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JULY 2014

DEPARTMENTS AFFORDABLE FAMILY CAMPING TRIP, PG. 44

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photograph a sunrise and sunset on the same day

mom & daughter slumber party with popcorn & pedis

make homemade ice cream

memorize the U.S. presidents in order

learn to knit

“Man Up!” And other stereotypical things not to say to boys

moonlight bike ride in lenexa on july 12 (lenexa.

play flashlight tag

watch mary poppins & talk in a british acccent all day

host a family dance party

go on a spontaneous road trip

see sound of music at starlight (july 25-31)

tie-dye something

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rent a paddle boat at shawnee mission lake

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make DIY

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take selfies at 5 historical sites near or far

bake cupcakes to give away to neighbors

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Women’s Health

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Healthy Kids

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Word from Dad

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Craft Corner

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Media Mix

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Faith & Family

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keep a daily gratitude journal

create a summer 2014 soundtrack

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Party Guide

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Summer Fun Guide

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Calendar of Events

try one new food every week

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Tips on raising a child who cares

Create summer memories with tweens Our cover girl is Sydney from Lenexa. Cover and select interior photos by KiaBondurant.com Where you find family, you will find us.

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ON THE COVER Unhelpful Things Parents Say

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Goodbye Ghosts 18 Social Media Gossip

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Kid’s Collections

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Bucket List Bingo

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Super Summer

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EDITOR’SLETTER JULY 2014 Publisher Michael Gimotty Michael@KCParent.com Associate Publisher Darrell Dean Darrell@KCParent.com

T

TUESDAYS

Follow KC Parent on Facebook this summer because EVERY Tuesday we are giving away 2 family 4-packs of Tut tickets at Union Station. Details on pg. 57.

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kcparent.com july 2014

Happy Summer, Kansas City!

Editor Margaret Sarver Margaret@KCParent.com Art Director Lauren Goldman Lauren@KCParent.com Advertising Sales Darrell Dean Lynn Hawkins Advertising@KCParent.com Electronic Media Manager Kristina Light Kristina@KCParent.com Event Calendar Susan Hawke Calendar@KCParent.com Proofreader Susan Crainshaw Susan@KCParent.com Distribution To be added to our distribution list, e-mail Distribution@KCParent.com

100% LOCAL

Local Contributing Writers William Bartlett (Belton), Jennifer Bosse (Kansas City), Wendy Connelly (Overland Park), Tisha Foley (Belton), Jessica Heine (Olathe), Jennifer Higgins (Kearney), Christa Melnyk Hines (Olathe), Megan Kapple (Kansas City), Kimberly Levitan (Leawood), Kristina Light (Kansas City), Stephanie Loux (Olathe), Jane Blumenthal Martin (Overland Park), Kate Meadows (Louisburg), Jena Meyerpeter (Lenexa), Erin Stegman (Overland Park), Jim Strahle (Kansas City), Melanie Yunger (Shawnee)

Business Office 11936 W. 119th #335, Overland Park, KS 66213 913.782.3238 phone • 913.681.5139 fax OUR PRODUCTS Where you find family, you will find us.

kansas city’s #1 attraction guide

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starting solids

50 WAYS TO FALL IN LOVE WITH KC

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3 unhelpful things parents say

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BABY’S 1st SUMMER

kc style!

traveling while pregnant safe sleep for baby

THE PREGNANCY DECISION ISSUE 1 kcparent.com july-sept 2014

.com

TUT

his July marks a major milestone in the Sarver home. This month, my husband and I become parents of a teenager. My firstborn, Tori, turns 13. How did this happen? I close my eyes and can feel her in my arms the first time I held her. Such a darling newborn with skinny, skinny legs and a long wisp of hair over her right ear. I am simply stunned that my baby will be a teen. I know she’s tired of hearing me go on about it (and I promise, Tori, I did not get the shirts made that read “How did I get to be the mom of a teen so quickly???”), but I know all of you parents out there can relate. It just goes by way too fast! I couldn’t be any prouder of the young lady she is becoming. She’s an independent thinker. Even though there are times the constant questioning and challenging of everything I say wear me down, I am thrilled that she is willing to ask questions and stand up for what she believes. She has great fashion sense. On many occasions she has put together stylish outfits for me by simply using items I have in my closet. She loves to cook and experiment in the kitchen. She’s very artistic and loves to create. This summer, she’s started running. A lover of books, she’s told me more than once that her idea of a great day is starting a book in the morning and finishing it in the evening. She is beautiful inside and out, and I want to wish her the happiest of birthdays! May it be a day filled with family, fun and a maybe a surprise or two! Whether July brings a celebration in your home or not, the lazy, hazy days of summer are in full swing! We’ve got plenty of summer fun articles and a jam-packed calendar of events so that every day can be a celebration in your home!

Facebook.com/KansasCityParent Pinterest.com/KCParent @KCParent

Member of:

Circulation verified by:

Margaret Sarver, Editor

Kansas City Parent Magazine is published 12 times a year by Family Media Group. It is distributed free of charge throughout the Kansas City area. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect KC Parent’s opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission. Kansas City Parent Magazine does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. All photography and letters sent to KC Parent will be treated unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright purposes and are subject to unrestricted right to edit and comment editorially. KC Parent often includes websites that may be helpful to our readers. We verify each site prior to publication. However, content changes frequently. We encourage you to use caution and discretion when visiting a website.


kcparent.com july 2014

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destination: healthy vacation

W

ith summer vacation in full swing, many families are taking that much needed vacation. Although it is certainly time to relax, let your hair down and maybe sit by the pool, no one wants to come home from vacation sick or injured. Of course you can’t prevent everything, but with a few planning strategies you might be able to prevent some or deal with others more easily. The Centers for Disease Control has developed the three P’s for safe traveling: Be proactive, prepared and protected!

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Being proactive just means taking steps to anticipate issues that might come up during your trip. Take into account your destination, activities planned and your current health status. If you are planning a trip out of the country, you may even want to visit your doctor about 4-6 weeks before you leave. Another suggestion might be to locate travel clinics within your destination. Visit ASTMH.org (American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene) or ISTM.org (International Society of Travel Medicine) for more information. You also can contact state health department websites for U.S. listings.

Prepared:

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kcparent.com july 2014

Think like a Boy Scout! Pack smart! Plan ahead for illness and injury by packing medications that you might need, such as something for a fever, pain or GI issues.

Know what to do if you become sick or injured, or bring phone numbers of your health care provider with you so you can call with questions. Finally, share important information about your trip, such as destination, phone numbers, medical information, living will, copies of passports, etc. Make arrangements to check in with this person occasionally throughout your trip.

Protected:

• Use sunscreen and insect repellent. • Drink bottled water—and plenty of it. • Limit alcohol intake. • Wear your seatbelt. • Respect laws and culture if out of country. • Eat healthy, including plenty of fruits and vegetables. • Wear protective gear when participating in adventures. Family vacations provide much needed rest, family time and wonderful memories. To ensure a healthy vacation for your family, consider visiting with your family doctor to answer questions before takeoff! Melanie Yunger is a local wife, mother and nurse practitioner. As always, please consult your health care provider with any questions or concerns.


I am ... … a Royals Hall of Famer. … a TV broadcast analyst. … community-minded. … an entrepreneur. … a blood donor. … appreciative. … thankful. … giving. … blessed. Jeff Montgomery used to save games for the Royals with his arm. These days, he does something more important with his arm; he rolls up his sleeve, donates blood and saves lives. Jeff still has a busy schedule, but that doesn’t stop him from being a loyal and dedicated blood donor who takes 60 minutes of his time every 56 days to help save a life in his community.

Who are you?

savealifenow.org kcparent.com july 2014

11


HEALTHYKIDS

the benefits of

flax & chia seeds

F

lax seed and chia seeds have been showing up in the news, on our grocery store shelves and in our everyday recipes. I’ve read enough to know that these are “good” for us, but I was unsure of why and how they work. So I did a little research, and that research showed a lot of information about the benefits and uses. Flax seed has been used for thousands of years and has tons of benefits. It contains omega-3 fatty acids, which will help reduce heart disease, stroke and reduce inflammation associated with plaque build-up. It contains lignans, which reduce the risk of cancer and may improve blood sugar and, therefore, diabetes (more studies are needed to confirm this). Finally, flax contains fiber. Flax can be purchased in seeds or oil.The seeds are best but need to be ground (you can buy them already ground or use a coffee grinder) in order to achieve maximum benefit. Flax seed has a nutty flavor and can easily be added to oatmeal, pancake mix, smoothies or yogurt. Chia seeds are small and black and look a little like poppy seeds. They contain omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, antioxidants and calcium. Chia seeds are supposed to expand in the stomach, helping you to feel full sooner, eat less and shed weight. However, there are not many

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studies published on this, and WebMD says not to expect a big weight loss based on chia seeds alone. What research has shown is that including chia seeds as part of a healthy diet may help improve cardiovascular risk factors by lowering cholesterol, triglycerides (sugars) and blood pressure (EatRight.org). Chia seeds have a mild, nutty flavor and are easy to add to other foods, most often cereals, baked goods, rice and yogurt. Added to liquids, they turn into a gel or pudding and can be eaten as a dessert. When attempting to add these items to my family’s diet, I discovered my children didn’t notice the added flax seed, but they did notice the chia seed. However, both were eaten with no complaining when I added them to yogurt and oatmeal. This has been a cheap, easy way to add extra nutrients to my family’s diet. Because my children are so young, I am starting slow and using the seeds sparingly to make sure their little bodies are able to tolerate the additional fiber. So far, so good, and I am calling this a success! Jessica Heine is a labor and delivery nurse. She lives in Olathe with her family. As always, please consult your health care provider with any questions or concerns.


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kcparent.com Four Area Metro Locations: Kansas City • Liberty • Excelsior Springs • Raymore july 2014 july 13 2014


unhelpful things parents say

We’ve all been there: Our kid is upset or worried, and we try to give advice to help. But when trying to help our child feel better, we may accidentally say things that cause more harm than good in the long run. Taking the time to think about a better reply is hard sometimes but better for our children. You’ll do better next time.

Don’t worry; everything will be fine!

Everyone says this, but in reality, everything might not be fine, and there might be cause to worry. While it can be easy to just say “Don’t worry,” getting to the root of the problem is a better idea, because then you can address the underlying problem at hand. “You might say, ‘I know you’re nervous/ scared, and I understand. How can I help you feel better?’ Then talk through different scenarios or talk them through the situation or the day,” Ronna Sparks Woodward, Liberty mother of two, says. “For example, if your child is going to have surgery, let him or her know the process of check-in, IV, etc.” Once the underlying problem is established, then “don’t worry” can really happen for the child. “When my children start to worry, I encourage them to pray about it. If there is something specific that they are worried about, then I go through the worst scenario with them,” Amanda Jensen, Kearney mother of three, says.

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Stop being so shy and try to be more outgoing.

Especially to an outgoing parent, a child’s being shy or uncertain in a situation can be frustrating. IIt’s easy to tell her to stop being shy, but it may not help. She might just need encouragement. “You might say, ‘Let’s talk through different ways that you can approach people.’ Or ‘Is there something that bothers you about what’s going on that makes you feel like you can’t talk to people?’” Sparks Woodward says. “Some kids are just naturally shy, and if parents push and force them out of their comfort zone, it can be harmful.” Pushing a child to be overly friendly when that’s not her personality can actually be harmful for a child. Working to help the child learn strategies to help the shyness is better than harping on her to stop being shy.

Maybe it’s an F on a test or a strikeout with bases loaded, and we respond with an encouragement that they’ll do better the next time. But what if they don’t? Kids need to learn from their mistakes in order to improve and truly do better the next time. “Sit down with the child and say, ‘Let’s talk through what happened and why it didn’t go as well as you hoped. Did you do your best/try your hardest? What happened? Why do you think that it ended up that way? Let’s figure out what happened and how it can go better next time,’” Sparks Woodward says. “That way, they can learn from their mistakes to fix what happened.” Learning from their mistakes is important if they want to do better the next time. If they keep repeating the behavior, they won’t see any improvement. “We might say, ‘No one expects you to know how to do it all the first time. You are just learning,’” Jensen says. “We keep learning.” Jennifer Higgins is a freelance writer, teacher and mother from Kearney.


FACT:

Social and emotional intelligence may be the most important determinant of a child’s future success. PRIMROSE WAY:

Being school-ready is just the beginning. OPEN HOUSE JULY 12, 10 AM – 2 PM Primrose School of Overland Park 12100 W 135th St | Overland Park, KS 66221 913.400.2435 | PrimroseOverlandPark.com

Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2014 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for ‘fact’ source and curriculum detail.

Dentistry That Will Make Kids

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Effects of Adult Speech on Grammar Development An Intervention Study

Does your child have a language delay?

PURPOSE To study the effects of adult speech on grammatical development of preschoolers with language delays.

BENEFITS

cts of Adult Speech on Grammar Development n Preschoolers with Specific Language Delay PURPOSE

tudy the effects of adult speech grammatical development of schoolers with language delay.

BENEFITS

Caregivers receive a summary of all testing for their child, whether or not the child qualifies for the study.

WHO QUALIFIES?

hildren 4 and 5 years old with lopmental delays that appear to be specific to language.

CAREGIVER RESPONSIBILITIES

Bring your child to KUMC for up to 4 preliminary evaluations of your child’s communication skills. Attend 10 study sessions at KUMC or at home.

Effects of Adult Speech on Grammar Development Contact: Dr. Marc E. Fey Contact: Dr. Marc E.KU FeyMedical Center Hearing & Speech Dept. • Hearing & Speech Dept. • KU Medical Center (913) 588-0574 • mfey@kumc.edu or visit our website alliedhealth.kumc.edu/school/research/fey (913) 588-0574 • mfey@kumc.edu

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kcparent.com july 2014

Just Out for a Soda

“D

learning

Learn more at one of our free events

WORDFROMDAD

Children receive 24 intervention sessions either in their home or at KUMC. Children receive a gift card good for new books. Caregivers receive a summary of all testing for their child, whether or not the child qualifies for the study.

WHO QUALIFIES? 3 and 4 year old children with developmental delays that appear to be specific to language.

CAREGIVER RESPONSIBILITIES Bring your child to KUMC for up to 4 preliminary evaluations of your child’s communication skills. Allow your child to participate in 24 intervention sessions, twice a week for 12 weeks. Bring your child to KUMC for testing sessions half way through and at the end of the study. Families are reimbursed for travel to KUMC.

ad, where are you going?” Laura saw my hand on the knob, ready to leave the air conditioning and step out of the house. “Just out for a soda.” I love summer nights, no matter how hot and sticky. “Can I come?” “Sure, but we’re walking. Feel up to it?” “Yep.” She followed me out the door, put her hand in mine and we strode off into the dark. Well, as dark as a suburb can be with lighted streets and houses. The scents and sounds of summer after nightfall delight me, and I took a deep breath while focusing my hearing. It was too good not to share. “Laura, stop and close your eyes.” She gave me a questioning look, but complied. “What can you hear?” She stood in silence for a moment. “I hear bugs.” “Good. What else?” “A dog, no two dogs barking.” She was beginning to get it. “Air conditioning. Wind chimes. A bullfrog. By the lake? No, in the creek. The leaves blowing in the breeze.” She cataloged everything she could hear that hot night, and I stifled a chuckle. “OK, now what can you smell?” She kept her eyes closed and inhaled. “Sweet. Is that? It is. Honeysuckle. Grass, cut just this afternoon. Dust from the Millers’ gravel driveway. But the hot asphalt in the street’s the strongest.” She opened her eyes and knit her brows. “Why, Dad?” “This is the way summer sounds and smells. We can’t keep this season all year. So whenever we want it, all we have to do is close our eyes and remember.” Thirty years passed, and I opened an email from Laura. “Dad,” she wrote, “I took Isabel for a walk to get a soda last night. Halfway there, I made her stop and close her eyes.” William R. Bartlett lives in Belton with his family.


