Page 1

2021–2031

PARKS, RECREATION, TRAILS & OPEN SPACE Master Plan


2021–2031

CITY OF CLEBURNE PARKS, RECREATION, TRAILS & OPEN SPACE MASTER PLAN

City of Cleburne Contact: Aaron Dobson, Director of Parks & Recreation 418 W. Henderson Street P.O. Box 677 Cleburne, Texas 76033 Office: 817-645-0949

MHS Planning Contact: Hunter Rush, Senior Planner & Partner Emily Gunderson, Planner

212 W. 9th Street Tyler, Texas 75701 Office: 903-597-6606


Acknowledgments The City of Cleburne and MHS Planning & Design, LLC would like to thank the following community leaders and volunteers for their input in the development of this master plan. A special thanks to the residents of Cleburne for their participation and input during the planning process.

Mayor & City Council

Scott Cain – Mayor Derek Weathers – Councilmember, SMD 1 Christopher Boedeker – Mayor Pro Tem, SMD 2 Mike Mann – Councilmember, SMD 3 John Warren – Councilmember, SMD 4

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan Advisory Committee Christopher Boedeker – Chairman John Warren – Vice Chairman Steve Shaffer Debby Miller Kim Lively Brian Goodman

City Administration

Parks & Recreation Board Members

Parks & Recreation Department

4B Economic Development Corporation

Steve Polasek – City Manager Chris Fuller – Deputy City Manager Ivy Peterson – City Secretary

Aaron Dobson – Director of Parks & Recreation Kristi Dempsey – Administrative Assistant Rodney Carlock – Parks Superintendent Katie Easdon - Recreation Manager

Brian Goodman – President Shane Atkins Sheryl Gray Steve Shaffer Kyle May

Debby Miller - President Christopher Boedeker Michelle Kennon Kim Lively Mike Mann Jean Moss John Warren Scott Cain, Ex Officio

The City of Cleburne would like to give a special thank you to the community leaders who volunteered their time while serving on City Council and the Parks & Recreation Board: Robert O. Kelly, D.D.S. - Former Councilmember, Betty Cook - Former Parks & Recreation Board Member & Johnathan Laureles - Former Parks & Recreation Board Member.


Table of Contents special thanks

&

acknowledgments

1. Introduction 6

Summary 8 Overview of Parks System Inventory 14 Mission & Vision 16 The Process & Methodology 17

2. Who We Are 18 History of Cleburne 20 Location, Character & Resources 21 Community Profile 22 Benefits of Parks, Trails & Recreation 24

3. Our Parks & Recreation System

26

4. Community Input & Key Findings

56

5. Objectives & Standards

66

Parks Classification Table 28 Parks & Open Space Inventory 31 Park Locations with Service Area 38 Trail Network Inventory 40 Level of Service 46 10-Minute Walk 48 Department Programs & Special Events 50 Community Programs & Special Events 52 Athletic Partnership Events 54

Community Input 58 Key Findings 64

Goals & Objectives 68 Maintenance Level of Service 72 Design & Branding Standards 76 Safety & Crime Prevention Design 82 Parks & Recreation Ordinance Summary 84


86

Goal & Objectives 88 Inventory 90 Needs 92 Priorities 94 Recommendations 96 Kirtley Park Site Plan 98 Buddy Stewart Park Site Plan 102

Table of Contents

6. Kirtley Park at Lake Pat Cleburne & Buddy Stewart Park

7. Parks & Trails 106 Needs & Recommendations

8. Future Parks & 126 Recreation Expansion Future Parks System 128 Future Trail Network 130 Future Bikeway System 132 Proposed Loop Trail Maps 136

9. Implementation Schedule 142 10. Community Involvement & Funding 150 Community Partnerships 152 Funding Opportunities 154

11. Appendices 156 Appendix A: Individual Park Designs 158 Appendix B: Maintenance Maps 202 Appendix C: Citizen Survey Results 224

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Park Needs 108 Trail Needs 114 Park Recommendations 118 Trail Recommendations 122 Parks System Amenities Priorities 124

5


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 1 Introduction


Summary The City of Cleburne

hired MHS Planning & Design in November 2019 to perform an analysis of the overall parks system and make recommendations for future parks, trails and open space developments. The Summary is intended to briefly explain the process the City & MHS utilized to understand the existing parks system, conduct public input, develop a mission and vision statement, set goals and objectives determine the needs of the community and create a road map to develop a parks system that meets the desires of the residents of Cleburne. As the City continues to grow, the parks system will need to grow too. The investment into parks should be a priority to the City due to the fact that parks, trails and open spaces drive commercial development and increase residential property values. After initial review of the 21 parks, natural areas, sports fields & courts, recreational center, golf course and water park, it is apparent that the City of Cleburne has a great foundation for a successful parks system. However, it is important to note that many of the existing parks need upgrades and more resources allocated to maintenance. The City must continue to update, enhance and maintain the existing parks to ensure they are safe, aesthetically pleasing and meet the desires of the community.

In addition to improving and continually maintaining the existing parks system, the City must look towards the future and acquire additional properties for parkland throughout the city limits to ensure the total developed parks acres grows simultaneously with the growing population. The Level of Service is a measurement of usable park acres per 1,000 residents within the community. Based on the existing parks system, surrounding communities and the National Recreation and Park Association standards, the City of Cleburne’s recommended Level of Service is 17.3 acres per 1,000 people. The City of Cleburne currently has a total of 466.50 usable park acres and a current population of 31,080 residents. Based on these numbers, the City has a Level of Service of 15.01 acres of developed parkland for every 1,000 residents. It is imperative the City acquire properties over the next three to seven years to ensure the gap between the existing Level of Service and the growing population does not continue to increase. To understand the desires of the residents of Cleburne, the City provided several different forms of engagement to ensure everyone had the opportunity to voice their opinion regarding the existing and the future parks system.


during the development of this Master Plan. There was one statistically valid survey for the entire parks and recreation system and one information survey for the development of Lake Pat Cleburne. Combined the City received 1,775 responses (652 Master Plan responses & 1,123 Lake Pat Cleburne responses). The statistically valid Master Plan survey was designed and analyzed by the National Service Research (NSR) Company. An important aspect of the planning process was to conduct a demand and needs assessment which involved citizen input. This citizen input is the foundation of a great master plan, therefore the City of Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department used multiple types of citizen input and public meetings to receive recommendations and feedback during the planning process. NSR worked closely with MHS Planning & Design and the City of Cleburne staff throughout the research process. The City of Cleburne mailed 34,000 postcards (17,000 Master Plan

postcards & 17,000 Lake Pat Cleburne postcards) to households throughout the City. The postcard provided information about the needs assessment survey and provided an online link to access the survey. An additional survey was conducted specifically for the Lake Pat Cleburne needs analysis. This survey was available for all residents to complete online or submit a paper copy. The survey was also sent specifically to the homeowners around Lake Pat Cleburne. The survey helped determine the list of priorities for Lake Pat Cleburne and Buddy Stewart Park. Overall, 58% of the residents rated the quality of the parks and recreation opportunities in Cleburne as satisfactory. 52% of Cleburne residents rated the quantity of parks in Cleburne as satisfactory. Over 80% of residents strongly agree or agree that parks and recreation facilities are well worth the cost to taxpayers.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Two surveys were conducted in the City of Cleburne

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Public Input

9


Needs Summary

Enhance existing parks to make them inviting & safe for children & families.

Construct trails within parks and throughout the City for safe & interconnected recreational opportunities.

Acquire additional park properties to ensure Cleburne's Level of Service standard does not decrease as the population increases.

Develop Lake Pat Cleburne with both active and passive recreational opportunities.


Upgrade Booker T. Washington Recreation Center to better suit the needs of the community.

Preserve natural open spaces to ensure areas remain free from development.

Provide general park amenities such as shade, picnic tables, benches, bbq grills & native plants.

Chapter 1 - Introduction Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Upgrade and enhance the sport complexes to ensure fields are satisfactory for recreational & tournament play.

Enhance the golf course greens with natural turf & plant native trees for additional shade.

11


Parks System Priority Amenities The following Parks System

Priorities list is based on the Needs Summary and recurring themes from the focus group and public meetings, citizen surveys, City Staff recommendations and the professional consultant’s opinion. The Advisory Committee reviewed the major themes and worked with City Staff and MHS Planning to determine the top priorities listed below. It is important to note the following list is intended to be a guide for development of existing and future parks and amenities over the next ten years.

1 Multi-Purpose Trails & Nature Trails 2 Shaded Spaces in the Parks 3 Site Amenities: Benches, Tables, Water Fountains, Grills, Bike Racks, etc. 4 Playgrounds 5 Skate Park 6 Dog Park 7 Disc Golf Course 8 Fishing Piers/Viewing Stations 9 Boat/Kayak/Canoe Launches 10 Multi-Purpose Sports Courts 11 Outdoor Amphitheater 12 Pickleball Courts 13 Sports Practice Fields 14 Open Space & Natural Areas


13

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 1 - Introduction


Overview of Parks System Inventory

21 Parks

565.92 Acres of Parkland

2 Natural Areas

18-Hole Golf Course

1 Splash Pad Splash Station

1 Recreation Center

Lake Pat Cleburne

2 Boat & Paddle Launches

2 Football Fields

6 Basketball Courts

15 Baseball Fields

20 Soccer Fields


15

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 1 - Introduction


Mission & Vision city of cleburne's parks

&

recreation department mission

"To provide memorable experiences through parks and recreation that enrich our community." city of cleburne's parks

&

recreation department vision

“The vision of the City of Cleburne’s Parks and Recreation Department is to continually provide and maintain safe, attractive, and inviting parks, trails and programs for the residents of Cleburne.”

overview This plan is meant to serve all areas within the city limits of Cleburne. A more detailed analysis of potential projects, scopes, costs, timelines and funding sources are provided for implementation through the year 2031. For this plan to remain meaningful, it should be periodically amended and revised throughout the implementation period. Typically, plans are updated every five years to reflect the current needs of the community.

purpose of the plan The purpose of the Parks, Recreation, Trails and Open Space Master Plan is to present community-wide goals, objectives and needs regarding the Parks System. The Plan will serve as an informational tool related to parks, trails & open spaces to help guide City Council, the Parks Department, and City Staff on present and future decisions. The purpose is to provide implementable projects regarding the existing and future parks, trails and open space system.


and Open Space Master Plan planning process began in 2019 when the City of Cleburne contracted with MHS Planning & Design to develop a new parks plan to better suit the changing needs of the community. The Advisory Committee, representing a cross section of the community with City Council members, Parks Board members, 4B Board members and key City Staff were selected to guide the development of the Parks Master Plan for future park, trails and recreation opportunities. The Advisory Committee, Parks Board, 4B Board, City Staff and City Council were involved in each major step of the planning process and provided the local insight needed to produce a successful document to assist in guiding local decision makers through 2031. The City of Cleburne is committed to understanding the needs of the residents to develop a Parks Master Plan that represents the needs of the community. The City went above and beyond collecting data from residents through several different avenues to connect with as many citizens as possible. The City of Cleburne developed a statistically valid, online survey and continually promoted the surveys by mailing out 34,000 postcards to residents, using multiple online social media platforms and contacting local schools. A total of 1,775 survey responses (652 Master Plan responses & 1,123 Lake Pat Cleburne responses) were completed and submitted to the City. In addition to gathering public input through the surveys, the City conducted focus group meetings to better understand these specific group needs within the City of Cleburne’s parks, recreation and open space system. Additionally, the City and MHS conducted four different focus group meetings at the high school, two middle schools and an elementary school. The City also hosted an open public Town Hall Meeting that was attended by approximately 70 residents. Every individual in attendance had the opportunity to ask questions or provide input regarding the existing and future parks system.

Lake Pat Cleburne is an asset to the entire City and surrounding areas. The lake is used primarily for fishing but is open for skiing, boating, swimming, kayaking, canoeing, etc. To better understand the needs for this specific site, a citizen survey was conducted and MHS developed two conceptual Site Plans and presented them to the City for comments, questions and concerns. Existing and future parks projects were developed based on the citizen survey results, focus group input, public meeting comments, the Advisory Committee, City Council, Parks Board and City Staff. Taking into account existing inventory, available resources, and professional opinion the parks projects and overall master plan focus on the importance and need for maintenance as the parks system continues to grow and develop. This plan dives into new parks ordinance recommendations based on both neighboring communities and national standards. To ensure the Advisory Committee was continually engaged in the process, the City hosted a meeting to present the survey findings, goals and objectives and the proposed projects and timeline. The Advisory Committee provided feedback so MHS could adjust different aspects of the plan. After the meeting, the master project list was refined and the projects for the City were prioritized based on local demand and their perception of needs. This parks master plan was presented to the Advisory Committee, 4B Board, Parks Board and City Council to verify that the City of Cleburne Parks Master Plan reflects the community’s needs and priorities.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

The Parks, Recreation, Trails

Chapter 1 - Introduction

The Process & Methodology

17


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 2 Who We Are


History of Cleburne Known for its role

as a crossroads and transportation center, the City of Cleburne can trace its roots back to the old wagon trail, Johnson County road. The road was used by soldiers moving from Fort Belknap to Fort Graham. In the early days, the location of the City near West Buffalo Creek attracted travelers and cattlemen from the nearby Chisholm Trail. After the Civil War, Camp Henderson, a temporary facility, was renamed and re-established as a town and named after Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne on March 23, 1867. The City became the county seat of Johnson County and currently is on U.S. Highway 67, thirty miles south of Fort Worth.

The City continued to develop with the arrival of the railroad in the 1870s through the 1900s. By the 1990s, the City of Cleburne was still served by Santa Fe and Amtrak. During the 1920s through the 1940s, the City sustained a population decline and financial crisis during the depression and WWII. By 1945, the City began to increase in population and find a renewal of economic prosperity caused by close proximity to the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. Cleburne experienced substantial growth, increased employment, and expanded higher education opportunities.

Richard Elam and Mildred Padon, “Cleburne, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.


Worth and is the county seat of Johnson County. Cleburne is a unique town with a rich history about transportation, the Civil War, and agriculture. The Town has a vibrant community and is focused on a high quality of life by providing many amenities for its residents and visitors. The City offers a small water park, a sports complex for tournaments, a multi-use

34.9

square miles

sports facility for semi-professional sports, a theater for live performances, multiple museums and many parks and natural areas. The major employers in the City include Cleburne Independent School District, Walmart and its distribution center, local hospitals, and local government agencies such as the City and Johnson County. Cleburne is a growing town with a strong sense of City pride.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

The City of Cleburne is located 30 miles south of Fort

Chapter 2 - Who We Are

Location, Character, & Resources

21


Community Profile city of cleburne housing

&

income

Since 2010, the City of Cleburne has added 632 housing units and the average household size is 2.65, with 19.4% of households speaking a language other than English in the home.

homeownership

$137,853 Average Value of Owner-Occupied Households in 2020

10,915 households

$50,253 Owner-Occupied Housing - 61.3%

Median Household Income

Renter-Occupied Housing - 38.7%

All statistics and information are referenced from: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/cleburnecitytexas/PST045219 - and - https://rdc.dfwmaps.com/pdfs/2020%20NCTCOG%20Population%20Estimates%20Publication.pdf


According to the North Central Texas Council of Governments 2020 Population Estimates, the population of Cleburne, Texas is 31,080 in 2020. 6.3% are under 5 years of age, 22.3% are between 6 and 19 years of age, 56.2% are between 20 years and 64 years and 22.3% are 65 years or older. Using Cleburne Public Works' 3.25% population growth rate, the projected population of Cleburne is 42,794 by 2030.

population by race White - 91.75% Black - 3.68% Asian - 0.81% Population 31,080

Chapter 2 - Who We Are

city of cleburne population

American Indian - 0.65% Pacific Islander - 0.46%

,7

94

Other - 1.61%

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

30 20

25 20

20

population estimates

22 .3% + 65

64 – 20

19 – 6

20

.3% 22 % 6.3

Un

de

r5

population by age

31

,0

80

56

36

.2%

,4

70

42

Two or More - 1.04%

23


Benefits of Parks, Trails & Recreation Across the United States

and Texas, more cities are building and connecting parks through extensive trail systems, sidewalks and bike lanes. These connections give citizens more options and access to recreational facilities. The data and statistics highlighted in this section are national findings and are used to emphasize the impact parks and trails can have on a city and region.

economic benefits

Private property values increase with a closer proximity to parks. This increase in property value also increases property tax revenues and improves local economies.

Parks and recreation programs

generate revenue directly from fees and provide indirect revenues to local and regional economies from sports tournaments and special events.

Home prices near parks & trails can be 3% to 5% higher than comparable homes in the area.

The Mineral Wells to Weatherford Rail-Trail near Dallas, Texas attracts approximately 300,000 people annually and generate local revenues of $2 million.


Studies show reductions in stress, lowered blood pressure, and perceived physical health when citizens visit parks.

Residents living near trails are 50% more likely to meet the recommended activity guidelines.

environmental benefits

When Cleburne constructs greenbelts throughout the community, especially along Buffalo Creek, the land is acquired and preserved as natural open space or parkland. The preservation of this land will provide a safe habitat for flora and fauna as the City continues to grow and develop.

The construction of greenbelts helps with preventing natural erosion and provides a buffer to filter water from road runoff before contaminating the existing water source.

All statistics and information are referenced from: https://activelivingresearch.org/blog - and - https://www.greenway.org/ - and - https://www.railstotrails.org/experience-trails/benefits-of-trails/ - and - Crompton, John, The Impact of Greenways and Trails on Proximate Property Values, 2019

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Parks and trails provide mental and health benefits to all residents.

