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Hip=hop Dance Studio Charlotte, NC 2009-2010

Kelli Franklin Thesis Document




Kelli Franklin 2009 Thesis Document




PROPOSAL 1. Project Proposal 2. Project Premise 3. Project Site

PRECEDENTS 1. Programmatic a. Richmond Ballet Company b. London Contemporary Dance c. Laban Center for Dance and Mvmt. 2. Materials a. Daimer Financial Services b. De Young Museum c. Dobpler Interactive LED d. Perforated Metal, LED e. Screen Panel System

AnALYSIS 3. 1 3. 2 3. 3 3. 4

Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Conceptual Models Parti Diagrams Studio Diagrams Narrative of Spaces


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THE SITE 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6. 4.7 4.8 4.9

Topography Map Zoning Map Historic Wards Aerial Map Surrounding Context Map Extended Context Map Immediate Site Context Site Plan Bird’s Eye View

DESIGN 1. Ground Floor Plan 2. Second Floor Plan 3. Third Floor Plan 4. Fourth Floor Plan 5. Fifth Floor Plan 6. Sixth Floor Plan- Roof Plan 7. Section A 8. Section B 9. Southeast Elevation 10. Southwest Elevation 11. Response to Site 12. Final Preliminary Design

ANALYSIS 1. Structural Steel Diagram 2. HVAC System Diagram 3. Material Taxonomy Concrete LED Panel Perforated Metal Screen Airplane Hangar Doors

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Drawings 1. Plans First Floor Plan Second Floor Plan Third Floor Plan Fourth Floor Plan Fifth Floor Plan Sixth Floor Plan 2. Sections Section 1A, 2A Section 3B 3. Wall Sections Wall Section 1 Wall Section 2 Paraphet Detail Foundation Detail 4. Container Exercise Lobby Office 5. Northeast Elevation


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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


PROJECT PROPOSAL

The building type I have chosen to research throughout this semester is a NC Hip-Hop Dance Studio. Hip-hop is a type of dance that rejects the limitations of classical ballet and favors movement that comes from emotion or an expression of inner feeling. Although Charlotte has grown in a structured manner much like a grid, its growth also meanders as business and gentrification occurs. In the same way, contemporary/ hip-hop dance was developed after the very structured ballet movements, but also varies as dancers learn new moves and begin to express themselves. Charlotte, NC’s culture is rich with dancers that participate as performers in addition to those meeting to improv as a means of “underground” art. Students and adults are meeting in random places all over Charlotte to coach one another and then participate in local “dance offs”, where they show off their talent. These dance offs are a way for each crew, or dance group, to “battle” their talents against other groups. Sometimes the competitions are predetermined and publicized immensely, however, they also can be a few individuals coming together in their spare time to dance for fun. The dancers are mostly grouping wherever they can find space that is safe and does not cost anything to rent.

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In Charlotte, these spaces are hard to find. This proposal for a dance studio will be accepting of both dancers, those dancing for organized performance and those dancing for fun. The site for this building is located in Uptown Charlotte, an area that is undergoing tremendous growth and acceptance towards new cultures and lifestyles. The site, located on the corner of 6th Street and N. Tryon Street, is the perfect opportunity for these dancers to present themselves as one of those cultures. Every year, Charlotte hosts a Dancing in the Streets festival where the dancers take to the streets to entertain the lunch crowd in Uptown Charlotte. This has been one of the most popular Charlotte Dance Festival events. The dancers start at Spirit Square (Tryon St. and Trade St) and dance their way down the sidewalks and plazas to end in Wachovia Plaza (2nd Street and Tryon Street). This is just the beginning of the impact that dancing can have on Charlotte. This semester I will design a studio that will educate others about adifferent type of dance and will provide them a space where they can feel comfortable.

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


PROJECT PREMISE

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Hip-hop Music is used to express concerns of political, social, and personal issues. Hip-hop dance is a social dance style that has evolved as a response to that music. Hip-hop dance is separated from other forms of dance because it is often freestyle or improvizational. The informal freestyle sessions and battles are usually performed in cipher. Cipher is a circular dance space that forms naturally once the dancing begins. In the 1970s hip-hop dance became widely known after the first professional breaking, locking, and popping crews formed. The most influential groups include Rock Steady Crew, The Lockers, and the Electric Boogaloos. This style evolved from trained dancers who wanted to choreograph music to hip hop. As a result, the dance is practiced both indoors and out.