I am ... … excited for tomorrow. … a future astronaut. … crazy about music. … a great dancer. … a big sister. … a blood recipient. … determined. … a survivor. … brave. … strong. … happy. Eleanor has dreams that are out of this world! She is a big sister who loves to sing and dance all day long. Eleanor is able to dance, play and most importantly, dream anything that she wants to dream, because she is a survivor. She won her fight against Pre-B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia! She is thankful for blood donors who took just 60 minutes of their time to help save her life.

Who are you?

savealifenow.org kcparent.com july 2014

17


say good-bye to

ghosts Learning to live with and stand up to fear is, in most cases, a normal (albeit challenging) stage of a child’s development.

I

n the Usborne Illustrated Stories for Boys, my 4-year-old son frequently turns to the story called “The Bed Monster’s Secret.” It’s the tale of Ben Boggle, who every night lies awake in a cold sweat, because how could he sleep with a monster under his bed? Every night, when Ben Boggle turns out the light, the monster awakes with a snort. It gurgles and growls in the shadows. Here is the spoiler alert: Ben Boggle ultimately discovers that the creature, despite its horrific noises, is a tiny mouse-like critter with big ears, who happens to be good at math and helps Ben Boggle conquer his worst subject in school. The moral of the story might be that things are not always (as scary/ big/choose your word here) as they seem. But any parent who’s had to comfort a child pale with fear has wondered: Where do kids’ fears come from? And how can children and parents fight them? The answer, in many cases, according to Allan Gonsher, a licensed social worker and registered play supervisor with Kids, Inc. Kansas City, is quite simple. It’s important to explore fears objectively, as curiosities and mysteries rather than

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things to be afraid of, Gonsher suggests. “As soon as you say ‘fear,’ you’re already developing a sense that something is wrong,” he says. “It’s important to allow children to have a normal developmental challenge with their imagination.” Karen Johnson, a mom of three in Olathe, knows what it’s like to face a child’s fear head-on. Her 5-year-old son used to be terrified of loud noises. “Cheering at games would cause him to burst into tears,” Johnson recalls. But Johnson and her husband did not shy away. They continued to expose their son to noise and talked to him about anticipated noise ahead of time. “We would tell him he didn’t need to be scared, and that the noise was for a happy reason,” she says. Eventually, her son’s fear of noise waned. So much of a child’s young life is processing the world around him. So it’s important that kids learn to take care of themselves and work out insecurities. “Children have to learn how to be in the room with the dragons and monsters and dinosaurs and ghosts,” Gonsher says.

So often, the passing of fear is simply a matter of time. Jen Laverentz believes she shot herself in the foot when she recently allowed her 4-year-old son, Hank, to watch Monsters University. “He did not want to turn off the lights [after seeing it],” says Laverentz, of Overland Park. “He did not want us to leave him at bedtime.” Laverentz and her husband bought a night-light and at night read their son Bible stories about God’s giving people courage. When Hank still would not stay in bed all night, Laverentz tried another trick: She promised him a donut the next morning if he stayed in bed all night. It worked. A parent’s support is crucial in helping a child overcome a fear, Gonsher says. Keeping situations lighthearted (when appropriate) and keeping lines of communication open are key. Your child needs to know that you won’t get mad, laugh at her or threaten her own security and confidence. Phrases such as “You’re acting like a baby” or “Your big sister isn’t scared of monsters” do nothing to help a


situation; they only reinforce insecurity. Trust is huge. You want your child to know he can come to you with anything, whether a fear of monsters now or a fear of standing up to peer pressure 10 years down the road. Discussing where a fear comes from opens up a solid, healthy line of communication early on. “We live in a world where you have to do everything perfectly, always be on time, always look as though everything is fine,” Gonsher says. “I wish parents would relax a little bit and enjoy their children and enjoy their lives.” Learning to live with and stand up to fear is, in most cases, a normal (albeit challenging) stage of a child’s development. So, too, is living in an active imagination. By the time a child is 4, her mind is becoming wonderfully, fruitfully imaginative, according to Gonsher. “To some extent, we need to encourage it,” he says. “I think sometimes parents feel so insecure, like they have this precious, breakable object. Children are precious. But they’re not breakable.”

2 kid-rendered fears and 2 kansas city moms’ responses Fear: Dark and loud or unusual noises Mom in shining armor: Missy Landis, Olathe Fear-fighting weapon: We got our 2-year-old daughter a night-light and reminded her that God was watching over her. Sometimes, we leave on the bathroom light across the hall from her room, and in some cases we allow our dog to stay in the room with her so she feels safe. We always remind her that she is safe and that we will never leave her. Fear: Trying something new Mom in shining armor: Karen Johnson, Olathe Fear-fighting weapon: Persistence. When I made my son try an orange slice for the first time, he was hysterical. He kept it in his mouth for 20 minutes, refusing to chew it. Finally, I let him spit it out. We probably battled with him more than we should have. On his third birthday, we took him bowling for the first time. He cried the whole way there. He was afraid, because he didn’t know what bowling was. But we stuck with it, and he ended up having a lot of fun. Now, I know he can go anywhere and do anything, and I know he will find something he can eat without issue.

Kate Meadows writes from Louisburg, where she is busy with her two boys. She recently launched a new Website of writing and editing services at KateMeadows.com.

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kcparent.com july 2014

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they don’t make ‘em like they used to 5 classic movies to watch with your family

By Kristina Light

Lately, we’ve been revisiting some classics (thanks to free DVDs at the library!), and so many of the oldies are such gems. Not just fun and entertaining, they often provide something thoughtprovoking and a good lesson, as well! You may enjoy a few of our favorite family films.

For a list of summer movies under the stars, visit KCParent.com.

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Mary Poppins: The music is outstanding, the story is pure, imaginative fun, and we love the step back in time to jolly old England. Julie Andrews plays the “practically perfect” Mary Poppins, the nanny sent to help a British family with a bit of magic. As they dance on rooftops, jump into chalk paintings and let laughter send them flying, the family discovers new relationships and priorities. This is one movie our family never tires of.

Pollyanna: Pollyanna is set 100 years ago during the advent of the automobile, and the fun of a historical piece is pure delight. The characters are vivid, there are multiple stories all at once, and this is one of a few instances when I prefer the movie to the book. The book was simply too sweet, and Pollyanna was almost unbelievably perfect, but Hayley Mills adds just enough spunk to make Pollyanna real without diminishing the “Glad Game” at all.

Jungle Book: There are many renditions, but we love Disney’s animated version of the Jungle Book. It is not perfectly true to Kipling’s novel, but for children it is great (if you aren’t a story purist...and on this one, I’m not). The music is outstanding and upbeat, the characters are hysterical, and it is full of adventure and laughs.

The Absent-Minded Professor (the original with Fred MacMurray): I’m a fan of Fred MacMurray in general. The AbsentMinded Professor is a funny film the whole family will love (if you suspend disbelief for a moment and remember they didn’t have CGI when this was filmed). The professor, played by MacMurray, creates a rubbery, gravitydefying glop that launches a madcap adventure the whole family can enjoy.

Cinderella: We enjoy Rodgers & Hammerstein’s musical, but Disney’s animated film is our favorite. The animation is outstanding—the sequence where Cinderella’s rags transform into a gown was one of Walt’s favorite pieces of animation of all time, and it’s easy to see why. The scene truly sparkles. This is one princess with kindness, perseverance and grace— and a funny and fast-paced story to tell her tale.


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strategies to better balance

home and work life Y

To work or stay home? That is the question. Visit KCParent.com to read how other local moms decided what was best for them.

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esterday was a long day. After a full day of work, I zoomed home to see my kids and husband and grab a bite to eat before I headed out to one more work meeting. Then I raced back to give my daughter a kiss goodnight (missing my son’s bedtime) and catch up on the day’s events with my husband. I still feel tired and a little sad about the family time I missed. Fortunately, I know I’ll take that time back a little later this week, leaving work early to enjoy some coveted time with my family. I’m equally fortunate to have a great husband, a strong network of friends and family for support and a few tricks up my sleeve to handle days—or weeks!—that might otherwise get the better of me. If any of this sounds familiar, read on for a few ideas to physically and emotionally balance things out when you feel pulled in all directions. Plan, plan, plan: I was never a planner before I had kids. But whether you work outside of the home or not, a little planning can make a huge difference during weekdays. Whether it’s organizing your meals for the week or just helping your kids pick out their clothes for school the night before, a little forethought can absolutely make a hectic day manageable. Double up on tasks: It’s not always possible to double up on duties for efficiency, but it can feel like a lifesaver when you do it. My favorite double-duty action: meals. If we have chicken one evening for dinner, we’ll cook double the amount and use the leftover as chicken salad for lunches and have chicken quesadillas for dinner the next night. Or we’ll just cook a double batch of food one night so we can feast on leftovers the next. When the kids were younger, I even had a single birthday party for both of them, whose birthdays fall close together. We had twice the number of kids at the party, and only one event to plan. Even though they don’t have joint birthday parties anymore, we still reuse games from one birthday party to the next, modifying to the new party theme along the way. Figure out what you can and can’t live with: This was the most difficult thing for me to do when I first went back to work full time after maternity leave. I quickly realized I didn’t want all my memories of my children’s babyhood to involve folding laundry. I adjusted my own expectations and made sure I had time to do the really important things,


SPECIAL OFFER TRAIN ALL SUMMER$169 like reading books, cuddling and playing with Baby. Allowing myself to “select” things that could slide made it possible to mentally turn off the “I need to finish one more thing before I spend time with my child” voice in my head. Find an outlet for stress: Whether it’s a quick walk break around the office floor between meetings, scheduled exercise time, a 15-minute “talk date” with your husband every night or a girls night out with friends each month, it’s important to give yourself “me” time to relieve stress. Ask for help: Women in our generation have a tough time asking for help. Take it from me, once I got over the “I can do it all” syndrome, life got quite a bit easier. Whether a scheduled carpool ride or covering in a lastminute emergency, reliable help from friends and family is critical to striking a balance. Asking for help also can be a great way to forge new relationships and strengthen old ones. When my daughter entered elementary school, I was hesitant to ask other parents for help. However, reaching out to others has helped me connect with some great new friends. Sharing the joys and the mistakes of parenting makes us human, after all. Realistic time management: Time management is my least favorite phrase... probably because I still think I can make it through three errands in one hour or less with two kids tagging along! Try to be honest with yourself—if you have a kid in a car seat or a curious kid who likes to stop every four feet to inspect something, can you really make it to the store and back in 15 minutes? Probably not. Jane Blumenthal Martin and her husband both enjoy actively parenting their two children in Overland Park. Cartoon by Jim Strahle who makes his home in Kansas City.

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stay safe from social media gossip

S

Why kids gossip: • To feel relevant • To fit in • For popularity • To get back at someone who hurt them • To feel better about themselves

ThatsNotCool.com features “Call Out Cards” and videos that offer pre-scripted messages that kids can send to individuals who are bothering, harassing or pressuring them.

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hared whispers and notes in the hallway? That’s so yesterday. Today’s gossip is intense as it snakes quickly through social media. The impact is immediate and, for the victims, often devastating. How do we teach kids to communicate in a thoughtful way and protect themselves, too? Strike a balance. Social media is a wonderful networking tool for kids. They can connect with friends, discuss homework, work on projects, organize clubs and deepen their friendships. Complement social media use by getting your child involved in organizations and activities that help nurture her sense of self-worth, confidence and face-toface social skills. Follow the rules. To reinforce how serious you are about your child’s conducting himself with integrity online, don’t allow him to lie about his age. Many social media platforms like Facebook require a minimum age of 13, in accordance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. Through this law, companies that target children younger than 13 are under increased government regulation. Set boundaries. Social media use is a privilege that comes with responsibilities. Establish consequences if your child abuses that privilege. Decide when and where she can log into her accounts. Time limits are also important, says Sarah Manriquez, LCSW, the Family Conservancy.

“That’s important for brain development and physical activity,” Manriquez says. “When kids spend so much time connecting through social media, they lack the skills to fully connect with people and have reciprocal communication with them.” Consider creating “no-tech zones” in your home, like around the dinner table, where homework is completed or at bedtime. Put the computer in a central location of your home. Shut down your wireless at night or have your kids turn in their smartphones at a designated time each evening. Educate yourself. “Be aware of what’s out there, whether you want to get actively involved in your own Facebook page or not,” says safety expert Tracey Hawkins, owner of Safety and Security Source in Kansas City. “Get on those websites, see what they’re about and get an idea of what the kids are seeing so you can combat it. You can’t fight what you don’t know.” Role model. By getting on social media yourself, you can role model how to use it in a responsible way. But avoid using social media to humiliate or teach your child lessons. You may mean well, but this strategy can backfire, teaching kids that social media is an acceptable forum for backlash. Monitor activity. Even if your children are considerably more tech savvy than you, they still require parental guidance. Have access to all of your child’s accounts and passwords, and routinely check text messages


We asked KCParent.com readers, at what age should kids be on social media? 13% 8-10

25% 10-13

62% 13+

and social media account activity. Use errors of judgment as opportunities to discuss and problem solve. “Don’t be afraid to look since you are only trying to protect your children. Their safety is your responsibility. If there is something they are afraid to show you, it is probably something you need to be aware of,” says Detective Brian Karlstrand, Western Missouri Cyber Crimes Task Force, Gladstone Police Department.

online can get them into hot water at school and legally. “Parents can ask their kids: ‘Before you post something on social media, would you want me to look at it first?’” Hawkins says. “If the answer is no, then they should think twice about putting it on there.” Guard privacy. As a rule, your kids should never share their passwords with friends or significant others, even if they say they completely trust them. Remind

IF THERE IS SOMETHING THEY ARE AFRAID TO SHOW YOU, IT IS PROBABLY SOMETHING YOU NEED TO BE AWARE OF. Predators generate fake profiles to connect with children. Go through your child’s friend list to make sure she knows everyone on it. Also, discourage your child from using sites and apps that allow for anonymity, which can create an environment ripe for abusive behavior among participants. Talk...a lot. Open, honest communication is your best ally to protect your kids and to help them learn to be thoughtful communicators. Use opportunities like driving in the car, TV programs or dinnertime to discuss stories about kids’ dealing with social media troubles. “Kids respond better when you don’t directly ask them (about their behavior),” Manriquez says. “They get freaked out. They don’t want to out themselves or their friends. When you can talk about issues in a roundabout way using scenarios already seen in the media, it takes the pressure off of them and they are more open to talking about it.” Think before you post. Teens are impulsive by nature, and social media offers the instant gratification they crave. Stress the importance of empathy toward others. Also, make them aware that taunting someone

them to log out of their accounts if they use another person’s device. Uh-oh. Now what? If your child is attacked, shut down her account. Avoid retaliation which can amplify gossip. Also, block that person from your child’s electronic device. Support your child and encourage her to lean on close, trustworthy friends. Report abusive behavior to the school and/or the other child’s parents. You can also contact the police. “Online stalking or harassment can become a criminal issue when the child actually feels scared or threatened,” Karlstrand says. If your child is a victim of bullying, harassment or child enticement, preserve the evidence and contact your local law enforcement. Additional resources include NetSmartz.com, KidsHealth.org and ThatsNotCool.com. Freelance journalist and author Christa Melnyk Hines resides with her family in Olathe. Her latest book, is Happy, Healthy & Hyperconnected: Raise a Thoughtful Communicator in a Digital World. Connect with her at ChristaMelnykHines.com.

