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Connect kids with food for healthy habits January 2017 LIBERTY TRIBUNE THE KEARNEY COURIER GLADSTONE DISPATCH THE SMITHVILLE HERALD

Youth With Vision targets substance abuse

Book Buzz: Challenges Await


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LIB E R T Y T R IBUN E , T HE KE A R N E Y COU RI ER, G L A D S TO NE D I S PATC H, THE S MI THV I L L E HERA L D

Youth With Vision founder, students continue advocacy By Kellie Houx The last week in January is National Drugs and Alcohol Facts Week. In the Northland, one group that has been around for more than 20 years sharing substance abuse facts and figures at the peer level is Youth With Vision. The group also will take its message to Jefferson City on Jan. 25. Started in 1994 by Prevention Services Manager Vicky Ward with Tri-County Mental Health Services,Youth With Vision came about when Ward became somewhat disillusioned that the coalitions to spread prevention to young people were mostly made up of adults. “So we had these coalitions across three counties that had parents, law enforcement and others who had young people’s best interests at heart, but any message seemed like a lecture from an adult,” she said.“When TriCounty received a contract to provide assistance, it occurred to me pretty quickly that we should have some

students there. We were doing programs that target youth, but we weren’t involving them.” So Ward stepped out and founded Youth With Vision to create a youth leadership group that not only reached into the members’ own schools, but also became a voice for legislative change and advocacy. “They are sharing what they are doing in their school groups, plus helping influence these adult coalitions,” Ward said.“We are seeing this in Smithville and with the Liberty Alliance for Youth. It’s such a win-win situation.” On Jan. 25, the Youth With Vision leaders will head to Jefferson City. The student board will be meeting with senators and state representatives to share priorities and issues. “We like our youth advocates to talk about local and state ordinances such as keg registration,” Ward said.“In Youth With Vision, the student leaders’ roles are to ensure their peers reach their full potential.” Currently the student board raises

funds through Mud Mania and Bunco Mania to support some of the costs of programs, making public service announcements, the costs of the Jefferson City trips and materials for legislators and presentations at adult conferences. Co-Chair of Youth with Vision and Park Hill South senior Madelyn Judah joined Youth With Vision in her eighthgrade year. She was recommended by a teacher who had a daughter in the group. “I have developed a passion for what we stand for,” she said.“I want to see regulations on e-cigarettes and medical marijuana. When we go to Jefferson City, we will share what we stand for and

seek to get legislative support.” Judah said if students stand up, others often join in. “I am really proud of Youth With Vision and how we have brought the Tobacco 21 project to cities in the Northland,” she said.“I have learned how to stand up for what I believe in, and when I talk to the legislators, I have gained confidence. We are stronger with students who want to make our community better and improve the lives of our peers. Smithville junior Jordyn Beard had a middle school counselor who encouraged her to join Youth With Vision. “She told me that I speak up for what is right,” Beard said. “That has

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carried over well with my position as the advocacy committee chair. I also agree that we have done great things such as helping with the Tobacco 21 issue. Last year, we won the youth advocacy award. We have promoted that nicotine is nicotine whether it is e-cigarettes or regular cigarettes.” Beard said the group attended a conference where they looked at changing the stigma of mental illness. “I really enjoy getting together with my peers to help educate others and protect my peers with substance abuse,” she said.“We are also looking at revamping our Safe Celebration Campaign to help educate our peers on the effects of underage drinking around prom and graduation. I also serve as the vice president on the Statewide Tobacco Free Missouri Youth coalition.” Liberty North High School sophomore Morgan Neal serves as the group’s membership chair. “We focus on recruiting students,” she said.“We work at building the team and

Ja nua ry 2017

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Jordan Elder, Madeline Mills, Madison Schmerbach, Conor Henry and Jordyn Beard received an award given to youth advocates by ACT Missouri, the governing body over all regional support centers in the state.

getting to know each other. We come from schools all over the Northland. I would say that some of my best friends are from Youth With Vision.” Neal said the organization is constantly trying to improve the

message and share it with as many people as possible. “We try to educate those around us, but there are always people who tell us we are wrong,” she said.“In the end, we do work hard with education. We study

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up on what we are saying. We are here in Missouri and getting our name out there is a good thing.” As with the others, she is pleased to see Tobacco 21 passed in Kansas City and Liberty.