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204 N. Tryon Street Charlotte, NC 28202

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


THE SITE

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PRECEDENTS

“Life is rich, always changing, always challenging, and we architects have the task of transmitting into wood, concrete, glass and steel, of transforming human aspirations into habitable and meaningful space.� (Arthur Erickson)

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2.1 Richmond Ballet Company

designed by 3North Collaborative

3North Collaborative approaches design with a process called “IQ Intangible Qualities.� The IQ approach reveals project themes and concepts that quide the project direction and client decisions. This streamlines not only the project, but the coordination for all participants, which saves time and costs. Richmond Ballet Company exists on an urban site on Canal Street in downtown Richmond. It hosts six dance studios, a library, a box office, storage for all sets and costumes, an elevator and freight elevator and a fully outfitted scene shop. The studio located on the third floor is an assembly space that is wired for performance lighting and sound.

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“Dancing about architecture seems like a perfectly valid activity to me. Using the 4D (inc timeline) aspects of dance to reveal something interesting about human built 3D spaces seems like a great thing. Dance is mostly a self- expression, but it can also be a form of communication/spectator entertainment.� (Alexander Blair, January 2002)

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“Glass balconies between landings act as stretching zones so from the street you see the dancers silhouettes in motion, figures superimposed one above the other. The tower is the centre’s shop window, advertising its presence to the neighborhood.” (Architectural Review, June 2001)

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2.2 London Contemporary Dance by: Allies and Morrison Architects

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The London Contemporary Dance Company originated as a 19th century drill hall that was later converted to a dance school in 1969. The new addition includes six studios and a new entrance for students and staff. The entry to the building is a three story glass stair tower that is at its best when illuminated at night. The building form is a strip between two possible buildings. The only natural daylight occurs on the shorter north and south facades. One of the objectives of this building is to allow as many spaces as possible to have natural light, therefore a slot is cut into the building penetrating down 3 of the 6 floors.

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2.3 Laban Center for Movement & Dance designed by Herzog and de Meuron

Herzog and De Meuron designed this building with folded floor plates and extended views. The ramping floors, spiriling stairs, and curves of the building create a dynamic that invites motion. The ramps also ensure full access for people with a wide range of disabilities to visit the building. Throughout the day, the building’s semi-translucent cladding allows traces of dance and movement to be visible through the walls. At night, the building is a colored beacon with light and movement spilling out illuminating the surrounding area.

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“Dancing is an arrangement or patter in space, as architecture and painting are, and employs, as they do, spatial rhythm. It is an arrangement in time, as music is, and employs time rhythm, as music does...Dancing employs rhythm in both spheres audible and visual. It is a time-space art, and the only one. (Agnes de Mille).

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“The goal was to recreate a lively centre, well integrated to the rest of the city and harmonious in the use of materials, such as terracotta, common to all the buildings.� (Renzo Piano on Potsdamer Platz)

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2.4 Daimler Financial Services by: Renzo Piano

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Potsdamer Platz is a reconstruction area of Berlin, Germany. It is a cultural and commercial center of the city. “In the 1930s the district was destroyed by WWII bombings and turned into a desert by the construction of the Wall. With its surface area of 600,000 square metres, the scheme has the dimensions of a small town. And like a village, it is designed around a “piazza”, the focal point of the project. The entire project is made of eighteen new buildings, eight of which were designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. A wide range of facilities, such as shops, homes, offices, restaurants, cinemas and a casino, have brought the site back to life.” The glass pattern of the building is facile until it reaches the fire stair. At this point the pattern dissapates off the edge of the building.