Family discussion questions: If that was happening to you, what would you do? What did you think about that? What would you say if a friend asks for your account password? What would you advise your friend if her boyfriend was pressuring her to send an intimate photo?

Sites to be aware of: • Ask.fm • Snapchat • Vine • Kik • Textplus • Whisper • Tinder Source: Western Missouri Cyber Crimes Task Force, Gladstone Police Department. kcparent.com july 2014

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prepping for an empty nest: making the most of the time left

a local mom reflects on her child’s leaving the nest

W

hen I walked into my son’s classroom on his first day of kindergarten and kissed him, wished him a super fantastic first day and then left almost in a sprint for the bathroom to grab a tissue, the thought of an empty nest was nowhere near. There’s tons of time, right? In the blink of an eye, he is now in the sixth grade. I only have six more summers before I will be called an empty nester. After I counted them, I started to panic!! When we become parents, everyone tells us the time will move fast and to enjoy it, but do we really have a complete understanding of just how fast it will fly? I had no clue. What about all the summer vacations you wanted to put into place before your children jet off into the next phase of life? Should you go ahead and book airfare and hotel accommodations for the summers you have left? What are you going to do when they leave? Stepping back from some of these questions and taking a deep breath helps make clear that quality time needs to be the focus. Many parents seem to wrap themselves up in all the noise of what they need to complete in a day, missing the opportunity to observe what is happening right then and there with their children. Too many times we are so involved in everyone else’s chatter (on the phone) that we miss what our kids are expressing at that very moment in time. Maybe

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you are on the computer and your teenager has finally decided to share his day. Will your ears be fully engaged to hear the full story, or will you compose an entire paragraph to a client or friend without really hearing a word your child has said? So many of us stay connected 24/7 and never turn off our phones. In

Remember when you would sit and watch your precious bundle of joy sleeping and observe every breath and movement? What about doing something similar when your kids are older? a world where people want to hear from you NOW, it is a hard balance. Maybe it’s time for parents to have a technology timeout. Whitney Foxx, mother of four, says “My kids are

young, but I know they won’t be for long, so I don’t mind leaving my phone upstairs when we head to the basement to play house, race cars or anything else they want to do.” Have you ever taken a moment to just sit and soak in your surroundings? Remember when you would sit and watch your precious bundle of joy sleeping and observe every breath and movement? What about doing something similar when your kids are older? Switch from watching them sleep to watching them read or go through the kitchen looking for a snack. Think of it like going to the movie theater to see a film. Step outside what is happening in front of you and just sit and observe. Do you still see the sleeping baby you used to watch for hours? It is the same thing, but in a different way. Especially when there are teenagers running around, this is a good technique to help prepare oneself for the final year they are home. It helps keep you centered on what is most important and, in a way, starts the letting go process. My son cracks up when he sees me doing this and says, “You are doing that watching me thing again, aren’t you?” It has become a fun, quirky moment for us. I am sure he will share it as a “remember when” during future family gatherings when he is an adult. Mary Nan Dupont, mother of three college students and estate planner at Dupont Law Firm, offers some insightful thoughts.


With a full year of empty nesting under her belt, she says, “The anticipation is worse than the actual moment. And each child is different, so saying good-bye was different each time.” Some parents are not ready to hear this, but in most cases the child is ready to go. They have matured and grown out of their secondary school phase and want to branch out and plant seeds that are their own. “Let go of the expectations and pressure of making things happen and just enjoy the time you have left with them,” Dupont says. “Cherish the moments.” Again, when you are in the midst of raising a family, managing a household, working a full- or part-time job, spending time with your partner, running to sports events or other activities, empty nesting is not going to be your first thought when you rise in the morning. It is a topic you start to think about more and more as the end-of-the-year report cards grow in numbers. It hit me hard, but I am glad it did. Because six summers will soar by fast in my world. But by recognizing this, I will try my very best to stay fully engaged and enjoy every possible moment to the fullest. Erin Stegman is a creative and thinkoutside-the-box mother in Overland Park. She is owner and jewelry designer of ErinPaigeDesigns.com.

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KCPARENT.COM!

We have everything you already love about our site plus a bunch of new features, including an ALL NEW PARTY GUIDE where parents can search by location with venues displayed on Google Maps plus search for party type AND see photos and video.

To save time, scoop ice cream into a cupcake pan before the party begins. Easy, individual-sized scoops are ready once cake is served! Margie Smith, Overland Park If celebrating your child’s birthday at a venue away from home, consider hosting the party on a weekday for smaller crowds and better prices. Anna Duvall, Shawnee Let your child decorate her own cake with colorful candies (Skittles and M & Ms work well. Maria Hines, Kansas City Take a photo with each guest. Print up the photos postcard size and write the thank you note on the back. A super easy, personalized thank you note! Sam Shepherd, Kansas City

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THE ALL-NEW

I learned the hard way—always have a plan B! Some good fall-back games are oldies but goodies, such as hot potato, limbo, freeze dance and Simon Says. You can always rename duck, duck, goose to match the party theme. Tricia Finkel, Liberty

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Kid’s Collections:

a great way to boost science processing skills

IN ADDITION TO AWAKENING WONDER AT THE VAST BOUNTY OF OUR NATURAL WORLD, COLLECTING THINGS ALSO BECKONS CHILDREN TO RESPOND TO THE “FUN OF THE HUNT.”

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H

ave you noticed that any time you’re outside with children they naturally begin to pick things up and “collect” them? This habit is part of their natural curiosity about the world, and it’s a wonderful thing. Nurture that curiosity by encouraging the children in your life to make collections of all kinds. Younger children can choose three or four treasures to save and display. Older children are able to curate ever more detailed collections of all kinds. In addition to awakening wonder at the vast bounty of our natural world, collecting things also beckons children to respond to the “fun of the hunt.” From an educational point of view, collections lend themselves to basic math and science learning. Younger children can sort by size, color, shape and pattern. Older children will learn to identify, la-

bel, organize into categories and classify their treasures in many different ways. Parents can support these learning activities by allowing collections display space in the home. Many children enjoy creating their own “museum” for a period of time. They will naturally want to add drawings, short informational descriptions and charts. Voila! You have created an engaged learner! What to collect? The possibilities are endless. Some favorites from the natural world include rocks and minerals, shells, feathers, bark, leaves, pinecones, insects, butterflies and moths. Other collectibles might include coins, stamps, stickers, miniature toys, dolls, bottle caps, comic books, gum wrappers, buttons or marbles. If there are a lot of them around, you can collect them.


CRAFT ITEMS TO KEEP ON HAND FOR DISPLAYING COLLECTIONS Cardboard boxes and the inside dividers Tape Glue Markers String, twine Scissors Fabric scraps Clothespins to hang items Lumber scraps Styrofoam trays Cans Plastic containers with lids Old picture frames Plastic wrap Clear contact paper Paper bags Plastic bags Clipboards for recording data Children’s binoculars Waxed paper

Support your children’s wonder and joy in the intricacies of nature by creating lists of beautiful things seen, favorite hikes or places to play and anything else that builds children’s appreciation of the beauty around them. Display the charts and lists on walls to be read and enjoyed in times to come. Such activities will increase logical thinking skills and involve organization of factual information in the writing process. Children who develop a passion for their collections also gain self-confidence and will learn to share their passion with others. They’ll talk about their collections, share and trade items with others and otherwise engage in social skills. They will “own” their collection in such a way as to gain in responsibility and care-giving of something valuble to them.

SKILLS ENHANCED THROUGH CREATING KID COLLECTIONS Observation: Noticing alike and different, noticing unique features, using the five senses to record information. Classification: Sorting and organizing according to a property, such as size, shape or color. Measurement: Finding the length, width or other quantity using a measuring tool. Communication: Sharing information with others, relating facts. Making inferences: Using data to speculate on factual information. Making predictions: Using data to predict an outcome. Interpretation of factual data: Making meaning from data gathered, answering questions posed. Experimentation: Posing questions, designing a test, logging data and trying out possible solutions to problems.

BOOKS ON KID COLLECTIONS The Kids’ Nature Book: 365 Indoor/ Outdoor Activities and Experiences by Susan Milford Nature Smart: A Family Guide to Nature by Tekiela and Shanber Field Guides by theAudubon Society The Insect Book: A Basic Guide to Collection and Care of Common Insects for Young Children by Connie Zakowski Kids Collect: Amazing Collections for Fun, Crafts and Science Fair Projects by Dan and Mary Hubley Collecting Bugs and Things by Julia Spencer Collecting Things Is Fun by Kimberlee Graves The Usborne Book of Collecting Things by Ray Gibson Let’s Go Rock Collecting by Roma Gans and Holly Keller

Inquiry: Asking appropriate questions to determine an outcome or evaluate a circumstance

They’ll increase their knowledge base in a certain subject area, too. If they have chosen to collect bird nests, they may also learn all about the habitats of birds, their diet, their size, shape and defining marks. They’ll want to observe birds in their natural habitat, and they’ll ask questions, make inferences, synthesize information and engage in many scientific processing skills. They will be independent learners. Adults can further encourage such independent learning by purchasing appropriate books, field guides and posters related to the collection of the day. You might even want to have a disposable camera or binoculars on hand for capturing images during impromptu nature walks. Keep poster board on hand to be ready for those inspired

lists, charts and drawings that will make up displays of collected items. Happy collecting! Jan Pierce, M.Ed., is a retired teacher and freelance writer. She explores the out-ofdoors with her three grandsons who are avid collection-makers. Resources: Practicing Science Process Skills at Home by Debbye Vitti and Angie Torres, 2006. “Research Matters to the Science Teacher,” National Association for Research in Science, by Michael J. Padilla, University of Athens, Georgia, 1990, 2013. *This article first appeared in The Mother’s Heart Magazine in the May/June 2013 issue.

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“man up” and other stereotypical things I won’t say to my son

“A boy is told that ‘big boys don’t cry,’ that he shouldn’t be a ‘mama’s boy.’ If these things aren’t said directly, these messages dominate in subtle ways in how boys are treated—and therefore how boys come to think of themselves.”

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A

few days ago, I decided to make coffee for myself. I rarely drink coffee, opting instead for green tea. As I poured the grounds in, my 3-year-old said, “Mommy, only boys drink coffee. Girls drink tea.” As I explained to him that boys can drink tea and girls can drink coffee, I realized that we have officially arrived at the pivotal place in every childhood where gender stereotyping begins. I understand why he might draw that conclusion. His father makes coffee every morning while I opt for tea, and he sees these things transpire. According to the article “Avoiding Gender Stereotypes” on Parents. com, “Research shows that infants can tell the difference between males and females as early as their first year. What’s more, they begin forming gender stereotypes as soon as they know they are boys and girls.” It is normal for children at this age to try to explore and understand the rules of the world—what is and what isn’t. Our job as parents is to help them navigate the muddied waters, so that they can grow into emotionally and mentally healthy adults. The more we know, the better we can be for them. Let’s start from the beginning. Gender is defined in the dictionary as “the state of being male or female— used with reference to social and cultural differences rather than biological ones.” This means that gender is not about whether you are a girl or a boy as defined by your reproductive organs. Gender is what society deems appropriate for males and females in regards to toys, clothes, movies, colors, sports and academic pursuits. For example, society generally frowns upon boys’ wearing pink and girls’ playing football because


of gender constraints. It’s important to understand, however, that gender stereotyping can be damaging to a child’s learning his or her sense of self and place in the world. KC blogger Megan Thode says, “‘Buck up!’ is one that I’ve heard, and the child’s reaction is always the same. There is a look of shame and frustration on his little face.” This is all too normal an occurrence, as author William Pollack, PH.D, writes in Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood. “Boys are made to feel shame over and over, in the midst of growing up, through what I call society’s shame-hardening process,” he says. “The idea is that a boy needs to be disciplined, toughened up, made to act like a ‘real man,’ be independent, keep the emotions in check. A boy is told that, ‘big boys don’t cry,’ that he shouldn’t be a ‘mama’s boy.’ If these things aren’t said directly, these messages dominate in subtle ways in how boys are treated—and therefore how boys come to think of themselves.” Boys aren’t just told to hide their vulnerability and emotion, refrain from playing certain games and wearing certain colors, they also are given an array of rules that they are expected to abide by around women. Kansas City mom Heather Birdwell says that one aspect of gender stereotyping that bothers her is that boys are taught to do certain things for girls. “We teach respect over ‘stereotypical’ roles. I expect my daughter to hold a door open for someone behind her, just as much as I expect my son to grab a door for a person with their hands full.” While I do believe that the gender lines are blurring as society begins to understand more about boys’ and girls’ emotional, mental and physical needs, it’s important that we work to lay the foundation for our children as they grow. How do we do this? There are several ways to avoid gender stereotyping, according to an article on Parents.com: 1. Encourage mixed-gender play dates. 2. Reinforce behaviors that shatter stereotypes. For example, a father may tell a son in tears, “Sometimes I feel like crying, too.” 3. Question all generalizations. Janice Garfinkel, a teacher in South Bellmore, NY, constantly tries to probe generalizations in her classroom. “In preschool, the girls tell the boys, ‘Pretend you’re the dad, and it’s time for you to come home from work. I’m the

mom, and I’m taking care of the baby.’ I always ask the kids, ‘Do you know any moms who go out to work each day?’”

received a kitchen set and a train table. There was no mention of kitchens or cooking being just for girls or train tables being strictly the boy thing to do. Those are the activities they enjoy at the moment. I am also teaching my boys about communicating their feelings. My sons are learning to articulate emotions out loud rather than being forced to hide them under the mask of being a man. “Boys can’t…” isn’t part of my vocabulary. “Be a kind, honest person” is. I think that’s a good lesson for all.

4. Tune in to your own biases. “Parents should review their behavior to make sure they’re not doing or saying anything that feeds into something harmful,” says Charles Flatter, Ph.D., a professor of human development at the University of Maryland. I am careful not to draw lines with my sons. Sometimes they parade around in my high heels, scarves draped over one shoulder and wide grins on their faces. I never say “Stop being a sissy.” For Christmas, they

PACE

Jennifer Bosse lives in KC with her husband and two sons. She does not believe in gender stereotyping.

UMKC’s degree program for working adults

The Program for Adult College Education (PACE) enables full-time working adults to earn bachelor’s degrees. Classes meet in flexible weeknight, weekend and independent study formats. The degree programs offered through PACE will help prepare you for a number of professional career fields or graduate studies in areas such as:

Education Law Allied health and medical programs Commercial economics and business-related areas

Classes begin soon. Call the PACE office today.

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THE UNIVERSIT Y OF MISSOURI-K ANSAS CIT Y: A UNIVERSE OF KNOWLEDGE IN A CIT Y OF OPPORTUNIT Y.

w w w. u m k c . e d u kcparent.com july 2014

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raising an

empathetic child Many parents want to quickly jump in and make sad or angry feelings go away for their children. Allowing your child to feel a wide range of emotions while experiencing support and comfort from you helps increase his emotional intelligence.