Chapter 2 - Who We Are

health benefits

25


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 3 Our Parks & Recreation System


Parks Classification Table To better understand the existing

conditions of the City of Cleburne's parks system, an inventory and assessment was conducted. The assessment of the parks system included walk throughs of each park, interviews with City Staff, a review of the annual budget and two citizen surveys. The parks classification system for all parks in the City are separated into six major categories where each parks category serves a unique purpose. The City of Cleburne’s Parks Classification and Inventory is as follows:

Classification Service Area

Size

Population Served

Typical Facilities

Mini Neighborhood Park

1/2 Mile

1 - 4 acres

500 - 2,500

Small playground, landscaping, sidewalks, drinking fountains, picnic tables, lawn area & benches

Neighborhood Park

1/2 Mile

5 - 10 acres

2,000 - 10,000

Playgrounds, picnic areas, pavilions, sports courts and/or fields, restroom, drinking fountains, natural open spaces, landscaping & parking

10,000 - 50,000

Sports courts and/or fields, playgrounds, picnic areas, pavilions, walking/jogging trails, swimming pools, spraygrounds, open space, landscaping, recreation centers, restroom, drinking fountains & parking

Determined by Primary Use

Dependant on Primary Use

Concentration of one or two of the following: Baseball/softball complex, soccer fields, sports stadiums, golf courses, water parks, performing arts parks, amphitheaters, drinking fountains & ornamental gardens

Varies

Varies

5,000 - Entire Community

Landscaping, multi-purpose trails, benches, information kiosks, exercise courses, playground, signage, picnic stations, lighting & drinking fountains

Varies

Determined by Primary Use

Entire Community

Nature trails, multi-purpose trails, benches, picnic areas, wildlife viewing stations, educational components, information kiosks, interpretive signs, exercise courses & drinking fountains

Community Park

Special Use Park

Linear Parks

Natural Areas

2 Miles

Varies

40 - 150 acres


29

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System


Parks & Open Space Inventory The existing parks in the City of Cleburne are classified in the table shown below. A brief description and inventory of each

individual park can be found on the following pages. To illustrate the geographic distribution and areas of the City currently served by the parks system, the service area of each existing park has been shown on page 37. Ideally, all developed areas of the City should fall within the service area of a mini-neighborhood park, neighborhood park or community park.

existing parks table Park Name

Classification Type

Developed Acres

Total Acres

1

Booker T. Washington Recreation Center

Special Use Park

3.60

4.32

2

Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park

Natural Area

54.82

121.58

3

Carver Park

Community Park

10.79

10.79

4

Cleburne Golf Links

Special Use Park

202.21

216.52

5

Cleburne Sports Complex

Special Use Park

83.75

87.81

6

Don Moore Field

Special Use Park

3.00

3.00

7

East Buffalo Creek Park

Linear Park

8.51

8.51

8

Hulen Park

Community Park

19.80

19.80

9

J.E Standley Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

0.00

0.73

10

John P. Bradshaw Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

0.39

0.39

11

John S. Butner Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

4.16

4.16

12

Kirtley Park

Special Use Park

26.89

26.89

13

McAnear Park

Natural Area

0.00

4.57

14

Old Sports Complex

Special Use Park

24.68

24.68

15

P.D Lacewell Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

1.69

1.69

16

Splash Station

Special Use Park

2.90

2.90

17

West Buffalo Creek Park

Linear Park

4.93

4.93

18

Westhill Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

2.33

2.33

19

West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp

Special Use Park

1.40

8.19

20

Winchester Park

Mini Neighborhood Park

0.00

0.51

21

Winston Patrick McGregor Park

Special Use Park

10.65

10.65

466.50

564.95

Total Acreage

67


67

MAIN STREET

13 13 21 21

W HENDERSON

1111 10 10

15 15

17 17 99 66

18 18

22

20 20 44

11

88 16 16

33 77

14 14

55

legend

Mini Neighborhood Park Community Park

19 19

Natural Areas

12 12

Linear Park Special Use Park Existing Park

0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

Undeveloped Park Roads City Limits

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

67

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

existing parks map

31


21

20 Parks 21 20 Mini Neighborhood

1/2

mile service areas

9. J.E. Standley Park

10. John P. Bradshaw Park

11. John S. Butner Park

913 Westhill Drive

609 Brazos Street

604 Buffalo Street

Total Acres - 0.73 Developed Acres - 0.00 • Creek Access • Picnic Table • Park Sign

Total Acres - 0.39 Developed Acres - 0.39 • Basketball Court • Drinking Fountain • Park Sign • Picnic Tables

Total Acres - 4.16 Developed Acres - 4.16 • Benches • Grill • Park Sign • Picnic Table

15. P.D. Lacewell Park

18. Westhill Park

20. Winchester Park

700 Granbury Street

1228 Hilltop Drive

1411 Hyde Park Blvd

Total Acres - 1.69 Developed Acres - 1.69 • Benches • Gardens • Parking (Unpaved) • Park Sign • Picnic Table • Playground • Restroom / Maintenance Building

Total Acres - 2.33 Developed Acres - 2.33 • Baseball / Softball (Backstops only) • Basketball Court (Lighted; half court) • Drinking Fountain • Grill • Picnic Table • Playground • Park Sign

Total Acres - 0.51 Developed Acres - 0.00 • Undeveloped Facilities


21 20 21 Community Parks 20

3. Carver Park

8. Hulen Park

600 Park Street

301 Westhill Drive

Total Acres - 10.79 Developed Acres - 10.79 • Basketball Court • Benches • Drinking Fountain • Grills • Park Sign • Parking • Pavilion • Picnic Shelters • Picnic Tables • Playground • Restrooms • Softball Diamond (Lighted) • Splash Pad • Trails (Lighted)

Total Acres - 19.80 Developed Acres - 19.80 • Baseball / Softball (Backstops only) • Basketball (Lighted) • Benches • Gazebo • Grills • Historic Site (“Spirit of Cleburne” steam engine) • Horseshoe Pits • Interpretive Signs • Maintenance Building • Parking • Park Sign

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

mile service areas

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

2

33


Special Use Parks

21 20 21 20

service area varies

1. Booker T. Washington Community & Recreation Center

100 Mansfield Road Total Acres - 4.32 Developed Acres - 4.32 • Gymnasium • Weight Room

• Cardio Room • Banquet Hall with Kitchen • Restroom / Locker Room • Computer Lab • Multi-Use Room

5. Cleburne Sports Complex

900 All Star Parkway

• Soft Toss Station • 2 Playgrounds Total Acres - 87.81 • 4 Concession Stands Developed Acres - 87.81 • 7 Baseball / Softball Fields (Lighted) • Restrooms • Pavilions • 20 Soccer Fields • Benches • 2 Football Fields • 2 Batting Cages

4. Cleburne Golf Links

2501 Country Club Road Total Acres - 216.52 Developed Acres - 216.52 • Grill • Pro Shop • 18-Holes • Driving Range

6. Don Moore Field

901 S Walnut Street

Total Acres - 3.00 Developed Acres - 3.00 • Baseball Field • Restroom


16. Splash Station

1900 - 2500 Lakeshore Drive

225 South Washington Street

1010 Hillsboro Street

Total Acres - 26.89 Developed Acres - 26.89 • Boat Dock / Pier • Boat Ramps • Grill • Parking • Pavilions • Picnic Shelters • Picnic Tables • Sand Volleyball • Swimming Beach

Total Acres - 24.68 Developed Acres - 24.68 • 2 Baseball / Softball Fields (Lighted) • Batting Cages • Pee-Wee Football Field • Parking

19. West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp

2900 Spur 1434

Total Acres - 8.19 Developed Acres - 1.40 • Boat Ramp • Parking • Park Sign

Total Acres - 2.90 Developed Acres - 2.90 • 8-Lane Competition Pool • Leisure Pool • Zero-Depth Sprayground Entry • Kids Water Playground with Slide • Lazy River • Vortex • 2 Water Slides • Concession Stand • Locker Rooms • Gift Shop • Parking • Seasonal Winter Dome

21. Winston Patrick McGregor Park

1628 West Henderson Street

Total Acres - 10.65 Developed Acres - 10.65 • Arbor • Benches • Children’s Garden & Maze • Community Center / Meeting Rooms (Renovated House)

• • • • • •

Gardens Parking Pavilion Pond Windmill Trails

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

14. Old Sports Complex

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

12. Kirtley Park

35


21 20 21 20 Linear Parks service area varies

7. East Buffalo Creek Park

17. West Buffalo Creek Park

800 Olive Street

9 North Buffalo Street

Total Acres - 8.51 Developed Acres - 8.51 • Trail • Benches

Total Acres - 4.93 Developed Acres - 4.93 • Benches • Grill • Trails (Lighted)


service area varies

2. Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park

13. McAnear Park

2424 W Henderson

Near the intersection of Roberts Avenue & McAnear Street

Total Acres - 121.58 Developed Acres - 101.41 • Boat Ramp • Grills • Parking • Pavilions • Picnic Tables • Trail

Total Acres - 4.57 Developed Acres - 0.00

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

21 20 21 20

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Natural Areas

37


22 77 33 88 44 99

10 5510

66

88

77

99

10 10

Park Locations with Service Area

12 16 1519 17up to a 2-mile 18 radius.19 14a18 15 parks 16can serve17 parks typically 1/2-mile 15 radius, The standard set by the National 1317 19 12 17serve14 18 18 16 15 16 13 19while community Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) is for all residents to have safe and equal access to parks within a 1/2-mile or 10-minute The service area radius map designates the ideal carrying capacity for different park classifications. Mini-neighborhood

21 21

walk of their house.

66 15 15 55

15 15

Mini Neighborhood Parks 3 1 2 3 1 2 8 10 7 9 8 10 7 9 1/2 mile service area 9. J.E Standley Park 10. John P. Bradshaw Park 11. John S. Butner Park 15. P.D Lacewell Park 18. Westhill Park 20. Winchester Park

12 1117 17 12 18 16 11 18 16 88 66 77 21 20 21 20 Community Parks 2

15 15

16 16

mile service area 3. Carver Park 8. Hulen Park

17 17

Natural Areas

service area varies by use 2. Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park 13. McAnear Park

44

77

88

99

16 16

17 17

18 18

Linear Parks 66 55

service area varies by use

7. East Buffalo Creek Park 17. West Buffalo Creek Park

14 13 14 13 19 19 10 10 99 18 18

19 19

15 15

15 15

Special Use Facilities service area varies by use

1. Booker T. Washington Rec Center 4. Cleburne Golf Links 5. Cleburne Sports Complex 6. Don Moore Field 12. Kirtley Park 14. Old Sports Complex 16. Splash Station 19. West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp 21. Winston Patrick McGregor Park

*The parks on the map that do not have a service area circle still serve the City of Cleburne in some capacity. The natural areas, linear parks and special use facilities do not have a standard service area because the facilities and parks vary in size and have different carrying capacity levels.

67


67

MAIN STREET

13 13 21 21

W HENDERSON

1111 10 10

15 15

17 17 99 66

18 18

22

11

88 16 16

33 77

14 14

55 legend

20 20 44

Mini Neighborhood Park Community Park Natural Area Linear Park

19 19

Special Use Park

12 12

Existing Park Undeveloped Park 1/2 Mile Service Area

0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

2 Mile Service Area Roads City Limits

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

67

39


Trail Network Inventory The existing trails in the City of Cleburne are classified in the table shown below. A brief description of the types of users and location of each trail can be found on the following pages. The City of Cleburne has a strong but limited framework for creating a trails system. The City has sidewalks, a few loop trails and the beginning of greenbelt corridors. The purpose of this portion of the Parks, Open Space and Trails Master Plan is to highlight the connections and current gaps in the system.

existing trails table Trail Location

Classification Type

Developed Distance

Trail Width

West Buffalo Creek Park

Greenbelt

0.42 miles

6' - 8'

West Buffalo Creek Greenbelt

Greenbelt

0.40 miles*

6' - 8'

East Buffalo Creek Park

Greenbelt

0.60 miles

6'

Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park

Loop Trail

2.00 miles

5' - 6'

Carver Park

Loop Trail

0.51 miles

6'

Cleburne Sports Complex

Loop Trail

**

8'

Hulen Park

Loop Trail

0.97 miles

5' - 8'

Winston Patrick McGregor Park

Loop Trail

0.50 miles

6'

Total

5.40 miles

*A total of 0.40 miles are developed within West Buffalo Creek Greenbelt, however, there are ADA & bike restraints such as stairs & creek crossings. ** The Cleburne Sports Complex contains loop trails to access facilities, however, they have not been included in the total amount because access is not provided for daily recreational use.


Pedestrians include walkers, joggers and runners will be the primary users of the trail system and they will have varying needs and comfort levels. They will use the trail system for two reasons, recreation and exercise. Walkers will participate at a slower, passive pace which may appeal to more vulnerable populations such as mothers with strollers, younger children and older adults. Runners and joggers prefer wider trails which allow them to run in groups and safely pass walkers. Pedestrians typically prefer loop trails that connect to larger trail systems, which allows them to drive and start at a park or trailhead. Bicycling appeals to many citizens and each may have their own comfort level and reason for riding. Most bicyclists will use

the trails for recreation and participate for more leisure purposes, rather than commuting. They prefer off-street trails, shareduse paths and low-traffic neighborhood roads. Advanced cyclists have experience sharing the roads with cars and maneuvering through traffic. Seniors, families and children are the most vulnerable and their accessibility and lower speed should be considered when creating access points, sight lines and orientation of the trail.

Other type of users on the trails include skateboarders, scooters, hoverboarders, in-line skaters and BMX riders. These users

will be more aware of cracks in the surfacing and fallen debris on the trails.

1 mile walk = 20 minutes (3 mph) 1 mile bike ride = 6 minutes (10 mph)

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

There are various types of citizens who will utilize the trails in Cleburne. The major reasons for which they use trails fall into two categories: recreation and exercise. The types of users may include walkers, runners, bicyclists and others. They would all be using the same trails but may require different facilities along the trails. Each user may have a preference on the type of trail and how close it is to vehicular traffic.

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

trail user types

41


trail facility types The three facility types best suited for Cleburne include shared-use paths, loop trails, sidepaths or sidewalks. The following images and descriptions are examples of each type and include recommendations on when to use and how to retrofit each type.

shared-use

(greenbelt)

paths

Shared–use Paths are physically separated from the flow of vehicular traffic and are not always parallel or adjacent to the roadway. These paths are for non–motorized traffic such as runners, walkers, bicyclists, skaters, wheelchair users, etc. The paths are typically found along creek corridors, greenbelts,

within or adjacent to utility easements, railroad right-of-ways and road right-of-ways. Shared-use paths are recommended to be 10’–12’ wide with a 2'–wide shoulder and a suggested 10'–12’ of vertical clearance. A center line striping is recommended for a shared-use path with heavy volumes of traffic.


Loop trails are typically 8'-10' wide with a minimum of 6', if 8' cannot be accommodated. Depending on the use, different types of signs may be suggested or required. These include, but are not limited to, directional signage, mileage markers, warning signs and gateways.

sidepaths Sidepaths are bidirectional trails located adjacent and parallel to roadways. They are physically separate from the flow of vehicular traffic and typically wider than traditional citysidewalks to accommodate higher volumes of pedestrians and bicyclists. Sidewalks can be retrofitted to accommodate heavy amounts of traffic by expanding the width or adding an additional sidewalk to the opposite side of the roadway. The City of Cleburne has a growing sidewalk network which

can be leveraged to expand the trail system throughout the community. City Staff needs to ensure that sidepaths are compliant with ADA standards, have adequate crossing signage and signals and are strengthened with crosswalks. Sidepaths are typically 8’–10’ wide, minimum 6', depending on intended carrying capacity. They should be separated from the roadway by using a 3'–5' wide buffer of grass, plantings, or vertical delineators.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Loop trails can be used to describe many types of trails that are completely contained within individual park boundaries. These trails can vary in use, surfacing material and width. The different types of surfacing include concrete, asphalt, crushed granite or stone, boardwalk, mulch, natural dirt and others.

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

loop trails

43


buddy stewart park

hulen park

winston patrick mcgregor park

west buffalo creek

east buffalo creek

carver park

67


67

existing trails map

W HENDERSON

legend

Existing Park

Undeveloped Park Existing Greenway 0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

Existing Trail Road City Limit

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

MAIN STREET

45


Level of Service Level of Service is a measurement of usable park acres

per 1,000 residents within the community. The purpose of the Level of Service is for City Staff and residents to better understand the importance of the parks system within the City. The Level of Service will help support essential decisions by government officials regarding parks, open space and trail developments into the future. This analysis can help support investment decisions related to land acquisition,

facility improvements and population changes over time. The Level of Service for parks and open spaces are based on usable parkland, therefore, undeveloped or unusable parkland is not factored into the calculation. While private recreational spaces, Home Owner Associations (HOAs) open space lots, outdoor public school play areas and sports fields are valuable for the community, these facilities are not included in the Level of Service tabulation.

To create a recommended standard for the City of Cleburne, MHS Planning compared Cleburne to surrounding communities and the NRPA standard of 10.1 acres per 1,000 residents.

Cleburne's Recommended Level of Service 17.30 acres per 1,000 residents

Cleburne’s Existing Level of Service Total - 15.01 developed acres per 1,000 residents. Total Available Park Acres: 564.95 Total Developed Park Acres: 466.50 Total Population: 31,080 population


e hi ac

ah

W ax

G

ra n

bu

ry

ld ie

sf

an

M

Cl

eb

ur

ne

n so

rle

le

standard for the Level of Service Analysis, MHS Planning compared the City of Cleburne to surrounding communities and the NRPA standard. The NRPA standard of 10.1 acres per 1,000 residents is meant to be a recommended guide, not a specific rule. Each community will set their own community-specific standard

based on previous trends and neighboring communities. Cleburne is responsible for determining their own balance of quantity versus quality parks system. It is important to continue monitoring the Level of Service that best suits Cleburne based on future population projections, available land and high-quality parks.