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2.5 De Young Museum

designed by Herzog and de Meuron

The De Young Museum, located in San Francisco, California, was completed in October 2005. The entire exterior is clad of copper, which is expected to eventually oxidize and take a greenish tone to echo the nearby eucalyptus tree. In order to further harmonize with the surroundings, shapes were cut into the top to reveal gardens and courtyards where 48 trees had been planted. The abstract texture of a forest canopy was created from high-contrast digital images that were mapped onto the building surface and pixelated into a finite set of depths and diameters. Herzog and de Meuron used a software by A.Zahner Co. to create the metal sheets. The De Young was a important to study for materiality. I want to design a building that reveals movement within the building. The perforated metal sheets would be appropriate for this effect.

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“The result is not only maximum energy efficiency, robust and less demanding in regards of maintenance, costs etc. Its an artistic experience of play and fun into the public space, with the bonus of creating “a safe space”.” (Svjelvik)

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2.6 Dobpler Interactive LED Wall by: Skjelvik Design

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“Imagine a public light system with the Light Emitting Diode’s create energy saving potential with the added savings made possible by ‘light on demand’. Not as a primitive On/Off experience, but gradually and smooth, increasing the amount of lights exactly to the amount of people, their movements and speed.” (Skejelvik) This LED system interacts with people. Every movement creates a reaction that leaves an impression on the environment; most importantly, the building. Skjelvik Design has tested the LED’s to find the different effects that are made possible by this design. On the production stage, a transparency effect is created, showing on the ouside the inside movements. A mixed effect is also possible. The Hip-Hop Building is designed to put the dancers on display. The Dobpler LED Wall gives them the opportunity to make an impression on the building. For the purposes of a hip-hop dance studio, it is the visitor’s opportunity to “dance” with the building while the dancers perform for the visitor.

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2.7 Perforated Metal, LEDs By: Various Artists

There are many different ways to use a double skin to activate the facade of a building. Some double skins are made of LED systems that showcase different effects to the viewer. Others are made of perforated metal or copper that can be seen at both day and night. To the right are several images of designs using perforated metal or LED systems. These systms can be used to show rhythm, to give a revealing effect, or to give ventilation to the building. Double skin facade buildings were developed in the 1970s during the first energy crisis as an attempt to improve building performance. The cavity between the two walls can either be naturally or mechanically ventilated. In the building schema I have chosen, it will be naturally ventilated with metal grate flooring 30� in width.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“Architecture is the learned game, correct and magnificent, of forms assembled in the light.� (Le Corbusier)

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2.8 Screen Panel System - Bendigo Bank By: BVN Architecture and Gray Puksand

This building is using a screen system to control the daylighting on the inside of the building. The major facade to the west has colored perforated aluminium sunscreens. They reduce the western sun and provide a visually stimulating reading of the building. The colors represent the reds of the existing Bendigo brick buildings transitioning to the greens of the park opposite. In the building I have designed, I want to use this panel system as a system that partially reveals as well as controls the daylighting to the inside. The street facade also has a cutout much like that of my own project. I will continue to seek other ways to resolve the connection between glass and a dual facade.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“In architecture as in all other operative arts, the end must direct the operation. The end is build well. Well building has three conditions: Commodity, Firmness, and Delight.� (Henry Walton)

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“I absolutely believe that architecture is a social activity that has to do with some sort of communication or places of interaction, and that to change the environment is to change behavior.� (Thom Mayne)

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SITE ANALYSIS

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


204 N. Tryon Street The address to the site is 204 North Tryon Street. It is located in the center of Uptown Charlotte, NC. It is the historic site to the Carolina Theater of Charlotte. The building to the right is the Mint Museum of Art and Craft. The building directly adjacent to the left is the Mecklenburg County Public Library. Both of these buildings have an impact on the design of this building, with respect to the retail streetfront and the sizing of the windows.