A

t recess, a child trips on the play equipment and falls into a muddy puddle. Some of the other children laugh; some don’t pay much attention. One child wanders over that way and helps him up. What is it about this one child that drives him to help another? Why is he concerned about a friend when others aren’t? Clearly, the child’s ability to empathize plays a crucial role in his actions. As parents, we all would like to think that our child would be the one to help. We want to believe that we are raising our kids to “do the right thing” and to care about others. Empathy, however, is a bit more complicated than that. Empathy goes beyond simply “caring” about someone; it’s the ability to actually feel with someone. An empathetic individual is able to see a situation from another’s perspective (or really “feel” from another’s perspective), respond in a way he or she believes would be comforting to that person, all while separating his or her own feelings from those of others. While the explanation of empathy might sound complicated, teaching this skill to your child is not. In fact, most parents are probably already instilling empathy without even realizing it. Here are five tips for raising an empathetic child: 1. Be a responsive parent. Beginning in infancy, babies learn empathy when their needs are met by a caregiver. If a baby is fussy, a responsive parent cuddles; if a baby is hungry, a responsive parent feeds her. As children get older, they need to know that parents understand their feelings and are there to comfort them in times of need. Children whose needs are met at home have a greater capacity for showing empathy to others. 2. Label feelings. When children are able to identify and name their own emotions, they are better able to recognize emotion in others. Younger children are able to understand basic feeling labels such as mad, happy and sad but might need parental help in labeling these feelings. Simple acknowledgement of a feeling by a parent can be enough to diffuse a situation: “I can see you are very mad that we had to leave the park. I was having fun, too.” As children

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get older, parents can help them label more complex feelings, such as frustration, disappointment, nervousness, embarrassment, etc. 3. Allow all feelings to be okay. Many parents want to quickly jump in and make sad or angry feelings go away for their children. Allowing your child to feel a wide range of emotions while experiencing support and comfort from you helps increase his emotional intelligence. Children who are taught that certain feelings are not okay often grow up struggling with how to feel or express these emotions. Allow your child to feel uncomfortable feelings and provide him with safe ways to express and cope with them. 4. Model empathy. Sue Boxer, director of early childhood at B’nai Jehudah, is inspired by the quote “If you don’t model what you teach, you are teaching something else.” She believes that children are very keen observers and will pick up on how we, as adults, treat others. Simply expressing concern about someone or trying to understand their hurt or angry feelings teaches your children about empathy. Jessica Marien, Leawood mom of four, says she and her husband try to model empathy by speaking “internal dialogue” out loud. “This allows my children to hear us ‘wonder’ about how our decisions will impact others,” she says.

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5. Volunteer. Finding ways to serve others allows your child to think about what it would be like to be in someone else’s shoes. A visit to a nursing home might open your child’s eyes to the loneliness a resident might experience. Even a simple act of donating toys might help spark a conversation about what it might feel like to have little or nothing. Providing experiences for your child to help make the world a better place is a great building block for the development of empathy. Know that developing and practicing empathy is a lifelong process, not something that happens overnight. Our job as parents is to do all we can to teach and model empathy for our children as they grow. It is one of the greatest gifts we can offer them. Kimberly Levitan, LCSW, is the founder of Playful Solutions, providing play therapy for children and families in the Kansas City metro. Teaching and modeling empathy is part of her daily work with clients. To learn more, visit PlayfulSolutionsKC.com. kcparent.com july 2014

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bucket list bingo..............37 drive-in fun.......................38 firecracker flags..............39 patriotic popcorn............40 summer books..................41 sense-ational summer..42 s’mores, anyone..............44 summer safety.................46

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TWEEN BUCKET LIST

bingo creating summer memories with your tween

“Best. Summer. Ever.” are the words we’d all like to hear from our tween daughters. Why not make 2014 a summer to remember? Creating a summer bucket list is the perfect way to ensure your daughter’s summer days aren’t idled away in the summer sun or in front of a screen. Sitting down to create a bucket list can be half the fun when you work together to come up with realistic, varied and achievable goals. Remember that some of our best memories often come from seemingly small yet intentional activities and routines. Think of events you and your tween can do together, then truly enjoy each other’s company and make this a summer to remember.

photograph a sunrise and sunset on the same day

go on a spontaneous road trip

see sound of music at starlight (july 25-31)

stargaze! download the star walk app onto your phone

• Kids are considered tweens when they are pre-adolescent (generally between the ages of 9 and 12).

mom & daughter slumber party with popcorn & pedis

play flashlight tag

tie-dye something

rent a paddle boat at shawnee mission lake

make DIY flip-flops from pinterest

• Tweens are quickly developing a social conscience about the world around them.

make homemade ice cream

watch mary poppins & talk in a british acccent all day

FREE

create a summer 2014 soundtrack

build a sandcastle

memorize the U.S. presidents in order

host a family dance party

attend a concert

take selfies at 5 historical sites near or far

bake cupcakes to give away to neighbors

learn to knit

go on a spontaneous road trip

practice a new sport for one week

create a wovenfinger knitting hula hoop rug

try one new food every week

The truth about the tween years:

• Enthusiastic and eager are two words often used to describe tweens.

(AllFreeKidCrafts.com)

keep a daily gratitude journal

Jena Meyerpeter is a freelance writer from Lenexa who is currently loving the tween years with her oldest daughter.

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family fun at the drive-in By Margaret Sarver

Our family looks forward to summer nights at the drivein each year. It’s a fun way to catch the latest flicks and spend time with friends and family. Below are a few tips to make the most of your drive-in experience:

Kansas City area drive-in theaters: Boulevard Drive-In Where: 1051 Merriam Ln. Kansas City, KS Phone: 913.262.0392 Web: BoulevardDrivein.com B & B I-70 Drive-In Where: 8701 E. 40 Hwy. Kansas City, MO Phone: 816.861.0500 Web: BBTheatres.com B & B Twin Drive-In Where: 1320 N. 291 MO Hwy. & 291 E. Kentucky Rd., Independence, MO Phone: 816.257.2234 Web: BBTheatres.com

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• Arrive early. Check websites for start times. As the days get longer, the start times get later. We typically arrive at least an hour early to procure what we consider to be the perfect spot (second row, in the center. We used to sit up in the first row, but you’ll find a lot of families parked in the back move up front with chairs and blankets when the show begins).

• Bring chairs and blankets. The majority of the people backed in and opened up the rear of their cars for the kids while the adults sat in lawn chairs. Even though it was July, we brought a blanket “just in case.” We were glad we had it.

• Bring bug spray. The Boulevard Drive-In has a fun playground for the kids to enjoy before the show begins, but it is in a grassy area and heavily populated by bugs.

• Go with friends. We made plans to attend with another family and arrived at the same time, so we were able to park next to each other. We happened to meet up with two other families. It was fun for us to have friends to talk to and fun for the girls to have friends to play with.

• Check the food policy. Concessions are available, and at the Boulevard you are welcome to bring in food. Check with the particular theater before heading out and stock up on snacks on the way. Don’t forget the paper towels and wet wipes.

• Bring cards or a game. After playing on the playground for almost an hour, the kiddos were tired, but we still had some time to wait before the movie began. Luckily, the friends we were with brought Uno, and the girls played until the movie began.


CRAFTCORNER

“These festive flags are so easy for kids to make and hang outside on a tree, decorate a bike or spruce up the front porch for the Fourth of July.�

firecracker flags T

hese festive flags are so easy for kids to make and hang outside on a tree, decorate a bike or spruce up the front porch for the Fourth of July. All you need are a few simple materials that you probably already have on hand to get started on these fun firecracker flags!

Materials Needed: Construction paper White glue Ribbon or yarn String Stickers Scissors

Begin by decorating pieces of construction paper with stickers or anything else you might have on hand. On the back of the paper, attach ribbons or yarn with glue to hang down as fringe on the bottom. Once the paper is dry, form into a cylinder shape and either glue or staple the seam closed. Punch three holes in the top and thread string through the holes to hang. Megan Kapple is a blogger from Kansas City, MO, where she lives with her husband and three young daughters. She loves anything DIY and crafty and blogs about her adventures at HomemadeGinger.com.

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PATRIOTIC POPCORN JARS Party —— in a ——

Jar

Party in a Jar

Party in a Jar features 16 kidfriendly craft projects that not only provide entertainment for pint-sized partygoers but also function as take-home party favors! From edible dino terrariums to holiday-themed Patriotic Popcorn Jars gifts and centerpieces, these upcycled jar crafts are earth—— Makes 10 decorated jars —— friendly and sure to be the hit Celebrate the Fourth of July with red-white-and-blue-colored popcorn in a jar. Kids will haveof your next get-together. PartyinaJarBook.com fun coloring their popcorn before enjoying this festive snack under the fireworks.

Materials 10 (1-pint) Mason jars 1 cup popcorn kernels 3 sealable plastic bags 1/2 teaspoon blue edible color dust 1/2 teaspoon red edible color dust 10 festive cupcake liners jute or string

Directions

Photographs by Jennifer Roberts from Party in A Jar by Vanessa Rodriguez Coppola; reprinted with permission of Gibbs Smith.

1. Pop 1 cup of popcorn kernels according to package directions. 2. Divide popped popcorn into 3 large sealable plastic bags.

Photographs by Jennifer Roberts from Party in A Jar by Vanessa Rodriguez Coppola; reprinted with permission of Gibbs Smith.

Celebrate the Fourth of July with red-white-and-bluecolored popcorn in a jar. Kids will have fun coloring their popcorn before enjoying this festive snack under the fireworks.

3. Add 1/2 teaspoon blue edible color dust in one bag, seal and shake until the popcorn is completely colored. Add 1/2 teaspoon red edible color dust in another bag, seal and shake until the popcorn is completely colored. Leave the last bag of popcorn uncolored. 4. Layer the popcorn in jars starting with the blue popcorn, adding the uncolored white popcorn and then the red. 5. Place lids on the jars and cover the lids with a festive cupcake liner, tying it in place with jute or string. Tip: You can find edible color dust in the cake-decorating aisle of most craft supply stores.

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MEDIAMIX

summer school, summer fun New Books Make an Adventure of Reading By McGeath Freeman

Count on the Subway

Math is all around–even on vacation. When a little girl and her mom take a trip into New York City, the counting begins. From counting a single metro card to counting passengers who exit and enter a stop, the numbers come and go fast with expediency. The playful rhyming and zippy pacing of the text match the movement of the subway system. And the quirky characters and stylized

By Paul Dubois Jacobs & Jennifer Swender Illustrated by Dan Yaccarino Best for: Ages 3-7

images remind us that learning can, and does, happen everywhere. Pay attention to the details on each page. Yaccarino’s mid-century illustration style may seem flat, but it’s filled with layers of detail, like the robot boy, a purse dog and more. Speaking of dogs, how many wiener dogs can you find in this book?

What’s good: Yaccarino always engages the reader in his visual storytelling. What’s bad: : Nothing. It’s a fun book by counting book veterans.

I Pledge Allegiance

Learning about someone who chooses to become a citizen is good for all of us. So is getting a little history behind the pledge. After all, living in the land of the free and the home of the brave is a gift we should all appreciate.

By Pat Mora & Libby Martinez Illustrated by Patrice Barton Best for: Ages 4-8

Mora and her daughter, Martinez, draw on their own family history to tell the tale of Libby and her Great Aunt Lobo. Both are learning the Pledge of Allegiance. Libby is learning about the pledge for her

class at school, while Lobo wants to become a U.S. citizen. Libby’s teacher gives them details and history surrounding the pledge, but the part that stands out most to me is Lobo’s own history. She says that when she came to the country as a little girl with her family, the flag made her feel safe. “The American flag–red, white and blue–wrapped itself around me to protect me.” Young readers may not understand that it’s a metaphor for the safety of living in America, but it’s a great conversation starter.

What’s good: Great conversation starter for classrooms and families. What’s bad: A little lengthy for young readers.

Kingdom Keepers VII: The Insider

Ridley Pearson said this is the last installment of the Kingdom Keepers series. If you haven’t read the other books in this series, don’t pick this one up yet. Start with book one. Fans have been waiting for the final battle, and that’s just what they’ll get as the Keepers pick up the fight with the Overtakers, four years after book six. Mostly, it’s an excellent final book in the series. A few small plot

By Ridley Pearson Best for: Ages 10-12

points are left hanging – a rarity from Pearson. And the final chapter will leave you wondering if it really is the last we’ll hear about the Keepers’ battle with the Overtakers.

What’s good: Several fans offered input for the story and had their writing included. What bad: Several plot points are introduced, then dropped without resolution.

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Observe and enjoy the world around you this summer on a sense-ational adventure celebrating all five senses: When children come into contact with

nature, they reveal their strength.

-Maria

a sense-ational

summer of fun in kansas city

5

fun ideas under $5

FOR A SUMMER OF KC FUN VISIT KCPARENT.COM

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Montessori

TOUCH: Deanna Rose Children’s Farmstead (138th & Switzer, Overland Park, KS, 913.897.2360. FREE Mon.-Thur. with $2/person admission Fri.-Sun. During the summer (Memorial Day to Labor Day), the Farmstead is open until 8:00 on Tuesday and Thursday). The farmstead showcases a variety of farm animals: goats, longhorn steer, cows, horses, chickens, mules, sheep, bison, prairie dogs, a koi pond, and even some rescued animals—our favorite being the bald eagle. Kids enjoy the petting zoo area where they pet and feed goats They also enjoy feeding the fish, riding ponies or a horse-drawn wagon, learning about cows in the dairy barn where they can milk a model cow and riding miniature John Deere tractors. The farmstead is beautifully maintained, well shaded and full of wonderful hands-on fun for the entire family.

More Summer Fun for the Senses in Kansas City: Touch: Search “Beaches” on KCParent.com for a guide to local beaches where you can splash, play and build sand castles in the summer sun. Sight: Search “Waterfalls” on KCParent.com to discover 12 majestic waterfalls in the Midwest.

Taste: Kansas City is home to more than 30 farmers markets. They range from small markets selling exclusively organic produce to the City Market with more than 140 local vendors. You can purchase fruits, vegetables, plants, herbs, homemade soaps, baked goods and even live animals. Best of all, many vendors offer samples.


Thanks to art,

instead of seeing

one world, our own, we see it multi-

plied, and as many

It’s difficult to

original artists as there are, so many

think anything but

worlds are at our

while eating a

-Marcel Proust

pleasant thoughts homegrown tomato. -Lewis Grizzard

TASTE: A visit to Powell Gardens: (1609 NW U.S. Hwy. 50, Kingsville, MO, 816.697.2600, PowellGardens.org) is a treat for all five senses. Powell Gardens, one of Kansas City’s botanical gardens, features many wonderful areas to explore. One of our favorites, the 12-acre Heartland Harvest Garden, is the largest edible landscape in the United States. After a visit, children better understand where their food comes from. One of the highlights of a visit is the opportunity to sample foods at the tasting stations, which are open during growing season. “On any given day, you’re likely to find several things to try, from basics like strawberries to more unusual items like yard-long noodle beans,” Callen Zind, Powell’s marketing and events director, says. “With more than 2,000 types of food plants, we can almost guarantee there will be something to surprise you!”

disposal.

SIGHT: The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, Kansas City, MO, 816.751.1278, Nelson-Atkins.org) is one of our favorite destinations in Kansas City. The beautifully lit Bloch Building, the all-new interactive outdoor sculpture “Glass Labyrinth” and amazing galleries featuring art from around the world make this a terrific family outing, date night or parents night out. Best of all, because admission is free, you don’t have to do it all in one day! Visit for 30 minutes or just an hour or two and come back another day. With young children, come after they’ve enjoyed breakfast and are well rested, then visit for a bit and return another day to see more. Tours are available, including FREE mobile audio guided tours. Check out an iPod Touch or connect with your own webenabled device. The mobile audio guide has a special Kansas City Sculpture Park tour just for kids! Guided tours are also offered for free every day. In addition, you will find family guides in the Bloch Lobby that explain various exhibits specifically with kids in mind. You may pick up free copies of the guide at the museum, or read the family guides online

Smell: Head to Loose Park (51st & Wornall in Kansas City, MO), where you can stroll through the most beautiful and fragrant rose garden in the metro.

before your trip! Tip: Search “Nelson-Atkins Scavenger Hunt” on KCParent.com to add to your fun.