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BOOK BUZZ: Challenges Await We welcome 2017 knowing “Challenges Await” to improve ourselves and the world we share with others. This theme resonates in Newsbee’s January Picks. Take a cue from three marvelous books that drive home the importance of having a good attitude, of being honest and tolerant too. These are tall orders, but around the hive and bee-yond Newsbee knows you’re up to it.

Penguin Problems

It’s easy to continually look on the dark side like the wailing waddler in “Penguin Problems,” by Jory John. Optimism certainly isn’t in this penguin’s forte, in fact it isn’t anywhere on his ice floe. From the minute he wakes, the penguin is miserable, continually lamenting his sorry lot in life. “It’s way too early. My beak is cold. What’s with all the squawking, you guys?” Talk about seeing the glass as half empty — this fella’s tumbler is bone dry. When a wise walrus hears the penguin complaining, he steps in to offer his philosophy, challenging the penguin to see the beauty surrounding him, to be happy in the realization “that (he) is exactly where (he) needs to be.” The penguin seems to soak up the good vibes and change his tune, but he does another aboutface in a book that, while funny, still gets a serious message across. Uncluttered pages provide plenty of white space for Lane Smith’s zany art, which is sure to warm readers’ hearts.

A Bike Like Sergio’s

Being honest makes us feel good, but envy can be a button-pusher, taking us down a crooked path. That’s the case for a boy niggled by envy in “A Bike Like Sergio’s,” by Maribeth Boelts. Every kid has a bike but Ruben, and the best bike on the block belongs to Sergio, a shiny speedster that Ruben runs alongside on the boys’ outings. Sergio urges his buddy to get a bike, but Ruben’s family struggles to make ends meet. At Sonny’s Grocery, an opportunity wafts its way into Ruben’s hands when a lady’s purse tips over at the checkout counter. Thinking it’s just $1, Ruben doesn’t bother to return the cash — imagine his shock later when he sees it’s a $100 bill, both a blessing and a curse. The windfall is enough to buy a bike like Sergio’s, but a series of circumstances spawn empathy, as Ruben’s conscience goes on high alert. With telling illustrations by Noah Z. Jones, that depict the characters’

strong emotions, “A Bike Like Sergio’s” is a cautionary tale that drives home the old adage, “Honesty is the best policy.”

Wolf Hollow

The end result of intolerance is a world divided. “Wolf Hollow” by Lauren Wolk is set in 1943 in a town in Pennsylvania where distrust of Toby, a German “vagabond,” runs rampant. The moral compass in this stellar story is 11-year old Annabelle, a farm girl with a heart of gold who’s terrorized by Betty. Annabelle has a happy home and doesn’t know fear of anything but Copperheads and the Nazis who are waging war in Europe — until Betty moves to a farm near Wolf Hollow. Betty is mean-spirited, poking Annabelle with her pencil at school and threatening to beat her up. There’s no recourse for Annabelle because Betty says she’ll lay into her brothers if Annabelle tells anyone about her mistreatment.The only soul in Wolf Hollow, who’s wise to the Betty, is Toby. He’s been through his own hell — fought in World War I and returned to the States injured in mind and body.Toby is “strange,” but he has a deep affection for Annabelle, whose anguish deepens as Betty’s bullying escalates. “Wolf Hollow” is a beautiful book that has a lot to say about judging others. It’s an addictive read from first page to last. — Reprinted with permission, Missourian Publishing Company. Copyright 2017.