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TOPOGRAPHY MAP 10 Foot Contours

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ZONING

Zoned UMUD-O:

Zoned UMUD Zoned UMUD-O: Zoned R- Residential Districts

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HISTORIC WARDS

Fourth Ward First Ward Second Ward Third Ward

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AERIAL

Parcel #: 08001110

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Dunhill Hotel

Hearst Tower

McGlohon Theater

SURROUNDING CONTEXT MAP Site: 6th and Tryon

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Charlotte Public Library

03 Mint Museum Craft + Design

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EXTENDED CONTEXT MAP Site: 6th and Tryon

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Mecklenburg Fire Museum Discovery Place Hodges Taylor Gallery Public Library McGlohon Theater The Light Factory SITE Farvan International Gallery Millenium Dance Studio Barebones Theater Group Levine Museum of the South TEW Galleries Imaginon Children’s Museum Children’s Theater

03 Wojo Productions Redsky Gallery Bechtler Museum Afro-American Cultural Center Nascar Hall of Fame

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SITE PLAN

Not to Scale

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Bird’s Eye View Not to Scale

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“I claim that is where architecture starts, with the concept.” (Louis Kahn)

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CONCEPTUAL ANALYSIS

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“All architecture is shelter, all great architecture is the design of space that contains, cuddles, exalts, or stimulates the persons in that space.� (Philip Johnson)

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2.9 Conceptual Models Hip-Hop Dance Studio The concept for this building began with several iterations. Each of the parti models to the left represent different ideas. Some represent the idea of transluency and opacity through the use of materials. Others are using layers in the floor plate structure to define the spaces within. The chosen parti for this building is very simple and consists of four main spaces: one that is fully exposed and activates all senses, one that is only exposed by view of the street, one that is partially exposed to view and partially revealed to the passerby, and one that is exposed only from above. I felt that the correlation between this parti and the hip-hop dance studio is the improvisational qualities of the dance. There are some times that these dancers wish to be fully displayed and some times that they are hidden in practice. This building warranted a parti that could pull those ideas together.

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2.10 Parti Diagrams Hip-hop Dance Studio Above: These images represent the different spaces defined by the parti. There are 4 totaled, each of which are numbered. Right: The digrams are a spatial layout of the building and how the parti spaces are defined by this layout. The first one shows how the studio spaces would receive the majority of their light. The second one shows that not only is light penetrating these spaces, but the viewer from outside is able to see the dancers aswell. The third one shows the location of the outdoor plaza used for dancing. This space can be used by visitors, passerbys, or those just needing to take a seat for a minute. Its primary purpose is to give the dancers the opportunity to dance on the street, considering hip-hop derived as a street dance.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“Architecture is a social act and the material theater of human activity.� (Spiro Kostof)

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This set of diagrams shows the studio as seen from across 6th street to a bystander. The bystander cannot clearly see the third floor, however, the first and second floor are within the bystanders line of sight.

This set of diagrams shows the studios as a unified part of the buildings facade. The studios are not separated or defined by volume. Instead, a change in material or the use of structure to frame the space would be necessary.

This set of diagrams show the studios as an inset to the building facade. This accentuates the building and creates an interesting dichotomy between the office spaces and the dance studios.

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2.11 Studio Diagrams Hip-Hop Dance Studio The studios were a significant part of the building design. I started to study which spaces activate which senses. As indicated in the diagrams to the left, I needed to see how high a bystander could see into the building if standing from across the street. The two studio spaces have different presence to the street. The diagram iterations show how that presence effects the view that the bystander has to the dancers and into the studios. The models to the far left indicate these diagrams in 3D. These were to better represent how these spaces would be spatially in response to the wall of offices and the street. The studio that extends over the street does provide shelter for those walking underneath, but it also prevents them from viewing the studios above. When the studios are flush with the offices underneath, they do not visually read of any importance. The studios that are inset are still within viewing distance from those across the street and can also be seen from those walking directly adjacent to the building. It is this design that I continued to follow through in the design. 55 55


2.12 Narrative of Spaces Hip-hop Dance Studio Above: These images represent the different spaces defined by the parti. There are 4 totaled, each of which are numbered. Right: The digrams are a spatial layout of the building and how the parti spaces are defined by this layout. The first one shows how the studio spaces would receive the majority of their light. The second one shows that not only is light penetrating these spaces, but the viewer from outside is able to see the dancers aswell. The third one shows the location of the outdoor plaza used for dancing. This space can be used by visitors, passerbys, or those just needing to take a seat for a minute. Its primary purpose is to give the dancers the opportunity to dance on the street, considering hip-hop derived as a street dance.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


04 “Some architects have a preconceived notion of what a building should be - they design from the outside like the building is a piece of sculpture. I prefer to patiently search through extensive discovery until I find a seam somewhere, crack it open and discover the art inside of the process.� (Curtis W. Fentress)

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DRAWINGS

“I prefer drawing to talking. Drawing is faster, and leaves less room for lies.� (Le Corbusier)

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B

Transformer

Elect. Room

Up

Wardrobe

Cooling Tower Storage Staff

Comm. Room

Workstation

Production Equip Workroom Kitchen/ Break Room

Smoker's Freedom

Director's Office

Men's Public Lavatory

Conference Room

Women's Public Lav.

Workstation

Work Room

Study Room

Secretary

Box Office

A

Gift Shop

Up

Scale: 3/32” = 1’ Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Ground Floor


B

Up

Fan Room

Calming Room Family Locker

Staff

Family Locker

Men's Lav. Workstation

Men's Locker

Small Dance Studio

Balcony Above

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Women's Lav.

Staff Office

Dancer's Study Lounge

Staff Office

Staff Office

Open to Lobby Below A

Janitors Closet

Elec.

Up

Scale: 3/32” = 1’

Second Floor Plan 61 61


B

Up

Boiler/Chiller Pump Room Staff

Workstation Staff Office

Open to Small Dance Studio Below Men's

Balcony Over Studio

Staff Office

Women's

Staff Office/ Control Room

Staff Office

Balcony Above

Staff Office

Large Dance Studio A

Janitors Closet

Elec.

Up

Scale: 3/32” = 1’ Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Third Floor Plan


B

Up

Open to Below

Men's

Small Dance Studio

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Women's

Open to Below

Open to Below

Balcony Over Studio

Open to Large Dance Studio A Janitors Closet

Elec.

Up

Scale: 3/32” = 1’

Fourth Floor Plan 63 63


Open to Small Dance Studio

Open to Below

Open to Below

Open to Below

Large Dance Studio A Janitors Closet

Elec.

Up

Scale: 3/32” = 1’ Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Fifth Floor Plan


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Open to Large Dance Studio

Scale: 3/32” = 1’

Sixth Floor Plan - Roof Plan 65 65


5.12 Section A Hip-hop Dance Studio The Sections allow us a better understand of how the building is assembled spatially. Although this section does not reveal any information about the structure directly, it does imply which parts of the structure contain more mass. You can easily see in the Section to the right that the exterior walls are thicker than the interior walls. You will also notice that when the structure is spanning a much wider distance, the overhead structure has to be thicker.

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5.7 Section A

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5.8 Section B

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5.10 Elevations Hip-hop Dance Studio

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5.10 Elevations Hip-hop Dance Studio

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


204 N. Tryon Street

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5. 11 Response to Site & Light Hip-hop Dance Studio The Lobby space, as shown in the photo to the left, is made mostly of glass. This allows light to penetrate the space, highlighting the dancers. As people enter the building they are shadowed by a lower ceiling, however, the dancers in the lobby are placed into spotlight. The Hip-Hop Dance Studio is two floor heights taller than that of the Mint Museum of Craft + Design. The Library, located left of the studio, has a plaza that allows opportunity for viewing advantage to the studio spaces. The LED wall faces the Library on 6th Street. The photography montage located below is take as a section through Tryon Street.

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5. 12 Preliminary Design Hip-hop Dance Studio

The prelminary design for this building closed the semester with a double-skin covering a glass curtain wall facade. The predominant spaces are still those mentioned in the parti diagrams: the front plaza spaces for dancers on the streets, the stack of large studios above that space, and the smaller studios located as a “punch out� of the facade facing 6th Street. The building is made of a structured steel with the largest beam spanning approximately 60 feet. The fire stairs are properly located with no twenty foot dead ends within the building. Attached to the glass facade will be a form of revealing screen that allows light to penetrate the facade.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“Architecture is the will of an epoch translated into space.� (Ludwig Mies van der Rohe)

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


“Architecture is not about designing something from a free, fanicful idea. It is about discovering and establishing one’s own principle, some kind of regularity - finding an individual formula to apply to one’s buildings.” (Shigeru Ban)

ANALYSIS

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system structural Hip-Hop Dance Studio


Structural Steel Elect.! Room

Up

Transformer

Wardrobe Cooling Tower Storage

Staff

Comm.! Room

Workstation

Director's ! OfďŹ ce

Kitchen/! Break! Room

Production Equip! Workroom

Men's Public Lavatory

Conference Room Women's Public Lav.

Workstation

Work! Room

Secretary

Box! OfďŹ ce

Gift! Shop

Up

Study! Room

Structural steel and concrete are the materials used to structure the building. The dancers move quite abruptly and I needed a material that could withhold the bouncing on a sprung floor and carry the sound down the structure. The material also needed to be light in appearance. The dancers do a great job of lifting themselves from the ground and make it seem as if their bodies are weightless. I wanted a structure that could be relatively thin considering the height of the spaces that the dancers need. The diagrams show primary structure.

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Cooling and Heating Hip-Hop Dance Studio


VAV Reheat System The Variable Air Volume reheat system passes air through a reheat coil before it is distributed to the local diffusers. A local thermostat controls the flow of water or electricity through the reheat coil, allowing for close individual control of room temperature. The building I have designed is for small office rooms as well as large assembly studios for the dancers to perform and practice. The reheat system is much more energy efficient than a constatnt air volume reheat system.

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taxonomy materials Hip-Hop Dance Studio


Concrete The concrete on the facade of the building acts as a backdrop to the perforated metal screen. The punched openings in the concrete have a direct connection to the spaces behind the concrete. For each type of space behind the wall, there is a different punched opening. Some of them are tall to elongate the amount of light let into the space. The sizes of the windows correspond to the street facade of the surrounding buildings. The first floor on the adjacent buildings is double height and the floors above have long windows.

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taxonomy materials Hip-Hop Dance Studio


Dobpler LED wall The Dobpler LED wall, designed by Skjelvik Design, is a public light system that provides light as a gradual, smooth, experience. The system interacts with the public creating a reaction, leaving an impression of environment as they pass by. The modules are incorporated into the buildings exterior and are covered with a hardened safety glass. The LED lights are covered by glass on both sides which causes a transparency effect to occur. This material will wrap the corner of the buildings facade tying together both 6th and Tryon Street.

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taxonomy materials Hip-Hop Dance Studio


Perforated Metal Screen A perforated metal screen can create a textured surface that allows light to pass through. Although light passes through the surface, the metal holes do not reflect light back to the viewer so they tend to darken the overall surface appearance. When this texture is applied to the facade of the building it will display the rhythm of the steel structure behind the metal screen. This would also allow those working in the offices to have less glare on their computers without obstructing their views to the city.

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taxonomy materials Hip-Hop Dance Studio


Airplane Hangar Door The door designed by Wilson Doors is made of aircraft-grade aluminum. It is a light-weight construction that reduces the need for any additional structural support. It is a lightweight door system that saves interior space. This door, much like the garage doors, will open up the lobby so that the dancers can extend into the street. The plaza created by the threshold between the interior and exterior space is where the “street dance� is held. The opening allows fluidity between both the interior and exterior.

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“To create architecture is to put in order. Put what in order? Function and objects.� (Le Corbusier)

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DRAWINGS

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Comm.! Room

Women's Public Lav.

Storage

Men's Public Lavatory

Transformer

Production Equip! Workroom

Study! Room

Elect.! Room

Kitchen/! Break! Room

Boiler Room

Conference ! Room

Staff

Workstation

Up

Workstation

Director's ! OfďŹ ce

1A

Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Work! Room


07

Box! Office

Secretary

2A

Gift! Shop

Up

Lobby

First Floor Plan

Hip-Hop Dance Studio Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Plan: First Floor 3/32" = 1'0" NotScale: shown to scale

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Women's Lav.

Women's Locker

Men's Locker

Men's Lav.

Family Lav.

Family Locker

Small Dance Studio

Up !

Staff

Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Workstation

Fan Room

Staff! Office

Staff! Office


07

Open to Lobby Below

Staff! Office Janitors! Closet

Elec.

Up

Second Hip-Hop FloorDance Plan Studio

Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Plan: Second Floor Scale: 3/32" = 1'0" NotFloor shownPlan to scale First

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Staff! Office

Men's

Open to Small Dance! Studio Below

Workstation

!

Up

Boiler/Chiller! Pump Room

Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Staff Office/! Control Room

Open to ! Below

Roof Access

Staff

Women's

Staff! Office

St Of


taff! ffice

07

Large Dance Studio

3B

Staff! Office

Janitors! Closet

Elec.

Up

Third Floor Plan Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Drawn at Floor 3/32” = 1’ Plan: Third Scale: 3/32" = 1'0" Not shown to scale

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Open to ! Below

Open to ! Below Men's

Women's

Open to ! Below

Up

Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Small Dance Studio

Workstation

Cooling ! Tower


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Open to Large Dance Studio

Janitors! Closet

Elec.

Up

Fourth Floor Plan Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Plan: Fourth Floor Scale: 3/32" = 1'0" Not shown to scale

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Open to ! Below

Open to ! Below Open to Small Dance Studio

Up

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


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Large Dance Studio

Janitors! Closet

Elec.

Up

Fifth Floor Plan Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Drawn at Floor 3/32” = 1’ Plan: Fifth Scale: 3/32" = 1'0" Not shown to scale

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Open to ! Below

Open to ! Below

Open to ! Below

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


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Open to Large Dance Studio

Janitors! Closet

Elec.

Up

Sixth Floor Plan Hip-Hop Dance Studio

Drawn at Floor 3/32” = 1’ Plan: Sixth Scale: 3/32" = 1'0" Not shown to scale

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Section 1A

Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Not shown to scale

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Section 2A

Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Not shown to scale

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Section 3B

Drawn at 3/16” = 1’ Not shown to scale

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Wall Section 1

Drawn at 1/4” = 1’ Not shown to scale

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Paraphet Detail Hip-Hop Dance Studio Low Parapet Detail

Scale: 1 1/2 " = 1'0"

Foundation Detail Hip-Hop Dance Studio Foundation detail

Scale: 1 1/2 " = 1'0"

Wall Section 2

Drawn at 1/4” = 1’ Not shown to scale 111 111


Lobby: Reflected Ceiling Plan Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Not shown to scale Hip-Hop Dance Studio


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Staff! Office

7.5 Container Exercise

Staff! Office

Lobby & Office

The container exercise was designed to help us consider the plastic, spatial qualities of each room. This included light, materiality, furnishings, and how they relate to the user’s experience of the space. The two spaces I have chosen are the Lobby and the Office. The lobby is defined by a collective while the office is designed for the individual. It is important for us to understand each space at a larger scale to better understand the architecture in relationship to people. The materials and light can have a direct impact on the way we work, the way we think, and the way we interact with one another.

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Hip-Hop Dance Studio


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Northeast Elevation

Hip-Hop Dance Studio Northeast Elevation

Scale: 3/16 " = 1'0"

Drawn at 3/32” = 1’ Not shown to scale 115 115


BIBLIOGRAPHY 3north. 3north Architecture. Web. <http://www.3north.com/>. Design, Skjelvik. “Dobpler Interactive Led Wall.” Dobpler Interactive. Web. <http:// www.dobpler.com/>. Galinsky. “Daimler Financial Services Potsdamer Platz Berlin by Renzo Piano and Christoph Kohlbecker.” Daimler Financial Services Headquarters, Berlin. Galinsky, 1998. Web. <http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/daimlerfs/index.html>. Gilbert, Dennis. “Ballet-dance Monthly.” Ballet-dance Monthly. Web. <http://www. ballet-dance.com/200312/theplacegallery/pages/Flaxmandusk.htm>. Quotations, Think Exist. “Quotations.” Think Exist Quotations. Web. <http://thinkexist.com/quotations/architecture/>.

Hip-Hop Dance Studio


by: Kelli Franklin

117 117


Hip-Hop Dance Studio