Take time to stop and smell the flowers. -unknown

SMELL: Visit the Kauffman Memorial Gardens (4800 Rockhill Rd., Kansas City, MO), one of the most beautiful places in Kansas City. The gardens are a beautiful spot for a stroll and photography, and they are open and free to the public. Moms will appreciate that the gardens are gated, keeping children within the walls to explore the flowers and fountains without worry that they’ll wander into the street or parking lot. The indoor gardens offer a nice place to sit and relax, and they have public restrooms, as well. Bonus Tip: On select dates throughout the summer, you may catch a FREE ride from Kauffman Gardens to Powell Gardens. Read the Powell Gardens shuttle schedule at PowellGardens.org/Shuttle for more information.

Music is the art of

thinking with sounds. -Jules Combarieu

SOUND: Kansas City is home to many wonderful children’s musicians, as well as great performers in every genre that the entire family will enjoy. Visit KCParent.com and search our Calendar for FREE summer concerts all season long! Local attractions and parks host talented musicians who perform great outdoor concerts, offering a terrific opportunity to introduce kids to a love for music. Best of all, most of these concerts also permit you to bring your own picnic and perhaps even toss a Frisbee or blow some bubbles, making it a truly fun and memorable family experience. So enjoy some great music under the summer sky. Kristina Light every year looks forward to summer fun at Powell Gardens, where her daughters especially enjoy the annual Festival of Butterflies.

Hear: Visit KCParent.com and search our calendar for FREE concerts all summer long! Photo credit: John Lamberton

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s’mores, anyone?

W

hen families tighten their budgets, often one of the first things they forgo is the family vacation. Who can afford a lavish resort or a high-priced amusement park? But a vacation does not have to be expensive or far from home to help you achieve the goals of relaxing, having fun and making memories. How about a family camping trip? Maybe you have never been camping, or perhaps you camped BC (Before Children) but don’t remember how to pitch a tent or survive without a microwave. With a little preparation, you can have a fun, economical family vacation in the great outdoors.

Preparing the Kids

Tips for a fun, affordable camping vacation

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If your kids have never been camping, they could be excited about sleeping in a tent, cooking over a campfire and searching for constellations…or they might dread the thought of spending a few days without their comfy bed and their favorite TV shows. Here are a few tips for your first-time campers: • Build enthusiasm by getting kids involved in the planning stages. They can help choose what to bring, where to go, etc. • Spend a night or two camping in the back yard to get kids used to sleeping in a tent. • Keep the first camping trip short and close to home before you head out for a longer stay in the Ozarks or other popular destinations. Several area lakes have campgrounds, including Longview, Jacomo, Blue Springs, Shawnee Mission Park and Smithville. • First-time campers might be more comfortable if they have a few favorite toys from home. Stuffed animals, books, coloring books or a game will make the camping experience enjoyable while not bogging down the car.

Choosing a Destination If you feel your family is ready for a longer camping trip, consider all the factors when you choose a destination. How far do you want to travel? Does the campground have activities for children? What amenities


are most important to you? Word of mouth is best when it comes to choosing a campground. Check with family and friends who camp, or call camping stores in the area to get the staff ’s advice. Online forums and reviews are also useful. If you are camping in Missouri or Kansas, you can find a listing of state parks and campgrounds on these websites: MoStateParks.com and KDWP.state.ks.us. If you are venturing farther, you can find national parks listed at NPS.gov.

Equipment to Take If you’re not a seasoned camper, thinking about all the equipment and supplies needed for an outing can be overwhelming. Don’t sweat it, though, and don’t buy a bunch of new equipment right off the bat. If your family discovers they love camping, you can accumulate supplies along the way. Garage sales and thrift stores are great places to pick up cookware, dishes, coolers and food containers. Search your closets and cupboards for old towels and blankets, and ask family and friends if they have old items they wouldn’t mind passing along. Must-haves include sleeping bags and/ or air mattresses, tent, blankets, pillows, firstaid kit, sunscreen, insect repellant, flashlights

(don’t forget extra batteries!), cookware, water and food. Stacy Brady of Gladstone frequently takes her nephew camping. She recommends packing extra blankets and sheets, as you never know when someone might get sick or when the weather might turn bad. Plan ahead by making a list of things you want to bring. Separate into categories: bedding, cooking/eating, personal care, clothing, miscellaneous. Bring the list with you and add things you wish you had brought, so you will remember them next time. Store camping equipment in plastic tubs with the checklist taped to the lid, so you will be prepared next time you go camping. Equipment checklists can be found on many camping websites, but they often include everything but the kitchen sink. Use them as guidelines and personalize the list for your family.

Tents This is one item you don’t want to scrimp on, particularly if you plan to camp regularly. Here are a few things to consider: • Buy a tent with a capacity rated two people higher than the actual number of people who will use it. For example, a

family of four would buy a six-person tent. This allows for some elbow room and storage space. • Consider a two-room tent. The kids can sleep in one room and the adults in the other. • Tents with roof vents allow air circulation and eliminate condensation inside the tent. • Tents with a large rain fly (the “umbrella” that covers the tent) and tub floor will keep leaks out.

Menu Many people consider this the best part of the camping experience. Warren and Cassie Ayres of Independence often camp at Fleming Park and Watkins Mill State Park with their children. Their menu is not limited to hot dogs over a campfire. Warren says, “We have corn on the cob, baked beans which we set right inside the fire, baked potatoes, hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken and s’mores. In the mornings we have eggs, bacon, biscuits and gravy.” Whether you’re cooking with campfire, grill or propane stove, get creative with your food selections, and be sure to pack lots of snacks! Tisha Foley lives in Belton with her husband and two children.

April though October ENJOY A GUIDED TOUR through the Budweiser Clydesdales’ state-ofthe-art breeding facility located in the rolling hills of Boonville, Missouri. This incredible facility is home to more than 100 Budweiser Clydesdales, ranging from foals to stallions. Be sure to bring a camera to capture the grace and beauty of the Budweiser Clydesdales as they move freely in their natural environment and provide once-in-a-lifetime photo opportunities. Budweiser samples will be offered along with the opportunity to visit our gift shop.

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kcparent.com 2014

Trim:7.4x4.85july Bleed: none Live: 7.15x4.6

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summer safety In this day and age, we’re distracted. But in regards to water safety, it’s absolutely critical to pay close attention to any child near water.

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S

ummertime! Time to send the kids outside to wear themselves out! For parents with younger children, which season takes more time to get the kids ready to play outside is debatable. In the winter little ones need help into their winter gear, but in the summer they need to be dredged in sunscreen. They may not easily comply, but sunscreen is a big deal. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, getting one blistering sunburn when you’re a child doubles your chances of developing melanoma. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone apply a water-resistant sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays every day of the year. Choose a sunscreen that is at least SPF 30, apply it 15 to 30 minutes before going outside and reapply every two hours. Summer is also the season where

scraped knees are inevitable. Ride-on toys, bikes, scooters, even running around, can lead to falling down and needing a Band-Aid. Make sure your first aid kit is stocked and ready with the perfect bandages to make it all feel better. Helmets were not cool when I was riding my bike to school. However, when I began road biking as an adult, I found out the importance of helmets after a fall. My kids have not known any different. We put helmets on before we get the bikes out. It’s also important to find the correct size of helmet. If your child is a little resistant, have him pick one out with his favorite character or color. In my experience, it’s nice to carry a first aid kit in the car and stroller. Perhaps it’s not filled to the brim for every emergency, but having a few bandages, wipes, etc. is helpful. When my daughter was about 15


months old, she was climbing up the stairs on a playground and hit her face on the last step, busting her lip open. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, each year more than 200,000 children go to hospital emergency rooms with playgroundrelated injuries. Along with more time outdoors comes more time to be pestered by those pesky bugs. If the bugs are out with a vengeance, make sure to apply a bug repellent with DEET. Also, wearing loose-fitting, longsleeved clothing in softer colors and socks and shoes instead of sandals can help. It’s always a good idea to have periodic tick checks, especially if you are out near many trees or in grassy areas. Since the July average high temperature is 90 degrees Fahrenheit for KC, heat illness and dehydration are also safety concerns. Try to have outdoor time during the morning and later in the evening. Keep plenty of water available and teach your child that it’s cooler to play in the shade. There are various symptoms to both heat illness and dehydration, including thirst, headache, irritability and dizziness. If you recognize that your child is not enjoying being outside or isn’t acting like

himself, it may be time to find some AC and take a break for a while. Summer isn’t summer without swimming pools and sprinklers, but we all know swimming pools can pose a real danger. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports swimming lessons for most children 4 years and older, and for children 1 to 4 years of age who are ready to learn how to swim. It’s important to remember that all children learn and develop at their own pace and that each child will be able to swim in his own time. In this day and age, we’re distracted. But in regards to water safety, it’s absolutely critical to pay close attention to any child near water. Children can drown in very little water left in any kind of container. Even though it’s a pain to have to keep refilling the wading pool in the back yard, water play containers should be emptied after each use and stored upside down to prevent filling with rain water unbeknownst to you. Stephanie Loux enjoys summer with her family at her home in Olathe.

• Never leave your child unattended around water. There is no room for compromise on this one. Babies can drown in as little as one inch of water. • Put the cell phone away. Give young children 100 percent of your attention when they are near or around water. • Empty all tubs, buckets, containers and wading pools immediately after use. Store them upside down and out of children’s reach. • Parents have a million things to do, but learning CPR should be on the top of the list. It will give you tremendous peace of mind—and the more peace of mind you have as a parent, the better. SafeKids.org

As always, please consult your health care provider with any questions or concerns.

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Quiz: How Healthy Is Your Home?

Is your kitchen floor so clean you would allow your kids to eat off of it? (Ha—I know. Mine isn’t either.)Do you know where dust bunnies most like to gather in your home? So many of our major cleaning projects happen in the spring, and it’s only natural. After all, spring is a season of new beginnings, but any time of year can be a time to freshen things up. “Cleaning and organizing go hand-inhand,” says Krystal Cooper, owner of We Organize, a Kansas City-based organizing service (We-Organize.com). “They’re cousins.” With a bent toward tidying up, KC Parent set out to determine what constitutes a healthy home. How healthy is your home? Take our quiz to find out.

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[ in the kitchen ]

1) Which is the best option for wiping down counters and sinks? A. A sponge. B. A dishcloth. C. A dry microfiber towel. 2) How often should you clean out your fridge? A. Wipe up spills immediately; unplug fridge and clean the interior seasonally. B. Wipe up spills once a month; unplug fridge and clean the interior once a year. C. Perform a thorough cleaning of your fridge once a month. 3) Wipe down kitchen counters and take out the trash frequently to: A. Keep your kitchen smelling fresh. B. Keep the threat of pests down. C. Eliminate germs to which kids are especially susceptible. 4) The best type of cutting board to use to help avoid bacteria and food-related illness is:

[ clutter/pest control ]

5) During what season is pest infestation most prevalent? A. Spring B. Summer C. Fall D. Winter 6) Seal cracks and small openings along the foundation of your home to: A. Make the outside of your home more attractive. B. Improve your home’s ventilation. C. Prevent pests from getting in. 7) True or false: An organized garage is an important component to a healthy home. A. True B. False 8) What is the best way to eliminate clutter from your home? A. Have a garage sale B. Give unused or unwanted items to Goodwill C. There is no “right” way to eliminate clutter. Get rid of broken, unwanted or unused items in a manner that feels right to you.

A. Wood B. Glass C. Plastic/acrylic [Answers: In the Kitchen]

[Answers: Clutter/Pest Control]

1) B 2) A 3) B 4) C

5) A 6) C 7) A 8) C

Not only do dishcloths stand up to bleach solutions better than sponges, they also dry more thoroughly between uses, lessening the chance for bacteria to grow. Martha Stewart herself recommends spills be wiped up immediately and that you check for spoilage/leaks daily. To seasonally clean the entire fridge, unplug it and allow shelves and crisper drawers to warm up to room temperature before washing. Don’t forget to clean the door seals, which collect crumbs.

“Spring is the season when homeowners begin to notice pests again, because the warmer temperatures encourage greater activity,” says Jim Fredericks, technical services director for the National Pest Management Association. Often, the garage is the first place pests will invade. An unorganized garage invites pest infestation and ups the chances for spilled or leaky products. “The garage is often the first space you enter when you come home,” says Cooper of We Organize. “You don’t want to walk in and instantly feel chaos.” kcparent.com july 2014

49


[ fire safety/ventilation ]

[ home hazards ]

9) True or false: Batteries should be replaced in your smoke detectors once a month.

13) The lighting in and around your home should be:

A. True B. False 10) Rid smoke detectors of dust and dirt (which can trigger the alarm sensor) by: A. Blowing air through it with an air compressor. B. Sucking up air and dirt with a vacuum. 11) How many carbon monoxide detectors should you install in your home? A. Two, including one in the basement. B. One on each level of your home. C. One, either near your sleeping area or on your home’s highest level. 12) It is okay to keep windows and doors open during the warmer months:

A. Bright and all-encompassing. B. Bright in some places and dim in others, to help evoke appropriate moods. C. Mostly dim. 14) What hazard do these items have in common: a rug, a crumbled cement step, a chair that is not pushed in? A. All are fire hazards. B. All are tripping hazards. C. All are signs of a house that is not childproof. 15) Regularly clean lint out of your dryer vents and hose to: A. Lessen fire hazard. B. Make your appliance more energy efficient. C. Dry clothes faster. D. All of the above. 16) What frequently uncleaned item poses a significant risk of illness?

A. As much as possible, to save on utility bills. B. On a limited basis, to save on utility bills but to keep outside dust and dirt at bay. C. It is never advisable to leave windows and doors to your home open.

A. A toothbrush B. A pet toy C. A floor vent

[Answers: Fire Safety/Ventilation]

[Answers: Home Hazards]

5) B 6) A 7) C 8) B

13) A 14) B 15) D 16) B

Homeowners should change smoke detector batteries once every six months, says Lenexa Fire Marshal Marty Quick. “A good way to remember this is to change your batteries whenever you change your clocks for daylight savings time,” he says. Blow air rather than suck air to clean smoke detectors, Quick says, to efficiently eliminate anything that might trip the alarm sensor. Because carbon monoxide is lighter than air, it rises. “I recommend you have a carbon monoxide detector close to your sleeping area, where you can hear it,” says Quick.

Areas with low lighting up the risk for accidents. What’s more, frequent reading in poorly lit areas can hurt your eyes. Use high-wattage light bulbs indoors to keep rooms bright. Once a year, call a professional to clean your dryer vent and inspect hoses, to keep your dryer in safe and good working condition. And finally, clean pet toys once a month with hot, soapy water, or throw soft toys in the laundry on the hot water cycle. Just be sure your dryer vent is clear before tossing those clean toys in the dryer.