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

To create a recommended

Bu

da

ne Ke n

N

RP A

10

.1

10

.2

5

12

.7

15

.0

18

.0

19

.2

20

.0

Surrounding Communities Level of Service

47


10-Minute Walk National Recreation and Park

Association (NRPA) and Trust for Public Land (TPL) are encouraging cities to improve access to parks and green spaces by ensuring that every resident has safe and easy access to a quality park within a 10-minute walk. TPL publishes a report each year with statistics about each city's progress on providing quality

parks within a 10-minute walk of each resident. According to this report, on average, only 30% of Cleburne residents have access to a park within a 10-minute walk. The report shows access by age, income, race and ethnicity and in Cleburne only 30% of residents within each category have access to a quality park within a 10-minute walk.

RESIDENTS WITHIN A 10-MINUTE WALK

Yes - 31%

No - 69%

*Based on the Trust for Public Land Findings


2 Mile Service Area

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

.5 Mile Service Area 5 Mile Service Area 2 Mile Service Area 10 Mile Service Area 5 Mile Service Area Flood Plains 10 Mile Service Area City Boundaries TxDOT Owned Road Flood Plains Trail Along TxDOT Owned Road City Boundaries Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Along TxDOT Road TxDOT Owned Road Shared Use Path - Proposed Along TxDOT Road Trail Along TxDOT Owned Road

174

TEXAS

171

TEXAS

67

Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Existing Along TxDOT Road Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Shared Use Path - Proposed Along TxDOT Road Bike Signed Route - Proposed

legend

Bike Shared Lane - Existing .5 Mile Service Area Satisfied Greenbelt - Existing Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Greenbelt - Proposed Bike Signed Route 2 Mile Service Area- Proposed Low Need - Paths Existing Shared Use - Proposed Moderate Need 5Greenbelt Mile Service Area Loop Trail -- Proposed Existing Greenbelt

10 Mile Service Area High Need Street Crossings Shared Use Paths - Proposed Railroad Crossings Flood Plains Loop Trail - Existing Existing Parks City Boundaries Street Crossings TxDOT Owned Road Roads Railroad Crossings

67

.5 Mile Service Area

22

2 Mile Service Area 5 Mile Service Area 10 Mile Service Area

67 BUS

Flood Plains

67

City Boundaries TxDOT Owned Road

Trail Along TxDOT Owned Road Trail Along TxDOT Owned Road Existing Parks Existing Undeveloped Parks Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Along TxDOT Road Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Along TxDOT Road 67 Roads Shared Use Path Proposed Along TxDOT Road Future Park Locations Shared Use Path - Proposed Along TxDOT Road Existing Schools Undeveloped Parks Existing Bike Shared Lane - Existing Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Future Park Locations Bike Signed Route - Proposed Existing Schools Greenbelt - Existing Greenbelt - Proposed

Bike Shared Lane - Existing Bike Shared Lane - Proposed Bike Signed Route - Proposed Greenbelt - Existing Greenbelt - Proposed

171

TEXAS

0

19 19

174

TEXAS

.5

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

d

.5 Mile Service Area

0

1

.5

Scale as shown in miles Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility*Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

49


Department Programs & Special Events Cleburne Parks and Recreation

Department hosts numerous programs and events throughout the year. This section highlights various recreation and athletic programs and special events the Department offers. The programs are listed by location and where the programs are offered.

splash station programming • Community Swimming: Open swim is offered during the summer season for the general public. • Cleburne ISD Swim Team: Cleburne ISD uses the competition pool year round for swim meets and practices. The pool has a Winter Dome for protection in the cold and rain. • Sigma Swim Team: Sigma Swim is a public-private partnership that utilizes the pool year round for practices. • Sigma Swim Lessons: Swim lessons are contracted through Sigma Swim to offer a variety of lessons for all ages. • Fitness Classes: The City offers various aquatic fitness classes for all ages. • Movies: Dive-in Movie Nights are offered to the community to enjoy a movie while spending time in the pool. • Birthday Parties: Three different party packages are offered during the summer season for participants to purchase and celebrate their party.

booker t. washington programming

• Fitness Classes: The City offers a variety of fitness classes at various intensity levels for different age groups. These classes are offered on a weekly basis. • Cooking Matters Class: The City partners with Tarrant Country Food Bank to offer a free cooking class to the community. This class is offered at least twice a year and supplies families with one meal each week of the 6 week class. • Library Computer Classes: The Parks and Recreation Department partners with the Library to offer different skill level classes for computer knowledge. • Pickle Ball Night: The City hosts weekly pickle ball nights for community members to come and play. • Volleyball Night: The City offers weekly volleyball nights for community members to come and play. • Movie Night: During the holidays, the City offers movie nights for community members. • MLK Day: The Parks and Recreation Department partners with East Cleburne Community Center to host a Martin Luther King Jr Day Banquet. • BTW Birthday Celebration: Once a year, in the spring time, the City hosts a celebration to remember the City's history and celebrate the current members of Booker T. Washington Recreation Center. • Art Class: The City offers an art class in the fall, with an instructor, on how to create art pieces using chalk paint.


additional programming

&

events

• Adult Kickball: The City hosts Recreation Co-Ed leagues throughout the year. • Fishing Derby: The event is located at Hulen Park for kids and families to participate. During the event, lunch is prepared and served by the Parks and Recreation Department. This City partners with Texas Parks and Wildlife for the event. • Drive Thru Trunk or Treat: The City partners with The Railroaders and Autumn on the Square to bring businesses an opportunity to market their organization while participating in a fun community-wide Halloween event. • Virtual Programming: The Parks and Recreation Department offers a variety of virtual programming for all ages to engage and connect through the City's online community. • Movie Night at the Airport: The City partners with the airport to host a movie night under the stars. Before the movie, there are games and crafts; during the movie there is popcorn and drinks. • Market Days at Market Square: There are 20 or more vendors who gather and sell handmade items at Market Square. • Downtown Sounds: The City hosts live music, serves a variety of food, and keeps Downtown open later to provide late-night shopping. • Senior Bingo: The City partners with various senior organizations in the community to provide weekly bingo opportunities with a variety of prizes for winners. • Senior Health Fair: There are over 20 different senior organizations that meet with senior citizens to share information about their organizations and what they offer. • Festivals at Hulen Park: During the year, there are a variety of festivals held at Hulen Park. The Parks and Recreation Department helps book and manage the events. • Hulen Park Concerts: In the month of June, the City offers live music events for community. • Springfest Carnival in the Park: The City partners with the Plaza to host a community-wide carnival. • Cinco de Mayo: The Parks and Recreation Department partners with the Chamber to provide the community with a cultural experience celebrating various aspects of Mexican heritage. There is live music, food, vendors and entertainment.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

helps prepare and maintain the fields.

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

• Adult Softball: The City offers Competitive and Recreation leagues throughout the year. The Parks and Recreation Department

51


Community Programs & Special Events The City of Cleburne citizens, local organizations and other agencies host programs and events throughout the year. The

Parks and Recreation Department supports these events by assisting with set-up, clean up, logistics, grounds maintenance, and provides lighting. Below are programs and events hosted by organizations other than the City. The information in italics is the role the Parks and Recreation plays to support these events.

events at city parks • Fitness Classes at Hulen Park: Various fitness groups meet at the Park to workout. Support and clean up. • Friends of Winston Patrick McGregor Park: A group of volunteers that spend time supporting the Park. Support volunteer work days and provide guidance (tools, community service volunteers, preparation, clean up, volunteer forms, etc). • Cleburne Wine Festival: A community-wide event to support local vendors and artisans. Help with logistics, set up, maintain grounds, and clean up.

events with the library • Star gazing event at Lake Pat Cleburne. Set up and clean up. • Equipment Show: An event to show children the different types of equipment the City has. Support with equipment.

chamber of commerce events • Dragon Boat Races: Fundraising event to support the Chamber of Commerce. Provide logistics, place boats in the water and remove them, grounds maintenance, traffic control and clean up. • Shakespeare in the Park: Event for the local theater company and Chamber of Commerce. Support with logistics, supply the McGregor Park House for actors preparation, clean up on a nightly basis, set up advertisement along the Park. • 4th of July at the Depot: A celebration event for community. Help with set up, traffic and clean up. • Whistle Stop (Hulen, Market Square, and other City facilities): A Christmas light event for public. Help with logistics, install and remove the lights, and grounds maintenance. • Whistle Stop Lighted Christmas Parade: Benefits the CCC Foundation for scholarships. Set up and clean up.


Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

&

events

• Chisholm Trail Outdoor Museum Boat Show. Set up and clean up. • 5K Runs: A variety of 5K’s start and finish at Hulen Park throughout the year. Assist with logistics, set up, grounds maintenance and clean up. • V.F.W.: The local VFW places flags at P.D. Lacewell Park for Memorial Day. Support and clean up. • Keep Cleburne Beautiful: A local organization that removes and prevents trash and litter from gathering in the City's waterways. Support and clean up. • AgriLife Extension Services: This organization provides accommodations for locals to receive their Continuing Education Units (CEUs). • Hulen Park - Raise up American Patriots: A local Christian group that sings and states their testimonies. Clean up. • Keene Seventh Day Adventist Academy: This group helps set up projects for school aged children to help the Parks Department.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

other programs

53


Athletic Partnership Events The City of Cleburne has tournament-grade athletic facilities. With these facilities many local associations and organizations

use them for events and tournaments. The Parks and Recreation Department support these associations and organizations by providing grounds maintenance, set up, clean up and logistics. The following information highlights some the events and programs that occur at the City's athletic facilities.

cleburne sports complex partners • Cleburne Baseball and Softball Association

&

events

• Cleburne Soccer Association • Cleburne Football Association • Johnson County Sports Association • Various Tournament Providers • Chisholm Trail Classic: A youth soccer tournament that brings hundreds of teams to the Complex and City. • Cleburne ISD Cross Country Invitational and District Host Site • Various 5K Host Site • The Parks and Recreation Department maintains the athletic fields and supports the local organizations.


cleburne golk links events school districts. • Hosts Men's & Women’s City Championships • Hosts Men's & Women’s Senior City Championships

• Programs

• Hosts youth golf camps in the summer. • Offers private lessons year round for all ages and skill level. The golf pros provide lessons on putting, chipping, and the long game.

• Chamber Events • Hosts Chamber Golf Tournament • Hosts the 4th of July celebration by providing support with logistic, use of parking lots, supply golf carts for VIP rental use, food and beverages, oversee set up, clean up and tear down.

• Independent School Districts

• Hosts the Cleburne ISD fail safe system for Smith Middle School. • Provides practice and tournament facilities for three local high schools throughout the year. • Provides products for: Cleburne ISD, Joshua ISD, Glen Rose ISD, Alvarado ISD & Rio Vista ISD.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

• The City averages 24 tournaments a year to support local associations, organizations, businesses, and various independent

Chapter 3 - Our Parks & Recreation System

• Tournaments

55


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 4 Community Input & Key Findings


Community Input National Service Research (NSR) completed a

comprehensive research study for the City of Cleburne as part of the Parks Master Plan. An important aspect of the planning process was to conduct a demand and needs assessment which involved citizen input. This citizen input is the foundation of a great master plan, therefore the City of Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department used multiple types of citizen input and public meetings to receive recommendations and feedback during the planning process. NSR worked closely with MHS Planning & Design and the City of Cleburne staff throughout the research process. The City of Cleburne mailed 34,000 postcards to households throughout the City. The postcard

provided information about the needs assessment survey and provided an online link to access the survey. To complete this study effort, NSR designed and conducted a statistically valid, online survey for Cleburne residents to complete. The survey was posted on the City of Cleburne website and various social media sites. There were 652 survey responses. An additional survey was conducted specifically for the Lake Pat Cleburne needs analysis. This survey was available for all residents to complete online or submit a paper copy. The survey was also sent specifically to the homeowners around Lake Pat Cleburne. A total of 1,123 survey responses were received. The survey helped determine the list of priorities for Lake Pat Cleburne and Buddy Stewart Park.


out about parks and recreation opportunities through Facebook and 31% learn through the park and recreation flyers.

of respondents feel parks, recreation and open space in Cleburne is more important today compared to 10 years ago.

72%

of respondents are willing to pay additional property taxes to fund the improvement priorities. The mean amount they are willing to pay is $114/year.

All age groups have interest

in participating in a City of Cleburne recreation or leisure program.

85% of respondents strongly agree/ agree that parks and recreation facilities in Cleburne are well worth the cost to taxpayers.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Over half of the survey respondents find

65%

Chapter 4 - Community Input & Key Findings

summary of findings

59


satisfaction

58% of respondents rated the quality of parks and recreation opportunities as excellent or satisfactory.

Half of respondents (52%) rated the quantity of parks and recreation opportunities as excellent or satisfactory.

*See pages 50 to 53 for the City of Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department's list of programs and events.


61

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 4 - Community Input & Key Findings


frequency of use of facilities

Community and neighborhood parks, athletic fields, playgrounds, Lake Pat Cleburne and trails are the

frequently used facilities, at least weekly, in Cleburne.

most


order of the respondents’ choice for the most important facility or needed amenity

1 Expand Amenities Along Lake Pat Cleburne 2 Add Trails to Lake Pat Cleburne 3 Add Additional Trails and Connections Throughout the City 4 Add a Dog Park 5 Renovate and Enhance Existing Parks 6 Add Shade to Playgrounds 7 Improve and Enhance Maintenance of Parks 8 Have More Special Events in the Parks 9 Add an Amphitheater 10 Add a Skate Park

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

The list below is in rank in the City of Cleburne.

Chapter 4 - Community Input & Key Findings

most needed facility

63


Key Findings strengths • Athletic Complex with High Quality Maintenance • Great Improvement in the Parks System Over the Previous 3 Years • Recreation Programming • Special Events • Quality of Staff • Strong Park System Framework

weaknesses • Aging Park Amenities: Playgrounds, Sports Courts, Ball Fields, Picnic Tables, Pavilions • Lack of Continuous Trail Connectivity, Skate Park & Pickleball Courts • Underutilization of Lake Pat Cleburne, Buddy Stewart Park & McGregor Park • Deferred Maintenance


- a balance of active and passive recreational opportunities including trails and natural areas along Lake Pat Cleburne. - connectivity to parks, schools, residential and commercial areas.

Chapter 4 - Community Input & Key Findings

- a continual reinvestment into their parks & they value a high quality, well maintained and safe parks system.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Cleburne residents desire:

65


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 5 Objectives & Standards


Goals & Objectives The following goals and objectives are provided to give direction for future community decisions regarding parks, open

spaces and the maintenance of public spaces within the city limits of Cleburne. These goals and objectives were established based on input from the City of Cleburne residents, the Parks Master Plan Advisory Committee, City Staff and the consultant’s professional opinion.

parks goal

To provide a balanced parks system that meets the diverse recreational needs of the citizens of Cleburne, is easily accessible by residents, promotes healthy living and creates a distinct community character.

parks objectives • To ensure all parks and recreational opportunities are available to the residents of Cleburne regardless of age, physical or mental ability, race, income or religion. • To focus on the development of Lake Pat Cleburne and the surrounding park properties to provide additional recreational opportunities for residents and visitors. • To continually invest in new and updated equipment at high-use community parks such as Hulen Park and Carver Park. • To be proactive in the development of existing parkland owned by the City. • To provide new and different recreational opportunities throughout the parks system for residents. • To continue to partner with other public and private entities for the development and enhancements of parks and recreational facilities. • To develop and install consistent signage throughout the entire parks system.


To identify and preserve high quality natural open spaces for the protection of valuable ecosystems, inherent aesthetic value and unstructured recreational activities.

open space objectives • To provide citizens with well-balanced recreational experiences that include both active and passive opportunities. • To address natural open space needs when developing active recreational facilities. • To be proactive in the acquisition and protection of unique natural open spaces throughout the City of Cleburne, specifically along East and West Buffalo Creek and within Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park and McAnear Park. • To limit development in natural open spaces to minimize adverse effects on valuable ecosystems.

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

open space goal

To provide a comprehensive network of trails and sidewalks that safely connect the citizens of Cleburne to specific destinations, provide alternative transportation options and safe environments for recreational exercise.

trails objectives

• To construct trails purposefully throughout the community to provide the opportunity for residents to reasonably and safely access public parks. • To intentionally design greenbelts that will positively impact trail tourism, the environment and the health and wellness of the citizens of Cleburne. • To construct sustainable trails using natural and permeable materials to strengthen the environmental benefits of greenbelts. • To utilize the City’s easements, rights-of-way, existing sidewalks and safe street crossings to supplement a better trail network. • To continually research the viability of developing trail systems along creeks, floodways and private utility easements that will link public and private recreational facilities, local businesses, neighborhoods, school campuses and neighboring communities. • To provide necessary amenities such as bike racks, benches, rest stations, water fountains and shaded areas to encourage trail usage and enhance the user experience. • To provide and install trail signage such as wayfinding, gateways, trailheads and directional maps to improve connectivity and enhance the user experience.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

trails goal

69


maintenance goal To ensure a high quality, safe and aesthetically pleasing parks system through continued maintenance, upkeep and strategic planning.

maintenance objectives • To continue maintaining the existing parks system at a high level and increase maintenance capabilities as new facilities are developed. • To focus on hiring and retaining employees with technical skills to ensure the parks system is maintained at a high level. • To continue to forge partnerships with public and private organizations for the maintenance of recreational facilities. • To ensure funding availability for future maintenance needs and increased responsibilities. • To ensure all maintenance vehicles, including trucks, tractors, mowers, edgers, blowers, etc. are routinely maintained to prolong the life of each individual piece of equipment.

maintenance needs The City of Cleburne has 564.95 acres of parkland and open space that is managed and maintained by the Parks and Recreation Department. The parks system and various types of amenities require different levels of maintenance and service. Each service requires diverse skill levels and different time requirements to complete. To maintain parks at Level A, the services include regularly scheduled mowing, edging, weed-eating, blowing, and trash collection. Other services include irrigation, fertilizing, planting and pruning, ballfield maintenance, flood control and various other tasks as they arise. It is recommended the City continue to contract out Level B and Level C routine activities such as park mowing, blowing, edging and weed eating. Technical

staff should continued to be hired and trained in areas of sports fields, golf course and aquatic maintenance, irrigation, fertilization and playground inspection and repair. The City should continue to invest, train and provide certification opportunities for technical skill-sets. Based on City Staff input and professional opinion, the City of Cleburne’s Parks System is split into three different categories based on the level of maintenance performed. The categories are high level, medium level and low level of maintenance. Depending on the level of maintenance required, each park will have predetermined amounts of acreage designated within each level of maintenance. The following pages describe each level and the amount of park acreages the City maintains.