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Connect kids with food for

HEALTHY HABITS

Grocery shop together or go to a farmers market. Some cities now have year-round indoor markets, where together you can select fruits and veggies to try. Often the farmers are there, so you can learn about produce and get ideas for how to prepare unfamiliar items at home. In the Northland, the Gladstone Farmers Market operates inside to the apartment complex lobby of The Heights Linden Square, 601 NE 70th St. in downtown Gladstone, from 2 to 6 p.m. on the first and the third Wednesdays of each month November through April. Cook with your kids. Find fun recipes that let them explore fresh foods where they can be creative. Find ageappropriate ways to involve them, like stirring or measuring, and encourage them to get hands-on with recipes, such as this fun Flower Salad recipe from registered dietitian Ellie Krieger. Explore the story of where some of their favorite foods come from. Kids learn and remember information when it comes in the form of a story. Cuties is giving families the chance to uncover

those stories by encouraging them to submit questions using #AskAGrower on Facebook. Actual growers will answer with stories about how this sweet, seedless and easy-to-peel fruit is grown with care by their family of growers. A video series at cutiescitrus.com/ourstory also helps bring the stories to life. “Making learning about food fun is good for the whole family,” Krieger said. “It encourages kids — and parents — to explore new foods and be more connected to where their food comes from. It’s truly a ‘healthy’ conversation to have together.”

Flower Salad

Recipe courtesy of Ellie Krieger Servings: 1 Flower 1 Cuties clementine 9-10 thinly sliced strips red bell pepper, cut in 1-inch pieces 1/2 grape tomato 1 celery stick, cut to 3 inches 2 small leaves romaine lettuce honey and lemon juice. 1 piece English cucumber, unpeeled, Serve dip in dish alongside flower, seeded and cut to 1 1/2 inches or in a mound underneath cucumber then thinly sliced slices. — Family Features Dip 2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt 1/2 teaspoon honey 1/4 teaspoon fresh lemon juice Peel clementine and separate sections almost all the way, leaving attached at the base. Place on plate with base down. Place piece of red bell pepper between each citrus section, and half tomato in center to form flower. Place celery and lettuce leaves underneath as stem and leaves. Arrange cucumber slices below to represent grass. In small bowl, stir together yogurt,

Nutritional information per serving: 76 calories; 0.5 g total fat; (0.3 g saturated fat, 0.2 g poly fat); 4 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 2 mg cholesterol; 21 mg sodium.

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Winter is a good time to get moving to prepare for your spring 5Ks, including the first-ever Liberty Hospital Half Marathon and Norterre 5K on March 4. While it’s cold outside, make use of the gym membership or the treadmill you just bought to get ready to run or walk this spring. Daiven Ruddock, assistant strength and conditioning coach at Liberty Hospital Sports Medicine, says that following a consistent training program and eating healthy can have you off the couch and on the road to a 5K in a matter of weeks. “I recommend a simple jog-and-walk method,” said Ruddock who designed a “couch to 5K” program for Liberty Hospital Sports Medicine.“Everything is broken down into 30-minute windows.” A beginning runner or walker can begin with simply walking 30 minutes. Indoor tracks, gyms and treadmills work well during the winter months. “Each week, jogging times and walking times will be introduced slowly at an easy pace to build up your aerobic work capacity with interval training,” Ruddock said. Rest days are included in the training program. “Rest days are needed for recovery, but I recommend using rest days as active recovery days,” said the conditioning coach.“Active recovery means get up and move and do an activity besides walking or running; do not just sit inside on the couch.” Examples of other activities during winter include indoor swimming,

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WORK UP TO THAT 5K

Start training now for spring runs

aerobics, racquetball, basketball or weight training. “You may want to get involved with a strength and conditioning program or

an adult fitness program to build and strengthen the muscles of your body,” Ruddock said, noting classes are available at Liberty Hospital Sports

Medicine.“Even 30 to 45 minutes of strength training will go a long way for your health and livelihood.” Also focusing on health and wellness in the new year, the Liberty Parks & Recreation Department is hosting Commit to Get Fit. This program at the Liberty Community Center from January to March focuses on strength training and aerobic exercise. No matter which class or program a future runner chooses, Ruddock said, food is a big part of the changes that must be made. “You cannot out-train a bad diet,” he said.“What you eat is 80 to 90 percent of what results you’ll see. What you put into your body will control the results you want, and also will control how fast you recover day to day. You will only see improvements if you put in the work and follow the program.” To help stay motivated during training, Ruddock says to have fun. “Whether that’s making sure you have your favorite play list going in your ears or you’re with a group of friends training together, have fun! This program is a stepping stone to lead to better things.” To download a copy of Ruddock’s “couch to 5K” program or learn more about fitness classes, go to www. LibertyHospital.org/SportsMed or call 407-2315. To learn more about Commit to Get Fit, call 439-4360. Register for the Liberty Hospital Half Marathon and Norterre 5K at www. LibertyHospitalHalf.org. — Liberty Hospital