Kate Meadows is a mom of two boys and owner of a magnet that says, “Cleaning while your kids are growing is like shoveling snow while it’s still snowing.” Her latest essay, “Due Dates,” was published in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Multitasking Moms in March. She lives in Louisburg. KateMeadows.com

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FAITH&FAMILY

RAISING UP A GODLY GENERATION

P

resident Woodrow Wilson said, “A nation that does not remember what it was yesterday does not know what it is today, nor what it is trying to do. We are trying to do a futile thing if we do not know where we came from or what we have been about.” Each generation is charged with the essential task of transmitting its truths to the next, and one generation’s failure to do so can break the link that binds the future to the past. We remind our children of the remarkable story of our nation each Independence Day through the ritual of fireworks and songs proclaiming freedom. Just as we preserve our nation’s history, we are called to pass on our faith to future generations, and to proclaim a testimony of what the Lord has done in us— for our story is our children’s story: I will open my mouth with a parable; I will utter hidden things, things from of old— things we have heard and known, things our ancestors have told us. We will not hide them from their descendants; we will tell the next generation the praiseworthy deeds of the Lord, his power, and the wonders he has done. He decreed statutes for Jacob and established the law in Israel, which he commanded our ancestors to teach their children so the next generation would know them, even the children yet to be born, and they in turn would tell their children. Then they would put their trust in God and would not forget his deeds but would keep his commands. –Psalm 78:2-7

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Families often pass faith on through a keepsake Bible. Whether it’s an heirloom from generations past or a Bible inherited from a lost loved one with notes in his or her own hand, there’s something especially sacred about these copies of Scriptures. Why not preserve your own marks of faith for your children in a Bible personalized with your thoughts? Sacred Scribbles: Consider this Bible an artistic canvas. Break out the pens and highlighters and mark it up with abandon, leaving notes, words of wisdom, icons and doodles. For our children’s Bibles, I tucked stickers into the margins beside each Bible verse they had memorized and highlighted them on the page (color coded). Hall of Faith: The Book of Hebrews records the faith of the Israelites, recalling stories down the generations. Consider creating your own “hall of faith” inside this Bible, recording stories of family members and ancestors on their journeys through life, a cloud of witnesses cheering your children on the path marked out for them. Family Tree: Many heirloom Bibles contain a family tree. Use the extra pages in front or back to record your family’s history,

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or find family tree scrapbooking materials and paste them in. Testimony: Share with your posterity why you love God. Your story, in your words, could inspire your children’s children to faith—what a legacy! Love Note: In the Bible, include a note written to your children with your hopes and prayers for them, steeped in love from you. Wendy Connelly, faith columnist, is a mother of two and a graduate student at St. Paul School of Theology, Leawood.

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july

THE KCPARENT.COM CALENDAR FEATURES OVER 1,000 EVENTS EACH MONTH!

CALENDAR

MAHAFFIE STAGECOACH STOP & FARM

No part of this calendar may be reproduced in print or web format.

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celebrate

learn

play

watch

create

The Kansas City skies will be aglow with fireworks! For a complete list of firework displays and 4th of July celebrations all over the city, log onto KCParent.com.

Travel back in time each Thursday at Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm’s Family Fun Nights. Enjoy FREE admission and lots of hands-on activities. Mahaffie.org

It’s luau time in the city! Enjoy water slides, bounce houses, sand art, hula classes and more at this month’s Sprint Family Fun Days in the Power & Light District on July 12. 816.842.1045

On July 18 head to the City Market for a movie under the stars. Come early to enjoy dinner at a restaurant or pack a picnic and bring a lawn chair or blanket for the movie. TheCityMarket.org

Celebrate summer reading with American Girl! Throughout July, create a summer reading bookmark at the American Girl Doll Store. Includes a doll-sized poster to take home. Free. AmericanGirl.com


1 tuesday

TUT TUESDAYS

See details pg. 57

Mini Keeper for a Day 7:30, Kansas City Zoo. Do you have what it takes to be an animal keeper? Spend a day with zoo staff. Must pre-reg at KansasCityZoo.org. Blackberry Picking 9:00, Gieringer’s Orchard. Come to the orchard and pick your own blackberries. Check Facebook for availability. 913.893.9626 Gardens Gone Wild 9:00, Powell Gardens. This summer see a 12-foot elephant, a pair of wrestling bears and a 5-foot-tall hen at the gardens. 816.697.2600 Toddler Time 9:30, Sky Zone. If you can walk, then you can jump! Toddler Time is for the little ones to have their own jump time. $7. 913.213.5900 Free Summer Movies Every Tue-Thu, Phoenix Theatre (Legends). Cool off from the summer heat with a free movie. Different movies each week. Doors open at 9:00. PhoenixTheatres.com

Celebrate America 10:00, MCPL (Liberty). Storyteller Jo Ho takes listeners on a spark-filled celebration with tales. Free. Pre-reg. 816.781.9240

What’s for Dinner? 3:00, Burr Oak Woods Nature Center. Watch as the captive amphibians, fish and turtles enjoy their feast. 816.228.3766

Summer Reading Bookmark Craft 1:00, American Girl Doll Store. Girls can decorate their own summer bookmarks for themselves. Free. AmericanGirl.com

Kids and Clay 4:30, Ceramic Café. Kids learn basic skills such as hand building, slab work, pinch pots, etc., and create a fun masterpiece. $16. 913.383.0222

Popsicles in the Park 6:30, Sycamore Hills Park. Bring the entire family out for live music, puppet shows, art stations, raffled prizes and free Popsicles. 816.325.7370

2 wednesday

Celebrate Olathe! 9:00, Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm. Celebrate the grand opening of the Community Center. End the festivities with 19thcentury fireworks. 913.971.5111

Flags 4 Freedom Thru July 5, Merriam Marketplace. More than 3,000 flags fly to honor our veterans and active military. Free. 913.384.5340

Liberty 4th Fest Today & tomorrow, Historic Liberty Square. Celebrate America with food, music, a parade, fireworks and more! Liberty4thFest.com

Doo-Dad Mike Concert 10:00, Johnson County Museum. Doo-Dad Mike brings his high-energy rock concert to the museum. $3. Pre-reg. 913.715.2575

July Fourth Celebration Thru Saturday, Downtown Parkville. Lots of family fun! Tonight, carnival rides open at 6:00. ParkvilleMo.org

Hard Hat Tour 2:00, Kansas City Museum. Take a hard hat tour of Corinthian Hall and see how it looks mid-renovation. KansasCityMuseum.org

Every Monday & Thursday from Open-6pm Unlimited Mini Golf, 2 Go-Kart Rides & 10 Arcade Tokens Only $10.99 Per Person! Visit website for details!

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Booms & Blooms Festival 9:00, Powell Gardens. Visit the gardens, enjoy children’s activities and in the evening, music and fireworks. $5-$12. PowellGardens.org

Visit Warm Springs Ranch Thru Oct 31, Warm Springs Ranch (Boonville). Take a day trip to the state-of-the-art Budweiser Clydesdale breeding farm. Pre-reg at WarmSpringsRanch.com.

ALL-YOU-CAN-PLAY DAYS!

Arcade

3 thursday

Independence Day Fireworks 7:00, Lions Park (Lexington). A 4th of July celebration for the entire family. Stay for fireworks! VisitLexingtonMO.com

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kcparent.com july 2014

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Photo Credit: Daniel A. Swalec

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Thru July 13, Starlight Theatre. This retelling of the biblical story of Joseph blends pop, country and rock into an uplifting story. KCStarlight.com Hairspray 8:30, Gladstone Amphitheater. Bring blankets and enjoy a musical based on the 1988 John Waters film. Free. 816.423.4091

4 friday: independence day

Independence Day 9:00, Missouri Town 1855. This 1850s celebration provides the perfect setting for a fun-filled day of activities. 816.503.4860 Independence Day at the Farmstead 9:00, Deanna Rose Children’s Farmstead. Get the entire family involved in some patriotic, fun Independence Day games. OPKansas.org Lenexa Community Days Parade 10:00, Old Town Lenexa. Gather along the parade route and watch floats, bands, antique cars and more. Free. 913.477.7100 Independence Day & Fireworks 4:00, Recreation Park (Raymore). Come out for live music, classic car show and other fun events before the fireworks begin at dusk. Raymore.com 80th Anniversary Celebration Rosedale BBQ. Food specials, kids’ activities, music, funnel cake

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truck and more! RosedaleBarbeque.com 4th of July Fireworks 5:00, Celebration Park (Gardner). This year’s celebration includes live music, bounce houses and food vendors. GardnerKansas.gov 4th of July Celebration 5:00, Longview Lake Shelter #13. Celebrate the 4th of July Jackson County style with live musical entertainment, sky divers, food and fireworks. 816.503.4800 First Fridays 7:00, Crossroads Art District. Galleries and shops remain open the first Friday of each month. KCCrossroads.org Red, White & Blue Springs 7:30, Blue Springs High School. See artist Justin Webb and then stay for a fireworks display. BlueSpringsGov.com

5 saturday

Build a Bug House 9:00, Home Depot locations. Free hands-on workshop. Build your own bug house. Workshops.HomeDepot.com 1st Saturdays 9:00, Shoal Creek Living History Museum. This family fun event includes

re-enactors, food and craft vendors, crafts and demonstrations. Free. 816.792.2655 1860s Living History 10:00, Mahaffie Farmstead. Enjoy stagecoach rides, cookstove and blacksmith demonstrations. Every Sat and Sun thru Labor Day. $4-$6. 913.971.5111 Water World 10:00, Burr Oak Woods Nature Center. Learn about the mysterious and wondrous things that lie beneath the surface of a stream. Pre-reg. 816.228.3766


Silly Summer Cap 11:00, Lakeshore Learning. Kids create a sky-high crown out of colorful paper and kooky pipe cleaners. Free. 913.432.3998 Independence Day at Lanesfield 1:00, Lanesfield Historic Site. Drop in to see the school decorated for an old-fashioned Independence Day. Make a craft. Free. 913.893.6645 art + family = FUN 1:00, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Join us every Saturday and Sunday for free activities for all ages! 816.751.1278 Plaza Live 2:00, Country Club Plaza. Enjoy a concert by local entertainers in the beautiful Plaza courtyards. CountryClubPlaza.com Saturday Night Feeder Saturdays thru Oct, 4:00, Cedar Cove Feline Sanctuary. Watch the cats being fed. $5. 816.739.0363

6 sunday Visit Warm Springs Ranch Thru Oct 31, Warm Springs Ranch (Boonville). Take a day trip to the state-of-the-art Budweiser Clydesdale breeding farm. Pre-reg at WarmSpringsRanch.com. Gardens Gone Wild 9:00, Powell Gardens. This summer see a 12-foot elephant, a pair of wrestling bears and a 5-foot-tall hen at the gardens. 816.697.2600 Big Draw 2:00, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art. An artist-led sketching experience in the galleries or on museum grounds. Pre-reg at 816.457.6136.

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Music in the Park 6:00, Rotary Park (Blue Springs). Bring a blanket and enjoy music in a park setting. Free. 816.228.0137 The Winter’s Tale 8:00, Southmoreland Park. Enjoy this year’s performance at the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival. Free. KCShakes.org

7 monday Jungle Safari VBS Thru July 11, Community Covenant Church (Lenexa). Vacation Bible School for ages 3 through 5th grade. Register at CCCKS.org/Vacation-Bible-School. Countryside Baptist VBS 9:00, Countryside Baptist Church. Get ready for an exciting journey through history in “Promise Seekers—Lost in Time.” Free. 913.592.3270 Moms FREE Monday 9:30, Paradise Park. Moms are free at the Children’s EduTainment Center with a paid child’s admission. 816.246.5224 Tots in the Park 10:00, Webb Park (Oak Grove). Bring little ones to the park to play, hear a story and enjoy a snack. Pre-reg at CityOfOakGrove.com. All-You-Can-Play Day 10:00, Cool Crest. On Mondays and Thursdays, get unlimited mini golf, two go-kart rides and 10 arcade tokens for only $10.99. CoolCrest.com kcparent.com july 2014

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Super Kid Saves the World 10:00, Crown Center. Hands-on exhibit for kids to explore. The big message is reduce, reuse, repair and recycle. Free. CrownCenter.com

Popsicles in the Park 6:30, Country Club Park. Bring the entire family out for live music, puppet shows, art stations, raffled prizes and free Popsicles. 816.325.7370

Discovery of King Tut 10:00, Union Station. Let your footsteps retrace the paths of the breathtaking ancient Egyptian archeological site. $12.50$19.95. UnionStation.org

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Thru July 13, Starlight Theatre. This retelling of the biblical story of Joseph blends pop, country and rock into an uplifting story. KCStarlight.com

8 tuesday

TUT

9 wednesday

See details pg. 57

Summer Fun Thru July 11, the Presbyterian Church of Stanley. At this music camp, students will explore music through singing, hand bells, instruments and more. $20. 913.681.8180

Let’s Build a Birdhouse! 9:00, Historic Mt Gilead. This fun hands-on activity will teach kids how to build their very own bluebird nesting box. $10. Pre-reg. 816.736.8500

TUESDAYS

Science Explorations 9:00, JoCo K-State Research and Extension. Build gliders, make balancing toys or use your imagination in our makers space. $30. 913.715.7000 Laura Ingalls Wilder 10:00, Mid-Continent Public Library. Join us to learn all about Laura’s growing up and writing in rural Missouri. Pre-reg at 816.781.9240. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 11:00 & 1:30, the Coterie. Take a musical adventure with an out-of-thisworld car that flies through the air and sails the seas. TheCoterie.org

5 Glace: Two locations—4960 Main St., KCMO, & 4535 W. 119th St., OPKS. At Glace you’ll find one-of-a-kind decadence showcased in a dozen flavors you’ve never imagined. Locally owned and operated, this Christopher Elbow ice cream shop frequently invents new flavors just begging to be tried.

Story Time in the Park 10:00, North Kansas City Community Center Park. Fun in the fresh air. Songs, games and stories in the park. KCParks.org Animal Tales 10:30, Ernie Miller Nature Center. Visit the nature center for stories, songs and surprises. Meet a special animal friend every time. $2. 913.764.7759 Puppet Show 11:00 & 2:00, Puppetry Arts Institute. Anitra Steele performs Good Night Irene with hand puppets. $5. 816.833.9777

Sylas and Maddy’s: Two locations—11925 S. Strang Line Rd., Olathe, KS, 913.393.3500 & 1014 Massachusetts, Lawrence, KS, 785.832.8323. Sylas and Maddy’s makes fresh homemade ice cream and waffle cones daily, so you’re guaranteed to enjoy the best product they have to serve. Their delicious flavors have been super popular with local customers since 1997.

Murray’s Homemade Ice Cream: 4120 Pennsylvania Ave., KCMO, 816.931.5646. The old ice cream parlor style and homemade ice cream have made this spot a Kansas City favorite since 1984.

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Hard Hat Tour 2:00, Kansas City Museum. Take a hard hat tour of Corinthian Hall and see how it looks mid-renovation. KansasCityMuseum.org Fiddler on the Roof 7:00, West Platte Performing Arts Center. Weston Community Theatre presents Fiddler on the Roof. 816.640.2788

10 thursday Blackberry Picking 9:00, Gieringer’s Orchard. Come to the orchard and pick your own blackberries. Check Facebook for availability. 913.893.9626 Story Time 9:30, Siloam Mountain Park (Excelsior Springs). Come hear stories, make a craft and enjoy a snack. Create great family memories. Free. Pre-reg at 816.630.6721. Tales for Tiny Tykes 9:30 & 10:30, Plaza Library. Toddlers ages 18-36 months can listen to a 20-minute story time followed with a craft. 816.701.3481 Pay for Play 10:00, Backyard Specialists (Olathe). Play on the equipment for a couple of hours. The hardest part will be leaving the fun! $2. 913.307.6023 Family Fun Nights 6:00, Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm. Enjoy FREE admission and a different theme of history each week with lots of hands-on activities. Mahaffie.org

Poppy’s Ice Cream Shop & Coffee House: 307 SE Douglas St., Lee’s Summit, MO, 816.246.4141. Poppy’s has that old-fashioned feel with a classic atmosphere and all the warmth and hospitality of the locally owned business that it is. Our favorite thing about Poppy’s is that all the ice cream is made in-house, and the homemade flavors are truly delish!

fave kc ice cream shops

Shatto Ice Cream: Available at local grocery stores in the frozen food aisle. Made with milk from the cows at the local family-owned Shatto farm, Shatto ice cream is sold at local grocery stores. While the ice cream is delicious, the Shatto Ice Cream Sammich is our Did You Know? The waffle favorite.

ice cream cone was invented at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair? Read on to discover which local ice cream shop sells their tasty treat in homemade waffle cones!