Level B Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

Level C

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Level A

71


Maintenance Level of Service level a maintenance Level A maintenance parks are developed parks with high-activity use that are maintained and operated by the City. Typically, mini neighborhood parks, neighborhood parks, community parks and special-use parks are maintained at a high level. These parks involve weekly or biweekly mowing, edging, fertilizing, trash collection, irrigation system repairs and maintenance, tree and shrub trimming, etc. The City of Cleburne offers 8.33 acres of Level A parks for every 1,000 residents. Level A Maintenance Park Name

Acres

COMMUNITY PARKS Carver Park

10.79

Hulen Park

19.80

COMMUNITY PARK ACRES

30.59

SPECIAL USE FACILITIES Booker T. Washington Rec Center

3.60

Cleburne Golf Links

202.21

Cleburne Sports Complex

76.87

Don Moore Field

3.00

Market Square (Johnson County owned)

0.97

Old Sports Complex

9.45

Splash Station

2.90

Winston Patrick McGregor Park

10.65

SPECIAL USE FACILITIES ACRES

309.65

Total Park Acreage

340.24

Maintenance Level of Service

10.95

(per 1,000 residents)


Level B maintenance parks are those that have an undeveloped portion but are still maintained routinely by the City. These parks are maintained periodically with mowing and edging as needed, removal of fallen trees, trash collection, trail cleaning and erosion control when necessary. The City of Cleburne offers 3.31 acres of Level B parks for every 1,000 residents. Level B Maintenance Park Name

Acres

MINI NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS J.E Standley Park

0.73

John P. Bradshaw Park

0.39

John S. Butner Park

4.16

P.D Lacewell Park

1.69

Westhill Park

2.33

Winchester Park

0.51

MINI NEIGHBORHOOD PARK ACRES

9.81

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

level b maintenance

Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park

54.82

NATURAL AREA ACRES

54.82

LINEAR PARKS East Buffalo Creek Park

8.51

West Buffalo Creek Park

4.93

LINEAR PARK ACRES

13.44

SPECIAL USE FACILITIES Cleburne Sports Complex

6.88

Kirtley Park

26.89

Old Sports Complex

15.23

West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp

8.19

SPECIAL USE FACILITY ACRES

57.19

Total Park Acreage

135.26

Maintenance Level of Service

4.35

(per 1,000 residents)

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

NATURAL AREAS

73


level c maintenance Level C maintenance parks areas are undeveloped parks and maintained on an as needed basis. These parks are maintained on an as needed basis such as brush hogging, the removal of fallen trees and repairs of any issues that could impact the safety of citizens. The City of Cleburne offers 2.21 acres of Level C parks for every 1,000 residents. Level C Maintenance Park Name

Acres

NATURAL AREAS Byron “Buddy” Stewart Park

66.76

McAnear Park

4.57

NATURAL AREA ACRES

71.33

SPECIAL USE FACILITIES Booker T. Washington Rec Center

0.72

Cleburne Golf Links

14.31

Cleburne Sports Complex

4.06

SPECIAL USE FACILITIES ACRES

19.09

Total Park Acreage

90.42

Maintenance Level of Service

2.91

(per 1,000 residents)


75

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives


Design & Branding Standards Wayfinding and signage is

an important aspect to the Cleburne Parks System. Wayfinding is a form of signage that guides people through physical spaces, such as parks to assist and enhance the user experience. It is recommended the City adopt a wayfinding and signage plan that is meaningful and unique to the parks system. A successful signage system consists of several different construction materials and styles that are repeated throughout each park. The intent is to create a wayfinding system that allows park users to know when they have arrived at parks and how to navigate them. For the City of Cleburne, the following sign design standards are recommended: steel, wood and stacked stone. These three,

generic park signage

at a minimum two, elements should be present on all signs that are located in parks. It is also recommended that each park have a gateway entry sign that identifies the main entry and a secondary park gateway entry sign at larger parks that identifies less traffic areas. Secondary park gateway entry signs can be used as the primary sign at smaller and less frequented parks as long as the materials are consistent. The materials used are important to show consistency throughout the park system and ensure what materials are needed when renovations, updates or general maintenance is needed. Typically, stacked stone, IPE wood and steel materials are sturdy and do not need periodic maintenance.

In addition to distinctive park entry signs, the City should use additional signage to guide users and encourage specific behavior. Examples of these signs are shown below. Additional signage and pavement markings can be used to reinforce bike lanes and prevent motorists from driving or parking in a designated bike lane. Pavement markings are also necessary to delineate which roads are for bicyclists and motorists. It brings awareness to both riders and drivers about sharing road space.


IPE Wood & Metal Letters

Corten Steel & Metal Letters

Corten Steel & Metal Letters

colors R: 156 G: 54 B: 33 # 9C3621

R: 246 G: 225 B: 182 # F6E1B6

R: 36 G: 76 B: 90 # 244C5A

R: 8 G: 8 B: 8 # 080808

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Stacked Stone

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

materials

77


parks system wayfinding Park Gateway Entry: A lighted sign to designate the main entrance and transition the user into the park boundaries. Secondary Park Gateway Entry: Designate a park entrance.

8' 8’ 7' 7’ 6' 6’ 5' 5’ 4' 4’

Park Gateway Entry

Secondary Park Gateway Entry


Mile Marker: Posts along the trail that identifies the distance from a set point. Directional: Provide directions and distances to nearby destinations and key points of interest. Interpretive: An educational display which describes and explains natural, historic or cultural points of interest.

8'

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

Trail Head with Map: Designate a major access point for a trail; provides directional information.

6' 5' 4'

Trail Head with Map

Mile Marker

Directional

Interpretive

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

7'

79


bikeway standards When implementing and building

a trail network, it is important to know and adhere to design standards which are mandated by State and National agencies. These agencies include American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), Texas Accessibility

Standards (TAS), Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and Texas Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (TMUTCD). By following the standards, the City of Cleburne will create a safe, reliable and connected trail network that is easier to maintain and enjoyed by all citizens for recreation, exercise, and transportation.


81

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives


Safety & Crime Prevention Design Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

(CPTED) is a theory and method implemented in many cities to create safe environments through four design principles. These strategies are established and enforced by law enforcement officers, architects, city planners, landscapers, and volunteers to create a safe physical environment and prevent crime. The goal of CPTED is to integrate the four design principles during the

design phase of development and throughout the maintenance lifetime of a physical environment. The improved designs will help reduce fear and incidence of crime to improve the quality of life for citizens. There are four overlapping CPTED strategies: Natural Surveillance, Natural Access Control, Territorial Reinforcement and Maintenance. The photos are examples of CPTED principles currently in use in the parks system.

natural surveillance

natural access control

territorial reinforcement

maintenance


The placement of physical features and people in a way that maximizes visibility and minimizes hidden areas or blind corners.

cpted 4 design principles

Territorial Reinforcement:

The placement of physical delineators to define the areas of control and distinguish between public and private spaces. This can be accomplished through landscape plantings, pavement changes and gateway treatments to define property lines.

Maintenance:

High levels of maintenance create an environment of care and reduce tolerance for disorder. Maintenance reduces plant overgrowth and increases visibility through pruning, replacing light bulbs and removing trash.

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives

Natural Surveillance:

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Natural Access Control:

The placement of physical barriers and access points to guide users to and through spaces by a specific route. Design features include signage, lighting, gateways and fencing.

83


Parks & Recreation Ordinance Summary Park Ordinances are the rules and regulations pertaining

to all of the recreation facilities in Cleburne. The following is a summary of the recommended changes to Chapter 98 of the Cleburne Park Ordinances. It is imperative to note these are merely recommendations. The City Council will need to vote to approve the proposed changes. The majority of the original ordinance sections were adopted in the late 1960’s with a number of revisions occurring throughout the years. Many of the definitions and regulations are out of date and positions identified in the ordinance no longer exist. The primary goal of the revision/update is to simplify the regulations while establishing up to date standards. As a general rule, it is best practice to include the technical details in the ordinance itself, while referencing City policy documents for items that can change from year to year. An example of this would be establishing the rules for using a particular park in the ordinance while referencing a current fee schedule and hours of operation that can be amended or updated annually, either by Staff or by a Policy Board. These types of changes are recommended throughout the park ordinances to minimize the amount of changes by a City Council vote. In the General Provisions section, the park curfews were modified to coincide with daylight hours rather than a specific time. Throughout the Parks and Recreation chapter, the City Manager or designee was added to all sections so that specific responsibilities can be delegated by the City Manager or designee. In the Park and Recreation Board section, the duties of the Board was clarified to be an oversight Board. Splash Pad and Pool hours of operation and fee schedules have been removed and instead will reference an annually adopted fee schedule.

Lake Pat Cleburne had the majority of changes as most of these regulations were adopted in the 1960’s. Primarily, references to regulations established and enforced by others, such as Texas Parks and Wildlife (TPWD), have been established to keep the regulations up to date. Subsequently, individual requirements, such as boat registration and boat safety gear requirements, have been removed from the ordinance. Sewage facility regulations have been removed and reference the local health code guidelines. This section also adds enforcement authority to relevant departments such as TPWD Game Wardens and County Sheriff’s Department. The Pier and Boathouse section should be updated and should establish procedures for annual inspections of facilities over water. It should also establish a procedure for annual inspections of facilities over water. The golf course operates as an independent entity. Fees and course hours need to be continually adjusted to stay competitive in the market. It is recommended to remove the fees and hours to give the City Manager or designee more flexibility in changing rates and hours of operations. The individual parks have the hours and fees removed and reference an annually adopted fee schedule. This gives the City Manager or designee the ability to negotiate special events with individual groups without needing to obtain a variance to the ordinance. Overall, many of the recommendations to the parks ordinances are to ensure that the rules and regulations refer to big picture items, the City Manager or designee has authority in decision making and that the document is simplified.


85

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 5 - Vision & Objectives


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 6 Kirtley Park at Lake Pat Cleburne & Buddy Stewart Park


Goal & Objectives Lake Pat Cleburne is a significant community feature which has been underutilized in the past. It has great potential to be

a community and regional hub, provide many recreational opportunities and become a destination for both Cleburne residents and surrounding cities. The following goal and objectives are provided to guide future community decisions in the development of Lake Pat Cleburne and future surrounding amenity sites.

lake pat cleburne goal

To create a recreational lake experience that provides social spaces, amenities, economic opportunities, natural and passive open areas and sustainable development for the benefit of all Cleburne residents.

lake pat cleburne objectives • To develop passive and active recreational facilities and programming around Lake Pat Cleburne. • To proactively build sustainable and natural features along Lake Pat Cleburne. • To steward and conserve the environmentally sensitive landscapes surrounding Lake Pat Cleburne. • To seek alternative funding opportunities to construct and maintain amenities around Lake Pat Cleburne. • To develop a Lake Pat Cleburne district with unique and consistent signage. • To provide amenities and programming that are accessible to the residents of Cleburne. • To continue to partner with other public and private entities for the development, enhancements and hosting of events at Lake Pat Cleburne.


89

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Inventory The existing conditions around Lake Pat Cleburne are opportune for development and recreational programming. Below is an inventory list of current amenities and facilities surrounding and in proximity to Lake Pat Cleburne. Ideally, all shorelines and land within proximity to Lake Pat Cleburne should have designated uses whether they are active or passive recreation.

• 1,700+ acre lake • Premier city-owned park land adjacent to Lake Pat Cleburne • Buffered by existing amenities: • Buddy Stewart Park • West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp • Kirtley Park • Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Launch • Cleburne Golf Links

The Chisholm Trail Outdoor Museum, a privately-ran outdoor museum on City-owned property, is on the northern side of Lake Pat off of Highway 67. This facility has trails, observation areas, and a kayak launch.


91

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Needs The needs analysis is based on various forms of input:

focus groups, a Town Hall meeting, two citizen surveys, the Advisory Committee, City Staff and the consultant’s professional opinion. Detailed in the next few pages are several big picture needs that have been identified by the above groups and the citizen survey.

There are a number of recreational activities that can be both active and passive, depending on the users’ intention at the time. Due to this, the conflicting activities are assumed to be active when describing them in the section below. It is better to assume they will be more active because the facilities will be designed and implemented for a higher impact use than if they were designed to only be passive.

active recreation needs Lake Pat Cleburne has tremendous opportunities for more active recreation programming and amenities. In the Lake Pat citizen survey, 10.15% of residents solely chose active recreation as the primary function of Lake Pat Cleburne, while almost 68% of residents voted for both active and passive recreational amenities around the lake. The recreational activities which fall into both active and passive categories include fishing, a swim beach and trails. Fishing can occur on the lake in a boat and on a fishing pier; this activity has both passive and active components to it. A swim beach can be active with swimmers in the water or passive with users

floating along the shoreline. The beach could be active with residents playing games, but also passive as people relax to sunbathe or read. In the Lake Pat Cleburne citizen survey, the popular active recreation activities already occurring at Lake Pat Cleburne include: fishing, walking/hiking, boating, kayaking/canoeing, volleyball and jogging. When asked which additional recreational facilities would citizens like to have at Lake Pat, the top active recreation responses include fishing piers, multi-use paved and nature trails, playgrounds, a swim beach, an amphitheater, boardwalks and sand volleyball courts.

The top active recreation activity requested at Lake Pat are

FISHING PIERS.


The City-owned areas surrounding Lake Pat Cleburne have great potential for large-scale passive recreation. In the citizen survey, 17.9% of residents chose only passive recreation as the primary function of Lake Pat Cleburne, while almost 68% of residents chose both active and passive recreation as the primary function. Passive recreation activities include picnicking, rest and relaxation spaces, bird watching and wildlife observation, photography, pavilion use and picnic benches. When asked if

there were other activities that residents used Lake Pat for, many responded with relaxing, driving, photography and bird watching and wildlife observation. When asked which additional recreational facilities would citizens like to have at Lake Pat Cleburne, the top passive recreation responses include pavilions and picnic areas, tree plantings, bird watching and wildlife observation, wildflower and pollinator habitats and open spaces for general play.

The top passive recreation activity requested at Lake Pat are

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne

passive recreation needs

natural area needs The City of Cleburne owns a plethora amount of land around Lake Pat Cleburne, which allows the City to preserve several acres of existing natural space. The natural areas with the highest conservation priority include the Cross Timbers woodlands and the remnant prairies near Buddy Stewart Park, as well as the riparian zone at Lake Pat Cleburne. When considering the preservation of the riparian zone of a river or stream, it consists of the riverbanks and the low-lying plain which is subject to flooding. By preserving large natural open spaces, the City of

Cleburne can maintain its rural appeal while also providing engaging active and passive recreational programming. Nearly 61% of Cleburne residents responded that it is very important or important to preserve the shoreline along Lake Pat Cleburne as natural open space. Almost 82% of citizens responded that it is somewhat important to very important that specific areas along Lake Pat shoreline be supplemented with native plantings for conservation and preservation of natural areas.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

PAVILIONS & PICNIC AREAS.

93


Priorities As the City continues

to expand in population and absorb growth from the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, it is imperative the City of Cleburne focus on developing and utilizing Lake Pat Cleburne and Buddy Stewart Park as a central piece of the parks and recreation system. Based on the feedback from the citizen survey and City Staff, Lake Pat

Cleburne should have more active recreational opportunities and Buddy Stewart Park will remain as a primitive area with more passive recreational activities. The System Priorities in the lists below are influenced by a Town Hall meeting and citizen survey, the Advisory Committee, City Staff and the consultant’s professional opinion.

kirtley park priorities 1. Multi-Use Paved & Nature Trails with Signage

6. Swim Beach

2. Fishing Piers

7. Amphitheater

3. Restroom Facilities

8. Boardwalk for Bird Watching and Wildlife Observation

4. Playgrounds 5. Pedestrian Amenities (picnic areas, benches, drinking fountains, etc.)

9. Rehabilitate Boat Ramp 10. Sand Volleyball Courts

buddy stewart park priorities 1. Fishing Piers 2. Disc Golf Course 3. Dog Park

6. Pedestrian Amenities (picnic areas, benches, drinking fountains, etc.)

7. Pavilions

4. Boat and Paddle Sport Launches

8. Nature Play and Lawn Game Spaces

5. Boardwalks for Bird Watching and Wildlife Observation

10. Wildflower and Pollinator Habitats

9. Nature Trails with Interpretive Signage


95

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Recommendations Influenced by the needs analysis, list of priorities, the citizen survey and City Staff, the following recommendations should be considered over the next five to ten years.

active recreation recommendations

• Design and construct a multi-use trail, with trail loops, along the shoreline of the proposed development • Design and construct a disc golf course at Buddy Stewart Park • Rehabilitate the existing boat launches: Lake Pat Cleburne, West Public and Buddy Stewart • Design and construct a designated swim beach area • Construct paddle sport launches in conjunction with the boat or shallow launches • Design and construct fishing piers on either end of the proposed development • Provide an inclusive and fully-accessible playground for children of all ages • Construct a restroom facility on the southern end of the developed park • Increase the number of sand volleyball courts around Lake Pat Cleburne • Design and construct an amphitheater that opens toward Lake Pat Cleburne

passive recreation recommendations • Construct boardwalks at Lake Pat Cleburne and Buddy Stewart Park for birding and wildlife observation • Construct a pavilion/stage with the amphitheater • Add more pedestrian amenities such as picnic spaces, benches, drinking fountains and signage along trails • Designate and maintain open grassy areas for lawn games and general play • Consider a feasibility study to construct a nature trail around the entirety of Lake Pat Cleburne


• Designate low foot traffic areas as wildflower and pollinator habitats • Increase the number of natural and aquatic plantings along the shoreline

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne

• Preserve the primitive nature of Buddy Stewart Park by continuing low-impact and sustainable development practices

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

natural area recommendations

97


Kirtley Park Site Plan This park master plan is based on input from Cleburne residents, City Staff and the consultant's professional opinion. The site plan and 3D renderings are visual representations of the recommendations and priorities listed within this chapter.


