prizes will be given at intervals during the show. Other events include The Great Pumpkin Race, a 5K/8K Race and a one mile Run/Walk, a motorcycle show, jack-o-lantern contest and more. Free admission and free parking.

Loachapoka, Al. www.syrupsopping.org; October 19. 6:00am-4:00pm. Weaving and cloth-making demonstrations, musical entertainment featuring hammered and mountain dulcimers, banjos and guitars, a doctor’s beautiful herb garden and crops garden, bread making, soap making, period pottery, fireplace and outdoor cooking, and other old time crafts. Food includes famous sweet potato biscuits made on site, camp stew, beans, collards, BBQ, and home-made ice cream Tour the two-story 140 year old Trade Center museum, watch the blacksmiths at work, visit the Log Cabin, and the Taylor Whatley agricultural implement collection.

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Columbus Civic Center, Columbus, Ga. www. columbusciviccenter.org; Oct 15-20. Celebrate the beginning of autumn in the Chattahoochee Valley. Food, rides, games, pageant and more!

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9294 Singer Pond Rd., Lumpkin, Ga. October 31-November 2. 10:00am-5:00pm. Come visit us at Westville as we take care of Autumn chores and have fun while we’re doing it!

Wiregrass Heritage Festival

Landmark Park, Dothan. www.landmarkpark. com; October 26. Learn how peanuts were harvested in the Wiregrass a half-century ago. Enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of cane grinding, syrup making, butter churning, basket

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weaving, soap making and other traditional farm activities. Plus, food, music and antique tractors and farm equipment.

Church Events All Saints Fair

Lakeview Baptist Church, Auburn. 1600 East Glenn Avenue. www.lakeviewbaptist. org; October 31; 5:00-7:00 pm. Safe, family fun alternative to trick-or-treating; everyone welcome. Games include train, gladiator joust, gyro, horse and wagon, go fish, soccer kick, ring toss, bowling, inflatables and more! Lots of games, prizes and candy! Tickets children 0-12 years old- $3.00 fee includes hot dog supper, games and prizes. Or, $10.00 max per family. Individual Teen- Adult-$1.00 hot dog supper fee. Come dressed up, but please avoid goulish costumes.

Cornerstone Church Truck-or-Treat

Lee-Scott Academy, 1601 Academy Drive, Auburn. www.cornerstonebuzz.org; October 27, 4:00-6:00pm.

Fall On the Farm Festival

Providence Baptist Church, 2807 Lee Road 166, Opelika. October 19, 10am-12noon. Activities include Games, Face Painting, Fish Pond, Cake Walk and much more. www.providencealive. com

Parkway Baptist Church Fall Festival 766 E. University Drive, Auburn. 887-3782. October 30. 6:00pm. Free to the community. Come dressed in costume to play carnival games and win prizes, visit the petting zoo, and much more!

Trunk or Treat & Chili Cook-Off

Grace United Methodist Church, Auburn. October 28. 5:00pm. Children and adults are invited to come in costume, and children are invited to visit the decorated car trunks to “trick or trunk.” Adults are invited to prepare and bring your best chili dish to be judged and shared with others, with prizes for the best chili recipes and best costumes to be awarded at the conclusion of supper. 844-7003.

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A concussion is an injury caused by a blow to the head in which the brain moves rapidly and may collide with the inside of the skull. Even a minor fall or collision may be of concern, so be alert to symptoms such as headaches, unsteadiness, confusion or other types of abnormal behavior.

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Costume Shopping Check It Out!

239 North Gay Street, Auburn. 826-0803. www.check-it-outballoons.com

Kids Clothes Connection

3700 Pepperell Pkwy, Opelika (next to Goodwill). Gently used children’s costumes available. www.kidsclothesconnection.com

Party City

Tiger Town, Opelika. Specializing in all things party! Costumes for all ages, accessories, decorations, and more.

ThinkFirst _____________________________________________

Alabama

CONCUSSION CLINIC 205.934.1041 www.Childrens AL.org/concussion IN CASE OF MEDICAL EMERGENCY, CALL 911 OR GO DIRECTLY TO YOUR LOCAL ER

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Out of Town / State Fun The Columbus MuseumFall Festival

1251 Wynnton Rd, Columbus, Ga. www.columbusmuseum.com; October 12. 11:00am-3:00pm. Free! Create five awesome animal projects, animal scavenger hunt, games and prizes, movies and more! Dress up for the Crazy Creature Costume Contest: Ages 0-4-11 am; Ages 5-7- 12 pm. Ages 8-10- 1 pm.

Zoo Boo: Montgomery Zoo

www.montgomeryzoo.com; October 17-20, 24-31. 6:00-9:00pm. A safe alternative to Halloween, ZooBoo provides a fun-filled evening of games, treats, and costumed characters, Enjoy education presentations, and the traditional haunted ride.

3rd Annual Atlanta’s Day of the Dead

(Dia de los Muertos)-Atlantic Station in Midtown, Atlanta. www.atlantadayofthedead. com; November 4. 12:00-5:00pm. A traditional Mexican celebration that remembers the life of family members and friends who have passed away. Altars are built in their honor, that include photos of the loved one, food they enjoyed, activities they participated in, and other special items. Free.

3rd Annual Track-or-Treat: Chris Patterson Memorial 5K

Chattahoochee Valley Community College. October 26. 8:00am. $20 before race $25 day of. Come dressed in your most creative Halloween costume and get ready to run! Awards given to top male and female runners and awards given to best costumes. All race proceeds benefit the Chris Patterson Student Support Fund, a scholarship fund designated to aid deserving CVCC students. laurenlpatterson@gmail.com

11th Annual Pumpkin Festival

Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com; September 27-October 27

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

(Fridays-Sundays). Throughout weekends enjoy attractions, entertainment, activities and fall decorations that are fun for all ages. Event highlights include Kids Trick or Treat Scavenger Hunt, Family Scavenger Hunt, The Great Pumpkin Puppet Parade, Children’s Costume Contest, Storytelling, Pie Eating Contest, Pumpkin Palooza, & Pumpkin Party Patch. Entrance to the Pumpkin Festival is included in the Adventure Pass.

22nd Annual Halloween Fairyland

Tannehill State Park. www.tannehill.org; October 26. The Tannehill Halloween Festival, a non-scary fun-filled holiday event focused on the campgrounds, annually attracts over 6,000 visitors, most of them children. Begun in 1992, the event features park-sponsored programs during the afternoon and traditional Halloween candy “trick or treat” stops at more than 200 campsites during the evening. Park events include a moon walk, clowns, face painting, pony rides and sand art. A special tradition is the festival’s annual Halloween Festival tee shirt. Campground site decorations and lights are extensive, creative and surreal.

28th Annual Tour of Southern Ghosts

Antebellum Plantation, Stone Mountain, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com; October 11-13, 17-20, 24-27 (Thurdays-Sundays). Meet professional storytellers spinning their tales of famous (and not-so-famous) Southern Ghosts along the lantern-lit paths of the Antebellum Plantation grounds- never too frightening and always appropriate for young children. Each night offers a different cast of six storytellers.

Alabama Shakespeare Festival presents ‘Dracula’

Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Montgomery. www.asf.net; October 27-28. www.alabamadancetheatre.com

BOO 18 Halloween Party ‘Monsters Inc’ Benefiting the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Alabama

B & A Warehouse, Birmingham, Al. www.boohal-

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loweenparty.com; October 25. 8:00pm. Live music, ‘Scary’-oke singing, costume contest and more. Open to adults 21 yrs and older.

Fall Family Fun Days- The Rock Ranch The Rock, Ga. www.therockranch.com; September 28-November 16. Open 10:00am8:00pm each Saturday, guests will enjoy themed entertainment plus Train Rides, Hay Rides, a Petting Zoo, Zip Lines, Pony Rides, the Pumpkin Cannon, Tiny Town and much more! Lumberjack Day-October 5. Featuring collegiate Timbersports competition. Day of the Cowboy- October 12. Hot Air Balloon Rally- October 19. The ‘Not-So-Spooky’ Halloween FestivalOctober 26. Pumpkin Destruction Day- November 2.

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Freeman Rd, off Highway 49N, Dadeville, Al. www.eaglecreekhayride.com; October 19, 25, and 26. 7:30-11:30pm.What really lurks in the deep hollows of the woods in Central Alabama? On your tour, bring someone you can hold tight because when you dare to venture down the Fields of Fear Hayride, the last thing you want is to be alone.

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DeSoto State Park. www.DesotoCarvernsPark. com; October 25-26. Weekend of FREE spooky storytelling & fun events guaranteed to run shivers up and down your spine! Friday & Saturday night both will be spooky nights of storytelling, costumes, treats, & more with storyteller Renee Morrison & her story-tellin’ aunt Jenny Whitman. Storytelling, Spooky Movie Under the Stars- October 25.

Great Pumpkin Roll

Alexander City, Al. 256-329-9227. October 26. 3:00-5:00pm. Free. Bring your own pumpkin or get one at the Farmer’s Market. Rolling begins at the top of Alabama Street at Strand Park.

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Growing Up Wild for Preschoolers

October 26. Mask Making, Creepy Critters Show and then Saturday night join us in DeSoto’s Campground before the party for ghoulish games & trick or treating through-out the campground.

of the Civil War Navies. Enjoy family friendly entertainment aboard the Water Witch including music, games and tales. During your tour you might recognize our more famous ghosts as well as hear the little known stories of Nurses, Citizens and Sailors.

Harvest Time at Old Alabama Town

Hogansville House of Horror

Montgomery. www.oldalabamatown.com; October 1-31. Come down to Old Alabama Town as we feature Harvest Time in the 1800’s. Join us for tours of the cotton gin and grist mill, and get a firsthand look at farming in the 19th century. Individual self-guided tours offered Monday through Saturday from 9:00am3:00pm. Guided tours available by reservation only, for groups of 10 or more.

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Old Cahawba, Sturdivant Hall, Old Live Oak Cemetery, Selma, Al. www.preserveala.org; October 18-19. On Friday night, 7:00-10:30pm, join Central Alabama Paranormal Investigation on an investigation of Old Cahawba. The past will come back to haunt you as we tour magnificent antebellum Sturdivant Hall and some “spirited” characters of Old Live Oak Cemetery. On Saturday, take a walking tour, 10:00-11:00pm.

Haunted Museum Tours

Port Columbus Museum, Columbus, Ga. www. portcolumbus.org; October 24-26. 6:309:00pm. Your “Ghost Host” will guide you through the museum as you encounter spirits

Royal Theatre, Hogansville, Ga. www.hauntedhogansville.com; October 20, 26-27, 31. 7:009:00pm. The Old Royal Theater of Hogansville is stirring in its mouldering grave. Entities are rising from the dust and debris of the decades-and you may have to meet them face to face! It’s creepy--it’s old--it’s HAUNTED!

Monster Mash Party & Performance Presented by The Montgomery Ballet. Davis Theatre Courtyard, Montgomery. www.montgomeryballet.org; October 25. 6:30pm.

Owl-O-Ween

Oak Mountain State Park, Pelham. 205-6637930, Ext. 4. October 26. Features children’s activities, wildlife presentations and educational programs. Free after paid admission to park.

OZtober

DeSoto State Park, Every Saturday in October. 10:15am and 12:15pm. Follow Dorothy and her friends as she makes her way home in this one hour roaming production. The journey begins at the Yellow Brick Road in the park and concludes in the cave which has been

transformed into the Magical Emerald City. Tickets $19.99 or $9.99 with Fun Pac. Wear your favorite Oz costume and receive $2.00 off your ticket.

Pope’s Haunted Farm

450 Lee Rd 724,Salem, Al. 706-566-7766. www.popeshayride.com; October 5, 11-12, 18-19, 25-27, November 1-2. 7:30pm. Pope’s Haunted Farm has three different events to experience and scare you. The Haunted Barn made as a mock of the Saw movies, the Haunted Hayride that many have claimed to see the infamous evil specter Jasper, and lastly you can experience the Haunted Forest that’s an unguided tour that includes a graveyard deep in the woods.

Scott’s Halloween Bash

Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum, Montgomery. www.fitzgeraldmuseum.net; October 31. Featuring a night of music and mayhem.

The Montgomery Ballet presents “The Phantom of the Opera”

Davis Theatre, Montgomery. October 11-13.

Whispers From the Past: A Native American Experience

Aldridge Botanical Gardens, Hoover. www.aldridgegardens.com; October 6. 1:008:00pm. Explore Native American life through demonstrations featuring flint knapping, cooking, hunting and weapons and activities like leaf pounding, grinding corn and more. AOP

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A Page in a Book by Gerry Paige Smith

The Gift of Grandfathers Grandfathers often have the special gift of wisdom and extra attention to share with our children. For children who are blessed to know their grandfatherly forebears, they often gain the benefits of their grandfather’s life experiences and memories through those rare and treasured interactions. Getting to know their grandfathers is a vital part of children’s lives as they work to assemble their understanding of how families are made and grown, how each relationship is different and special. The following titles explore the unique connections between children and their grandfathers in beautiful, loving and poignant ways.

Max and the Tag-Along Moon

by Floyd Cooper (Philomel / Penguin Books for Young Readers) At the end of Max’s visit with his Grandpa, the hardest part is saying goodbye. As their last hug is framed by the rising full moon, his Grandpa says, “That ‘ol moon will always shine for you…on and on!” And true enough, as the family drives away, Max watches his Grandpa recede from view while the moon waxes large. Through all the twists and turns of the drive the moon plays peek-a-boo, yet it is always there. But when the clouds arrive, the moon is hidden and Max isn’t sure that it’s shining anymore. Missing his Grandpa AND the moon, Max lies in bed worrying about the absence of both until a gentle light begins to fill his bedroom, keeping his Grandpa’s promise. A lovingly illustrated testament to a relationship that is constant despite the challenges of time and distance, ‘Max and the Tag-Along Moon’ is gentle support for kids missing a grandparent.

Joone by Emily Kate Moon (Dial) Joone revels in the life she shares with her Grandpa in his homey yurt. Narrating the ways they spend their days, Joone offers a child’s eye view of the ways that her grandfather finds a balance between play and parenting. Her words reveal bits of her Grandpa’s life (before he was old) showing that she’s paying attention to who he was, as well as who he is. With lively illustrations and spare text, readers will appreciate the blending lives of a loving grandfather moving slowly through the day while his adventuresome, full of zest granddaughter runs, climbs and swims with enough energy for both of them.

Zayde Come to Live by Sheri Sinykin, Illustrated by Kristina Swarner (Peachtree) Rachel thinks she knows why her Zayde (grandfather) has come to live with her and her family. Although no one has told her, she knows because he is dying. He is no longer able to play hideand-seek, or catch a ball without getting tired. He runs out of breath when he reads to Rachel, so she reads to him. While she’s aware that she will eventually lose her Zayde, she’s more worried about what will happen to him when he dies. She doesn’t know who to ask until the family’s rabbi visits. The answers she receives are reassuring and allow her to focus on every moment, every breath that she can still share with her Zayde before the end. The title alone, ‘Zayde Comes to Live’, is an optimistic message leading a powerful story recommended for kids who are facing the loss of a grandparent or elder relative. Find more A Page in a Book recommendations at www.PageBookReviews.com.

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TheFlyLady

A Flight Plan For You and Your Home. by Marla Cilley

Parents Should Do Their Best,

Finding an Extra Hour Each Day! But Not Expect Too Much in Return Wouldn’t you like to find an extra hour to your day and not lose any sleep to do it? I think I have found a way to accomplish this! Recently it was brought to my attention that, on an average, people spend 55 minutes each day looking for lost items! Just think about what you have looked for today. I have been asking folks all day about what they have been searching for. Some of the answers were typical: flip flops, shoes, socks, the remote, bills, keys, sunglasses, glasses, phone, birth certificate and the most popular “My Mind”! If the truth be told, whenever you lose anything your mind is the first thing to go! The stress and guilt of losing something again causes us to not think logically. I wish we had an acronym to help us FIND things. I may not have that acronym, but I do have a plan!

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

Let’s go back in time and stop ourselves from losing things in the first place. My grandmother always said, “Everything has a place and everything in its place!” Just think about how this little saying can put an extra hour in our day. If we took the time to pick up after ourselves instead of stashing things like a crazy person then we may actually be able to find those items when we need them. But the problem is that we don’t have a place picked out for that item. The reason we don’t have a place is because clutter has taken over all of our storage areas and flat surfaces. We buy houses with lots of closets, kitchen cabinets and drawers, yet each one is filled to capacity with miscellaneous items. There is no true organization to our homes because we can’t seem to get rid of our clutter. In order to find a place for everything we have to begin the process of decluttering. We can set our timers for 15 minutes and sort through those cluttered recesses,

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one drawer or one shelf at a time. Sort the clutter into three bins: Give away, put away, and throw away! I know that in your “Want it now” mentality that you are determined to get your house organized as fast as you can. The problem with this is that you will crash and burn! When we take baby steps to release the clutter and use our zones to work our way around our homes, we can determine places for the things we love and use. As you eliminate the clutter, you are going to find that you have several like items. One time we got a testimonial in which a lady said she found seven pairs of scissors in her home as she decluttered. We know how that happens. When we can’t find a pair of scissors we go out and buy another pair. Isn’t it funny that we spend more time buying a new pair than searching for the old one? Once the clutter is gone you can determine a place for everything and with more time on your hands, you can put things back where they belong! For more help getting rid of your CHAOS, see her website and join her free mentoring group at www.FlyLady.net. Also check out her books, Sink Reflections, published by Random House, and her New York Times Best Selling book, Body Clutter, published by Simon and Schuster. Copyright 2013 Marla Cilley. Used by permission in this publication.

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Family Calendar Ongoing

A2Z Local Homeschooler’s Association For homeschooling families in the Auburn/Opelika Lee County area of Alabama. A2Z Loop is an all-inclusive support group open to all homeschool families in the Auburn/Opelika area regardless of differences in beliefs, cultures, nationality, race, religion, or method of home schooling. For more information call 334-728-1162 or email: momofpnk@gmail.com. Alabama Mentor’s Foster Parent Training Classes Offered in the Opelika Auburn area. Call 334-705-8877 x 18 to register or email: Deanna.Hand@thementornetwork.com. Alabama Shakespeare Festival “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” Oct. 6–20. Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Montgomery. www.asf.net. Atlanta Center for Puppetry Arts • “Peter Rabbit.” Through Sept. 22. • “Everybody Loves Pirates.” Sept. 25–Oct. 6. • “The Wizard of Oz.” Oct. 9–20. • “The Dragon King.” Oct. 22–Nov. 3. www.puppet.org. Barber Berry Farm Muscadine and Scuppernong Picking. Through Sept. 28. Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9–2; Sat. 8–4. Barber Berry Farm, Millbrook. www.barberberryfarm.com. Birmingham Children’s Theater • “City Mouse, Country Mouse.” Through Oct. 1. • “The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963.” Oct. 7–19. www.bct123.org. Bosom Buddies (a breast cancer support group) Meets at The Health Resource Center the first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. (334) 528-1260. www.eamc.org. Cloverdale Playhouse, Montgomery “Wait Until Dark.” Sept. 26–Oct. 6. www.cloverdaleplayhouse.org. Expressions of a BraveHeart Program A fine arts program for teens and young adults with special needs (ages 11–21), sponsored by Opelika Parks and Recreation, utilizing Auburn University faculty and students, as well as community volunteers. Two 30-minute sessions of art, dance/creative movement and music will be offered and participants will select 2 of the 3 classes. Expressions meets every 2nd and 4th Monday twice a month for 1.5 hours. Opelika Sportsplex, 334.705.5560. www.opelikasportsplex.com. Family Theatre • “Ramona Quimby.” Sept. 27–Oct. 12. • “The House at Pooh Corner.” Oct. 25–Nov. 9. Columbus, Ga. www.familytheatre.org. Hampstead Farms, Montgomery Farm-to-Fork Food Invasion. Oct 1–31. www.foodinvasion.com. Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art • The Art of Jean Woodham. Through Oct. 12. • JCSM at 10: The First Decade. Through Jan. 4, 2014. • Mickett/Stackhouse: Prints, Drawings, Plans and Models. Through Jan. 4, 2014. • David Henderson Installation: History of Aviation. Sept. 26–Jan. 4. Free. Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art. www.jcsm.auburn.edu. Lee County Parents of Chinese Children helps children understand, see and grow up with other families that look like their family (white parents/Asian child). The group is 100% free! We try to eat out at Asian establishments monthly and have playdates. Families that are waiting to adopt are welcome! We accept any families with adopted children from all Asian countries. Contact Melody at mmhilyer@bellsouth.net for more information. Meditation Garden and Labyrinth Come and Find the Quiet Center... in the Meditation Garden and Labyrinth, provided as a community service by Village Christian Church, 700 East University Drive, (across from Auburn Early Ed.). 334-887-5111. Try the practice of walking meditation or simply sit and enjoy the sights and sounds. The garden and labyrinth are always open and guests are always welcome. Montgomery Ballet www.montgomeryballet.org. Montgomery Performing Arts Montgomery Performing Arts. www.mpaconline.org. Newnan Theater Company • “‘night Mother.” Sept. 26–Oct. 6.

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September/October2013

• “The Mystery of Irma Vep.” Oct. 24–Nov. 3. Georgia. www.newnantheatre.org. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Sept. 27–Oct. 5. Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham. Old Alabama Town, Montgomery • Back to School at Old Alabama Town. Through Sept. 30. 9 a.m.– 3 p.m. • Harvest Time & Tavern Fest. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Oct. 1-31. www.oldalabamatown.com. Opelika-Auburn Newcomers Club A club for new women in town which offers fun social activities, meets for lunch on the 3rd Thursday of every month. Call Joan at 501-4974. Red Mountain Theatre “Grease.” Sept. 26–Oct. 20. Birmingham. www.redmountaintheatre.org. Rosa Parks Museum • The Berlin Wall Series: Paintings by Jim Harrison III. Sept. 6–Oct. 29. Rosa Parks Museum Exhibit Hall, Montgomery. www.troy. edu. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Free. Shelby County Arts Council 5th Annual Shelby County Arts Council Juried Art Show. Sept. 12–Oct. 17. Columbiana, Al. www.shelbycountyartscouncil.com. Shelby County Fair Through Sept. 21. Exhibition Center, Columbiana, Al. Telfair Peet Theatre “On the Verge.” Sept. 26–Oct. 4. Telfair Peet Theatre, Auburn University. www.cla.auburn.edu/theatre. Virginia Samford Theatre “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Through Sept. 22. Birmingham. www.virginiasamfordtheatre.org. Vulcan Park and Museum A Place of Our Own: Birmingham’s Fourth Avenue District. Through September 29. www.visitvulcan.com.

Parents Support & Moms Groups

Auburn Mommies, a fun group of moms in the Auburn/Opelika area that meet weekly for playgroups and Mommy and Me walking twice a week. We also have a Mommies Night Out once a month. Http:// groups.yahoo.com/group/auburnmommiesinalabama/. Auburn Mommy and Me Big Dog Running Co, Auburn. 10–11 a.m. Social time, story time, music/movement, arts & crafts. Ages 9 months–3 years. Free! 334-209-2580. Ongoing Calendar addition: Auburn MOPS 1st Wednesday of each month, September-May. 9–11:30 a.m. Trinity United Methodist Church, Opelika. Meetings open to moms with preschool children ages 5 years and under. $5 per meeting; childcare $5 per child. $25 yearly membership dues. Weekly playdates, monthly moms night out, resources, and more. www.facebook.com/ AuburnOpelikaMOPS; AUMOPS@yahoo.com. Breast Feeding class meets the second Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon on EAMC’s third floor. Call 528-1260 to register. La Leche League, a support group for nursing moms, meets the 2nd Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. @ CORNERSTONE Family Chiropractic, Airport Plaza, 323 Airport Road Suite E, Auburn. For more information call Josie at 257-3950. Lee County Autism Support Group meets every other month. Call Julie Brown 887-3903 or Florence Evermom 887-5005. Covenant Presbyterian Church on Shelton Mill Road in Auburn. MOMS Club of Auburn, a group of stay-at-home moms that meets about twice a week to provide support for each other and fun interaction for kids. New website is www.auburnmoms.com. Moms In Touch. Do you worry about your children? Come experience how you can replace your anxiety and fear with peace and hope by praying with other moms. Moms In Touch International gathers moms together for one hour, once a week, to pray specifically and scripturally for our children and school. Won’t you join with us in prayer for this next generation? Please contact Julia Farrow at julia@cornerstonebuzz. org for information about our local groups. For more

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information about Moms In Touch International, visit www.MomsInTouch.org. Single Moms Outreach of East Alabama Single Moms Outreach of East Alabama offers 2nd Saturdays, group classes, and more. Contact Penny Messer at 334-444-6827. Email smoea@bellsouth. net. Website www.smoea.vpweb.com or find us on facebook. Teen Moms (for moms under 20) is a ministry that connects trained adults with pregnant girls and teenage moms. Support meetings, classes, job preparation, devotions and games. Call Laura Fuller at laura@insideyfc.com or 334-501-5637. www.insideyfc.com.

Mom’s Morning Out

Auburn United Methodist Church, Children’s Day Out Program, every Monday-Thursday from 9 a.m.–12 noon. $10 per child for the entire morning, $2 each additional child. Attendance will be on a first come-first served basis. Contact Barbara Dawsey at 826-8800 for more information. Trinity United Methodist Church (Opelika) Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:45–12. $15 per child.

Support Groups

Caregiver Support Group Caring for a family member or friends can be rewarding, but it’s not easy. Whether you are the caregiver for your parents, spouse or a dependent child, this group is for you! Learn ways to cope with every day stresses of caring for someone you love. Gain tools and resources to help you on your journey. This program is supported by the Opelika Sportsplex, Lee-Russell Agency on Aging and HomeInstead Senior Care. This group is open to the public. Meets the last Monday of each month at 12:30 p.m. at Opelika Sportsplex AAC. Instructors are: Valeri White (Sportsplex), Bridgette Sager (Home Instead Senior Care), Lisa Askew (Lee-Russell Council of Gov). Food Allergy Support of East Alabama The Food Allergy Support of East Alabama group offers support through the sharing of information and resources. We are also working to increase awareness of food allergies in the state of Alabama. For more information, visit our website at www. foodallergysupporteastal.org or call Barbara at 334-8263082; bkg2007@bellsouth.net. GRACE - Post-Abortive Support Group Are you struggling with feelings of regret or sadness from having a pregnancy termination in your past? Do you feel like you can’t share these struggles with anyone? Would you like to find healing and forgiveness? You are not alone. Women’s Hope Medical Clinic wants to help you! You are invited to take part in our GRACE abortion recovery group. This confidential group gives you the opportunity to process the grief of your termination in a safe and non-judgmental setting. If you would like more information about the times, dates and location for this group, call or e-mail Sherry at Women’s Hope: 334.502.7000 or sherry@womenshope.org Don’t let the regret of the past rob you of the joy in the future. Call us today. We are here to help.

Sports

Auburn High School Football Sept. 27, Oct. 11, 18. Opelika High School Football Sept. 20, Oct. 4, 11, 25, 31. Columbus Cottonmouths Oct. 26, Nov. 8, 9, 16, 23, 26, 28, 30. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Tuskegee/Morehouse Football Classic Oct. 12. 2:00 p.m. www.tuskegee-morehouse.com. Auburn Equestrian Sept. 28, Oct. 19, Nov. 9, 15. Auburn Football Oct. 5, 12, 26 (homecoming), Nov. 16, 30. Auburn Soccer Sept. 20, 22, Oct. 4, 11, 25, 27. Auburn Swimming & Diving Sept. 21.

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Thursday, September 19

“Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. The largest children’s and household consignment in our area! For times and directions, www.kidsclothesconnection.com.

Friday, September 20

20th Annual Foggy Hollow Bluegrass Gatherin’ Foggy Hollow Farm, Wellington, AL. www.foggyhollow.com. Fall Birmingham Home Show BJCC, Birmingham. www.bjcc.org. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 18 for details. Masquerade Party Presented by The Montgomery Ballet. The Alley Bar. 7:30 p.m. www.montgomeryballet.com. Uptown Concert Series ‘Rock Candy Band’ 7–10 p.m. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. Shelby County Fair Exhibition Center, Columbiana, AL.

September/October2013

Picnic with the Tortoises at Oxbow Meadows Columbus. 1 p.m. Free. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. 22nd Annual Magic City AIDS Walk Avondale Park, Birmingham. www.birmingham365.org. Alabama Nature Center Public Weekend Lanark Park, Millbrook. www.alabamawildlife.org. Picnic with the Tortoises at Oxbow Meadows Columbus. 1 p.m. Free. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. “To Kill a Mockingbird” See Sept. 18 for details.

Monday, September 23 Southeastern Distribution Apparatus School & Conference Auburn University Hotel and Dixon Conference Center. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 18 for details.

Tuesday, September 24 Southeastern Distribution Apparatus School & Conference Auburn University Hotel and Dixon Conference Center. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 18 for details.

Wednesday, September 25 Southeastern Distribution Apparatus School & Conference Auburn University Hotel and Dixon Conference Center. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 18 for details.

Saturday, September 21 Thursday, September 26 French Colonial Weekend Ft. Toulouse-Ft. Jackson State Historical Site, Wetumpka. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.fttoulousejackson.org. 20th Annual Foggy Hollow Bluegrass Gatherin’ See Sept. 20 for details. Tri-City Latino Festival Columbus Civic Center. 9 a.m. Free. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Fall Birmingham Home Show BJCC, Birmingham. www.bjcc.org. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.-noon. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. 4th Annual Open House: Warm Springs Fish Hatchery www.warmspringsga.com. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 19 for details. Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. 4th Annual Open House: Warm Springs Fish Hatchery www.warmspringsga.com. Alabama Nature Center Public Weekend Lanark Park, Millbrook. www.alabamawildlife.org. 22nd Annual Waverly BBQ Waverly Community Center. 8 a.m.–3 p.m. BBQ available from 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Chicken and Pork plates $10, Boston butts $25. Family fun includes: Celtic Traditions dancers, Farmer Brown Petting Zoo, BINGO, door prizes, kid’s greased pig race and more. 887-7288. Shelby County Fair Exhibition Center, Columbiana, AL.

Sunday, September 22

French Colonial Weekend Ft. Toulouse-Ft. Jackson State Historical Site, Wetumpka. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.fttoulousejackson.org. Fall Birmingham Home Show BJCC, Birmingham. www.bjcc.org.

Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks Opelika Center for Performing Arts. Admission is $10 for adults/$7 for students. 334-745-9715. Annual BBQ on the Green Sturdivant Museum, Selma. www.sturdivanthall.com. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Southeastern Distribution Apparatus School & Conference Auburn University Hotel and Dixon Conference Center. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 19 for details. “The Illusion” Riverside Theatre, Columbus. www.columbusstate.edu/ theatre. “On the Verge” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/theatre/buy-tickets.

Friday, September 27 Festival in the Pines Tannehill Historical State Park, McCalla. www.tannehill.org. Taste of 4th Avenue Jazz Festival Birmingham. www.justataste.org. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Fort Benning Movie Under the Stars Wetherby Field. www.benningmwr.com. Porktoberque Houston County Farm Center, Dothan, AL. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale See Sept. 19 for details. “The Illusion” See Sept. 26 for details. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL. Homeschool Day Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com.

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Saturday, September 28

Friends of the Auburn Public Library Fall Book Sale 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Dean Road Recreation Center Gymnasium (307 S. Dean Road). Titus Bluegrass Festival Titus Community Center. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.titusbluegrassfestival.com. 2nd Annual Flomaton Railroad Junction Day Downtown Flomaton. www.flomaton.com. Johnny Ray Century: Alabama Backroads Century Series 100 mile route circumnavigating the old Johnny Ray line which ran between Opelika and LaFayette. Begins at Trinity United Methodist Church, Opelika. www. eastalabamacyclingclub.com/johnnyraycentury. Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks See Sept. 26 for details. Waverly Fall Boogie 1015 Mayberry Avenue, Waverly, Al. 12–8:30 p.m. www.fallboogie.ticketbud.com/standarddeluxe. Festival in the Pines Tannehill Historical State Park, McCalla. www.tannehill.org. Whistle Stop Festival Historic Irondale. www.irondalewhistlestopfestival.com. Head to Toe Women’s Expo: The Ultimate Girl’s Day Out Eventcenter Downtown, Opelika. www.eventcenterdowntown.net. Russell Brand The Tabernacle, Atlanta. www.ticketmaster.com. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.–noon. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. Young Eagles Day FREE Airplane Rides for Kids! Columbus Airport. Ages 8–17. 8:30–11:30 a.m. (weather permitting). 706-3242453. Fall Family Fun Day: Hats Off for Heroes The Rock Ranch, Ga. www.therockranch.com. Marvelous Monarchs Program at Callaway Gardens www.callawaygardens.com. Lee County Alabama Motorcycle Benefit for Autism Spring Villa Park, Opelika. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Live music, food, kid zone, and vendors. $5 admission/3years and under free. Luanne Helms 334-707-0116. Auburn Beautification Council Plant Sale Dean Rd. Rec Center, Auburn. 8 a.m.–noon. Prices range from $6–15. Proceeds support Auburn Beautification Council projects. 501-2936. Porktoberque Houston County Farm Center, Dothan. Jubilee Arts and Crafts Festival Main Street, Daphne. Festival in the Pines: Fine Arts & Crafts Tannehill Ironworks Historical State Park. www.birmingham365.org. Single Moms of East Alabama Craft Show Opelika. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 9 a.m.–6 p.m. The largest children’s and household consignment in our area! www.kidsclothesconnection.com. “The Illusion” See Sept. 26 for details. Uptown Beer and Wine Festival Uptown Columbus. 1–5 p.m. www.calendarcolumbusga.com. Rivers, Rails & Rights Walking Tour Old Alabama Town, Montgomery. 9:30 a.m. $5. www.oldalabamatown.com. Oktoberfest The Hotel at Auburn University. 4–9 p.m. Featuring 100 craft beers, live music and tradition German cuisine. Tickets www.facebook.com/hotelatauburn. St. Peter UMC Fall Festival Hootenanny Columbus. 10 a.m. www.stpeterumc.com. Special Heroes Day at Dream Field Farm www.dreamfieldfarms.com. Georgia Celebrates Your State Parks Day FREE admission.

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Family Calendar Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Sunday, September 29

Festival in the Pines See Sept. 28 for details. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” See Sept. 19 for details. Jubilee Arts and Crafts Festival Main Street, Daphne. Bark in the Park 2013 Wetumpka, AK. Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks See Sept. 26 for details. Antique Vehicle Show at Angel’s Antique and Flea Mall Opelika. 2–4 p.m. 745-3221. “The Illusion” See Sept. 26 for details. Festival in the Pines See Sept. 27 for details. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Monday, September 30 Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. 2013 Auburn/Opelika Bartender of the Year Contest The Hotel at Auburn University. 5:30–7:30 p.m. Open to the public. To enter, 887-8747. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Tuesday, October 1

Wildlife Explorers Preschool Program Oxbow Meadows, Ga. 10–11am. $5 per child / no charge for adults. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Lee County Fair Lee County Fair Grounds, Opelika. www.aotourism.com. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Wednesday, October 2 Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Lee County Fair Lee County Fair Grounds, Opelika. www.aotourism.com. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Thursday, October 3

71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference. Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. Kids in the Kitchen Covington Rec Center. 3:30–4:30 p.m. Ages 4–7yrs. $15 fee. Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks Opelika Center for Performing Arts. Admission is $10 for adults/$7 for students. 334-745-9715.

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

September/October2013

Southern Women’s Show Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Free Workshop ‘Parenting a Child with ADHD’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 6–8 p.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org Kids in the Kitchen Covington Rec Center, Opelika. 3:30–4:30 p.m. Ages 4-7 years. $15. 705-5560. 71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Lee County Fair Lee County Fair Grounds, Opelika. www.aotourism.com. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Friday, October 4

71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. River City Horns Uptown Columbus. 7 p.m. Free Concert. www.calendarcolumbusga.com. The Black Jacket Symphony presents The Beatles’ “ABBEY ROAD” Montgomery Performing Arts Centre. 8 p.m. www.mpaconline.org. Tavern Fest Old Alabama Town, Montgomery. www.oldalabamatown.com. “Les Miserables” Faulkner University Dinner Theatre, Montgomery. www.faulkner.edu/StudentLife/dinnerTheatre. Southern Women’s Show Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Antiques at The Gardens Birmingham Botanical Gardens. www.bbgardens.org. Cafe Jordan Hare 50 yard line, Jordan-Hare Stadium. Reservations are limited and required. gwevent@auburn.edu or 8448817. Friday Football Luncheon Enjoy lunch with other Auburn fans and preview the week’s matchup with Coach Malzahn or others of the Auburn Coaching staff. Reservations are required. gwevent@auburn.edu or 844-8817. AU Lecture Series, ‘This is Patriotism’ Auburn Alumni Center. 3 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Campus Walking Tours Auburn Alumni Center. 4 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Jordan-Hare Stadium Locker Room Tours Gate 10 through the Jane and Mike McCartney Brick Plaza. 4–6 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. AUsome Amphibians and Reptiles Louise Kreher Forest Ecology Preserve, Auburn. 4:30–5:30 p.m. Admission is $5/person. Children 3 and under are free. www.auburn.edu/preserve. 4th Annual Paint The Town Pink Run & Flash Night Run/Walk Woodruff Park, Columbus. 8:30 p.m. Facebook: Paint the town pink run. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse.org. First Fridays “Shop Late, Eat Local” Opelika shops will stay open until 8 p.m. www.opelikamainstreet.org. Crafty Crafters Holiday Market Prattville Pickers Event Center, Prattville. www.iamacrafter.webs.com. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art’s 10th Anniversary Celebration Out of the Box sculpture exhibition grand opening and tasting tour around the lake. Tickets on sale: www. jcsm.auburn.edu. 71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference. Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com.

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60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org. “On the Verge” See Sept. 26 for details. Lee County Fair Lee County Fair Grounds, Opelika. www.aotourism.com. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Saturday, October 5

71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference. Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. Wildlife Walks Oxbow Meadows, GA. 10–11 a.m. $2 per/3 and under free. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks See October 3 for details. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Southern Women’s Show Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Nixburg House Open House Equality, Al. Free. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Facebook, NixburgHouse. Tecumseh at Tuckabatchee Tallassee Log Cabin. 9 a.m.–9pm. www.facebook.com/ tuckabatchee. Antiques at The Gardens Birmingham Botanical Gardens. www.bbgardens.org. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.– noon. www.uptowncolumbusga. com. Autism Walk 2013 Hardaway High School Track, Columbus. www.autismhopecenter.com. Help the Hootch Watershed Festival at Golden Park, Columbus. 8 a.m.–12 noon. (706) 653-4008. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse. org. Pure in Heart Conference for Tween Girls CrossPointe Church, Columbus. 8 a.m.–3:15 p.m. www.pureinheartconference.com. Shady Days in Gay Arts & Crafts Festival Gay, Ga. Free. www.shadydaysingay.com. Sensory Sensitive Screenings “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2.” Columbus. www.autismhopecenter.com. Opelika Unplugged Event Center Downtown, Opelika. 7 p.m. Admission $5 (FREE for songwriters). www.eventcenterdowntown. net. Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. Walking Horse Show Arena at the Sportsplex, Alexander City. 4–10 p.m. www.alexandercity.org. Lumberjack Day featuring Collegiate Timbersports Competition UGA, FLA, CLEM, TENN, AUB, ALA A&M. The Rock Ranch, Ga. www.therockranch.com. Crafty Crafters Holiday Market See Oct. 4 for details. 50th Annual Bluff Park Art Show Hoover. www.bluffparkartshow.com. Southern Women’s Show Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. 10th Annual Birthday Party and Family Day Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art. Free. Auburn. www.jcsm.auburn.edu. Free Workshop ‘Couples Relationship Enhancement Part 1 Communication’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 8–10 a.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. Football, Fans & Feathers Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Southeastern Raptor Center. 4 p.m. Open to the public; Tickets $5/person. Raptor show, flight demonstration, and educational program. www.vetmed.auburn.edu. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com.

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Family Calendar Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com. Lee County Fair Lee County Fair Grounds, Opelika. www.aotourism.com. 60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org. Oak Mountain State Fall Fair Oak Mountain Amphitheater, Pelham, AL.

Sunday, October 6

71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference. Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. Picnic with the Tortoises Oxbow Meadows, Ga. Free. 1 p.m. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Southern Women’s Show. See Oct. 3 for details. Antiques at The Gardens Birmingham Botanical Gardens. www.bbgardens.org. Opelika High Theatre Society presents The Fantasticks See October 3 for details. Whispers From the Past: A Native American Experience Aldridge Botanicals Gardens, Hoover. 1–8 p.m. www.aldridgegardens.com. The Pet Parade Eufaula. 9 a.m.–1 p.m. www.facebook.com/hsbc.org. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse. org. Shady Days in Gay Arts & Crafts Festival Gay, Ga. Free. www.shadydaysingay.com. Crafty Crafters Holiday Market See Oct. 4 for details. Southern Women’s Show Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. 71st Annual State Convention & Civil Rights Conference. Columbus Trade Center. www.naacpga.org. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com. 60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org.

Monday, October 7

Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com. 60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org.

Tuesday, October 8

Homeschool Day at Dream Field Farm www.dreamfieldfarms.com. Imagine It! Atlanta’s Hands On Children’s Museum Target Free Second Tuesdays. Free tickets available 1–7 p.m., first come, first served as capacity allows. www.childrensmuseumatlanta.org. Signature Chefs Auction Auburn University Club, Auburn. 6 PM. Benefiting the March of Dimes. For tickets or sponsorship information call 334-513-7381. Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com. 60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org.

September/October2013

Wednesday, October 9 Kids Clothes Connection Fall/Winter Sale Opelika 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Philips Arena, Atlanta. www.ticketmaster.com. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com. 60th Annual Fall Flower Show at The Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.alnationalfair.org. AU Symphonic Winds Concert Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. 7:30 PM. www.auburn.edu.

Thursday, October 10

“Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. America’s Got Talent: Live Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Free Workshop ‘Improving your Child’s Behavior with Effective Parenting’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 6–8 p.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. Discount Days at Kids Clothes Connection Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Philips Arena, Atlanta. www.ticketmaster.com. AU Chamber Winds Concert Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. 7:30 PM. www.auburn.edu. Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com.

Friday, October 11

3rd Annual PCI United Way Golf Tournament Maple Ridge Golf Course, Columbus. www.calendarcolumbusga.com. Gregg Allman Montgomery Performing Arts Centre. 8 p.m. www.mpaconline.org. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. The Montgomery Ballet presents “The Phantom of the Opera” Davis Theatre, Montgomery. www.montgomeryballet.org. Storytelling: Awesome Autumn, Tales From Around the World Monroeville, AL. AU Lecture Series, ‘This is Homecoming’ Auburn Alumni Center. 3 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Campus Walking Tours Auburn Alumni Center. 4 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Jordan-Hare Stadium Locker Room Tours Gate 10 through the Jane and Mike McCartney Brick Plaza. 4–6 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. AUsome Amphibians and Reptiles Louise Kreher Forest Ecology Preserve, Auburn. 4:305:30 p.m. Admission is $5/person. Children 3 and under are free. www.auburn.edu/preserve/. Auburn University Parent’s Weekend Katherine Martin, klm0044@auburn.edu/ Plainsman Park Movie Nights Plainsmen Park, AU Campus. 7 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Uptown Concert Series ‘DSOS’ 7–10 p.m. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse. org. Fall Family Weekend sponsored by Auburn University Parents’ Association Auburn Campus. 8 a.m.–5 p.m. www.auburn.edu/ student_info/student_affairs/AUPA/fallfw.html. Discount Days at Kids Clothes Connection Opelika. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Philips Arena, Atlanta. www.ticketmaster.com.

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Alabama National Fair Montgomery. www.thegarrettcoliseum.com.

Saturday, October 12

First Flight and First Light at Oxbow Meadows Ga. 8 a.m. Free and includes binocular rental for all participants. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. Radical Reptiles Oxbow Meadows, Ga. 2 p.m. $5 per/3 and under free. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. Teen Scene Field Trip to US Space and Rocket Center Dean Rd. Rec Center, Auburn. Register by Oct 1. Ages 12–15 years. $25 fee; 6 a.m.–6 p.m. 501-2946. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Montgomery Half Marathon www.montgomerymarathon.com. Riverwalk Wine Festival 1–4 p.m. www.funinmontgomery.com. The Montgomery Ballet presents “The Phantom of the Opera” Davis Theatre, Montgomery. www.montgomeryballet.org. Chris Tomlin Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Oktoberfest Alexander City Sportsplex. Free. 8 a.m.–2 p.m. www.alexandercityonline.com. Riverfront Market Day Selma. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.riverfrontmarketday.com. Auburn University Parent’s Weekend Katherine Martin, klm0044@auburn.edu. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.–noon. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse.org. ‘This Is How We Do It” Day at Westville Lumpkin, Ga. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. www.westville.org. 4th Annual Chattahoochee Valley Down Syndrome Association Buddy Walk Mock Rec Pavilion at Columbus State University. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. www.firstgiving.com. Second Saturday Lee County Historical Society Museum. Loachapoka. www.leecountyhistoricalsociety.org. Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. Oktoberfest Sportsplex, Alexander City. 8 a.m.–2 p.m. www.alexandercity.org. Georgia’s Official Day of the Cowboy The Rock Ranch, Ga. www.therockranch.com. LaGrange Railroad Festival www.lagrangerailroadfestival.com. Free Workshop ‘Couples Relationship Enhancement Part 2 Conflict Resolution’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 8–10 a.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. Discount Day at Kids Clothes Connection Opelika. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.kidsclothesconnection.com. Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Philips Arena, Atlanta.www.ticketmaster.com. Alabama National Fair See Oct. 4 for details. Eggtoberfest Stone Mountain Park, Ga. Big Green Egg Co. celebrates the EGGhead community and its chefs. www.stonemountainpark.com.

Sunday, October 13

The Montgomery Ballet presents “The Phantom of the Opera” See Oct. 11 for details. TuTu Run and Tippy Toe Run presented by Variations Dance Studio AHS Track Field, Auburn. 3:45pm for little runners ages 2-6 and 4:30pm for ages 7 and up. A tutu is a must for this 2 mile run. Join us for free food, fun giveaways and a fabulous time! www.variationsstudio.com

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Family Calendar Auburn University Parent’s Weekend See Oct. 11 for details. “Pinkalicious, the Musical” Springer Children’s Theatre. www.springeroperahouse.org. LaGrange Railroad Festival www.lagrangerailroadfestival.com. Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Philips Arena Atlanta. www.ticketmaster.com. AU Softball Family Fun Day Jane B. Moore Field, AU Campus. 1 PM. Afternoon with Coach Clint Myers and the entire Auburn Softball Team. Enjoy inflatable games, skill demonstrations, autographs, homerun contest, kids; activities, awesome giveaways and much more. Admission is FREE! www.auburn.edu. Alabama National Fair See Oct. 4 for details.

Monday, October 14

AU Chamber Choir Fall Concert Auburn First Baptist Church. 7:30 PM. www.auburn.edu.

Tuesday, October 15

“Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Fall Home School Day at DeSoto Caverns Park Childersburg. www.desotocavernspark.com.

Wednesday, October 16 The Beach Boys Montgomery Performing Arts Centre. 7:30 p.m. www.mpaconline.org. CLA Arts and Humanities Month BBQ and Kite Flying Cater Lawn, AU Campus. 12:30–1:30 p.m. Free. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org.

Thursday, October 17

Midtown Mingle Columbus. 7 p.m. www.midtowncolumbus.org. “Almost, Maine” Riverside Theatre Complex, Columbus. www.columbusstate.edu/theatre. AACT Fall Jr. and Adult Show Jan Dempsey Community Arts Center, Auburn. 502-9326. Fall Treats Covington Rec Center. 3:30–4:30 p.m. Ages 5-9 years. $15 fee. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org. “Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Free Workshop ‘Celebrate Yourself’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 6–8 p.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets.

Friday, October 18

“Almost, Maine” See Oct. 17 for details. AACT Fall Jr. and Adult Show Jan Dempsey Community Arts Center, Auburn. 502-9326.

Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

September/October2013

3rd Annual All In, All Pink Breast Cancer Awareness Event AU Student Center Greenspace, Campus. Hosted by the Vice President for University Outreach, in collaboration with The Office of Public Service and the Kappa Chi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Contact, ezc0007@auburn.edu. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. Tribute to A.R. Siddons Auditorium in the Auburn University Hotel and Conference Center. 5–6 p.m. 844-6169. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Talladega 500 Weekend www.talladegasuperspeedway.com. On The Tracks Downtown Opelika. 6 p.m. Biannual Food & Wine Festival with live entertainment, wine tasting, and more. Tickets, www.onthetracks.org. “Rave On!” See Oct. 17 for details. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com. Stone Mountain Highland Games Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com.

Saturday, October 19

Wildlife Walks Oxbow Meadows, Ga. 10–11 a.m. $2 per/3 and under free. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. “Almost, Maine” See Oct. 17 for details. Arts On the River Columbus. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. www.artsontheriver.com. Uptown’s Foodie Festival Woodruff Park, Columbus. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. Color Me Free 5K Village Mall, Auburn. 8 AM. Hosted by Chick-fil-A Village Mall. Benefiting Freedom 21: Waging War of Human Trafficking. www.colormefree21.com. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Seasonal Artist Showcase Rumbling Water Studios & Gallery, Wetumpka. Free, 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.facebook.com/Rumblingwater. Talladega 500 Weekend www.talladegasuperspeedway.com. Loachapoka Syrup Sopping www.syrupsopping.org. War Eagle Robotics Student Act Center, AU Campus. Annual fall program/ competition for 26+ middle, junior, and high schools from across Central Alabama and West Georgia. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.–noon. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. “Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Astronomy Nights at the Coca-Cola Space Science Center 7 p.m. www.ccssc.org/observatory/astronights. Crazy Crawfish Cook Off Festival at Front Porch of the South Columbus. 12–10 p.m. www.crazycrawfishcookoff.com. 18th Annual Arts on the River Columbus. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. www.artsontheriver.com. Ossahatchee Indian Festival & Pow Wow Hamilton, Ga. www.Ossahatchee.org. Day Out With Thomas: The GO GO Thomas Tour 2013

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SAM Shortline at GA Veterans Memorial State Park, Cordele, Ga. www.samshortline.com. 42nd Annual Historical Fair Loachapoka. 7 a.m.–4 p.m. 887-2255. Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. Hot Air Balloon Rally The Rock Ranch, Ga. www.therockranch.com. Alabama Nature Center Public Weekend Lanark Park, Millbrook. www.alabamawildlife.org. Free Workshop ‘Couples Relationship Enhancement Part 3 Intimacy’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 8–10 a.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com. Stone Mountain Highland Games Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com.

Sunday, October 20

Picnic with the Tortoises Oxbow Meadows, Ga. Free. 1:00 p.m. www.oxbow.columbusstate.edu. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6-9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. Greater Columbus Fair Columbus Civic Center. www.columbusciviccenter.org. Seasonal Artist Showcase See Oct. 19 for details. The Ugly Duckling & The Tortoise and The Hare Presented by the New Orleans-based dance troupe, Lightwire Theater. The Rivercenter for the Performing Arts, Columbus. www.rivercenter.org Talladega 500 Weekend www.talladegasuperspeedway.com. Calera Goes Pink Golf Tournament Timberline Golf Club, Calera. Day Out With Thomas: The GO GO Thomas Tour 2013 SAM Shortline at GA Veterans Memorial State Park, Cordele, Ga. www.samshortline.com. Alabama Nature Center Public Weekend Lanark Park, Millbrook. www.alabamawildlife.org. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com. Stone Mountain Highland Games Stone Mountain Park, Ga. www.stonemountainpark.com.

Monday, October 21

AACT Fall Jr. and Adult Show Jan Dempsey Community Arts Center, Auburn. 502-9326. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

Tuesday, October 22

“Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. WWE Smackdown Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

Wednesday, October 23

“All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

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Haunted Museum Tours Port Columbus. 6:30–9 p.m. www.portcolumbus.org. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. “Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Free Workshop ‘Talking to your Children About Sexuality’ Transformations Life Center, Opelika. 6–8 p.m. www.transformationslifecenter.org. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

Friday, October 25

Haunted Museum Tours Port Columbus. 6:30–9 p.m. www.portcolumbus.org. The Great Pumpkin Splash Opelika SportsPlex. 6–8 p.m. The pool will turn into a floating pumpkin patch! Pick a pumpkin, $3. Ages 6–12 years. Must pre-register by Oct 22. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Monster Mash presented by The Montgomery Ballet Davis Theatre Courtyard. Halloween party and performance. 6:30 p.m. www.montgomeryballet.com. Disney’s “Beauty and The Beast” Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. AU Lecture Series, ‘This is Technology’ Auburn Alumni Center. 3 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817.

September/October2013

Downtown AUtumn Nights Auburn. Aubie, the band and cheerleaders will begin the celebration while live music will entertain the crowd into the evening. The entire Auburn Family and visiting fans are invited to enjoy the festivities at the new entertainment area located on Gay Street in downtown Auburn. 844.8817. Campus Walking Tours Auburn Alumni Center. 4 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. Jordan-Hare Stadium Locker Room Tours Gate 10 through the Jane and Mike McCartney Brick Plaza. 4–6 p.m. Free and open to public. 887-8817. AUsome Amphibians and Reptiles Louise Kreher Forest Ecology Preserve, Auburn. 4:30–5:30 p.m. Admission is $5/person. Children 3 and under are free. www.auburn.edu/preserve. Downtown Auburn Nights Aubie, the band and cheerleaders will begin the celebration while live music will entertain the crowd into the evening. The entire Auburn Family and visiting fans are invited to enjoy the festivities at the new entertainment area located on Gay Street in downtown Auburn. “Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Day Out With Thomas: The GO GO Thomas Tour 2013 SAM Shortline at GA Veterans Memorial State Park, Cordele, Ga. www.samshortline.com. Fort Benning’s Annual Oktoberfest www.benningmwr.com. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6-9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. “All That Fosse” Telfair Peet Theatre, AU Campus. www.cla.auburn.edu/ theatre/buy-tickets. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, AL. 6:30-10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

Saturday, October 26

Haunted Museum Tours Port Columbus. 6:30–9 p.m. www.portcolumbus.org. “Les Miserables” See Oct. 4 for details. Disney’s “Beauty and The Beast” Birmingham Jefferson Convention Center. www.bjcc.org. Old Time Farm Day Greenville, AL. www.oldtimefarmday.com. Peanut Butter Festival Brundidge, AL. Free. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. www.brundidgealabama.com. Big Dog Running Company presents Big Dog Howl 5K Run 1104 Broadway, Columbus. 8 PM. www.bigdogrunning.com. Great Pumpkin Roll Strand Park, Alexander City. Free. www.mainstreetac.org. Weogufka Old Farm “N” Bluegrass Day Weogufka Center for Arts. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. www.weogufkacenter.com. Spinner’s 32nd Annual Pumpkin Patch Arts & Crafts Show Free. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. www.spinnersprattville.com. Cotton Pickin Celebration Old Baker Farm, Harpersville, AL. www.oldbakerfarm.com. Magic City Classic Legion Field, Birmingham. www.themagiccityclassic.com. Owl-O-Ween Oak Mountain State Park, Pelham. 205-663-7930, Ext. 4. Whigmaleerie Day in Wilsonville Columbiana, AL. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. www.southshelbychamber.com. Market Days on Broadway Columbus, Ga. 9 a.m.–noon. www.uptowncolumbusga.com. “Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org.

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Family Calendar Day Out With Thomas: The GO GO Thomas Tour 2013 SAM Shortline at GA Veterans Memorial State Park, Cordele, Ga. www.samshortline.com. Fort Benning’s Annual Oktoberfest www.benningmwr.com. Young Eagles Day–FREE Airplane Rides for Kids Columbus Airport. Ages 8–17. 8:30–11:30 a.m. (weather permitting). 706-324-2453. Alexander City Main Street Farmer’s Market 7–11:30 a.m. www.alexandercity.org. The “Not-So-Spooky” Halloween Festival The Rock Ranch, GA. www.therockranch.com. Football, Fans & Feathers Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Southeastern Raptor Center. 4 p.m. Open to the public; Tickets $5/person. Raptor show, flight demonstration, and educational program. www.vetmed.auburn.edu. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. Ghost Stories at Rikard’s Mill Beatrice, Al. 6:30–10 p.m. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

Sunday, October 27

Willie Nelson and Family Montgomery Performing Arts Centre. 7:30 p.m. www.mpaconline.org. “Dracula” The Alabama Shakespeare Festival. www.asf.net. Spinner’s 32nd Annual Pumpkin Patch Arts & Crafts Show Free. 11 a.m.–4 p.m. www.spinnersprattville.com. Cotton Pickin Celebration Old Baker Farm, Harpersville, AL. www.oldbakerfarm.com. Barking at the Moon Festival and Parade Fultondale Bark Park, Birmingham. 1–5 p.m. Free. www.fultondaleartscouncil.org.

September/October2013

“Rave On!” Springer Opera House, Columbus. www.springeroperahouse.org. Day Out With Thomas: The GO GO Thomas Tour 2013 SAM Shortline at GA Veterans Memorial State Park, Cordele, GA. www.samshortline.com. Fort Benning’s Annual Oktoberfest www.benningmwr.com. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com.

Monday, October 28

“Dracula” The Alabama Shakespeare Festival. www.asf.net. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com. 8th Annual Howl-oween Pet Parade Downtown Opelika. Bring your best dressed dogs in their Halloween costumes. A donation for parade participation or dog food donation in lieu of money is expected. The event supports Rescue K911 and runs through Historic Downtown Opelika from 8th Street and Railroad Avenue. www. rescuek911.com.

Tuesday, October 29

Children’s Fall Festival and Carnival Opelika SportsPlex. 6-8 p.m. Ages 12 and under. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com.

Wednesday, October 30 Halloween Movie Night ‘Ghostbusters’ Town Creek Park, Auburn. 6:15 p.m. 501-2940.

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Halloween Treat Bags Covington Rec Center. 3:30–4:30 p.m. Ages 4–11 years. $15 fee. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com.

Thursday, October 31

13th Annual Downtown Trick or Treat Auburn. 6–8 p.m. 501-2939. Alice Cooper Montgomery Performing Arts Centre. 8 p.m. www.mpaconline.org. Scott’s Halloween Bash Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum, Montgomery. 6–9 p.m. www.fitzgeraldmuseum.net. ZooBoo 2013 The Montgomery Zoo. 6–9 p.m. www.montgomeryzoo.com.

Saturday, November 2

Adoption Celebration Agape’s 5th annual Adoption Celebration will be held on at the Dreamfield Farms and Pumpkin Patch in Union Springs, AL, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. The community event provides an opportunity for adoptive families to come together, build relationships and celebrate God’s unique plan for their family. The celebratory event is free and lunch will be provided. To register your family for the event, please email info@agapeforchildren.org or call 334-272-9466.

Please send your calendar events to kendra@auburnopelikaparents.com by the 5th of the month. It’s FREE!

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ParentingOnThePlains by Dr. Polly Dunn

Does My Child Need Therapy? I think my child needs therapy. Do you think my child needs therapy? How do I know if my child needs therapy? Maybe I need therapy! HELP! Does that sound familiar? These are the types of concerns and questions that I hear from parents every single day. At some point or another, most of us have been there, me included! In a lot of ways, I think all children could benefit from some therapy. It would be sort of like going to the dentist every six months for a cleaning or the pediatrician annually for a well visit, just to check in and see how everything is going. Any problems? Anything you’d like help working on? If so, let’s set some goals and get to work. If not, we’ll see you again next year, but feel free to call us sooner if you have any problems come up. Doesn’t that sound good? Unfortunately, that’s not the way therapy usually happens. Often the cost of therapy keeps many people from being able to get services. Even if you have insurance, the co-pay can just be too much. Others can’t get therapy because they don’t have a child psychologist in their community or there is a long wait to get an appointment. And, sadly, some don’t pursue therapy for their kids because they worry about the stigma associated with seeing a psychologist. So, what’s my answer when people ask me if their child needs therapy? Usually I tell them to trust their instincts. As parents, we know our children better than anyone. If something doesn’t seem right then go with that gut feeling and get help. But how do you even start? Here are a few tips to get you headed in the right direction: Decide what issue you want help with. Some examples of common childhood problems include depression, anxiety, social skills problems, defiance, or anger. What is the primary issue you want to address? Once you’ve given some thought to the issue you want to address, do some re-

search. Get your hands on one of the many well-written books by child psychologists that teach parents how to address the common problems of childhood. I have a few favorites listed on my website if you’d like some recommendations. A lot of times those books will take you step by step through a treatment protocol to get your child back on the right track. If the problem is serious, overwhelming, or you just need more help than a book can offer, then you’ll want to seek the help of a professional. I often tell parents to talk to their child’s pediatrician or school counselor first. They will be able to provide some immediate

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assistance and are familiar with your child and the options for therapy in your community. You’ll also want to check with your insurance company to see if they cover mental health services, and if they have providers that you are required to use. Once you’ve selected a therapist, give them a call and schedule your first appointment. No matter what, don’t forget to trust your instincts. If you think that you or your child would benefit from talking with a therapist, then go with that gut feeling and get help. Dr. Polly Dunn received her Ph.D. from Auburn University in 1999. She is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and currently serves as the Director of the Auburn University Psychological Services Center, a position she has held for over ten years. Dr. Dunn is also the founder of www.ChildPsychMom.com where she blogs about what works and what doesn’t in her hectic life as a child psychologist, wife, and mom of four.

www.facebook.com/auburnopelika.parents


Insidious: Chapter 2

One Direction: This Is Us

MPAA Rating: PG-13 Overall: C Violence: C Sexual Content: A Language: BAlcohol / Drug Use: AThe MPAA has rated Insidious: Chapter 2 PG-13 for intense sequences of terror and violence, and thematic elements. The poor Lambert family doesn’t learn very fast. In their previous Insidious outing they had to put up with squeaky doors and haunting sounds until they finally discovered the ghost that was freeloading in their home wasn’t attached to their house, but to their son (Ty Simpkins). The discovery saved the family but cost the life of Elise, their psychic (Lin Shaye). Now in “Chapter 2”, parents Josh and Renai (Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne) are living in Josh’s mother’s (Barbara Hershey) home where they once again are spooked by creaks and groans. Worse yet the police are still investigating Elise’s death and Josh is a prime suspect. A case lot of WD-40 would likely solve ninety percent of their issues, but the opening of this movie assures us this issue is more than rusty hinges. It turns out Josh had his own ghostly interaction with mediator Elise when he was a young boy, along with an assistant named Carl (Hank Harris). Now Carl (Steve Coulter) is feeling the need to communicate with Elise in the afterlife. For added support he teams up with Specs and Tucker (Leigh Whannell, Angus Sampson) -- Elise’s tech team from the first movie -- and discovers the Lamberts are still in danger. Other than a brief twist in the third act, this movie is all about scene and setting. Old houses with dim light bulbs and an abandoned hospital (complete with confidential patient records still on the shelves) provide plenty of boo business. As the plot thickens the violence escalates, with portrayals of a possessed male character that lashes out and strikes a woman multiple times, attempts to choke her and threatens a child with a weapon. Other scenes depict fights and scuffles with a knife and a hypodermic tranquilizer. Squeamish stomachs will also awaken when a hidden room is discovered that’s full of murdered corpses -- all women. Finally another flashback reveals a child forced to assume an opposite gender identity. There is no sexual content and profanities are limited to a single scatological curse and terms of Christian deity. Obviously those who don’t appreciate themes involving séances and psychics will also want to search for scares elsewhere. The movie deserves credit for turning some everyday objects into spooky devices, like a tin can telephone that becomes a conduit for a rude awakening during a child’s sleep. But the involvement of children in this story will almost certainly make this a nightmare generator for young audiences. For older teens and adults, there’s little here of artistic or moral value to make the film worth your time.

MPAA Rating: PG Overall: B+ Violence: ASexual Content: B+ Language: B Alcohol / Drug Use: A The MPAA has rated One Direction: This Is Us PG for mild language. It is easy to roll your eyes at the thought of another boy band. These types of groups have come and gone for a long time. And yet it seems every generation of girls is as excited as the last to scream and cry and swoon over the next crop of crooners. Luckily for young fans the new rash of concert movies has made these singers more accessible for the mass audience who can’t afford the price of concert tickets. Not only do moviegoers get front seat exposure to the performers, they also get behind-the-scene coverage of the tour and intimate details into the boys’ humble beginnings. If it all feels a bit orchestrated, wait. There’s more. One Direction, the latest phenomenon in the teen music scene, is the brainchild of Simon Cowell, the acerbic judge from American Idol and Britain’s The X Factor. After soloists Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Liam Payne, Harry Styles and Louis Tomlinson failed to advance to the finals of The X Factor, they were given a second chance at the competition. Put together as a five-member boy band, they competed in the group category. They failed to win the competition again but by that time, their good looks and audience appeal had helped to attract a huge fan base. Following their third place finish they signed a record deal with Cowell’s Syco Records and became an almost instant success in the UK, thanks in large measure to social media. And social media has continued to be the moving force behind the band’s worldwide megastardom. There’s nothing like the quick thumbs of tireless teen tweeters to spread the word about their favorite celebs. Although the English-Irish band members refute the idea that they are a typical boy band (they don’t dress in identical outfits and their choreography on stage resembles more of a free for all than composed dance steps), they still follow the prescribed formula pretty closely. Each member has his own descriptor -- the funny one, the serious one, the flirt etc. -- and their pop rock songs are full of sweet and sloppy lyrics that appeal to their young audiences. However it doesn’t take much trolling of the Internet to know these guys aren’t squeaky clean, but so far they seem to have avoided any paternity lawsuits. And the movie, directed by Morgan Spurlock, does it’s best to promote these performers as the kind of boys you wouldn’t mind your daughter bringing home -- at least on her iPod. Their parents, tour director and fans also all get a chance to extol these singers as the documentary intercuts personal interviews with musical interludes from their concerts. One Direction: This is Us certainly won’t appeal to all. Still, if you or your daughter is in the demographic niche that can’t help but squeal when someone sings, “You don’t know you’re beautiful, that’s what makes you beautiful”, then an hour or so with this British pop group will probably be worth the price of movie tickets.

What Parents need to know about Insidious: Chapter 2... Violence: WARNING -- Information contains plot spoilers: A possessed man seriously assaults a woman and attempts to murder her -- a child that witnesses the incident runs for cover. A man is seen with a large knife and is poised to kill a child. A room full of female corpses is discovered, all of which were murder victims. Dialog mentions a man attempting to castrate himself. Men fight with a knife and a hypodermic needle containing tranquilizer; by the end a man is stabbed and another shot with the needle. A dead woman is seen sitting in a chair. Many “jump” scenes are included that intend to frighten with visuals and/or sounds. Sexual Content: None noted. Language: A single scatological term, a couple of terms of Christian deity and a few other mild profanities are used. Auburn Opelika Parents I October 2013

What Parents need to know about One Direction: This Is Us... Violence: Characters engage in horseplay and one character slaps another. One character pulls down another’s pants (exposing his boxers) during a concert. Sexual Content: A boy removes his shirt during a couple of recording sessions saying he prefers to sing only in his underwear. A couple of characters are seen in their underwear a few of times. Some mildly suggestive lyrics are included. Language: Characters swear on occasion. Alcohol / Drug Use: None noted.

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Auburn-Opelika Parents October 2013