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arolina attle onnection JULY 2020 •

Vol. 34, Issue No. 7

Spotlight on

GELBVIEH


Performance Extra is utilized in the development of heifers before breeding season. Feeding 16% Performance prior to breeding will ensure those intake adequate Performance Extra CalfExtra is a very palatable blended feed designed foranimals the producer who wants energy to cycle properly to aCattle successful bred or cow. Thiswith ration also works more texture in their and feed lead product. start on Extraheifer Calf quicker than a straight pellet. well in all stages of cattle production where there is a need forand a higher and energy. This product consists of Whole Cottonseed, Soybean Meal, the 16%protein Performane Extra Pellets.

Performance Finishing Feed is designed for producers finishing our cattle on their farm. This is a blended feed of half cracked corn and half 13% Feeder Blend. Call 888-777-5912 for pricing.

Performance Feeder Blend is a pelleted combination of corn, dry corn gluten, soy hulls, calcium carbonate, and wheat midds with a trace mineral vitamin pack. Performance Feeder Blend is designed as a maintenance ration for all stages of cattle production.

Performance Hi-Mag Mineral is a free choice mineral containing 14% Magnesium which is essential in controlling grass tetany in cattle on vegetative forage.

Hi Mag Mineral with Clarify to also assist with Fly Control


….

ONNECTION Amazing Grazing — Get a Leg Up on the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season, by Dr. Deidre Harmon ....................................................................................................... page 10 American Angus Association News ................................................................................................ page 16 American Brahman Breeders Association News, by Joe W. Mask, Ph.D. .................................. page 38 American Hereford Association News ........................................................................................... page 23 Animal Agriculture Alliance News .................................................................................................. page 39 Ashley’s Beef Corner — National Programs in North Carolina, by Ashley W. Herring .......................................................................................................... page 8 Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges News .................................................... page 21 Beef Checkoff News .......................................................................................................................... page 44 Beef Cuts and Recommended Cooking Methods ......................................................................... page 45 Beef Improvement Federation News ............................................................................................. page 26 BioZyme Incorporated News .......................................................................................................... page 48 Boehringer Ingelheim News ............................................................................................................ page 52 Bring Your Beef Showdown ............................................................................................................. page 34 Carolina Cooking — Citrus Marinated Beef Top Sirloin & Fruit Kabobs .................................. page 20 Carolina Video and Load Lot Monthly Summary .......................................................................... page 15 Clemson Extension 2021 Bull Test Call for Nominations, by Steven E. Meadows, Ph.D. ............................................................................................. page 41 Cows Being Used to Produce COVID-19 Vaccine ......................................................................... page 33 Director’s Report — Opportunities, by Bryan K. Blinson ............................................................... page 3 E.B.’s View from the Cow Pasture — You Get New Experiences Every Day, by E.B. Harris........................................................................................................................ page 11 Federation of State Beef Councils Update .................................................................................... page 25 International Genetic Solutions News ........................................................................................... page 32 Merck Animal Health News .............................................................................................................. page 32 N.C. Weekly Livestock Report ........................................................................................................ page 44 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Myth of the Month ....................................................... page 30 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association News ............................................................................... page 53 NCBA Members Establish Organization’s Approach to COOL .................................................. page 30 NCBA President’s Report — NCBA Continues Fighting for All Producers, by Marty Smith .................................................................................................................... page 31 New NCCA Members for 2020 ........................................................................................................ page 43 North American Limousin Foundation News ............................................................................... page 42 North Carolina Cattle Receipts, Trends, and Prices ..................................................................... page 10 On the Edge of Common Sense — Hind Speak, by Baxter Black .................................................. page 12 On the Horizon — My Amazing Grazing Research Experience, by Madeline Newsome ....................................................................................................... page 13 Preg Check and Cull Replacement Heifers Early .......................................................................... page 37 Promoting Growth and Grade ......................................................................................................... page 49 Reimagining Liver Health in Beef Cattle ........................................................................................ page 43 S.C. Beef Council News, by Roy Copelan ......................................................................................... page 41 S.C. Charolais News, by Georgeanne Webb .................................................................................... page 36 South Carolina Cattle Receipts, Trends, and Prices ...................................................................... page 11 Texas Tech Investigates Antimicrobial Resistance in High Risk Cattle ..................................... page 47 The 44 Farms International Beef Cattle Academy Application Now Open ............................. page 24 The Simmental Trail, by Jennie Rucker .......................................................................................... page 33 USDA’s Livestock Risk Protection Deserves a Second Look ...................................................... page 52 Watch for Heat Stress, Summer Pneumonia in Beef Cattle ....................................................... page 35 Why Cattlemen Should Care About Dog Import Legislation ..................................................... page 37 Yon Family Farms Named BIF Seedstock Producer of the Year ................................................. page 17 You Decide!, by Dr. Mike Walden ...................................................................................................... page 14

GELBVIEH Characteristics of the Breed ..... page 4

Gelbvieh and Balancer Maternal Influence ..... page 6 Gelbvieh History and Development ..... page 4

Measure the Ways Crossbreeding Pays ..... page 5

The Value of Crossbreeding for Commercial Herds ..... page 6

North Carolina Cattlemen’s Association President JEREMY LEE 5153 Battle Run Drive • Catawba, NC 28609 Vice Presidents KARL GILLESPIE 860 Corbin Road • Franklin, NC 28734 BURON LANIER 2877 Piney Woods Road • Burgaw, NC 28425 SCOTT WEST 489 Panacea Springs Road • Littleton, NC 27850 Immediate Past President MIKE COX P.O. 1317 • Elon, NC 27244 NCBA Policy Division Director - FRED SMITH, JR. NCBA Federation Division Director RALPH BLALOCK, JR. Beef Board Director - ROBERT CRABB Secretary/Treasurer - EVERETT JOHNSON Directors At Large MATT POORE • NEIL BOWMAN • TODD SEE

The Carolina Cattle Connection Vol. 34, No. 7 JULY 2020 Sales and Publication Office 2228 N. Main Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526

Phone: 919-552-9111 or 919-552-9112 Fax: 919-552-9216 Email: mail@nccattle.com Website: www.nccattle.com

The Carolina Cattle Connection

is printed on 30 lb recycled newsprint by BN Printing in Benson, N.C.

Manager, N.C.

STAFF

BRYAN BLINSON

Manager, S.C. TRAVIS MITCHELL Editor and Advertising Director CASEY L. HINNANT

Executive Director BRYAN K. BLINSON Assistant Editor and Proofreader 2228 N. Main Street • Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526

KIM BURDGE

N.C. Cattlemen’s Beef Council Director of Consumer Information ASHLEY W. HERRING

N.C. Circulation

KIM BURDGE

Administrative Assistant - KIM BURDGE

S.C. Circulation

To Be Announced

South Carolina Cattlemen’s Association Executive Director TRAVIS MITCHELL Phone: 864-803-1126 Email: twmitch@clemson.edu S.C. Beef Council ROY COPELAN Phone: 803-917-1119 Email: scbeef@scda.sc.gov Website: www.sccattle.org Executive Committee President - Thomas Legare 1st Vice President - Roscoe Kyle Secretary - Carol Hendrix Treasurer - Eric Seymour Past President - Cecil Eaddy

William Brigman, Latta • Joe Oswald, IV, Allendale Roscoe Kyle, Inman • Terry Kirkland, Batesburg Eddie Evans, Easley • Cecil Eaddy, Manning Thomas Legare, Johns Island • Richard Sox, Lexington Carol Hendrix, Westminister • Clay Alexander, Starr Timmy Benton, Walterboro • Michael Bailey, Lancaster Dale Wilson, Abbeville • Thomas Jones, Marion Lee Haddon, Gaffney • Jack Ferguson, York Drake Yon, Ridge Spring • Gene Crim, St. Matthews

Material in The Carolina Cattle Connection is not to be reproduced in total or in part without the written permission of the Editor. All submissions becom property of The Carolina Cattle Connection, but we make every effort to return items such as photographs and artwork as requested. The Carolina Cattle Connection, the official publication of the N.C. Cattlemen’s Association and the S.C. Cattlemen’s Association is published monthly by the N.C. Cattlemen’s Association. A complementary subscription is included with membership to each state’s association. Nonmember subscriptions are $25 per year.

All address changes for NCCA members to: The Carolina Cattle Connection 2228 N. Main Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526. All address changes for SCCA members to: The Carolina Cattle Connection P.O. Box 11280 Columbia, SC 29211-1280

Our

breed Spotlight special sections are excellent forums to r e ac h p r o d u c e r s a n d cattle industry insiders in the Carolinas and throughout the S outheast . A dvertisers also receive a special discount for placing their message in the Spotlight. The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


Director’s Report By BRYAN K. BLINSON Executive Director, NCCA

Opportunities Now may seem to be an unusual time to consider opportunities. However, there is no better time for opportunities to present themselves than when we are faced with challenges. Given what our families, our industry, our country, and our world have been through in the last few months of the pandemic, our challenges have often seemed insurmountable. In the face of these challenges, I am convinced that the tenacity and ingenuity of our farmers will find ways to come out stronger on the other side of this unprecedented time. The last few months have been filled with uncertainty in the cattle industry for sure. We are accustomed to uncertainty as it pertains to weather, animal health, and even regulatory and consumer desires. However, this COVID-19 pandemic created uncertainties that went far beyond our industry but affected us dramatically. Our economy has been affected in ways that we may not even realize yet. The supply chain for goods was impacted worldwide, and we saw the effects in the meat case, dairy coolers, and even the toilet paper aisle. Our emotions were tested as we did not know what to expect or how to deal with the next infection report, plant closure, or if one of our loved ones would contract the disease. Most of us had not dealt with prolonged isolation, now known as “social distancing.” For many, the only real contact with the outside world was social media, which, along with the news, only added to the uncertainty we all faced. No one had the answers to when the crisis would end or how we would dig out of the hole it created, but I am thankful for those who had to make the hard decisions. Many of these decisions may prove to have saved lives, livelihoods, and other things we all hold dear. Others may prove to have cost these same things. I have to believe that all of the hard decisions that were made were not only difficult but with the best of intentions. I may not agree with all of the decisions but certainly am thankful to those who had the responsibility of making them. To explore a few opportunities born of challenges, we will consider some of the improvements that we have made to

answer past challenges. Most of us have figured out ways to manage our pastures and forage types to mitigate drought. Farmers have found flood tolerant forages to deal with hurricane effects. We continue to improve animal health and efficiency as we develop and improve vaccinations and treatment protocols for diseases that have challenged the health of our cattle. We are constantly working with Congress, our state legislature, and even county government to deal with regulatory challenges, and certainly in North Carolina have developed cooperation between commodity and farm groups as well as other business groups to create a stronger alliance when negative political winds blow. The Feed the Dialogue Foundation, which has proven to be a tremendous alliance between commodity groups, farm groups, and agribusiness to promote modern agriculture, would not exist were it not for the challenges of activism from those outside of agriculture. I am not sure what innovative products, techniques, or markets may result from the challenges brought on by COVID-19, but I am sure they will not only help us deal with the next issue but, in many cases, will improve the industry on an “everyday” basis. One of the amazing opportunities that presented itself was the ability to sell local beef. With the breakdown of the supply chain, meat in the grocery stores became as scarce as bread and milk before a snowstorm for a short period of time. Consumers across the state quickly realized that the farmer they drive by every day may just be able to help deal with this shortage. It seemed that everyone wanted to get in on the local meat scene. This instant demand explosion created another challenge, and that was the capacity of our local harvest facilities. In short order, we all began to explore ways to create additional capacity and training opportunities for our processors so they can enhance farmers’ opportunities to sell and consumers to buy the great beef all of you produce. There are currently efforts in the works to do just that, and hopefully, by the

time you are reading this, there will be significant State funds assisting with the effort. The potential for added capacity and job opportunities in the field can help our farmers who wish to participate in a greater share of the final beef dollars, which is always the goal. There may also be additional job opportunities for some of our rural youth to pursue careers in the field. While all of us in the industry knew of the need, the crisis was the driver that engaged the action. Our markets were challenged from top to bottom during the crisis. All of agriculture and, particularly the protein markets, were challenged in numerous ways. We have to hope that the lessons learned will help to improve the resiliency of the supply chain, and I suspect it will. There is little doubt that the challenge has created an opportunity to enhance price discovery in our industry, and hopefully, in turn, will result in a greater share of the food dollar to be returned to the farmer. Consumer appreciation may also be a positive byproduct of the challenges we have faced. For a long time, consumers seemed to think that the food and other products could not possibly become scarce at the grocery store. The COVID-19 crisis emphasized that with the breakdown of the supply chain, the seemingly never ending supply can come to a screeching halt. Again, I am very thankful to the farmers, the truckers, the processors, and others who found ways to quickly get the supply of products back as soon as they did. It is my hope that our consumers will have a better understanding of the

importance of farmers and all of those who keep the abundant supply of food in the coolers and on the shelves. With so many restaurants closed, another opportunity presented itself to our customers, family mealtime. It seems that many families rarely had, nor had taken the time to prepare meals at home and sit down and eat them together. We have taken the opportunity since the beginning of the shutdown to distribute how to videos on beef preparation. We focused on cooking techniques and recipes of some of the undervalued cuts such as roasts and others that they may not have had the confidence to try before. Going forward, I expect that many of these families will continue to try new cuts now that they realize how great the experience was. What better way to remember a good beef meal than to remember how enjoyable it was when eating it with family. We have no idea just how impactful these last few months may prove to be on the next few years. I contend that we can choose to lament the problems it caused or embrace the lessons we learned from it. I hope that as a society, we can look back at the time more of us got to spend together with family and realized just how much we need others as a positive opportunity born of a very negative situation. I remain confident that all of our farm families that produce beef will find ways to not only survive this crisis but to come up with new ideas to help their families and others. That is who you are, and I am always proud to work for folks who constantly set the example of the family working together to help not just yourselves but those around you.

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The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

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e Special

Spotlight on

GELBVIEH

Section f

Gelbvieh History and Development Origin of Breed - The Gelbvieh breed is one of the oldest German cattle breeds, first found mainly in three Franconian districts of Bavaria in southern Germany. Starting in 1850, systematic breeding work began in stud herds. Through purebreeding, the “red-yellow Franconian cattle” were developed from several local strains, including Celtic-German Landrace and Heil-Brown Landrace cattle. These local strains have been further improved with intensive breeding work since 1870. This solid colored breed of red-yellow cattle enjoyed great popularity as draft and slaughter cattle. Since World War II, Germany used a stringent selection program to repopulate its cattle herds. Only three percent of the registered cows were used to produce potential bulls. These cows were selected on structural soundness and conformation.

Bulls from these select cows were performance tested, and the top half was progeny tested. The progeny evaluation included gestation length, birth weight, calving ease, growth rate, slaughter weight, carcass quality conformation, udder soundness, and fertility and milk production in daughters. Semen was released only from bulls that proved their superiority in progeny testing. In the 1960s, Red Danish cattle were included in the herd book to improve milk production. Development in America - Leness Hall, the director of International Marketing for Carnation Genetics, first saw Gelbvieh cattle in 1969. He worked towards importing Gelbvieh semen to the U.S., and finally was able to bring 43,000 units to America in 1971. In that same year, the American Gelbvieh Association was formed.

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Today, there are approximately 45,000 active, registered Gelbvieh cows in the United States and 1,400 active members of the American Gelbvieh Association (AGA). AGA is the largest Gelbvieh association in the world and ranks fifth in number of registered animals among beef breed associations in the United States. Most registered U.S. Gelbvieh are classified as purebreds (at least 88 percentage Gelbvieh) and were bred up by mating fullbloods and purebred Gelbvieh bulls to foundation cows.

services to assist in maximizing return on investment in Gelbvieh and Balancer bulls and replacement females. Cow/calf producers who use Gelbvieh genetics are eligible to add value to females by marketing them through the Maternal Edge commercial female sales. Visit www.maternaledge.com for more information about a sale in various areas. For cattlemen looking to market bulls, replacement females or feeder cattle, check out the AGA’s free Exchange service, including: Bull Listings, Female Listings,

and Feeder Calf Listings. Visit www. gelbvieh.org/exchange to view current listings or to post a new listing. Brand your Gelbvieh influenced feeder calves with SmartCross® ear tags. This ear tag tells the buyer he is getting quality and predictability. Contact the AGA office at 303-465-2333 for more information on the three tag styles to fit any management program, as well as electronic ID tags. For more information about Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics, visit www. gelbvieh.org.

Characteristics of the Breed

Breed Registry and Improvement Programs - Purebred Gelbvieh cattle as well as hybrid cattle can be registered with the AGA. Breeders can document Gelbvieh influenced bulls and females with registrations and EPDs through AGA’s three hybrid registry programs: Balancer®, Southern Balancer®, and Hybrid. Balancer cattle are registered hybrid seedstock and have documented pedigrees and EPDs. Balancer animals are 2575 percent Gelbvieh with the balance Angus or Red Angus. Southern Balancer is a Gelbvieh heat tolerant composite specifically targeted to producers who want the maternal heterosis, disposition, fertility, and carcass consistency of a Bos Indicus x Gelbvieh cross. Hybrid animals, of any breed or cross, may be recorded using the Hybrid Cattle Recording Service. The AGA documents the pedigree, breed composition, and calculates performance data and provides EPDs. For Gelbvieh members and commercial users of Gelbvieh and Balancer genetics, the AGA offers several

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

Coloration - Traditional Gelbviehs are reddish gold to russet or black in color. Traditional German Gelbviehs tend to be darker on their necks than the rest of the body; this is more prominent in bulls than in cows. Red Gelbviehs can be confused with traditional colored Limousins because of the same light pigmentation around the eyes and nose. Gelbviehs also have strong skin pigmentation, which makes them ideal for temperate to arid conditions. Body type and characteristics - Gelbvieh are beefy, moderately muscular cattle, with frame sizes ranging from medium to large. They are long and smooth-haired, with bulls averaging around 2,300 lbs and cows averaging around 1,300 lbs in weight. Head characteristics - Though the traditional Gelbvieh breed was originally horned, this has been bred out in most of the modern day Gelbvieh cattle. Cows have a moderately long face, not dissimilar to Simmentals, Charolais, or Limousins, and bulls

have similar head characteristics to the aforementioned breeds. Other characteristics - The Gelbvieh breed is great for its high fertility, freedom from genital defects, superior calving ease, mothering ability, exceptional milking ability, and high growth rates. Carcass characteristics have a lot of potential, since the breed is mostly lean, but can be crossed with breeds like Angus to get an exceptional carcass quality. Gelbviehs are also very quiet and docile, which is easily passed on to their offspring, crossbred or not. They are also highly adapted to hot arid climates, with not only the skin pigmentation that makes them resistant to sunburn and able to stand out in the hot sun without any problems, but also their ability to restrict blood flow to the areas where they have been bitten by ticks, isolating the ticks and starving them. This is a characteristic that has been noticed and proven by South African Gelbvieh Association, and is currently undergoing more research.


e Special

Spotlight on

GELBVIEH

Section f

Measure the Ways Crossbreeding Pays Now more than ever, producers are trying to maximize outputs and herd performance all while reducing costs. Taking advantage of tools that allow for reduced costs and increased productivity and profitability is an essential worth to producers in today’s industry. One tool that has been utilized in the beef industry for several years, and one that has evident value in beef production is crossbreeding. Crossbreeding provides increased performance with minimal, if any, additional costs to the producer. Through the practice of crossbreeding, heterosis (or hybrid vigor) and breed complementarity are achieved within the herd. Heterosis can be defined as the superiority in performance of the crossbred animal compared to the average of its straightbred parents. When valuing heterosis, you essentially gain a dual advantage: individual heterosis and maternal heterosis.

purebred mothers. It refers to the combined improvement in traits from the dam that causes an increase in the performance of her and her progeny. Improved fertility, increased calf survivability, greater cow longevity, and more pounds of calf produced are examples of maternal heterosis. As seen in Table 5, a crossbred cow has been shown to have a 16.2 percent increase in longevity and has proven to stay in the herd longer than a straightbred cow. This table also reflects the increase in the number of calves through a cow’s lifetime as well as additional pounds of cumulative weaning weight and more profit for the producer. The effects of heterosis are greatest for lifetime production with a 30 percent improvement, longevity, or herd life with a 15 percent increase, and annual income improvement from heterosis at 23 percent. The crossbred female is really where

Table 4. Individual heterosis: Advantage of the crossbred calf1

Trait

Calving rate Survival to weaning Birth weight Weaning weight Longevity ADG Yearling weight

1

Observed Improvement

3.5 0.8 1.6 18.0 1.36 0.08 29.1

% Heterosis 3.7 1.5 1.8 3.9 16.2 2.6 3.8

crossbreeding pays off. Traits that are most influenced by heterosis are those traits with low heritability, such as fertility traits. Traits that are most affected by heterosis can be seen in the table to the right. Utilizing crossbreeding systems also allows for the opportunity to capitalize on breed complementarity. This is the assessment of strengths and weaknesses of each breed type and applying those that complement each other. Breed complementarity is one of the best ways

Table 5. Maternal heterosis: Advantage of the crossbred cow1

Trait

Calving rate Survival to weaning Birth weight Weaning weight Longevity

Observed Improvement

Cow Lifetime Production: No. Calves Cumulative Wean. Wt., lb. Adapted from Cundiff and Gregory 1999.

3.5 0.8 1.6 18.0 1.36 0.97 600

% Heterosis 3.7 1.5 1.8 3.9 16.2 17.0 25.3

and easy crossbreeding system. Gelbvieh are also an ideal fit for a crossbreeding program because of their superior maternal characteristics such as longevity and fertility. Gelbvieh females are known for reaching puberty at an earlier age and remaining in the herd longer. With these attributes, combined with performance gained through maternal heterosis, Gelbvieh influenced cattle make the ideal female for any herd. So, why not reap the benefits of the heterosis advantage? Source: American Gelbvieh Association

2020 Spotlight Issues Schedule

Most of the breed associations in North and South Carolina have stepped forward and renewed their contracts for Spotlight sections in The Carolina Cattle Connection for 2020. If your breed is not featured as a Spotlight section and you would like to inquire on any open months please feel free to contact us. Below is the tentative schedule for the upcoming year.

Adapted from Cundiff and Gregory 1999.

Individual heterosis results in an increase of calf survival to weaning, along with increased growth. Table 4 shows the increase in performance that can be achieved through individual heterosis. Through crossbreeding, calves have been seen to have a 3.9 percent increase in weaning weight and a 2.6 percent increase in average daily gain, all which translates to increased profits. Similar to the definition of heterosis above, maternal heterosis is the advantage of a crossbred mother over the average of other

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to describe the benefits of Balancer ® cattle. Balancer animals are 25 to 75 percent Gelbvieh with the balance of Angus or Red Angus. They combine the Gelbvieh growth, muscle, leanness, fertility, longevity, and low yield grading ability with the carcass qualities of Angus to make an animal that meets today’s modern industry demands. Balancer hybrids offer a simple and powerful way to maintain hybrid vigor and the proper combination of British and Continental genetics in your cowherd in a straightforward

2020 Reserved Spotlight Issues

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER

CHAROLAIS FORAGES ANGUS PEST MANAGEMENT BRAHMAN HEREFORD GELBVIEH SIMMENTAL SANTA GERTRUDIS *************** *************** RED ANGUS

Contact The Carolina Cattle Connection 2228 N. Main Street Fuquay-Varina, NC 27526 Phone - 919-552-9111 for the contact person for each Spotlight Issue.

The Carolina Cattle Connection

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e Special

Spotlight on

GELBVIEH

Section f

The Value of Crossbreeding for Commercial Herds The crossbred beef cow can make you more money! One of the main keys to successful crossbreeding is finding two breeds that excel in different traits but together result in high breed complementarity. The crossbred animal that effectively captures the value of breed complementarity is the Balancer®. The Balancer captures the maternal strengths of Gelbvieh cattle and the marbling strength of Angus or Red Angus cattle. A Balancer is a registered hybrid seedstock breed that are 25-75 percent Gelbvieh with either Angus or Red Angus contributing the remaining breed percentage. “Crossbreeding can have positive effects on a ranch’s bottom line by not only increasing the quality and gross pay weight of calves produced but also by

increasing the durability and productivity of the cow factory,” said Bob Weaber, Ph.D., cow/calf extension specialist at Kansas State University. The Balancer hybrid will do just as Dr. Weaber states. Balancer calves will load the scales with more pounds on sale day and their mothers will keep producing similar calves year after year. In addition to increasing the amount of pounds sold, ranch profitability improves from crossbreeding by reducing the maintenance requirements of your cow herd. “Positive changes in cow longevity, reproductive rate, and calf performance from heterosis effectively reduces maintenance energy requirements per pound of beef produced. Dilution of maintenance costs of the cow herd

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

improves sustainability in both the environment, through more efficient land use, and profitability areas,” Weaber said. Matt Spangler, Ph.D., with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, believes that a well thoughtout crossbreeding program should be utilized in a comer operation. “The most successful commercial operations use crossbreeding as the standard rather than the exception as they

exploit maternal heterosis to increase production, but mostly in order to reduce cost…They focus on the cost per pound of production, relative to the possible revenue per pound,” Spangler said. Balancer cattle excel at meeting the demands of the cow/calf producers and the feedlots. Balancer cattle make it easy to implement crossbreeding into any commercial herd and give the rancher the benefits of profit making hybrid vigor.

Gelbvieh and Balancer Maternal Influence Gelbvieh and Balancer cattle offer maternal superiority through increased longevity, added fertility, and more pounds of calf weaned per cow exposed. In addition, Gelbvieh and Balancer females offer a small mature cow size, more maternal milk, and reach puberty at an earlier age. U.S. Meat Animal Research Center data shows Gelbvieh females have the smallest mature cow size of the four major continental breeds. The Gelbvieh breed was the only breed in the study to reduce mature cow size. At an average of 1,382 pounds, Gelbvieh sired females had the lowest five-year-old cow weight. This reduced mature cow size allows for puberty to be reached at an earlier age, which leads to calving earlier in the season and producing a calf at a younger age. These females are able to wean heavier calves while still maintaining low birth weights and a tight calving interval year after year. Gelbvieh and Balancer females also excel in stayability, which is the probability a bull’s daughters will remain in the cow herd until at least six years of age. This trait is economically beneficial to cow/calf producers and directly impacts profitability. With the high costs associated with the development or purchase of replacement females, sustained reproduction is essential in a herd. U.S. MARC data, along with American Gelbvieh Association genetic trends, prove that today’s Gelbvieh and Balancer cows are highly productive, offering increased longevity, more maternal milk, less mature weights, early puberty, quiet disposition, and will calve easily, producing calves with low birth weights and tremendous growth. With stayability and cow productivity being important factors in cow/ calf profitability, adding Gelbvieh and Balancer maternal influence through a crossbreeding program is a great option for commercial producers.


The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

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nice flavor contrast to the Mexican spices. Is chuck eye roast the same as chuck roast? Chuck eye roast can be challenging to find in the grocery store, but your local grocery store butcher should be able to cut one for you. The chuck eye is from the shoulder area of

Ashley’s Beef Corner

T

National Programs in North Carolina By ASHLEY W. HERRING Director of Consumer Information N.C. Cattlemen’s Beef Council We typically have so much going on within our state regarding beef promotion that I forget to share what is happening on behalf of us at a larger level. As many of you know, half of the Beef Checkoff goes towards national programs that are larger in scope and cost than what we can manage locally. The following promotion is an example of just that. The Beef Checkoff identified food influencers from around the country that meet their standards to share our messaging. One such influencer is Amee Livingston, who lives in Charlotte. Amee is actually a member of our Beef Expert Bureau, so she has worked with us for years. We typically look for an influencer who naturally shares about beef on their platforms, has a highly engaged following, and is looking to build a long term relationship with us. We also make sure that they are not working with a competitive protein while we are working together or have partnerships with plant based alternative products. Amee is a food enthusiast who likes to recreate recipes in more nutritious ways by lightening up meals. Her other interests involve physical fitness, specifically Olympic weightlifting, and competing as a masters athlete. She is a certified trainer at Fight Back Performance and Recovery, where she specializes in exercise for cancer survivorship and Pre- and Post-natal women’s fitness. She has several certifications. Amee has shared several beef posts on her blog, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. These posts have themes that range from beef and heart health to decreasing food waste. One of her most recent posts is a recipe that uses the chuck eye steak, which may be easier to source at this time. It’s also a cut that holds a lot of value, making it easy for a weeknight meal. I’m including her post along with the pictures so you can see what it looks like. If you are on social media, look up

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Amee’s Savory Dish, be sure to give her a follow and share these posts. Slow Cooker Mexican Picadillo Recipe - A slow cooker beef recipe for Mexican Picadillo made with tender chuck eye roast, carrots, potatoes, onions, beef stock, tomato sauce, and traditional picadillo spices. This easy beef recipe is loaded with flavor. The best part is that it comes together in less than fifteen minutes and cooks while you go about your day! *This post is a collaboration with Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. on behalf of the Beef Checkoff. I received compensation, but all opinions are my own.