99

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Amphitheater

Playground & Picnic Area


Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Boardwalk

Sand Volleyball Courts

101

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Buddy Stewart Park Site Plan This park master plan is based on input from Cleburne residents, City Staff and the consultant's professional opinion. The site plan and 3D renderings are visual representations of the recommendations and priorities listed within this chapter.


103

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


Dog Park & Wildflower Area


Viewing Deck & Picnic Area

105

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 6 - Lake Pat Cleburne


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 7 Parks & Trails Needs & Recommendations


Park Needs The Needs Analysis is based on the input from Town Hall meetings, Focus Group meetings, two citizen surveys, the Advisory

Committee, City Staff and the consultant’s professional opinion. Over the next few pages are the general needs in the overall parks system, divided into subsections, which have been common themes during the planning process. Lake Pat Cleburne is not extensively described in the following paragraphs due to there being an individual Lake Pat Chapter later in the plan.

existing park needs As the parks system begins to age and Cleburne continues to develop, the Parks Department should look to diversify, expand and design additional park features and recreational opportunities throughout the entire City. The amenities and recreational opportunities at Booker T. Washing Recreation Center, Hulen Park, Splash Station and Carver Park need to be updated and enhanced to sustain the attraction from residents and surrounding communities. Splash Station is a great asset to the Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department but it is beginning to lose its uniqueness. The City needs to update the amenities and add an additional aquatic feature. There are a variety of different sized parks in Cleburne, but they lack development and recreational programming. Moving into the next ten years, the City has great potential to build upon the current framework and elevate and distinguish itself from neighboring communities. Throughout the Town Hall meeting and focus group meetings, it was repeatedly stated that the City needs to focus on the development of trails throughout the community and reconstructing trails that are too damaged to be used. Many residents feel the need for more unique forms of recreation and not standard park amenities such as playgrounds, benches, picnic areas, etc. Citizens expressed the need for a skate park within the community. Numerous conversations with local residents lead to the understanding that a dog park and a disc golf course are desired in town. These two recreational facilities need large open areas to function properly, therefore Buddy Stewart Park is a prime location for a disc golf course and a dog park.

There is a need to upgrade and renovate the existing recreational spaces and parks in Cleburne. In the citizen survey, when asked what are the most needed facilities in Cleburne, renovate and enhance existing parks ranked fifth, add shade to playgrounds ranked sixth, improve and enhance maintenance of parks ranked seventh and add additional playgrounds ranked eleventh. As Cleburne grows and diversifies, it is important that neighborhood and community parks reflect the desires of the community. The City has undeveloped parks which can be designed for desired and innovative facilities. The undeveloped parks at the mini-neighborhood-level include J.E. Standley Park, John S. Butner and Winchester Park; undeveloped natural area-level parks are Buddy Stewart Park and McAnear Park To improve park safety and accessibility, each playground and additional element should be routinely evaluated for maintenance, possible structure replacement and ensuring the structure is compliant with the current safety guidelines established by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). In general, parks and individual elements need to be assessed in terms of accessibility and, if needed, upgraded to the newest ADA standards, established under the Americans with Disabilities Act.


Priority locations for the development of new parks, on existing City property, include the land adjacent to Carver Park and the recently acquired McAnear property. The land adjacent to Carver Park is ideal parkland because it is partially in the floodplain, already borders an existing park and has abandoned buildings which can be demolished while the existing slabs can be used as sports courts. The land is not suitable for commercial or residential development because it is relatively small and not easily accessible by thoroughfares.

The McAnear property, recently acquired in 2020, is also a great location for parkland because of the increased residential development occurring in the west portion of Cleburne. This property should have walking trails, a playground, parking and site amenities. As residential development continues to expand within the City limits, it is imperative for City Staff to acquire and develop portions of the parks system to ensure the City’s developed park acreage increases at the same rate as the population. As park development occurs, it is recommended that the City design an overall master plan for each specific project which will allow the City to develop new parks in systematic phases to ensure projects can be built on schedule and within a reasonable budget.

The top park needs in the City of Cleburne include

UPDATE AMENITIES, ENHANCE PARKS, ADD SHADE, IMPROVE MAINTENANCE & ACQUIRE NEW PARKLAND.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

As the City of Cleburne grows in population and becomes more diverse, there is a need to expand the parks system through the acquisition of new land, rezoning existing undeveloped City land, developing existing parkland and updating older parks. While the City of Cleburne's Level of Service is sufficient for the existing community, it is important for the City to anticipate future population growth. To anticipate this growth, the City needs to proactively be purchasing land and developing parks, while it is economically feasible, to maintain a high Level of Service. The land acquisition should be focused in the northern and western portions of Cleburne because the majority of development is trending in these regions.

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

new park needs

109


athletic needs Youth athletics have different recreational needs than the general public. Focus group meetings were specifically held with the leaders of each organized sport to better understand the needs from each organization. The meetings gave insight into what each group currently uses for games and practices and what additional facilities they need to continue supporting the youth in Cleburne. It is important to note that every youth organization stated they are happy with the current facilities;

especially as the field maintenance and Parks Department leadership have improved over the past several years. It was mentioned that the current number of ball fields are adequate to efficiently handle the level of play. However, there is a need for more fields to allow for increased tournament play. While each organization has its own specific needs, as seen in the following paragraphs, many organizations expressed overlapping desires which are outlined in the following list:

The top athletic needs in the City of Cleburne include

PRACTICE FACILITIES, LIGHTED FIELDS, SPORTS FIELD PLAYGROUND & STORAGE.

youth baseball

&

softball

Youth baseball and softball currently plays at the Cleburne Sports Complex and practices at the Old Sports Complex. The City hosts many tournaments throughout the season and it is imperative the fields are maintained at a high level to continue attracting high-caliber tournaments. The City should continue to look for more opportunities to host additional tournaments. To maintain healthy fields, a target of no more than 14 teams (7 games) should be played on a single field in a week. Throughout the focus group meeting, the leaders of youth baseball expressed gratitude to the City and Parks Department for the large improvements over the past several years at the ballfields. Although they had many praises, it was apparent there were some additional needs at the facility. Drainage on the fields was one of the largest concerns as it

impedes play and causes scheduling issues during the rainy season. In addition, there was a desire to construct a Field of Dreams; a field that is specifically designed to allow children of all ages and abilities to play baseball. The participation rate in recreational youth softball has been declining nationally over the past several years and unfortunately, the trend in decline is local in Cleburne. Even with the decline in the sport, it is imperative to continue to maintain and provide spaces for those who do choose to participate in the sport. After discussions with the local leadership in the sport, it was apparent that no additional softball fields were needed but practice facilities are always desired. It is typical for each softball field to accommodate 12 teams (6 games) per week to ensure the fields remain healthy and are not overused.


Youth soccer is a growing sport in the City of Cleburne and all over the nation. Soccer is a high impact sport and it is important to maintain the turf at a high level to ensure safe play. It is standard for most soccer games, in the City, to occur on Saturdays; creating a target level of 12 teams (6 games) per field per week (Saturday). As youth soccer demand grows, so do the needs of the organizations and

the City. Some of the largest needs within the sport are the minor renovations of fields to enhance the drainage issues. A multi-purpose field or artificial turf field is desired for a premier game field at the Sports Complex. In addition, there was some discussion regarding the desire for a renovated restroom and concession facility which many within the sports organizations supported.

youth football Youth football participation has cycles of growth and decline over the past several years but still remains an important and active sport in the City of Cleburne. Currently, youth football plays and practices on fields at the Cleburne Sports Complex. Overall, the leaders of youth football are generally happy with the fields but are in need of support amenities to successfully host games. The biggest needs for youth football are additional

lighted fields, additional bleachers, a PA system and new scoreboards. In addition, there was a strong desire to renovate the press box as many stated that it seemed dangerous to climb and remain in for long periods of time. Youth football typically plays games on Saturdays and to ensure field health, it is suggested that a total of 12 teams (6 games) per field are played per week (Saturday).

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

youth soccer

The Homeschool Athletics Group is organized to ensure that children who school from home have the same opportunities to recreate with children who attend public or private schools and can participate in recreational activities. The City of Cleburne, the Homeschool Youth Athletics Group and other organized youth athletic groups work closely together to share the recreational facilities provided by the City. To assist

funding the program, the homeschool youth organization relies on selling concessions; thus, one of the main needs of the group is more access to the concession stand. The City has done an excellent job of providing many recreational facilities and many of the needs for this group are the same for the others; additional lighting and practice space is needed.

cleburne links golf course In the 1960s, Cleburne Golf Links was constructed as a 9-hole course. In 2009, the City invested resources in the course and expanded it to an 18-hole golf course. There is a pro shop, grill and restaurant, event space and driving range. There is an average of 24,000 players a year with a growing interest outside of local play. To continue increasing the amount of interest and number of weekly players, the City should consider hosting more tournaments and promoting the Clubhouse as an event space. Due to the current and anticipated growth of the course, there is a need to hire additional staff for the Pro Shop and general maintenance. The current configuration of

the golf course does not allow for players to come back to the Clubhouse until hole 18 because of the out-and-back style of the course. The majority of the holes are linear, without any curves. Needs pertaining to course infrastructure include continued assessment of the course's irrigation, increasing and enhancing the number of bunkers, planting additional shade trees throughout the course, improving the topsoil, replacing turf on select greens and technical maintenance on the larger mowers twice a year. A tree plan was suggested during the meeting, which would allow for the City to systematically plant, irrigate and maintain tree canopy throughout the course.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

cleburne youth homeschool athletics group

111


indoor facility needs Booker T. Washington Recreation Center is currently the only indoor athletic facility owned by the City of Cleburne. The facility has a combination volleyball court and basketball court; therefore, youth volleyball and basketball games cannot be scheduled at the same time. Also available at the Recreation Center is a cardio room, weight room, locker rooms, a banquet hall and kitchen. Booker T. Washington needs to be

updated and modernized to meet the changing needs of the community and provide enough amenities to meet the growing demand. The City should consider enhancing and expanding the historical memorabilia collection showcasing the history and legacy of Booker T. Washington Recreation Center. The City should construct an additional indoor basketball facility on the City-owned land adjacent to Booker T. Washington.

natural open space needs It is necessary for the Parks and Recreation Department to anticipate the population growth by being proactive in the protection and conservation of their existing open space. The City has unique natural and open spaces such as Lake Pat Cleburne, Buddy Stewart Park, McAnear Park, West Buffalo Creek, East Buffalo Creek and McAnear Creek. Natural open spaces are ideal for passive recreation and primitive activities such as walking trails, reading and relaxing, bird watching, wildlife observation, photography and picnicking. These natural areas are important to have throughout Cleburne because of the habitat diversity they provide, water recharge and filtration abilities, mitigate stormwater and improve air quality.

McAnear Park is an undeveloped tract of land that is currently owned by the City along McAnear Creek. There is currently a need to develop a linear park to serve the surrounding neighborhood while focusing on the preservation of the natural resources. The City has additional opportunities to extend the greenbelts along West and East Buffalo Creek as well as create a new greenbelt along McAnear Creek. The sustainable development of these greenbelts will provide greater opportunities for Cleburne residents to access parks, lead healthier lives and stay more active. This will also increase the ratio of developed park acreage per 1,000 residents to ensure the City is developing parkland at the same rate as the population growth.

The City of Cleburne should converse natural areas for

HABITAT DIVERSITY, WATER RECHARGE & FILTRATION MITIGATE STORMWATER & IMPROVE AIR QUALITY.


general community needs In addition to creating new parks and upgrading existing facilities, the Parks and Recreation Department will need to provide more park support facilities. Support facilities are park amenities that are not specifically recreational-based but instead provide basic, community needs at local parks. These types of amenities are benches, bike racks, drinking fountains/ water bottle refill stations, grilling and picnic areas, parking lots, restrooms, shade and wayfinding. Shade can be provided through trees or man-made elements such as shade canopies, sails, umbrellas and pavilions.

Throughout the planning process, including public meeting and focus group meetings, the topic of special events and programs were mentioned numerous times. Many residents are interested in a variety of events such as festivals, outdoor amphitheater programs and fitness classes. The need for programmed recreational opportunities, whether formal or informal, is needed within the community. The Parks Department and other local groups need to coordinate to host local events, whether large or small, for the residents of Cleburne.

Wayfinding is a process using signage, pavement markings and gateways to help citizens navigate and orient themselves through the physical environment and enhance their understanding, use and experience of a space. Cleburne needs a cohesive and integrated wayfinding plan throughout the entire parks system from mini-neighborhood such as P.D. Lacewell to the trail network to community parks such as Hulen Park. The signs needed for the wayfinding system include directional signage, confirmation signage, trailhead signs with maps, entry gateways and mile markers.

When preparing for and designing additional facilities, enhancing existing parks and amenities and hosting special events, the City of Cleburne needs to continue providing accessible elements and programs. Through the engagement of persons with disabilities and minority groups City Staff can continue adapting culturally-sensitive programs and including ADA compliant amenities to parks.

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

BENCHES, PICNIC AREAS, BBQ GRILLS, SHADE, SIGNAGE, ADA ACCESS, SPECIAL EVENTS & PROGRAMS.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

The top community needs in the City of Cleburne include

113


Trail Needs The trail needs section

is intended to be used as a general resource and starting point for the City of Cleburne’s trail network. In the past, the City has constructed trails and sidewalks in parks and along Buffalo Creek without a specific plan or guide. This section explores trail system options and analyzes the City's ability to construct and delineate trails. Cleburne has an existing trail framework with sidewalks in the Downtown area and along collector/arterial streets, on wide streets in newer areas of the City, and along natural creeks. The City should look for opportunities to retrofit and incorporate trails into the existing framework. Throughout the planning process, there was strong support from the citizens

and City Staff to strengthen and improve the trail system in Cleburne. Citizens voiced concern for better walkability and improved signage around Downtown and throughout the parks system. When surveyed if citizens could reasonably walk to a park, 26% responded yes, while 58% said they used trails more than twice a year. This indicates the need for a larger trail network with stronger connections to everyday locations such as schools, parks, Downtown, The Depot and local businesses. In the future, after the trail system is expanded, citizens will have access to safer walking spaces, can lead healthier lifestyles. The following pages provide greater detail about trail destinations and connections.

The top trail needs in the City of Cleburne include

TRAILS ALONG LAKE PAT, CITY-WIDE TRAIL CONNECTIONS, FIX DAMAGED TRAILS & UTILIZE GREENWAY OPPORTUNITIES.


115

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations


destinations

&

connections

In addition to the recreational and exercise benefits of trails, these paths provide exceptional opportunities to connect Cleburne residents to various destinations around the City. These destinations and safe connections encourage families and individuals to explore Cleburne by walking, jogging, bicycling and skating. As the City expands and develops,

the City should anticipate the need to connect destinations by constructing trails, sidewalks and shared-use paths to integrate the trail system in new residential and commercial developments. The City of Cleburne has key destinations, as seen in the following images, that should be connected through the trail network.

cleburne public library

cleburne high school

downtown cleburne

the depot


cleburne sports complex

hulen park

johnson county market square

lake pat cleburne

splash station

westhill park

winston patrick mcgregor park

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

carver park

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

booker t. washington recreation center

117


Park Recommendations The following actions are

recommended to be implemented to ensure the Cleburne Parks System continues to meet the recreational needs of the growing community. Recommendations are determined by the citizens of Cleburne through the public Town Hall meeting, focus group meetings

and the surveys. The Advisory Committee, City Council and City Staff provided valuable insight about the needs of the community to ensure the following recommendations will benefit the City of Cleburne today and into the future. These recommendations can be developed in multi-year phases.

new park recommendations - Develop the City-owned land north of Carver Park as parkland • • • • • • • •

Construct concrete and nature loop trails Connect the loop trails to Carver Park and East Buffalo Creek Park Install mile markers and additional signage along loop trails Replace existing playground Construct open lawn area for multi-purpose field practice and general play Construct a large pavilion Convert the existing building slab into multi-use sports courts Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches, trash receptacles, signage

- Develop the land south of McAnear Park • • • • •

Develop a linear park Construct a playground* Construct walking trails* Construct a parking lot* Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches, trash receptacles, signage

- Acquire and develop a community park in north Cleburne • • • • • • •

Construct multi-purpose practice fields and/or courts Install a playground Install a sprayground Construct multi-purpose loop trails Construct nature trails Construct wildlife viewing stations Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches, trash receptacles, signage

*Funding and construction provided by developer.