TRAIN RIDES

11 friday Science City Field Trip 9:30, Science City. Learn about Leavenworth Virtual School and enjoy family fun at Science City. 913.684.1540 Thomas Hart Benton Display 10:00, National World War I Museum. View a display describing the impact of Benton’s US Naval experience on his art. 816.888.8100 Summer Arts Program 10:00 & 11:00, Jo Co Museum. Dress for mess and experiment with a new art technique each week. Reservations req’d. 913.715.2575 Paint Me a Story 10:30, Paint, Glaze and Fire. Paint a pottery piece that goes along with a favorite story. Snack included. $13-$15. Pre-reg. 913.661.2529 Kids SciFri 11:00, National WWl Museum. A one hour class in which kids use all of their senses to explore the connection between science and history. Free with admission. 816.888.8100 WeekEnder Crown Center Square. Date night! Festivities begin at 5:00, music at 6:00 and movie at 9:00. Free admission. 816.274.8444 Middle School Teen Night 7:00, Paradise Park. Mini golf is featured fun at tonight’s event. DJ, ping pong, pizza and more! Paradise-Park.com Ice Cream Train 7:00, Belton, Grandview and

Ice Cream Train $10.50 Every Friday, June - Aug. 7 pm

Kids under three FREE

Train Rides

$9.50; Regular Trains Depart Sat, 2 pm [May - Oct] Sun, 2 pm [May - June/Sept - Oct] Sat., 11 am [June - Aug only]

Hot Dog Train $10.50 2nd Sat., July & Aug. 7 pm

Charters • Field Trips or Birthday Parties, plan by appointment. Tickets go on sale one hour before train departure time. Cash or check only.

Purchase online with credit card.

Belton, Grandview & Kansas City Railroad Co.

502 Walnut •Belton, Missouri • 816-331-0630 • www.beltonrailroad.org

TUT TUESDAYS

.com

EVERY Tuesday this summer, KC Parent is giving away 2 family 4-packs of tickets to The Discovery of King Tut at Union Station (a total summer value of $3,000). Follow KC Parent on Facebook for instructions every Tuesday with #TutTuesdaysKC.

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KC RR. Enjoy a train ride and an ice cream treat. A great summer evening! 816.331.6630 Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Thru July 13, Starlight Theatre. This retelling of the Biblical story of Joseph blends pop, country and rock into an uplifting story. KCStarlight.com Sand Cinema 9:00, Longview Lake Beach. Load the kids in the car and head to the movies on the big screen at Longview Lake Beach! $5/car. 816.503.4800 Sky Mania 9:00, Sky Zone. A 90-minute, all-access pass to everything at Sky Zone. Includes two slices of pizza and a drink. Ages 10-15. $18. 913.213.5900

12 saturday

Family Fun Day 9:00, Mosaic Life Care Center. A fun day that includes balloon animals, face painting, a magician, kids parade, storytelling, crafts, games and more! MyMosiacLifeCare.org SHOP

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Tractor Daze & Touch-a-Truck 9:00, National Ag Center and Hall of Fame. ONLY SHOP KANSAS CITY’S LY Petting zoo,ON tractor show, kiddie pedal pull contest, food and gardening KANSAS CITY’S demos. Free. 913.721.1075 Fresh + Fit Class 9:00, City Market. A group fitness class the second Saturday E X C LU S IV E of each month IV Ethrough October. Free. 816.842.1271

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L i m $1 Sale Baby it e d T i m10:00, Children’s Orchard (Olathe, Indep, KCMO, Lee’s Summit, Blue Springs). All regularly priced infant clothing is only $1 (items $3.99 or less). ChildOrch.com Zootastik Learning Fest 10:00, Kansas City Zoo. Learn about camouflage in the animal world through activities and demonstrations. KansasCityZoo.org Time Travelers 10:00, Shawnee Town 1929. Experience what it was like to live and work on a truck farm in the 1920s summertime. $3/adult, $1/child. 913.248.2360

It’s what Legends is made of ST Y L E . S E L E C T I O N . S AV I N GS. SUMMER SAVINGS FROM 25% TO 65% AT OVER 100 STORES INCLUDING: Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH • Nike Factory Store Banana Republic Factory Store • Tommy Hilfiger Stride Rite Outlet • Carter’s • Gap Outlet Polo Ralph Lauren Factory Store J.Crew | crewcuts • Gymboree Outlet Cole Haan • White House | Black Market Outlet Under Armour® • And many more...

Lowe’s Build and Grow 10:00, Lowe’s stores throughout the metro. Join the fun today! Kids will create a turbo with pullback motor. Free. LowesBuildAndGrow.com Antique & Craft Fair 10:00, Bingham-Waggoner Estate. The 27th annual fair offers unique arts and crafts. 816.461.3491 Open House 10:00, Primrose School (Overland Park). Visit the school to learn all we have to offer your child. PrimroseOverlandPark.com Wonderpalooza 10:30, Wonderscope. Enjoy a special performance by Mr. Kneel. Different performers each month. 913.287.8888 Sprint Family Fun Days 11:00, Power & Light District. It’s luau time in the city! Enjoy water slides, bounce houses, sand art, hula classes and more! Free admission. 816.842.1045 Count & Decorate Octopus 11:00, Lakeshore Learning. Kids practice counting to 8 with a wavy-legged octopus they create. Free. 913.432.3998 Garden Day 11:00, Atkins-Johnson Farm and Museum. Free crafts, activities and demonstrations. Kids can take home their own seed starter kit. 816.453.3276 Kids Team Up for Art 1:30, Kansas City Public Library (Plaza Branch). Focus on both individual skill building and the completion of a group project. WestportCenterForTheArts.org Second Saturdays 4:00, Downtown Weston. Stroll into unique shops and galleries for late night shopping. Live entertainment. WestonMO.com

I-435, Exit Parallel Pkwy West 913.788.3700 • LegendsShopping.com

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Feast in the Fields 6:00, Gieringer’s Orchard. Date night! Enjoy a chefprepared four-course meal featuring all local foods and wine. $100/person. 913.893.9626


Life Cycle of Stars 8:30, Powell Observatory. A talk on astronomy, a tour and (if skies are clear) viewing through various telescopes of the moon, planets and stars. $4-$6. ASKC.org Saturday Night Movies 8:45, Mulberry Lake. Enjoy The Incredibles with your family under the night sky. Don’t forget lawn chairs, blankets and snacks. 816.741.8540

13 sunday

UCP Shawnee Mission Triathlon 7:00, Shawnee Mission Park. Both long and short course available. Pre-reg at 913.826.2950.

HIS TOMB HIS TREASURES THE BREATHTAKING RECREATION

Art of the Machine Car Series 10:00, City Market. Car enthusiasts can view custom, restored and vintage vehicles. Free. 816.842.1271 Story Time for Preschoolers 1:30, Nelson-Atkins Museum. Drop in for story time in the Creative Café. Free. Nelson-Atkins.org

14 monday Winston Churchill: The Artist 10:00, Hallmark Visitors Center. Enjoy a rare opportunity to view the art of Churchill. Learn about his connection with Hallmark. 816.274.3613 1860s Living History 10:00, Mahaffie Farmstead. Enjoy stagecoach rides, cookstove and blacksmith demonstrations. Every Sat and Sun thru Labor Day. $4-$6. 913.971.5111 Power Hour 1:00, Little Monkey Bizness. Arrive between 1:00 and 3:00 on Mondays and Wednesdays and admission is just $5 plus tax! 913.631.7000 International Spy Academy VBS 6:30, Grace Christian Fellowship Church. Vaction Bible School for ages 3 through 11. Free. 913.268.6300

15 tuesday

TUT TUESDAYS

See details pg. 57

ADVENTURE AWAITS. UNIONSTATION.ORG/TUT

Presented by

Proud Sponsors

Create. Explore. Experiment.

Cass County Fair Thru July 20, Pleasant Hill. Lots of fair fun for the entire family, including music, motocross, demolition derby and more. PleasantHill.com Visit Warm Springs Ranch Thru Oct 31, Warm Springs Ranch (Boonville). Take a day trip to the state-of-the-art Budweiser Clydesdale breeding farm. Pre-reg at WarmSpringsRanch.com. Toddler Time 9:30, Sky Zone. If you can walk, then you can jump! Toddler Time is for the little ones to have their own jump time. $7. 913.213.5900 Fancy Nancy Sees Stars 10:00, MCPL (Liberty Branch). Join Dawnna Morris as she shares a “Fancy Nancy” story by Jane O’Connor. Pre-reg at 816.781.9240. Thomas Hart Benton Display 10:00, National World War I Museum. View a display describing the impact of Benton’s US Naval experience on his art. 816.888.8100 Creative Story Time 11:00, Ceramic Café. Hear a story, create a pottery piece and enjoy a simple snack. 913.383.0222 Tots on Tuesday 11:00, Kemper Museum. Bring in your preschooler for a fun and fashionable get-together every third Tuesday. 816.753.5784 Summer Reading Bookmark Craft 1:00, American Girl Doll Store. Girls can decorate their own summer bookmarks for themselves. Free. AmericanGirl.com

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take note: july ’14

July 4, Independence Day: Visit Flags for Freedom (June 28-July 5 in Merriam, KS, Flags4Freedom.org) to celebrate independence. Each year, a group of local volunteers organizes the event featuring a proud and patriotic display of more than 2,000 American flags!

National Hot Dog Month: Werner’s Fine Sausages (5736 Johnson Dr., Mission, KS, WernersWurst.com) has been in the area since 1973 and sells specialty sausages, including smoked Italian with mozzarella, potato sausage and German bratwurst. Pick out your favorite and have a summer barbecue for everyone to enjoy.

July 6, National Fried Chicken Day: RC’s Chicken (330 E. 135th St., Kansas City, MO, 816.942.4999) serves our favorite fried chicken in Kansas City. The homemade chicken & waffles is our top pick. July 15, Cow Appreciation Day: Take a tour of Shatto Dairy Farm (9406 N. Hwy. 33, Osborn, MO, 816.930.3862, ShattoMilk.com), a working dairy farm and milk bottling company offering tours to groups of any size.

July 20, Moon Day: The Arvin Gottlieb Planetarium at Science City (30 W. Pershing Rd., Kansas City, MO, 816.460.2020, UnionStation.org) boasts a 60-foot dome, making it one of the largest planetariums in the Midwest. Visit the planetarium for incredible simulated views of the night sky and educational programs that still captivate this generation of budding scientists.

July 24, Amelia Earhart Day: Tour the Amelia Earhart Birthplace (223 N. Terrace St., Atchison, KS, 913.367.4217, AmeliaEarhartMuseum.org). The museum displays many Amelia artifacts and model planes, and guides share the story of her life.

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National Blueberry Month: Kansas City families can enjoy picking their own blueberries at several local patches. Visit KCParent.com and search “blueberry picking” for a complete guide. Always remember to call ahead before heading to a berry patch, because picking availability varies with weather and number of visitors the previous day.


Tee Off Tuesday

Tuesdays, 10:00, Cool Crest. Unlimited miniature golf and 30 arcade tokens for only $12 per person. CoolCrest.com

16 wednesday

Go WILD Turtle Tikes 9:00, Burr Oak Woods Nature Center. Learn about this special group of Missouri’s reptiles and create a special terrapin friend to take home. Pre-reg at 816.228.3766. Free Play Cedar Ridge Christian Church. Daily free play for young children while parents enjoy a coffee drink. 913.393.3000 Story Time in the Park 10:00, Chouteau Greenway Park. Fun in the fresh air. Songs, games and stories in the park. KCParks.org Jo Ho Storyteller 10:00, Johnson County Museum. Stop by for “American Tall Tales” to introduce children to the biggest characters of all. Free. 913.715.2552 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 11:00 & 1:30, the Coterie. Take a musical adventure with an out-of-thisworld car that flies through the air and sails the seas. TheCoterie.org

17 thursday

Gardens Gone Wild 9:00, Powell Gardens. This summer see a 12-foot elephant, a pair of wrestling bears and a 5-foot-tall hen at the gardens. 816.697.2600 Story Time 9:30, Siloam Mountain Park (Excelsior Springs). Come hear stories, make a craft and enjoy a snack. Create great family memories. Free. Pre-reg at 816.630.6721. Pay for Play 10:00, Backyard Specialists (Olathe). Play on the equipment for a couple of hours. The hardest part will be leaving the fun! $2. 913.307.6023 Hard Hat Tour 2:00, Kansas City Museum. Take a hard hat tour of Corinthian Hall and see how it looks mid-renovation. KansasCityMuseum.org Amelia Earhart Festival Thru July 19, Atchison, KS. A downtown music, food and crafts fair, carnival and more. AtchisonKansas.net Family Fun Night 6:00, Mahaffie Stagecoach. Enjoy free admission and different activities based on a theme. Tonight’s theme: Border War. 913.971.8563 Annie 7:30, Blue Springs City Theatre. The popular comic strip heroine takes center stage in one of the world’s best-loved musicals. BlueSpringsCityTheatre.com

18 friday

Rubber Duck Regatta 1:00, Oceans of Fun. Thousands of rubber ducks will tumble through the water course in a race to the finish. Benefit for

Alex’s Lemonade Stand. AlexsLemonade.org Englewood Art Walk 5:30, Englewood Shopping District. See artists in action, enjoy demonstrations and relish live music and refreshments. 816.252.3372 Mid-Summer’s Night Cache 6:00, Shawnee Mission Park. A modern-day scavenger hunt is a great way to get out of the house and get moving. 913.826.3160 City Market Cinema 6:00, City Market Park. Come early to enjoy dinner at a restaurant in the City Market and bring a lawn chair and blanket for the movie. TheCityMarket.org Masters of Darkness 7:00, Ernie Miller Park Amphitheater. Learn how the human body adapts to the coming of night as the five senses change. $3. 913.764.7759 Movie in the Park 9:00, Oak Grove Park. Bring the family and enjoy the movie The Nut Job under the stars. Free. Gladstone.mo.us

19 saturday Miami County Fair Thru July 26, Paola. Youth rodeo, carnival, races, parade, bike derby, horse show, pancake breakfast, concerts and more. MiamiCountyKansasFair.com Cars & Chili Cook-Off Shoal Creek Living History Museum. The 19th-century log cabins are the backdrop as car clubs show off their prized possessions. Free. 816.792.2655 Aesop’s Amazing Fables 10:00, Powell Gardens. Martin City, Jr. brings theater to the gardens today with its presentation of Aesop’s Amazing Fables. PowellGardens.org Time Travelers 10:00, Shawnee Town 1929. Experience what it was like to live and work on a truck farm in the 1920s summertime. $3/adult, $1/child. 913.248.2360 Scavenger Saturdays 10:00, Kemper Museum of Art. Follow the clues on this “ART-astic” adventure! 816.753.5784 Fall Big Brand Event 10:00, Children’s Orchard (Olathe, Indep, KCMO, Lee’s Summit, Blue Springs). Give the kids the names they prefer at the prices YOU prefer. ChildOrch.com Cheetah Run 10:30, Kansas City Zoo. Witness the fastest mammals on earth race around a track at top speed. Every month the zoo unleashes the cats for extra exercise. KansasCityZoo.org Wiggly-Eyed Glitter Fish 11:00, Lakeshore Learning. Water not required! Children create a glittery

geometric fish with colorful craft sticks! Free. 913.432.3998 Mermaid and Pirates Day Noon, Roeland Park Aquatic Center. Come walk the plank on a pirate ship and swim with the mermaids. $3-$4. 913.432.1377 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 2:00, the Coterie. It’s a 2-for-1 Saturday. Buy one ticket and receive one free plus get a FREE copy of the young adult novel Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Rides Again. TheCoterie.org Isabelle Dances into the Spotlight 6:00, American Girl Store. Be one of the first to see American Girl’s newest movie. $5. Pre-reg at 877.247.5223.