This is one of those easy weeknight meals that tastes as if you slaved over the stove for hours. Traditional Mexican Picadillo is usually made with ground beef on the stovetop, so if you’re a picadillo purist, don’t shy away from trying out this tender slow cooked chuck eye roast variation. My version still has a lot of the traditional picadillo ingredients and spices, like raisins, garlic, jalapeños, and cumin, in a shredded beef dish. The herb and spice combination in this dish is what makes it sing. The raisins might sound weird here, but just trust me when I say that it adds a

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

the cow and a continuation of the same muscles that make up the ribeye. The ribeye is one of the most flavorful and tender cuts of beef, so you can see why this roast is such a perfect choice for this dish. If you can’t find a chuck eye roast, a chuck pot roast, cross rib roast or blade would be good substitutes. What to serve with Mexican Picadillo - You can eat this as a stew with a side of tortillas or serve it in traditional picadillo fashion over steamed rice. You can also make it without the potatoes and carrots. The shredded beef is delicious in a burrito bowl or as a flavorful soft taco filling. If you want a lower carb variation with more vegetables, serve it over steamed riced cauliflower. This is my personal preference to add more vegetables to this meal. There are so many great options for buying cauliflower already riced these days, so you don’t need to add extra prep time to make it. I love the steamable bags of riced cauliflower in the freezer section of the grocery store. They are fast, easy, and tasty!

For toppings, I love fresh chopped cilantro and sour cream or Mexican crema. Mexican crema is similar to créme Fraiche with a higher butterfat content and lower acid content than sour cream. It’s SO delicious and flavorful, and a little goes a long way. How To Make Slow Cooker Mexican Picadillo 2-2½ lb chuck eye roast 2 Tbsp Extra virgin olive oil 15 oz can tomato sauce ½ cup beef broth or beef stock 1 tsp beef stock concentrate (I use Better Than Bouillon brand or 1 tsp beef bouillon) 16 oz Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and chopped into cubes

3 large carrots, peeled and chopped ½ large onion, chopped 4 cloves garlic, minced ½ cup golden raisins 1 tbsp diced pickled jalapeños, drained (can also use 1 fresh seeded and chopped jalapeño for more kick) 1 tsp each: cumin seeds, Mexican chili powder, salt and pepper Garnish: 3-4 sprigs fresh cilantro, chopped Sour cream or Mexican crema 1 fresh jalapeño, sliced

Heat olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add roast and brown on both sides, about 2-3 minutes total. Transfer roast to the slow cooker, along with juices from the pan. Peel and chop the potatoes and carrots. Then chop the onion and garlic. Add chopped vegetables, onions, garlic, jalapeños, raisins, and spices to the slow cooker. Whisk together the tomato sauce, beef broth or stock, and beef bouillon concentrate. The bouillon adds so much flavor. Don’t leave this out! Next, pour the sauce mixture on top.

Cover and cook on LOW for 7½ to 8 hours or on HIGH for 3½ to 4 hours until roast shreds easily with a fork. Remove the roast and shred the beef. Add beef back to the slow cooker, stir and serve. Analytics on the most recent content Amee created for us: Reach (Informed by audience on her blog, IG, FB, Pinterest) - 72,565 Engagement (Informed by number of likes, comments, shares, link clicks, etc.) - 206 Working with influencers like Amee gives us the opportunity to share our messaging without it coming directly from the beef industry. Amee has thousands of followers who recognize that her opinions and advice is trustworthy. She is a credible source of information about food for her readers. We value these relationships because it drives beef demand.


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PAGE 9


By DR. DEIDRE HARMON N.C. State University

Get a Leg Up on the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season Once again, we are entering that time of year when mother nature lets us know exactly how powerful she can be. We are only a few weeks into the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, and we have already had three named storms, two of which came before the official start of the season (June 1). Although storms are an inevitable part of our life, having an emergency preparedness plan for your livestock operations can make this hurricane season a breeze. The following is a storm preparedness list that you can do right now to help you be more prepared for future storms. • Prior to the storm, move livestock to interior pastures. Locating livestock in interior pastures will help prevent animals from escaping if trees fall on fence lines or if they are swept away by swift moving water. • During storms, flooding and power outages pose as major threats to the security of water and feed resources. Water can be stored for several days in plastic water totes for emergency use. Likewise, feed resources should be placed in dry areas that are not prone to flooding. • Cattle should have a unique identification tag that can be linked to farm management records. Ear tags work great but could be paired with a permanent tattoo ID just in case tags become torn or lost. Having good farm management records prior to the storm can help identify missing animals after the storm and help with insurance claims. • If possible, consider relocating animals from high impact areas prior to the weather event. This may include areas prone to flooding and areas where falling trees pose a safety threat to cattle. • Have a fencing tool kit prepared that includes t-posts, t-post driver, clips, barbwire, smooth wire, bolt cutters, fencing pliers, hammer, and staples. It would also be very beneficial to include temporary fencing in your fencing toolkit. Having a reel of polywire, step-in posts, fiberglass posts, and a solar charger can help you quickly erect a fence to keep

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cattle from escaping a storm damaged pasture. It is also useful when trying to exclude cattle from toxic plants such as wild cherry trees that were damaged/ blown over during the storm. • Some methods of storm preparedness may take place months prior to hurricane season. If your farm contains toxic plants that may become damaged during a storm, it is best to take care of the problem before it becomes a problem. In the summertime, mark any wild cherry trees or other toxic plants when they are easily identifiable. In the winter, when the leaves are gone, take time to remove those toxic plants from your pasture when they do not pose a threat to animal health. This proactive step will save you some time and worry during and after a storm. • Keeping a well maintained chainsaw will help you quickly get downed trees cut off fences. Check the bar and chain oil level often and have an extra bottle stored for emergency purposes. Maintaining a sharp chain and having an extra one on hand will make cutting more efficient and safer for the person running the chainsaw. • Move tractors and other equipment to open areas away from trees, structures, and flood prone areas to prevent damage from water and falling debris. • Generators may be expensive but are a useful investment if storms frequently impact your area. Having a generator with an ample amount of fuel can be used to pump well water to cattle, run feed out of feed bins, power fence chargers, and prevent your family from being in the dark. It is also useful to have several power cords available. • Keeping your files in a dry and secure area is a proactive way for you to be prepared to clean up after the storm. Keeping a record of important contacts, such as insurance company and information, local FSA office, and veterinary support, can make the disaster response less stressful. • Maintaining an ample supply of tarps may be useful to help protect feed

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

resources prior to the storm or quickly cover and temporarily repair damaged roofs, barns, or storage sheds after the storm. • Unfortunately, in some scenarios, euthanizing of hurt livestock may be a necessary and humane mode of action. In your storm preparedness toolkit make sure you have the ability to euthanize if necessary and follow guidelines on the proper techniques of doing so. • Lastly, the primary goal of storm preparedness is to make sure you and your family are safe. Create a storm toolkit for your family that includes any important documents including identification, insurance, deeds, first aid

kit, storm radio, flashlight, battery packs for electronics, blankets, medications, canned food, water, electrolytes, bug spray with DEET, sunscreen, and any other consumables you deem necessary. Also, think about the safety of your pets that may need food, water, and a crate. Dealing with weather related disasters can be stressful. Having a well developed plan for your family and your livestock operation can help ease some of the headaches of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season. For more information on storm preparedness and cleaning up after, visit us at www.beef.ces.ncsu.edu and at www.cefs.ncsu.edu/extension-andoutreach/amazing-grazing/.

N.C. Cattle Receipts, Trends, and Prices for the Month of MAY 2020 Cattle Receipts: 13,561

Previous Month: 14,455

Feeder supply - 34% steers • 39% heifers • 27% bulls SLAUGHTER CLASSES

Avg. Wt. Price Cows - % Lean Breaker 1,478 $61.69 Boner 1,168 $60.98 Lean 966 $51.81

Bulls - Yield Grade 1-2

1,545

$91.62

FEEDER CLASSES

FEEDER STEERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 424 $141.39 $599.49 450-500 469 $141.87 $665.37 500-550 520 $138.15 $718.38 550-600 567 $134.79 $764.26 600-650 623 $128.54 $800.80 650-700 674 $122.13 $823.16

FEEDER BULLS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 423 $141.82 $599.90 450-500 474 $135.34 $641.51 500-550 522 $128.97 $673.22 550-600 572 $125.56 $718.20 600-650 623 $115.93 $722.24 650-700 671 $109.72 $736.22

FEEDER HEIFERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 423 $124.84 $528.07 450-500 469 $124.31 $583.01 500-550 520 $115.66 $601.43 550-600 565 $115.12 $650.43 600-650 626 $107.93 $675.64 650-700 671 $101.21 $679.12

Source: N.C. Dept. of Agriculture - USDA Market News Service, Raleigh, N.C. - 919-707-3156


S.C. Cattle Receipts, Trends, and Prices for the Month of MAY 2020

E.B.'s View from the Cow Pasture

Cattle Receipts: 7,536

Previous Month: 5,228

Feeder supply - 32% steers • 40% heifers • 28% bulls

By E.B. HARRIS

SLAUGHTER CLASSES

You Get New Experiences Every Day During this COVID-19 crisis, as you well know, all the barbershops were closed. I thought about it several times. When I was a tyke, we had 300 sheep here on the farm. Daddy had three pairs of sheep shears and one pair of horse clippers. For those of you who don’t know much about sheep shears, I will explain them. The blade on a sheep shear is wider than the one on a set of horse clippers. The prongs, or cutting part, on the horse clippers are close together. On the sheep clippers, the comb part is a lot further apart and has about half as many prongs as horse clippers. He would get them together in late winter or early spring. Then he would send them off and get them ready for use when it was time for sheep shearing. When they came back, Daddy would plug them up on the back porch and make sure they were ready for work. One spring, he took a pair out to check them. He told me to hop up in the chair that was there on the back porch, and he would cut my hair. I hopped up in the chair to get my hair cut. Mama was in the kitchen and saw what was about to take place. I think daddy had made one pass up the back of my head before mama came on the porch and told him he was not going to mess up my hair. Daddy was just having fun. One thing about having a good hair cut and a not so good hair cut is that in just a couple of weeks, it will all look the same anyway. As soon as the barbershops were allowed to open back up, I sent the person who cuts my hair a text to see when I could come in for a haircut. They answered to come in on the morning after Memorial Day at 10:00. That was the first

Avg. Wt. Price Cows - % Lean Breaker 1,519 $63.14 Boner 1,240 $64.55 Lean 926 $57.61 day they would be open. I arrived a few minutes early at the place where I was to get my hair cut. On the door was a notice, “Only 1 Customer at a Time.” I could see another customer was there, so I waited outside. In a few minutes, the lady came to the door and motioned for me to come on in. When I got to the door, she said, “E.B., the first thing I have to do is to take your temperature. Do you mind?” She put an instant reading thermometer by my temple. She read it and said I was fine. The next thing she asks was for me to put on a mask, which I did. She then asked me to put on this outer garment that looked like a laundry bag. She was wearing an outfit that looked like a welder’s helmet except it was clear, a mask, an outer garment, and gloves. She said she was following the rules that the license board had issued in order to her to be able to open. On the way home, I thought about this: The person who cuts your hair now, and does it legally, does about what a doctor does – so they may need to hang up two shingles. Hopefully, everything will soon be back to normal. Stay safe, get a good haircut, and be prepared for changes that come about.

Bulls - Yield Grade 1-2

1,630

$93.10

FEEDER CLASSES

FEEDER STEERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 423 $141.15 $597.06 450-500 475 $137.58 $653.51 500-550 523 $134.06 $701.13 550-600 572 $132.35 $757.04 600-650 620 $123.73 $767.13 650-700 673 $120.35 $809.96

FEEDER BULLS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 420 $137.25 $576.45 450-500 474 $133.88 $634.59 500-550 521 $129.44 $674.38 550-600 570 $124.98 $712.39 600-650 620 $117.67 $729.55 650-700 665 $114.08 $758.63

FEEDER HEIFERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Wt. Range Avg. Wt. CWT Avg. Price 400-450 425 $123.14 $523.35 450-500 471 $119.37 $562.23 500-550 521 $116.65 $607.75 550-600 572 $114.52 $655.05 600-650 614 $109.12 $670.00 650-700 660 $105.00 $693.00

Source: N.C. Dept. of Agriculture - USDA Market News Service, Raleigh, N.C. - 919-707-3156

“If you have cattle, pastureland, or raise hay like I do, you need to call Donna Byrum. In 10 minutes on the hood of my pickup, she signed by up for a program that I had no idea about. The next time she came by the farm, she brought me a check!” ~ E.B Harris

DONNA BYRUM

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For all your crop insurance needs! The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

PAGE 11


Baxter Black

On the edge of common sense Hind Speak

“Hey buddy, maybe you’ll rope better after your horse foals. Ha ha!” “Thanks, pal. I had a horse like yours once. But his brain was so small his head caved in, and he bit his own ears off! Look, it’s starting in yours...see that indention.” The quick retort. That clever comeback, the snappy rejoinder that puts the annoying smart mouth in his place. The French call it Esprit d’Escalier - the wit of the stairway. In my case, it would be better called Esprit d’ Much Later. I don’t think of what I wished I’d said till I’m tossing and turning at 2:00 in the morning. My normal response to the roping chide would have been more like, “Huh? Oh. It’s a gelding. Yeah, I guess you know, I get it. Ha, ha. Duh!” The trick is to let the tormentor step into his own trap: “My gosh, Bill, if I had a bull that threw calves like that, I’d sell ‘em as quick as I could!” “You had... you did. I bought him at yer yearlin’ sale two years ago!” “This is ridiculous, havin’ to nearly undress to get through airport security.” “I’ve never heard anyone say that who’s been hijacked.” “I’ve been tryin’ to call you for three weeks to tell you about this great

networking investment opportunity. How do you expect people to get a hold of you if you have an unlisted phone number?” (A visual Esprit d’Escalier...the raised eyebrows) “How can you live without a computer?” “Somebody’s gotta think up all that stuff you read on that little screen.” “Ugh... how can you wear that fur coat?” “I’m doing research on lunatics, and this seems to be good bait.” “Dear, why do you always undercook my bacon? You know I like it crisp.” “Yer mother always cooked it crisp and said you were difficult to potty train. I don’t want you to revert.” “I hope you don’t mind us joining you. Looks like yer catchin’ all the fish.” “Not a bit, have y’all been vaccinated for leprosy?” “I run every day. Are you familiar with running?” “Yeah, I saw The Fugitive.” “How could anyone be so stupid?” “Maybe it’s the company I keep.” Now that you’ve got the idea try this on... “Did you make that bridle yourself, or is your kid learning leatherwork in kindergarten?”

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PAGE 12

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


On the Horizon By MADELINE NEWSOME N.C. State University

My Amazing Grazing Research Experience My name is Madeline Newsome, and I am a rising senior at N.C. State University, majoring in animal science. This past year I became interested and involved with the Amazing Grazing team, the N.C. State University Pasture Based Livestock Education Program, and their work. Growing up on a commercial poultry and beef cattle farm in Stokes County guided my decision to major in animal science, but it has been my work with the Amazing Grazing team

that has helped me find a passion for forage based beef cattle management and nutrition. I seemingly fell into my position with the team while searching for an undergraduate research opportunity that interested me. I was first introduced to the program and its purpose by Dr. Matt Poore, one of the Amazing Grazing leaders. I was instantly captivated by the work they were doing and the team itself. I had never met a group of people so excited and united by a common goal,

and I was eager to be a part of it. Under the guidance of Dr. Matt Poore and Dr. Deidre Harmon, I was given the opportunity to take on an undergraduate research project that assessed and compared characteristics such as yield potential, quality, and persistence of nine selected varieties of tall fescue. With these nine varieties, seven are novel endophyte tall fescue, one is Kentucky-31, or endophyte infected fescue, and the final variety is endophyte free. These tests were conducted at one of N.C. State’s research locations and two NCDA research locations across North Carolina in order to evaluate how the trial results differ in the varying climates. The locations of the trials are the Butner Beef Cattle Field Lab in Bahama, the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville, and the Piedmont Research Station in Salisbury. This research is crucial to farmers and professionals because of the harmful effects of toxic endophyte fescue and Fescue Toxicosis Syndrome, which causes a massive loss of over $1 billion in profits to the beef cattle industry each

year. While Kentucky-31 (KY-31) is widely spread throughout the Southeast and the Fescue Belt due to its high yield and incredible resilience, it can be counterproductive for cattle producers in terms of weight gain, reproductive performance, and overall health of the cattle. While there are many proposed methods to manage these symptoms while continuing to graze toxic endophyte fescue, the objective of my undergraduate research project is to compare many varieties of tall fescue in order to provide comparative data for farmers to make the most informed decision about what to plant in their fields and pastures. Working with the Amazing Grazing team has been incredible, and I feel I am fortunate to be a member. It has been such a great learning experience for me and has driven my desire to not only continue my undergraduate research project but to also branch out and get involved with other forage and cattle based research projects during my senior year.

FORECLOSURE A UCTION Bid on site Saturday, July 18, 2020 • 10:00 a.m. 410+-Acres • Surry County, NC

Located in the Foothills G Bold Stream G Pond G Convenient to I-74/I-77 with view of the Blue Ridge Mountains Cropland G Pastureland G Livestock Facilities G Special Needs Barn – 13,871+/- SF built in 1972 Breeding Barn – 5,895+/- SF built in 2001 G Heifer Barn – 742+/- SF built in 2007 Free Stall Barn – 7,695+/- SF built in 1994, renovated 2007 G Upper Free Stall Barn – 18,776+/- SF built in 2007 Lower Free Stall Barn – 18,776+/- SF built in 2007 G Wean Barn -5,490+/- SF built in 2005 Equipment shed G Shop G Brick home G Frame Home G Offered in parcels from 25 to 140 acres and combinations TERMS: 5% deposit at the auction. Balance not to exceed 30 days. Subject to upset bids and Trustee approval. Preview date: July 9 • 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Appointments available by call the auction firm at 800-442-7906. Farm located at 1174 Pine Ridge Road • Mount Airy, NC 27030

Auction conducted by Rogers Realty & Auction (NCAL 685) 1310 EMS Drive Mount Airy, NC 27030 www.rogersauctiongroup.com The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

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You Decide! By DR. MIKE WALDEN

Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics N.C. State University You Decide: Can We Have Both Health and Wealth? In the five previous recessions I’ve lived through as a professional economist, the government did everything it could to encourage consumers to buy and businesses to sell. The more consumers bought, and the more that businesses sold, the more employment and income would increase, and the more unemployment would drop. In other words, encouraging commerce was a way back to prosperity. Today’s recession is different. For weeks consumers and workers have been told to stay home and avoid going to stores and work. Many businesses have been forced to close. Commerce has been purposefully limited. As a result, the economy has plunged into a deep downturn, and unemployment has skyrocketed. It’s estimated the restrictions on buying and selling are costing the national economy $500 billion per month, $12 billion of which is here in North Carolina. Of course, the reason the economic limits have been applied is to contain the COVID-19 virus, limit deaths, and protect the health care system. A coronavirus (COVID-19) unexpectedly hit the world and the U.S. early this year. If left unchecked, the fear was hospitals would be overwhelmed, and deaths would soar, with some estimates suggesting more than a million Americans could die from the infection. Health experts said to contain the virus, social interaction had to be severely limited. Hence, we have been living with stay-at-home orders, business closures, and rising joblessness as the cost of preventing something worse – massive deaths and disease and a health care system that couldn’t help everyone. Now a new debate is growing. It appears in most states there has been success in preventing hospitals from being overrun with virus cases. Supplies of needed equipment, like ventilators, have also been met. And while the number of new cases and deaths continue to rise, the rate at which they are rising has slowed and – in some areas – dropped. These results can be interpreted as success in containing the virus. As a result, there are calls for relaxing economic restrictions and reopening more of the economy.

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Supporters point to the positive medical results cited above. They also cite data suggesting financial and mental stress may be rising as a result of the current economic challenges. This group – which I will label Economy Firsters – worry that if the economic restrictions remain too long, the current recession will turn into a depression. Conversely, there’s a worry that reopening the economy too fast or too widely could revitalize the spread of the virus and significantly increase the number of cases and hospitalizations – perhaps beyond what the health care system could handle. Those who favor a delayed, or very slow, approach to removing economic restrictions I dub Health Firsters. So, the question is, can we have both wealth and health? Can we bring the Economy Firsters and the Health Firsters together? Normally the answer is “yes.” Normally, more wealth in a country provides more resources for better health. Yet now isn’t a normal time. When confronted with an issue like reopening the economy versus keeping it under wraps to contain the virus, the typical approach of economists is to compare benefits and costs. While we have decent estimates of the benefits of relaxing restrictions in terms of added spending and more jobs, we’re not confident we have similar information on the cost side. Most experts predict we will have more infections and more deaths as the economy opens, and interactions increase, but they are unsure how many more. Still, life is full of many kinds of risks. For example, thousands die on the roads each year. Does that mean we should prohibit driving? As a society, we have decided “no.” Instead, we rely on driver education, the commonsense of drivers, and the enforcement of driving laws to limit driving deaths and injuries because we consider the benefits from driving to be so high. Perhaps a similar approach can be applied to the virus crisis. A middle ground recognizes the benefits of opening the economy and gaining jobs and incomes. It also pays attention to the possible consequences for more cases and deaths from permitting additional human contact while the virus persists.

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

A reasonable middle ground plan could rely on applying three components to reopening the economy: safe behavior to reduce risks, testing to track risks, and rapid intervention to control risks. Behavior to reduce risks includes those health experts have recommended – distancing, masks, and hand washing. Ramping up testing allows identification of those infected before they can infect others. And rapid intervention to locations experiencing an uptick in cases can control those outbreaks from further spreading. Government and businesses will also have to work together, so consumers and workers feel safe interacting. The notion is we can have both - a functioning economy and protection from

COVID-19 - until the virus is banished from our lives. Then we can get back to normal where health and wealth go handin-hand. Can we do it? You decide. You Decide: How Will the Job Market Change After the Virus? There are still many, many questions about the coronavirus. One of the biggest is how life will change after the virus is banished. Among those many changes is the impact on the job market. As jobs come back after the virus crisis, will they be the same jobs or different? There is consensus among economists that when jobs do return, the mix of those jobs will not be the same, for two reasons. First, not all businesses will come back. Despite the massive effort

Carolina Video and Load Lot Monthly Summary (Week ending JUNE 4, 2020)

Carolina Video and Load Lot Monthly Summary of all markets ending Thursday, JUNE 4, 2020. All cattle in this report are located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Prices FOB the farm or local scale and many weighed with a 0-2 percent shrink and sold with a 5-10¢ per pound slide on the heavy side only. Many all natural lots. Cattle Receipts: 1,977 Last Month: 2,473 Feeders made up 100 percent of the offering. The feeder supply included 44 percent steers and 56 percent heifers. Nearly 82 percent of the run weighed over 600 pounds. Head totals are based on load lot estimate of 49,500 pounds. FEEDER STEERS (Medium 1) Avg. Wt. Price Range 790 $140.25

Head 62

Wt. Range 790-790

Head 78 60 58 30

Wt. Range 625-625 825-825 850-850 985-985

Head 50 83 85 146 70 85 56

Wt. Range 500-500 590-590 575-575 650-695 700-700 700-740 870-870

Head 93 70 22

Wt. Range 525-525 700-700 875-875

FEEDER HEIFERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Avg. Wt. Price Range Avg. Price 525 $128.25 $128.25 700 $117.50 $117.50 875 $108.50 $108.50

Head 50 160 23 151 103 67 140 65 121

Wt. Range 475-475 600-600 625-630 650-650 650-650 730-730 700-700 750-750 800-815

FEEDER HEIFERS (Medium 1-2) Avg. Wt. Price Range Avg. Price 475 $145.50 $145.50 600 $130.75 - $131.00 $130.88 615 $133.00 $133.00 650 $124.75 - $130.75 $127.73 650 $128.75 - $130.00 $129.66 730 $125.50 $125.50 700 $130.25 - $134.75 $132.50 750 $123.75 $123.75 807 $120.25 - $123.00 $121.62

Head 49

Wt. Range 750-750

REPLACEMENT HEIFERS (Medium 1) Avg. Wt. Price Range Avg. Price 750 $1,100.00 $1,100.00

Avg. Price $140.25

FEEDER STEERS (Medium and Large 1-2) Avg. Wt. Price Range Avg. Price 625 $135.50 $135.50 825 $126.75 $126.75 850 $125.00 $125.00 985 $115.50 $115.50 FEEDER STEERS (Medium 1-2) Avg. Wt. Price Range 500 $155.50 590 $150.50 575 $155.00 672 $142.75 700 $138.50 720 $134.75 - $140.00 870 $128.00

Avg. Price $155.50 $150.50 $155.00 $142.75 $138.50 $137.27 $128.00

Delivery Value Added Delivery Value Added Split Loads Delivery Value Added Value Added Value Added Value Added Delivery Value Added Split Loads Delivery Value Added Value Added Value Added Value Added Value Added Value Added Delivery Value Added

Source: N.C. Dept. of Agriculture - USDA Market News Service, Raleigh, N.C. - 919-707-3156


of the federal government to financially support firms during the crisis, many firms – both large and small – have already thrown in the towel, and more will follow. These bankruptcies will take millions of jobs with them. Second the virus crisis has changed consumer buying preferences and altered the ways in which firms conduct business. The best examples are remote working and remote buying, both of which minimize personal contact. If a significant part of these changes survives post virus, they will mean a big shake up on the kinds of jobs businesses offer. Some of the expected job changes haven’t been created by the virus crisis. Instead, the virus has magnified ongoing trends and their impacts. For example, as a result of the tremendous increase in online shopping in recent years, several nationwide retailers who relied on in person shopping have closed. The virus didn’t create this trend; it simply accelerated it. However, the virus has added a new dimension to the attraction of online shopping. The original benefit of cyber shopping was saving time. Consumers could shop and buy from the comfort of their home. The virus has created a new plus – avoiding face-to-face contact and the additional effort (waiting to enter a shop, wearing masks) that in-person shopping will likely entail in the future. The kinds of jobs available in the next several years will crucially depend on two things - the types of changes businesses think they will have to make to

be successful in the post-virus world, and the kinds of changes individuals – both as consumers and workers – will want to be made in order to feel safe. Unfortunately for workers, I think the first upcoming job trend will be an increased movement by businesses away from using people to perform tasks to using more machines and technology. This is not new; it has actually been occurring for centuries. Many businesses have found automation and technology to be more efficient and cost effective than humans, especially for routine jobs. Farming and manufacturing are good examples of where this shift has occurred. Luckily, as technology and machines have replaced people, new jobs for humans in new industries – mainly in the service sector – have been developed. But with the coronavirus, there’s now a different liability for using humans to perform jobs. Humans can get sick from a virus and easily spread their illness. Also, even if they stay healthy, workers can be ordered to stay at home and not work in order to contain the spread of a virus. For example, North Carolina’s meat processing plants, which are labor-intensive and have suffered virus outbreaks, probably will move to more machinery in the future. But even many personal service jobs - in restaurants, office buildings, and personal care - could be overtaken by machines, including robots, using artificial intelligence. A move to more remote working could be the biggest game changer for jobs. As remote working has expanded

during the virus crisis, surveys show many businesses and workers like it. Even if remote working doubled from its pre-virus level of 10 percent of the workforce to 20 percent, it would affect numerous industries and jobs. Commuting would drop, and so would vehicle purchases. Restaurants would lose lunch customers. Occupancy of office buildings would plunge, meaning cuts in support and maintenance staff. None of these changes will happen overnight, and some could be slowed or reversed as we move away in time from the virus crisis. Still, looking ahead, I see job expansions in three broad areas. One is servicing households who choose to combine their work life and home life and therefore spend more time at home. Jobs related to package and meal delivery, service delivery in health care and education, and improved internet connections are examples. In fact, high speed and reliable internet service will perhaps be the top priority for the ‘athome for everything’ household. Second, are jobs that manage and facilitate the increase in virtual interactions that are expected to result from the reduction in personal faceto-face contact. These jobs span many

fields, from technical tasks in developing and maintaining digital linkages and programs to content areas in a variety of subjects, including health, education, entertainment, and even travel. Third, I expect there will be an increase in jobs – indeed, many of these in newly created fields – focusing on preventing, or at least containing, future pandemics. These will include jobs in government, in medicine, and in preventative measures for businesses and homes, allowing them to maintain safety from any future virus attacks. We now have experienced both the personal and economic damage a serious virus outbreak can cause. Pandemic prevention and mitigation will be an important new calling. Even in the best of times, our economy goes through simultaneous job creation and job destruction. The aftermath of the coronavirus will send this job churning to a new level. Will the outcome be a plus or minus? You decide. About the author. Mike Walden is a William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor and Extension Economist in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at N.C. State University who teaches and writes on personal finance, economic outlook, and public policy.

ALL Regular Copy for the

AUGUST ISSUE by JULY 5! ALL Spotlight Material for the AUGUST ISSUE By JULY 1!

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q JULY 2020

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North Carolina Angus Association ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS Backed by the world’s largest and most reliable genetic evaluation program. Registered Angus genetics deliver better calving ease, more growth, and superior marbling. Contact one of these N.C. Angus breeders today for your next genetic selection: 4K FARMS/TARHEEL ANGUS Richard D. Kirkman, DVM Siler City 919-742-5500 email: info@tarheelangus.com

MESSICK ANGUS Kathleen Messick Madison 336-937-1956 email: messickangus@yahoo.com

BACK CREEK Joe & Robin Hampton Mt. Ulla 704-880-2488 (Joe); 704-880-3572 (Robin) email: robinbackcreek@att.net

PANTHER CREEK FARMS John C. Smith, Jr. Pink Hill 252-526-1929 email: JohnSmith3982@embarqmail.com

BB ORGANIC FARM NC, LLC R. & E. Miller Wake Forest 919-570-2816 email: bborganicfarmnc@gmail.com

PROPST FARMS James L. Propst Zach Moffitt - Manager Concord 336-736-6340 email: zmoffitt19@gmail.com

BILTMORE ESTATE Kyle Mayberry - Manager Asheville 828-768-1956 email: livestock@biltmore.com www.biltmorelivestock.com BRIDGES BEEF CATTLE Eddie, Cindy, John & Crystal Bridges Shelby 704-692-2978 email: bridgesbeefcattle@gmail.com BRITT FAMILY FARMS James Britt Calypso 919-738-6331 jrb4070@hotmail.com C-CROSS CATTLE COMPANY Duane Strider Asheboro 336-964-6277 email: ccrosscattle@yahoo.com www.ccrosscattle.com FOUR S FARMS Kim & Connie and Jason & Robin Starnes Luther Lyerly - Manager Salisbury 704-640-5875 email: kim-4sfarms@carolina.rr.com GENTRY HOMEPLACE ANGUS Howard & Donna Gentry King 336-413-6698 whgentry@windstream.net H&H FARMS Buddy & Jennifer Hamrick - Owners Bly Hamrick - Manager Boiling Springs 704-472-1912 email: jennham@bellsouth.net HILL ANGUS FARM Dr. Gary M. Hill Hendersonville 229-848-3695 email: gmhill@uga.edu JACK KNOB FARMS Karl, Janet, & Logan Gillespie Franklin 828-371-2220 email: karl@jackknobfarms.com www.jackknobfarms.com

SMITH CREEK ANGUS FARM Marty & Lynne Rooker Norlina 252-213-1553 email: mrooker@mrookerlaw.com SPRINGFIELD ANGUS Phil Goodson Rick Kern - Manager Louisburg 919-880-9062 (Phil); 919-272-6124 (Rick) email: jpgoodson@bellsouth.net www.springfieldangus.com TRIPLE LLL ANGUS Greg Little Monroe 704-219-1294 email: greg.little@ATImetals.com UWHARRIE RIDGE FARMS Mark Wilburn Asheboro 336-953-0521 email: uwharrieridgefarms@gmail.com VANDEMARK ANGUS Keaton & Janie Vandemark Spring Hope 252-885-0210 email: keaton@vandemarkfarms.com WINDY HILL FARMS, LLC Michael A. Moss Will Moss - Manager Ramseur 336-549-0070 email: michaelmoss@rtmc.net WOOD ANGUS FARM, LLC Russell Wood Willow Spring 919-275-4397 email: rwood4400@gmail.com www.woodangus.com

Sharon Rogers

N.C. Angus Association Executive Secretary

336-583-9630 Email: ncaa.sec@gmail.com Website: www.ncangus.org

LANE ANGUS Roger Lane Bundy Lane - Manager Gates 252-398-7711 email: ritalane@embarqmail.com

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ANGUS NEWS The 2020 Leaders Engaged in Angus Development (LEAD) Conference Update Announcement. The American Angus Association staff has been informed that the 2020 Leaders Engaged in Angus Development (LEAD) Conference will not be permitted to continue in Orlando, Fla., and the surrounding areas. Due to the group size and the state of Florida’s COVID-19 reopening guidelines, the venues did not feel confident a conference of our magnitude could be held July 30-August 2. We are disappointed our event cannot proceed as planned, but understand the reasoning and appreciate the guidance, support, and understanding from our venues and patrons. Despite this announcement, the American Angus Association staff continue to research new locations and virtual options to hold a youth leadership conference sometime this fall. We are exhausting every effort to gather and provide our junior members with leadership and educational opportunities in a format that will guarantee a great experience. We hope you understand the fluidity of the situation and remain confident we will make a decision that is best for our membership. We are aware June 15 was the early entry deadline for the 2020 LEAD Conference. At this time, all prior registrants will receive a full refund. Once a new location and date are set, a new registration link will be opened to NJAA members. All prior registrants will have to re-register for the conference. We are confident that with your cooperation and support, we will have a successful event for our Angus family, despite these challenging circumstances. Stay tuned for additional updates regarding the conference and make plans to join us this fall. Bring the Heat from Home for the Certified Angus Beef® at Home Contest. The highly acclaimed contest held traditionally at the National Junior Angus Show will be replaced with a virtual format for 2020. For the past 36 years, National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) members and their families have gathered at the National Junior Angus Show (NJAS) to test their culinary skills on the product that drives many of their livelihoods, Certified Angus Beef. Due to COVID-19, this year’s contest will

look a little different as it takes on an alternative format. Members will have the opportunity to submit a video to participate in the Certified Angus Beef at Home Contest, designed to promote and share the CAB story with consumers. Despite the change to a video format, the goal of this alternative contest remains the same: for participants to learn the importance of informing consumers about the nutritional benefits of beef and the Certified Angus Beef brand. NJAA members and their families will develop a video featuring a beef recipe and consumer focused content about the merits of CAB. “Year after year, the Certified Angus Beef Cook-Off and Chef’s Challenge is a contest the entire family can get excited about,” said Anne Lampe, American Angus Auxiliary Cook-Off co-chair. “Juniors and their families across the country still have the opportunity to bring the heat this year from their own kitchens and impress the judges with their knowledge about beef and its nutritional benefits.” The contest requires that the video include a few components, including partial preparation of the beef dish, educational information on CAB, and the active participation of at least one NJAA member. The video can feature anything from a Pasture to Plate scenario to a mock TV-style cooking show. Members are encouraged to share a recipe they enjoy, whether it’s a beef comfort food, holiday recipe, or the perfect meal for family supper. The contest will have no age divisions, and NJAA members ages 8-21 are invited to participate either individually or with members of their own household. Videos can be shot at different times and edited prior to submission and are asked to fall between 10 and 15 minutes. Members will upload their video and a photo of their completed dish to be reviewed by the judges. “Past participants have done an amazing job communicating the brand’s specifications,” said Marilyn Conley, Certified Angus Beef supply development administrative assistant. “We challenge you to take it to the next level and explain to the judges why the specifications make the CAB brand better than ordinary beef.” For additional questions, please contact Anne Patton Schubert at 502-


477-2663 or Anne Lampe at alampe@ wbsnet.org or 620-874-4273. To find out information about the NJAA and NJAS, visit www.angus.org/njaa. American Angus Auxiliary. For over 60 years, the American Angus Auxiliary has been working with the American Angus Association and the National Junior Angus Association to promote youth and the Angus breed. The American Angus Auxiliary has worked to develop a number of educational and promotional programs to benefit everyone involved in the Angus industry. The American Angus Auxiliary presents more than $15,000 in scholarships each year to ten young men and women involved in the Angus industry. As a member of the American Angus Auxiliary, you can play an important role by working to promote our youth and the Angus industry, meet the challenges of today’s society and work toward developing our Angus youth into tomorrow’s leaders. The American Angus Auxiliary offers individuals interested in the welfare of the Angus breed the opportunity to work together to provide educational, promotional, and social programs and activities. American Angus Association Names Joel Cowley AGI President.

Beef industry veteran joins from Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. The American Angus Association recently named Joel Cowley president of Angus Genetics, Inc. (AGI). With his combination of beef industry experience and innovative leadership, Cowley will guide the company’s genetic evaluation technology and research programs. “In a time of advancing science and fast-paced innovation, Joel will lead AGI’s efforts to remain at the top of our game and connect that science to the cattlemen who depend on it,” said Mark McCully, American Angus Association CEO. “He is a true leader, and his animal breeding training, coupled with executive experience, makes him ideally suited to lead AGI to the next level.” Cowley’s roots are firmly planted in the beef industry. He completed his undergraduate studies at Colorado State University, where he competed on the livestock judging team. Cowley achieved his master’s degree in animal breeding at Texas A&M University while serving as the University’s livestock judging coach. Cowley also served as a beef cattle extension specialist at Michigan State University, where he completed his MBA. Most recently, Cowley was the

president and chief executive officer of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo™, where he directed the efforts of 35,000 volunteers and 130 full time staff to conduct an event that draws more than 2.5 million visitors in 23 days and annually awards $27 million to youth and education. Though he enjoyed being part of an event that hosts the world’s largest livestock show and connects urban consumers with agriculture, Cowley wanted to have a more direct impact on production agriculture and welcomed the opportunity to work with Angus breeders. He previously worked for Certified Angus Beef LLC as an executive account manager and then assistant director of foodservice. “Angus breeders are the leaders in improving their genetics, their breed, and the beef industry,” Cowley said. “I am fortunate to be asked to lead those efforts and am looking forward to working on the research that will continue the advancement of genetic evaluation of beef cattle worldwide.” In addition to his work experience, Cowley has served on the Texas FFA Foundation, Texas 4-H Youth Development Foundation, University of Houston Bauer College of Business

Board of Directors, and the Academy Sports and Outdoors Texas Bowl Board of Directors. He recently was named Texas A&M University Department of Animal Science Outstanding Alumni and a Houston Business Journal Most Admired CEO. Elevate Your Game at the 2020 Angus Convention. Join the Business Breed in Kansas City, November 7-9, for the American Angus Association’s annual event. Known for historic cattle, rail trails, the American Royal, world class barbecue, and most recently, the reigning Super Bowl Champions, the American Angus Association is excited to announce that Kansas City will host the 2020 Angus Convention this fall. The Association invites the cattle industry to “Elevate Your Game” at the 2020 Angus Convention, November 6-9, at the Kansas City Convention Center. The weekend long event serves as a meeting point for all quality minded cattle producers from every sector of the cattle supply chain. With a focused lineup of educational sessions, an expansive trade show, and world class food and entertainment, there is truly something for everyone. “The Show-Me State is honored to

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Yon Family Farms Named BIF Seedstock Producer of the Year The Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) recognized Yon Family Farms, Ridge Spring, South Carolina, as the BIF Seedstock Producer of the Year Award on June 10 during the group’s annual meeting and symposium online. This national award is presented annually to a producer to recognize their dedication to improving the beef industry at the seedstock level. The Yons are first-generation cattle producers. Having met while studying animal science at Clemson University, Kevin and Lydia took their dream job after graduation managing a registered Angus herd in Columbia, South Carolina. When that herd was abruptly dispersed in 1996, the Yons purchased 100 cows from their previous employers and 100 acres in Ridge Spring and set out with their three young children to continue their dream of raising cattle. Since taking that leap of faith, Yon Family Farms has grown from its humble beginnings to more than 1,500 Angus cows and thousands

of acres of crop, pasture and timber land. They host two production sales a year and offer an “open door policy” for consumer farm tours and private treaty bull purchases. Each February, the family sells 200 registered Angus bulls and 100 females, and market another 300 bulls and 100 females in an October sale. True pioneers of data collection, the Yon family doesn’t miss a beat when it comes to collecting information, enrolling in programs, and returning that information back to their customers. Listening to the needs of their primarily Southern-customer base, they have introduced Simmental and Brangus genetics to their Angus cow herd to provide a genetically broader bull offering. The Yons spend an equal amount of time as stewards of their land, grazing and processing forage as sustainably as possible. The philosophy behind Yon Family Farms has always been to produce cattle that balance all economically important traits, genetics that will keep people in business on the maternal side of the cow base, and producing an end product that will meet the needs and demands of the

end consumer. The American Angus Association and Clemson University nominated Yon Family Farm. More than 1,200 beef producers, academia, and industry representatives have participated in the organization’s 52nd Annual Research Symposium — Online, which took place June 8-12.. BIF’s mission is to help improve

the industry by promoting greater acceptance of beef cattle performance evaluation. For more information about this year’s symposium, including additional award winners and coverage of the meetings and tours, visit www.BeefImprovement.org/ symposium.

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Angus News continued from the previous page host this spectacular event,” said Jim Brinkley, American Angus Association Board Member of Milan, Missouri. “It will be a great gathering of Angus and beef industry enthusiasts as we learn, network, and conduct the business of the Association.” Before the official start of the convention on November 6, the Missouri Angus Association will host the National Angus Tour, where participants will spend a day exploring the area’s Angus operations and related sites. Attendees will see how beef producing families have adopted new and creative ways to stay viable while bringing the next generation of cattlemen into the operation. The tour includes three unique destinations. Valley Oaks Angus built the 999 head “under roof” feedlot in 2016 to assist in the delivery of locally grown beef to the Kansas City Metro Area. The low stress, high efficiency system bridges their agribusiness enterprises. The second stop is at Mershon Farms, LLC, in Buckner, Missouri. Established in 1865, Mershon Farms, LLC is a diversified crop and livestock farm that utilizes proven carcass genetics and retained ownership, from birth through harvest. Mershon Farms, LLC was recognized as the 2019 BIF Commercial Producer of the Year and is a previous Missouri Angus Association Commercial Producer of the Year recipient. Lunch will be served at the nearby historic Lone Summit Ranch. Established

in the early 1900s and once a premier purebred cattle operation, it is now fully restored and a popular meeting and wedding venue. “Missouri has a strong history of outstanding Angus and commercial breeders,” Brinkley said. “We’re excited to showcase these progressive and innovative operations.” The tour is always a crowd favorite at the Angus Convention. Tour registration opens with Angus Convention registration on July 1. Sign up early because spots are limited. The convention officially kicks off on Saturday with a speaker who has elevated his game in numerous arenas. Jordy Nelson, Super Bowl champion, former Green Bay Packer, Angus cattleman, Kansas State University alumni, and Kansas rancher, will bring his unique perspective on taking success to the next level when he addresses attendees during the Opening General Session. During the Angus Convention, guests will hear from speakers who inspire forward thinking and vision for the future of the quality beef business through Angus University. In the multiple workshop sessions, practical applications are shared on topics ranging from cattle health and management and commercial programs and marketing to understanding genomics and evolving technology. The Angus Genomics Symposium, sponsored by NEOGEN Genomics, features presenters, academic

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

professionals, and industry leaders who will explore how producers can apply new ideas to their home operations. The Angus University workshop sessions sponsored by Zoetis will keep the pace and empower breeders to think outside the box. “In today’s ever changing environment, education has never been more important for producers,” said Brinkley. “We are at a pivotal point in our industry where knowledge is power, and every advantage is vital to our continued success.” The Angus Convention trade show highlights a specific group of progressive cattlemen and women focused on improving and sustaining the beef industry. Guests are welcomed by allied industry partners, fellow Angus breeders, and others with product offerings to benefit today’s cattle producer on the trade show floor. The Learning Lounge reaches even more producers, right in the epicenter of the convention. Four incredible grand prize giveaways and Certified Angus Beef brand meals are served throughout the event. “This is a must attend for anyone with an interest in the beef industry,” Brinkley said. “Kansas City is centrally located with easy access by the interstate, air, and train.” Angus breeders receive exclusive booth discounts, and those interested in reserving space can visit the trade show section of the website. Registration and hotel reservations open July 1, and more information will be available online at www. angusconvention.com. Annual Convention of Delegates – An important part of the Angus Convention each year is conducting business on behalf of the nearly 25,000 member organization. This year marks the 137th Annual Convention of Delegates for the American Angus Association, where representatives from each state will elect new members and officers to the Board of Directors and look to the future for the Angus breed. Plans are already underway for the Annual Meeting, and the first step is nominating Angus leaders to serve as voting delegates for their respective state or district. Updates to PAP, $C, and More Took Place on May 29, 2020. Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (PAP) Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) was officially released on May 29. This release comes after the PAP EPD existed in a research capacity for the last 16 months. Measured in millimeters of

Mercury (mmHG), a lower PAP EPD is a more favorable indication a sire should produce progeny with a lower PAP score, which is used as an indicator of susceptibility to high altitude disease, commonly experienced at elevations 5,500 feet or greater. Selection for this trait aims to improve the genetic potential for a sire’s progeny to have lower PAP scores and identify animals with a smaller risk of contracting high altitude disease. Any animal with a PAP score in a proper contemporary group or a genotype in the evaluation will receive a PAP EPD. The PAP EPD remains a tool to increase the environmental adaptability of cattle living at altitude. To learn more about PAP, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCkFf5T9KY&feature=youtu.be. Combined Value Index ($C) was launched on May 29. The American Angus Association launched the new Combined Value ($C) on May 29. $C is an economic selection index that aims to characterize profitability differences across the entire chain by combining the two underlying breeding objectives that drive the American Angus Association’s maternal and terminal economic indices. Expressed in dollars per head, $C includes all 15 traits involved in Maternal Weaned Calf Value ($M) and Beef Value ($B). The breeding objective, which drives the $C model, is built around a 500 head commercial cow herd that replaces 20 percent of their breeding females per year with replacement heifers retained within their own herd. In addition, this same herd then retains ownership on the cull heifers and their steer mates through the feedlot and market those cattle on a quality based carcass merit grid. “The idea of combining maternal and terminal traits into one economic selection index allows a producer to make genetic progress in several different traits at once while accounting for the relationships among these traits, which may pull costs and revenues in different directions,” said Kelli Retallick, Angus Genetics Inc. genetic service director. “For example, continuing to increase weaning weight, yearling weight, and carcass weight results in a more saleable product, increasing revenue; however, it also drives up input costs across other segments of the operation due to the positive correlation with cow size.” Like all $Values, $C is composed of expected progeny differences (EPDs). The EPDs directly influencing the combined index are calving ease direct (CED) and maternal (CEM), weaning

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Angus News continued from page 18 weight (WW), yearling weight (YW), maternal milk (Milk), heifer pregnancy (HP), docility (DOC), mature cow weight (MW), foot angle (Angle), claw set (Claw), dry matter intake (DMI), marbling (Marb), carcass weight (CW), ribeye area (RE), and fat thickness (Fat). “Essentially what $C tries to accomplish is giving commercial cattlemen a way to select cattle that give them nearly all the horsepower that $B affords them, but puts the bumpers up around cow traits such as mature cow weight, docility, and fertility, which affect costs associated with an individual operation,” Retallick said. For more information about $Value Indexes, visit www.angus.org/Nce/ ValueIndexes.aspx. Economic Assumption Update – Each year, the costs and revenue prices underlying the bio-economic model, which drive the Association’s $Values, are updated. This annual update is assembled using data provided by CattleFax. The

Any news from your county? Be sure to share your meetings, sales, field days, etc., with your fellow cattlemen through the Connection! PAGE 20

economic assumptions implemented each year are the average of the previous seven years of data – the 2020 economic assumptions are based on prices recorded from 2013-2019. This year’s biggest changes will come in terms of Ration Cost, which will, in effect, create some re-ranking in both Feedlot Value ($F) and Beef Value ($B). In May 2019, AGI implemented economic assumptions based on data from the years 2012-2018 inclusive (seven years). Ration Cost, this seven year average, was $213/ton. In May 2020, economic assumptions based on the average of 2013-2019 will be implemented, and as a result, ration cost will average $194. This drop is due to the exchange of 2012 and 2019 costs where 2012 was a year of high feed costs at $310/ton, 2019 replaces it at $174/ton, reducing the average to $194/ton. Besides the change to the economic assumptions, the model was updated to address a discrepancy in the calculation of feed requirements due to a metric to imperial (kg to lb.) conversion error in one formula. Overall, the above updates did not result in a significant change to individual $Values. Updates to models and economic assumptions were largely related to feed costs and requirements, with other changes being minor. Still, correlations between $F calculated with the 2019 and the 2020 assumptions were still high (0.97), and all other correlations between 2019 and 2020 values being very high (0.99). Even with these very high correlations, some individual animals can change significantly, with the largest decrease in $B being -27 and the largest increase in $B coming in at +20. Overall, breeders can expect sires to rank very similarly when the 2020 assumptions are implemented. For more information on $Values, visit www.angus.org/Nce/ ValueIndexes.aspx. Targeting the Brand™ Logo Update – At the February 2020 Board Meeting, the Board of Directors passed an amendment to the Targeting the Brand logo specifications. On May 29, any male or female with a $G >= +55 and Marbling EPD >= +0.65 will receive and be eligible to be marketed with the Targeting the Brand logo. Based on actual sire identified carcass data on more than 8,600 head, these are the Marbling EPD and $G thresholds that will most likely result in progeny achieving an average 50 percent Certified Angus Beef brand acceptance rate. With demand for the brand higher than ever, these numbers are designed to help commercial cattlemen continue on a plane of marked progress with the intent of moving the needle beyond our industry

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

average acceptance rate, currently at 35 percent. To learn more about Targeting the Brand, visit www.cabcattle.com/ targeting-the-brand/. Annual Update Genomic Scores – While GE-EPDs are updated on a weekly basis, genomic scores, which are a byproduct of the evaluation, are only updated once a year. This annual update took place on May 29. The update includes a larger reference population, which genomic scores are ranked against, and an updated methodology to calculate these scores. It is also preferable to use the GE-EPDs when making selection decisions, and the updates to these genomic scores will not affect the GEEPDs themselves. To learn more about

GE-EPDs, visit www.angus.org/AGI/ GenomicEnhancedEPDs.pdf. Angus Means Business.  The American Angus Association is the nation’s largest beef breed organization, serving more than 25,000 members across the United States, Canada, and several other countries. It’s home to an extensive breed registry that grows by nearly 300,000 animals each year. The Association also provides programs and services to farmers, ranchers, and others who rely on Angus to produce quality genetics for the beef industry and quality beef for consumers. For more information about Angus cattle and the American Angus Association, visit www.angus.org.

Carolina Cooking Citrus Marinated Beef Top Sirloin & Fruit Kabobs Total Time - 45 minutes 1 beef top sirloin steak center cut, boneless (about 1 pound) 1 medium orange ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¼ teaspoon ground red pepper (optional) 4 cups cubed mango, watermelon, peaches and/or plums Garnish Chopped fresh cilantro leaves Grate peel and squeeze 2 tablespoons juice from orange; reserve juice. Combine orange peel, cilantro, paprika, and ground red pepper, if desired, in a small bowl. Cut beef steak into 1¼ inch pieces. Place beef and 2½ tablespoons cilantro mixture in food safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Place remaining cilantro mixture and fruit in separate food safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Close bags securely. Marinate beef and fruit in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours. Soak eight 9 inch bamboo skewers in water 10 minutes; drain. Thread beef evenly onto four skewers leaving small space between pieces. Thread fruit onto the remaining four separate skewers. Place kabobs on grid over medium, ash covered coals. Grill beef kabobs, covered, 5-7 minutes (over medium heat

on preheated gas grill 7-9 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Grill fruit kabobs 5-7 minutes or until softened and beginning to brown, turning once. Drizzle reserved orange juice over fruit kabobs. Garnish with cilantro, if desired. Makes 4 servings.

Citrus Marinated Beef Top Sirloin & Fruit Kabobs


A s s o c i a t i o n o f A m e r i ca n Vete r i n a r y M e d i ca l C o l l e g e s

NEWS

APLU & AAVMC Establish Gene Editing in Animal Agriculture Task Force. The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) recently announced the creation of a Gene Editing Task Force. Recognizing the potential for gene editing to increase food security and safety, the 11-person panel is comprised of scientists and industry leaders who will map out recommendations for regulating this emerging genomic technology in animal agriculture with appropriate safeguards and procedures. The need for a task force was born out of a September 2019 symposium, “Gene Editing in Livestock: Looking to the Future,” which the two associations organized. During that event, 23 of the nation’s leading experts from academia, government, industry, and professional groups gathered to examine a series of questions ranging from the nature and safety of this promising technology to its ethical implications. Symposium participants concluded that work with animal and plant genomes has vast potential for limiting disease and increasing productivity, but agreed that appropriate regulatory processes should be thoroughly considered and structured. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration regulates genetic work on food animals as an “animal drug,” and the USDA regulates these technologies with crops. “This is a very promising area of biotechnology that has the potential to unleash enormous progress in terms of food production and security,” said Dr. Noelle Cockett, President of Utah State University and a renowned geneticist who is leading the task force. “Last fall’s symposium featured a series of presentations and discussions which identified and explored important questions and implications related to this emerging technology. These need to be thoughtfully considered and transformed into policy and regulatory recommendations. That’s the goal of this task force.” To develop a task force, the AAVMC and APLU established a steering committee, which put out a call for nominations. That steering committee selected six people from academia to serve on the task force: Dr. Jon Oatley, Washington State University; Dr. Bhanu

Telugu, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine; Dr. Londa Nwadike, University of Missouri; Dr. Jonathan Beever, University of Tennessee; Dr. Rex Dunham, Auburn University; and Dr. James Murray, University of California, Davis. The task force will also include Dr. Andrew Rowan, Wellbeing International; Dr. Kathy Simmons, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association; Clint Nesbitt, Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO), and an as yet unnamed liaison to the Center for Food Integrity. The task force will be chaired by Dr. Cockett. “The potential for gene editing to dramatically boost food security globally and reduce the burden on natural resources is enormous, but it must be done carefully and ethically,” APLU President Peter McPherson said. “We are very pleased to partner with AAVMC on this task force, which is bringing together some of the foremost leaders in the world to help recommend a path for government to take to regulate this field in a way that protects all involved while allowing the science to flourish.” The task force conducted its first virtual meeting in June 2020, and inperson meetings will be held following the relaxation of pandemic-induced social distancing protocols. The APLU and the AAVMC decided to take action in this area following inquiries from members of Congress to Food and Drug Administration Acting Commissioner Norman E. Sharpless concerning current regulatory processes. That provided the impetus for the AAVMC and the APLU to organize the fall 2019 symposium for leading scientists and other scholars. “The symposium we presented last fall in partnership with APLU was a big step forward in a very important process,” said AAVMC CEO Dr. Andrew T. Maccabe. “We’re very grateful to the group of respected experts who have agreed to help us move this project forward. We’re also pleased to have the opportunity to collaborate with APLU on a large scale program that has such vast implications for agricultural productivity and disease prevention.” Discussions and presentations held over the September 2019 day-and-ahalf conference explored different facets of the gene-editing issue from a public policy perspective. Conference sessions

included Science and Research, Industry Perspective, Bioethics, Public Policy and Regulation, and Communication and Public Engagement. The APLU and the AAVMC previously teamed up on a multi-year effort designed to address the growing antimicrobial resistance problem. That led to the establishment of the National Institute of Antimicrobial Resistance Research and Education, which is based at Iowa State University and operates in collaboration with a consortium of partner universities and medical institutions. To examine the program and learn more about the people who participated, please visit www.aavmc.org/assets/ site_18/files/newsletter_files/oct%20 vme%20aavmc-geneediting-program.pdf. About the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. APLU is a research, policy, and advocacy organization dedicated to strengthening and advancing the work of public universities in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. With a membership of 246 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and affiliated organizations, APLU’s agenda is built on the three pillars of increasing

degree completion and academic success, advancing scientific research, and expanding engagement. Annually, member campuses enroll 5.0 million undergraduates and 1.3 million graduate students, award 1.3 million degrees, employ 1.3 million faculty and staff, and conduct $49.3 billion in university based research. About the AAVMC. The member institutions of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) promote and protect the health and wellbeing of people, animals, and the environment by advancing the profession of veterinary medicine and preparing new generations of veterinarians to meet the evolving needs of a changing world. Founded in 1966, the AAVMC represents more than 40,000 faculty, staff, and students across the global academic veterinary medical community. Our member institutions include veterinary medical colleges and schools in the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand, as well as departments of veterinary science and departments of comparative medicine in the United States.

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l l a o t s k n a h e T h t n i s r e e t n u l o v d n a s t l n a a p n i c o i t i par Reg

t s a e h t u o S w 0 o 2 h 0 S 2 d r o f e r e H r o i n u J

North Carolina Hereford Association Board of Directors OFFICERS

George Ward President (2020-2023) 3404 Shady Grove Road Providence, NC 27315 434-251-3637

Wes Carpenter Vice President (2019-2022) 2939 Old Salisbury Road Winston-Salem, NC 27127 336-970-1655

Myron McCoy Secretary/Treasurer (2018-2021) 11350 Old Hwy. 70 West Cove City, NC 28523 252-637-4995

Pam Bissett (2018-2021) 9196 Grassy Creek Road Bullock, NC 27507 919-482-1176

Bill Kirkman, III (2020-2023) 2440 Herfshire Drive Greensboro, NC 27406 336-382-9635

Wayne Mitchem (2018-2021) 400 David’s Chapel Church Road Vale, NC 28168 704-472-4369

Kevin Robinson (2019-2022) P.O. Box 1057 Mocksville, NC 27078 336-399-9884

Brent Creech (2018-2021) 13037 NC Hwy. 39 Zebulon, NC 27597 919-801-7561

Reggie Lookabill (2019-2022) 1994 Arnold Road Lexington, NC 27295 336-240-2142

Kim Prestwood (2019-2022) 390 Pleasant Hill Road Lenoir, NC 28645 828-320-7317

Bryson Westbrook (2018-2021) 405 W. Marion Street Shelby, NC 28150 908-230-4878

Jim Davis (2020-2023) 243 Horseshoe Neck Road Lexington, NC 27295 336-247-1554 PAGE 22

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

N.C. Hereford Association Website - www.nchereford.org Email - nchereford@yahoo.com


How to Update Your Herd Inventory on MyHerd. Follow these steps to update and submit your herd inventory on www.MyHerd.org: 1. Log into MyHerd and click on the “ToDo” task labeled “2020 Fall Herd Inventory Update needed.” 2. MyHerd populates a list of females expected to calve this fall. Review and update the cow herd inventory. ◦ If the populated list is correct, click the “Submit Inventory Billing” button. ◦ To make changes to any cows listed, follow the steps below: ▪ Click on the line of the female needing to be updated. ▪ Click the “Disposal” button for females that were previously sold or culled and give the proper disposal code

News

and date. ▪ Click the “Reproductive Status” to mark females as “Next Season” if they’re bred to calve in the spring 2021 season, “Non-Exposed” if they haven’t been exposed to breeding conditions (this code can only be used for first time heifers), or provide a proper calving ease score for females not expected to calve this season. ◦ Add new or additional females to the inventory; provide their registration numbers and adding them a herd ID. ◦ Review each herd ID and make corrections. Each female must have a unique herd ID, and it cannot be repeated within the herd. 3. When the cow inventory list is up-to-date, click the “Submit Inventory Billing” button.

4. One the “Submit Inventory Billing” button is clicked, the inventory is submitted to the AHA, and the charges are billed. Genetic Evaluation Improvements. The breed improvement shop has been busy working on improvements to the genetic evaluation. Many of you participated in the Whole Cow Herd DNA project, which netted over 10,000 genotypes. This project allowed our science team to better understand the genomic contributions and relationships of the markers impacting maternal traits like Sustained Cow Fertility (SCF), Calving Ease Maternal (CEM), and Milk (M). Currently, when an animal is genotyped, there is no genomic contribution to the aforementioned traits and, thus, no improvement in accuracy. With the submission of female genotypes, the Association now has the data to be able to take this needed step. These improvements will be implemented into the genetic evaluation in early July, and genotyped animals will

receive increased accuracies not only for SCF, CEM, and M but will also receive improved predictions for each of these traits. Some changes for these specific expected progeny differences (EPDs) will be noted, particularly for nonparent animals without production data in regard to maternal traits. Adding the genomic component to SCF, CEM, and M is a great step forward in determining a sire’s maternal ability earlier in life, as opposed to waiting until he has daughters in production for results. Beyond adding the genomic component to the SCF model, the way contemporary groups are handled in that model will be restructured as well. In the current model, all daughters of a sire are compared across the breed to one another. In the new SCF model, the herd will be fit for comparison and, consequently, the new analysis will factor in the environment more suitably. Because of this improvement, you may see changes in SCF values for some proven sires, although the correlation to

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Hereford News continued from the previous page

Wilkes Livestock Exchange 106 Armory Road • PO Box 2146 North Wilkesboro, NC 28659 Phone: 336-838-3442 • Fax: 336-838-3591 Weekly Sales - Wednesdays - 1:30 p.m. Take-up Tuesday Evenings

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the current and new SCF models is 0.70. Given SCF is a significant driver for the Baldy Maternal Index and the Brahman Influence Index, some animals will move ranks in their respective indices. Stay tuned for more detailed articles and webinars that explain the improvements to the genetic evaluation as we approach the rollout of these changes this summer. Mahanes Promoted to Assistant Records Supervisor. The American Hereford Association (AHA) is excited to name Abby Mahanes as the assistant records supervisor. Mahanes will provide support to the records department and will assist with coordinating day-to-day functions of the customer service team, in addition to her customer service duties. “Abby has been an integral part of our customer service team for over four years,” says Laura Loschke, education and information services coordinator and records supervisor. “She has an abundance of knowledge not only about our breed but our members as well. I’m very excited to see her further her roles with us.” Mahanes joined the AHA in 2016 and has become a key team member of the records department. She has grown

as a leader over the past four years. Her knowledge and willingness to learn will allow her to go far in this new position. “I feel truly blessed and excited for the opportunity to continue my career at Hereford while being able to still assist the membership on a daily basis,” Mahanes says. “Over the years, I have built and continue to build countless relationships with breeders. Our breeders are the best around, and I wouldn’t want to be working with anyone else. I look forward to my future with the Association and assisting the customer service team in any way.” About the American Hereford Association. The American Hereford Association, with headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., is one of the largest U.S. beef breed associations. The not-for-profit organization, along with its subsidiaries - Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) LLC, Hereford Publications Inc. (HPI), and American Beef Records Association (ABRA) - provides programs and services for its members and their customers, while promoting the Hereford breed and supporting education, youth, and research. For more information about the Association, visit www.Hereford.org.

The 44 Farms International Beef Cattle Academy Application Now Open Limited class size offers an exclusive and customized learning experience. The 44 Farms International Beef Cattle Academy is accepting applications for its 2020-2021 online certification program. Applications for this comprehensive certificate program, through Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, are due August 15. “We’ve developed the strongest course offerings paired with industry leading experts, and we anticipate our third program year to build on the success of the previous two years,” says Reinaldo Cooke, program coordinator and associate professor at Texas A&M University. “Students can quickly apply class learnings to their operation or business – that’s an instant return on investment.” Prospective students should apply as soon as possible. An ideal student candidate is eager to learn and is passionate about driving the industry forward. Class size for the prestigious academy is limited to offer an exclusive and customized learning experience. The academy’s online learning format allows anyone from

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across the globe to participate. Firsthand experience - Students currently enrolled in 2019-2020 offered these perspectives for future attendees: • “Because the classes are set up to be flexible, it’s really ideal for students who work during the day. I spend most of my day on the farm, so being able to participate at my own pace makes it much more valuable and worthwhile.” Kazakhstan student • “For me and my operation, International Beef Cattle Academy has been a real game changer. The materials and classes have opened my mind for so many opportunities and new approaches in our business.” – South American student • “It is very interesting that you can watch all of these classes online, access all the material and then be face-to-face with the speaker to ask anything about those things you learned.” – Kazakhstan student • “My favorite course was the one over nutrition, but all of the courses were very valuable. I was able to learn even more than I did from my college classes.” – Romanian student • “It is one thing to read about beef

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

production, but when you put things into practice, you are going to have questions related to your specific operation. Having the opportunity to ask your questions to industry experts is incredibly valuable, and my favorite thing about the course.” – Kazakhstan student What to expect - The 44 Farms International Beef Cattle Academy consists of eight courses at 30 learning hours per course. Classes are taught online with pre-recorded lectures. In addition to the pre-recorded lectures, there is a weekly interactive session for the student and instructor. The oneon-one sessions are customized based on individual student needs, says Ky Pohler, program coordinator and assistant professor at Texas A&M University. Course topics include: • Cattle welfare and behavior • Forage production and utilization • Nutritional management and requirements • Reproductive physiology and management • Breeding and genetics • Immunology and herd health management

• Safety of beef products • Carcass and beef quality Following online coursework, the academy typically concludes with an optional residency period and graduation ceremony in College Station, Texas. “The ability to participate virtually also provides peace of mind amid times of global health concerns,” says Pohler. “With two years of experience in conducting the academy online, our team knows what it takes to provide participants with the full value of this educational opportunity without sacrificing the opportunity for a first rate experience.” Scholarships available - New for the 2020-2021 program, scholarships are available for interested individuals. The scholarship opportunities will help extend participation in the academy to a broader audience, covering up to 70 percent of tuition costs. The next academy begins in September 2020 and continues through August 2021. Apply today at www. animalscience.tamu.edu/ibca/ or email ibca@tamu.edu for more information.


Federation of State Beef Councils Update State Beef Councils Join with NCBA to Greatly Expand Digital Beef Advertising. Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Campaign Benefits from Infusion of State Beef Council Direction, Funds. State beef councils around the country are joining forces to invest state controlled Beef Checkoff dollars in Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. digital advertising campaigns. These efforts will significantly expand beef promotion in their own states as well as in consumer abundant U.S. regions. The councils are working with the staff at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a Beef Checkoff contractor, to provide reach to about 70 million consumers, creating more than 733,000 visits to the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. website through Google advertising, generating an estimated 56 million national and state video views on YouTube, and producing more than 2.3 million radio listens through Spotify. Seventeen state councils have instituted “state footprint” media campaigns to feature Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. advertising within their own states. Four multi-state collaborative media campaigns have also been created, with states focusing on four regions – Southeast, Western United States, Top 5 States, and the Midwest – with campaigns targeting beef consumers. Avenues selected for the advertising include Google Search Advertising,

YouTube Video Advertising, and Spotify Audio Streaming Advertising. Google Search Ads deliver hundreds of thousands of consumers to the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. website, the Beef Checkoff’s one stop resource for all things beef. YouTube ads showcase beef through the power of video advertising, inspiring consumers with crave worthy beauty shots of beef. YouTube is the “new TV,” with the world watching one billion hours of YouTube videos daily. Spotify is the world’s largest and fastest growing radio streaming platform, and radio ads on that platform bring to life the sizzling sounds of beef, backed by beef’s signature Copeland Rodeo music. States have spent more than $1.1 million in state controlled checkoff dollars toward the campaigns so far in 2020. Because the NCBA staff has expertise in advertising and marketing, the campaign can efficiently focus more directly on checkoff funded Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. digital media related to beef cooking, nutrition, and production, helping optimize the campaign. Beef content is also extended, and Beef Checkoff funds leveraged, promoting a consistent beef message and strengthening the national and state elements of the Beef Checkoff. “Through these campaigns, state beef councils can extend both national and state developed content, leveraging

funds from both the national and state halves of the $1 per head national Beef Checkoff to reach consumers and promote a consistent beef message,” says Buck Wehrbein, a Nebraska cattle feeder and chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils. “This allows state beef councils to spend their dollars more efficiently, focusing on stories about local producers while expanding distribution of recipes and other national Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. assets throughout the country. The extension is a great example of how individual state beef councils and the Federation of State Beef Councils partner on projects and efforts that help strengthen beef demand.” State beef councils supporting the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. media campaign within their states are the Wyoming Beef Council, North Dakota Beef Commission, Nebraska Beef Council, Oklahoma Beef Council, Texas Beef Council, Ohio Beef Council, Wisconsin Beef Council, and Washington State Beef Commission. Also, the Utah Beef Council, Idaho Beef Council, Iowa Beef Industry Council, Pennsylvania Beef Council, Louisiana Beef Industry

Council, Virginia Beef Industry Council, Arizona Beef Council, Kansas Beef Council, and Florida Beef Council. In addition, the Northeast Beef Promotion Initiative is participating in the campaign. Beef councils supporting digital beef advertising within targeted regions are North Dakota Beef Commission, Iowa Beef Industry Council, Illinois Beef Council, Wyoming Beef Council, and Northeast Beef Promotion Initiative (Top 5 States Media Campaign); Michigan Beef Industry Commission, Missouri Beef Industry Council, Minnesota Beef Council, Iowa Beef Industry Council, Illinois Beef Council, Nebraska Beef Council, and North Dakota Beef Commission (Midwest Media Campaign); Oklahoma Beef Council, Iowa Beef Industry Council, and North Dakota Beef Commission (Western U.S. States Media Campaign; and Alabama Beef Council, Florida Beef Council, Georgia Beef Board, Kentucky Beef Council, Tennessee Beef Industry Council, Mississippi Beef Council, South Carolina Beef Council, and North Carolina Cattlemen’s Beef Council (Southeast Media Campaign).

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Beef Improvement Federation

NEWS

Beef Improvement Federation Releases New Guidelines for Performance Evaluation. Since its establishment in 1968, the primary purpose of the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) has been to bring standardization to performance testing and evaluation. In keeping with this mission, BIF is proud to unveil the latest version of its Guidelines for Uniform Beef Improvement Programs. After nine printed editions, the Guidelines have been reinvented in a web based Wiki format, which can be found at www.guidelines. beefimprovement.org. “This new format allows the Guidelines to be continually updated to keep pace with the rapidly evolving field of objectively evaluating beef cattle,” explains BIF President Tommy Clark. According to Darrh Bullock, BIF eastern regional vice president and chairman of the Guidelines Committee, “The overall result is a more dynamic set of Guidelines that will enhance and rejuvenate BIF’s contribution to the industry. It achieves the goal of returning the Guidelines to its role of standardization rather than just documentation. Overall, these reimagined Guidelines will again make BIF the first place people will go when looking at enhancing their breed improvement program.” The new Wiki-based BIF Guidelines are divided into three principal sections: 1) Data Collection and Processing; 2) Genetic Evaluation; and 3) Selection and Marketing. In addition, there are areas about BIF and a “Useful Pages” section that contain an invaluable “Essential Reading” list for those interested in delving deeper into all things related to the objective evaluation of beef cattle. There are also hot links in most sections of the Guidelines, which leads producers, industry personnel, and academics to explanations of related subjects. “Looking back to the early years of performance testing, the pioneering groups involved included bull test stations, the state Beef Cattle Improvement Associations, the national organization Performance Registry International, breed associations, bull studs, and academia,” Bullock explains. “However, there was no standardization between these various early performance trailblazers, with each developing their

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own methodology and terminology. As an example, some groups were using 200 and 400 day weights to compare animals’ growth, while others were using 205 day weaning weights and 365 day yearling weights. This led to considerable confusion within the industry, but with the formation of BIF, all these groups were brought together to develop a consensus on a uniform approach for the various performance practices and terminology.” Fast forward to today, and the need for industry standardization is just as important as it was in 1968 when BIF was founded. Examples of new traits and methods that need standardization include novel traits like feet and leg scores, udder scoring, hair shedding, and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). Feed efficiency trials, predictions for sustained fertility, and whole herd reporting are other examples where best practices and uniformity between performance organizations are needed. This urgency for standardization has become even more magnified with the implementation of multi-breed EPDs by a number of organizations. Bullock says, “Reinventing the Guidelines was a three-year project, which started when Drs. Lauren Hyde and Bruce Golden approached the BIF board of directors with the idea of switching the Guidelines from the books that had been printed in the past to the new web based format. Although the Guidelines use Wiki software, they differ from Wikipedia in that suggested updates pass through a section editor for review before inclusion in the Guidelines.” The writing of the Guidelines involved a large number of people, including a coordinating subcommittee comprised of 11 people, as well as a drafting committee of another seven people. They then recruited approximately 40 additional people whose expertise was used to write the draft of the various aspects of the Guidelines. Dr. Merlyn Nielsen, University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor emeritus of animal genetics, then served as overall editor. For more information on the new BIF Guidelines for Uniform Beef Improvement Programs, contact Bullock at dbullock@uky.edu. BIF Selects New Board, Officers. The Beef Improvement Federation (BIF)

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

announced new directors and officers on June 8 during the group’s annual meeting and symposium, hosted virtually this year. Joe Mushrush of Strong City, Kan., was introduced as the 2020-2021 BIF president, and Matt Perrier of Eureka, Kan., is the new vice president. New directors elected to serve on the BIF board were producers John Irvine of Manhattan, Kan.; Troy Marshall of Burlington, Colo.; and Joy Reznicek of West Point, Mississippi. New association representatives elected were Shane Bedwell of the American Hereford Association, Kelly Retallick of the American Angus Association, and Matt Woolfolk of the American Shorthorn Association. Bob Weaber, Kansas State University professor, was announced as the new BIF Executive Director. Weaber will be taking the reins from Jane Parish, Mississippi State University, who served as executive director from 2015-2020. “Jane has been a great leader for the organization, and we are grateful for the years she dedicated to BIF,” says Tommy Clark, 2019-2020 BIF president. “Under her leadership, BIF has raised the bar in member services as well as its communication and marketing efforts to members, the board, and the organization’s partners.” Also retiring from the staff after 18 years of service to BIF is Lois Schreiner. From 2002-2020, Schreiner served as executive assistant to several directors and has been integral in BIF’s success. “Lois is phenomenal,” says Weaber. “She has been the heart and soul of BIF, and the behind the scenes contribution she has made to BIF for the past 18 years

is immeasurable.” More than 1,300 beef producers, academia, and industry representatives registered to participate in the organization’s 52nd Annual Research Symposium — Online. BIF’s mission is to help improve the industry by promoting greater acceptance of beef cattle performance evaluation. For more information about this year’s symposium, including presentation archives and award winner releases, visit www.BeefImprovement.org/symposium. The 2021 BIF Convention and Research Symposium will be June 22-25 in Des Moines, Iowa. Diligent Leader. Humility and gratefulness define 2019-20 BIF President Tommy Clark. With a sincere passion for the improvement of cattle, Tommy Clark describes himself as a beef enthusiast to the bone. The Culpeper, Virginia, native owns a herd of about 130 cow/calf pairs between the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the nation’s capital. The herd is primarily purebred Angus but also consists of some Charolais and commercial cows. The Clarks sell bulls annually, sometimes through a cooperative type bull sale, but typically private treaty. The farm consists of about 600 acres of owned and leased land used primarily for pasture and hay, but also some row cropping. Growing up on a family farm in Culpeper County, the cattle industry runs in Tommy’s blood. After high school, Tommy attended Germanna Community College and started a show and sale cattle fitting service. Mostly, he attended the school of hard knocks, he explains with a laugh. But these experiences, along with

Be a winner! Join your local cattlemen’s association AND your state cattlemen’s association!


more than 30 years managing two other purebred cattle operations, paved the way for his involvement and service to the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF). Tommy and his wife, D’Arcy, have two college aged kids, Jessie and Will. Tommy reflects on once being a hardheaded teenager, then raising hardheaded teenagers. He says it’s interesting to watch the evolution of thinking as one’s experience increases. “We all do what we can as we go through life, whether it’s good, bad, or indifferent. I’m really grateful to have had a lifetime of experiences in the cattle industry.” Steeped in history - Virginia was the first state to have an organized state beef cattle improvement association, founded in Charlottesville in January 1955. In 1958, Virginia’s first bull test station was developed at Culpeper Agricultural Enterprises. Tommy remembers tagging along with his uncle in the early 1960s to buy bulls out of the Culpeper test station. Culpeper Agricultural Enterprises was also home to the Culpeper-Madison Feeder Calf Association, which was among the first in the state to have a sort of value added program. Culpeper County

was something of a “crown jewel” in the state, being so ahead of its time; the area was home to the bull test station, a value added program, and many elite purebred programs. Counties just north of Culpeper, closer to the Washington, D.C., metro area, boasted prestigious Angus and Hereford operations when Tommy was young; he remembers attending a national Hereford field day event, hosted in northern Virginia. It was his first exposure to the big picture of the cattle industry and his first interactions with industry leaders. These experiences contributed to Tommy’s interest in beef improvement, and he followed the trail of what was happening in real time as procedures and technologies were developing. But it wasn’t until Virginia hosted the BIF Annual Research Symposium and Convention in the 1990s that Tommy had a ‘watershed moment’ — he remembers passing around a printed copy of the proceedings and being fascinated by the sheer depth of content and information it contained. Since then, he has immersed himself in BIF, both as an attendee and as a board member.

BIF involvement - “Tommy has served on the BIF Board for the past seven years with distinction. He’s a quiet leader who works diligently to understand issues facing the board,” says Bob Weaber, BIF central region secretary. For Tommy, involvement with BIF is not only about being on the cutting edge of the industry but also about exposure to others within the beef cattle industry. Like many producers, Tommy often finds himself caught up in farming when the BIF convention rolls around and wonders if he should take time away from the farm to attend. “I’m not at BIF convention for more than a day before I’m glad I’m there,” Tommy explains. “You run into folks you otherwise never would have met and develop a pattern of only seeing people at BIF.” Tommy laughs as he talks about his friend and fellow BIF board member John Genho, who lives less than 20 miles away from Tommy in Virginia. “We see each other at BIF meetings and conventions more than anywhere else!” Tommy is passionate both about the people he’s had the opportunity to meet and engage with through BIF, as well

as the valuable industry information it provides. “The exposure to current science and what’s going on in industry provides a unique depth of insight to other’s ideas – that’s what keeps me coming back to the trough,” Tommy says regarding his involvement with BIF. Some highlights of his tenure on the BIF board include working on a committee with 2017-18 BIF President Donnell Brown to standardize recommendations of policies on genetic defects and how they are handled by breed associations; redefining procedures on collecting feed efficiency data; developing recommended guidelines on foot and leg scoring processes; the creation and finalization of WIKI guidelines and making those available to industry; and, most recently, developing a contingency plan to convert to a webbased symposium due to COVID-19. COVID-19 impact - This year’s program was planned to be hosted in Kissimmee, Florida, the BIF Board of Directors, along with host state representatives, made the decision to transition the annual research symposium and convention to an online format amidst

Continued on the next page

The Carolina Cattle Connection

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John Queen: 828-421-3466 • Evans Hooks: 770-316-9611 Canton, NC • 828-646-0270 • SELEXvideo@gmail.com • www.selex-video.com PAGE 28

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


BIF News continued from the previous page the quickly evolving global pandemic. Once a final decision was made, the transformation from an in-person to virtual format happened rapidly. Tommy chose to remain positive throughout the situation. “Challenges provide opportunities,” he says. “I really think we will reach more people than we otherwise would not have reached normally. It’s available to more people. Going forward, I think all of these types of conventions will have a lasting effect on people who can’t just pick up and go away for five days.” Weaber is complementary of Tommy’s positivity, leadership, and ability to think outside of the box. “He was one of the first to suggest the incredible opportunity this challenge presents to BIF to test and expand our digital reach in the U.S. and around the world.” The adaptation of everyday practices caused many people, Tommy included, to look through a different lens. Part of the BIF symposium experience is personal interaction in the hallways and at meals, but Tommy promises there won’t be any less content, information, or benefit to attendees as a result of the change to a virtual format this year. “It’s just the way we have to adapt. It’s funny; we have breakout sessions on adaptability and technologies in cattle, and now we are having to do the same this year,” he says. “It’s not all negative in this situation. Lots of things were just cancelled, so it’s saying something that we are making it work and continuing on with our conference. We are looking forward to having a wide reach as a result of unfortunate circumstances.” Looking ahead - BIF provides a space for all of those involved in the industry to come together and sit down in a non-political atmosphere. Tommy says it doesn’t matter who you are or what area of industry you come from; the discussion boils down to what objectives BIF wants to focus on and accomplish, then a plan is developed to move forward. “We [BIF] bring a consistent message back to producers – we are able to set aside different preferences and reach for the common thread,” Tommy continues. Industry and technology are constantly evolving and progressing, often causing standards and policies to become irrelevant shortly after development. Through a collective effort, BIF is able to keep up with the perpetual current scenario, evolve, and remain relevant to the beef industry. Always becoming increasingly

more prevalent, Tommy says he believes the beef industry should constantly be aware of public perception of its practices and production methods. Under the microscope at the moment is public health, which Tommy says is an opportunity for the beef industry to focus on food safety and the industry’s relationship with the public. Words of wisdom - While helping export bulls in the 1980s, Tommy became friends with a producer from Australia. The two often communicated via mail and occasionally over the phone, in the middle of the night on the United States’ East Coast. Tommy recalls a line from a letter he received from this friend that has stuck with him to this day –– “Those of us who are truly passionate about improving our cattle do what we can in the short span of a lifetime.” At the time, this quote wasn’t exactly earth-shattering. As the years went on though, Tommy found more and more meaning in it. “I was sitting out in a pasture on the hillside with my dog watching an old cow and her heifer calf,” he recalls. “I was really proud of them, and I was planning the future of the heifer calf and started thinking forward and realized the real impact and message of that quote.” This commitment to improving cattle, both on a personal and on a more industry-wide scale, is what drove Tommy to become involved with BIF. Tommy says his tenure on the board has been rewarding, and he appreciates the opportunity to be exposed to and influenced by his interactions with other board members. Everybody brings a different perspective to the table; Tommy says it’s a thrill to be in the room on the leading edge of what’s coming down the pipe in the beef industry. “There’s no way I could ever give back what I’ve gained from BIF, both on the board and as an attendee.” About the Beef Improvement Federation. BIF is an organization dedicated to coordinating all segments of the beef industry — from researchers and producers to retailers — in an effort to improve the efficiency, profitability, and sustainability of beef production. The organization was initiated more than 50 years ago to encourage the use of objective measurements to evaluate beef cattle. Continuing the tradition, BIF is now the clearinghouse for developing standardized programs and methodologies for recording of performance data for all traits, from birth weights to carcass traits. Its three leaf clover logo symbolizes the link between industry, extension, and research.

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NCBA Members Establish Organization’s Approach to COOL NCBA COOL Related Policy International Trade 1.12 Country-of-Origin Labeling Implementation WHEREAS, there are serious concerns about mandatory Country-ofOrigin Labeling (COOL), and WHEREAS, there is increasing recognition about the many adverse aspects of Country-of-Origin Labeling including the costs, benefits, and impact of Country-of-Origin Labeling relative to tracking, auditing, verification, and compliance, and WHEREAS, NCBA opposes mandatory labeling but remains in support of Country-of-Origin Labeling that is voluntary and industry driven, and WHEREAS, the World Trade Organization declared the implementation of the previous mandatory Country-ofOrigin Labeling law to be in violation of international trade laws, subjecting the United States to severe retaliatory tariffs unless it was repealed, and WHEREAS, the implementation of the previous federal Country-of-Origin Labeling law placed a great burden on domestic producers and disrupted the beef market, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, NCBA shall continue to oppose mandatory Country-of-Origin Labeling laws or regulations that may violate international trade laws, and NCBA will work with Congress and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to ensure that Country-of-Origin Labeling laws or regulations for red meat products allow maximum benefits and minimal market disruptions to the United States beef and cattle industry.

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Marketing Directive 2018 Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL) WHEREAS, Country-of-Origin Labeling of meat products is a service to the consumer, and WHEREAS, consumers can be confused by the inconsistency of current voluntary labels being used to define beef as a product of the United States (U.S.), and WHEREAS, this service should be market driven based on consumer demand and willingness to pay any premium that reflects the cost of providing the service, THEREFORE BE IT DIRECTED, NCBA foster and support programs that provide for voluntary COOL of U.S. beef, BE IT FURTHER DIRECTED, NCBA supports establishment of a voluntary label defining beef born and raised in the United States. International Trade Directive 1 (interim policy from 2020 Annual Convention) Transparency and Verification of Voluntary Origin Labeling Claims 3 WHEREAS, the potential for ambiguous labeling of beef products without meaningful audit and verification is a cause for concern among beef producers across the country, and WHEREAS,NCBA listened to its members and formed a producer led working group to investigate concerns over labeling of beef as “Product of USA” or “Made in the USA” and in response to findings of the working group, THEREFORE BE IT DIRECTED, NCBA staff will work with USDA and the entire value chain to ensure that

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

accurate and voluntary origin labels are in place to benefit beef producers and consumers. International Trade Winter Resolution (interim policy from 2020 Annual Convention) Transparency in Labeling WHEREAS, NCBA supports clear retail labeling of beef products to reduce consumer confusion at the point of purchase, and WHEREAS,the potential for ambiguous labeling of beef products without meaningful audit and verification is a cause for concern among beef producers across the country, and WHEREAS, USDA currently oversees multiple, voluntary Process Verified Programs (PVPs) that include source of origin claims, and those PVPs have a proven track record of adding value to enrolled cattle, the flexibility to adapt to the needs of producers, and have been designed and tested by cattlemen in real world production, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, NCBA supports the use of voluntary source of origin claims. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, NCBA supports USDA verification of any source of origin claim or label. What COOL Should Be Mandatory COOL (mCOOL) was law for more than six years. While it had some supporters, there were many problems with the initial program. Among the first was the fact that only about 30 percent of beef was actually labeled. Beef bound for restaurants, foodservice, and hotel consumption wasn’t labeled.

Secondly, the government program was not very effective in educating consumers. The photo above shows what mandatory COOL labels looked like. Did you find the origin label? Look at the small print at the bottom of the clear wrap. Mandatory COOL is supposedly about marketing. Marketing is about catching the consumer’s eye. This doesn’t do it, but it is exactly what happens when you ask the Federal government to market your beef. The photo below is an example of what voluntary labeling looks like. Big difference when you can see an American flag and the bold words “American Beef.”


Also, origin labeling doesn’t have to be U.S.-specific. A voluntary labeling program allows for more flexibility to make the program work for the cattle business, rather than making producers conform to one government-mandated standard. The image below is a great example from Kentucky.

Now, it’s important to note that NCBA believes that any voluntary origin labels that are put in place are verified by USDA to make certain that any label claims that are made, origin or otherwise, are accurate and correct. That’s why NCBA has introduced policy and is working with USDA to make certain the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, which oversees marketing claims made under its Process Verified Programs (PVPs), has oversight of any origin labeling claims, not the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service. As we already discussed, COOL is a marketing claim, not a food safety claim. However, it needs to be stated again, NCBA supports voluntary COOL programs, and those programs must be verified to make certain any product claiming American origin is, in fact, from the United States.

NCBA

President’s Report By MARTY SMITH

National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

NCBA Continues Fighting for All Producers May was another very busy month for NCBA, as we continued to lead the fight for America’s cattle producers in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. As I wrote in this space, when the pandemic first hit our shores more than two months ago, we are all being impacted by this pandemic. We have all been concerned for the health and well being of our families — and for the economic well being of our operations across the beef supply chain. We at NCBA have been and continue to be concerned with how we can help producers get the relief they need and to continue to work together as productively as possible throughout these tough times. We are all looking for solutions, and I want you
to know that we hear you, and

we take the viewpoints of our members very seriously. Take the establishment of the new Coronavirus Food Assistance Program, or CFAP, for example. As you know, our industry has a long tradition of not advocating for direct benefits from the federal government. But in the immediate aftermath of the pandemic’s arrival, market volatility hit a lot of cattle producers very, very hard. We heard from a lot of our members, who told us loud and clear that this was an unprecedented situation and that a policy change was necessary. We listened to our members, and we got right to work. Our public policy team in Washington, D.C. — funded by the voluntary dues-paying members of NCBA — immediately brought the issue to the attention of lawmakers on Capitol Hill, and within days we had secured authorization and

Regular copy deadline is JULY 5 for the AUGUST issue Spotlight material is due

JULY 1

for the AUGUST issue

$19 billion in funding for direct assistance for agricultural producers in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Of course, that wasn’t the end of the road, so our team never stopped working. After final Congressional approval of the CARES Act, it was the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s job to quickly set up the CFAP system and to figure out how to distribute the relief funds — and to whom. Once again, our team in D.C. worked
with USDA officials to make sure that the urgent needs of America’s cattle producers were known to and understood by the officials crafting the program. NCBA’s hard work and influence on pandemic relief were apparent when we were one of only two ag trade groups to be invited to the White House on May 19 to be on hand and speak when President Trump and USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue announced details of the CFAP system. Representing cattle producers at the White House was a true honor, but again this wasn’t the end of the road. Much more needs to be done to address the needs facing family cow/calf producers and stockers in the CFAP details that have been released so far. That’s why we’re going
to continue pushing on Capitol Hill for additional resources for cow/calf producers, backgrounders, and all other segments of our industry who may not sufficiently benefit from the program in its current form.

CFAP is just one of the many issues we worked on during the month of May. We continue to work to bring permanent, significant, and fair reforms to cattle markets, ensure that processing facilities and truckers are able to continue moving the beef supply forward to consumers and to promote beef as a delicious and nutritious protein with consumers. We still all have a long road ahead of us as we begin to recover from the damage done by this pandemic, and as we do, I can promise you two things. We will always listen to our hard working, dues paying members. And we will never stop fighting hard for our members. You may not agree with every single position we take on these difficult issues, and I understand and respect that. But you will not find a harder-working team that is having a bigger impact on behalf of American cattle producers than you will at NCBA. As I’ve said before, it’s very easy to sit on the sidelines complaining or throwing stones. Leading and making a real difference is much harder, but it’s the road we choose. If you, your friends, or family members would like to join us in this battle — or to make your voices heard in our policymaking process — we welcome you. You can join us at www.ncba.org/ join.aspx.

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MERCK

Animal Health News Merck Animal Health Completes Acquisition of Quantified Ag®. Merck Animal Health, known as MSD Animal Health outside the United States and Canada, a division of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, N.J., announced the completion of its acquisition of Quantified Ag ®, a leading data and analytics company that monitors cattle body temperature and movement in order to detect illness early. In April 2018, Merck Animal Health invested in Quantified Ag and partially funded their development work in data analytics in livestock. Specific terms of the agreement were not disclosed. The announcement further positions Merck Animal Health as a global leader in animal health, broadening its portfolio in connected technology to improve cattle health outcomes by leveraging data and analytics for animal health and well being. Quantified Ag, located in Lincoln, Nebraska, provides a pro-active system for cattle producers and feedlot operators to track an animal’s biometrics and behavioral data through a non-invasive cattle ear tag equipped with sensors to monitor the health of the individual animal or herd. The technology can detect animal illness, thus reducing the potential for disease outbreak, allowing for easy identification of sick animals, and providing easy-to-use software reports on any mobile device, desktop, tablet or secure website. Proprietary algorithms are able to identify animals showing signs of

illness or disease and provide real time alerts. Quantified Ag product portfolio will join the Allflex Livestock Intelligence business unit within Merck Animal Health. Allflex Livestock Intelligence is a complementary business that specializes in identification and monitoring technology that delivers realtime, actionable data and insights to help improve livestock management. “We are pleased to take this step forward with Quantified Ag as we continue to broaden our portfolio with complementary products and technologies to advance animal well being for our customers” said Rick DeLuca, president, Merck Animal Health. “Our goal is to improve the detection of animal illness, and the responsible use of treatments to maintain the health of livestock. We are at the technological forefront of shaping the future of animal health through our commitment to leveraging our scientific and technical capabilities and expertise through comprehensive solutions to manage the health and well being of animals.” New digitally based tools that enable rapid large scale, data capture coupled with powerful data management platforms for rapid analysis and monitoring are transforming the farming and companion animal industries. This more informed approach to animal health and disease prevention is facilitating improved process management, thereby

Don’t put your cart before your horse... advertise that sale ahead of time! You’ll see positive results. PAGE 32

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

enhancing yields, overall efficiency and sustainability while complementing the portfolio of veterinary pharmaceuticals and vaccines at Merck Animal Health. Vishal Singh, co-founder and chief executive officer, Quantified Ag, said, “We believe that Merck Animal Health is the right company, ideally positioned to keep developing our products in a sustainable manner. We’ve enjoyed a collaborative partnership over the past few years and are pleased with this next step.” About Merck Animal Health. For more than a century, Merck, a leading global biopharmaceutical company, has been inventing for life, bringing forward medicines and vaccines for many of the world’s most challenging diseases. Merck Animal Health, a division of Merck & Co., Inc. in Kenilworth, N.J., is the global animal health business unit

Beef breed organizations unite to strengthen industry. An industry wide collaboration is improving breeding tools. International Genetic Solutions (IGS), a group of more than 17 cattle associations and organizations, is working across the breed spectrum to provide resources and technologies that ensure cattlemen and women along the industry chain are set up for success. “We’ve put together a massive collaborative effort with approaching 20 million head of cattle to provide the most scientifically credible, the most cost effective, the quickest, multi-breed, directly comparable genetic evaluation on the planet,” says Chip Kemp, IGS Commercial & Industry Operations. IGS partners and leaders across the beef industry met virtually during the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) virtual symposium. “If you think about IGS, from a big picture standpoint, it’s the value of collaboration,” says Tom Brink, Red Angus Association of America CEO. “Beef breeds, historically, haven’t always worked together so well, or so much, but IGS broke the mold on that. Being able to combine these data sets, more analytical power, better EPD predictions to use for all the breeds involved, IGS just really facilitates that in an unprecedented way.” The collective effort is intended to help individuals make more informed decisions - from seedstock to commercial producers. “The collaboration that we have with IGS will do two things: not only will it help their members sell seedstock

of Merck. Through its commitment to the Science of Healthier Animals®, Merck Animal Health offers veterinarians, farmers, pet owners, and governments one of the widest ranges of veterinary pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and health management solutions and services as well as an extensive suite of digitally connected identification, traceability and monitoring products. Merck Animal Health is dedicated to preserving and improving the health, well being and performance of animals and the people who care for them. It invests extensively in dynamic and comprehensive R&D resources and a modern, global supply chain. Merck Animal Health is present in more than 50 countries, while its products are available in some 150 markets. For more information, visit www.merckanimal-health.com.

NEWS

bulls and replacement heifers, but it will also help their customers, commercial producers make an informed decision in their operations. And those two things together will contribute to accelerating genetic improvements,” says Stewart Bauck, vice president of agri-genomics for Neogen Genomics. “It’s going to have a significant, important, and long term beneficial impact on the beef industry. Bob Weaber of Kansas State University agrees. “Getting everybody pulling the wagon together allows the IGS team and the leading scientists in the world, working in beef cattle genetics, to accelerate the process of genetic improvement,” Weaber says. “Tools like the IGS Feeder Profit Calculator puts increased profit potential in the hands of cattlemen and women as they assign and assess the value of their stock.” IGS, and the tools it provides, is unique, Brink adds. “We’re a lot stronger working together than we are individually,” he says. “We’re getting a lot better genetic predictions by doing what we’re doing, working together, so that’s really the power of IGS.” About International Genetic Solutions. IGS is an unprecedented collaboration between progressive organizations across the U.S., Canada, and Australia that are committed to enhancing beef industry profitability. The collaboration encompasses education, technological advancement, and genetic evaluation. Through collaboration, IGS has become the largest beef cattle evaluation in the world.


Cows Being Used to Produce COVID-19 Vaccine

THE SIMMENTAL TRAIL

By JENNIE RUCKER Executive Secretary N.C. Simmental Association Changing Times. Forever and ever, my July column of The Simmental Trail has been filled with information and pictures of the Simmental winners from the N.C. Junior Beef Round-Up. But since the year 2020 is one that has been filled with so many changes and adjustments as we deal with COVID-19, the places where youth have been able to exhibit their show animals are few and far between! I wish that I was able to report show results, but since I’m not, I will fill this column with the news that the N.C. Simmental Association is going full steam ahead with planning their Fall Harvest Sale and Annual Meeting. NCSA Fall Harvest Sale. We are looking ahead to our 46th Annual N.C. Simmental Association Fall Harvest Sale. This will be one of the few chances cattlemen and women have to select from a large number of Simmental and SimAngus females from many states, not just North Carolina. Our top producers will be bringing their best genetics to the

Shuffler Sale Facility in Union Grove, N.C., on September 5. They will be offering bred heifers, open heifers, cow/calf pairs, bred cows, and herd sire prospects. There will also be some top embryo lots. Cattle will be on display for viewing all day on September 4. Friday is also our annual meeting, always held at the sale facility. We may have to rearrange things to comply with social distancing, but we can get it done! The annual meeting begins at 6:00 p.m. with a beef dinner, and it is always casual attire. For information about this sale, call the NCSA office at 336-468-1679 or D.P. Sales Management at 859-987-5758. D.P. Sales Management with Doug and Debbie Parke and Holli and Drew Hatmaker serve as our sales management team. They have done a great job for years and will continue to do so. There will be a possibility of this sale going to online only, but that will be announced on our Facebook page or at www.dponlinesales.com. You can request a sale catalog by emailing me at ncsa@yadtel.net. We hope to see you there!

N.C. Simmental Association 1341 US Hwy 21 • Hamptonville, NC 27020 336-468-1679 • www.ncsimmental.com • NCSA@yadtel.net Like us on Facebook!

The fight against COVID-19 continues throughout the U.S. A biotechnology company in South Dakota is using cows to produce human antibodies to fight SARSCoV-2. Clinical trials using the antibodies will begin this summer. “This is promising,” Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease physician at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security told www.ScienceMag.org. “We want to have as many countermeasures as we can.” The approach to producer antibodies being used by SAb Biotherapeutics was developed by researchers 20 years

ago. According to ScieneMag.org, the company genetically alters dairy cows so that certain immune cells carry the DNA that allows people to make antibodies. The change allows the animals to manufacture large quantities of human antibodies against a pathogen protein injected into them. Cows are a good choice for producing antibodies because they have a lot of blood and their blood can contain twice as many antibodies per milliliter as human blood, said Eddie Sullivan, SAb Biotherapeutics’s president and CEO. Read more from www.ScienceMag.org.

Our advertisers are “Champions” too. For expert A.I., superior genetics, the best in purebreds and outstanding farm supplies, check the Classifieds in this issue!

American Simmental Association 1 Genetics Way • Bozeman, MT 59718 406-587-4531 • www.simmental.org

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Bring Your Beef Showdown August 1, 2020 Location - Sarratt Farms 210 Ivine Rd. Gaffney, SC 29341 Entries Dues - July 15, 2020 Cattle Entry Fee - $10/head Mail Entries & Payments to: Cherokee County Cattlemen’s 742 Antioch Rd. Blacksburg, SC 29702 Contact - Peter Wilkins, 864-490-5394 GENERAL RULES 1. Bring Your Beef Showdown is open to junior exhibitors of the beef breeds and crosses within the age limits set forth by the show committee. Participants must have reached their 5th birthday and must have not reached their 22nd birthday prior to January 1, 2020. 2. The show is for weaned heifers. 3. Cattle must be checked in by 10:00 a.m.

4. Heifers must NOT be fitted. NO adhesive or paint is allowed. Cattle should be washed, brushed, and haltered. 5. Limited tie space will be available in the barn. However, you can tie to your trailer. 6. ALL breed classes much be PUREBRED and have current registration papers. ALL percentage breeds will be shown in the Commercial class. 7. The Bring Your Beef Showdown Committee/or Sarratt Farms will NOT be responsible for injuries or damage to animals, equipment, or persons while attending the Show. 8. All out of state cattle must be accompanied by an official health certificate as stated in health regulations. 9. Please bring a generator — POWER IS LIMITED! Prizes and premiums will be based on the amount of entries and will be mailed after the show! Show order and show time will be announced closer to time of show depending upon total number of entries.

Please call or follow us on Facebook for up-to-date information. HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR OUT OF STATE CATTLE All out of state cattle must be accompanied by an official health certificate signed by an accredited veterinarian or an approved state or federally employed veterinarian. An approved health certificate should accompany the animal to the checkpoint located adjacent to the barn before unloading anywhere on the grounds. The health certificate should contain the following: 1. Name and address of exhibitor. 2. Description of each animal including breed, sex, and age. 3. All animals coming from out of state must have official identification that is listed individually on the health certificate (840 tag or NUES metal tag ONLY will be acceptable). 4. A statement by the veterinarian signing the health certificate that the cattle listed are not infected with or have been recently exposed to any communicable disease to the best of their knowledge. 5. In state DOES NOT require health papers. 6. MUST be within 30 days of the show and have the address 210 Ivine Rd., Gaffney, SC 29341 on the papers. HEIFER RULES 1. All heifers must be calved on or after September 1, 2018. Check in will

include age verification, breed eligibility/ registration. 2. Any breeds without 6 head entered will be put into the Commercial show. CLASS BREAK DOWN Steers - shown by weight Heifers January 1, 2020 - After November - December 2019 September - October 2019 July - August 2019 May - June 2019 March - April 2019 January - February 2019 September - December 2018 BREED SHOWS Angus AOB (Purebred) Charolais Commercial Hereford Red Angus Simmental Shorthorn Steers SHOWMANSHIP 1. Participants must exhibit the anima|(s) entered in the exhibitors’ name 2. Judging is strictly on showmanship — no fitting. (Clipped, washed, and brushed only) 3. Classes will consist of: Senior (1621), Intermediate (12-15), Junior (8-11), Novice (5-7)

Y’all have stumbled on the best place to advertise expert A.I., superior genetics, the best in purebreds and outstanding farm supplies. Check the Classifieds in this issue! PAGE 34

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


Watch for Heat Stress, Summer Pneumonia in Beef Cattle Hot, humid days can be dangerous and even deadly for cattle. “The combination of heat and humidity creates stress on livestock because respiration is the predominate route for cooling,” says Karl Hoppe, Extension livestock systems specialist at North Dakota State University’s Carrington Research Extension Center. “Once cattle start to pant, some heat stress has occurred.” Keeping the internal body temperature at normal is possible with panting and adequate shade and water. Sometimes cattle will stand in ponds to cool off on a hot day. “Healthy cattle can handle some heat stress,” says Gerald Stokka, NDSU Extension veterinarian and livestock stewardship specialist. “However, too much heat, along with high humidity, can result in excessive heat stress, leading to death. Cattle can get relief from heat stress when the nights are cool. Night cooling for beef cattle occurs when the nighttime temperature falls below 72ºF.” Producers also should be aware of the increased risk of “summer pneumonia” in suckling calves following heat stress. An increased respiratory rate, along with the stress of heat, may overwhelm the natural defense mechanisms of the lungs.

In calves that may be compromised due to inadequate intake and absorption of immunity (colostrum) from the dam, the risk is even greater. Calves that develop pneumonia may not be discovered until too late in the course of the disease. Early signs may be calves off by themselves, dams with full udders, a drooped ear and rapid respiration. Adult cattle and yearlings that have experienced respiratory disease early in life or postweaning may have decreased lung capacity and will be at a greater risk of heat stress. “Cattle that have damaged lungs due to pneumonia may die on the first moderately warm day,” Stokka says. He urges producers to consult with their veterinarian for confirmation of the heat stress diagnosis and for treatment options. Night cooling allows the animal to cool off and get relief from heat stress. When night cooling doesn't exist, cattle have a difficult time handling the heat stress the next day. “Usually, healthy cattle won’t die from heat stress on the first hot day,” Hoppe notes. “Cumulative days of heat stress without night cooling physiologically challenge

cattle. After three days, some cattle can’t handle the heat and humidity and die.” Brahman and brahman crossbred cattle are more tolerant to elevated heat and humidity. Bos indicus breeds (Brahman crosses) often are included in the cow herd breeding program in southern states. For northern cattle, reducing heat stress includes providing drinking water in adequate amounts and access to the water. Provide at least two inches of water per trough space per head. Providing shade also will help cattle reduce elevated body temperatures. Cattle will seek windy locations, wet places to stand, or ponds to wade in to help cool off. Cattle with dark hides tend to show heat stress and have higher internal body temperature than cattle with lighter colored hide. For feedlot cattle, moving feeding time to later afternoon or evening will help reduce heat stress. Several hours after consuming a meal, the fermentation and digestion of feed creates heat. By feeding later in the day, the heat produced from digestion will develop during the night and not add to the daytime heat stress. Usually, the fatter the cattle, the more difficulty in handling heat stress, Stokka says.

Heat stress can be forecast and is based on temperature, wind speed, humidity and solar radiation. The National Weather Service and U.S. Department of Agriculture has a heat stress forecast website. When heat stress is anticipated, cooling the ground may help. This can be done by putting water on the pen surface and/or adding bedding to change the pen's surface color, which normally is black. Wetting the bedding also may help. Using sprinklers or fire hoses to cool cattle that already are panting isn't a good practice, Hoppe says. Spraying water onto the cattle raises the humidity and can increase heat stress. However, when cattle are in severe heat stress, soaking the animals with water may be necessary for their survival. Cattle are at danger of death from heat exposure when: • The heat index is 75 or greater for a 72 hour period • The heat index during a 48 hour period is not lower than 79 during the day and not lower than 75 during the night • The daytime heat index reaches 84 or higher for two consecutive days For more information, see the NDSU Extension publication "Dealing With Heat Stress in Beef Cattle Operations."

Contact these RAAC members to learn more about Red Angus genetics and how they can fit into your herd. HARDROCK BEEF CATTLE Ronnie & Donna Holman 4613 Hickory Nut Ridge Road • Granite Falls, NC 828-302-8659 ronnie@hardrockbeefcattle.com JK RED ANGUS Jeff Banfield & Madison Adams 331 Tee Jay Farm Road • Aberdeen, NC 910-281-3821 jkredangus@gmail.com LANGDON RED ANGUS & SIMMENTAL John & Eileen Langdon 7728 Raleigh Road • Benson, NC 919-796-5010 johnlangdon5@gmail.com ROGERS CATTLE COMPANY Johnny & Sharon Rogers 945 Woodsdale Road • Roxboro, NC 336-504-7268 rccbeef@gmail.com PRESNELL RED ANGUS Jonathan & Jacob Presnell 368 Whitaker Road • Shelby, NC 704-473-2627 (Jonathan) • 704-616-8775 (Jacob) BULL HILL RANCH Jim & Alvina Meeks • Raymond Prescott, Manager 1986 Trinity Church Road • Gray Court, SC 864-682-3900 • 864-682-2828 bullhill2@mindspring.com

Jerry Simpson, President - 704-302-2940 • simpson_jerry@msn.com

COUNTRY BOY FARMS David Miller 316 Key Road • Edgefield, SC 706-840-3709

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S.C. Charolais News By GEORGEANNE WEBB S.C. Charolais Association

First of all, I will explain the picture that I submitted. While in Knoxville, Tenn., on June 6 for the Appalachian Sale, I took this picture. David and I were headed to the sale barn on Saturday morning. Our truck was loaded in the back seat with luggage, semen tank, and cooler. Greg Clifton and Jay Purchase were in the parking lot without a car and needed a ride across the big highway to the Cracker Barrel for breakfast. Because we were loaded up, they decided they would ride on the tailgate of the truck. We transported them across the big highway, up the hill to Cracker Barrel. No bail money was needed as we didn’t get caught, and no one lost their hat. You know when we all get together out of town, we just have to show out! If you missed the sale, you missed a great time and a great crowd. It was great seeing old friends and meeting a lot of new ones. Right after we checked into the hotel, I got a call from Judy Clements!

She was downstairs and had just flown in to attend our sale. Judy and I in the same hotel in Knoxville, Tenn., you know we had a big time! A big group of us got together on Friday night to eat at Cracker Barrel. We had to space out with six to a table, but we could holler from table to table. It is a distinct possibility that none of us will be allowed back into Tennessee. We were all like a bunch of caged animals that escaped our pens. The cattle sold great and went to 15 states. One even sold to someone in Washington State. Once home, we got busy and weaned another group of calves. We really need to cut some of these hay fields if it ever quits raining for a few days. I hate to complain about rain, but one field is so high I cannot drive the mule through there as the grass is above the front window of the mule and I can’t see where I am going. I will end with a funny story that happened the night we got back from Knoxville. I was exhausted, took a

shower, and went to bed early. A little after midnight, the cat jumped on the bed and woke me up. In the dark, I looked at her and saw that she had something in her mouth. All I could think of was she had brought me a mouse. She dropped it beside my head, and if you think the

girl in the Exorcist levitated in her bed, well, you should have seen me. I swear I jumped over the ceiling fan. I cut on the light, and she had brought me one of her toys, a soft fuzzy ball that she plays with. Needless to say, it was tough to go back to sleep. That darn cat!

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


Why Cattlemen Should Care About Dog Import Legislation The opinions in the following commentary are those of Art Parola, a native of Kentucky and a consultant with over a decade of experience in the pet industry. He is passionate about animals, wildlife, and the outdoors.  Heartwater. Even hearing the word can make any beef or dairy producer shudder. The rickettsial disease threatens protein food supplies by infecting and killing cattle, sheep, goats, and other ruminants, potentially within hours of the first development of symptoms.  The disease is native to sub-Saharan Africa but has spread to other regions including the Caribbean, where eradication efforts have been unsuccessful. A small arachnid known

as the Bont tick is the main vector, although once established other tick species may be able to disperse outbreaks further. While the U.S.. has been successful in preventing the importation of bont ticks and heartwater thus far, pathways still exist that could potentially allow the vector and disease into the United States. Adult ticks feed on the blood of mammals including cattle and canines. Last year, over a million dogs and puppies were imported into the U.S. to be rescued from alleged homelessness or abuse. Unfortunately, the real sources of these animals are largely unknown. A significant portion were imported from the Caribbean region, the same area that is infested with,

Preg Check and Cull Replacement Heifers Early Many ranchers choose to breed replacement heifers about a month ahead of mature cows. In addition, they like to use a shortened 45-60 day breeding season for replacement heifers. The next logical step is to determine which of these heifers failed to conceive in their first breeding season. This is more important today than ever before. As bulls are removed from the replacement heifers, this would be an ideal time to call and make arrangements with your local large animal veterinarian to have those heifers evaluated for pregnancy in about 60 days. In two months, experienced palpaters should have no difficulty identifying which heifers are pregnant and which heifers are not pregnant (open). Those heifers that are determined to be open after the breeding season should be strong candidates for culling. Culling these heifers immediately after pregnancy checking serves three very economically valuable purposes. • Identifying and culling open heifers early will remove sub-fertile females from the herd. Lifetime cow studies from Montana indicate that properly developed heifers that were exposed to fertile bulls, but DID NOT become pregnant were often sub-fertile compared to the heifers that did conceive. In fact, when the heifers that failed to breed in the first breeding season were followed throughout their lifetimes, they averaged a 55 percent annual calf crop. Despite the fact that reproduction is not a highly heritable trait, it also makes sense to remove this genetic material from the herd so as to not proliferate females that are difficult to get bred. • Culling open heifers early will reduce late summer forage and winter feed costs. If the rancher waits until next spring to find out which heifers do not calve, the pasture

use and winter feed expense will still be lost and there will be no calf to eventually help pay the bills. This is money that can better be spent in properly feeding cows that are pregnant and will be producing a salable product the following fall. • Identifying the open heifers shortly after (60 days) the breeding season will allow for marketing the heifers while still young enough to go to a feedlot and be fed for the choice beef market. "B" maturity carcasses (those estimated to be 30 months of age or older) are very unlikely to be graded Choice and cannot be graded Select. As a result, the heifers that are close to two years of age will suffer a price discount. If we wait until next spring to identify which two-year-olds did not get bred, then we will be culling a female that will be marketed at a noticeable discount compared to the price/pound that she would have brought this summer as a much younger animal. Even in this unusual, topsy turvey cattle market, it is unlikely that an open two-year-old cow will bring more total dollars next spring than a long yearling 850 pound heifer will bring late this summer.  Most years there has been a sizeable advantage in sale price for the younger heifer. Certainly the percentage of open heifers will vary from ranch to ranch. Do not be concerned, if after a good heifer development program and adequate breeding season, that you find that ten percent of the heifers still are not bred. Resist the temptation to keep these open heifers and “roll them over” to a fall calving herd. These are the very heifers that you want to identify early and remove from the herd. It just makes good economic business sense to identify and cull non-pregnant replacement heifers as soon as possible.

and has been unable to control, heartwater disease. A massive threat to the US food supply could be hiding beneath the fur of an imported dog. Ticks traveling as stowaways on dogs coming into the United States is not a hypothetical situation. Dogs are one of the animals suspected of having transported the Asian longhorned tick into the country from Asia. Originally found infesting a sheep farm in New Jersey (suspiciously close to John F. Kennedy International Airport, a major hub for illegal dog imports according to Customs and Border Patrol officials and Center for Disease Control Veterinarians) in 2017, the species has now been detected in at least12 states. Asian longhorned ticks have been shown to carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and other pathogens, but fortunately thus far there is no evidence the species can carry or transmit heartwater. This should obviously be a major concern to farmers. Large scale imports of dogs without proper screening for parasites and diseases is troubling. But what is even more worrisome is the lack of oversight currently being implemented to do anything about it. Many of the dogs

entering the country are younger than the law allows, and others almost certainly have fraudulent veterinary documents. While the emotional appeal of saving a puppy from an undesirable situation causes many to look the other way, the potential risk to the nation’s food supply must be considered. Congressman Ralph Abraham of Louisiana, a medical doctor and veterinarian has introduced H.R. 6921, the Healthy Dog Importation Act, to Congress. The bill will ensure all dogs entering the United States are properly screened for pathogens and parasites. The legislation will prevent inadvertent introduction and spread of diseases to dogs, humans, and livestock by streamlining federal oversight of imports, ensuring electronic import documentation is shared between federal agencies, and clarifying USDA Animal and Plant Inspection Service’s key enforcement authority. For the well being of the millions dogs that provide companionship and service, the health of livestock that provide for the protein needs of a prosperous nation, and the safety of all people, the cattle industry must understand the current threat presented by unscreened and illegal canine imports and voice support for this legislation.  

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BRAHMAN NEWS

By JOE W. MASK, Ph.D., Executive Vice President As I stepped outside recently, it feels as if spring is gone and summer is in full force. June is usually a busy time of the year, and with us still under some restrictions due to COVID-19, we are busy planning many summer activities. When thinking about what I am hearing as I travel and visit with many ABBA members, one of the main things that is expressed is the need for communication. The intention of this newsletter is to help aid in communication efforts and to inform our members of what is going on within the ABBA and the Brahman breed.

One big issue that has come up over the last month is our www.brahman. org website. The office staff, committee members, as well as programmers, have been trying to come up with a solution. The solution is that we try to make it work until our new site is ready to launch. I am very optimistic that we can make it work. As I hear from Morgan after her meeting once a week with the new site designers, we are all in for a treat with our new site. I would like to give you an update on the Board of Directors decision to move from LGS to Digital Beef as our

new registry program. We have signed a contract with Digital Beef, and they have the first download data set to start the process of building our new system. I will say some of this was slowed due to COVID-19, but we are moving forward. You will be hearing more news in the upcoming months about the system and our plans for extensive testing of the system before it goes live. I want to thank the guys at LGS and Neogene for their continued support of the ABBA and the Brahman breed during this transition and beyond. As you remember, there was a constitution change vote taken several months ago to move the ABBA office. There have been several meetings with committee members to explore options and locations. That being said, College Station, Tex., has been selected as the new location for the ABBA office. This move will give the ABBA an opportunity to have an impact on college students and

collaborate with researchers to conduct relevant science based research. The first thing you may be thinking is that research would just be at Texas A&M University, and the answer is no. We would be collaborating with multiple Universities, and you will read more about that later in the newsletter. The committee has identified a piece of property, and we are in the negotiation stages at this time. We hope to report more progress in the coming weeks. I am happy to report that the ABBA Board of Directors are going to be meeting on July 9-10, 2020, in Brenham, Texas. Due to social distancing and travel restrictions, this has been a challenge to plan. Please see the schedule below for meetings and locations. I would like to thank Morgan Thomas, the Youth Activity Committee, and the AJBA Board of Directors for their hard work and persistence in planning the 2020 All American. As you know,

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

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the event was relocated to Texarkana, Arkansas, and scaled back to four days this year. With that being said, it is going to be a great event, and the numbers of entries are looking good as well. We look forward to seeing everyone this summer in July for the show. We are still moving forward with “Ear Talks,” and I think we have had some outstanding participation in all of our episodes, both live and taped. If you have suggestions for upcoming segments, please let Morgan or myself know, and we will work to fit them into the schedule. As I mentioned earlier in the newsletter about research and working with multiple Universities, let me mention something coming up in July. We had a preliminary discussion last week with two professors at Texas A&M University about Brahman cattle and research areas of interest. This discussion sparked a new idea to bring researchers together from Texas A&M University and the University of Florida with our ABBA committee chairs to discuss topics of interest to take back to their respective

committee for more discussion on guidance and implementation. With that being said, we are working to have this think tank meeting the morning of July 9 to provide the committees on July 10 more talking points for their meetings. As we move forward, we will be including more academic and industry partners for the same purpose. As I conclude this month, I would like to let you know about something that I am really excited about. I have asked the ABBA Board of Directors to complete a SWOT analysis as it relates to the ABBA. Some of you may be wondering what a SWOT analysis is. SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis is a framework used to evaluate a company’s competitive position and to develop strategic planning. SWOT analysis assesses internal and external factors, as well as current and future potential. A SWOT analysis is designed to facilitate a realistic, fact based, data driven look at the strengths and weaknesses of an organization,

NEWS

Undergraduates, graduate students, and collegiate clubs invited to sign up for College Aggies Online scholarship competition. Annual scholarship competition kicks off September 14. The Animal Agriculture Alliance announced recently that its annual College Aggies Online (CAO) scholarship program will return this fall, kicking off September 14. The nine week program brings together college students from across the country to develop life long advocates for agriculture. Undergraduates, graduate students, and collegiate clubs are invited to sign up. Students will have the opportunity to network with social media savvy farmers and industry leaders while enhancing their communication skills. Each week participants receive training from these communications experts about current and emerging issues in agriculture. Students earn points by completing weekly challenges, including writing blog posts, designing infographics, creating social media content, and submitting letters to the editor. Collegiate clubs usually host events on their campus to engage with peers

about agriculture, but to ensure students are able to adhere to social distancing guidelines to protect their health and the health of others, the Alliance is updating the club division to include virtual engagement opportunities and events suited for small groups. Events include hosting a campus event, food drive, guest speaker, farm tour, and more. “The College Aggies Online program is cultivating the next generation of leaders in agriculture who are skilled at engaging consumers and influencers,” said Kay Johnson Smith, Alliance president, and CEO. “We’re impressed and inspired by the passion, creativity, and dedication each year’s crop of students presents in bridging the communication gap between farm and fork, and we’re honored to provide the tools and resources to do just that.” Last year, 300 individuals and 20 collegiate clubs participated, representing 35 states and 95 universities. Students reached 7.2 million people online with their social media posts and more than 5,000 people in person at campus events. Students interested in becoming confident and effective communicators

its initiatives, or an industry. The organization needs to keep the analysis accurate by avoiding pre-conceived beliefs or gray areas and instead focusing on real life contexts. Companies should use it as a guide and not necessarily as a prescription. Key Points of a SWOT analysis • SWOT analysis is a strategic planning technique that provides assessment tools. • Identifying core strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats lead to fact based analysis, fresh perspectives, and new ideas. • SWOT analysis works best when diverse groups or voices within an organization are free to provide realistic data points rather than prescribed messaging. I mentioned in my email to each of the BOD’s that their responses would be confidential and anonymous, and they will be. Only myself, as the researcher of this project, will know who said what and with my memory, I will not remember long. I genuinely believe this

exercise will give the Board of Directors a direction and ideas on moving this great breed forward. As I bring this correspondence to a close, please feel free to reach out to me if you ever have questions or concerns about the ABBA. I look forward to visiting with members and getting fresh ideas. With the unrest in our country at this time, please stay safe, and until next month, God Bless!

for agriculture are invited to sign up at www.animalagalliance.org/initiatives/ college-aggies-online/. CAO would not be possible without the generous support of our sponsors. 2020 sponsors include Dairy Management, Inc.; Seaboard Foods; Bayer; Institute for Feed Education and Research (IFEEDER); Domino’s Pizza Inc.; and Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). To become a sponsor of this year’s program, contact Casey Kinler, director of membership and marketing, at ckinler@ animalagalliance.org. More than 65 organizations and individuals endorse open letter on the importance of animal agriculture in the time of COVID-19 and beyond. Leading academics across four continents have joined U.S., Canadian and international organizations representing millions of farmers, producers, and veterinarians to sign an open letter pushing back against misinformation around animal agriculture during the pandemic. Signatories -- including the Animal Agriculture Alliance, World Veterinary Association, and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) -- clarified that domestic livestock production is safe and has not played a role in the spread of COVID-19, despite recent unfounded claims. The letter calls for governments

and authorities to reassure consumers around the safety of meat, milk, eggs, and fish while also working with farmers and veterinarians to share lessons and expertise around animal health. This has been signed by more than 65 farmer groups, producer associations, veterinarians and researchers, including: • U.S. associations like Animal Agriculture Alliance, North American Meat Institute, and American Feed Industry Association • academics from UC Davis, Iowa State, and University of Arkansas, and • Former USDA Undersecretary for Food Safety, Richard Raymond. This is alongside similar global, European, and Canadian groups. The Open Letter is available online at www.medium.com/@LivestockLetter/ open-letter-on-the-value-of-animalagriculture-97ab380271f6. About the Animal Agriculture Alliance. The Animal Agriculture Alliance is an industry united, nonprofit organization that helps bridge the communication gap between farm and fork. We connect key food industry stakeholders to arm them with responses to emerging issues. We engage food chain influencers and promote consumer choice by helping them better understand modern animal agriculture. We protect by exposing those who threaten our nation’s food security with damaging misinformation.

NOTICE

Letters to the editor are welcome and we appreciate your input. HOWEVER, letters that are not signed will not be considered for publication.

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q JULY 2020

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Beef Promotion and Research Program

PRIVATE TREATY SALES CHECKOFF INVESTMENT FORM Information is required by (7 CRF 1260.201). Failure to report can result in a fine. Information is held confidential (7 CRF 1260.203).

Today’s Date: ________________ Seller’s Name: ____________________________

Buyer’s Name: ____________________________

Address: _________________________________

Address: _________________________________

City: ________________ State: ____ Zip: ______

City: ________________ State: ____ Zip: ______

Seller’s Signature: _________________________

Buyer’s Signature: _________________________

Both the seller & the buyer are responsible for making sure that the $1.50 per head assessment is collected and remitted to the Beef Promotion & Research Board.

Total Number of Cattle Sold: ___________________ x $1.50 Per Head = $ _______________________ Date of Sale: __________________

Person remitting assessment form:

Seller

o

Buyer

o

* State of Origin of Cattle: ______________________

* If the cattle purchased came from another state within the last 30 days, indicate from which state the cattle were purchased.

Send Report and Remittance to:

SOUTH CAROLINA BEEF COUNCIL P.O. Box 11280 Columbia, SC 29211 According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0581-0093. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1.8 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disbility, sexual orientation, marital or family status, political beliefs, parental status, or protected genetic information. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at 202-720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 14th and Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call 202-720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020


S.C. Beef Council News By ROY COPELAN July is a great month of celebration for our nation’s independence and the freedoms you and I have every day. Let’s all show our appreciation and thankfulness.

over 250 engagements. Also, June as “Beef Month” reached over 350,000 consumers around South Carolina with media impressions over our social network, press releases, and billboard advertisements. Trust you are viewing the five billboards around South Carolina (I26 with 2 locations, I-85 with 2 locations, and I-77 with 1 location). Great reviews from our consumers! We welcomed a new Livestock Auction Market in Chesnee. Clint Harold is owner/operator of the facility and conducts sales on Mondays beginning at 11:00 a.m. Please stop by and introduce yourself to Clint and his staff. The market is located at 535 Cliffside Highway outside of Chesnee.

What will be on your grill this Independence Day...hamburgers, hot dogs, beef kabobs, or a great steak? Try some outstanding South Carolina fresh vegetables and fruits with your beef products.

retailers have information on the burger contest in their meat department or wine areas. You can visit the website at www. buildabetterburger.com to review the official rules. Last year, five people from our state entered the burger contest. Act today. I hope to see you out and about these nice summer days. Stay safe and healthy! Also, check on others during these uncertain times. Until next month.

Clemson Extension 2021 Bull Test Call for Nominations By STEVEN E. MEADOWS, Ph.D., Clemson Extension Beef Specialist

Celebrate the 30 th Sutter Home “Build a Better Burger” recipe contest. You could win $ 30,000 by entering your favorite homemade burger recipe. The deadline for entries is July 31. Regional winners will be announced by mid-August with competition in Atlanta, Georgia. All South Carolina food

This is to serve as an open call for nominations for the 2021 Clemson Extension Bull Test. The deadline for nominations is July 15. The rules and regulations for nominations can be found online at the Clemson Bull Test website. We had a great test in 2020 and a record breaking sale as well. Quality genetics are in demand. We look

forward to the 2021 test and testing top quality genetics. Updated rules and regulations and nomination forms can be found at www.clemson.edu/ extension/bulltest/clemson/index.html. Please note all deadlines as specified. We look forward to another great test. If there are any questions, please contact me at smdws@ clemson.edu.

With the first day of summer beginning and Father’s Day, our Summer Grilling beef promotional activities have begun, but on a reduced schedule. Our South Carolina food retailers and foodservice operators have begun to welcome the promotional events, especially Thursday through Saturday, at various locations. National Hamburger Day, May 28, was a huge success by the media and consumers. Good Morning America welcomed consumers posting photos of their beef burger creations. In South Carolina, we promoted our social media platform for that special day and reached

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q JULY 2020

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The 2020 Estimated Progeny Equivalents. An estimated progeny equivalent is the average number of progeny records it would take to see an equivalent change in accuracy from a genomic test. For example, if a nonparent animal is genotyped, the accuracy of his/her EPD is akin to an animal that has already produced five offspring with a carcass weight record (see table below). Over time, these estimates will change as statistical models are improved, the number of phenotypes increases, and the information from genomic data improves.

form available on the NALF website or 15 individual qualifying letters of support from lifetime, founder, or active annual members, or a combination thereof to be received in the NALF office no later than September 1. Nominating Committee Gary Fuchs - Chairman who would chair as immediate past president Bret Begert Curt Wieczorek Mark Barker Ken Holloway Matt Lewis Bob Mitchell

Nominating Committee Announced. The date for interested members to contact the nominating committee is until July 15, as we moved it up with the by-law change at the Board Meeting. There will be one opening and four re-ups this year. The by-laws updates for the process are listed below: 10. Nominating Procedures A. All prospective candidates must express their interest to the Nominating Committee by July 15 each year, and if the committee does not slate those interested persons, supporters then may add their candidates’ names to the ballot via the at large nomination process. (effective beginning with the 2010-2011 election cycle) B. To qualify as a member-at-large, the candidate must have at least 15 qualifying signatures from lifetime, founder, or active annual members on either the petition style

Are you Receiving the State Scoop? NALF is still putting together the “State Scoop,” our state association e-newsletter! This is a quarterly newsletter that will include events and state news to keep the associations upto-date. The North American Limousin Foundation would appreciate involvement from each state association by submitting state news, contact updates, highlighted events, etc., so we can better serve you. Please email any news you would like in the next state e-newsletter to Mallory Blunier at LimousinMedia@gmail.com. For state association leaders who did not receive the State Scoop and would like to, feel free to sign-up using the “Subscribe to our mailing list form” at the bottom of the page at www.NALF.org. Click the State E-News box to subscribe. All State Scoop e-newsletters will be archived on the

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

NALF website under the News tab. Postponement of ILC France 2020. In a press release dated April 6, the organizing committee of the International Limousin Congress France 2020 committed to announce its decision to maintain or defer the event no later than May 31. Considering the evolution of the situation as well as persisting uncertainties, and a state of health emergency announced for several more months, we have decided to shoulder our responsibilities and announce our decision today instead of waiting for May 31. In view of the closure of many borders in the Schengen Area, as well as travel bans and restrictions in or from certain countries, we have decided to postpone the International Limousin Congress, which was to be held in France from September 17-26. This decision, which we did not take light heartedly, stood out as an evidence, and was taken in order to ensure the safety of participants, and free them of the stress and uncertainties associated with the period, and the organization of travel. The large number of registered participants for the ILC 2020 confirms the interest of the “planet Limousine” for this international meeting set in the very heart of the cradle of the breed, and it seems essential for us to emphasize the fact that the event is not cancelled, but postponed. The International Limousin Congress will take place in September 2021, based on the program imagined for 2020, and will include in its schedule the Concours National Limousin and trips to Bordeaux, Limoges, and Paris. Given that the event is postponed, the following measures have been taken to benefit those who have already registered, and allow them to easily maintain their participation: - Registration fees (short program/ long program) collected by ILC France 2020 will be held, and will count as registration for ILC France 2021; - In the event of a cancellation request from a registered participant, the general terms and conditions of sale of ILC France 2020 will apply. We are aware of the implications of such a decision and assure you that it

was taken in concertation with all parties involved. The organizing committee remains fully committed to transferring the ILC France 2020 to 2021 and is at your disposal to answer all questions. We look forward to welcoming you in September 2021 for an International Limousin Congress that we have all been expecting...and deserve! Please stay well and be safe. About the International Limousin Council. The International Limousin Council is the global organization for Limousin Associations around the world. The main purpose and objectives of the ILC are to network with the world’s elite Limousin breeders while coordinating international research efforts; encouraging uniform recording and registration policies and to highlight and honor efforts that have been made for the benefit of the Limousin breed on an international and domestic level. Every two years, the International Limousin Congress (ILC) is hosted by a different country. This event first took place in 1973 in France and has been going strong ever since. The ILC event has traveled to numerous countries, including France, U.S., Argentina, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, Denmark, Ireland, Zimbabwe, Brazil, Mexico, Italy, and Canada. The International Limousin Congress prides itself on being an event that not only serves as an opportunity to exchange industry and research knowledge but also a memorable experience that will leave you captivated with a new culture and heading home with lasting friendships. About the North American Limousin Foundation. The North American Limousin Foundation, headquartered in Englewood, Colo., provides programs and services, including the documentation of more than 25,000 head of cattle annually, for approximately 4,000 members and their commercial customers. The Limousin breed and Lim-Flex® hybrid offer industry leading growth and efficiency, while being an ideal complement to British breeds. For more information about NALF, please visit www.nalf.org.

You shouldn’t have to have a gun held to your head to take advantage of the expert A.I., superior genetics, the best in purebreds and outstanding farm supplies featured in the Classifieds in this issue!


New NCCA Members for 2020 In 2007, members of the Membership Committee passed a resolution to recognize all NEW members of the NCCA in The Carolina Cattle Connection at the NCCA Annual Conference in Hickory. A new member is defined as someone who has never been a member or someone who has rejoined after a brief break in membership. The new members are identified in this new members section by name and county of residence. Below is a list of NCCA’s new members for the last month: Out-of-State Barbara Petrilla – Penn. Peter Wilkins – Cherokee Hills Farm – S.C. Alamance County Deanna Martin

Buncombe County Jessica Lynn Chomos Anna Cole Anika L. Eide Bo Owenby – Owenby Farms & Livestock Michaela Payne Shaianne Peedin Carolina Soto Katelyn Turpin Chatham County Jackson Coy Headen Cleveland County John Presnell – Presnell Red Angus Farm Dale Woolford Davie County Dillon Byerly – Black Cedar Angus Duplin County Mike Thomas

Reimagining Liver Health in Beef Cattle It’s a silent challenge, yet costly to the beef cattle business: liver abscess disease. “So one of the recent estimates would be about 60 million annually that liver abscesses could cost the beef packing industry,” says Scott Laudert, beef industry consultant. “Then there are also performance effects that have a direct effect on the profitability to the cattle feed yard or the cattle owner. Usually we’ll see in severe abscess situations those cattle would have about a five percent decrease in feed intake, about a ten percent reduction in average daily gain or performance. Carcass weight is also reduced by about ten percent, and so those the feed intake and the carcass weight or live weight would be a direct loss to the feed yard.,” Laudert continues. That’s only on those deemed “severe.” About ⅔ of liver abscesses fall into the mild category, and don’t cause economic loss. Today, antibiotics are the best tool for control, but Laudert says some best practices could be adopted to reduce overall use and improve outcomes. “So my belief is that a producer needs to start his control measures very early in the feeding period for beef type steers and heifers,” Laudert says. “Once we start cattle on feed and they start going up on ration if there is any kind of inconsistent intake, they get too much grain and they get a buildup of lactic acid in their rumen-then the bacteria can really proliferate and then that sets the animal up for the disease condition to go ahead and develop. So early and mid would be the critical times.” Good bunk management is key. Starting treatment earlier, and ending it

sooner shows promise. “A lot of the producers have pulled Tylosin out of the market the last 30 days prior to harvest and have not seen an increase in liver abscesses. This is one step forward. We need more like that. Does roughage help? Is there vaccines that are going to address it independent of medically important antibiotics? That would all be positive,” says Glen Dolezal, vice president, Cargill Protein. As cattlemen aim to balance care with concern for judicious antibiotic use, the feeding community is seeking new solutions. “We’re encouraged that suppliers are experimenting and coming up with best practices to replace the need for using medically important antibiotics subtherapeutically. We think it’s the right thing to do,” Dolezal says. Cattle that have liver abscess disease don’t show clinical signs, and one study suggests they don’t even know it themselves… “There is some research out of Colorado State University looking at cortisol levels and also temperature and mobility score as the cattle come out of a squeeze shoot and there’s no difference between the animals in those three parameters, the animals that had liver abscesses and those that didn’t. So the authors of the study concluded that liver abscesses don’t cause discomfort are likely not a welfare or well-being issues with feedlot cattle,” Laudert says. Multi-faceted and under the radar, the problem is tricky and costly—but most certainly worth the effort to solve.

Forsyth County Jeremy May – Ogburn Stables Ranch

Macon County Brittany Ty Burrell

Granville County Herb Gregory

McDowell County Hanna Atkins

Harnett County Thomas Wood – Manasseh Farm

Pamlico County Bobby Hacker – Runnin On Faith Farms

Haywood County Wesley Atkins Justin Best – Rough Creek Cattle Company

Swain County Miranda Cope

Henderson County Emily Baer Jessica Lamb Joseph Santos Whittney L. Smith Iredell County Gerald C. Campbell – Campbell Crest Farms

Transylvania County Brenna Paige Bryson Kaylee Cope Sarah Stertzbach Wake County Adam Quittner – Quittner Cattle Co. Wilkes County James Harvey Johnson & Todd Johnson

Johnston County Chris L. Batten Jason Lee – Jason S. Lee and Sons

The Carolina Cattle Connection

Yancey County Blake Dahlberg – Winter Star Family Farms William Smith

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Beef Checkoff News The Beef Checkoff recognizes beef farmers and ranchers working hard to keep beef on the table. As Americans fire up their grills for summer, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. is highlighting the hard working beef farmers and ranchers who make grilling season possible in a new video. The video, which was released on Memorial Day weekend, takes consumers on a journey through a hard day of work raising beef, from dawn to dusk – all in 30 seconds. As the day’s work comes to a close, the Utesch family, of the Triple U Ranch in Iowa, gathers together to savor some delicious real beef burgers. The video then ends with the Barthle family, of the Barthle Brother’s Ranch in Florida, on horseback, as the video proudly proclaims: “Summer Grilling Season Brought To You By Beef Farmers and Ranchers.” In addition to showcasing life on the ranch, the video highlights the commonality of families gathering around the dinner table in an effort to help consumers feel connected with the farmers and ranchers who raise the high quality, delicious beef they know and love. “Beef sizzling on grills during the summer months has brought families together for generations,” said Buck Wehrbein, Federation Division chair at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. “Cattle producers are happy to provide the high quality, tasty beef our customers have come to know and expect. With this video, consumers get an inside look at the lives of farmers and ranchers and all of the work that goes into getting beef on our grills.” The video, which will be shared on social and digital media, is just a small glance into what is to come this summer from the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand. This summer, the brand will focus on how grilling brings people together, whether physically or virtually, and will continue to recognize those who raise beef. To see the brand’s latest efforts, visit www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, on behalf of the Beef Checkoff, submitted more than 100 research studies to the Dietary

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Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee highlighting beef ’s important benefits in a healthy American diet. Over the last 13 months, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, has submitted 21 sets of public comments and more than 100 research studies in support of beef’s role in a healthy diet to the 2020 – 2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee (DGAC). “Beef is part of a healthy diet for most Americans, and a large body of research supports the flexibility to choose lean beef more often as an important source of high quality protein and nutrients during all life stages, from birth to older adults,” said Shalene McNeill, Ph.D., R.D., executive director of nutrition research for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. “We believe it’s imperative that this research is reviewed and considered as part of the DGA process.” The DGAC is comprised of 20 health and nutrition experts and is responsible for developing recommendations to inform the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as they develop the updated Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs), which are updated every five years. The DGAs are designed to provide Americans with a roadmap for healthy eating. They are the foundation for federal nutrition programs, along with school, military, hospital and nursing home menus, and the basis for many expert nutrition recommendations. The government has encouraged public participation throughout the DGAs process. Beef supports health at every life stage, and the 21 sets of comments submitted to the DGAC by NCBA on behalf of the Beef Checkoff reviewed the scientific evidence on the following topics, among others: • Beef’s critical role in growth and development, especially as a high quality source of iron for older infants, women, and girls. • The large body of high quality evidence, consistently showing that lean beef supports heart health as part of a

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

healthy diet. • The important role beef plays as a source of high quality protein and essential nutrition for the aging population. • Dispelling the myth that Americans are overconsuming red meat, when in fact, Americans, on average, eat less than two ounces of beef each day[i], which is in line with current DGA recommendations. • Best scientific practices for evaluating beef related research, including accurate meat definitions. • Research reinforcing the importance of flexibility in choosing beef in a variety of healthy dietary patterns, including those low in carbohydrates and high in protein. Recognizing that the forthcoming 2020 – 2025 DGAs will be the first set of guidelines to include recommendations for infants and young children from birth to 24 months of age, NCBA also submitted comments about the critical role of beef in growth and development. Beef is especially important as a high quality source of iron for pregnant women, infants, adolescent girls, and women of childbearing age. Included in the 21 sets of comments are numerous gold standard Randomized Control Trial research studies reinforcing beef as an important source of high quality protein for Americans of all ages. This includes Beef Checkoff funded research demonstrating how lean beef can be the protein of choice in many healthy dietary patterns, including the popular Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and Mediterranean Diet. Research was also submitted showing the benefits of low carbohydrate and higher protein diets, like the BeefWise study that found lean beef, as part of a healthy and higher protein diet, can help people lose weight while maintaining muscle mass and heart health. One of the most recent studies contributing to the body of evidence supporting beef’s role in a healthy diet was published in the Journal of Nutrition in May. This research was conducted at Indiana University and found that people can have the flexibility to include about six ounces of lean, fresh beef to daily healthy diets - replacing these calories with those from carbs - without increasing heart disease or diabetes risks. Beef farmers and ranchers have a long history of supporting nutrition research with leading scientists at universities and research institutions across the country to better understand beef’s role in health. As traditional sources of research funding, such as government and academic grants, are becoming increasingly limited, farmer

and rancher supported research helps fill gaps and ensures the body of nutrition knowledge continues to grow. The final DGAC report will be released in mid-July. On August 11, the USDA and HHS will hear oral comments from the public on the DGAC advisory report, with the final DGAs expected at the end of the year. To view a list of the comments submitted to the DGAC by NCBA, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, visit w w w. b e e f r e s e a r c h . o r g / humannutrition.aspx, and to learn more about beef nutrition, visit www. beefitswhatsfordinner.com/nutrition. Reference [i] Zanovec M., O’Neil C.E., Keast D.R., Fulgoni V.L. 3rd, Nicklas T.A. Lean beef contributes significant amounts of key nutrients to the diets of US adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. Nutr Res. 2010 Jun;30(6):375-81. About the Beef Checkoff. The Beef Checkoff Program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle, in addition to a comparable assessment on imported beef and beef products. States may retain up to 50¢ on the dollar and forward the other 50¢ per head to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board, which administers the national checkoff program, subject to USDA approval. About NCBA, a Contractor to the Beef Checkoff. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) is a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program. The Beef Checkoff Program is administered by the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, with oversight provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

N.C. Weekly Auctions Report

Feeder Cattle - Medium and Large 1-2 (Week ending JUNE 5, 2020) Kind Avg. Wt. $/lb Steers 300-400 $125.00 - 175.00 400-500 $121.00 - 167.00 500-600 $120.00 - 152.00 600-700 $110.00 - 139.00 700-800 $104.00 - 131.00 800-900 $ 99.00 - 116.00 Heifers

300-400 400-500 500-600 600-700 700-800 800-900

$120.00 - 157.00 $114.00 - 139.00 $107.00 - 129.00 $ 90.00 - 124.00 $ 88.00 - 120.00 $ 90.00 - 97.00

Slaughter Cows: (over 850 lbs) Breakers (70-80% lean) $50.00 - 80.00 Boners (80-85% lean) $53.00 - 88.00 High Dressing (70-85% lean) $61.00 - 86.00 Source: N.C. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services - USDA Market News, Raleigh, N.C. • 919-707-3156


CHUCK

SHANK

CHUCK

BRISKET

RIB

PLATE

RIB

LOIN

SIRLOIN

ROUND SHANK

FLANK

LOIN

SIRLOIN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

ROUND

INGEDIENT CUTS

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

LEAN

BRISKET LEAN

LEAN

PLATE & FLANK LEAN

LEAN

KEY TO RECOMMENDED COOKING METHODS GRILL or BROIL PAN BROIL/ SKILLET

BRAISE/ POT ROAST

LEAN

These cuts meet the government guidelines for lean, based on cooked servings, visible fat trimmed

ROAST

STIR-FRY

INDIRECT GRILLING

SKILLET TO OVEN

* MARINATE BEFORE COOKING FOR BEST RESULTS

A cut of cooked fresh meat is considered ‘lean’ when it contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, andless tahn 95 mg of cholesterol per 100 grams(3½ oz) and per RACC (Reference Amount Customarily Consumed), which is 85 grams (3 oz.)

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The Real Cost of Shipping Fever and What You Can Do About It. Shipping fever, or bovine respiratory disease (BRD), costs the cattle industry up to $900 million annually. 1 But what does that number really mean to producers? “It’s hard for me to appreciate $900 million worth of losses spread out across the whole industry,” said Mike Nichols, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim. “But it’s a cost that impacts every operation — it hits profitability, competitiveness, and sustainability.” According to Dan Stafford, DVM, feedyard, and stocker consultant in southcentral Texas, BRD is the No. 1 cause of disease for his producers. “It’s almost impossible to put a number to how each animal is impacted adversely,” he stated. “Initially, when producers think about costs associated with BRD, they think about up front, tangible losses like mortality or how much it costs to give antibiotics, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.” Drs. Nichols and Stafford agree that the most costly aspect of BRD is

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often the long term losses: 1. Chronic cases - A chronic case is an animal that survives BRD, but doesn’t respond well to treatment and becomes chronically ill. A chronic animal will never be able to catch up to healthy pen mates or reach peak performance. 2. Reduced feed efficiency and lower carcass value - Infected animals are going to take longer to reach target weights, and are going to have lower carcass values at market. 3. Employee morale and turnover - “When animals are healthy, they’re enjoyable for employees to care for, but when we have significant BRD issues, it’s really tough on employee morale,” said Dr. Stafford. “It can and does contribute to employee turnover, which of course is a big cost.” 4. Psychological health - “There’s an emotional aspect of BRD that we don’t often talk about,” added Dr. Nichols. “It’s demoralizing to constantly treat BRD. I’ve seen it become a major driver for producers to make a change, even more

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

so than financial reasons.” Managing treatment costs - “The most common complaint I get from clients about BRD is that we continue to get more expensive, new-and-improved antibiotics, but it feels like we’re still getting the same results,” said Dr. Stafford. “I try to remind producers that to manage the cost of antibiotics and BRD, we need to make sure that we’ve got a well thought out treatment protocol in place.” • Recognize the signs of disease early - “Identifying signs and diagnosing BRD early, almost when the animal is on the verge of getting sick, is when you’ll get the best response out of any antibiotic,” Dr. Stafford explained. • Find the specific cause of BRD Discovering the specific BRD causing pathogen can determine whether producers are implementing the correct vaccination and treatment protocols. Diagnostics could include conducting a necropsy, or performing a deep nasopharyngeal swab on live calves, with the guidance of a veterinarian. • Use a long lasting, fast acting antibiotic - “We want our antibiotic to have a quick response so we can get the animal back with its pen mates,” noted Dr. Stafford. “We also want long lasting antibiotics when possible, so we don’t have to bring animals back up and handle them several times.” • Follow the label - “Some producers will treat an animal, come back the next day, and want to treat again if the animal isn’t looking better,” said Dr. Nichols. “The producer’s intentions are good. They see the animal is still suffering and want to help. However, if the product label states it is effective for ten days, we need to refrain from retreating too quickly and give the animal sufficient time to respond to the antibiotic. Giving another dose in that situation increases cost without increasing effectiveness.” Following the label is also an important part of judicious antibiotic use. “We want to use these antibiotics thoughtfully, so we can use them for years to come,” emphasized Dr. Stafford. • Keep records - A basic set of records that track the animal, health problem, treatment day and product can help determine whether a treatment protocol is working. Review these records with a veterinarian to evaluate whether a different antibiotic needs to be chosen, or if more attention needs to be paid to earlier diagnosis and more aggressive treatment. • Use your veterinarian - “There are still a lot of producers who don’t work with a veterinarian,” said Dr. Stafford. “Instead, they rely on advice from relatives or neighbors, and often wind up with misinformation. They’ll be using

products that they don’t fully understand how to use correctly, and end up spending time and money on the wrong treatment.” Prevention offers the most value Drs. Nichols and Stafford stress that the best way to manage the cost of BRD is through prevention. Every herd is going to be different, so work with a nutritionist and veterinarian to implement the following elements: 1) Vaccination - “Unknown vaccination history is the biggest obstacle my feedyard producers face when dealing with BRD,” said Dr. Stafford. “Ideally, my clients wouldn’t buy an animal unless it already had at least one round, if not two rounds, of vaccinations. My dream scenario would be for them to buy cattle that are vaccinated once at branding, and again at weaning before shipment. Then, when cattle arrive at the feedyard, they’d get a booster. If all my producers did that, it might put me out of work.” 2) Nutrition - Nutrition is a major management component in avoiding BRD wrecks. “When we optimize a nutrition program, we are also going to optimize immune function and help prevent disease,” explained Dr. Nichols. “Animals on a proper nutrition program are also going to respond better to vaccinations and to treatments if they do get sick.” A solid nutrition program includes providing plenty of fresh, clean water, as well as giving animals a balanced ration at consistent times with adequate protein, energy and trace minerals. 3) Stress Management - “I think we’ve made very efficient systems for handling and moving cattle, but as we’ve done that, we’ve put extra stress on animals,” remarked Dr. Stafford. “Cattle are now expected to move hundreds of miles in the blink of an eye, meet new pen mates and face all the other stressors that go along with moving.” Stress can compromise an animal’s immune system and make them susceptible to disease. Producers can manage stress in these ways: • Shield cattle from harsh weather conditions, and give them plenty of bunk space. • Avoid overcrowding, as it causes stress and promotes the spread of disease. • Practice low stress handling to ensure the moving process goes smoothly for both producers and the cattle. Low stress handling techniques include presenting a calm disposition, avoiding loud noises, reducing the use of cattle prods, and removing visual distractions. • Administering a metaphylaxis treatment, or a group antibiotic treatment, for at-risk animals in a timely manner can help reduce morbidity and mortality on beef operations. “Your antibiotic should protect against all four of the


BRD causing pathogens, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis,” Dr. Nichols pointed out. A BRD success story - “I have a feedyard client who has been struggling with increasing mortality, morbidity and

medicine costs associated with BRD for the last ten years,” said Dr. Stafford. “It was getting to where they couldn’t bear it anymore, so they tried two approaches. First, they sought out and bought more cattle from a determined origin. The animals were not commingled and

Texas Tech Investigates Antimicrobial Resistance in High Risk Cattle With the world dealing with a global pandemic thanks to the COVID-19 virus, the food supply chain has seen drastic changes as public consumption and purchasing habits have changed. Those changes are having a particular effect on supplies of beef, chicken, pork and other meats. Food industry experts and farmers have worked extensively to deliver safe meat for the public, long before the coronavirus ever came into existence. Reducing the amounts of antimicrobials used in food animals is of particular concern in order to produce the healthiest meats possible. Now, that effort will have help from Texas Tech University. Kristin Hales, a researcher in the College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources, has been awarded a near-$1 million grant as part of a larger initiative from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to mitigate antimicrobial resistance (AMR) across the food chain. Hales, the Thornton Distinguished Chair and associate professor in the Department of Animal & Food Sciences, received an award for $999,998 from the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) for her project, “Investigating the Emergence and Ecology of Antimicrobial Resistance in High Risk Beef Cattle. The project, in collaboration with the Texas Tech University School of Veterinary Medicine in Amarillo, the University of Nebraska in Lincoln and the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Nebraska, will seek to identify how (AMR) develops and is spread in beef cattle, and develop mitigation strategies to reduce AMR incidents throughout the beef industry. “To achieve our goals, we have assembled a highly qualified, interdisciplinary team with expertise in food safety, gastrointestinal microbial ecology, microbiome, ruminant nutrition, animal health, disease, epidemiology, and outreach,” Hales said.  Hales’ five year research project has several objectives in order to attain its goal: • Understand the emergence and transmission of AMR in high risk cattle in the beef production system. • Implement new, science based strategies for metaphylactic use of antimicrobials that reduce AMR spread in high risk cattle. • Evaluate baseline levels of AMR reservoirs in commensal and pathogenic bacteria within high risk beef cattle longitudinally from feedlot arrival to harvest. • Help current and future veterinarians and cattle nutritionists understand potential food safety risks due to AMR while helping them deliver the best advice possible for cattle health. “Understanding the role of commensal and pathogenic bacteria and their likelihood or capability of becoming resistant to antimicrobials is difficult because it is a complex process,” Hales said. Hales anticipates the study will produce critical information to control the development of AMR and produce science based methods to mitigate AMR in beef production. Having this information is critical to the food supply and food chain sustainability and to reducing the use of antimicrobials in cattle. Her first long term goal in the research project is identifying strategies that reduce AMR in a feedlot cattle production setting. The second long term goal is to develop an alternative to the drug tylosin phosphate that is used to control liver abscesses in cattle. The expectation is that by identifying sources of AMR bacteria and reducing the amount of antimicrobials used in beef cattle, the potential spread of AMR can be reduced, therefore preserving antimicrobials for human and animal therapeutic uses, improving food safety and strengthening the food supply chain.

were not run through a sale barn. These animals came in less stressed and had a vaccination history. “Second, they reduced the number of cattle that they were willing to take in at any one time, especially during the big fall runs. The manager always said, ‘I can control BRD. All I have to do is close the front gate.’ So, they went from processing 800 new animals a week to 250. They were no longer overloading their system, and they saw incredible results. The cowboy crew could finally catch their breath, and they were able to do a better job. That operation wound up making more money — they saved eight- to tenfold on medicine, and had a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity.” Bringing back the art of animal husbandry - “Animal husbandry is an art, and, in some cases, it’s the missing piece for the very best care we can give animals,” said Dr. Nichols. “Not the difference between bad care and good care, but the very best care.” “We need to put ourselves in the situation of the animal,” agreed Dr. Stafford. “What do you want? You want clean water, something good to eat, protection from the elements, and to be comfortable. Good animal husbandry is about focusing on those basics, while leveraging the antibiotics we have available. That’s what’s really going to save us on BRD costs in the long run.” Reference 1 Chirase NK, Greene LW. Dietary zinc and manganese sources administered from the fetal stage onward affect immune system of transit stressed and virus infected offspring steer calves. Anim Feed Sci Tech 2001;93:217-228. Switching Dewormers is a Big Decision, Make it an Informed One. New LongRange ® calculator provides return on investment data. Cattle producers now have a tool to calculate the value of using an industry leading parasiticide, LongRange (eprinomectin). Boehringer Ingelheim launched the LONGRANGE Payoff Projector, a calculator that provides beef cattle producers and their veterinarians with a detailed estimate of what you can expect to gain by using the long lasting injectable dewormer. “ We k n o w t h a t p r o d u c e r s are concerned about the price of LONGRANGE, as compared to the lower cost dewormers,” said Doug Ensley, DVM, technical marketing manager, Boehringer Ingelheim. “The Payoff Projector is a simple, mobile friendly tool designed to help producers calculate the potential value of using LONGRANGE on their herd, before they purchase the product.” Unlike conventional dewormers that

offer 14-42 days of parasite protection, LONGRANGE delivers up to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose. Over the course of a grazing period, this means more efficient utilization of feed resources, and ultimately more weight gained each day.1 By providing the calculator some basic information about your operation, such as the cost of your current dewormer and the average weight of your cattle, the Payoff Projector estimates the cost of upgrading to LONGRANGE, along with your herd’s expected return on investment — conveniently calculated in both dollars and pounds. To learn more and to calculate your profit potential, visit www. TheLongRangeLook.com/calculator to view or download the Payoff Projector. Once downloaded, the tool can be used offline, anywhere. It can be easily bookmarked and accessed on any mobile device for on-thego convenience.”Of all the animal health practices used to improve production, controlling parasites provides producers the greatest economic return,”2 stated Dr. Ensley. “It’s important to consult a local veterinarian to develop a cost effective parasite control program for your herd.” PLEASE NOTE: The purpose of this tool is to help you calculate opportunities based on inputs into the variable fields. Calculations do not imply a guaranteed weight gain. References 1 Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label. 2 Lawrence J.D. and Ibarburu M.A. Economic analysis of pharmaceutical technologies in modern beef production in a bioeconomy era. Iowa State University. 2009. Available at www2. econ.iastate.edu/faculty/lawrence/ Pharma_202007_20update.pdf. Accessed January 13, 2020. About Boehringer Ingelheim. Improving the health and quality of life of patients is the goal of the research driven pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim. The focus in doing so is on diseases for which no satisfactory treatment option exists to date. The company, therefore, concentrates on developing innovative therapies that can extend patients’ lives. In animal health, Boehringer Ingelheim stands for advanced prevention. Boehringer Ingelheim is the second largest animal health business in the world. We are committed to creating animal well being through our large portfolio of advanced, preventive healthcare products and services. With net sales of $4.4 billion and around 10,000 employees worldwide, we are present in more than 150 markets. For more information, visit www.boehringeringelheim.com/animal-health/overview.

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Conserve Costs without Sacrificing Performance. Cattle producers are always looking for ways to reduce their input costs without surrendering their herds’ performance. Now, they can do both successfully. BioZyme Inc., makers of the VitaFerm line of supplements, is launching VitaFerm Conserve™ to its product family. “ Vi t a F e r m Conserve was purposefully crafted with the producer in mind as an economical line of vitamin and mineral supplements for the beef cattle herd that complements our existing products during the times of year when reproduction isn’t the primary focus,” said Jack Oattes, BioZyme Area Sales Manager. VitaFerm Conserve is a complete vitamin and mineral supplement line that, like all BioZyme products, comes with the Amaferm advantage to maximize nutrient digestion and absorption. Although it contains a balanced vitamin and mineral package and Amaferm, Conserve does not contain organic trace

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NEWS

minerals. Rather than formulating to optimum nutrient levels like the VitaFerm Concept•Aid line, VitaFerm Conserve is formulated at sufficient nutrient levels to maintain performance. Therefore, the savings can be passed on to the producer without sacrificing the health or performance of the cow herd. Five formulas will be available in the VitaFerm Conserve line. In addition to the standard VitaFerm Conserve, there will be VitaFerm Conserve Mag to mitigate the effects of grass tetany; VitaFerm Conserve CTC 3G to assist those in areas prone to anaplasmosis; VitaFerm Conserve Garlic, to deter insects; and the VitaFerm Conserve Protein Tub, for convenience. “We are excited to offer VitaFerm Conserve to our customers who want to conserve costs without giving up the benefits of a balanced and fortified mineral package along with the Amaferm advantage, 365 days out of the year,” Oattes said. To learn more or to find your nearest

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

dealer, visit www.vitaferm.com. Considerations for Summer Hauling. Young livestock exhibitors spend countless hours, days, and weeks getting their livestock “dialed in” for summer shows. This year, due to COVID-19, they’ve had a little extra time to work with their animals since numerous late spring shows have been cancelled. As some states begin to open up, while others remain closed, exhibitors are hauling further than ever to get the opportunity to show their animal in a live show. You’ve grown and worked hair, kept them fresh in their condition and have them show broke like a dream. Now, you just have to haul them as summer heats up and hope that they handle the trip and get to the show looking their best. That can be challenging when you are going a few hours across the state to a preview show. However, with many restrictions still in place in certain states, young people are traveling further, even across several states and time zones to get their animals out of the barn and in the ring to jackpots, with hopes to eventually get to a breed junior national. Making plans with a reliable weather app, allowing plenty of time, following

some basic animal husbandry practices and keeping animals on a schedule are four of the most important considerations to keeping your livestock healthy and handling travel in the summer heat, according to Jeanene Dal Porto, coowner of Dal Porto Livestock at Oakley, California, who has traveled the U.S. with son, Dawson, to numerous National Junior Angus Shows. “It’s all pretty simple. If you’re hot, they are hot. If you are miserable, they are miserable. You have spent all this time and work at home in the barn, doing whatever it is needed to prepare for this show, and you need to continue with that on the road. Don’t quit just because you pulled out of the driveway,” Dal Porto said. “You can give yourself a break when you pull back into the driveway when you get home, but you’ve spent all that time, blood, sweat, tears, love, everything you did, and it doesn’t quit because you’re on the trailer heading to the show. That’s when it gets real. That’s when the real work starts.” Keeping Cool - The most important task of hauling your animal to its summer show destination is to ensure it stays healthy and safe. That means keeping it cool and hydrated. Dal Porto said she


checks the weather along her family’s planned route, and if temperatures seem too excessive, they make plans to travel at night once the sun has set and the temperatures have dropped. She also makes sure no adverse weather like tornadoes or severe thunderstorms are in their immediate path, and always has an alternate route, and plenty of layover options just in case. In addition to traveling during the cooler parts of the evening, take advantage of your trailer’s cooling system. Be sure that any ventilation you have is open, working, and not blocked. It is best to have front and rear vents open to maximize airflow. If your trailer is equipped with an air conditioner, use it. You should have your A/C serviced prior to traveling to ensure it is in working condition prior to the hot travel days. While proper ventilation is of utmost importance, so is keeping your animals

hydrated. Be sure to have water buckets easily accessible. If you are hauling water from home, make sure to have that water readily available, so when you do stop, you can easily water your animals. “A lot of truck stops have water, and most show broke cattle will see that bucket and drink. They know if they see that bucket, they better drink because it might be a while before their next stop. We always give time; that’s the crucial thing. I don’t usually like to do more than a ten hour day on the trailer, and that is stopping for a water break if need be. If it’s not too hot, they can go ten hours without water. Remember, this is what works for us,” she said. Back to the Basics - No matter what species you are hauling during the summer, it is always good to keep some basic animal husbandry in mind. Don’t overcrowd your trailer. And if you are hauling a smaller animal like a pig, goat

or lamb that is accustomed to its own pen, pen the animal that way on the trailer to avoid any fighting that might cause injury while traveling. Another consideration is bedding. You want to keep your livestock as comfortable as possible on their trip, without slipping and falling. Be sure to provide them with good, slip proof bedding for the haul. Shavings or wood chips are a good option as well as a rubber mat. Remember, shavings will help absorb any animal waste and help keep your animals clean. Before you leave, make sure you have checked your truck and trailer for any maintenance issues. Are the tires properly inflated? Lights connected and working? Trailer doors all closed and secured? These might seem like simple

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Have you forgotten something? Make sure your cattlemen friends are members of your state association!

Promoting Growth And Grade When it comes to growth implants in cattle, animal scientist Robbi Pritchard only worries about three things: getting enough premium if you’re not use them, using them wrong and using them with too little insight. “Using them without sound technical advice, you can ruin a bunch of carcasses, no doubt about it. Using them wrong and running out of gas can cost you a lot of money in cost of gain,” said the longtime South Dakota State University ruminant nutritionist. But if used correctly, “you can have all of the performance and all of the final product value you want.” But what exactly is “used right?” During the 2019 Feeding Quality Forum in Amarillo, Pritchard said the answer depends on everything from the type of cattle to the quality of working facilities. It’s not one-size-fits-all, but it can work for most cattle. When someone says they have better genetics that don’t need an implant, they’re wrong, Pritchard said. “For sure, if you’re going to go implant-free, you want superior genetics; that’s a slam dunk. But to say that we can come up with genetics that remove the need for them, not so much,” he said. “The person who told you that may not realize how implants really work, because the better the genetic growth potential, the bigger the absolute daily response to the implant.”

A moderate potency implant boosts daily gains by about 15 percent. That’s 0.3 pound (lb.) on calves gaining 2 lb. per day, but 0.6 lb., “if you have superior genetics that are gaining 4 lb. a day,” he said. With that kind of growth potential comes the need to match nutrition that will keep up with an implant. Maybe that’s the reference. Maybe, he suggested, some producers are saying, “My cattle can eat enough and grow fast enough that if you give them an implant, the management plan doesn’t keep up.’’ When it comes down to the bottom line, implants usually win. Pritchard shared dollar figures during a follow up presentation at the 2019 Angus Convention in Reno. With a wide Choice-Select spread and cheap feed, the base carcass grid price for non-implanted finished cattle would need to bring $11/hundredweight (cwt.) above the base for conventional cattle to make up for the weight their implanted contemporaries gained. That gets even steeper as quality premiums diminish or feed gets more expensive. Two decades of experience and dozens of research trials suggest an implant at branding or “turnout” has no impact on grade, but the weight added at weaning shows up on the rail. That extra 25 lb. of weaning weight adds 8-10 lb. of carcass weight. Estrogenic based implants increase frame size. “That’s one of the problems we had a long time ago with implants in cattle

not grading,” Pritchard said. “We kept backgrounding them like they were smaller-frame cattle, but when we put the implant in their ears, we just turned smaller-frame cattle into a bigger-frame animal but didn’t feed him accordingly— and that’s where we would lose the grade.” Implant strategy on the ranch all depends on the marketing strategy: when you’re selling, who you’re selling to and how you’re weaning and growing the animals until delivery. Pritchard offered several if/then scenarios: • “You don’t want to sell a calf that has an implant that isn’t mostly depleted,” he said. If the buyer gives another implant and basically doubles up, that’s where carcass quality will suffer, and discounts will ensue. • “If you’re going to carry those calves over to grass, don’t implant them,” Pritchard said. “You didn’t want them to grow; why give them a growth promotant?” • “If you’ve got a creep feeder out there, please implant the cattle. Otherwise, you’re just selling me more fat,” he said. • “Don’t implant calves on weaning day.” For a few days after weaning, they struggle to take in enough calories to gain weight, much less support an implant. • “If you’re going to implant cattle, deworm them,” he said, noting internal parasites decrease feed intake. “Depressing intake and stimulating growth are counterproductive when it comes to carcass quality.”

• “If you’re downsizing your cows’ mature size, think very seriously about implanting.” • “Get your day count right, because if you run out of implant everything’s going to go backward. If you’re too short or you overlap them, you’ll create problems,” he said. • “There’s no upside to overdosing. There’s this American thing: if something’s good, more is better. However, there are limits.” Other options include use of a long acting versus a traditional implant, he said, calling them as different as a Crescent wrench or a box-end wrench. “Which one’s better? Whose toolbox doesn’t contain both?” he asked. “Everybody has both of them because there’s a place for both of them.” Consumer acceptance of the technology is a consideration, but Pritchard says it fits the sustainability narrative. “They do reduce the amount of labor per serving of beef. They also reduce the carbon footprint per serving of beef,” he said. Moreover, implants let cattlemen keep cows matched to their environments and still produce calves matched to the market. After all the considerations, it comes down to a couple of linked points, Pritchard said: “Weight without quality is problematic, but quality without weight is unprofitable.”

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BioZyme News continued from the previous page reminders, but when in a hurry to leave, it is often the simple things that are overlooked. Layovers on the Long Haul - Dal Porto likes to plan around the length of time it takes to travel to the show, allow for plenty of time for stops and only keep the cattle on the trailer for about ten hours a day. She credits their show cattle herdsman, Hadley Pitts, for helping plan their route and making sure they have adequate layovers along their course. Pitts is a big part of getting the cattle ready, and he also checks in with them as they travel to their show destination to make sure the people and the cattle are safe. Dal Porto likes to get to a show about four to five days early to let them acclimate to the weather, especially the humidity, which they are not used to in Northern California. One of the things she appreciates about traveling through the Midwest is the accessibility and set up of many fairgrounds they have laid over at during their travels. She said most will allow them to pull in, unload, rinse and feed and have the facilities to do so. She has also had extended layovers at fellow breeders like Hoffman’s in Nebraska and Prairie View Farm in Illinois, which also have the facilities to share. “When we get to a layover stop, we get them off, let them drink, eat, rinse, get them under fans, and let them relax. They need to be kept comfortable, and they need their routine,” Dal Porto said. In addition to following weather patterns, planning a route, and laying over along the way, Dal Porto said common sense and basic animal husbandry should be followed when hauling animals during summer heat. Allow plenty of room in the trailer. Leave all the side vents and roof vents open for ventilation and make sure nothing is blocking the flow of good circulation. Stop often and check on the animals. Carry Vita Charge Climate Control Gel with you to help them stay cool and continue eating and drinking. Vita Charge Climate Control is

Don’t get caught napping!

Deadline is 5th of month prior to issue!

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designed for all species and contains Capsaicin to help maintain the animal’s body temperature in times of extreme heat and changes in the environment. In addition, it contains Amaferm, a precision based prebiotic research proven to maintain normal body temperature. Amaferm also impacts intake, digestion, and absorption of feedstuffs, ensuring animals get the maximum nutrients. “There’s nothing better than windshield time with your kid. That is part of making memories with your kid,” Dal Porto said. Summer shows might have been put on hold, but now that you can finally travel to some, make sure that your animals are traveling safely and comfortably. The hours in the barn and the hours on the road are all worth the memories made when you get to your summer show destination. And prep to win EVERY. DAY. with products from Sure Champ. For more information or to find a Sure Champ dealer near you, visit www.surechamp.com. BioZyme Expands HEAT Line as Temperatures Rise. As temperatures start to climb, and the summer days approach, BioZyme Inc., is excited to expand its line of vitamin and mineral supplements that contain HEAT. The HEAT line now includes a variety of supplements for beef cattle in all phases of production, as well as a sheep breeding mineral. All BioZyme products contain Amaferm, a precision prebiotic designed to increase intake, digestibility, and absorption of available feed. HEAT is a package of proprietary plant extracts that include a unique blend of clove, cinnamon, and chili pepper to help support animal performance in both heat and fescue situations. Amaferm and HEAT are both research proven to maintain body temperature any time it reaches above 70ºF or hotter. HEAT for Cattle - In addition to introducing a new breeding mineral for sheep, BioZyme launched a new breeding mineral for cattle, VitaFerm Concept•Aid 5/S HEAT. This free choice vitamin and mineral supplement for beef cattle is specifically designed for reproductive success when fed 60 days pre-calving through 60 days post breeding. This improved breeding mineral also contains HEAT to help maintain normal performance during temperatures of 70ºF and hotter, or anytime cattle are grazing fescue. VitaFerm Concept•Aid HEAT contains organic copper, zinc, and manganese to ensure maximum

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

bioavailability of nutrients to the animal, as well as high levels of vitamin E and selenium to promote optimized fertility. Help get your cows bred and keep them bred through the summer, resulting in more live calves. In addition to the Concept•Aid HEAT, the HEAT package also comes in a variety of other products to assist the beef producer in various stages of production and offer convenient solutions to challenges. • VitaFerm HEAT mineral is a free choice vitamin and mineral supplement for beef cattle on pasture to help prevent heat stress during temperatures in excess of 70ºF, or anytime cattle are grazing fescue. • VitaFerm HEAT Aureo 3G is a loose vitamin and mineral supplement for beef cattle on pasture to help prevent heat stress during extreme temperatures, or anytime cattle are grazing fescue and includes Aureo for control of Anaplasmosis. Due to the presence of Aureo, this medicated feed requires a VFD from your veterinarian. • VitaFerm HEAT IGR is another free choice vitamin and mineral supplement for beef cattle on pasture to help prevent heat stress, or anytime cattle are grazing fescue. This option includes IGR to prevent the breeding of horn flies in the manure of treated cattle. IGR is limited to availability in licensed states. • VitaFerm HEAT Tub is a 200 pound cooked tub to help prevent heat stress in cattle during excessive temperatures. • Gain Smart Stocker HEAT is a free choice vitamin and mineral supplement for stocker cattle designed to balance basic nutrient needs for maximized efficient gain on grass pasture. It is ideal

to keep stocker cattle in optimum health in excessive heat while keep them eating and drinking. • Vita Charge Stress Tub HEAT is a 50 pound cooked tub for beef cattle that supports digestive health and promotes feed and water intake during times of stress and recovery. It conveniently allows beef cattle to get their daily dose of Vita Charge without additional handling while including the HEAT package. In addition to helping maintain body temperature and combat heat stress, all HEAT products contain garlic to deter insects. The combination of Amaferm, HEAT, and garlic make the above supplements a great choice for any cattle producer. To learn more about the Amaferm advantage and how to help keep your livestock temperatures regulated this summer, visit www.biozymeinc.com. About BioZyme Inc. BioZyme Inc., founded in 1951, develops and manufactures natural, proprietary products focused on animal nutrition, health, and microbiology. With a continued commitment to research, BioZyme offers a complete line of feed additives and high density, highly available vitamin, mineral, trace mineral, and protein supplements for a variety of animals, including cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep, goats, horses and dogs. BioZyme brands include Amaferm®, AO-Biotics®, VitaFerm®, Vita Charge®, Sure Champ®, Vitalize®, and DuraFerm®. With headquarters in St. Joseph, Missouri, the company reaches a global market of customers that stretches into countries across five continents. For more information about BioZyme, visit www. biozymeinc.com.


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The Real Cost of Shipping Fever and What You Can Do About It. Shipping fever, or bovine respiratory disease (BRD), costs the cattle industry up to $900 million annually. 1 But what does that number really mean to producers? “It’s hard for me to appreciate $900 million worth of losses spread out across the whole industry,” said Mike Nichols, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim. “But it’s a cost that impacts every operation — it hits profitability, competitiveness, and sustainability.” According to Dan Stafford, DVM, feedyard, and stocker consultant in southcentral Texas, BRD is the No. 1 cause of disease for his producers. “It’s almost impossible to put a number to how each animal is impacted adversely,” he

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stated. “Initially, when producers think about costs associated with BRD, they think about up front, tangible losses like mortality or how much it costs to give antibiotics, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.” Drs. Nichols and Stafford agree that the most costly aspect of BRD is often the long term losses: 1. Chronic cases - A chronic case is an animal that survives BRD, but doesn’t respond well to treatment and becomes chronically ill. A chronic animal will never be able to catch up to healthy pen mates or reach peak performance. 2. Reduced feed efficiency and lower carcass value - Infected animals are going to take longer to reach target weights, and are going to have lower carcass values at market.

3. Employee morale and turnover - “When animals are healthy, they’re enjoyable for employees to care for, but when we have significant BRD issues, it’s really tough on employee morale,” said Dr. Stafford. “It can and does contribute to employee turnover, which of course is a big cost.” 4. Psychological health - “There’s an emotional aspect of BRD that we don’t often talk about,” added Dr. Nichols. “It’s demoralizing to constantly treat BRD. I’ve seen it become a major driver for producers to make a change, even more so than financial reasons.” Managing treatment costs - “The most common complaint I get from clients about BRD is that we continue to get more expensive, new-and-improved antibiotics, but it feels like we’re still getting the same results,” said Dr. Stafford. “I try to remind producers that to manage the cost of antibiotics and BRD, we need to make sure that we’ve got a well thought out treatment protocol

in place.” • Recognize the signs of disease early - “Identifying signs and diagnosing BRD early, almost when the animal is on the verge of getting sick, is when you’ll get the best response out of any antibiotic,” Dr. Stafford explained. • Find the specific cause of BRD Discovering the specific BRD causing pathogen can determine whether producers are implementing the correct vaccination and treatment protocols. Diagnostics could include conducting a necropsy, or performing a deep nasopharyngeal swab on live calves, with the guidance of a veterinarian. • Use a long lasting, fast acting antibiotic - “We want our antibiotic to have a quick response so we can get the animal back with its pen mates,” noted Dr. Stafford. “We also want long lasting antibiotics when possible, so we don’t have to bring animals back up and handle them several times.” • Follow the label - “Some producers

USDA’s Livestock Risk Protection Deserves a Second Look USDA’s insurance products have proven successful for crop farmers. Often providing a lifeline after natural disasters. Yet, for all its successes there has never been a widely used product to help cattle producers manage price risk. That could be changing due to recent improvements to Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) plan of insurance. What is LRP? LRP protects producers from unexpected price declines. It allows producers to insure their cattle based upon expected market prices and protects them if prices fall unexpectedly. LRP allows producers to insure between 70 and 100 percent of the projected price of their cattle. The projected price is based upon feeder cattle or live cattle futures prices and may

vary depending upon the type of cattle (e.g., steers or heifers) and the weight of the cattle. The insurance coverage can be matched to the time that the cattle would typically be sold. LRP provides coverage for cow/calf, stocker, and feedlot operations. LRP has been available since 2003, but participation remained low due to perceived cost and other issues such as lack of options to insure further ahead than a few months. Recent Improvements - On July 1 2019, USDA implemented significant improvements to LRP and has recently announced that additional improvements will be effective on July 1st of this year. Changes that have and will soon take place include: • Affordability - Reducing cost by

Source - RMA Summary of Business

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The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

Source - RMA Summary of Business

increasing the premium discount from 13-25 percent for the highest levels of coverage and even higher for coverages with over a five percent deductible; • Delayed Premium - Allowing premium to be paid after the insurance coverage ends; and • Head Limit - Increasing the number of head that can be insured. Together these changes make LRP significantly more appealing to producers. While premiums still need to be reduced, it’s important to note that today’s LRP isn’t the LRP of old. Additional Potential Changes - In August USDA’s Federal Crop Insurance Board of Directors will once again consider further improvements to LRP.

When determining whether to make changes to an insurance program, producer support is one of the key criteria that is considered. Cattle producers who are interested in improved risk management options should email Applied Analytics (information at bottom) to learn about efforts underway to continue to improve LRP. If approved, these changes will provide cattle producers an affordable tool so they can better protect themselves in today’s volatile markets. Bottom Line - LRP is a much improved program. Today it’s more affordable and has tremendous flexibility. While USDA needs to continue improving LRP – in today’s volatile market it is worth a second look.


will treat an animal, come back the next day, and want to treat again if the animal isn’t looking better,” said Dr. Nichols. “The producer’s intentions are good. They see the animal is still suffering and want to help. However, if the product label states it is effective for ten days, we need to refrain from retreating too quickly and give the animal sufficient time to respond to the antibiotic. Giving another dose in that situation increases cost without increasing effectiveness.” Following the label is also an important part of judicious antibiotic use. “We want to use these antibiotics thoughtfully, so we can use them for years to come,” emphasized Dr. Stafford. • Keep records - A basic set of records that track the animal, health problem, treatment day and product can help determine whether a treatment protocol is working. Review these records with

a veterinarian to evaluate whether a different antibiotic needs to be chosen, or if more attention needs to be paid to earlier diagnosis and more aggressive treatment. • Use your veterinarian - “There are still a lot of producers who don’t work with a veterinarian,” said Dr. Stafford. “Instead, they rely on advice from relatives or neighbors, and often wind up with misinformation. They’ll be using products that they don’t fully understand how to use correctly, and end up spending time and money on the wrong treatment.” Prevention offers the most value Drs. Nichols and Stafford stress that the best way to manage the cost of BRD is through prevention. Every herd is going to be different, so work with a nutritionist and veterinarian to implement the following elements: 1) Vaccination - “Unknown vaccination history is the biggest obstacle my feedyard

NCBA NCBA Applauds Introduction of Emergency Grazing Legislation. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association recently applauded the introduction of the bipartisan, bicameral PASTURE (Pandemic Authority Suitable To Utilize Reserve Easements) Act of 2020 by U.S. Representatives Roger Marshall (R-1st Dist., Kan.) and Angie Craig (D-2nd Dist., Minn.). Companion legislation was introduced in the Senate by Sens. John Thune (R-S.D.) and Tina Smith (D-Minn.). “Yesterday’s introduction of the bipartisan, bicameral PASTURE Act is a welcome step toward providing grazing flexibility to livestock producers during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs Ethan Lane. “As farmers and ranchers are keeping and feeding livestock for longer periods of time, Congress must ensure that producers do not face a forage shortage. Emergency haying and grazing of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acreage is a relied upon practice for livestock and forage management. The PASTURE Act gives USDA the ability to open CRP acreage for emergency haying

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and grazing during the COVID-19 pandemic. “On May 15, 2020, NCBA and 35 of its state affiliates sent a letter to Congress urging action on this issue. NCBA looks forward to continued work with both Republicans and Democrats to ensure that cattle producers receive much needed flexibility during this unprecedented time.” For more information, read NCBA’s letter to Congress on this issue, visit w w w. n c b a . o rg / C M D o c s / B e e f U S A / Publications/NCBA_CRP.pdf. Senate Receives Letter from 48 Livestock and Natural Resource Groups Opposing the Great American Outdoors Act. The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the American Sheep Industry Association (ASI), and the Public Lands Council (PLC), and many other affiliate organizations recently wrote Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, Energy and Natural Resources Chair Lisa Murkowski, and Energy and Natural Resources Committee Ranking Member Joe Manchin urging Congress to retain its role in safeguarding public lands by opposing the Great American Outdoors (GAO) Act (S.3422). The GAO Act as written creates

producers face when dealing with BRD,” said Dr. Stafford. “Ideally, my clients wouldn’t buy an animal unless it already had at least one round, if not two rounds, of vaccinations. My dream scenario would be for them to buy cattle that are vaccinated once at branding, and again at weaning before shipment. Then, when cattle arrive at the feedyard, they’d get a booster. If all my producers did that, it might put me out of work.” 2) Nutrition - Nutrition is a major management component in avoiding BRD wrecks. “When we optimize a nutrition program, we are also going to optimize immune function and help prevent disease,” explained Dr. Nichols. “Animals on a proper nutrition program are also going to respond better to vaccinations and to treatments if they do get sick.” A solid nutrition program includes providing plenty of fresh, clean water, as well as giving animals a balanced ration

at consistent times with adequate protein, energy and trace minerals. 3) Stress Management - “I think we’ve made very efficient systems for handling and moving cattle, but as we’ve done that, we’ve put extra stress on animals,” remarked Dr. Stafford. “Cattle are now expected to move hundreds of miles in the blink of an eye, meet new pen mates and face all the other stressors that go along with moving.” Stress can compromise an animal’s immune system and make them susceptible to disease. Producers can manage stress in these ways: • Shield cattle from harsh weather conditions, and give them plenty of bunk space. • Avoid overcrowding, as it causes stress and promotes the spread of disease. • Practice low stress handling to

more than $14 billion in new, mandatory spending and gives federal agencies free rein to spend $360 million per year solely to acquire new private land without any oversight from Congress. This raises concerns among the 48 livestock and natural resource groups who signed the joint letter, as the groups point out the blatant conflict by pairing the mounting disrepair of current land under federal control and allowing rampant acquisition without accounting for management of future land acquisitions. “As introduced, the GAO Act, and every other bill that preceded it that contained similar provisions, is an irresponsible way to fix a very real problem. Currently, land management agencies like the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management face staggering backlogs of much needed maintenance...If passed, the GAO Act sentences hundreds of millions of acres of American land and water to a poorly-managed future,” the groups wrote. The Senate had its first procedural vote on S.3422 on June 8. The groups were eager to engage in the process and encouraged Congress to vote ‘no’ and find a more responsible way to confront conservation challenges. To read the full letter and review a complete list of signatories, visit www. publiclandscouncil.org/wp-content/ uploads/2020/06/Livestock-affiliateletter-Oppose-LWCF.pdf. Ranchers Criticize Senate for Irresponsible Passage of Land Grab Legislation. The National Cattlemen’s

Beef Association Executive Director of Natural Resources and the Public Lands Council Executive Director, Kaitlynn Glover, recently released the following statement in response to the Senate passage of the Great American Outdoors Act: “Today’s passage of the Great American Outdoors Act is a disappointment to those who value conservation and active management of our natural resources. By making funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) mandatory, proponents of this bill sentenced existing and future lands and waters to the same fate facing current federal assets – billions of dollars in deferred maintenances. Today is indeed a landmark day – with this legislation, Congress has abdicated their responsibility and privilege to engage in these important conservation decisions. I hope they are more prudent in representing their constituents when setting conservation priorities in future legislation.” About the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. NCBA has represented America’s cattle producers since 1898, preserving the heritage and strength of the industry through education and public policy. As the largest association of cattle producers, NCBA works to create new markets and increase demand for beef. Efforts are made possible through membership contributions. To join, contact NCBA at 866-BEEFUSA or membership@beef.org.

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BI News continued from the previous page ensure the moving process goes smoothly for both producers and the cattle. Low stress handling techniques include presenting a calm disposition, avoiding loud noises, reducing the use of cattle prods, and removing visual distractions. • Administering a metaphylaxis treatment, or a group antibiotic treatment, for at-risk animals in a timely manner can help reduce morbidity and mortality on beef operations. “Your antibiotic should protect against all four of the BRD causing pathogens, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis,” Dr. Nichols pointed out. A BRD success story - “I have a feedyard client who has been struggling with increasing mortality, morbidity and medicine costs associated with BRD for the last ten years,” said Dr. Stafford. “It was getting to where they couldn’t bear it anymore, so they tried two approaches. First, they sought out and bought more cattle from a determined origin. The animals were not commingled and were not run through a sale barn. These animals came in less stressed and had a vaccination history. “Second, they reduced the number of cattle that they were willing to take in at any one time, especially during the big fall runs. The manager always said, ‘I can control BRD. All I have to do is close the front gate.’ So, they went from processing 800 new animals a week to 250. They were no longer overloading their system, and they saw incredible results. The cowboy crew could finally catch their breath, and they were able to do a better job. That operation wound up making more money — they saved eight- to tenfold on medicine, and had a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity.” Bringing back the art of animal husbandry - “Animal husbandry is an art, and, in some cases, it’s the missing piece for the very best care we can give animals,” said Dr. Nichols. “Not the difference between bad care and good care, but the very best care.” “We need to put ourselves in the situation of the animal,” agreed Dr. Stafford. “What do you want? You want clean water, something good to eat, protection from the elements, and to be comfortable. Good animal husbandry is about focusing on those basics, while leveraging the antibiotics we have available. That’s what’s really going to save us on BRD costs in the long run.” Reference 1 Chirase NK, Greene LW. Dietary zinc and manganese sources administered from the fetal stage onward affect immune system of transit stressed and virus

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infected offspring steer calves. Anim Feed Sci Tech 2001;93:217-228. Switching Dewormers is a Big Decision, Make it an Informed One. New LongRange ® calculator provides return on investment data. Cattle producers now have a tool to calculate the value of using an industry leading parasiticide, LongRange (eprinomectin). Boehringer Ingelheim launched the LONGRANGE Payoff Projector, a calculator that provides beef cattle producers and their veterinarians with a detailed estimate of what you can expect to gain by using the long lasting injectable dewormer. “ We k n o w t h a t p r o d u c e r s are concerned about the price of LONGRANGE, as compared to the lower cost dewormers,” said Doug Ensley, DVM, technical marketing manager, Boehringer Ingelheim. “The Payoff Projector is a simple, mobile friendly tool designed to help producers calculate the potential value of using LONGRANGE on their herd, before they purchase the product.” Unlike conventional dewormers that offer 14-42 days of parasite protection, LONGRANGE delivers up to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose. Over the course of a grazing period, this means more efficient utilization of feed resources, and ultimately more weight gained each day.1 By providing the calculator some basic information about your operation, such as the cost of your current dewormer and the average weight of your cattle, the Payoff Projector estimates the cost of upgrading to LONGRANGE, along with your herd’s expected return on investment — conveniently calculated in both dollars and pounds. To learn more and to calculate your profit potential, visit www. TheLongRangeLook.com/calculator to view or download the Payoff Projector. Once downloaded, the tool can be used offline, anywhere. It can be easily bookmarked and accessed on any mobile device for on-thego convenience.”Of all the animal health practices used to improve production, controlling parasites provides producers the greatest economic return,”2 stated Dr. Ensley. “It’s important to consult a local veterinarian to develop a cost effective parasite control program for your herd.” PLEASE NOTE: The purpose of this tool is to help you calculate opportunities based on inputs into the variable fields. Calculations do not imply a guaranteed weight gain. References 1 Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label.

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

Lawrence J.D. and Ibarburu M.A. Economic analysis of pharmaceutical technologies in modern beef production in a bioeconomy era. Iowa State University. 2009. Available at www2. econ.iastate.edu/faculty/lawrence/ Pharma_202007_20update.pdf. Accessed January 13, 2020. Which STD Test Is Right for Your Herd? Test bulls prior to breeding to avoid a trich wreck down the road. The long term effects of spreading trichomoniasis, commonly referred to as trich, in your cattle herd can be much more devastating than simply having a number of cows open at the end of the breeding season. “A small percentage of pregnancies will be affected the first year, but it’s typically the second or third year of a trich infection that really causes the economic losses,” said Joe Gillespie, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim. “With multiple infected bulls breeding cows, you can see more than 50 percent of your cows open, which results in a huge reduction in production and profitability for a cow/calf producer.” Cattle infected with trich continue to appear and act normally, so testing is the only way to confirm the presence or absence of this sexually transmitted disease in your herd. To diagnose the disease, a preputial fluid sample is taken from the sheath of the bull’s penis. Prior to breeding, Dr. Gillespie recommends testing bulls with one or both of the following methods: 1) A pouch culture is considered the “gold standard” of trichomoniasis testing methods, allowing the protozoa collected from preputial or vaginal samples to grow in a special medium. “If you find a positive result with this test, you can have a great deal of confidence that you have a trich infected animal,” stressed Dr. Gillespie. “Advantages of this test include ease of use and quick results, but occasionally, the culturing method will result in a falsenegative. This happens when the particular sample collected does not contain Tritrichomonas foetus organisms, but they are, in fact, still present in the animal.” 2) The other testing option uses a polymerase chain reaction, commonly known as the PCR method. This test recognizes RNA or DNA fragments from trich causing protozoa to confirm if your cattle have been exposed to the disease. “PCR testing doesn’t tell you if you have an active trich infection, but it can tell you if you have a history of trich infection in your herd,” explained Dr. Gillespie. 2

Ideally, trich testing will accompany an annual breeding-soundness examination and be conducted by a certified veterinarian. Successful trich management requires a multi-pronged approach In addition to testing bulls prior to turnout each year, successful management typically requires a combination of protocols, which often include: Testing bulls for trich three weeks after the breeding season and culling any newly infected bulls; Maintaining a closed herd or thoroughly evaluating cattle entering the herd for risk of trich; Administering a vaccine that helps protect against the spread of trich; Using artificial insemination; and Practicing strict biosecurity measures. “The economic impact of trichomoniasis is devastating, but you can prevent or overcome an outbreak by adhering to strategic management and prevention practices,” said Dr. Gillespie. “I’ve seen a producer with a 50 percent herd pregnancy rate get back to 90 percent by implementing a management plan that included a vaccination program, and strictly using new, clean bulls or artificial insemination.” It’s important to note that the risk of developing a trich infection varies among herds, so effective prevention and management protocols do not look the same for every operation. Furthermore, trich testing regulations vary by state. Dr. Gillespie strongly encourages producers to work with their local veterinarian to design a comprehensive trich testing and management plan unique to their herd. About Boehringer Ingelheim. Improving the health and quality of life of patients is the goal of the research driven pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim. The focus in doing so is on diseases for which no satisfactory treatment option exists to date. The company, therefore, concentrates on developing innovative therapies that can extend patients’ lives. In animal health, Boehringer Ingelheim stands for advanced prevention. Boehringer Ingelheim is the second largest animal health business in the world. We are committed to creating animal well being through our large portfolio of advanced, preventive healthcare products and services. With net sales of $4.4 billion and around 10,000 employees worldwide, we are present in more than 150 markets. For more information, visit www.boehringeringelheim.com/animal-health/overview.


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LASSIFIED PUREBRED C ATTLE BREEDERS BACK CREEK ANGUS

Joe and Robin Hampton

A NIMAL HEALTH

www.huntsbrangus.com Calhoun, GA 770-548-7950

345 Withrows Creek Lane Mt. Ulla, NC 28125

704-880-2488

Angus

Black Crest Farm

W.R. “Billy” McLeod

1320 Old Manning Rd., Sumter, SC 29150

803-481-2011

williammcleod@ftc-i.net • www.blackcrestfarm.com

Walter D. Shealy III and Family

20977 US Hwy 76 • Newberry, SC 29108 Walter Shealy • 803-924-1000 Dixon Shealy • 803-629-1174 walter@blackgrove.com • dixon@blackgrove.com www.blackgrove.com

C. A. H. Jim Traynham Wingate, N.C. 704-233-5366 Cell - 704-292-4217

Brent Glenn, DVM Lancaster, S.C.

Carolinas Animal Health, LLC

“Cattle with Something Extra”

519 Morgan Mill Rd., Monroe, NC 28112 704-289-5083 • 704-289-1696 • 800-222-8638

ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION

INSURANCE AUTO • HOME • LIFE BUSINESS • FARM & RANCH

QUALITY GELBVIEH, ANGUS, & BALANCER CATTLE

DUANE & WENDY STRIDER, OWNERS

THE HERD THAT CONSISTENTLY PRODUCES CATTLE WITH PERFORMANCE, CARCASS, AND EYE APPEAL.

803-789-7000

SEXED SEMEN

Duane Cell: 336-964-6277 • Wendy Cell: 336-964-5127 Home: 336-381-3640 • Fax: 910-428-4568 ccrosscattle@yahoo.com • ccrosscattle.com

The Josey Agency, Inc. Douglas Josey

Authorized Representative

Multi-Line Agent

336-382-9635 • bkherefords@gmail.com

BLACK GROVE Breeding Registered Angus since 1962

FORAGE PRODUCTS

* Located in Greensboro, N.C. -- Serving North and South Carolina*

REGISTERED POLLED HEREFORDS • EST. 1998 “Quality Cattle For Quality People”

Cattle Available Private Treaty John Wheeler • 910-489-0024 doublejfarm@yahoo.com • www.doublejfarmllc.com

Ernest B. Harris President

Phone: 252-257-2140 Mobile: 252-430-9595 ®

SMITH FARM

TRAILER SALES

trailers • truck bodies • tool boxes

Phil Goodson: 919-880-9062 Rick Kern: 919-272-6124

• Performance Tested • Ultrasound and 50K Evaluated • Registered Angus Bulls

Darryl Howard Cell: 910-990-2791

KEEP POSTED FOR UPDATES ON THE 2020 Tarheel Angus/4K Farm Production Sale RICHARD KIRKMAN, DVM 20416 US 64 West Siler City, NC 27344-0350

919-742-5500 • rdkirkman@centurylink.net

SENEPOL CATTLE FOR SALE Black & Red Available

THE YON FAMILY 318 Aiken Road • Ridge Spring, SC 29129 www.yonfamilyfarm.com

Angus • SimAngus • Ultrablacks

FOR SALE

BBU Registered Beefmaster Bulls and Females

WHITEHALL BEEFMASTERS Joe and Ann Logan 214 Cowhead Creek Road Greenwood, SC 29646

Telephone: 864-538-3004

Authorized Dealer

smithfarmtrailers@yahoo.com

Autryville, NC 28318 www.howardbrosfarms.com

Great for grass programs! Heat Tolerant • Calving Ease Gentle Natured • Tender Carcass

H.J. WHITE FARMS

PO Box 215 • Bladenboro, NC 28320 910-648-6171 (day) • 910-863-3170 (night)

YOUR AD HERE!

I NDEX

OF

James S. Wills

Telephone: 800-557-3390 Cell: 864-554-4658 Fax: 803-532-0615 willsj1@nationwide.com

LET THIS SPOT MAKE YOU $$$$$!

LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT

Carl R. Smith 2205 Finch Farm Rd. Trinity, NC 27370 336.475.1279

On Your Side®

555 West Church Street Batesburg, SC 29006

Inc. / Auctioneers

®

Agribusiness Primary Agent/Owner Master Farm Certified

3200 NC Hwy. 58 • Warrenton, NC 27589 NCAL #1468 • NC#C#4264 • VAL #146 • SCAL #3895 Email: ebharris@ebharris.com www.ebharris.com

104 Springfield Lane Louisburg, NC 27549

2610 Kee Moore Drive Chester, SC 29706

Nationwide

AUCTIONEERING

Headquarters - 775 Clacton Circle • Earlysville, VA 22936 Cattle located in Traphill, N.C.

SPRINGFIELD ANGUS

Cell: 803-385-8161 Email: djosey@truvista.net

A DVERTISERS

4K Farms/Tarheel Angus ........................................................ 55 45th Annual Union County Performance Tested Bull Sale ..... 15 AGCO — Massey Ferguson ........................................................ 2 American National Insurance — The Josey Agency .............. 55 Apple Brandy Prime Cuts ....................................................... 46 Back Creek Angus ................................................................... 55 BioZyme Incorporated — VitaFerm Concept•Aid .................. 48 Black Crest Farm ..................................................................... 55 Black Grove Angus .................................................................. 55 Bring Your Beef Junior Showdown ........................................ 34 Brubaker Family Angus .......................................................... 55 C-Cross Cattle Company ......................................................... 55 Carolinas Animal Health ........................................................ 55 Conquest Insurance Agency, Inc. ........................................... 41 Double J Farms ....................................................................... 55 E.B. Harris Auctioneers, Inc. .................................................. 55 EBS Farms 12th Annual Select Bull & Female Sale .................. 21 Edisto Pines Female Production Sale ..................................... 19 First Choice Insurance — Donna Byrum ................................ 11 Fowken Farm — CATTLE FOR SALE ........................................ 23 FPL Food, LLC .......................................................................... 12 Fred Smith Company Ranch ................................................... 55 H.J. White Farms ..................................................................... 55 Harward Sisters Cattle Company ........................................... 37 Howard Brothers Farms ......................................................... 55 Hunt’s H+ Brangus ................................................................. 55 Hutton & Sons Herefords ....................................................... 55 N.C. Angus Association Directory .......................................... 16 N.C. Cattlemen’s Association Membership Application ....... 43 N.C. Hereford Association ...................................................... 22

N.C. Simmental Association ................................................. 33 National Beef Checkoff/ North Carolina Cattle Industry Assessment ..................... 9 Nationwide® AgriBusiness Insurance — The Wills Company ...................................................... 55 Pearson Livestock Equipment ................................................ 3 Ragan & Massey — UF-Riata ................................................. 27 Red Angus Association of the Carolinas Directory .............. 35 Rogers Realty — FORECLOSURE AUCTION .......................... 13 Rusty Thomson & Family Cattle Fencing and Equipment ...... 7 Smith Farm Trailer Sales ....................................................... 55 South Carolina Private Treaty Sale Checkoff Investment Form .............................................. 40 Southeast AgriSeeds ............................................................. 55 Southeast Livestock Exchange — Upcoming Sale Schedule ............................................. 28 Southeastern Cow/Calf Conference — SAVE THE DATE ...... 38 Springfield Angus .................................................................. 55 ST Genetics — Bill Kirkman .................................................. 55 The Carolina Cattle Connection 2020 Spotlight Schedule ..... 5 The Carolina Cattle Connection Advertising Rates and Sizes ............................................ 51 Vetericyn Animal Wellness .................................................... 29 Virginia Herd Health Management Services — Pat Comyn, DVM .......................................................... 25 West End Precast — Feed Bunks ........................................... 18 West End Precast — Feed Bunks & Troughs ......................... 36 Whitehall Beefmasters .......................................................... 55 Wilkes Livestock Exchange ................................................... 24 Yon Family Farms Spring ...................................................... 55

The Carolina Cattle Connection

q JULY 2020

PAGE 55


VENTS ANGUS Aug. 1 — Edisto Pines Annual Production Sale, Leesville, S.C. Aug. 21 — Springfield Angus Annual Production Sale, Louisburg, N.C. Oct. 17 — Fred Smith Company Ranch Extra Effort Sale, Clayton, N.C. Nov. 21 — SimAngus Solution Sale, Burlington, N.C. Dec. 4 — Knoll Crest Farm Total Performance Bull Sale, Red House, Va. Dec. 5 — 45th Annual Union County Performance Tested Bull Sale, Monroe, N.C. 2021 Jan. 2 — 12th Annual EBS Farms Select Sale, Norwood, N.C. Jan. 30 — Harward Sisters Cattle Company Annual Bull & Female Sale, Norwood, N.C. CHAROLAIS Dec. 4 — Knoll Crest Farm Total Performance Bull Sale, Red House, Va. 2021 Jan. 30 — Harward Sisters Cattle Company Annual Bull & Female Sale, Norwood, N.C. GELBVIEH Dec. 4 — Knoll Crest Farm Total Performance Bull Sale, Red House, Va. Dec. 5 — 45th Annual Union County Performance Tested Bull Sale, Monroe, N.C. HEREFORD Dec. 4 — Knoll Crest Farm Total Performance Bull Sale, Red House, Va. SIMMENTAL Sep. 4 — N.C. Simmental Association Annual Meeting, Union Grove, N.C. Sep. 5 — N.C. Simmental Association Fall Harvest Sale, Union Grove, N.C.

Oct. 17 — Fred Smith Company Ranch Extra Effort Sale, Clayton, N.C. Nov. 21 — SimAngus Solution Sale, Burlington, N.C. Dec. 5 — 45th Annual Union County Performance Tested Bull Sale, Monroe, N.C. 2021 Jan. 2 — 12th Annual EBS Farms Select Sale, Norwood, N.C. Jan. 30 — Harward Sisters Cattle Company Annual Bull & Female Sale, Norwood, N.C. Red angus 2021 Jan. 30 — Harward Sisters Cattle Company Annual Bull & Female Sale, Norwood, N.C. OTHER EVENTS Jul. 7 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction Jul. 8 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Jul. 9 — Weaned Feeder Calf Sale, Norwood, N.C. Jul. 18 — Foreclosure Sale, Mount Airy, N.C. Aug. 4 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction Aug. 5 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Aug. 6 — Feeder Calf Sale, Norwood, N.C. Aug. 8-9 — N.C. Junior Beef Round-Up, Fletcher, N.C. Sep. 1 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction Sep. 2 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Sep. 3 — Weaned Feeder Calf Sale, Norwood, N.C. Sep. 10 — Feeder Calf Sale, Norwood, N.C.

Oct. 6 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction Oct. 7 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Nov. 3 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction Nov. 4 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Dec. 1 — Southeast Livestock Exchange Video Auction

IGHTER A guy spots a sign outside a house that reads, “Talking Dog for Sale.” Intrigued, he walks in. “So, what have you done with your life?” he asks the dog. “I’ve led a very full life,” says the dog. “I lived in the Alps rescuing avalanche victims. Then I served my country in Iraq. And now, I spend my days reading at a retirement home.” The guy is flabbergasted, he turns to the owner and asks, “Why on earth would you want to get rid of a dog like that?” The owner says, “Because he’s a liar! He never did any of that.”

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As the stranger enters a country store, he spots a sign: “Danger! Beware of Dog!” Inside, he sees a harmless old hound asleep in the middle of the floor. “Is that the dog we’re supposed to beware of?” he asks the owner. “That’s him,” comes the reply. “He doesn’t look dangerous to me. Why would you post that sign?” “Before I posted that sign, people kept tripping over him.”

A woman and her husband stop at a dentist’s office. “I need a tooth pulled right away,” she says. “Don’t bother with the Novocain; we’re in a hurry.” “Which tooth do you want pulled?” asks the dentist. The woman shoves her husband toward the dentist. “Go ahead, dear. Show him your tooth.”

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A husband and wife had been married for 60 years and had nocsecrets except for one...the woman kept in her closet a shoe box that she forbade her husband from ever opening. But when she was on her

PAGE 56

The Carolina Cattle Connection q JULY 2020

Dec. 2 — Mid-Atlantic Cattle Sales Video Auction Dec. 5 — 45th Annual Union County Performance Tested Bull Sale, Monroe, N.C. 2021 Jan. 2 — 12th Annual EBS Farms Select Sale, Norwood, N.C.

IDE

deathbed — and with her blessing — he opened the box and found a crocheted doll and $95,000 in cash. “My mother told me that the secret to a happy marriage was to never argue,” she explained. “Instead, I should keep quiet and crochet a doll.” Her husband was touched. Only one doll was in the box — that meant she’d been angry with him only once in 60 years. “But what about all this money?” he asked. “Oh,” she said, “that’s the money I made from selling the dolls.”

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A man goes to the doctor, concerned about his wife’s hearing. The doctor says, “Stand behind her and say something. Tell me how close you are when she hears you.” The man goes home, sees his wife in the kitchen, cutting carrots on the countertop. About 15 feet away he says, “Honey, what’s for dinner?” Nothing. He gets halfway to her and repeats the same question. Nothing. Very concerned, he gets right behind her and asks again “What’s for dinner?” She turns around and says “For the THIRD time, beef stew!”

When a zoo’s gorilla dies, the zookeeper hires an actor to don a costume and act like an ape until the zoo can get another one. In the cage, the actor makes faces, swings around, and draws a huge crowd. He then crawls across a partition and atop the lion’s cage, infuriating the animal. But the actor stays in character—until he loses his grip and falls into the lion’s cage. Terrified, the actor shouts, “Help! Help me!” Too late. The lion pounces, opens its massive jaws, and whispers, “Shut up! Do you want to get us both fired?!”


Profile for CarolinaCattleConnection

The Carolina Cattle Connection - Volume 34, Issue No. 7 (JULY 2020)  

The July 2020 issue of The Carolina Cattle Connection spotlights Gelbvieh cattle. It also includes information and activities relating to th...

The Carolina Cattle Connection - Volume 34, Issue No. 7 (JULY 2020)  

The July 2020 issue of The Carolina Cattle Connection spotlights Gelbvieh cattle. It also includes information and activities relating to th...

Profile for kclove78

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