• • • • • • • • •

Construct an additional pedestrian bridge across Buffalo Creek to Don Moore Field Construct a loop trail around Don Moore Field Redevelop existing courts to appropriate sports courts (basketball & pickleball) Construct a skate park Renovate existing parking lot near Don Moore Field Install new playground near Don Moore Field - Westhill Park Construct new parking lot near maintenance building • Construct a loop trail Construct a pavilion at Don Moore Field • Rehabilitate the existing basketball court Renovate restroom at Don Moore Field • Construct pavilion • Install site amenities: benches, trash receptacles, - Splash Station signage • Renovate existing locker rooms • Renovate family changing area - P.D. Lacewell Park • Construct additional storage facility • Construct a loop trail • Update water amenities • Remove non-functioning facilities: restroom, cistern, gazebo - Buddy Stewart Park • Construct pavilion • Construct a fishing pier • Install a new playground • Construct a disc golf course • Construct a parking lot • Construct a dog park • Install site amenities: benches, trash receptacles, • Construct a kayak and canoe launch signage • Construct wildlife viewing stations • Construct additional trails

- Winchester Park

- Develop the shoreline along Kirtley Park at Lake Pat Cleburne (see Chapter 6) - Carver Park • • • • •

Replace fencing at baseball field Install irrigation at baseball field Renovate large pavilion Install shade structures Construct volleyball courts

- Winston Patrick McGregor Park • • • • •

Replace fencing Improve nature trails Improve pond and irrigation Plant additional natural vegetation and wildflowers Install site amenities: benches, trash receptacles, signage

• Install a playground • Construct a sidepath • Install site amenities: benches, trash receptacles, signage

- J.E. Standley Park

• Install a playground • Construct a loop trail • Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches, trash receptacles, signage

- John S. Butner Park

• Install a playground • Construct a loop trail • Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches, trash receptacles, signage

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

- Hulen Park

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

existing park recommendations

119


athletic recommendations - Old Sports Complex • • • • • • •

Increase practice field capacity Replace existing fencing and irrigation Improve lighting capacity Improve parking lot Rehabilitate restroom facilities Construct playground Install site amenities: picnic benches, trash receptacles, signage

- Cleburne Sports Complex • • • • • • • • • •

Construct trails connecting existing sidewalks Provide light systems on unlit fields Install shade canopies over bleachers Construct playground near soccer fields Construct playground near football fields Replace backstop fencing with netting system Renovate maintenance facility Convert cubie field into a baseball/softball field Construct and provide additional storage space for equipment Install site amenities: picnic benches, trash receptacles, signage

indoor facility recommendations - Booker T. Washington Recreation Center • • • • • • •

Replace gym flooring Replace roofing Convert old day care facility to either Parks & Recreation Department administration offices or as special event space Construct outdoor playground Construct loop trails with the potential to connect to East Buffalo Creek Greenbelt Renovate interior Construct additional indoor basketball facility on City-owned land adjacent to Booker T. Washington

- McGregor House at Winston Patrick McGregor Park

• Renovate facility for either Parks & Recreation Department administration offices or to enhance the special event space


• Develop a greenbelt corridor along McAnear Creek going north from Country Club Road to McAnear Park • Construct additional multi-purpose paved trails along West and East Buffalo Creek

- Utilize low-impact and sustainable development in natural open spaces to minimize adverse effects on valuable ecosystems - Preserve natural areas around Lake Pat Cleburne and Buddy Stewart Park

general community recommendations - Add more amenities to existing parks to increase user experience and comfort • • • •

Shade structures and trees near playgrounds, benches, trailheads and picnic areas Drinking fountains and water bottle refill stations at trailhead and restrooms Benches and other rest areas along trails and near playgrounds Bike racks at recreation centers, parks and trails

- Create a complete Wayfinding Plan for the parks system

• Create a general theme for signage & determine where signs, maps, mile markers and gateways will be placed • Install signage throughout the parks system

- Continue to partner with other City Departments and local organizations to host outdoor events and programs such as festivals, concerts and fitness classes

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

- Acquire land and extend greenbelts

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations

natural open space recommendations

121


Trails Recommendations general recommendations The following recommendations are based on City Staff input, the existing needs, opportunities and constraints, and the desires of Cleburne residents. Cleburne citizens want to have connectivity to parks, schools, residential and commercial areas with a balance of active and passive recreational opportunities which can achieved through trails. To begin identifying and constructing a trails system, it is advised for the City to utilize the existing infrastructure and park loop trails. This can be

accomplished through installing directional and confirmation signage, mile markers, crosswalks and ADA compliant facilities. The future considerations, in Chapter 8, are anticipated improvements and developments for the City to progressively work on over the next five to ten years and beyond. These include expanding greenbelts along the natural creek corridors and constructing bikeways on the wider streets as development continues to increase in the City.

loop trail recommendations • Construct both concrete and natural trails at Lake Pat Cleburne and Kirtley Park. • Extend existing concrete path at Buddy Stewart Park and construct nature trails in the northwest wooded area. • Extend concrete trail at Hulen Park and Don Moore Field and install an additional pedestrian bridge across Buffalo Creek. • Extend the existing loop trail at Carver Park and construct a nature trail in the northeast wooded area. • Connect existing sidewalks at the Sports Complex to create larger loop trails near the soccer fields. • Construct a loop trail at PD Lacewell Park. • Construct a loop trail at Westhill Park. • Upgrade trails and paths to the recommended 8’ width (6’ minimum) when repairing existing trails when the space allows.


Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations hulen park (proposed

kirtley park

p.d. lacewell park

bridge location)

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

buddy stewart park

123


Parks System Amenities Priorities The following Parks System

Amenities Priorities list is based on the recurring themes from the focus group meetings, Town Hall meetings, citizen surveys, City Staff recommendations and the professional consultant’s opinion. The Advisory Committee reviewed the major themes and

worked with City Staff to determine the top priorities listed below. It is important to note the following list is intended to be a guide for development of existing and future parks and amenities over the next ten years. These priorities build off of the previous plan's recommendations.

1 Multi-Purpose Trails & Nature Trails 2 Shaded Spaces in the Parks 3 Site Amenities: Benches, Tables, Water Fountains, Grills, Bike Racks, etc. 4 Playgrounds 5 Skate Park 6 Dog Park 7 Disc Golf Course 8 Fishing Piers/Viewing Stations 9 Boat/Kayak/Canoe Launches 10 Multi-Purpose Sports Courts 11 Outdoor Amphitheater 12 Pickleball Courts 13 Sports Practice Fields 14 Open Space & Natural Areas


125

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 7 - Needs & Recommendations


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 8 Future Parks & Recreation Expansion


Future Parks System The City of Cleburne is projected to continue growing

and developing in the next decade. As development and the population increases, it is important the parks system continues to increase. Although it is necessary to enhance and redevelop existing parks, it is crucial the City acquire new land, rezone existing City-owned properties or develop undeveloped existing parks already within the parks system. The current Level of Service (LOS) in the City is 15.01 acres of developed parkland per 1,000 residents. The recommended LOS in Cleburne is currently 17.3 acres of usable park acres per 1,000 residents. This figure was calculated based on developing J.E. Standley Park, McAnear Park, Winchester Park, and continuing to develop Booker T. Washington Recreation Center, Byron "Buddy" Stewart Park, Cleburne Golf Links, Cleburne Sports Complex, and West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp.

The yellow dots in the map on the following page suggests areas throughout the City where future parks should be considered. These areas are based on current needs, future developments, land availability and the 10-Minute Walk map. It is important to note that the dots are merely representational and do not represent specific parcels of land, but suggest areas of the community in which parks are needed. The City will need to review each area and coordinate with potential land owners on the availability of land for future parks. Due to the fact that over 120 acres will need to be acquired in the next ten years, it is highly recommended the City begin the process of searching for specific areas of acquisition to ensure parkland is dedicated for the future.

Based on the 2031 projected population of 44,185 residents, the City will need to acquire and develop an additional 297.89 acres of parkland over the next decade to reach the recommended 17.3 acres of usable parkland per 1,000 residents.

RECOMMENDED LEVEL OF SERVICE IS 17.3 ACRES per 1,000 residents. By 2031, the City of Cleburne needs to have 764.39 ACRES OF DEVELOPED PARKLAND. The


MAIN STREET

W HENDERSON

67

legend Existing Park Proposed Location for a Future Park 0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

Road City Limit

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

67

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

67

129


Future Trail Network As the City of

Cleburne continues to develop, the Parks and Recreation Department should be coordinating with other City Departments to ensure the trail network is implemented during construction, redevelopments and new developments. The City of Cleburne has a Master Thoroughfare Plan which was adopted in 2008 and amended in 2017. The plan is guiding the City’s short-term and long-term transportation needs. While it does not expand into great detail about pedestrian facilities, it does propose road improvements and future expansions. The Parks and Recreation Department should coordinate with the Community Development and Public Works Departments to implement the proposed trail network. It is best to begin these discussions early during the planning process to accommodate

the proposed trails, wide sidewalks and on-street bike facilities. In addition to the City of Cleburne Departments, Johnson County and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) should be contacted because some streets are owned and maintained by these government entities. These two agencies will own and manage the majority of roads on the fringe of Cleburne and a few major thoroughfares which travel through Downtown. The roads TxDOT and Johnson County manage typically have higher traffic volumes. There is a need for high levels of coordination between all three entities. It is crucial to begin these conversations early in the process to allow for ample planning and cooperation through the design, funding, implementation and maintenance of this trail network.

greenbelt considerations • Extend the greenways along East and West Buffalo Creek.

- Acquire land through easements or buffers along the southern portion of East Buffalo Creek from E 2nd Street to E Henderson Street.

- Construct sustainable multi-use paths along East Buffalo Creek until Carver Park.

- Acquire land through easements or buffers along the northern portion of West Buffalo Creek from W Heard Street to W Kilpatrick Street.

- Construct sustainable multi-use paths along West Buffalo Creek from Hulen Park to W Kilpatrick Street.

• Develop McAnear Greenbelt from Country Club Road to McAnear Park. • Identify and eliminate gaps in the greenbelt network. This may require the construction of shared use paths or on-street pavement markings. • Install trail amenities such as rest areas with shade, drinking fountains and trash receptacles along trails. • Improve the wayfinding and gateways to trailheads. • Provide lighting at trailheads and gateways. • Install bike racks and repair stations at trailheads.


67

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

67

MAIN STREET

Road

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

W HENDERSON

City Limit

131

legend

67

Existing Park Undeveloped Park Existing Greenway Proposed Greenway Existing Trail Proposed Loop Trail 0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

Proposed Shared Use Path


Future Bikeway System Similar to the trail

network section, the City of Cleburne should anticipate the growth of the City and proactively coordinate with internal City Departments to ensure the bikeway system is implemented during the design and construction of roadway redevelopments and

bikeway

&

new developments. Additionally, the Parks and Recreation Department, Community Development Department, and Public Works Department should have an organized plan to coordinate with Johnson County and TxDOT to construct or retrofit bikeways on non City-owned roadways.

shared use path considerations

• Identify city-wide on-street and shared-use bike routes. • Coordinate with TxDOT for potential funding opportunities and approval. • Create a Wayfinding System Plan to design system-wide signage, identify sign and pavement marking locations and create an implementation schedule. • Install wayfinding for trail/bike network through the use of on-street signage and pavement markings. • Identify high-visibility connections near railroad crossings and school locations. • Install street safety measures at trail crossings such as flashing beacons, crosswalks, vertical delineators, etc. • Assess traffic calming measures to lower vehicular speeds when trails or crossings are present (ie speed humps, speed cushions, speed tables, altering pavement materials & pinchpoints). • Look for opportunities to design and construct an 8’-10’ wide shared use path from Hulen Park to the Sports Complex, along E 2nd Street. • Look for opportunities to design and construct an 8’-10’ wide shared use path from Booker T. Washington Recreation Center to Carver Park, along Mansfield Road and Park Street.


Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

67

67

MAIN STREET

legend

67

Existing Park Undeveloped Park Proposed Shared Lane Proposed Signed Route Proposed Sidepath TxDOT Bikeway 0

.5 Scale as shown in miles *Roadways enhanced for legibility

1

TxDOT Road Road City Limit

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

W HENDERSON

133


trail

&

bikeway opportunities

The opportunities represented in the images are examples which exist in the City of Cleburne. These include sidewalks, existing creek corridors, destinations, recommended street designs and residential areas. These all contribute to the goal of providing a comprehensive network of trails that safely connect the citizens of Cleburne to destinations by providing safe, alternative trail options. Cleburne has great potential to be a trails community because of the grid-like development of the City, wide streets in newer developments, slower traffic and a vibrant downtown. It is important to note that a connected trail network is not established through a single trail, path or sidewalk but instead consists of many facilities that support pedestrian mobility through the community. The

City of Cleburne has options when it comes to designing and implementing an active trail network. There are different types of street infrastructure that can be retrofitted to fit the needs of different types of roads. Already existing greenbelts along West and East Buffalo Creek provide opportunities for expanded greenways and can encourage the City to acquire easements for the remaining sections of Buffalo Creek. The City has an opportunity to work with private landowners along McAnear Creek to develop it as a natural recreational corridor before development expands in the area. Additional opportunities include parks which are undeveloped and have the potential for loop trails, the expansion of Carver Park and the land development of McAnear Park.

utility corridors

recommended design: wide streets with shoulders & sidewalks

sidewalks

creek corridors


bikeway constraints

Constraints exist when designing and implementing a trail network in a smaller, rural city which favors vehicular transportation, but through careful planning and the integration of already in-place infrastructure, the City of Cleburne can have a usable trail network. Barriers in the trail network include the north-south railway along 171, private landowners adjacent to

Buffalo Creek, and cracking/narrow pedestrian infrastructure. The proposed trail network connects various aspects of the community and there are four railroad crossings that will require attention. The impact of these barriers can be minimized through signage, pavement markings, traffic calming measures, and pedestrian bridges.

lack of accessibility

railroad crossings

lack of accessibility

low underpasses

&

safety concerns

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

&

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

trail

135


11

22

11 11

12 12

Byron "Buddy" Stewart Park - Proposed Loop Trail 2424 W Henderson

21 20 21 20 Existing Trail Proposed Nature Trail Proposed Concrete Trail

Description This loop trail extends the already existing concrete path within the Park, while also proposing a new nature trail construction in the wooded areas near the proposed disc golf course in the northwest area of the park. These paths will add an additional 2.15 miles of trail, totaling 4.13 available miles in Buddy Stewart Park. The trail will feature benches, shade, trash cans and wayfinding. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8’-wide Trail Material: natural surfacing & concrete Proposed Trail Length: 1-1/2 mile natural surfacing & 1/2 mile concrete


22

33

11 11

12 12

13 13

Existing Trail

21 20 21 20

Proposed Nature Trail Proposed Concrete Trail

Description This loop trail extends the already existing concrete trail in the Park, along with adding two new trails on the City-owned property north of Carver Park (in the opaque area within the red boundary line). A path between Booker T. Washington and Carver Park should be constructed along the easement on Oak Street, this will connect both facilities without having to cross streets and walk near traffic. These paths will add an additional 0.73 miles of trail, totaling 1.15 available miles in Carver Park. The trails will feature benches, shade, trash cans and wayfinding. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8' wide Trail Material: natural surfacing & concrete Proposed Trail Length: 1/3 mile crushed granite & 1/2 mile concrete

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

600 Park Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

11

Carver Park - Proposed Loop Trail

137


11

22

33

44

55

11 11

12 12

13 13

14 14

15 15

Cleburne Sports Complex - Proposed Loop Trail

900 All Star Parkway

21 20 21 20 Existing Trail Proposed Concrete Trail

Description This loop trail extends the already existing concrete pathways within the park. The sidewalks in the Sports Complex connect all the sports fields and allow participants and spectators to reach each field. These path connectors will add an additional 2/3 of a mile of trail, totaling 2.38 available miles in Cleburne Sports Complex. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8' wide Trail Material: Concrete Proposed Trail Length: 2/3 miles


55

66

77

88

14 14

15 15

15 15

16 16

17 17

Existing Trail Proposed Concrete Trail Proposed Bridge

Description This loop trail extends the already existing concrete path within Hulen to include Don Moore field and the surrounding open space. This path will add an additional 0.50 mile of trail, totaling 1.5 available miles within Hulen Park. The trail will feature benches, shade, trash cans and wayfinding. In addition to the trail, a new pedestrian bridge should be installed across Buffalo Creek, connecting Don Moore Field to Ronnie Kirkpatrick Field. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8’-wide Trail Material: concrete Proposed Trail Length: 1/2 mile Bridge: 125-foot prefabricated bridge

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

44

301 Westhill Drive

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Hulen Park - Proposed Loop Trail

139


13 13

P.D. Lacewell Park - Proposed Loop Trail

12 12

700 Granbury Street

14 14

15 15

15 15

21 21

Proposed Concrete Trail

Description This loop trail will be the first and primary trail to exist in P.D. Lacewell Park. This path will surround the perimeter of the park, encompassing the playground, parking and open space. This path will add 0.25 mile of trail within P.D. Lacewell Park. The trail will feature benches, shade, trash cans and wayfinding. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8' wide Trail Material: concrete Proposed Trail Length: 1/4 mile


15 15

16 16

17 17

18 18

Proposed Concrete Trail

Description This loop trail will be the first path constructed at Westhill park. This trail will be built on the perimeter of the park, encompassing the playground, rehabilitated basketball court and open space. This path will create a 0.25 mile trail within Westhill Park. The path will feature benches, shade, trash cans and wayfinding. Trail Specifications Trail Width: 8' wide Trail Material: concrete Proposed Trail Length: 1/4 mile

Chapter 8 - Department Expansion

15 15

1228 Hilltop Drive

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Westhill Park - Proposed Loop Trail

141


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 9 Implementation Schedule


Implementation Schedule The

following

Implementation

Schedule

presents action items that are based on the needs, recommendations and priorities found in this Master Plan. The purpose of this Implementation Schedule is to provide a framework to assist with future park and community development planning in the City. The Implementation Schedule is grouped by Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3. These tiers are categorized based on projected start and completion schedules. Tier 1 projects are proposed for 2021 to 2024,

Tier 2 projects are for 2024to 2027 and Tier 3 projects are for 2027 to 2031. It is important to note the following Implementation Schedule is intended to be a flexible guide for development of parks and facilities over the next five to ten years and beyond. The City should evaluate and change the order of projects if necessary or take advantage of any unforeseen opportunities that may arise that are not identified in this schedule as long as it fits the goals and objectives of this plan and the community.