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Annual health exams good for prevention By Amanda Lubinski Annual health exams are important for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, experts suggest. One-third of Americans have chronic diseases they are unaware of until getting diagnosed during an annual exam, Tam Sempek, a nurse practitioner at The Kearney Clinic, an affiliate of Liberty Hospital, said. “Those annual exams are important because it screens for those chronic illnesses,” she said. Annual exams, Sempek said, are covered by many health insurance plans, with many not requiring patient out-of-pocket expenses or co-pays. Things checked during an annual exam include weight, height, blood pressure, pulse rate, cholesterol, blood count and sugar levels, meaning they can alert physicians to the presence of heart concerns, diabetes and anemia. “(The annual exam) helps find problems early such as cancer or auto immune diseases. By finding them early, it increases your chances for treatment and longterm survival and better quality of life,” she said. A complete blood count, when ordered by a doctor during an annual exam, checks for blood abnormalities.

“A complete blood count examines several parts of your blood, including hemoglobin, white blood cells and platelets. An easy way to think of hemoglobin is as a transport vehicle. As a protein within your red blood cells, hemoglobin carries the oxygen that you inhale into your lungs to the rest of the tissues in your body. It also takes carbon dioxide from those tissues and brings it back to your lungs, so you can get rid of it when you exhale,” a release from the Mayo Clinic News Network at newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org, states. “White blood cells are part of your immune system. There are several types of white blood cells, but they’re all important for the body’s defense against infections. For example, one type of white cell called neutrophils fights off bacterial infections. So if you have a bacterial ear infection or pneumonia, those white cells actually eat up the bacteria.” Being committed to having an annual exam means patients are committed to being proactive. “It means they want to live a longer live, a healthier life. ... It’s about overall health. It’s a health care provider and the patient working together. The patient has to take an active role,” Sempek said.

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Health care experts say having an annual health exam means a patient is committed to health and prevention.

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Are all proteins created equal? By Charles Dunlap Protein. It’s an essential part of a diet. Most associate meat as a protein source. However, protein is part of any type of food a person may eat, just to varying amounts. The biggest question is, are all proteins created equal? Are there some proteins that are healthier than others? The short answer: yes. While red meat, such as pork and beef, is packed full of protein, it is also chock full of unhealthy saturated fats. A saturated fat is a type of fat that is solid at room temperature. Butter is an example of a saturated fat, along with the fats found in red meats. There are saturated fats present in skin-on chicken too. Saturated fats are the type that can contribute to increased cholesterol, which block arteries. According to the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University, proteins are built from amino acids. Some amino acids can’t be made by

our bodies and therefore come from our food. When it comes to protein, it is all about how it is packaged, the T.H. Chan School noted. You may eat a protein source, but what else comes with it? You may want to take note of the type of fat it has and if there is any associated fiber or salt before you dig in. Fatty fishes are recommended by the American Heart Association. “Fatty fish” may sound counterintuitive, but the type of fat in the fish is unsaturated, or liquid at room temperature, rather than saturated and therefore a healthier type of fat. The Northland’s own Smithville Lake is home to a variety of fish, including two types of catfish, two types of bass, walleye and white crappie, among others. While not as fatty as others, fish from the lake can still provide a healthier source of protein than red meat. The AHA recommends at least two servings of fish per week. Other alternative protein sources

include certain grains and nuts. However, as with all foods, protein intake should be done in moderation. Healthier meat protein sources include fish with omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, and white meat poultry, such as chicken breasts, without the skin. While dairy products tend to have saturated fats, milk, cheese and yogurt can still provide healthy proteins for the body. Eating one egg is a cheaper alternative to meat.

Beans and other grains like brown rice provide both fiber and protein. Tofu, while relatively tasteless, will take on any flavors introduced to it, and it helps lessen cholesterol. When searching for processed food items, such as energy bars, look for those with lower sugar and fat, and a fairly decent amount of protein — at least six grams. Though, if one makes their own energy snack, there is better control over the protein to sugar to fat content.