20 sunday Laser Tag 11:30, Paradise Park. Bring the family out to play and enjoy the newest attraction, laser tag! Paradise-Park.com Picnic in the Park 5:00, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Kansas City comes together in the Sculpture Park and Theis Park for the biggest picnic ever! Nelson-Atkins.org Music in the Park 6:00, Rotary Park (Blue Springs). Bring a blanket and enjoy music in a park setting. Free. 816.228.0137

21 monday Winston Churchill: The Artist 10:00, Hallmark Visitors Center. Enjoy a rare opportunity to view the art of Churchill. Learn about his connection with Hallmark. 816.274.3613 All-You-Can-Play Day 10:00, Cool Crest. On Mondays and Thursdays get unlimited mini golf, two go-kart rides and 10 arcade tokens for only $10.99. CoolCrest.com Tots in the Park 10:00, Webb Park (Oak Grove). Bring little ones to the park to play, hear a story and enjoy a snack. Pre-reg at CityOfOakGrove.com. kcparent.com july 2014

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22 tuesday

TUT TUESDAYS

See details pg. 57 Wyandotte County Fair Thru July 26, Wyandotte County Fairgrounds. Old-fashioned county fair: games, rides, carnival, demolition derby and more! WyCoFair.com CrossWay KidsCamp 9:00, CrossWay Bible Church (Blue Springs). A Bible-based sports camp that teaches kids a winning attitude on and off the field. Free. 816.228.1411

Creative Story Time 11:00, Ceramic Café. Hear a story, create a pottery piece and enjoy a simple snack. 913.383.0222 Summer Reading Bookmark Craft 1:00, American Girl Doll Store. Girls can decorate their own summer bookmarks for themselves. Free. AmericanGirl.com Popsicles in the Park 6:30, George Owens Nature Park. Bring the entire family out for live music, puppet shows, art stations, raffled prizes and free Popsicles. 816.325.7370

23 wednesday

Story Time in the Park 10:00, North Kansas City Community Center Park. Fun in the fresh air. Songs, games and stories in the park. KCParks.org

Free Summer Movies Every Tue-Thu, Phoenix Theatre (Legends). Cool off from the summer heat with a free movie. Different movies each week. Doors open at 9:00. PhoenixTheatres.com

Animal Tales 10:30, Ernie Miller Nature Center. Visit the nature center for stories, songs and surprises. Meet a special animal friend every time. $2. 913.764.7759

Discovery of King Tut 10:00, Union Station. Let your footsteps retrace the paths of the breathtaking ancient Egyptian archeological site. $12.50$19.95. UnionStation.org

Power Hour 1:00, Little Monkey Bizness. Arrive between 1:00 and 3:00 on Mondays and Wednesdays and admission is just $5 plus tax! 913.631.7000

All Day Play in Sky Maze 10:00, Amazing Play. For only $6, kids of all ages can run, climb and play in the Sky Maze. 816.994.2160

a 20-minute story time followed with a craft. 816.701.3481 Pay for Play 10:00, Backyard Specialists (Olathe). Play on the equipment for a couple of hours. The hardest part will be leaving the fun! $2. 913.307.6023 Thomas Hart Benton Display 10:00, National World War I Museum. View a display describing the impact of Benton’s US Naval experience on his art. 816.888.8100 Evening Wagon Ride and Swales Walk 6:00, National Frontier Trails Museum. Learn about the Santa Fe Trail in an hour-long tour with covered wagon ride. Pre-reg at 816.325.7575. Moonlight Movies on the Square 9:00, Pharaoh Theatre parking lot. Come out to see Coraline under the stars. Concessions available. FreeMoonlightMovies.com

ry Patch e Ber Th

24 thursday

Tales for Tiny Tykes 9:30 & 10:30, Plaza Library. Toddlers ages 18-36 months can listen to

berry picking In Kansas City, we enjoy many “u-pick farms” across the metro area. Please note, some farms from previous years are no longer in business or no longer offer u-pick. This list will get you started! If you know of a patch to add to the list, email Kristina@KCParent.com.

Berries & More

Fruit: Blueberries Where: 505 W. Lone Jack/Lee’s Summit Rd., Lone Jack, MO Phone: 816.697.3400 Nearby: Powell Gardens Tip: No children under the age of 12 allowed at this u-pick patch.

The Berry Patch

Fruit: Blueberries and blackberries Where: 22509 State Line Rd., Cleveland, MO Phone: 816.618.3771 Web: TheBerryPatchOnline.com

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Tip: The largest patch in the area, they update their phone line with the picking report regularly so you can visit on the prime picking days.

Cider Hill

Fruit: Apples Where: 3341 N. 139 St., Kansas City, KS Phone: 913.721.2507 Web: CiderHillFamilyOrchard.com Nearby: The Legends Shopping Center. Tip: Bring a fishing pole and picnic for a day of fun.

Cy and Dee’s Blackberry Farm

Fruit: Blackberries Where: 28615 Rockville Rd., Louisburg, KS Phone: 913.731.2324 Nearby: Cedar Cove Feline Sanctuary Tip: Make it a day trip and search “Louisburg” on KCParent.com for tips.

Gieringer’s Orchard

Fruit: Strawberries, blackberries, peaches (other fresh produce available for sale) Where: 39675 W. 183rd St., Edgerton, KS Phone: 913.893.9626 Web: GieringersOrchard.com Nearby: Lanesfield School Historic Site Tips: This family-friendly farm allows picnics.

Happy Valley Farm

Fruit: Blueberries Where: 29080 W. 95th, De Soto, KS Phone: 913.706.0370 Tip: Picking is by appointment only at this patch.

Schweizer Orchards

Fruit: Apples, peaches, blueberries, blackberries (other fresh produce available for sale) Where: S. Hwy. 169 & FF, St. Joseph, MO Phone: 816.232.3999 Web: SchweizerOrchards.com Tip: Make it a day trip and search “St. Joseph” on KCParent.com for tips.

Wagon Wheel Orchard

Fruit: Apples, cherries, peaches, plums, pears Where: 15380 Edgerton Rd., Gardner, KS Phone: 913.893.6050 Web: WagonWheelOrchard.com Nearby: Lanesfield School Historic Site Tip: Make an appointment to pick at this orchard.


Enter to win four tickets to see The Sound of Music at Starlight Theatre on Monday, July 28. Head to KCParent.com and click “Giveaways”.

25 friday

Toddler Time 9:30, Sky Zone. If you can walk, then you can jump! Toddler Time is for the little ones to have their own jump time. $7. 913.213.5900 Summer Arts Program 10:00 & 11:00, Jo Co Museum. Dress for mess and experiment with a new art technique each week. Reservations req’d. 913.715.2575 Paint Me a Story 10:30, Paint, Glaze and Fire. Paint a pottery piece that goes along with a favorite story. Snack included. $13-$15. Pre-reg. 913.661.2529 Kids SciFri 11:00, National WWl Museum. A one hour class in which kids use all of their senses to explore the connection between science and history. Free with admission. 816.888.8100 Douglas County Fair Thru Aug 3, Lawrence, KS. Petting zoo, pony rides, demolition derby, tractor show, live concerts, carnival and more. DGCountyFair.com Friday Night Family Fun 6:30, Plaza Library. Join us every Friday night for fun activities the whole family can enjoy! 816.701.3481

The Sound of Music Thru July 31, Starlight Theatre. The hills of Kansas City come alive with The Sound of Music! A classic the entire family will enjoy. KCStarlight.com

Kids Team Up for Art 1:30, Kansas City Public Library (Waldo Branch). Focus on both individual skill building and the completion of a group project. WestportCenterForTheArts.org

26 saturday

Saturday Night Feeder Saturdays thru Oct, 4:00, Cedar Cove Feline Sanctuary. Watch the cats being fed. $5. 816.739.0363

Georgia’s Chicken Run 7:30, Deanna Rose Children’s Farmstead. Lace up those shoes, because it’s time for Georgia’s Annual Chicken Fun Run/ Walk. OPKansas.org Show n’ Shine Truck & Car Show 8:00, Nat’l Ag Hall of Fame. See the cars, enjoy living history demonstrations and hay wagon rides. $3. AgHallofFame.com Annual Butterfly Count 9:00, Powell Gardens. Get paired with a leader to help count butterflies. Hike available in the afternoon. Pre-reg at PowellGardens.org. Make & Shake Noisemaker 11:00, Lakeshore Learning. Kids can really shake out a rhythm when they create a noisemaker out of beans and a paper plate. Free. 913.432.3998 The Lion and the Mouse 11:00 & 2:00, Puppetry Arts Institute. A joyous fantasy featuring table top puppets, a kazoo band and lots of silly business. $5. 816.833.9777

Family Fun Night 5:00, CW Parker Carousel Museum. Hot dog dinner, games, craft room, piñata and, of course, a ride on the 101-year-old carousel. $6. Backyard Bash 6:00, Paradise Park. Kick back and listen to the sounds of Liverpool. Summertime treats provided by Paradise Park Café.

27 sunday

Johnson County Fair Thru Aug 3, Jo Co Fairgrounds (Gardner). Enjoy a wide variety of fun, family entertainment. 913.715.7000 art + family = FUN 1:00, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Join us every Saturday and Sunday for free activities for all ages! 816.751.1278 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang 2:00, the Coterie. Giveaway Sunday! Every audience member will

summer time is creative time at

summer camps 95TH & MISSION ROAD

913.383.0222 CERAMICCAFEKC.COM kcparent.com july 2014

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be eligible to win great Coterie gifts. TheCoterie.org

free play for young children while parents enjoy a coffee drink. 913.393.3000

Heartland Chamber Music Festival Faculty Concert 2:00, Grace and Holy Trinity Cathedral. Performance by Heartland Chamber Music Festival instructors. Free. 913.735.4532

Coffee Playground 10:00, OP First Assembly of God. Free play in the gym for kids 5 and under. Inflatables, scooters, balls and other toys! OverlandParkMOPS.com

28 monday Visit Warm Springs Ranch Thru Oct 31, Warm Springs Ranch (Boonville). Take a day trip to the state-of-the-art Budweiser Clydesdale breeding farm. Pre-reg at WarmSpringsRanch.com. Story Time for Toddlers 9:30, MCPL (Liberty). A fun and interactive program which engages children and encourages literacy. 816.781.9240 The Sound of Music Thru July 31, Starlight Theatre. The hills of Kansas City come alive with The Sound of Music! A classic the entire family will enjoy. KCStarlight.com

29 tuesday

TUT TUESDAYS

See details pg. 57 Free Play Cedar Ridge Christian Church. Daily

Pirates and Princesses 10:00, Santa Fe Commons. Dress up as a pirate or princess and search for buried treasure or for jewels. A scavenger hunt using a GPS. Pre-reg at 913.642.6410. Tee Off Tuesday 10:00, Cool Crest. Unlimited miniature golf and 30 arcade tokens for only $12 per person. CoolCrest.com Creative Story Time 10:30, Ceramic Café. Hear a story, create a pottery piece and enjoy a simple snack. 913.383.0222 Summer Reading Bookmark Craft 1:00, American Girl Doll Store. Girls can decorate their own summer bookmarks for themselves. Free. AmericanGirl.com

30 wednesday Free Summer Movies Every Tue-Thu, Phoenix Theatre (Legends). Cool off from the summer heat with a free movie. Different movies each week. Doors open at 9:00. PhoenixTheatres.com Story Time in the Park 10:00, Hidden Valley Park. Fun in the fresh air. Songs, games and stories in

the park. KCParks.org Wonderpalooza 10:30, Wonderscope. Enjoy a special performance by the Sugar Free Allstars. Different performers each month. 913.287.8888 Miami String Quartet 7:00, Carlsen Center (JCCC). One of the most widely respected quartets in America performs. 913.469.4445

31 thursday Story Time 9:30, Siloam Mountain Park (Excelsior Springs). Come hear stories, make a craft and enjoy a snack. Create great family memories. Free. Pre-reg at 816.630.6721. Tales for Tiny Tykes 9:30 & 10:30, Plaza Library. Toddlers ages 18-36 months can listen to a 20-minute story time followed with a craft. 816.701.3481 Pay for Play 10:00, Backyard Specialists (Olathe). Play on the equipment for a couple of hours. The hardest part will be leaving the fun! $2. 913.307.6023 Junior Festival Concert 7:00, Yardley Hall (JCCC). Concluding performance by the Heartland Chamber Music Junior students. Free. 913.735.4532 Moonlight Movies on the Square 9:00, Pharaoh Theatre parking lot. Come out to see Free Birds under the stars. Concessions available. FreeMoonlightMovies.com

psst... we’re busy whipping up a juicy new issue for

august back to school guide • raise a child who gives back •caffeine and kids

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Join us for Family Fun Day at Mosaic Life Care at Shoal Creek!

July 12 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. It’s a FREE day of fun for the whole family! Enjoy tons of activities, face painting, arts and crafts, games, prizes, a parade, safety checks, a child identification program, healthy-living tips and so much more.

more than health care … life care

Plus, there will be a live radio broadcast and KC Wolf will make an appearance from 10 a.m. to noon! Mosaic Life Care at Shoal Creek Courtyard 8870 NE 82nd Terrace Kansas City, MO 64158

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2014 myMosaicLifeCare.org/event to register for this totally FREE event today! 66 julyVisit


EXPLORE KANSAS

CITY ZOO Watch Polar Bears Flip and Splash at Polar Bear Passage, Penguins Waddle and dive at Helzberg Penguin Plaza and much, much more!

Always a new adventure!

2014 FOTZ Memberships NOW AVAILABLE! kansascityzoo.org 816.595.1234 The Kansas City Zoo, a private, non-profit organization is operated in agreement with the Kansas City, MO Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners, partially funded by the Zoological District in Jackson and Clay Counties in MO, and is kcparent.com accredited by the july 2014 67 Association of Zoos and Aquariums.


At Saint Luke’s South Hospital, we’ll ensure those first moments are unforgettable For this special occasion, count on us. From our nurse midwife program guiding natural childbirth to high-tech care for high-risk pregnancies, our maternity experts will make your birthing experience as comfortable, secure, and joyous as possible. Our spacious birthing suites let you deliver, recover, and remain in the same room your entire stay. You’ll spend those first days bonding with your newborn without interruptions—the way it should be.

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Learn more: saintlukeshealthsystem.org/SouthBaby Schedule a tour: 913-317-7795

KC Parent Magazine July 2014  
KC Parent Magazine July 2014  

KC Parent Magazine July 2014

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