- Expand Carver Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct 1/4 mi. concrete loop trail - Construct 1/3 mi. nature trail loop - Install park and trail signage - Expand existing playground - Construct open lawn area for multi-purpose field practice & general play - Convert existing building slab into multi-use sports courts (pending approval by structural engineers) - Update Hulen Park - Convert existing tennis courts to basketball courts - Redevelop existing basketball court to a pickleball court - Create a Parks & Recreation Branding Plan - Standardize and install park entry & wayfinding signs - Develop a Detailed Trails Plan with Designated Routes & Technical Standards - Adopt New Park Ordinances - Continue to partner with CISD to provide recreational opportunities for the entire community

Chapter 9 - Implementation Schedule

- Enhance Buddy Stewart Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct a disc golf course - Construct a dog park - Construct nature trails - Plant native vegetation

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Tier 1

- Develop Kirtley Park at Lake Pat Cleburne (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct multi-purpose trails along east shoreline - Construct swim beach - Provide site amenities: covered picnic tables, benches & trash cans - Construct restroom facility - Construct parking lot - Install playground

145


Tier 2

- Enhance Cleburne Sports Complex - Construct 2/3 mi. loop trails around soccer fields in the southern portion of the property - Install lights on unlit fields - Construct additional storage for equipment - Install shade canopies over bleachers - Construct playground near soccer fields - Construct playground near football fields - Replace backstop fencing with netting system - Renovate maintenance facility - Convert cubie field into baseball/softball field - Develop Kirtley Park at Lake Pat Cleburne (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct concession area - Install shade structures - Construct boardwalk with viewing stations - Plant trees and native vegetation in select areas - Construct paddle sport launch adjacent to boat ramp - Construct parking lot - Construct amphitheater - Construct sand volleyball courts - Construct loop trails - Redevelop boat ramp - Resurface & stripe parking lot - Construct fishing pier - Expand Carver Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Install irrigation in baseball field - Install fencing at baseball field - Renovate large, existing pavilion - Install shade structures - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle - Construct volleyball courts - Construct additional large pavilion - Update Don Moore Field - Renovate parking lot - Install new playground - Construct pavilion - Construct skate park - Renovate restroom - Construct pedestrian bridge across Buffalo Creek to Don Moore Field - Construct 1/2 mi. trail around Don Moore Field


- Update Winston Patrick McGregor Park - Improve existing pond - Improve and expand irrigation system - Replace split-rail fencing - Improve nature trails - Improve existing vegetation by planting native, drought-tolerant & adaptive plant materials - Establish a wildflower area - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle

Chapter 9 - Implementation Schedule

- Enhance Buddy Stewart Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct fishing pier - Construct kayak/canoe launch - Construct wildlife viewing stations

- Improve Cleburne Links Golf Course - Returf greens on the 18-hole course - Update John P. Bradshaw Park - Rehabilitate basketball court with new surfacing and goals - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle - Develop +/- 7 Acres South of McAnear Park for a Linear Park Development (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct playground - Construct loop trail - Construct parking lot - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle - Hire Additional Parks, Recreation & Facility Staff as Additional Parkland is Acquired and Amenities are Constructed or Expanded. This includes staff for Booker T. Washington, Cleburne Golf Links and Splash Station. - Continue Partnering with Other City Departments, Local Organizations and Local Businesses to Host Outdoor Recreational Programs such as Festivals, Concerts and Fitness Classes.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Tier 2

- Update Booker T. Washington Recreation Center - Replace flooring - Repair roofing - Construct outdoor playground - Construct loop trails connecting to East Buffalo Creek Greenbelt

147


Tier 3

- Improve Old Sports Complex - Replace existing fencing and irrigation - Improve site lighting - Replace asphalt parking lot to accommodate 100 parking spots - Rehabilitate restroom facilities - Install playground - Construct pavilion - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle

- Renovate P.D. Lacewell Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct 1/4 mi. trail around perimeter of park - Provide & install benches and trash receptacles - Install new playground equipment - Construct parking lot - Remove concrete cistern & gazebo - Construct a pavilion - Remove non-functioning restroom - Redevelop Lake Pat Cleburne West Boat Ramp (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Redevelop boat ramp - Resurface & stripe parking lot - Construct paddle sport launch adjacent to boat ramp - Construct fishing pier - Develop J.E. Standley Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Install small playground - Construct shade structures - Construct sidepath - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle - Develop John S. Butner Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Install small playground - Construct shade structures - Construct sidepath - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle - Improve Westhill Park - Construct 1/4 mi. concrete trail - Rehabilitate existing basketball concrete slab - Construct pavilion - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle


- Acquire and Develop Greenbelt (Determine Location)

Specialty Projects

- Construct All-Inclusive Playground - A playground which goes beyond the minimum accessibility requirements and implements Universal Design to create play experiences for all users regardless of any disability or impairment. - Recommended location is Kirtley Park. - Acquire & Develop a Community Park in North Cleburne (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Construct multi-purpose practice fields and/or courts - Install playground - Install sprayground - Construct multi-purpose loop trails - Construct nature trails - Construct wildlife viewing stations - Install site amenities: picnic tables, benches & trash receptacles - Construct Field of Dreams (Public-Private Partnership) - Implement the Connectivity Network As Cleburne Expands and Redevelops - Require new developments to construct sidewalks - Acquire land along creek corridors - Add bike lane striping as roads are repaved - Renovate Booker T. Washington Recreation Center - Renovate interior of building - Construct indoor basketball facility - Upgrade Splash Station - Update aquatic amenities (i.e. FlowRider or Expanded Sprayground) - Renovate existing locker rooms - Renovate family changing area - Construct additional storage facility

Chapter 9 - Implementation Schedule

- Improve Cleburne Links Golf Course - Plant trees at the Cleburne Links Golf Course

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Tier 3

- Develop Winchester Park (TPWD Grant Opportunity) - Install small playground - Construct shade structures - Construct sidepath - Install site amenities: picnic table, bench & trash receptacle

149


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 10 Community Involvement & Funding


Community Partnerships The City of Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department

offers a variety of recreation programs and special events throughout the year. The City aims to provide recreation opportunities and community events for all skill levels, ages and interests. In addition to the City-run programs and events, there are numerous local associations and organizations in

Cleburne that provide programming and special events. A detailed account of these opportunities can be found on pages 48 to 53 in Chapter 3. This section highlights the partners and community organizations that offer programs and who the City supports in various capacities for events. These organizations contribute to the high quality of life in Cleburne.


153

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan Chapter 10 - Community Involvement & Funding


Funding Opportunities The City of Cleburne

has a variety of different funding opportunities available that can assist with the funding of the proposed projects in this plan. Funding sources typically fall within three different categories: Local Partnership Opportunities, Local City Funding or State and Federal Funding. There may also be additional funding available which is not listed within this plan.

locally generated funds

GENERAL FUND – PAY AS YOU GO These funds are typically used for smaller projects such as repairs and replacements at existing park facilities. GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS These bonds are issued by the city following an election in which the voters authorize their issuance for specific stated purposes, as well as the necessary tax increases to support them. These bonds pledge the property or ad valorem taxing power of the city. CERTIFICATES OF OBLIGATION These certificates have basically the same effect as general obligation bonds except they do not require an election to authorize them. These certificates are issued on the authorization of the City Council. Repayment is based on the property taxing power of the city, utility system revenues, or a combination of the two. PARK FEE ORDINANCE These fees are typically imposed on developers when they bring new projects into the community. The fees are typically used to ensure that as more development comes to the City, more park land is acquired, developed or improved. Each community has a specific ordinance, but typically the city can require the developer to provide land for a park, cash in lieu of the required land or park development fees. USER FEES This method of financing requires the eventual user of each facility to pay a fee for the use of each facility. Fees to be charged users can be established to pay for debt service, maintenance, and operation of the parks system. PRIVATE OR CORPORATE DONATIONS Donations from foundations, corporations, and/or private individuals are often used to acquire and develop parks. The city should constantly identify and pursue opportunities to receive such funding for parks. One avenue for receiving donations is through the use of the Texas Parks & Recreation Foundation. This foundation has been developed to help all communities in the State of Texas to maximize the benefits of donations of land, property, and money. CLEBURNE 4B ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FUNDS The 4B Economic Development Board of Directors was created in 2001 to act on behalf of the City to develop, implement, provide, and finance projects under Section 4B of the Development Corporation Act. DEBT ISSUANCE IN CLEBURNE The City of Cleburne can issue debt in the form of bonds to fund day-to-day obligations and capital projects.


&

federal funding

OUTDOOR RECREATION GRANTS These grants are intended for communities with a population of less than 500,000 and can be used for the acquisition of parkland, park development or for the renovation of existing parks and open spaces. This grant is a 50% matching grant with a ceiling of $750,000. INDOOR RECREATION GRANTS These grants are intended for communities with a population of less than 500,000 and can be used for the construction of recreation centers, local community centers, nature centers and other applicable indoor facilities. This grant is a 50% matching grant with a ceiling of $1.5 million. COMMUNITY OUTDOOR OUTREACH PROGRAM (CO-OP) These grants are primarily used to assist non-profits and local governments for recreational programming geared toward under served populations. The intent of the funds are to introduce the importance of environmental education and conservation and provide TPWD mission oriented outdoor recreational activities. This grant is a TPWD Sponsored grant with a minimum funding requirement of $5,000 and a ceiling of $50,000. RECREATIONAL TRAILS GRANTS These grants are intended for both motorized and non-motorized recreational trail projects; including new trail construction, existing trail improvements, acquisition of trail corridors, trailheads and/or amenities. This grant is federally funded by the Federal Highway Administration and administered by TPWD. This grant is 80 / 20 grant with up to 80% of the project being funded through TPWD with a ceiling of $200,000 for non-motorized trails and no ceiling for motorized trails. TXDOT SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOLS-INFRASTRUCTURE (SRTS) PROGRAM Administered by state departments of transportation, this is a federal grant; there is no local matching needed for these funds. The purpose of the SRTS program is to encourage safe bicycling and walking among schoolchildren. These proposals can be located anywhere in the state, regardless of population size. The SRTS projects must be planned to be within public right of way within 2 miles of a public, charter, or private school serving K-8th grade students. The types of projects typically funded include bicycle infrastructure improvements, shared use paths, sidewalk improvements and infrastructure-related projects to improve safety for non-motorized transportation. LAND & WATER CONSERVATION FUND (LWCF) GRANTS These funds are federally funded and administered through TPWD through the Texas Recreation Park Account. Note: If a City applies for an Outdoor Grant, Small Community Grant or Indoor Recreation Grant, TPWD may choose to fund a successful project directly through LWCF with no additional or separate application. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE (NPS) PROGRAMS These funds are primarily used for parks and recreational opportunities and consist of LWCF & Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Act (UPARR) dollars. The United States Congress appropriates funds to each State.

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan Chapter 10 - Community Involvement & Funding

state

155


City of Cleburne Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan


Chapter 11 Appendices


Appendix A: Individual Park Designs The following design development boards with the

individual park site plans and design photos are intended to be used for future planning. The site plans supplement the Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan Implementation Schedule to guide the City of Cleburne as they expand, develop and improve their existing parks and recreation system. The Individual Park Design pages are representational of future upgrades and developments of

each park, these designs are not to be used for construction. On each page there will be an aerial image of the existing park, a list of existing amenities, a small graphic showing the high, medium, and low maintenance levels within the park, and the park classification and acreage. Additionally, there will be a rendering of the proposed changes and future design of the park, photos to represent the new amenities and a list of proposed amenities.


159

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 11 - Appendices


Booker T. Washington Recreation Center 100 Mansfield Road Park St

special use park

Total Acres - 4.32 Developed Acres - 3.60

11

Ma

ns

fie

ld

Rd

11 11 20 20

Existing Amenities • • • •

Gymnasium Weight Room Cardio Room Banquet Hall with Kitchen

• Restroom / Locker Room • Computer Lab • Multi-Use Room

Maintenance Level


Proposed Amenities • Basketball Flooring • Loop Trails • Convert Day Care Facility to Parks & Recreation • Playground Department Office or Special Event Space • Roofing

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Walking Trails

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Playground

161


Byron "Buddy" Stewart Park

11

natural area

Total Acres - 121.58 Developed Acres - 54.82

2424 W Henderson

11 11

22 12 12

21 20 21 20 U

6 .S. U

7

6 .S.

7

Existing Amenities • • • •

Boat Ramp Grills Parking Pavilions

• Picnic Tables • Trails

Maintenance Level


Fishing Pier

Disc Golf Course Kayak Canoe Launch

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Disc Golf Course Dog Park Fishing Pier Kayak / Canoe Launch

• Native Plants • Nature Trails • Wildlife Viewing Station

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Dog Park

163


11

Carver Park 600 Park Street

e St F a t n Sa

11 11

Existing Amenities Basketball Court Benches Drinking Fountain Grills

33

12 12

13 13

Total Acres - 10.79 Developed Acres - 10.79

21 20 21 20

t Park S

• • • •

22

community park

• • • •

Park Sign Parking Pavilion Picnic Shelters

• • • • • •

Picnic Tables Playground Restrooms Softball Diamond Splash Pad Trails (Lighted)

(Lighted)

Maintenance Level


Playground

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Multi-Sport Court

Nature Trail

Proposed Park Expansion

Proposed Amenities • • • •

1/4 mi. Concrete Trail 1/3 mi. Nature Trail Fencing Irrigation

• • • •

Multi-Sport Court Open Lawn Pavilion Playground

• • • • •

Refurbish Pavilion Shade Structures Signage Site Amenities Volleyball Court

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Pavilion

165


11

22

11 11

12 12

Cleburne Golf Links 2501 Country Club Road

Existing Amenities • • • •

Grill Pro Shop 18-Holes Driving Range

44

13 13

14 14

Total Acres - 216.52 Developed Acres - 202.21

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Level

33

special use park

Co

u

y ntr

C

Rd b lu


Chapter 11 - Appendices

Trees

Wildflowers

Proposed Amenities • Plant Trees • Returf Greens

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Native Planting

167


11

33

22

Cleburne Sports Complex 900 All Star Parkway

E2

t

Total Acres - 87.81 Developed Acres - 83.75

Isl

14 14

an

dG

e rov

13 13

12 12

55

15 15

Rd

11 11

S nd

44

special use park

SB

21 20 21 20 raz

os

e Av

Existing Amenities • • • •

7 Baseball / Softball Fields 20 Soccer Fields 2 Football Fields 2 Batting Cages

(Lighted)

• • • • • •

Soft Toss Station 2 Playgrounds 4 Concession Stands Restrooms Pavilions Benches

Maintenance Level


Backstop Fencing

Playground

Proposed Amenities • • • •

2/3 mi. Concrete Trail Backstop Fencing Field Conversion Field Lights

• • • •

Maintenance Facility Playground(s) Shade Canopies Storage

Chapter 11 - Appendices Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Field Lights

169


22

14 14

66

15 15

15 15 boro

13 13

55

Total Acres - 3.00 Developed Acres - 3.00

St

St lnut S Wa

21 21

44

901 S Walnut Street

special use park

Hills

12 12

33

Don Moore Field

Co

tr n u

lu C y

d R b

Existing Amenities • Baseball Field • Restroom

Maintenance Level


Pedestrian Bridge

Skate Park

Proposed Amenities • • • •

1/2 mi. Concrete Trail Parking Lot Pavilion Pedestrian Bridge

• Playground • Restroom • Skate Park

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Playground

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Pavilion

171


33

55

14 14

15 15

800 Olive Street

i Trin

t ty S

13 13

44

East Buffalo Creek Park

66

77

15 15

16 16

linear park

Total Acres - 8.51 Developed Acres - 8.51

t Olive S

E

He

n

rs e d

o

t S n

Existing Amenities • Trail • Benches

Maintenance Level


Signage

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Pedestrian Bridge

Bench

Trail Lighting

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Expand Trail Pedestrian Bridge Signage Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Trail

173


sthil e W W

66

15 15

15 15

77

88

16 16

17 17

community park

Total Acres - 19.80 Developed Acres - 19.80

l Dr

St

t un

ry

ub l C

Existing Amenities • Baseball / Softball • Basketball (Lighted) • Benches

boro

Co

Hills

14 14

55

301 Westhill Drive

St lnut S Wa

3

44

Hulen Park

(Backstops only)

Rd

• Gazebo • Grills • Historic Site

("Spirit of Cleburne" steam engine)

• Horseshoe Pits

Maintenance Level

• • • •

Interpretive Signs Maintenance Building Parking Park Sign


Basketball Court

d br

u

y cl r t un

/ co

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Convert Tennis Court to Basketball • Pedestrian Bridge Convert Basketball Court to Pickleball Gaga Ball Pit Pavilion Cover on Basketball Court

Pickleball Court

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Gaga Ball Pit

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Gaga Ball Pit

175


4

55

e W

il

77

15 15

16 16

913 Westhill Drive

15 15

sth

66

J.E. Standley Park

r D l

88

99

17 17

18 18

mini-neighborhood

Total Acres - 0.73 Developed Acres - 0.00

Existing Amenities • Creek Access • Picnic Table • Park Sign

Maintenance Level


Pavilion

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Playground Shade Structures Sidepath Site Amenities

Sidepath

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Playground

177


66

55

609 Brazos Street

77

ns Robbi

5

88

John P. Bradshaw Park

15 15

16 16

99

10 10

18 18

19 19

mini-neighborhood

Total Acres - 0.39 Developed Acres - 0.39

St

17 17

Ave azos N Br

Existing Amenities • • • •

Basketball Court Drinking Fountain Park Sign Picnic Tables

Maintenance Level


Proposed Amenities • Rehabilitate Basketball Court • Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Site Amenities

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Resurface Basketball Court

179


John S. Butner Park

mini-neighborhood

Total Acres - 4.16 Developed Acres - 4.16

604 Buffalo Street

n St o s l i WW

11 11 20 20

St ffalo N Bu W

d St r a e H

Existing Amenities • • • •

Benches Grill Park Sign Picnic Table

Maintenance Level


Playground with Shade

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Playground Shade Structures Sidepath Site Amenities

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Pavilion

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Multi-Use Trail

181


Kirtley Park 1900 - 2500 Lakeshore Drive

11 11

special use park

Total Acres - 26.89 Developed Acres - 26.89

12 12

21 20 21 20 S Nolan R i ve r R d

Ol

Maintenance Level

Existing Amenities • • • •

Boat Dock / Pier Boat Ramps Grill Parking

• • • • •

Pavilions Picnic Shelters Picnic Tables Sand Volleyball Swimming Beach

oa F d

m

d R y


Chapter 11 - Appendices

Boardwalk

Amphitheater

REST ROOM

GRASSY SEAT ING

Playground

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Amphitheater Boardwalk Concession Area Fishing Pier