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Partnership expands prenatal care Expectant mothers in the Northland will have easier access to prenatal care thanks to a new partnership between North Kansas City Hospital and Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center. The two health care providers will work together to provide quality care through every stage of pregnancy. “We are excited to further serve the families of the Northland through this partnership with North Kansas City Hospital,” said Hilda Fuentes, president and CEO of Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center. “Not only will we be able to provide quality health care services, but we will be able

to deliver them in a convenient location.” North Kansas City Hospital donated the office space for the Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center Northland Prenatal and Pediatric Clinic, which opens in mid-January. Through the partnership, Samuel U. Rodgers health care professionals will provide prenatal care until the final weeks of pregnancy. At that time, the clinic will transfer the mother, along with her medical records, to a Meritas Health obstetrician, who will oversee her care and the baby’s delivery at North Kansas City Hospital. After the delivery, mother and baby will return to

Samuel U. Rodgers for their postpartum health needs. “When our obstetricians have access to the prenatal care and services the mother received, they can provide appropriate care and achieve positive outcomes for both mother and baby,” Jody Abbott, senior vice president and chief operating officer at North Kansas City Hospital, said. “Our partnership is a creative way to join forces. We are excited to work with an organization that understands how to support and provide the highest level of services and infrastructure for this patient population.”

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Recognize potentially dangerous household chemicals Homes are safe havens that people

safe items can prove dangerous

retreat to in an effort to relax and

when they are used or stored

unwind. However, homes may be

incorrectly. Individuals who make

harboring some hazards that put their

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themselves about common

Cleaning products and

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Air fresheners

These seemingly innocuous products may be doing more harm than good. Information published in a 2015 issue of The Journal of Toxicological Sciences linked

air fresheners to volatile organic compounds. They also may contain ultra-fine particles of formaldehyde and phenol. National Geographic’s “The Green Guide” states that many air fresheners contain nervedeadening chemicals that coat nasal passages and temporarily block one’s Continued on Page 12

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LIB E R T Y T R IBUN E , T HE KE A R N E Y COU RI ER, G L A D S TO NE D I S PATC H, THE S MI THV I L L E HERA L D

Continued from Page 10 sense of smell. Many widely available air fresheners use phthalates, which are linked to hormonal and reproductive issues, birth defects and developmental disorders. In lieu of chemical air fresheners, spray diluted essential oils around the house.

All-purpose cleaners

Many cleaners list bleach and ammonia among their ingredients. Bleach may be listed as sodium hypochlorite. When used as directed in a well-ventilated space, bleach and ammonia can be relatively safe. However, fumes from bleach or ammonia can cause rashes and skin irritation and



irritate the eyes and respiratory tract. Bleach and ammonia should never be mixed because mixing the two can produce a deadly chloramine gas. Vinegar and baking soda can be used as a replacement for many household cleaning products, and these alternatives have virtually no dangerous side effects.

Drain and oven cleaners

Many drain and oven cleaners contain lye (sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide), a chemical derived from salt or wood ash that is used to break down other substances, particularly those that are sticky. Lye is quite caustic in

high amounts and extremely alkaline, which can cause burns and skin irritation. Lye is also found in soaps and detergents. When handled correctly in safe amounts, lye can be used safely. However, it can be dangerous if it gets into the hands of children or is touched by pets.

Antibacterial products

Antibacterial soaps, lotions and wipes may contain triclosan, triclocarban and at least 17 additional ingredients that are linked to various negative health effects. In September 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the use of these antibacterial agents. These chemicals can disrupt hormone cycles and cause muscle weakness. “There’s no data demonstrating that over-thecounter antibacterial soaps are better at preventing illness than washing with plain soap and water,� the FDA said in a press release issued shortly after the rule was announced. In addition to the aforementioned products, some carpet cleaners, toilet cleaners and other detergents may prove harmful. Always read ingredient lists, use products in the proper fashion and keep any and all chemicals away from children and pets. — Metro Creative

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Northland Family — January 2017