• • • • • •

Kayak / Canoe Launch Parking Lot(s) Playground Refurbish Boat Ramp Restroom Sand Volleyball Courts

• • • • •

Shade Structures Site Amenities Swim Beach Trails Trees & Natural Plants

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Sand Volleyball Courts

AMPITHEATER PAVILION STAGE

183


McAnear Park

11 11

12 12

natural area

Near the Intersection of Roberts Avenue & McAnear Street

Total Acres - 4.57 Developed Acres - 0.00

13 13

ve A s

21 20 21 20 be o R

rt

Mc

An

ea rS t

Existing Amenities • Undeveloped Facilities

Maintenance Level


Chapter 11 - Appendices Trail

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Loop Trail Parking Lot Playground Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Playground

185


11 11

13 13

12 12

Old Sports Complex 225 South Washington Street

special use park

Total Acres - 24.68 Developed Acres - 24.68

t S y

SO

21 20 21 20 Ka

14 14

ran e Av

ash SW ing ton St E2

n

t S d

Existing Amenities • • • •

2 Baseball / Softball Fields Batting Cages Pee-Wee Football Field Parking

(Lighted)

Maintenance Level


Pavilion with Restrooms

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Asphalt Parking Lot Fencing Irrigation Lighting

• • • •

Pavilion Playground Restroom Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Playground

187


12 12

13 13

15 15

14 14

P.D. Lacewell Park 700 Granbury Street

h

Total Acres - 1.69 Developed Acres - 1.69

t

15 15

Baird

21 21

tc Mi

S ell

mini-neighborhood

St

an

Gr bu

en Warr

St

ry St

Existing Amenities • • • •

Benches Gardens Gazebo (Inaccessible) Parking

• • • •

Park Sign Picnic Table Playground Maintenance Building

Maintenance Level (Former restroom)


18 18

19 19

Open Lawn Area

Pavilion

Proposed Amenities • • • •

1/4 mi. Trail Parking Lot Pavilion Playground

• Remove Cistern & Gazebo • Remove Maintenance Building • Site Amenities

Chapter 11 - Appendices

17 17

Multi-Use Trail

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

16 16

Playground

189


13 13

14 14

Splash Station 1010 Hillsboro Street

15 15

15 15

special use park

Total Acres - 2.90 Developed Acres - 2.90

16 16

Hills boro St

Existing Amenities • • • •

• 8-Lane Competition Pool • Leisure Pool • Zero-Depth Sprayground Entry • Kids Water Playground with Slide •

Lazy River • Gift Shop Vortex • Parking 2 Water Slides • Seasonal Winter Dome Concession Stand Locker Rooms

Maintenance Level


18 18

19 19

Chapter 11 - Appendices

17 17

Splash Pad

Locker Rooms

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Aquatic Amenities (e.g. FlowRider, Splash Pad, etc.) Renovate Locker Rooms Renovate Family Changing Area Storage Facility

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

FlowRider

191


3

14 14

15 15

15 15

16 16

West Buffalo Creek Park 9 North Buffalo Street

St

Total Acres - 4.93 Developed Acres - 4.93

17 17

Main St

WH

son r e d en

linear park

W

hill t s e W

Dr

Existing Amenities • Benches • Grill • Trails (Lighted)

Maintenance Level


Chapter 11 - Appendices

Signage

Pedestrian Bridge

Bench

Trail Lighting

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Expand Trail Pedestrian Bridge Signage Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Trail

193


15 15

44

15 15

Westhill Park 1228 Hilltop Drive

17 17

16 16 rk

E

Total Acres - 2.33 Developed Acres - 2.33

D

18 18

r

H

ill

to

p

D

r

Cr es

tv

ie w

D

r

Pa

mini-neighborhood

Existing Amenities • • • •

Baseball / Softball (Backstops only) Basketball Court (Lighted & Half Court) Drinking Fountain Grill

• Picnic Table • Playground • Park Sign

Maintenance Level


Chapter 11 - Appendices

Pavilion

Basketball Court

Proposed Amenities • • • •

1/4 mi. Concrete Trail Pavilion Refurbish Basketball Court Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Park Path

195


55

15 15

17 17

16 16

West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp 2900 Spur 1434

g Ha

le

18 18

special use park

Total Acres - 8.19 Developed Acres - 1.40

19 19

d R r

Existing Amenities • Boat Ramp • Parking • Park Sign

Maintenance Level


Chapter 11 - Appendices Kayak / Canoe Launch

Boat Ramp

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Fishing Pier Kayak / Canoe Launch Refurbish Boat Ramp Refurbish Parking Lot

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Fishing Pier

197


Winchester Park 1411 Hyde Park Boulevard

mini-neighborhood

Total Acres - 0.51 Developed Acres - 0.00

20 20

de

Hy Pa rk d Blv

Existing Amenities • Undeveloped Facilities Maintenance Level


Chapter 11 - Appendices

Playground

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Playground Shade Structures Sidepath Site Amenities

Shade Structure

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Multi-Use Trail

199


Winston Patrick McGregor Park 1628 West Henderson Street

21 20 21 20

special use park

Total Acres - 10.65 Developed Acres - 10.65

Co lon ial Dr

en H W

d

n erso

St

Existing Amenities • • • •

Arbor • Gardens Benches • Parking Children' Garden & Maze • Pavilion Community Center / Meeting Rooms (Renovated House)

• Pond • Windmill • Trails

Maintenance Level


Trail

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Wildflower Plantings

Split-Rail Fencing

Proposed Amenities • • • •

Fencing Irrigation Nature Trails Plantings

• Refurbish Pond • Renovate McGregor House to host Parks & Recreation Department Staff or Special Events • Site Amenities

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Pond

201


Appendix B: Maintenance Maps The following maps are

intended to be used for maintenance scheduling and determining the resources needed to maintain the parks, fields and facilities at the predetermined levels. High level maintenance parks involve weekly or biweekly mowing, edging, fertilizing, trash collection, irrigation system repairs and maintenance, tree and shrub

trimming, etc. Medium level maintenance parks require periodic mowing and edging, removal of fallen trees, trash collection, trail cleaning and erosion control when necessary. Low level parks are maintained on an as needed basis such as brush hogging, the removal of fallen trees and repairs of any issues that could impact the safety of citizens.


11 11 11

Chapter 11 - Appendices

100 Mansfield Road

20 20

Maintenance Legend

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Booker T. Washington Recreation Center

203


Byron "Buddy" Stewart Park 2424 W Henderson

11

22

11 11

12 12

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend


11

22

33

11 11

12 12

13 13

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

600 Park Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Carver Park

205


Cleburne Golf Links 2501 Country Club Road

11

22

33

44

11 11

12 12

13 13

14 14

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend


22

33

44

55

11 11

12 12

13 13

14 14

15 15

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

11

900 All Star Parkway

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Cleburne Sports Complex

207


Don Moore Field

22

33

44

55

66

12 12

13 13

14 14

15 15

15 15

901 S Walnut Street

21 21

Maintenance Legend


44

55

66

77

13 13

14 14

15 15

15 15

16 16

Maintenance Legend

Maintained

by Johnson

County

Chapter 11 - Appendices

33

800 Olive Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

East Buffalo Creek Linear Park

209


Hulen Park

44

55

66

77

88

14 14

15 15

15 15

16 16

17 17

301 Westhill Drive

Maintenance Legend


66

77

88

99

15 15

15 15

16 16

17 17

18 18

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

55

913 Westhill Drive

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

J.E. Standley Park

211


55

John P. Bradshaw Park

66

77

88

99

10 10

15 15

16 16

17 17

18 18

19 19

609 Brazos Street

Maintenance Legend


604 Buffalo Street

20 20

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

11 11

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

John S. Butner Park

213


Kirtley Park 1900-2500 Lakeshore Drive

11 11

12 12

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend


12 12

13 13

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

11 11

Near the intersection of Roberts Avenue and McAnear Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

McAnear Park

215


Old Sports Complex 225 South Washington Street

11 11

12 12

21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend

13 13

14 14


13 13

14 14

15 15

15 15

21 21

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

12 12

700 Granbury Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

P.D. Lacewell Park

217


Splash Station

13 13

1010 Hillsboro Street

Maintenance Legend

14 14

15 15

15 15

16 16


15 15

15 15

16 16

17 17

Maintenance Legend

Maintained

by Johnson

County

Chapter 11 - Appendices

14 14

9 North Buffalo Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

West Buffalo Creek Linear Park

219


Westhill Park

15 15

1228 Hilltop Drive

Maintenance Legend

15 15

16 16

17 17

18 18


16 16

17 17

18 18

19 19

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

15 15

2900 Spur 1434

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

West Lake Pat Cleburne Boat Ramp

221


Winchester Park 1411 Hyde Park Boulevard

Maintenance Legend

20 20


21 20 21 20

Maintenance Legend

Chapter 11 - Appendices

1628 West Henderson Street

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Winston Patrick McGregor Park

223


Appendix C: Citizen Survey Results Awareness of Parks, Recreation Facilities, and Programs Q. How do you find out about parks, recreation facilities and recreation programs in Cleburne? Results: Just over half of respondents find out about parks and recreation opportunities through Facebook social media and 31% find out through park and recreation flyers. The primary other answers were; word of mouth, mail, newspaper, driving around and the Internet. Facebook/Social Media

51% 31%

Parks & Recreation Brochures/Flyers

29%

City of Cleburne Website 16%

Other 10%

Emails from City of Cleburne Youth Sports Associations School District Publications

8% 5%

Role of Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Q. The role of parks, recreation and open space in Cleburne today, as compared to 10 years ago is more important, the same importance, or less important to you and your household members? Results: 65% of respondents feel parks, recreation and open space in Cleburne is more important today compared to 10 years ago. More Important

65%

The Same Importance Less Important

29% 6%


Q. How would you rate the quality of parks and recreational opportunities in the City of Cleburne? Results: Just over half (58%) rated the quality of parks and recreation opportunities as excellent or satisfactory. 29% reported the quality is somewhat unsatisfactory and 9% reported unsatisfactory.

Somewhat Unsatisfactory - 29%

Satisfactory - 54%

Unsatisfactory- 9%

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Quality of Parks and Recreation Opportunities

No Opinion - 4%

Quantity of Parks and Recreation Opportunities Q. How would you rate the quantity of parks and recreational opportunities in the City of Cleburne? Results: Half of respondents (52%) rated the quantity of parks and recreation opportunities as excellent or satisfactory. 31% reported the quantity is somewhat unsatisfactory and 11% reported unsatisfactory.

Satisfactory - 46%

Somewhat Unsatisfactory - 31%

Excellent - 6% No Opinion - 6% Unsatisfactory - 11%

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Excellent - 4%

225


Recreation Program Interest by Age Groups Q. Which age groups in your household would be interested in participating in a City of Cleburne recreation or leisure program? Results: All age groups have interest in participating in a City of Cleburne recreation or leisure program. 42%

34% 25%

25%

21%

21%

17%

2% Under 5

6-10

11-17

18-29 30-49 50-65

65+

NI


Facility Playgrounds Booker T Washington Rec Center Athletic Fields Cleburne Golf Links Community Parks Splash Station Neighborhood Parks Senior Center Splash Pad Lake Pat Cleburne Pavilions Picnic Tables Basketball Courts Trails Boat Launch Ramps *Excludes not aware/don’t use answers

Improved* 34% 30% 30% 25% 19% 17% 15% 14% 13% 11% 10% 10% 10% 9% 7%

Stayed the Same* 53% 61% 58% 65% 64% 61% 67% 70% 64% 61% 68% 59% 58% 69% 57%

Declined* 13% 9% 12% 10% 17% 22% 18% 16% 23% 28% 22% 31% 32% 22% 36%

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Q. Within the past three years, do you feel the quality of each of these parks and recreation facilities in the City has improved, stayed the same or declined? Results: Respondents feel that playgrounds, the recreation center and athletic fields are the most improved, whereas boat launch ramps, basketball courts and picnic tables have seen the largest declines in quality.

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Quality of Facilities

227


Recreation Program Interest Q. Which of these would you or your household members (of any age) be most interested in participating? Results: The programs of interest are presented in the chart. There is high interest in many recreation programs and events. Program of Interest

Percent

Program of Interest

Percent

Festivals/Events

59%

Adult Sports League

20%

Farmer’s Market

58%

Skate Boarding

20%

Outdoor Amphitheater Events

48%

Disc Golf

19%

Arts & Crafts

39%

Bird watching

18%

Fitness Classes/Events

38%

Travel Programs

18%

Biking

36%

Baseball

18%

Kayaking

36%

Basketball

18%

Music/Dance

34%

Sand Volleyball

18%

Family Programs

33%

Soccer

18%

Yoga

30%

Horseshoes

17%

Youth Programs/Camps

27%

Softball

15%

Fishing Tournaments

26%

Tennis

15%

Community Gardening

25%

Pilates

14%

Senior Programs

23%

Outdoor Ping Pong

13%

Paddle Boarding

21%

Football

11%

Teen Programs/Camps

21%

Pickleball

11%

Parent/Child Programs

21%

Racquetball

6%

Preschool/Toddler Programs

20%

Cricket

1%

Races (5K, 10K)

20%

Not Interested

2%


Q. How much more per year in additional property taxes would you be willing to pay in order to fund the improvement priorities you have suggested in the survey? Results: 72% of respondents are willing to pay additional property taxes in order to fund the improvement priorities. The mean amount they are willing to pay is $114/year. More than $200/year

7.3%

Up to $200/year

9.9%

Up to $100/year 6.3%

Up to $50/year No Increase

25.5% 27.9%

*Excludes 49 non-residents who responded to the survey and did not answer this question.

Parks and Recreation - Cost to Taxpayers Q. Parks and recreation facilities in Cleburne are well worth the cost to taxpayers. Results: 85% (strongly agree/agree) of respondents feel parks and recreation facilities in Cleburne are well worth the cost to taxpayers.

Agree - 42%

Strongly Agree - 43%

Strongly Disagree - 5%

Disagree - 10%

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Up to $75/year

23.1%

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Willing to Pay Additional Property Taxes

229


Frequency of Use of Facility Q. Within the past year, how often have you or someone from your household visited or used these facilities in City of Cleburne? Results: Community and neighborhood parks, Lake Pat Cleburne, playgrounds, picnic tables trails and pavilions are the most frequently used facilities in Cleburne. community parks neighborhood parks athletic fields playgrounds lake pat cleburne trails cleburne golf links splash station basketball courts boat launch ramps picnic tables senior center pavilions booker t. washington splash pad

at least weekly

at least monthly

at least quarterly

twice a year or less

never


Priority Facility Rank 1 Expand amenities along the Lake

4

3

2

1

0

51

22

12

8

7

Mean Score 3.24

2

Add trails to Lake Pat Cleburne

52

20

11

9

8

3.25

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Add additional trails and connections throughout the City Add a dog park Renovate and enhance existing parks Add shade to playgrounds Improve and enhance maintenance of parks Have more special events in the parks Add an amphitheater Add a skate park Add additional playgrounds Add mountain bike/BMX trails around Lake Pat Cleburne Upgrade undersized and/or damaged trails Increase the amount of open space/natural areas Add disc golf course Add more picnic areas with grilling stations Add more benches/seating areas in parks Add additional practice fields Add additional multipurpose sports fields

46 31 42 47 42 36 17 19 33 29 41 31 17 23 29 13 11

24 19 28 21 29 26 20 20 26 19 28 22 13 23 28 16 15

12 18 17 14 15 19 26 24 21 19 13 23 21 29 23 25 26

9 21 8 11 8 12 20 23 11 18 8 15 27 15 12 29 30

9 11 5 7 6 7 17 14 9 14 9 8 22 10 8 17 18

3.19 2.69 3.09 3.13 3.12 2.91 2.41 2.41 2.89 2.70 3.12 2.75 2.24 2.59 2.80 2.15 2.10

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

Q. The Cleburne Parks and Recreation Department is establishing priorities to direct future departmental actions. How important is it for Cleburne to…. Results: The mean score is a calculation of the 4, 3, 2,1 scores excluding the no opinion responses. • The priority rank lists, in rank order, the respondents’ first, second and third most important facilities or amenities. • These rankings will provide guidance for the Master Plan priorities.

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Most Needed Facilities

231


Survey Source Q. How did you find out about this online survey? Results: Almost half of respondents found out about this survey from the postcard mailed by the City of Cleburne. 23% found out about the survey through City of Cleburne social media sites. 11% filled out paper surveys that were available at the recreation center, senior center, library and other city facilities.

Word of Mouth - 9.2%

Social Media - 23%

Other - 7% City Email - 5.1% Paper Survey - 11.2% City Website - 6.4%

Mailed Postcard - 47.4%


Q. In your section of the City, what ONE recreational facility or amenity would you say is most lacking?

Northwest - 93 comments - Playgrounds - Trails, sidewalks – walking/biking - Fishing - Improve boat ramp - Dog park - Recreation center - Parks

Northeast - 27 comments - Splash pad - Community park - Dog park - Playground with shade - Skate park - Lake Pat - pavilions, grills, trash cans, water, electrical

Chapter 11 - Appendices

Recreational Facility Needed in Your Area

Southwest - 178 comments - Dog park - Splash pad - Trails and sidewalks - Lake Pat amenities and activities, regular stockings, trails, beach area - Playground - Hulen Park improvements - Recreation center

Southeast - 30 comments - Dog park - Skate park - Trails - Tennis courts - Pickle ball

Parks, Recreation, Trails & Open Space Master Plan

233


2021–2031

CITY OF CLEBURNE PARKS, RECREATION, TRAILS & OPEN SPACE MASTER PLAN


2021–2031

PARKS, RECREATION, TRAILS & OPEN SPACE Master Plan

Profile for KEasdon

City of Cleburne Master Plan  

City of Cleburne Master Plan  

Profile for keasdon
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded