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Ke¯ke¯mapa (December) 2016 | Vol. 33, No. 12

t h e l i v i n g w at e r o f o h a

www.oha.org/kwo

s u s ta i n a b i l i t Y As Hawaiians cared for and managed natural resources in the past, OHA plans to manage its financial resources for the future

page

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INSIDE

OHA’s FY16 Annual Report

Ka’ala Farm. - Photo: Sean Davey for The Trust for Public Land


PUBLIC NOTICE TO SUCCESSORS (This public notice was published in Hawai‘i’s five major daily newspapers on November 20 & 27, 2016)

NOTICE TO POSSIBLE SUCCESSORS OF THE FOLLOWING DECEASED APPLICANTS, WHO DIED ON OR AFTER OCTOBER 26, 1998, AND FAILED TO DESIGNATE A SUCCESSOR TO THEIR HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS APPLICATION RIGHTS UNDER HAWAIIAN HOMES COMMISSION ACT, 1920, AS AMENDED: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

AGTARAP, Lillian Leihulu KOLO; AI, Raviland Kaui; AIONA, Thomas Ah Kong, Jr.; AKAU, Andrew Arthur, Sr.; AKI, Fred Miller, Jr.: APIKI, John Rawlins Bell, IV; ARMSTRONG, Hattie Tailene Haunani KALAMA; 8. BISSEN, Kenneth Louis, Sr.; 9. BOTELHO, Marcedes Ilima NAEHU; 10. BROWN, Lou Ann Kehaulani MAKAIWI; 11. CAMERON, Lillian Kuulei HEW LEN; 12. CHOCK, Albert Robert; 13. CHU, Wayne Lonohiwa; 14. EVANS, Michael Kalama; 15. FERNANDEZ, Earl Pokini; 16. FRISBEE, Evelyn Pualani KIMURA; 17. FUJIMORI, Randy Kalani Tetsuo; 18. GONSALVES, Leon, Sr.; 19. HANAKEAWE, Duenna Kuuipo; 20. HARP, Carolyn Sue; 21. HOHAIA, Minerva Kuuipo NAEHU; 22. HOLT, Harriette Healani; 23. HOOHULI, Clement Neki; 24. HOOKANO, Celia Mililani; 25. HORWATT, Rose Ah Lin AKANA; 26. IIDA, Elizabeth Lily Kuuleikaiwakapulani BISHAW; 27. KAAHANUI, Samuel Lawrence, Sr.;

‘Āina Ho‘opulapula, He Kuleana.

Hawaiian Home Lands HAWAIIAN HOMES COMMISSION • DEPARTMENT OF HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS

dhhl.hawaii.gov

KAAPANA, Manuel Yona, Jr.; KAEHA, Jerome Kaulana Mamala; KAHANA, David Kealohawiwoole; KAHOONEI, Wilbert Kamaile; KAHUANUI, James; KAHUMOKU, Amy; KAIKANA, George Lehi; KALEIOHI, Ellsworth Abraham Kaohimaunu; 36. KALIKO, Samuel, III; 37. KAMAKA, Larry; 38. KAMEALOHA, Kuupuailimanoheaikealaolauaeomakana MANUEL; 39. KANE, Lawrence; 40. KANEAKUA, Momi Ann Keaupuni; 41. KANINAU, Melvin; 42. KAWAILIMA, Prescott Keala; 43. KEAHILIHAU, Jolan Kuuleialoha; 44. KEAWE, Viheart Kaonilaulani; 45. KEKAUOHA, John Kolii, Sr.; 46. KEKAWA, James Keliikoa; 47. LEONG, John Hung Kai, Jr.; 48. LEOPOLDO, Iwalani Leling TABAYAYAN; 49. LUULOA, Dolores Nani; 50. MAKAIKE, Ernest Kekaha; 51. MAKAIWI, Francis Kelii; 52. MARQUEZ, Sandy Kealaonalani STANLEY; 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35.

53. MATSUYAMA, Rosanna Mahiole MAHI; 54. MILLER, Francis Thomas Keakamahana; 55. MIURA, Beatrice FARM; 56. MONTERVON, Dennis Kealoha; 57. NAEHU, Joe aka Joseph; 58. NAKOA, Ned, Jr.; 59. NAMOHALA, Herbert Moanauli , Jr.; 60. NEEDHAM, Elaine Ah Len NAMAUU; 61. NOA, Joseph Pilialoha, Sr.; 62. ONEKEA, Edward Kahakuhananui; 63. ORLANDO, May Kuulei Almeida DIAS; 64. PAGAN, Nadine Kaui KAPAHU; 65. PAHIA, Elsie Abigail KAUI; 66. PAU, Ezekiel, Jr.; 67. PEARCE, Judith Lee Mapuana HOOMANAWANUI; 68. PIILANI, Nancy Malia HANOHANO; 69. RUST, James Phillip; 70. SEMITEKOL, Maile ASING; 71. SIALANA, Rebecca Leinaala KANEKOA; 72. SOBCZAK, Jane Meleana KALA; 73. TAMPOS, Arcadio Kuulei Pikake, Jr.; 74. TODD, Shirley Naomi Chui Yuk PELE; 75. TORRES, Naynine Highland Ainahau KELLY; 76. VICTOR, Winona Kapualani; 77. WAGNER, Wilhelm Leiohu, Sr.; 78. WAIALAE, Bethsiene Lehua.

Relatives of the above-named decedents including spouse, children, and grandchildren; parents; widows or widowers of the children; brothers and sisters; widows and widowers of the brothers and sisters; or nieces and nephews, who are at least eighteen (18) years of age and are descendants of not less than one-half (50%) part of the blood of the races inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands previous to 1778, are hereby notified to present their claims for the Hawaiian Home Lands Application Rights of the above-named decedents. Written claims, with duly authenticated and certified copies of Hawaiian blood quantum verifications must be presented to the Applications Branch of the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, 91-5420 Kapolei Parkway, Kapolei, Hawai’i 96707, or at any of the District Offices of the Department, within one-hundredeighty (180) days from the last day of publication of this notice, or such relatives may be forever barred from succeeding to the Application Rights in question. Last publication date: November 27, 2016.


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¯lelo A Ka Luna Ho‘okele ‘o

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message from the ceo

I n t e g r i t y , c r ed i b i l i t y , t r a n s p a r e n c y a n d v i g i l a n ce

Aloha mai ka ¯kou,

N

ow that the contentious election cycle is behind us, it’s time to set the record straight on some of the “trash talk” that has been directed at this agency. Rather than fortify our defenses, our response is to be more proactive about demonstrating our integrity, building our credibility and being more transparent about the quality and breadth of our work, as well as its impact. Too many think the Office of Hawaiian Affairs is only concerned with attention-grabbing issues like governance, or iwi kupuna, or Mauna Kea. We do care deeply about those things, of course; they fall under OHA’s role as an ombudsman for our community. As government watchdogs, our kuleana is to assure that the state complies with laws and regulations in areas like the environment, education, health and development. But divisive issues draw attention away from our other meaningful work, such as programs and activities that reach into communities and empower our beneficiaries. We continue to advocate for the perpetuation of traditional customary rights and at the same time are trying to make a difference by increasing job opportunities, providing assistance with housing and rentals and raising the number of Native Hawaiian-owned businesses. We don’t have the resources to do everything asked of us but we can strive to collaborate when we can, take up the mantle ourselves when the time is right and leverage our political and

judicial standing as appropriate. Internally, we’re taking a look at our programs to make sure they align with OHA’s mission and vision. We need to know what we’re doing – as well as how, when and why we’re doing it. When funding leaves the agency, we need to be able to report on its impact. Don’t just take my word on it. This issue of Ka Wai Ola includes OHA’s annual report. I encourage people to read it, critique it, provide feedback and hold us accountable. I have a Mäori proverb on my wall: “Ignorance is the oppressor. Vigilance is the liberator.” To me, vigilance means spending money prudently and within budget, planning activities that are consistent with our mission, collecting information that demonstrates both the action and the outcome and reporting back to the community. To me, that equates to integrity and credibility. ‘O au iho nö me ke aloha a me ka ‘oia‘i‘o,

Kamana‘opono M. Crabbe, Ph.D. Ka Pouhana/Chief Executive Officer

mea o loko table of contents Kamana‘opono M. Crabbe, Ph.D. Ka Pouhana, Chief Executive Officer Community Engagement

Nicole Mehanaokala¯ Hind Director Digital and Print Media

Treena Shapiro Communications Specialist

Francine Murray Communications Specialist

MO‘OLELO NUI | COVER FEATURE

Ma¯lama ‘a¯ina, ma¯lama waiwai Page 12 By Francine Kananionapua Murray

As ali‘i managed their resources in centuries past, OHA is developing a plan to ensure fiscal resources are available to support the well-being of Native Hawaiians for generations to come.

Nelson Gaspar Communications Specialist Email/Websites

kwo@OHA.org www.OHA.org www.oha.org/kwo @oha_hawaii /officeofhawaiianaffairs /ohahawaii

Ke¯ke¯mapa | December 2016 | Vol. 33, No. 12

ea | governance

A year in review of Hawaiian governance Page 4 By Derek H. Kauanoe

Developments in 2016 include a draft Native Hawaiian Constitution and new direction from the Department of Interior about creating a government-to-government relationship with a future Hawaiian nation.

‘AI¯NA | land & water

Rules strengthen Hawaiians’ role in resource management Page 9 By Treena Shapiro

The ‘Aha Moku Advisory Committee has established new rules to give Hawaiians from all major islands more representation in resource management decisions that impact their communities.

Book Review

‘Facing the Spears of Change’ Page 10 By Makana Risser Chai

Marie Alohalani Brown’s new book, “Facing Spears of Change: The Life and Legacy of John Papa ¯I ‘ı¯” relies on Marie Alohalani Brown archival research and primary English and Hawaiian language and her new book. ¯ Photo: Kalei Nu‘uhiwa sources to tell the life story of one of the great ‘oiwi historians of the 19th century.

Published monthly by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Suite 200, Honolulu, HI 96817. Telephone: 594-1888 or 1-800-468-4644 ext. 41888. Fax: 594-1865. Email: kwo@OHA.org. World Wide Web location: www.oha.org. Circulation: 64,000 copies, 55,000 of which are distributed by mail, and 9,000 through island offices, state and county offices, private and community agencies and target groups and individuals. Ka Wai Ola is printed by O‘ahu Publications. Hawaiian fonts are provided by Coconut Info. Advertising in Ka Wai Ola does not constitute an endorsement of products or individuals by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Ka Wai Ola is published by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to help inform its Hawaiian beneficiaries and other interested parties about Hawaiian issues and activities and OHA programs and efforts. ©2016 Office of Hawaiian Affairs. All rights reserved.


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A Year in Review of Hawaiian Governance By Derek H. Kauanoe

I To restore pono and ea, Native Hawaiians will achieve self-governance, after which the assets of OHA will be transferred to the new governing entity.

n 2016, two Hawaiian governance developments took place. In February, more than 100 Hawaiian participants drafted and “passed” a constitution to propose to Hawaiians. This was accomplished through a month-long Hawaiian convention with diverse participants from throughout Hawai‘i and the Continent. Second, at the end of September, the Department of the Interior published an administrative rule for recognizing a Hawaiian government. These are two completely distinct developments that can and should be conceptualized in different ways. Hawaiian history provides us with an example for conceptualizing these developments.

For information visit www.doi.gov/hawaiian about the U.S. Department of Interior rule. - Photos: KWO File

Internal v. External Affairs

Kamehameha I understood the difference between his government’s internal affairs and its external affairs. With this understanding, Kamehameha had an agreement with King George III. Years later, King George IV articulated this agreement to Kamehameha II’s entourage when he said, “I will attend to the evils from without. The evils within your Kingdom, it is not for me to regard.” One Hawaiian scholar explains this arrangement, Before finalizing the rule, DOI representatives visited Hawai‘i to solicit input. “Kamehameha retained control over the internal affairs of his kingdom, the February 2016 Hawaiian convention has sevwhile Britain maintained the external affairs.” eral important components to discuss. With this historical context, we can view the The constitution states, “The primary purpose drafting of a constitution (and its future ratifica- of Government is to meet the needs and priorition) by Hawaiians for Hawaiians as an internal ties of its citizens, protect their rights, and care affair. The Department of Interior’s rule is relevant for the ‘äina.” Citizenship in the Nation is by to a future Hawaiian government’s external affairs choice and does not affect American citizenship. because it is specific to the external relationship Hawaiian is the national language and English is the Hawaiian government could have with the one of two official languages. The constitution United States. recognizes rights of individual Hawaiians and The government-to-government relationship collective rights of Hawaiians as a group. It also between indigenous governments and the United emphasizes the importance of Hawaiian culture States is similar to Kamehameha I’s historical and Hawaiian management of cultural and natural relationship to the British Crown. In the U.S., resources. If at any time citizens want to change federally recognized indigenous governments on the constitution, there are three ways to do so. A their land bases are generally protected by the government-to-government relationship means U.S. government from external entities (such as that a Hawaiian government is protected by the state or county governments). Kamehameha I’s federal government to pursue the goals and managreement required the British Crown to protect dates of its constitution while operating on its land the Hawaiian government from other external base. entities.

Native Hawaiian Constitution

Hawaiians ratifying a Hawaiian Nation constitution is an important part of developing our own internal affairs. The proposed constitution from

DOI Rule

How we determine our own individual relationships (business, friendships, romantic) is a useful analogy for conceptualizing the DOI rule. Although we might not write it down on paper, we

have our own preferences and criteria for our own relationships. In looking for a business partner, we may want a partner with certain skill sets. In choosing our own friends, we may want someone who has some values or perspectives similar to our own. For life-long partners, we may want someone we can rely on and actually live with for the rest of our lives. Criteria and preferences are natural parts of a committed relationship. The DOI rule is basically the preferences and criteria the United States wants in a partner for a government-to-government relationship. Although the rule is much more comprehensive than can be explained in this short column, there are some generally important preferences and criteria that should be mentioned. The DOI wants to make sure that the Hawaiian government it gets into a relationship with has general support from a lot of Hawaiians. It also wants to make sure that the Hawaiian government does not make people citizens who do not want to be Hawaiian Nation citizens. The DOI requires that the Hawaiian government “protect and preserve Native Hawaiians’ rights, protections, and benefits” as well as “the liberties, rights, and privileges of all persons.” It also wants to make sure that the Hawaiian government’s leaders are democratically elected by Hawaiian Nation citizens. Such preferences and criteria are reasonable. Hawaiians now have another tool available for protecting our lands and culture, perpetuating our language, and improving Hawaiian well-being. That tool is made available to a Hawaiian government if it wants. Building a Hawaiian government (an internal issue) is separate from the relationships a Hawaiian government might pursue later with entities outside of itself (an external issue). Although distinct, these internal and external affairs are related. A Hawaiian government that forms under the proposed constitution will decide whether to pursue a government-to-government relationship under the DOI rule. A Hawaiian government may choose not to pursue that relationship or it may choose to do so at a time that is most appropriate or preferable. Hawaiian interests and well-being are both advanced by having this choice. ¢ Derek H. Kauanoe is Governance Manager at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. She can be reached at derekk@oha.org.


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Voters select OHA Trustees By Ka Wai Ola Staff

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ovember’s General Election brought change to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees with the addition of Keli‘i Akina new Trustee Keli‘i Akina. Investiture of the OHA board, along with the State of OHA address, will be televised on ‘Ölelo TV Channel 54 on Dec. 9 starting at 10 a.m. A live web-stream will also be available on ‘Ölelo’s YouTube Channel – www.youtube.com/ olelocm. Follow #ohahawaii on social media for OHA’s updates from the ceremony. ¢

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General Election Results Hawaii Resident Trustee

> LINDSEY, Robert K. (Bob) 194,479 - 44.4% > TRASK, Mililani B. 142,461 - 32.6% Blank Votes: 100,436 - 23.0% Over Votes: 176 - 0.0% At-Large Trustee

> AKINA, Keli‘i 163,701 - 37.4% > APOLIONA, Haunani 156,158 - 35.7% Blank Votes: 117,565 - 26.9% Over Votes: 128 - 0.0%

Source: Office of Elections

Aloha

and

Mahalo

By Office of Hawaiian Affairs Staff

A

fter 20 years serving on the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees, Haunani Apoliona will be turning her focus to other ways to work with the Native Hawaiian community. Prior to being elected to OHA’s board in 1996, Apoliona spent 19 years in a number of positions at ALU LIKE, including president and CEO. From 2000 to 2010, she led OHA’s board – the longest any Board of Trustees Chair has held that leadership role. Aside from her public service, many know

Sig Zane brings Kaka‘ako history to life By Dave Dondoneau

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eaning on his hula roots, Sig Zane and creative team of designers are turning the 60 acres of land under development as the Ward Center master community into a storytelling canvas of Hawaiian history and culture. Their first project was recently completed on the South Shore Market wall, where various print techniques and graphic patterns have created a subtle but bold and regal mural that Zane hopes will give pause to people passing by. He wants visitors who see it to think of the area and the people who inhabited the area long before the high-end master community was built. To that end, placed above one of the entrances to the South Shore Market is the Hawaiian proverb “Ola ka wai mana, ulu a‘e ka honua Kukuluäe‘o.” Translation: “May the sacred waters always flow, nurturing the waters of Kukuluäe‘o.” It’s a nod to the spring waters that continue to flow below the 60-acre parcel of land today. “It is that kuleana, the responsibility of holding on to the stories of place that remain a very important, highest priority to us,” Zane said. “What we do in our work is bring that mo‘olelo to the forefront. “Working with Howard Hughes is really

Sig Zane’s new mural graces the South Shore Market. Photo: Courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation a treat because there are so many stories of this place already and what we want to do is focus on specifics of place. Everyone talks of sense of place, but we are about ‘specific’ place, uniquely talking about here.” Sig Zane Kaiao is the Hilo-based designservice arm of the aloha shirt maker with a mission to educate and share Hawaiian culture. The Howard Hughes partnership was formed through Ann Harakawa of Two Twelve and further deepened with cultural expert Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, who assisted with naming the residential towers

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in Ward Village. Sig’s son, Küha‘o, is also on the team along with Sig Zane Designs art director Brandy Alia Serikaku and senior graphic designer Chanel Tsang. Todd Apo, vice president of Community Development for the Howard Hughes Corporation, said the partnership with Zane is the first of its kind in Hawai‘i and they will move forward telling the area’s history through a series of patterns, logos and artwork that will be featured throughout the urban neighborhood. The South Shore Market and Waiea Ward Village, the first residential tower, both opened in November. “We obviously had known and could see the importance of art being a part of the community development as this area got redeveloped,” Apo said. “The other primary focus we had is about the history of this place, the culture of Hawai‘i. “It’s an interesting project because there is no blueprint for Sig and his team to follow, no right or wrong. There is no master plan for storytelling art in urban development in Hawai‘i because this is a first. It’s just a matter of finding the right people to talk to, finding the right guidance and that means finding the right partners. We’re relying on Sig and his team,” he added. “What will be exciting is the ability to do smaller but more numerous projects through-

Trustee, Haunani Apoliona along with her staff, at left, Louise K. Yee Hoy and behind, Reynold Freitas. - Photo: Francine Murray Apoliona as a slack-key guitarist, Hawaiian composer and member of the Nä Hökü Hanohano award-winning band Olomana. “The board is losing her deep knowledge and experience as well as determined leadership.” said Chairperson Robert Lindsey Jr. “But we must now turn our attention to honoring the outcome of the election and working together to address the issues facing our organization.” ¢

out the development now that we have the foundation to work off of. The next tower we are finishing is the Ali‘i, and they put together the name for us and we’re working on how it all gets incorporated into the Ward Village. That’s the kind of continued growth evolution we’re trying to do.” Hula experience, Zane said, has helped immensely because, like hula, his team is trying to tell a story. “In hula we have that responsibility of interpreting and translating in form,” he said. “Here, we are just putting it on a building, or sidewalk. Basically it is the same thing; telling that story in form.” Zane said he hopes to go back as far as possible when telling the story through art. One of the images he uses is taro, which was planted in the area by the Ward family when it was wetlands. “We bring taro to the forefront because of its many other meanings,” he said. “It symbolizes family. In building this community that is a very important value that we want to emphasize. The Hawaiian perspective of family is really important. “For example, when the poi bowl is on the table everything is calm. You cannot argue, you cannot bring any anger to this table. That’s a very important value to reinforce in art here. That’s our intent.” ¢ Dave Dondoneau is a freelance journalist based in Honolulu. Reach him at writingbydd@ gmail.com.


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BEAUTIFUL & AFFORDABLE

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OHA in the community Moloka‘i scholarship ‘aha

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A Scholarship ‘Aha held last month on Moloka‘i drew more than 100 attendees. Gus CobbAdams of Windward Community College (left) emceed the event, which was organized by OHA’s Community Outreach staff, including Brett Nakihei (right). - Photos: Courtesy of Brent Keliiokamalu Nakihei


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OHA Board Actions

legend

The following actions were taken by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees, and are summarized here. For more information on board actions, please see the complete meeting minutes posted online at http://www.oha.org/BOT. October 20, 2016

‘Ae (Yes) ‘A‘ole (No) Ka ¯nalua (Abstain) Excused

Motion

Motion passed to waive OHA’s 72-hour materials distribution policy for Items V. C., V. D., and V. E.

Motion passes with eight AYES and one EXCUSED.

Motion passed to go into Executive Session to consider the following: VI. Executive Session** A. Approval of Executive Session Minutes 1) October 6, 2016 B. Consultation with Robert G. Klein, Esq. and Anna Elento-Sneed, Esq. re: questions and issues pertaining to the board’s powers, duties, privileges, immunities, and liabilities regarding ongoing legal and personnel matters. Pursuant to HRS 92-5(a)(4).

Motion passes with seven AYES and two EXCUSED.

Motion passed to: 1. Adopt the use of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ (“OHA”) FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY PLANNING MODEL and 2. Approve the STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT relating to OHA’s FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY IMPLEMENTATION PLAN as follows: The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is committed to ensuring services and programs are consistently available and delivered to our la ¯hui through fiscally responsible and sustainable spending. The Office will:

Motion passes with nine AYES.

Adopt and implement a FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY IMPLEMENTATION PLAN to be effective beginning July 1, 2017 OP  rovide in it a FINANCIAL STRUCTURE that will establish fiscal objectives and result in increases to (1) the value of OHA’s assets and endowments and to (2) OHA’s capacity to deliver on its vision and mission O Incorporate in it specific SUCCESS INDICATORS and report on its progress at 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years postimplementation O Incorporate in it a CODE OF ETHICS applicable to OHA Trustees, Officers, and Employees O

Motion passed to support the following new legislative proposals and approve their inclusion in the 2017 OHA Legislative Package: • OHA-1 OHA Budget: Provides for OHA’s General Fund Biennium Budget FY2017-2018/FY2018-2019. • OHA-2 Per-Pupil Funding System Study For Public Charter Schools: Requires the Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study, with the support of the Department of Education, Department of Budget and Finance, the Hawai‘i State Public Charter School Commission, and other stakeholder agencies, to determine whether the non-facility general fund per-pupil funding system for public charter schools ensures equal operational per-pupil funding between Department of Education schools and public charter schools, as required under statute. • OHA-3 Konohiki Fishing Rights Resolution: Recognizes the historic success of the traditional, ahupua‘a-based konohiki fishing rights system, which used communities’ intimate knowledge of and connection to their nearshore area to ensure abundant resources and sustain a thriving Hawaiian population and culture prior to documented Western contact; chronicles the erosion and eventual abolishment of the konohiki fishing rights system and laws, as well as the resulting impacts to nearshore fisheries and the associated cultural lifestyles, traditions, and values of ahupua‘a tenants; and urges the Department of Land and Natural Resources to support culturally-grounded and community-driven fisheries management proposals, to enable kı¯puka communities to once again steward, restore, and perpetuate their nearshore resources and to protect and maintain the cultural traditions and values that rely upon them.

Motion passes with nine AYES.

The motion passed via voice vote, with all Trustees present voting “aye”. Motion passed to approve Mr. Scott Kaulukukui to serve a second and final term on the Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund (NHRLF) Board of Directors.

Motion passes with nine AYES.

The motion passed via voice vote, with all Trustees present voting “aye”. Motion passed to approve a Resolution supporting the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in its efforts to protect its sacred sites and natural and cultural resources.

Motion passes with nine AYES.

The motion passed via voice vote, with all Trustees present voting “aye”. Motion passed to approve the following candidates as OHA’s 2017 nominees for appointment to the Island Burial Councils for transmittal to the Governor: • Scott Haili Mahoney, Nominee for Ka‘u ¯ or Kohala regional representative on the Hawai‘i Island Burial Council • Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, Nominee for Kona regional representative on the O‘ahu Island Burial Council • Carol Lovell, Nominee for Kawaihau regional representative on the Kaua‘i/Ni‘ihau Island Burial Council

The motion passed via voice vote, with all Trustees present voting “aye”.

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Motion passes with nine AYES.

Board of Trustees

Ap oli on H. a Lin d R. sey Lin ds Ma ey ch ad o W aih e‘e

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hawaiian OlaKino

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Your english Health

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Hawaiian thinking for holiday health

By Claire Kuâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;uleilani Hughes, Dr. PH., R.D.

T

he season of over-indulgence is here and the holidays have begun. Thus, only a wee bit of time remains for trimming hips and waistlines before the festivities. Planning ahead could reduce the stresses of last minute fretting about getting into your holiday outfit. However, far more critical than fitting into the outfit is controlling blood pressure, blood sugar and weight as we celebrate. A lot depends or rides on long-term control of health issues.

Recently, two reports highlighted the hazards of indulging during the holidays. They give us reason to be thoughtful. An American Medical Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Internal Medicine study reported that cigarette smoking contributes to 1 of every 4 cancer deaths in the United States. Researchers analyzed surveys and government data on smoking rates and the number of deaths from a dozen smoking-linked cancers from the year 2014. They found that 167,000 deaths from lung, throat, stomach, liver, colon, pancreas, and kidney cancers (and leukemia) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; about 29 percent of all U.S. cancer deaths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; were attributable to smoking cigarettes. Second-hand cigarette smoke is implicated, as well. Scientists from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) studied and reported on eight more cancers: stomach, liver,

gallbladder, pancreas, ovary, thyroid, multiple myeloma (cancer of white blood cells in the bone marrow), and meningioma (cancer of the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord). The IARC scientists found that excess body fat had the greatest impact on the risk of esophageal (throat) and uterine (womb) cancers. And, when we Americans already have a high risk of cancers, like breast and colon (large intestine), even a small increase matters. The IARC scientists suggest that being overweight may lead to cancer by altering sex hormones, causing chronic inflammation, and raising insulin levels. In order to reverse these statistics, the scientists recommend losing weight, as well as watching what you eat to avoid gaining more weight. There are ways to decrease holiday â&#x20AC;&#x153;over-indulgence.â&#x20AC;? Some

suggestions are to eat a small healthy snack at home before going to a buffet and cocktail celebration, like a small apple or carrot, celery sticks or small glass of milk. Choose several low calorie options from the buffet first, then go back for other choices â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but always include some healthy options. Make the first (or second) beverage a non-alcoholic one, to take the edge off your thirst. Also, spend a lot of time talking to your friends and family, catching up on their families (their kids, parents, siblings) hobbies and work. In other words, fully enjoy the opportunity for fellowship and friendship. In her list of â&#x20AC;&#x153;points of fundamental importanceâ&#x20AC;? for individuals in a family, Kawena Pukui includes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rigorous concern for soundness of (the) body is a consideration throughout physical life, especially before and during infancy.â&#x20AC;? The words â&#x20AC;&#x153;rigorousâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;throughoutâ&#x20AC;? reveal the high degree of importance for this standardâ&#x20AC;Świthout exception, it was to be met. In old, old Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i, if a family member

was sick and unable to perform his kuleana, the entire family could be without food or care, especially if the member was a käne. Today, our work situations are different â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the great majority work outside the home. Today, one can take sick leave or go to work and perform with less efficiency; we can go to the doctor or hospital; we have options on different therapies and the family doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suffer hunger, discomfort or danger, even if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work for more than a day. Thus, today we can disregard this â&#x20AC;&#x153;kuleanaâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;Ś and, many of us do. Both the Hawaiian cultural health kuleana and the new information on two personal, negative habits give controlling health issues far greater significance and importance. Holidays are for celebrating and having fun with family and friends, however, those of us with an illness, need to be aware of the dangers of going overboard. It is a kuleana that you have to yourself and your family. ¢

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land and water

9

Rules strengthen Hawaiians’ role in resource management By Treena Shapiro

A

s our island state strives to address critical environmental issues, more policymakers see the importance of considering indigenous resource management practices alongside modern sustainability frameworks. Prior to Western contact, responsible stewardship allowed Hawaiian society to thrive and many of their sustainable practices have been passed down through generations of küpuna. The value of this wisdom was affirmed in 2012 when the state established the ‘Aha Moku Advisory Committee (AMAC) to make recommendations to the Department of Land and Natural Resources. The committee gives expert Native Hawaiians practitioners a voice in matters like the best use of agricultural land, native burials, overfishing, development

permits and other contentious issues the Hawaiian community grapples with, explained Malia Akutagawa, an assistant professor of law and Hawaiian studies at UH-Mänoa.

land and ocean, and the importance of our traditional stewards in informing wise natural resource management cannot be understated. AMAC has incredible potential to effectively

Hawaiian traditional knowledge as a resource in its own right and upholds international law protecting the rights of indigenous peoples – including the right to free, prior and informed con-

All in Hawai‘i depend on a healthy land and ocean, and the importance of our traditional stewards in informing wise natural resource management cannot be understated. AMAC has incredible potential to effectively amplify these community voices toward the common good.” — Kevin Chang, executive director of Kua‘a¯ina Ulu ‘Auamo Patterned after ancient ‘aha moku councils, the advisory committee is comprised of eight po‘o, or heads, who represent each of the major islands. The po‘o are nominated by the governor, confirmed by the state Senate and housed within DLNR. Working with their respective island ‘aha moku councils the po‘o can bring place-based local concerns to the state’s attention. “All in Hawai‘i depend on a healthy

amplify these community voices toward the common good,” said Kevin Chang, executive director of Kua‘äina Ulu ‘Auamo. New rules organized by Akutagawa and two of her law students and adopted by the advisory committee on Oct. 20 will only increase the panel’s potential. The final document reaffirms protections of customary rights and practices, recognizes

sent on decisions that affect them. The 37-page document clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the executive director and sets in place a communications process. “It creates greater transparency and accountability on all levels. Prior to this they operated without rules and it was a bit unclear and at times caused confusion at all levels,” Akutagawa said. Formalizing rules that incorporate

Hawaiian indigenous knowledge into modern decision-making is a major accomplishment, said UH Law Professor Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie. “Significantly, they reflect that our culture is alive and thriving; that we have not forgotten our ancestors; and indeed that we have carried their knowledge forward into the 21st century to address modern problems and ensure abundance for future generations.” Office of Hawaiian Affairs Trustee Carmen “Hulu” Lindsey of Maui was pleased and excited to see the completed rules. “Until now, AMAC has been met with various difficulties that many new hui often face. With these new rules, I am confident that the committee has created a structure and process that will help them collectively progress in a way that will surely benefit our larger communities.” ¢

KAMEHAMEHA PRESCHOOLS

PAUAHI KEIKI SCHOLARS

30 preschool sites located statewide offering classes for 3- and 4- year olds

Need-based scholarships for children attending approved, non-Kamehameha preschools

Application deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

Application deadline: Feb. 17, 2017

808-842-8800

808-534-8080

To learn more, visit

ksbe.edu/preschool

Kamehameha Schools gives preference to applicants of Hawaiian ancestry to the extent permitted by law.

FOR THE 20172018 SCHOOL YEAR

Kamehameha Schools 1261 ADV-Preschool Campaign OHA-Half-page, color


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na¯ puke

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books

review

Facing the Spears of Change: The Life and Legacy of John Papa ‘I¯‘ı¯ Review by Makana Risser Chai

“A Facing the Spears of Change: The Life and Legacy of John Papa ‘I¯‘ı¯ By Marie Alohalani Brown, PhD University of Hawai‘i Press. 248 pages. Hardcover $68.00, softcover $27, also available on Amazon’s Kindle.

s the sun reached its apex on July 31, 1847, hundreds of spectators watched as an imposing man with dark piercing eyes came forth to meet his adversaries. Tall and powerfully built, he was dressed in a black suit with a yellow feather cape draped over his broad shoulders. He walked toward twenty men armed with long spears ... Suddenly, the spears began to fly. He seized the first one out of the air, then another, and used them to parry the remaining missiles. When the spearmen finally depleted their arsenal, the man stood there unharmed, a spear in each hand. But the battle was far from over. He flung his two spears at his weaponless adversaries, then rapidly picked up the fallen spears around him, throwing them one after another until he had forced his rivals to flee. The spectators cheered throughout.” So begins a new book by Marie Alohalani Brown, PhD, about John Kaneiakama Papa ‘Ï‘ï, the man who so adeptly caught, parried, and threw spears in a display of the ancient art of lonomakaihe. At the time, ‘Ï‘ï was a member of

the House of Nobles, and of the Privy Council, to which Kamehameha III turned for consultation and advice. Later, ‘Ï‘ï would be a Judge of the Supreme Court. Today he is best known as one of the four great ‘öiwi (Native Hawaiian) historians of the 19th century, along with David Malo, Samuel Kamakau, and Kepelino. The book, Fragments of Hawaiian History, is a collection of some of the columns he wrote for Hawaiian language newspapers. Facing the Spears of Change: The Life and Legacy of John Papa ‘Ï‘ï is the first life story written about ‘Ï‘ï. The book relies on Hawaiian language primary sources, including letters, government documents and newspaper articles, to paint a vivid picture of an ali‘i who thrived within both ‘öiwi and Western cultural environments. His demonstration of lonomakaihe can be seen as a metaphor for his life. John Papa ‘Ï‘ï was born in 1800 in Waipi‘o on O‘ahu to a chiefly family that served the ‘ohana of Kamehameha. He was related by blood or marriage to Kälaimoku, Boki and Kekau‘önohi. He himself entered service at the age of 10 as kahu (attendant or guardian) to Liholiho when the future king was about 13-years-old, and Kamehameha

the Great still ruled. As kahu, ‘Ï‘ï was responsible for caring for the spittoon and malo of Liholiho, and for fanning him with a kahili. As he grew older, he became a kahu for Kamehameha's female war deity, Kihawahine, a great responsibility. ‘Ï‘ï and the monarchy came to maturity together. After Liholiho’s death in 1825, Kauikeouli became Kamehameha III, and during his reign ‘Ï‘ï’s responsibilities increased dramatically. In addition to the positions noted previously, he also was kahu for the royal children at the Chief’s Children’s School from 1840-1852, where he served and guided the future Kamehameha IV, Kamehameha V, Kaläkaua, and Lili‘uokalani, as well as Bernice Pauahi Bishop. During the Mähele, he served on the Commission to Quiet Land Titles. He was tapped for a variety of special duties as a negotiator, resolving disputes between and among ‘öiwi and foreigners, and even traveling to San Francisco to obtain the freedom of a Hawaiian who had been jailed for a crime he did not commit. Brown’s book shows the tireless devotion of ‘Ï‘ï to his kings and country throughout his life, and serves as an inspiration for those today who strive to serve the lähui (nation) as he did. ¢

e ke kumu mauli ola Hawai‘i

Ke pai komo ‘ia nei nā moho hou o ka makahiki kula 2017-2018 ma

he papahana ho‘omākaukau kumu mauli ola Hawai‘i

e kūpono no ka po‘e e ‘imi ana e a‘o:  ma nā kula kaia‘ōlelo-kaiapuni Hawai‘i

NO KE NOI A ‘IKE HOU AKU: www.kahuawaiola.org 808-932-7730 kuulei.kepaa@hawaii.edu

 ma nā polokalamu a‘o ‘ōlelo a mo‘omeheu Hawai‘i  ma nā kula e lawelawe ana i nā haumāna kuana‘ike Hawai‘i


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book roundup Abundance and Resilience: Farming and Foraging in Ancient Kaua‘i By Julie S. Field and Michael W. Graves University of Hawai‘i Press Hardcover $65.95

Nu‘alolo Kai near the remote Nä Pali on Kaua‘i, is a historic site, like a portal to Hawai‘i’s past that has been revealing traditional secrets to archaeologists and researchers since 1958 when Bishop Museum first excavated it. The essays in this book share a sustainable form of animal management that continued for five centuries in the area.

For the readers on your holiday gift list, consider some of the books released by Hawai‘i publishers this year, which explore topics from ancient Hawaiian history and legend to understanding life in modern Hawai‘i. The following is just a sampling of books released by local publishers this year.

Ka¯huna: Traditions of Hawaiian Medicinal Priests and Healing Practitioners

Maui Hooks the Islands Hawaiian Legends for Little Ones series

¯ea Chun, Ph.D. By Rev. Dr. Malcolm Na First People’s Productions Hardcover $39.95

By Gabrielle Ahuli‘i Illustrations Jing Jong Tsong BeachHouse Publishing Boardbook $7.95

This book provides the first glimpse of lost and forgotten traditional health practices of Hawaiian medicinal kähuna with accounts of specific epidmics in the 19th century, as translated by Dr. Chun. Learn of their many trials and what they endured during the Territory of Hawai‘i.

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Hawaiian Legends for Little Ones is a series of books that introduce children to some of Hawai‘i‘s most well-known legends. The four books are: “Maui Hooks the Islands,” “Pele Finds a Home,” “Hina” and “Naupaka.”

Ordinary ‘Ohana

Sand Mouse’s Soup

By Lee Cataluna Illustrated by Cheyne Gallarde Bess Press Hardcover $14.95

By Alvina Kwong BeachHouse Publishing Hardcover $7.95

A diverse family is a normal family here in Hawai‘i. This little book about a big family that always has room for one more assures readers that family is who you choose.

Sharing is a way of life in Hawai‘i. Sand Mouse gets his neighbors to add something to his pot. Soon he has a big pot of Portuguese soup to share with them. A delightful educational children‘s book.

All the books featured here, can found at Native Books Na ¯ Mea Hawai‘i. They are located at Ward Warehouse, 1050 Ala Moana Blvd #1000, Honolulu. Visit them at www.nameahawaii.com or call 808-596-8885.

FOR THE 20172018 SCHOOL YEAR

Na ¯ Ho‘okama a Pauahi Scholarship Need-based scholarship for undergraduate or graduate students. Application deadline: February 17, 2017 To learn more, visit ksbe.edu/college

Kamehameha Schools give preference to applicants of Hawaiian ancestry to the extent permitted by law.

Follow us:

Kamehameha Schools 1199 ADV-College Scholarships Recruitment Campaign

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Ka‘ala Farm. - Photo: Sean Davey/ Trust for Public Land

mo‘olelo nui

Malama ‘aina, cover feature

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malama waiwai

By Francine Kananionapua Murray

Around the 15th century, the Hawaiian population was growing so quickly that ruling chiefs in their wisdom became concerned that certain resources were becoming scarce. The land was surveyed and the islands separated into sections like pieces of pie, each including mountain peaks and flat lands spreading out and down to the ocean reefs. Each division included fresh water and had borders, often natural boundaries like rivers, mountain ridges or grooves of trees. And each was marked with an ahu, an altar of rocks, topped by a wood carving of a pua‘a, a pig’s head, or at times an actual pig, as an offering to the chiefs, hence the name ahupua‘a to describe the land division mauka to makai.

‘Ahu. -


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As Hawaiians cared for and managed natural resources in the past, OHA plans to manage its financial resources for the future

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/OHAHawaii

In dividing the land this way, chiefs and their konohiki managed vast resources within their ahupua‘a, which provided all life’s essentials – wood from uka, the mountains for shelter and canoes, medicinal herbs from deep within forests, sweet potato, kalo, ‘ulu and more from kula, inland, along with fish and limu rich in vitamins from the from ke kai, the ocean. Occasionally items were kapu, banned for a period of time to maintain the resource. If items were scarce in one ahupua‘a, residents could trade with a neighboring ahupua‘a for what they needed. This model of land and resource management was very successful and the abundance of natural resources helped the population to thrive and grow for generations. With this natural resource management model in mind, OHA is taking steps improve its financial resource management by taking a thorough inventory of all its financial assets, income and expenses, and then working with financial management experts to develop policies and strategies that can be implemented to ensure resources are available to better the lives of Native Hawaiians for generations to come. “We need to take care of the resources as a whole – the investment portfolio, the commercial properties, the legacy lands, the core operating budget, the grants, the sponsorships, the contracts, the procurement, the I Mana Ka Lähui and the Ka Wai Ola,” said OHA CEO and Ka Pouhana Kamana‘opono Crabbe. “We need to have a full inventory of what our assets are because if we are expending more than we are taking in, we are not fiscally healthy. So, we will need to diversify and exercise fiscal discipline, which means we have to scale down and stay within our budget. In other words I can’t go out and eat $12 worth of food if I only have $8.” OHA has an enormous task with its mandate to improve the lives of Native Hawaiians, which can mean many things to the many different sectors of the community, but it has limited resources to achieve this. “Prioritizing is sometimes like a juggling act,” explained Crabbe. “Between housing, homelessness, jobs, diabetes, obesity, acquiring land, fighting off law suits, which are unfunded liabili-

ties that take resources from programs for beneficiaries, it can be a struggle deciding what to focus on first, second and third.” There are fundamental things OHA must do to keep its doors open. Its consultants have helped take a very comprehensive look at the whole organization and then put it into a structured model that can project scenarios into the future, which will help OHA make more informed decisions. “I would say this was a healthy

means the same items will cost more, and with inflation expenses usually continue to rise. Subject to external factors that it cannot control, rather than reacting, OHA plans to minimize unwarranted risks by being proactive, anticipating different scenarios, strengthening internal processes, finding additional earning possibilities and diversifying. The board hopes to fully implement its new sustainability plan starting next fiscal year, in July 2017. Most agencies don’t have a fiscal sustainability plan. But OHA is not a typical government agency, it wears two hats – often operating as a nonprofit serving its beneficiaries, but also as a quasi-state agency that has to abide — OHA CEO and Ka Pouhana by state procurement and other rules and Kamana‘opono Crabbe regulations. As a quasi-state exercise,” said Crabbe. “I see this as agency, OHA differs from other state something that can unify OHA as a agencies like the Department of Health whole organization, where we are all on or Department of Land and Natural the same page. There is agreement now Resources, which receive revenue from between the board and administration on taxes and funds their departments may what the priorities and goals are for the generate. OHA gets some revenue from future. that but the majority of OHA’s funding The office is committed to ensuring is from the Native Hawaiian Trust Fund, services and programs are consistently which is why OHA feels compelled to available and delivered to our lähui manage the trust responsibly and in perthrough fiscally responsible and sustain- petuity so that it is sustainable for the able spending. Native Hawaiian community. Its implementation plan will include “It took a lot of work, really digging a financial structure that will establish deep into OHA’s spending patterns, confiscal objectives and result in increases tracts, grants, investment reports, work to the value of OHA’s assets and endow- plans and everything else, such as nation ments, improving capacity to deliver on building, purchasing this building and the its vision and mission, specific success potential for us to grow, all in anticipation indicators, progress reports and a code of our new direction of fiscal sustainabilof ethics applicable to trustees, officers ity,” said Crabbe. “It’s been a complicated and employees. process, but this plan will elevate OHA There are plans to grow OHA’s into the next era. investments and revenue, taking into “I believe fiscal sustainability is really consideration economic and market vol- about integrity, which means the deciatility, whether temporary that affects sions we make are prudent, using our world markets, such as huge drops in a money wisely and making it count on country’s gross national product (GNP). meaningful programs and projects for For example, in 10 years China’s GNP our beneficiaries, while perpetuating grew to 10 percent, but in the past two the trust. We always think about how to years it fell to 6 percent. If that were to improve the conditions and well-being happen in the United States there would of our people and our communities. The be massive unemployment across the best way for us to do that is to have a nation. There is also political volatility solid fiscal foundation.” around the world that affects the value of the dollar, at times causing inflation. This

We need to have a full inventory of what our assets are because if we are expending more than we are taking in, we are not fiscally healthy.”

Photo: John Matsuzaki

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‘alemanaka

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calendar

Calendar Listings

Honolulu City Lights Dec. 3, 4 p.m. Opening night festivities for the 32nd annual event include the Honolulu Hale tree lighting ceremony by the mayor, food booths, keiki rides and an electric light parade. Santa will visit the Mission Memorial Auditorium and the Honolulu Hale Courtyard will be filled with Christmas trees decorated by city employees, as well as a public wreath contest. Free. King Street near Honolulu Hale, www.honolulucitylights.org.

To have a local event listed in our monthly calendar, email kwo@ oha.org at least six weeks in advance. Make sure to include the location, price, date and time. If available, please attach a high-resolution (300 dpi) photograph with your email.

ke¯ke¯mapa HTY: ‘A Plantation Celebration’ Dec. 3, 10 and 17, 4:30 p.m. Honolulu Theatre for Youth’s current production casts a nostalgic eye on the plantation era with original scenes, music and classic stories looking back on the holidays in old Hawai‘i. $20, with discounts for keiki and seniors. Tenney Theatre, www.htyweb.org, 839-9885. Willie Wonderland Dec. 3, 7 to 10 p.m. Nä Hökü Hanohano award-winning artist Willie K returns with his popular ‘ohana-friendly holiday concert. $35-85, with discounts for keiki and MACC members. Maui Arts and Cultural Center, Kahului, www.mauiarts.org. Kona Historical Society at Mauna Lani Charity Trees Dec. 4, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Learn about the history of Kona through a historical photo collection as you admire a Christmas tree decorated with the society’s special photos, as well as those from other organizations. Prizes will be awarded to trees that receive the highest number of votes from the public. Mauna Lani Bay Hotel, Kamuela. www.konahistorical.org.

Küpuna Day: The Fire is Kindled Within the Hearts of Our Küpuna Dec. 9, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. A day of interacting and networking, participating in activities to improve küpuna functional abilities, enhance self-esteem and provide resources to inform and support küpuna and family member caregivers about dementia and Alzheimer’s. Free. Kulana ‘Oiwi Complex, Kaunakakai, Moloka‘i. Wa‘a ‘Auhau Workshop Dec. 10-11, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. This workshop on traditional carving styles utilizes the skills that were handed down generationally in South Kona to perpetuate traditional culture and practices associated to Makahiki, as well as general practices such as carving and maintaining resources to produce ceremony, protocol and practice of Makahiki in South Kona. Pu‘uhonua O Hönaunau National Historical Park, (808) 327-9525. Lighted Boat Parade Dec. 11, 6 to 7 p.m. Kona’s Kailua Bay will celebrate the holidays with a festive Lighted Boat Parade. Food and beverages will be available for purchase at Kailua Pier. Free. Ka‘ahumanu Place, Kailua-Kona, www.Historic KailuaVillage.com.

Downtown Honolulu will soon be aglow as the 32nd annual Honolulu City Lights goes bright on Saturday, December 3, 2016. - Photo: Friends of Honolulu City Lights/Bob Rock Moku‘ula by Midnight in Lahaina Dec. 13, 6 to 8 p.m. As the moon rises over the Moku‘ula Mokuhinia restoration site, enjoy a kanikapila-style jam and storytelling as local elders share tales of Lahaina. Special guest speakers will also talk about current Native Hawaiian issues. Limited seating is available for küpuna and everyone else is welcome to bring blankets and low beach chairs. Free. Beachfront of Hale Halawai in Kamehameha Iki Park, Maui.

Food, entertainment, and Makahiki games for all ages. - Photo: Courtesy of Ulu A‘e Learning Center Kä Kapolei Makahiki Dec. 17, 9 a.m. to noon Ulu A‘e Learning Center is proud to host the first annual Kä Kapolei Makahiki family event featuring food, entertainment and Makahiki games for all ages. Free.

Pu‘uokapolei, located at the pä hula, hula mound, in the upper area of Kapolei Regional Park.

Tickets start at $52, with discounts available for kama‘aina and HTC members at the Dec. 17 show, part of the Hawai‘i Classics concert series. Hawai‘i Theatre Center, www.hawaiitheater.com.

Ke Kökö: Net Making Dec. 17-18, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Net making played an integral part in traditional Hawaiian society, not just for providing food, but also for making capes and pouches. This workshop will focus on making a symbolic net called Ke koko o Maoloha i ka lani, or the net of Maoloha in the heavens, used in the closing ceremonies of Makahiki. Practitioners will gain historical knowledge of knotting and its important role in society, as well as the significance Amy Hanaiali‘i and Willie K., performs a holiday show of the Maoloha. For more at the Hawai‘i Theatre. - Photo: Courtesy of Hawai‘i information, call the OHA Theatre Center West Hawai‘i Island office at (808) 327-9525. Wailea Village Mochi Pounding Amy and Willie Dec. 30, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Holiday Show Practice and participate in the Dec. 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 18, ancient art of mochi pounding for 4:30 p.m. good luck at Akiko’s Buddhist A popular holiday tradition con- B&B’s 19th annual event. Hawaiian tinues with two of Hawai‘i’s top entertainment, fortune tellers, masartists, Amy Hanaiali‘i and Willie sage, used books, flowers, crafts K, celebrating the season through and jewelry will be available. Free. musical artistry. The Dec. 17 con- 29-2091 Old Mamalahoa Highway, cert is the final show of the 2016 Hakalau, www.akikosbnb.com/ monthly Hawaiian Classics series. activities/activities.html#mochi ¢


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HO‘OKAHUA WAIWAI ECONOMIC SELF-SUFFICIENCY

Cooking for a cause By Treena Shapiro

I

12-week program. Five are now employed and all have successfully transitioned out of homelessness. Robin Kumabe, executive director of Touch a Heart,

t’s 11 a.m. on a Thursday morning and three women in the Touch a Heart program are about to see the results of their morning’s work. Cutting open parchmentwrapped packets just pulled from the oven, they reveal steaming monchong filets, seasoned with soy sauce and sesame oil, and cradled by assortment of julienned Oatmeal Flax Cookies vegetables. It’s delicious and and Biscotti Bites. more than just lunch. Photo: Kimo Burgess said she It’s part of a nonprofit and her huspilot program that gives home- band Colin wanted to find a way to less and disadvantaged women partner with nonprofits with underan opportunity to turn their lives utilized kitchens where they could around through vocational and life teach sheltered homeless women skills training. So far, six single vocational and life skills, such as mothers have graduated from the how to budget, cook healthy meals,

OFFICE OF MAUNAKEA MANAGEMENT

OMKM would like to invite you to talk story about Maunakea For more information call 933-0734 or email omkm@hawaii.edu

extend a chicken to feed a family for a week and prepare for a career track in culinary arts. “The old adage, ‘Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime’ really sums up the mission of Touch a Heart,” Kumabe said. “Each year in Hawai‘i, an estimated 14,000 people experience homelessness. Of those living in a shelter, 71 percent are unemployed. At Touch a Heart, we wanted to do something about that and created a unique business model that teaches job skills, helps with employment placement, and also provides a delicious, quality product that can generate revenue.” For the pilot program, Touch a Heart has partnered with the Salvation Army, who provided its Family

Stocking Stuffer For the holidays, Touch a Heart has released a “Baker’s Heart” Holiday Gift Guide featuring Oatmeal Flax Cookies made with quinoa, chocolate chips and cranberries; Double Chocolate Almond or Cranberry Almond Biscotti, as well as Biscotti Bites. Prices range from $3 to $50. Catalog orders are due by Dec. 2. In addition to the catalog, limited quantities are available for purchase at Friend Café and Island Café in Kunia. For a catalog or to place an order, call 779-7083, email info@ touchahearthawaii.org or visit www.touchahearthawaii.org.

Treatment Center kitchen, as well as the first three participants from the Ke Ola Pono therapeutic living program. After 23 years as a unit manager at Zippy’s, Colin provided the instruction. Members of the fourth cohort all said the program has been a selfconfidence boost that has them all

ke¯ke¯mapa2016

15

more optimistic about the future – especially as sole breadwinners for their families. “I’m intending to work,” said Shanna Aipolani Kaaihue, 36. Her short-term goal is to move back to Kahuku and hopefully get a job at Turtle Bay. In the long-term, she’s thought about going into catering. For Gailynn Kalahiki, 31, it’s been empowering to realize she can handle the class on top of raising an infant and toddler and focusing on her recovery from addiction. “I don’t find it too stressful to be doable,” said the former cook who signed up for the class to brush up on her skills. “The experience makes me feel more well-rounded,” said Michelle Pondelicek, 38. The basic skills, even just arriving on time, make her more confident about finding a job. “It’s something to look forward to when we leave the program.” For more information about Touch a Heart, call 779-7083, email info@touchahearthawaii.org or visit www.touchahearthawaii.org. ¢


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¯ hou poke nu

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org n a t i v e hawaiia n » n e w s | f e a t u r e s | e v e n t s

news briefs

E Kala Mai > The October article “Healthy economies strengthen native nations” was written by OHA Governance Specialist Lindsay Kukona Pakele. KWO regrets the error in the byline. ¢

Scholarship season is underway

Application period opens for humanities grant Hawai‘i is one of 24 states and two territories eligible for a new grant program from the National Endowment of the Humanities. The Creating Humanities Communities grant supports grassroots programs involved in research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities. Only the states and territories who received the least funding in the last fiscal year have been identified as “incentive areas” eligible for matching grants of $30,000 to $150,000 over three years. “All Americans, no matter where they live, should be able to benefit from the power of the humanities,” said NEH Chairman Adams. “Through this new grant program, the National Endowment for the Humanities will stimulate the humanities in communities that have received less support in the past. The Endowment is particularly reaching out to Native American groups and tribal governments with this new grant.” The application deadline is Feb. 15, 2017. Those interested in discussing their applications with Office of Challenge program staff can take advantage of office hours in January and February. The staff will also review draft applications that are submitted by Jan. 16. For more information, call (202) 606-8309, email challenge@neh.gov or visit https://www.neh.gov/files/grants/ creating-humanities-communitiesbudget-instructions.pdf.

Hawaiian Featherwork book wins award A book featuring Hawaiian featherwork from national and international

statement. The agreement reached among the three parties includes protection of 160 acres of land containing endangered fauna and flora and ancient Hawaiian villages and portions of the historic KaniaoKalama road, as well as ensuring access rights are granted to the public and cultural practitioners. In addition, a planned 18-hole golf course will be reduced in size; a deer fence will be erected in order to protect endangered plants and a conservation easement over the protected lands will be provided to the Hawaiian Islands Land Trust.

Mäkua access ban challenged in court

Native Hawaiians interested in higher education may be eligible for scholarships to help cover their tuition. The University of Hawai‘i Common Scholarship Application period for the next academic year runs Dec. 1 to March 1, 2017. A Scholarship ‘Aha at Windward Community College will offer more information about scholarships available to Native Hawaiian students, including the UH/OHA STEM Scholarship. The session will be held Dec. 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. in WCC’s Hale ‘Akoakoa. For more information about scholarship opportunities, visit www.oha.org/scholarships. - Photo: Courtesy of University of Hawai‘i - West O‘ahu collections – and including insight from Hawai‘i scholars and cultural practioners – was honored with the R. L. Shep Ethnic Textiles Book award for 2015 for exemplary scholarship and engaging presentation. The award for “Royal Hawaiian Featherwork: Nä Hulu Ali‘i” was presented in October at the Textile Society of America Biennial Symposium in Savannah, Georgia. The book documents the 2016 exhibit of Hawaiian f e a t h e r wo r k shown at the De Young museum in San Francisco, which was notable for being the first showing of Hawaiian feather work in the continental United States. Produced by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Bishop Museum in Honolulu, and University of Hawai‘i Press, the book features ‘ahu ‘ula (feather capes), akua hula (feathered gods), mahiole (feathered helmets) and informa-

tion on the birds whose feathers were used, in addition to scholarly essays that provide historical and contemporary insight on Hawaiian featherwork. This book can be purchased at the Bishop Museum’s Shop Pacifica. For orders, call 848-4158 for or email shop@bishopmuseum.org.

hear from the Polynesian Voyaging Society about how ancient technology and perspectives like Polynesian wayfinding can help people solve problems in today‘s environment.

Polynesian Voyaging Society co-hosts RobotX

Environment and cultural groups have reached a settlement with Maui County and Honua‘ula Partners to ensure the proposed “Wailea 670” development includes protections for archaeological sites, rare plants and animals and other significant features. In 2008, Honua‘ula Partners initially obtained approval from the Maui County Council for a project that would include single and multifamily housing units, a golf course, commercial units and mixed-used units. The City Council initially required a native plant preservation area no larger than 130 acres and no smaller than 18 acres. The settlement comes more than three years after the Sierra Club and Maui Unite contested Honua‘ula Partners’ environmental impact

The Polynesian Voyaging Sociey and RoboNation are hosting the second edition of RobotX, a competition in which 200 students from 13 universities in Japan, Singapore, Korea, Australia and the United States will be challenged with building autonomous robotic systems that operate at sea. The robotic systems must include, but are not limited to, sensors, a propulsion system, buoyancy pads and software to demonstrate how technology can be used to care for and better understand the ocean. The end goal is for the robotic systems to complete a set of maritime-related tasks. Additionally, the students will

Settlement on Honua‘ula reached

Mälama Mäkua, represented by Earthjustice, is taking the U.S. Army to court over allegations that a ban on access violates a 2001 court-ordered settlement. Mäkua has been used as a live-fire training facility by the U.S Army since World War II. Although the military was supposed to hand over the Mäkua when the war ended, an argeement wasn’t reached until 2001. The settlement forced the Army to stop live-fire training while it completed an Environmental Impact Statement and began cleaning up unexploded ordnance in order to provide safe access to cultural sites. As a result of the ceasefire, Mälama Mäkua uncovered many cultural artifacts, such as Hawaiian temples, shrines and petroglpyhs. However, Mälama Makua claims that in June 2014 the Army cut off cultural access and halted the clean up – even after Mälama Mäkua provided a National Historic Preservation Act memorandum of agreement at the Army’s request in 2015. “Our patience is at an end,” said Sparky Rodrigues of Mälama Mäkua. “There was no valid reason for the Army to cut off cultural access in the first place, and even less justification to continue the access ban. In over a decade of cultural access at Mäkua, there has never been a single person hurt. By keeping practitioners from Mäkua’s sacred sites based on trumped-up safety concerns, the See news briefs on page 17


Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;olaha Lehulehu Public NOTICE

Burial Notice: MäkakaKopu-Moaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ula Ahupuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ăź District, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Island, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Notice is hereby given that human remains were documented during an Archaeological Inventory Survey of 619 acres of land [TMK: (3) 9-6-003: 022] near the former Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ăź Sugar Company Moaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ula Camp area in MäkakaKopu-Moaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ula Ahupuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ăź District, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Island, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. The lands are associated with Land Grant 2877 to Kealiinui. Three burials were identified and are presumed to be traditional Native Hawaiian remains. Proper treatment shall occur in accordance with Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Revised Statutes,

Chapter 6E regarding unmarked grave sites. The applicant, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ăź Mahi, LLC, proposes to preserve the burials in place for perpetuity, in accordance with a plan prepared in consultation with identified descendants and with the approval of the Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Island Burial Council and SHPD. Interested persons are hereby requested to contact Herbert Poepoe, Burial Sites Specialist, State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD), (808) 933-7650, 40 Poâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;okela Street, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 or Glenn Escott, Scientific Consultant Services, Inc., (808) 938-0968, PO Box 155 Keaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;au, HI. Please respond within 30 days of this notice to discuss appropriate treatment of the remains. Individuals responding must be able to

news briefs

keÂŻkeÂŻmapa2016

17

adequately demonstrate lineal and/ or cultural connection to the burials on the above referenced land. CULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT NOTICE Information requested by Scientific Consultant Services, Inc. of cultural resources and/or past and ongoing cultural practices on a 2,013-acre property located on lands of Käilipali Nui and Käilipali Iki Ahupuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a, between Näâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;älehu Town and Waikapuna Bay, Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ăź District, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Island, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i [TMK: (3) 9-5-007:016]. Please respond within 30 days to Glenn Escott at (808) 938-0968. ¢

OHA is developing a management plan for its 25,800acre Wao Kele o Puna. - Photo: KWO File

Continued from page 16 Army causes those sites to lose their mana (spiritual force), inflicting severe cultural harm.â&#x20AC;?

State makes progress on digitizing vital records The state Bureau of Conveyances is midway through its four-step goal to digitize 170 years of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vital records dating back to 1845. A Michigan-based company, U.S Imaging, received a $1.35 million contract for the first two phases, which included scanning 35 million microfilms that served as the original backups to 5,500 reference books, then the reference books themselves. The cumulative page count exceeds 3.3 million. Department of Land and Natural Resources Chair Suzanne Case says the upcoming third phase is to doublecheck the scanned images to ensure that they are in the best format possible for reproduction and access. The final phase will simply be to make the records viewable to anyone with a computer. While the project is underway, reference books and microfilms will still be open for review at the Bureau of Conveyances public reference room, which is open weekdays from 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. ¢

Input needed on Wao Kele o Puna By Office of Hawaiian Affairs Staff

S

ince the beginning of 2016, OHA has been working with its contractor, Forest Solutions Inc., and a number of subcontractors, to draft a Comprehensive Management Plan (CMP) for Wao Kele o Puna, OHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25,800-acre landholding in Puna, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. A substantial component to the

planning process has been community engagement, which so far has been conducted through ethnohistorical interviews and a community advisory council, called the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Aha KĂźkäkĂźkä. Before a first draft is produced, OHA seeks to gather additional community input through a public community meeting. The meeting is currently scheduled for Jan. 5, 2017, and will likely be held in Puna or Hilo. The exact time and location will be announced on the Wao Kele o Puna page of OHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website in December. We highly encourage any interested community members to attend. Any questions regarding this community meeting or the general planning process can be directed to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Olu Campbell at 808-594-1848, or at oluc@oha. org. ¢

    Mahalo a nui iÄ kÄ kou e HawaiĘťi. E mau ana ka haĘťaheo, mau a   mau! Imua i ka lanakila kÄ kou!    

 

    E Ĺ? e nÄ ĘťĹ?iwi ĘťĹ?lino, nÄ pulapula a HÄ loa, mai HawaiĘťi a NiĘťihau,"# a puni ke ao mÄ lamalama. It has been a !  !  "# privilege and honor to have served as OHA Trustee At 

 

Large for 20 years (1996-2016) and as Chairperson of         the OHA Board of Trustees for approximately ten years.  

  Rest assured that this transition does not diminish

   

    my will nor"# my focus to continue to â&#x20AC;&#x153;empower Native !        Hawaiians and strengthen HawaiĘťi.â&#x20AC;? My 20 years of         service at ALU LIKE, Inc. and these 20 years at OHA    

  

   have blessed me with working alongside and among honorable, ethical, and honest leaders, families and

             communities, across HawaiĘťi and this nation. For  that    privilege, I am eternally grateful.    



  

Transforming social justice into positive and truthful action to â&#x20AC;&#x153;empower Native Hawaiians and strengthen HawaiĘťiâ&#x20AC;? should remain uppermost for all of us whether      Native Hawaiian or non-Native.  

    

   The future for OHA and Native Hawaiians in the               emerging complex and confusing political socio           economic climate will be challenging and demanding of           stable, uniďŹ ed, collaborative and cohesive actions. Let us  

    

   hope OHA and all of us are ready for these challenges.                

                       Leave a legacy of â&#x20AC;&#x153;hana me ka ĘťĹ?iaĘťiĘťo, hana me ka                              haĘťahaĘťa a e ĘťĹ?lelo pono kÄ kouâ&#x20AC;?!              Finally, on behalf of Reynold and Louise, and staff that                 

        served with     us during our 20 year tenure we say mahalo,         !"!# !"!#       !"#" !"#"        mahalo a nui iÄ kÄ kou e HawaiĘťi. E mau ana ka haĘťaheo,                mau a mau!           Imua i ka lanakila kÄ kou!      Paid for by Apoliona for OHA 2016      *"Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă?Ă&#x160;{nĂ&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;7>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;>Â?Â&#x153;]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x153;>Â&#x2C6;ÂźÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2122;xĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°>ÂŤÂ&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}    !"!#    !"#"


18

leo ‘elele

ke¯ke¯mapa2016

trustee messsages

Focused on helping OHA realize its full potential

Board of Trustees Note: Trustee columns represent the views of individual trustees and may not reflect the official positions adopted by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees.

Robert K. Lindsey Jr. Chair, Hawai‘i T: 808.594.1855 F: 808.594.1883 Email: robertl@oha.org

—————

Dan Ahuna Vice Chair, Trustee Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau Tel: 808.594.1751 Email: dana@oha.org

—————

Leina’ala Ahu Isa, Ph.D. Trustee, At-large T: 808.594.1877 F: 808.594.1853 Email: ladyg@oha.org

—————

Rowena Akana Trustee, At-large T: 808.594.1860 F: 808.594.0209 Email: rowenaa@oha.org

—————

Peter Apo Trustee, O‘ahu T: 808.594.1854 F: 808.594.1864 Email: petera@oha.org

—————

Keli‘i Akina, Ph.D. Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1888

—————

Carmen “Hulu” Lindsey Trustee, Maui Tel: 808.594.1858 Fax: 808.594.1864 Email: hulul@oha.org

—————

Colette Y. Machado Trustee, Moloka‘i and La¯ na‘i Tel: 808.594.1837 Fax: 808.594.0212 Email: colettem@oha.org

—————

John D. Waihe‘e IV Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1876 Email: crayna@oha.org

W

ith the ity to future generations vo t e s of Hawaiians. Simply counted, put, the plan ensures that I want to OHA will remain solvent express for at least the next half my debt of gratitude to the century. more than 194,000 people Meaning, an entire new who re-elected me. generation of our people I am humbled and would benefit from our Robert K. honored for the privilege 38-year-old organizato continue representing tion’s renewed efforts to Lindsey, Jr. Hawai‘i Island on the improve conditions for Office of Hawaiian Affairs Native Hawaiians. Chair, Board of Trustees. Given this reality, the Trustee, Hawai‘i While I have been a board and administration probation officame together for cer, National Park a series of financial Service ranger workshops, where and Land Assets we plotted a strong, Director for Kamefuture course for hameha Schools, I OHA’s finances. find nothing else to We now have a full be as exhilarating or picture of our finansatisfying as public cial situation and a service. solid grasp of soluFor that reason, I tions to sustain it. take much comfort For example, we in the faith placed know that long term in me to always solvency is achievact with civility, Mele Kalikimaka e Hau‘oli Makahiki able through greater integrity and on our Hou! - Photo: Pixabay diversification of our people’s behalf. revenue streams. I will not let you down as our Similarly, we know that OHA has board turns its attention to address- the ability to overcome the changes ing the issues of major importance in regulatory environment through to our organization. better planning. While we can’t snap our fingers In addition, we know that OHA and instantly ease our people’s frus- must move toward managing its baltration with our ability to improve ance sheet items as they are able to their lives, our board can and must positively impact the trajectory of refrain from making matters worse. our financial situation. Our organization has pressing For all of these reasons, OHA’s needs that won’t be addressed by board and administration have comwild utterances, untamed egos or mitted to a fiscal sustainability plan self-inflated behavior. meant to ensure our organization’s But I have the fierce belief that future salvation. OHA’s pressing needs can be met All told, it is a plan that demonby a board whose trustees use their strates a firm commitment from top influence appropriately and act leadership at OHA to being responrelentlessly in our organization’s sible stewards of our people's trust. best interest. And I look forward in the weeks The early sign of the potential for ahead to working on implementing this happening was the fiscal sustain- it. ability plan that our board adopted in So, with the campaign finally over, October. may your heart be filled with every From my perspective, this plan joy at this special time of the year. puts our organization on a path to Mele Kalikimaka e Hauoli Makafulfilling its greatest responsibil- hiki Hou! ¢

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org n a t i v e hawaiia n » n e w s | f e a t u r e s | e v e n t s

Self-Assessment’s Second Question: Who Is Our Primary Customer?

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elcome been laid off, kupuna and to my elderly with no place to Decemlive and who need caregivb e r ers, people with persistent column mental illness, those strugof the Ka Wai Ola! gling against long-term Hau‘oli Kekemapa! chemical/alcohol depenMele Kalikimaka! Hau‘oli dency, and those in need of Makahiki Hou! affordable rentals/housing. Leina‘ala Last month, we looked All of these people belong at the first question of SelfAhu Isa, Ph.D. to the Primary Customer Assessment which was: Group: Persons with MulWhat is our Mission? This tiple Barriers. Trustee, At-large month, I will discuss the Our primary customer second question: is not necessarily Who Is Our Prisomeone you can mary Customer? reach, someone We don’t have you can sit down “Customers”… with and talk to that word is a directly. Primary Marketing term! customers might We have clibe infants, or ents, recipients, endangered spepatients, kupuna, cies, or members and students! of our future genRather than eration. Whether debate ‘lanor not you have guage,’ I want active dialogue, to ask the quesidentifying the tion: “Who must primary cusbe satisfied for tomer puts your OHA to achieve Mele Kalikimaka and Hauoli Makahiki Hou priorities in order results? It’s when from Trustee Ahu Isa, Lady Garrett and Alvin and gives you a you answer this Akee. - Courtesy photo. reference point question that for critical deciyou define your sion-making. customer. I know it is very tempting to say, “But there is more than one Customers Are Constantly primary customer”! But effective Changing organizations resist this temptation, Often, the customer is one step and keep to a focus—the primary ahead of us. Their numbers will customer. change as they will become more diverse. Their needs are more critiIdentify The Primary Customer cal in this environment today … Let me give you a positive exam- their wants and aspirations will ple of identifying and concentrating evolve. They are customers that we, on the primary customer in a com- OHA, must satisfy to achieve our plex setting like OHA. Right now, results. These may be individuals the latest survey results of our mis- who really need the service, want sion to our beneficiaries show the the service, but not in the way it following as its high priority: To is available today. An OHA that is increase people’s economic and devoted to ‘results’—always with social independence. OHA has regard to its basic integrity—will over 35 programs or more, and for adapt and change as their Customers over 36 years, they have been to (Beneficiaries) needs do. Know your help the physically handicapped, Customer, your Beneficiaries! single mothers who want to get off Be safe, Malama until next year! A welfare, older workers who have hui hou, Trustee Leina’ala Ahu Isa ¢


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trustee messsages

The Season of Aloha is Upon Us

I

suspect my sense of anxiety and the Let us make this a very special season diminished state of my inner spirit of aloha. Let us celebrate the word is shared by more than just aloha by acting out its deepest a few of you who have had meanings. Aloha – to exchange to weather the collapse of the breath of life and accept civility and human dignity that responsibility for each other’s has hovered over America this safety and well-being. Aloha – presidential election year. to respect and love all of God’s The pummeling of America creations. Aloha – to celebrate by mainstream media with their who we are in our diversity with angling of news reporting that an emphasis on those things that Peter reached out and squeezed the join us together as one people, public jugular (which was great respecting our differences, but Apo for ratings) had the chilling moving toward a shared future effect of manifesting the worst of tolerance and co-existence. Trustee, O‘ahu of who we are as a people. I President John Kennedy have a growing sense of urgency that we somehow have to turn our condition of existence from a hateful battle of Us and Them to a sense of mutual respect and tolerance expressed as a We. Somehow we have to rekindle our belief in the words of our founding fathers that we are “One nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all.” So as we ready ourselves for the fast approaching holiday season let us begin the healing by acting out the lyrics of pop composer Burt Bacharach whose song was sung so powerfully by Dionne Warwick and Jackie DeShannon, simply, “What the world needs now, is love, sweet love. It’s the only thing that there’s just too little of.” It is times like this that I count my blessings to live in the Aloha state. Not that Bula Logan and friend honi. - Photo: Kai Markell we are totally immune from being impacted by the national psyche said it all, “Hawai‘i is what the world is of an us-and-them reality – but – that the striving to be like.” Let us rejoice in our very nature of Hawai‘i’s cultural diver- humanity and good fortune of being of sity and the deeply imbedded sense of this place called Hawai‘i. aloha we have as people of Hawai‘i is a ‘Tis the Season of Aloha. Hawai‘i very precious gift we should never take loa kü like käkou. All Hawai‘i stand for granted. together. ¢

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Wrapping-up 2016

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ongratulations to all of the candidates who were elected to office in 2016. Campaigning is a grueling process but the real work is about to begin. I look forward to working with all of you in the 2017 Legislative Session to better the conditions of Native Hawaiians.

her 90th birthday on April 26th. Age has not slowed her efforts to help the Hawaiian people and to preserve and protect in perpetuity the legacy passed down to the present generation.

“One Voice, One Message”

On August 24th, the BAE Committee and OHA’s CEO proposed a new policy called “One Voice, The Constitution of the One Message,” which required Rowena Native Hawaiian Nation that all external communicaOn February 26, 2016, the tions be submitted to the CEO Akana majority of the Na‘i Aupuni for review and approval prior to ‘aha participants voted to adopt execution or engagement. Trustee, At-large The Constitution of the Native If this policy were to be Hawaiian Nation. As one of 154 approved, Trustees will no longer individuals that participated in the be able to publically voice their ‘aha, it is very difficult to put into words opposition to any board decision without what an awesome experience this was for facing severe sanctions for speaking out me. Not only was this an important histori- against the majority. Thankfully, the procal turning point in our history, but it was posal was deferred due to concerns about moving to see people who were often on it being unconstitutional. I will continue to opposite sides of an issue come together strongly oppose this undemocratic policy if for the good of the whole and finally draft it returns to the board table. the governing documents needed to restore our nation. The U.S. Department of the Interior

Forced Land Sales Bills

During the 2016 legislative session, Kamehameha Schools led the charge against legislation that would have forced Hawai‘i’s landowners to sell leasehold lands to their lessees. If HB 1635 or HB 2173 had become law, private land developers could have moved in to condemn and redevelop historical lands that were passed down from generation to generation of Hawaiians. Thankfully, on February 8th, KS announced that the House cancelled the hearing for HB 1635 and HB 2173, which effectively killed the bills. However, 2017 brings a new legislative session with new legislators who are unfamiliar with the issue. Let us all be maka‘ala (watchful).

Wishing our dear Princess a very happy 90th birthday

It was with great admiration and respect that I dedicated this column to honoring Her Royal Highness Princess Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kawananakoa who celebrated

Get the latest in Native Hawaiian, news, features and events.

Get your free holiday subscription today. Visit oha.org/kwo and sign-up | 808.594.1835

announces a pathway to nationhood

On September 23, 2016, the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) announced a “final rule to create a pathway for reestablishing a formal government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community.” It is now time for all of us to work together for the cause of recognition. While the board has NOT voted to accept the rules as written, let us begin to agree on the things that we can agree to and set aside the things we differ on and move forward together for the future generations of Hawaiians yet to come.

Merry Christmas

May each of you have a joyful and merry Christmas surrounded by family and friends. Stay safe out there. Aloha Ke Akua. ¢ Interested in Hawaiian issues and OHA? Please visit my website at www.rowena akana.org for more information or email me at rowenaa@oha.org.


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leo ‘elele

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org

trustee messsages

n a t i v e hawaiia n » n e w s | f e a t u r e s | e v e n t s

E Hana Käkou

Times of Change Require Strong Leadership

I

M

am humbled to have been chosen by the ted to the advancement of Native Hawaiians people of Hawai‘i to take on the role of and will work to uphold the legal status of OHA Trustee-at-Large. This Hawaiian assets for Hawaiian benawesome responsibility is eficiaries. I have fought to protect made even more so because I the foundational Hawaiian entitlemust step into the shoes of Trustee ments as secured by law, including Haunani Apoliona, who is an the Hawaiian Homelands and the outstanding steward of HawaiCeded Lands trusts. I affirm the ian values and a dedicated public rights of Hawaiian beneficiaries servant. I want to thank Trustee and believe we should not take Apoliona for her tireless years of assets away from Hawaiians. I Keli‘i service to the people of Hawai‘i, also affirm the private property and I welcome her ongoing input rights of the Ali‘i trusts, such as Akina, Ph.D. on the advancement of Native the Kamehameha Schools, to fulHawaiians. We continue to need fill the wills of their benefactors. Trustee, you, Trustee Apoliona. I am, after all, a proud alumnus of At-large The 73 percent of all voters Kamehameha Schools as are my who participated in the Trusteefour children. And for my fellow at-Large election this year is Kanaka Maoli who seek various unprecedented, demonstrating that OHA is models of self-determinism, I affirm their relevant and of concern to the entire com- First Amendment right to advocate for indemunity. To all voters, I say mahalo. And I pendence or nationhood. commit myself to be accountable to you. I consider it a sacred responsibility to Please allow me to share my heart, and serve in OHA, and I will work with my communicate my position on several issues fellow trustees to build a strong, transparent important to the Hawaiian people. and effective OHA that empowers the qualFirst of all, I promote the great Hawai- ity of life of present and future generations ian value of Aloha, which unites all people of Hawaiians. As trustees, we must protect as expressed in the 1840 Hawaiian King- and grow the assets of OHA in order to meet dom Constitution: “ ‘God hath made of one the real needs of Hawaiians for housing, blood (koko) all nations of men to dwell jobs, education, and healthcare, as well as on the earth,’ in unity and blessedness.” for economic empowerment. Therefore, I seek harmony between being I ask for your help and prayers in the spirit Hawaiian and being American. I am proud of “E Hana Käkou” (Let’s work together!) to be Hawaiian and proud to be American. to meet the needs of OHA‘s beneficiaries. ¢ At the same time, I am absolutely commit-

AHALO to each and every a fiduciary obligation to prudently manage one of you that took the time this trust and uphold the mandate to better to vote this year. the condition of Native HawaiAlthough I ran ians through the administration of unopposed and was grants and programs and advocacy not included on the ballot, this that serve the Native Hawaiian was a very important election, as community. I know that our board is every election, and I want to and leadership are firmly committhank everyone that volunteered, ted to this and will see to it that no voted and contributed in any fashspecial interest agenda impede on ion during the campaign season. those initiatives. I look forward to Dan I would also like to send a very working in the areas of increased special mahalo to Trustee Hautransparency and accountability, Ahuna nani Apoliona for her 20 years both of which will only help this of service at OHA and nearly 50 agency fulfill its mission. Vice Chair, plus years of service to the Native Leadership is the key during Trustee, Hawaiian community. I wish her, these seemingly unpredictable Kaua‘i and her ‘ohana, and staff (Louise Yeetimes. While much on the fedNi‘ihau Hoy and Reynold Freitas) all the eral level is unknown, we must best as they move on to the next stay focused and steadfast here chapter of their journey. at home. It is a time for strong, The results of this election caught many balanced leaders to step up and lead the of us by surprise. From Trustee Apoliona’s Native Hawaiian community in a galvaunseating, to the election of Donald Trump nized political voice to ensure that our as President. These results have left many in natural and cultural resources are protected our community uneasy and wary of the future and that our rights as indigenous people do for Native Hawaiian rights and programs. It not come under fire. It is up to us… and I is unknown what a Trump administration will do all in my power to assure that the will do in the areas of indigenous rights, Office of Hawaiian Affairs is at the forefront climate change issues, and natural resource of securing those rights and that our people management issues. However, I do know and ‘äina are not compromised. I strongly that OHA has a constitutional mandate that urge all in our community to begin to look must be strictly adhered to and a mission at elections in 2018, it is never too early, I and strategic plan that this board of trustees hope to see a strong slate of Native Hawaihas committed to fulfilling. ians running for all levels of office in 2018. I welcome our newest Trustee, Keli‘i Holo mua i ka pono a me ka ha‘aha‘a e nä Akina and look forward to working with po‘e Hawai‘i! ¢ him in furtherance of our mandate. We have

Watch Live!

Live streams are available for meetings of all standing committees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees. For the live stream, and for a schedule of board and committee meetings visit:

www.OHA.org/about/board-trustees Live streaming will continue to be available for O‘ahu meetings of the Board of Trustees.

To watch from your mobile/tablet devices, download the Ustream app from GooglePlay or App Store . TM

SM


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trustee messsages

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Stay connected.

! " $ * #ohahawaii

Holiday traditions strengthen ‘ohana It seems like just yesterday that we pur- shrimp and tofu; the other with vegetables chased new calendars for the year 2016 including wonbok cabbage, white and and here we are looking towards green onions, beansprouts, musha new year. Our weather has rooms, zucchini and eggplant. finally changed and it is nippy Each person is given a chawan of here in beautiful Kula, Maui. I rice, a little bowl of sauce (secret am so grateful for the blessing to mixture) and a little plate with have been born in Hawai‘i, the chopsticks or fork. Each person most beautiful place on earth. cooks on the pan whatever they When people ask me what makes want to eat with parents helping Hawai‘i so unique, I always children and spouses feeding each answer “our people.” Our people Carmen “Hulu” other. My family waits impatiently are unique. We are born with for this day all year long. Lindsey aloha in our hearts and raised to When our meal is done at respect our fellow man—to love midday, we segregate the gifts Trustee, Maui unconditionally and to kökua that were delivered from each when our neighbors need kökua. family to my home for all. The We can’t ask for a better place to Nakasone boys usually take the live. Having had the opportunity to visit lead for making individual piles for family many different countries, I know the true members. When they are done with the little value of our people as I compare us to other mountain of gifts, they ask permission to cultures, practices and traditions. open their gifts. It is so much fun watching Christmas is soon approaching—the their reactions as they open each gift with so season to be mindful of the birth of our much curiosity and excitement. Each year eldest brother, Jesus Christ, His sacrifice there is a special gift that they are looking and His teachings. Especially during this for within their piles. season we should feel the desire to give of Christmas is also a time for us to reflect ourselves—to serve our neighbors, those on our accomplishments for the year. What who are less fortunate, our elderly, our sick have we done? Could we have done better? and our lonely. How do we do better next year? I am thankWe should reconnect with family ful for the opportunities to better myself and members who have been distant—fix rela- how I may help those that need my help. I tionships that have been broken. look back at all the beneficiaries I met with We need to develop family traditions that this year—their trials, their concerns, their can strengthen the family unit and perpetu- problems and their opportunities as well. I ate these traditions for years to come. In my have gone over each concern in my mind family many of our traditions include our and tried to craft a solution that can bengatherings for celebrating special holidays efit each problem—whether it's a personal or occasions such as birthdays or anniver- problem, a lähui problem, or a County/State saries. Our favorite holiday is Christmas problem. If I can be of service, I feel that where everyone's favorite food is served this is the purpose of my election to the seat via the Teppanyaki pan. We have four tep- that I hold. I am grateful for this opportunity panyaki pans for our family of 18 including to serve you, the beneficiaries of the Office in-laws and maybe a special guest or two of Hawaiian Affairs. Mele Kalikimaka a added. Each pan has two platters—one with Hau‘oli Makahiki Hou! ¢ the protein which includes beef, chicken,

from mauka to makai… and online! Stay connected.

T W O

T H O U S A N D

A N D

S I X T E E N

OFFICE of HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS

INVESTITURE Watch the LIVE broadcast of the 2016 OHA Investiture Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, 10 a.m. On O‘ahu, tune into

¯ lelo TV Channel 54. ‘O Live web-stream also available on ‘Ōlelo’s YouTube channel:

www.youtube.com/olelocm

Follow #ohahawaii on social media for on-the-ground updates from the Investiture ceremony.

Empowering Hawaiians, Strengthening Hawai‘i

www.oha.org oha.org


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keÂŻkeÂŻmapa2016

hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ohui â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ohana

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org n a t i v e hawaiia n Âť n e w s | f e a t u r e s | e v e n t s

family reunions

E na- â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ohana Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i: If you are planning a reunion or looking for genealogical information, Ka Wai Ola will print your listing at no charge on a space-available basis. Listings should not exceed 200 words. OHA reserves the right to edit all submissions for length. Send your information by mail, or e-mail kwo@OHA.org. E ola na- mamo a Ha- loa! 2017 DUDOIT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Planning for the April 14 & 15, 2017 reunion is well on itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way. Monthly meetings are held at Godfrey Kaonohiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house at 47-641 Uakea Place, Kahaluâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;u, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. This year we are honoring our kĂźpuna, so please come and join us at the meetings and plan for a very special two day event. For information you can contact Howard Meheula at 808-393-8689, Colette Cordiero 808234-3032 or Cathy Kaonohi at 808-239-8684. You can also follow us on Facebook at Dudiot unlimited. Mahalo and hope to hear from the Dudiot â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ohana. KAHANAOI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pomaikai reunion will be held on Saturday, August 19, 2017 at Zablan Beach, Nänäkuli, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ohana includes, Kauwe, Kaluna, Laimana, McCabe, Cockett, Rowans, Wongs, Jones, Komomua, Kaopuiki, Cockett, Apiki, Kalauawa, and etc. Contact Jeanne Kahanaoi at 808-354-7365. KALAAUHINA-KEPAA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The descendants of Annie Kalaauhina, and William Ben Kepaa of Kuiaha, Maui, are planning a family reunion in Waimänalo, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ahu, from July 7 -9, 2017. Children of Annie and William were: Hoopii, Miriam, Edward, Kailaka, Makaopio, Smith, William, Mikala, Annie. Tutuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second marriage was to Peter Halo. Children of Annie and Peter were: Mary Halao Kepaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a Werner, and John Aiawale Halao Kepaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a. Her third marriage was to Ben Piipii Kahele no issue (children). Plans for Friday, July 7 are for a casual get together at our cousinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home in Waimänalo. Saturday, July 8 is

the Reunion LĂźau from 2 -10 p.m. on Department of Hawaiian Homelands (DHHL) property, mauka side of Hilu Street, in Waimänalo. Sunday, July 9 weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re winding down and simply spending time together. A small contribution will be asked to help offset costs. We will be sharing genealogy and would welcome yours. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a family face book page â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kekaula (Kalaauhina-Kepaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a) Lauâ&#x20AC;? that we can add you to. This is a closed group so please kĂśkua and identify yourselves and your connection to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ohana when you send a friend request. For more information contact Hudson Kekaula, hkekaula@hotmail.com 808-486-3941 (leave message) or Primrose Judge pjudge@ alionscience.com 703-933-6622. KINIMAKA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kinimaka â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ohana reunion will be July 2-5, 2017, Kona, Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Island. Contact Kaniu Kinimaka-Stocksdale at email: kaniu@ coconutwoman.me or call 808-313-1598 for more info. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;O wau no me ka haâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a haâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a. KULIOHOLANI-KONOWAHINE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;OHANA REUNION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The two surviving descendants of Alawa and his wife Ana Kulioholani are having a reunion. The descendants are Daisy Nakike Apua Alawa who married Kau Chit Aki, and her sister Ana Alawa who married Kamaka Pamaiaulu. Descendants of these two sisters: from Daisy Nakike Apua Alawa (Kau Chit Aki) are: Henry AhChoy Apua, Amoe Aki Yam, Edward Kau, Harry Aki, Sam Aki and Alex Aki. From Ana Alawa (Pamaiaulu) are: Julia Konawahine Pamaiaulu. Julia married Peter Kaiu Akiona and had ten children. Six of the surviving children are: Josephine DeLaura-

Crow, Ramona Teves, Veronica Samera, Dorothy Kekuewa, Shirley Hering and Lorna AkionaTerry. The reunion will be at the Waimanalo Hawaiian Homes Hale, 41-253 Ilauhole St., Waimanalo on Saturday, July 1, 2017, 8 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m. Cost $15 for adults 8 years and up (includes 1 Bento), $8 for children 5 to 7 years old (includes 1 Bento). Under 4 years old is free (no Bento, but may purchase a Bento for $8). Register on line at: https://sites.google.com/site/kauakiohana/home. Deadline February 28, 2017. For information or those who wish to help with the planning call John Aki at 808-492-5929 or email johnakijr@yahoo.com. LINCOLN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ohana Lincoln Reunion Committee is planning our next family reunion for June 16 & 17, 2017 in Kona. Our Reunion begins on Friday, June 16 with a historic visit to our ancestral lands and continues on Saturday, June 17 at Hale Halawai. If you are of Lincoln heritage and want to attend, please contact the following Committee members for more information. Please be sure to leave a message if no one answers. You can also email me as well, Rowena A. Lincoln, 808-497-1219, email: Ehulani822@ yahoo.com or Jonna Robello, 808-783-5423.

E Ă&#x2013; Mai

For more information on the Kuleana Tax Ordinance or for genealogy veriďŹ cation requests, please contact 808.594.1967 or email kuleanasurvey@oha.org.

KULEANA LAND HOLDERS THE KULEANA LAND TAX ordinances in the City and County of Honolulu, County of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i, County of Kauaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i and County of Maui allow eligible owners to pay minimal property taxes each year. Applications are on each countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site.

Empowering Hawaiians, Strengthening Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i

FAMILY SEARCH CULLEN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Looking for genealogy records for my great grandmother on my fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side. Mary Cullen 1869-1920 married John Fernandez 1860-1939. Their daughter Madeline Fernandez Colburn. Please call or text Pauahi Colburn at 722-8400. Mahalo nui ¢

oha.org ÂŞ.ÂŞ.IMITZÂŞ(WY ÂŞ3UITEÂŞÂŞsÂŞ(ONOLULU ÂŞ()ÂŞÂŞsÂŞ All personal data, such as names, locations and descriptions of Kuleana Lands will be kept secure and used solely for the purposes of this attempt to perpetuate Kuleana rights and possession.

Are you missing out? Offers for Hawaiian homestead lots are in the works for 2017, starting with Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ahu, Kauaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i, LÄ naâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i and Maui. Oftentimes beneďŹ ciaries who fail to update the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands with their updated mailing address do not receive our offers. If we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deliver information to your doorstep youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re missing out on important information like the lot offers, homebuyer education programs, and more!

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss your next offer! Update your contact info TODAY! Visit dhhl.hawaii.gov/deliver â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Check if you or someone you know is on our list of Non-Deliverable Addresses Download a Change of Address form or request one be mailed to you

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

You may also pick up a Change of Address form at any of our DHHL Offices statewide For more information, call our Homestead Services Division at (808)620-9220

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ä&#x20AC;ina Hoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;opulapula, He Kuleana. Hawaiian Home Lands HAWAIIAN HOMES COMMISSION â&#x20AC;˘ DEPARTMENT OF HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS

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ma¯keke

the marketplace

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Classified ads only $12.50 - Type or clearly write your ad of no more than 175 characters (including spaces and punctuation) and mail, along with a check for $12.50, to: Ka Wai Ola Classifieds, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Suite 200, Honolulu, HI 96817. Make check payable to OHA. (We cannot accept credit cards.) Ads and payment must be received by the 15th for the next month's edition of Ka Wai Ola. Send your information by mail, or e-mail kwo@oha.org with the subject “Makeke/Classified.” OHA reserves the right to refuse any advertisement, for any reason, at our discretion.

oha

offices HONOLULU 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Ste. 200, Honolulu, HI 96817 Phone: 808.594.1888 Fax: 808.594.1865

EAST HAWAI‘I (HILO) Wailoa Plaza, Suite 20-CDE 399 Hualani Street Hilo, Hawaii 96720 Phone: 808.933.3106 Fax: 808.933.3110

WEST HAWAI‘I (KONA) 75-1000 Henry St., Ste. 205 Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Phone: 808.327.9525 Fax: 808.327.9528

MOLOKA‘I

Ku- lana ‘O iwi, P.O. Box 1717 Kaunakakai, HI 96748 Phone: 808.560.3611 Fax: 808.560.3968

LA¯NA‘I P.O. Box 631413, La¯ na’i City, HI 96763 Phone: 808.565.7930 Fax: 808.565.7931

KAUA‘I / NI‘IHAU 4405 Kukui Grove St., Ste. 103 Lı¯ hu‘e, HI 96766-1601 Phone: 808.241.3390 Fax: 808.241.3508

MAUI 33 Lono Ave., Suite 480 Kahului, HI 96732-1636 Phone: 808.873.3364 Fax: 808.873.3361

WASHINGTON, D.C.

211 K Street NE Washington D.C., 20002 New phone: 202.506.7238 New fax: 202-629-4446

$65,000 (LH) MOLOKA‘I – 5.266 Acres located right outside airport. Large vacant lot, build affordable dream home. G. Jeannie Byers (R) PB, GI RB-14805 285-4774. West Beach Realty, Inc. RB-15007 808-696-4774. Jeannie@ westbeachrealty.com. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR AN ANCESTOR AT KALAUPAPA? Ka ‘Ohana O Kalaupapa, a non-profit organization made up of Kalaupapa residents, family members and friends, might be able to help. We have information on more than 7,000 people sent to Kalaupapa. Contact ‘Ohana Coordinator Valerie Monson at vmonson@ kalaupapa.org or call 808-573-2746. ATTENTION MEDICARE MEMBERS: Have questions about Medicare? Recently retired? Know you options? Let’s look for a plan that best suits your needs. Call Kamaka Jingao 808-286-0022. GIFT HOPE: HÖKÜLE‘A & the Worldwide Voyage are about coming together to perpetuate the things we love. Express this aloha by gifting voyage merchandise: hokulea.myshopify.com. GORDON THE JEWELER is offering Wahine and Käne Paddlers jewelry thru his website www.gordonthejeweler.com. View on Facebook also. Future products: Koa pendants inlayed with silver and gold paddlers, for that special occasion. Credit cards accepted. HOMES WITH ALOHA – Anahola 3.13 acres, working productive farm. Breadfruit, avocado, mango trees, Cash only – By appt. only $160,000. Leasehold. Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474 Williams Keller Honolulu. HOMES WITH ALOHA – Kamuela 4/2.5 10,000 sq.ft. lot $250,000. Leasehold. Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474 Williams Keller Honolulu. HOMES WITH ALOHA – Nänäkuli 3/2 teardown $130,000/ offer. Leasehold. Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474 Williams Keller Honolulu. HOMES WITH ALOHA – Papakölea 7,200 sq. ft. lot. $160,000/ offer. Leasehold. Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474 Williams Keller Honolulu.

HOMES WITH ALOHA –Wai‘anae 3/2 custom built home, corner lot $365,000. Leasehold. Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474 Williams Keller Honolulu. KÄNAKA MAOLI flags and regular Hawaiian flags (large 3’x5’) for your truck, boat or house ($10.00 each), hand flags (12”x18”), special T-shirts and tank tops with royal crest, island T-shirts for your island from $10.00, Känaka Maoli Pledge, long-sleeve T-shirts for hunters, stickers, window decals, banners. Order via www. kanakamaolipower.org or 808-332-5220. NO-COST MARITIME JOB TRAINING for well-paying jobs on shore or sea. Hands-on learning and sailing with Maritime Careers Exploration for NH women and men. 4-week class starts Jan. 4: Marimed.org or 34-3774. SCHOOLS/TEACHERS/LEADERS/LIBRARIANS: Ka ‘Imi Institute’s “Hawaiians as Scientists, He Mele No Kane” DVD w/Study Guide 5th-adult. Educators’ Special $15. Info/to order: www.kaimi.org. THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING A HOME? Call Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295-4474. Keller Williams Honolulu. To view current listings go to my website HomeswithAloha.com. Call or email me at Charmaine.QuilitPoki@gmail.com to learn more about homeownership. Mahalo nui. Specialize in fee simple & homestead properties, 30 years. WANTED: DHHL KËÖKEA, Maui 2+ acres Agricultural Lot. Have cash in hand for the right parcel. Please call (808) 281-2366. Mahalo! ¢

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2016 Office of Hawaiian Affairs Annual Report

Lei lo ÂŻkahi i ka lanakila U n i ty i s a d o r n e d i n v i c to r y


2

About OHA Vision “Ho‘oulu Lāhui Aloha” - To Raise a Beloved Nation. OHA’s vision statement blends the thoughts and leadership of both King Kalākaua, and his sister, Queen Lili‘uokalani. Both faced tumultuous times as we do today, and met their challenges head on. “Ho‘oulu Lāhui” was King Kalākaua’s motto. “Aloha” expresses the high values of Queen Lili‘uokalani.

Table of Contents About OHA

2

Message

3

Executives

4

Mission Statement To mālama (protect) Hawai‘i’s people and environmental resources and OHA’s assets, toward ensuring the perpetuation of the culture, the enhancement of lifestyle and the protection of entitlements of Native Hawaiians, while enabling the building of a strong and healthy Hawaiian people and nation, recognized nationally and internationally. Overview The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is a public agency with a high degree of autonomy. OHA is responsible for improving the well-being of Native Hawaiians. OHA is governed by a Board of Trustees made up of nine members who are elected statewide for four-year terms to set policy for the agency. OHA is administered by a Ka Pouhana (Chief Executive Officer) who is appointed by the Board of Trustees to oversee a staff of about 170 people.

Our Focus Our Hawaiian ancestors understood that the well-being of our community rested upon the inter-relationship of how we conduct ourselves, steward the islands we call home, and fulfill the responsibility of caring for our families, all within the physical and spiritual realms. They also understood that successfully maintaining lōkahi meant careful observation, knowledge gathering, and informed decision making to achieve pono. OHA is striving to embrace this time-tested wisdom through our Strategic Plan.

2016 Budget summary

5

Culture

6

Governance & Education

8

¯ina Health & ‘A

2016 OHA Annual Report Produced by the Community Engagement Division

10

Economic Self-Sufficiency

11

Grants

12

Sponsorships

EDITORIAL COORDINATION Meredith Desha Enos

GRAPHIC DESIGN OHA Digitial and Print Media

EDITORIAL REVIEW Meredith Desha Enos, Treena Shapiro Miyamoto, Francine Kananionapua Murray, N. Mehanaokala Hind

PHOTOGRAPHY Francine Kananionapua Murray, Nelson Gaspar

CONTRIBUTING EDITORIAL Meredith Desha Enos, Treena Shapiro Miyamoto, Ka Wai Ola staff and contributors

PRINTING Oahu Publications Inc., Jay Higa Hagadone Printing Company, Aimee Schu

14

Unaudited Financial Statements

16–19

Copyright © 2016 Office of Hawaiian Affairs. All Rights Reserved. No part of this report may be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in part in any form without the express written permission of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.


3

¯ kou, Aloha mai kA Joint Message from the board of trustees CHAIRperson and Ka Pouhana/CEO

As you may already know, OHA does three things: provide resources; advocate for Native Hawaiians on a range of issues; and facilitate collaboration among key stakeholders. We make a difference in our beneficiaries’ lives through grants, research, advocacy, community engagement—really the breadth of all we do. One year ago, we pledged to foster a sense of unity between the Board of Trustees and the administration. In this time, we’ve had many successes—such as the return of Kalani‘ōpu‘u’s treasured mahiole and ‘ahu ‘ula, which leveraged community and international partnerships. And like any organization, we have faced challenges. While we can’t avoid all political controversy, we can say with confidence that together we have developed a focused, consistent, data-driven approach to meeting our beneficiaries’ needs, all while promoting organizational integrity and unity. As our Annual Report illustrates, we continue to make inroads on our three main goals, and we have the data to back this claim. We don’t just tally grant awards—we track how they benefit the community and what impact they have. This document shows how we’re working toward our strategic goals and their significance to the Hawaiian community. You’ll see examples of shared goals being carried out by community leaders passionate about their work to advance the lāhui. Looking ahead, the Board of Trustees adopted in October a fiscal sustainability plan. In 2015 we faced a sharp increase in legal fees, a market downturn in the third quarter and a rise in fringe benefit costs. Given these circumstances, our Board and Administration came together this past year for a series of financial workshops, where we plotted a future course for OHA’s finances. The fiscal sustainability plan brings into sharp focus our greatest obligation—ensuring that our organization’s finances remain sound. From our perspective, this plan puts our organization on a path to fulfilling its responsibility—to future generations of Hawaiians. Simply put, the plan ensures that OHA will remain solvent for at least the next half century. The plan strengthens policies and guidelines essential to maintaining the financial accountability of our assets when making spending decisions necessary for OHA to fulfill its mission. It is an obligation that we are taking seriously as our Board and Administration approach our new fiscal sustainability plan with urgency and unity, demonstrating a firm commitment from top leadership at OHA to being responsible stewards of our people’s trust. Mālama pono,

Robert K. Lindsey Jr. Chairperson, Hawai‘i Island Trustee

Kamana‘opono M. Crabbe, Ph.D. Ka Pouhana, Chief Executive Officer


4

BOard of trustees

2016 Board of Trustees Above, First row (L-R): John D. Waihe‘e IV, Trustee, At-large; Robert K. Lindsey, Jr., Trustee, Hawai‘i; Colette Y. Machado, Moloka‘i and La¯na‘i. Second row (L-R): S. Haunani Apoliona, MSW, Trustee, At-large; Leina‘ala Ahu Isa, Ph.D., Trustee, At-large; Dan Ahuna, Trustee, Kaua‘i & Ni‘ihau; Peter Apo, Trustee, O‘ahu; Rowena Akana, Trustee, At-large; Carmen Hulu Lindsey, Trustee, Maui

adminstration

Executive Team - Left, First row (L-R): Lisa Victor, Chief Operating Officer; Kamana‘opono Crabbe, PhD, Chief Executive Officer; Second row (L-R): Miles Nishijima, Land and Property Director; Hawley Iona, Chief Financial Officer/Resource Management -Financial Assets Director; Lisa Watkins-Victorino, Ph.D., Research Director; Nicole Mehanaokala¯ Hind, Community Engagement Director; Kawika Riley, Chief Advocate


5

Grants $10,189,212

P  roperty $6,984,438 Includes operational costs for OHA’s properties at Kaka‘ako Makai, Na¯ Lama Kukui, the Palauea Cultural Preserve and Wao Kele o Puna.

Overhead $3,990,667

Special Programs $4,710,565  Reflects budgets for programs funded through non-trust fund sources, such as federal funds, and support of other OHA LLC’s.

Program Services $1,503,639

Governance Planning $130,062  Reflects the budget authorization for Governance Planning.

Includes grants and sponsorships. This total does not equal the total on pages 12 to 15 as those totals include prior year appropriations.

Includes facility related expenses such as utilities, rent and maintenance for OHA’s offices, and other expenses such as equipment costs.

Program Services includes costs directly related to program activities such as printing, advertising, bulk mail and other costs.

Approved Budget

Core Personnel $14,394,466

Includes salary and fringe, student helpers, worker compensation and other personnel costs. Does not include personnel costs for certain programs with designated sources of funding,

Contracts $8,010,981  Includes expenditures directly related to implementing program activities, services-on-a-fee and legal services.

Approved Budget

$49,914,030

OHA FY 2016 Budget Summary These two charts give a brief outline of OHA’s spending limit as provided by policy and the maximum budget authorization. In addition, the grants authorization listed may not equal the grants and sponsorships reported on page 12 to 15. The numbers listed on page 12 to 15 include prior year authorizations that were to be released to grantees in FY 2016. For further detail, please see the financial statements beginning on page 16

Spending Limit

$53,549,763 SPENDING LIMIT

State of Hawai‘i $3,217,504  General Fund Appropriations by the State Legislature. PLT  Revenues $15,100,000 State law says OHA is entitled to 20 percent of receipts from the use or sale of the public land trust. Since 2006, the legislature has authorized an interim amount at $15.1 million until it takes further action. 5%  of the NHTF Portfolio $17,299,064 The Native Hawaiian Trust Fund includes OHA’s investment portfolio. Withdrawals are capped at 5% of a 20-quarter rolling average market value to ensure resources are available for future spending. Fiscal Reserve $3,000,000  The Fiscal Reserve is comprised of previously authorized but unused core operating funding.

Property $10,092,568  Reflects the revenues generated by Na¯ Lama Kukui, Kaka‘ako Makai properties and deposits for use at the Palauea Cultural Reserve. Special Programs $4,710,565  Includes grants, federal funding for specific projects (including the Ha¯lawa Luluku Interpretive Development Project and the Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund Program and other miscellaneous income. Governance Planning $130,062  The Board of Trustees approved a financing vehicle in 2014 to fund OHA’s governance planning effort.


6

Cu lt u r e

Nainoa Thompson

Reconnecting to culture and connecting with the world In 1980, Nainoa Thompson became the first Hawaiian in 600 years to use ancestral wisdom to navigate the voyaging canoe Ho¯ku¯le‘a to Tahiti and back. The success made Ho¯ku¯le‘a an iconic symbol of the Hawaiian Renaissance and Thompson a source of inspiration for others hoping to reclaim ‘ike ku¯puna and revive Native Hawaiian culture. Thompson, now president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and in the midst of Ho¯ku¯le‘a’s Ma¯lama Honua Worldwide Voyage, says he’s honored to see so many of today’s young people taking an interest in their history. “Navigation is just one part of this cultural renaissance. We’re also seeing it in music, dance, language and education,” Thompson says. “This reconnection to the identity of our ancestors ultimately leads to a strong self-worth and pride in the native Hawaiian people, and I believe this is the foundation for the health and well-being of our people.” Ma¯lama Honua has allowed the Ho¯ku¯le‘a crew to collect stories of hope from around the world, including how indigenous communities in Hawai‘i and elsewhere are turning to traditional practices to reverse the environmental damage caused by human activity. “We’ve seen in so many places this growing awareness of what humankind is doing to earth and how indigenous knowledge brought together with science is providing solutions,” Thompson says. “We’ve also seen a shifting of values where restoration is more valuable than consumption and the need to act is so crucial.” Thompson’s passion and high-profile advocacy for ocean sustainability has contributed to Hawai‘i’s emergence as a global leader in conservation issues. “The world is turning to Hawai‘i as a classroom for cultural and environmental sustainability,” he said. “It is important to rediscover our traditions, bring them forward to the 21st century to address today’s needs for conservation. Protecting our indigenous culture will help us develop the sailplan for tomorrow.”


2016 Annual Report | 7

7

Clearly, the preservation and perpetuation of, and education in, culture is central to an enduring and healthy people. We have sponsored and held several Hawaiian cultural events, to touch thousands of people across the state:

1,940

58,439

attendees to Culture-focused ‘Ahahui events in 2016

attendees to 47 I Mana Ka La ¯hui workshops on six islands

In addition, there are other cultural assets OHA has contributed to:

3 directories

$180,000 donation to Ma ¯lama Mauna ‘Ala, for site restoration

$500,000 ¯ ina to help Aloha Kuamo‘o ‘A acquire for stewardship the Kuamo‘o battlefield in south Kona

OHA is updating its cultural directories; Ola Na ¯ Iwi: Directory of Hawaiian Artists and Cultural Resources; Ku Mai ka Po‘e Hula: Directory of Hula Resources; Na ¯ Lima Mikioi: Directory of Weavers and Fiber Artists

OHA used traditional and social media to bring Kalani‘o ¯pu‘u’s story to a 21st Century audience:

87

Facebook posts reached 2,207,535 unique users and got 3,507,486 impressions.

149,950

people around the world watched the powhiri ceremony at Te Papa through Facebook Live.

Ali‘i Kalani‘o¯pu‘u’s royal garments returned In 1779, the chief of Hawai‘i Island, ali‘i Kalani‘o¯pu‘u, greeted captain James Cook after his ship made port in Kealakekua Bay. As a demonstration of goodwill, Kalani‘o¯pu‘u gifted his ‘ahu‘ula (feathered cloak) and mahiole (feathered helmet) to Captain Cook. These and other treasures from around the Pacific were taken back to England on Cook’s ships. In a partnership between OHA, the National Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and Bishop Museum, the storied ‘ahu‘ula and mahiole were returned to the Hawaiian people in March 2016, after 237 years away. This return is particularly significant, as museums seldom release items, especially those with such significance and artisanship as the ‘ahu‘ula and mahiole, to indigenous people, and may represent a growing understanding of indigenous rights over cultural assets. Highlights from the return ceremonies included a powhiri (a Ma¯ori ceremony) at Te Papa, where the heritage pieces were given over to the Hawaiians. In addition, a private ceremony—conducted entirely in Ma¯ori and ‘o¯lelo Hawai‘i—welcomed the ‘ahu‘ula and mahiole to where they will be housed at Bishop Museum. OHA was named to hold the items in trust for the Native Hawaiian people.

40+

local, national, and international news stories aired, reaching hundreds of thousands of viewers on television, radio, and online.


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G ov e r n a n ac e & E d u cat i o n

Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie knowing our rights helps us move forward with a common understanding

“Understanding our rights is important, so that we know we have options,” explains Melody Kapilialoha MacKenzie, professor, editor, and director of Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law and the University of Hawai‘i at Ma¯noa. “We need to understand our histories, how our self-determination has been suppressed. There are possibilities to interact with other peoples and nations. Consequently, we need to be educated about each of our possible paths forward. “These decisions affect not just Native Hawaiians but all Hawai‘i.” In addition to her work at the center, MacKenzie recently edited Native Hawaiian Law: A Treatise, an update of the 1991 Native Hawaiian Rights Handbook. She began work on the treatise in 2000, and “one of the reasons it has taken so long to publish is that there has been a sea change, internationally, in the way governments view indigenous rights,” she notes. “Our claims are being taken more seriously, especially in relation to traditional and customary practices, land ownership, and natural and cultural resources.” Coupled with this global change of perspective is the work Hawaiians have been doing on their own. She spent much of February at the Native Hawaiian ‘Aha, “observing what was going on and acting as a resource when asked” as participants crafted a Native Hawaiian Constitution. “There were so many obstacles to overcome in the process, and so many different perspectives—but the participants still had respect and aloha for each other’s positions. “Going forward, I hope we can maintain that level of respect and aloha,” MacKenzie says. “More important than a particular form of governance structure is the ability to give aloha and respect—and go forward together as a people.”


A unique 60-minute hand-drawn film that gets straight to the point

9 In recent years, OHA has been making greater use of digital media, to create and support an educated and engaged 21th century La ¯hui. OHA’s 2016 multimedia efforts have resulted in:

450,636 pa pa k i l o Papakilodatabase.com views

D ATA B A S E

31,358

Kipukadatabase.com views

7,514

Mooaupuni.com views

65,868

OHA debuts ‘Pa’a Ke Aupuni: The Reel History of Hawai’i’ DPNJOHTPPO

OHA.ORG

Kamakakoi.com views

22,171

Ohadatabook.com views. The Native Hawaiian Data Book was updated and published online

OHA’s Washington, D.C. bureau started The Native Hawaiian Public Service Pipeline Blog, to provide information and opportunities for members of the Hawaiian community who are interested in public service at the federal level.

KAMAKAKO‘I PRESENTS OFFICE OF HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS PRODUCTION PA‘A KE AUPUNI: THE REEL HISTORY OF HAWAI‘I ANIMATION LEAD JAMES HALL ILLUSTRATIONS RUTH MOEN VOICE OF PUEO KAHU WENDELL SILVA WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY KE¯HAUNANI ABAD CREATIVE DIRECTOR AND PRODUCER CYNTHIA Y.H. DEROSIER CO-PRODUCED BY RYAN GONZO GONZALEZ AND ALICE SILBANUZ PRODUCTION COORDINATION GOOD JUJU CO. SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS HYPERSPECTIVE STUDIOS MUSIC AND SOUND DESIGN PACIFIC MUSIC PRODUCTIONS AN

3O

articles about governance in Ka Wai Ola, a publication of over 60,000 readers monthly.

#PAAKEAUPUNI

KAMAKAKOI.COM

“Pa‘a Ke Aupuni: The Reel History of Hawai‘i” is an animated feature produced by OHA that endeavors to have Hawaiians tell their own story, while remaining steadfast--pa‘a—to the facts. The film opens in traditional times, setting the stage for the era of Kamehameha and ends at the purported “annexation” of Hawai‘i in the late 19th century. “We wanted to come up with something that had utility for both Hawaiians and non-Hawaiians alike, a historical primer that could be used in a variety of settings,” said producer Ryan Gonzalez. “How can we get non-Hawaiians to support Hawaiians? How can we better engage Hawaiians? It all starts with education and knowing the facts.” “Pa‘a Ke Aupuni” evolved out of a combination of group discussions conducted by trustees and community members, a 2013 Board of Trustees motion that committed OHA to providing education to the Hawaiian community and general public on key points in Hawaiian history and community feedback. It debuted in Honolulu on July 31, 2015. In addition, OHA hosted 24 screenings across the pae ‘a¯ina that were attended by almost 1,500 people. It also aired on KGMB and KHNL. Tens of thousands of people have watched this ground-breaking film, and it continues to be available online, on digital cable, and for download.


10

¯ina H e a lt h & ‘A

Diane Paloma

Native hawaiian health is grounded in the land With a passion for healthcare and a love of Hawaiian culture, Diane Paloma, PhD, always knew she wanted to find a way to bridge the two to improve the overall ola pono (well-being) of Native Hawaiians. “Some of the biggest challenges are giving individuals and communities the opportunity to be healthy,” Paloma points out. “Making healthy choices is more of a luxury than a right.” For the past decade, Paloma has led the Native Hawaiian Health Program at The Queen’s Medical Center, which aims at eliminating health disparities between Hawaiians and other ethnic groups. One successful strategy has been empowering communities to develop culturally relevant health initiatives—which can transform entire communities, especially rural ones. “One of the best things about working in rural areas is they take ownership over progress and that fuels the sustainability of programs that will endure over changes in funding, leadership and organizations,” Paloma says. The Native Hawaiian Health Program has also been partnering with other organizations, including OHA, committed to a similar mission, with the recognition that improving Hawaiian health also helps Hawai‘i. “By raising the health status of Native Hawaiians, we raise the bar for everyone,” Paloma says. “Our health status becomes less of a burden upon the entire system and we can all thrive together. QUEEN’S Hana Ola is just one of the ‘a ¯ina-based initiatives OHA supported in 2016:

11

‘a ¯ina-based initiatives that recieved OHA grants

650 30,326 $1,088,200 acres managed (‘a ¯ina and loko i’a)

disbursed

pounds of various crops produced for sale or community distribution

56,428 hours of staff and volunteer time


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eco n om i c S e l f-s u f f i c i e n cy

Maile Meyer

our networks and indigeneity gives us economic strength ¯ Mea Hawai‘i and passionate For Maile Meyer, founder of Na arts advocate, economic self-sufficiency is about more than just finances. “Economic self-sufficiency isn’t about numbers of hours or amounts of money; it’s more focused on time, what you can do with the time,” she notes. “Our people need choice and the ability to define their own sense of ‘self-sufficiency,’ where our people feel empowered by what they do.” In her work, “I try to provide a space for Hawaiian producers, artists, authors, teachers, musicians, and practitioners, to exist and derive support in all forms,” she says. This support has involved payment for goods and services, camaraderie, work space, child care—and more. “Hawaiians are net makers, not ladder builders. Our economies involved relationships, exchanges, genealogy, ‘a¯ina, resources, expertise. Of course, money is a resource, but it’s too one dimensional.” She envisions a return to indigenous values that “amplify the intelligence of aloha,” to serve all of Hawai‘i, and “accepting outcomes that aren’t just derivatives of personal gain at the expense of others— the land, water, air, plants and animals, people, all life forms sharing our planet. A bottom line that ensures there is something for all stakeholders, is indigenous thinking to me. “Personal gain should be a goal of the past, shared resources is survival for our planet,” she notes. “We should try to define economic self-sufficiency in the oldest ways possible, not the newest. Hawaiians aren’t going anywhere: we are increasing in number and mindset, and we have a chance to model something that is rooted to this place.”

OHA directly supported economic self-sufficiency in 2016 through its loan programs: ¯ lama Loan disbursements FY2016 Ma

Moloka‘i

(July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015)

$167,887 Business $117,152 Education $429,676 Home Improvement $140,417 Debt Consolidation

$855,132

TOTAL

9

Kaua‘i

6

86

Maui

8

O‘ahu

41

Number of loans by islands (July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015)

Hawai‘i

24

FY2016 Consumer Micro-Loan disbursements (July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015)

Auto repair 55% Home repair 19% Medical expenses 10% Career advancement 3% Funeral expenses 10% Other 3%


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2016 GRANTS

North Kohala Community Resource Center $6,000 North Kohala Community Reunion 2015. Hawai‘i Pu‘uhonua Society - $5,000 CONTACT 2016 art exhibit. O‘ahu Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawaii. Inc. $2,300 Ho‘okupu Hula No Ka‘u Cultural Festival. Hawai‘i

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ Grants and Sponsorships programs are a cornerstone of the agency’s community giving.

University of Hawai‘i - Leeward Community College - $6,500 Huli Aku. Huli Mai: Contemproray Traditional Practices. O‘ahu Young Women’s Christian Association of Oahu $5,000 Kokokahi Community Fair. O‘ahu

In FY 2016, OHA awarded $10.8 million to programs across the state that are diverse as the community needs they serve. The grants total includes money from OHA’s core operating budget combined with other funding sources.

EDUCATION $2,863,000 CULTURE $864,800

The Estria Foundation - $226,500 Mele Murals project Statewide

PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS

‘Aha Pu ¯nana Leo. Inc. - $7,000 Pūlama Mauli Ola. Hawai‘i

Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation (Year 1 of 2) $150,000 The purpose of this project is to rebuild and restore the hula heiau at Imakakoloa, Kaˉ‘u along with the ritual dances, chants, and vocabulary necessary for this work so that hula practitioners and their families from Hawai‘i and around the world will participate fully in this process from start to finish and beyond as a part of their Hula execution. Hawai‘i ¯iwi (Year 1 of 2) Hui Ma ¯lama Ola Na ¯ ‘O - $64,343 The purpose of this project is to provide traditional Native Hawaiian healing art education to Native Hawaiians throughout the communities of Hawai‘i Island to perpetuate and develop strategies that expand the knowledge, respect and practical application of La‘au Lapa‘au, Lomilomi Ha Ha, La‘au Kahea, and Ho‘oponopono. Hawai‘i Ka¯ nehu¯na¯ moku Voyaging Academy (Year 1 of 2) - $150,000 The purpose of this project is to provide opportunities to O‘ahu youth to learn about and experience traditional Hawaiian navigation, and the dynamic and complex cycles of plant based resource management and skilled materials preparation used by ancient navigators to prepare for long distance voyages. O‘ahu Kohe Malamalama o Kanaloa - Protect Kaho‘olawe Fund (Year 1 of 2) - $67,400 I Ola Kanaloa will strengthen the cultural identity and engagement of Native Hawaiian haumana, hui, and ‘ohana on Hawai‘i, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu & Kaua‘i by providing them the opportunity to connect with, honor and care for the ‘āina & cultural sites; revitalize cultural relationships; & learn cultural practices & protocols through Kaho‘olawe. Statewide Kula No Na Po‘e Hawai‘i (Year 1 of 2) $20,000 This program creates a cadre of cultural practitioners with knowledge and proficiency in the carving of papa and pōhaku ku‘i ‘ai using traditional materials and methods. They will teach their community members how to make their own implements and will coordinate monthly gatherings to pound poi, thereby perpetuating a valued cultural practice. O‘ahu PA‘I Foundation (Year 1 of 2) - $48,257 MAMo: Maoli Arts Month is a broad community-based effort to celebrate the depth, breadth, and diversity of the Native Hawaiian arts community, to create economic opportunities for Native Hawaiian artists and cultural practitioners by increasing their presence in museums and galleries, and to educate locals and visitors about Native Hawaiian art. Statewide

‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS

‘Ahahui Kïwila Hawai‘i O Mo‘ikeha - $5,000 Ka Moku O Manokalanipō Pa’ani Makahiki. Kaua‘i East Maui Taro Festival - $7,000 24th Annual East Maui Taro Festival. Maui Friends of the Future - $5,000 Waipi‘o Kalo Festival. Hawai‘i Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival - $7,000 Alana Hawaiian Culture Program at the 2016 Hawai‘i Book & Music Festival. O‘ahu

PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS After-School All-Stars Hawaii (Year 1 of 2) - $236,975 These out-of-school programs in two O‘ahu (Naˉnaˉkuli and Wai‘anae) and three Hawai‘i island (Ka‘uˉ, Kea‘au, and Paˉhoa) Title 1 middle and intermediate schools operate at school sites to provide comprehensive after-school programs to improve proficiency in Reading and Math, as evidenced by Hawai‘i State Assessment (HSA) test scores. This program provides an alternative to risky after-school activities, offers fun, social learning activities, and improves students’ ability to advance to the next grade level. Hawai‘i; O‘ahu Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui, Inc. (Year 1 of 2) - $184,000 The Power Hour Program provides a safe and nurturing environment for middle and high school youth to develop good study habits and where they can complete homework assignments, with the goal of improving Native Hawaiian student proficiency in Reading and Math so that they can increase standardized test scores. Maui

Hawaiian Canoe Racing Association - $8,000 2015 HCRA State Championship Canoe Regatta. Educational Services Hawaii Foundation Hawai‘i (Year 1 of 2) - $89,030 Hawaiian Kamali‘i, Inc. - $6,000 The ‘Imi ‘Ike Learning Centers target at-risk Native The Pailolo Challenge. Moloka‘i Hawaiians, currently or formerly in foster, kith, kin care, in grades 4 to 12 by engaging them in academic Institute for Native Pacific Education and socio-emotional programs, differentiated direct and Culture - $6,500 instruction and Hawaiian culture-based pedagogy, and Ho‘i I Ke Ēwe ‘Āina Kūpuna. Hawai‘i meeting their multiple needs so they can meet or exceed Ka Moloka‘i Makahiki - $7,000 standard-based testings in reading and math. O‘ahu Ka Moloka‘i Makahiki 2016. Moloka‘i Hui Malama Learning Center (Year 1 of 2) Kai Loa. Inc. - $7,000 $219,995 Hui Malama Learning Center addresses the Makahiki Kuilima 2016. O‘ahu complex educational and social needs of at-risk youth Kalihi-Palama Culture & Arts Society, Inc. - (those with emotional, cognitive, social, physical or $5,000 Malia Craver Hula Kahiko Competition. behavioral issues, and lack fundamental literacy skills) aged 11-24 by providing holistic and integrated educaO‘ahu tional services to improve reading and math proficiency Maui Historical Society - $7,000 and increase standardized test scores. Maui Lei Day Heritage Festival 2016. Maui Chaminade University of Honolulu (Year 4 of Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce 4) - $33,000 To support scholarships - $8,000 Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Com- for Native Hawaiian nursing students. O‘ahu merce Presents 9th Annual Business Fest. Maui Hawai‘i Community Foundation Moanalua Gardens Foundation - $10,000 $250,000 To support the OHA Moanalua. He Wahi Pana. The 38th Annual Prince Lot Higher Education Scholarships program. Statewide Hula Festival. O‘ahu ¯ina Learning ‘Ohana - $1,500,000 Kanu O Ka ‘A Moana’s Hula Halau - $6,000 To support Hawaiian-focused charter schools. Statewide Festivals of Aloha - Maui Nui Style: “Ola ke kaiaulu i ke Univeristy of Hawai‘i Foundation (Year 2 of 3) aloha o loko”. Moloka‘i - $100,000 To support the Senator Na ¯ Wahine O Ke Kai - $6,000 Daniel Akaka Scholarship Endowment. Statewide Naˉ Wahine O Ke Kai Women’s Annual Moloka‘i to O‘ahu University of Hawai‘i - Office of Research Canoe Race. Moloka‘i, O‘ahu Services (Year 1 of 2) - $250,000 Na‘alehu Theatre - $6,000 To support the OHA Higher Education Scholar9th Annual Gabby Pahinui Waimānalo Kanikapila ships program through the Native Hawaiian Science O‘ahu and Engineering Mentorship Program. Statewide


13

‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS [NONE]

GOVERNANCE $0 PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS [NONE]

‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS [NONE]

Health $1,531,224 PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island (Year 1 of 2) $115,000 The Hua Ola Project will strengthen health for Native Hawaiian and other Club members by skillfully instilling healthy lifelong fitness and diet habits in the youth of 3 Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island communities through culturally responsive minds- and bodies-involved experiential healthy lifestyles education delivered by caring Club mentors. Hawai‘i I Ola La ¯hui, Inc. (Year 1 of 2) - $180,000 The Kūlana Hawai‘i project will provide comprehensive, culturally-minded weight and chronic disease management services to Native Hawaiian adults and their families to increase their engagement in healthy lifestyle behaviors such as dietary habits, physical activity, medication adherence, stress management, and reduce high risk behaviors such as smoking. O‘ahu Ko ¯kua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services (Year 1 of 2) - $143,000 The Ehuola ‘Ohana Health Project will foster health from the first breath through the last, preventing chronic disease through a conceptual framework of nā‘au, ‘āina and kai, kanaka, mauli and ola. Native Hawaiian keiki, mākua, wahine hāpai and their kane will learn cultural practices supporting nutrition and birthing, reclaiming a legacy of health. O‘ahu

focused charter schools on Kaua‘i. Kaua‘i Lunalilo Home - $597,468 To complete building and infrastructure repairs to the existing Lunalilo Home facilites to maintain an environment of safety and comfort for residents. O‘ahu

‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS Kula no na Po‘e Hawai‘i - $7,000 Ho‘okahi Palekana -- Papakolea ‘Ohana Health Fair 2016. O‘ahu

preparation, scholarships, and employment opportunities to  Native Hawaiians in Maui County. Maui

‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS Hawai‘i Construction Career Days - $10,000 Big Island Construction Career Day. Hawai‘i Hawaii First Community Ventures $6,500 ‘Ohana First at Hawai‘i First. Hawai‘i

Maui Family Support Services, Inc. - $6,500 Na Makua Kane: Celebration of Fathers. Maui

Land $1,088,200

YMCA of Honolulu - $7,000 YMCA Healthy Kids Day - E Ola Na Keiki. O‘ahu

PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS

Housing $3,456,124

Ka Honua Momona International (Year 1 of 2) - $100,000 The purpose of this project is to return momona (health and abundance) to the land and people of Moloka‘i through the community-based restoration of two ancient Hawaiian fishponds. Moloka‘i

PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS Hawaiian Community Assets (Year 1 of 2) $265,059 Increasing economic self-sufficiency of  Native Hawaiians through stable housing will provide financial literacy education, housing couseling, and asset building products to 500 low-income  Native Hawaiians to rent or own homes. Statewide Effective Planning and Innovative Communication Inc. (DBA Epic Ohana) (Year 1 of 2) - $16,675 Hawai‘i Youth Opportunities Initiative Opportunity Passport provides financial literacy training and matching funds for security deposit/first month’s rent for young people through age 25 who were in foster care. Statewide Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement (Year 1 of 2) - $174,390 Hawai‘i Individual Development Account will provide financial education, counseling, and match savings grants up to $5,000 to eligible Native Hawaiian first-time home buyers in Hawai‘i to support 40 new homeowners by addressing barriers to homeownership. Statewide

¯iwi (Year 1 of 2) - $121,700 Ka ¯ko‘o ‘O The purpose of this project is to restore and effectively manage ecologically and geographically linked kïpuka within He‘eia, increasing the capacity and resilience of ecological and food-producing systems in our ahupua‘a for the benefit of Hawaiians and other community members on O‘ahu. O‘ahu Ko ¯kua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services (Year 1 of 2) - $100,000 The purpose of this project is to restore the health of the Kalihi ‘ahupua‘a by promoting cultural practices for kama‘āina (residents) and malihini (visitors) to ultimately improve the health of the Māluawai watershed thereby ensuring its longterm sustainability. O‘ahu Kua‘a ¯ina Ulu ‘Auamo (Year 1 of 2) - $100,000 KUA will build and strengthen at least 3 “communities of practice” for ‘aˉina-based food production, providing targeted, coordinated (1) facilitation, (2) technical assistance/training, and (3) communications that will join together the efforts of at least 30 rural Hawaiian communities to increase community-based, Hawaiiancentered food production. Statewide

Department of Hawaiian Home Lands $3,000,000 To cover debt service on Kualapu‘u Public Conversion Charter School bonds issued by DHHL that will be used to establish (Year 1 of 2) - $135,256 The Project infrastructure support for Native Hawaiian affordable Pū‘olo will work to reduce the rate of childhood obe- housing opportunities. Statewide sity in students in grades K-6 and empower students and families in making positive health choices through ‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS a school-based initiative that integrates physical activity, [NONE] health and nutrition education, and family engagement with in-school student support and clinical health services. Moloka‘i

Ma Ka Hana Ka ‘Ike (Year 1 of 2) - $78,300 The purpose of Maˉhele Farm is to provide agricultural skills training to Haˉna keiki, ‘ohana, and kuˉpuna to promote sustainable food crop management, strengthen relationships between our ‘aˉina and community, increase the health of this kïpuka, and enhance local stewardship of land-based cultural resources. Maui

Salvation Army-Family Treatment Services (Year 1 of 2) - $112,000 The Ola Kino Maika‘i project will provide women in residential substance abuse treatment, and their children, obesity prevention and intervention to prevent excessive weight gain while women are engaged in smoking cessation and learning to live a drug free lifestyle and to prevent feeding practices that could result in obesity in their children. O‘ahu

Kumano I Ke Ala O Makaweli - $13,500 ˉ ina After-School Program as part To support the Aloha ‘A of the State’s R.E.A.C.H. initiative. Kaua‘i

Income $674,550

PROGRAMMATIC GRANTS

Hawai‘i Community Foundation (Years 1 & 2 of 3) - $50,000 To support the Hawai‘i Environmental Funders Group (EFG). Statewide

The Trust for Public Land - $500,000 Parents and Children Together (Year 1 of 2) - To support the acquisition of the Kuamo‘o battlefield $261,500 Ready to Work and Career Support and burial grounds of Kona. Hawai‘i Services will increase the incomes of Native Hawaiians by delivering services that promote employability and job retention including job preparation training, voca- ‘AHAHUI EVENT GRANTS tional and 2-year degree scholarships, and high school Kailapa Community Association - $8,000 The Queen’s Medical Center (Year 1 of 2) - equivalancy preparation. O‘ahu ˉ ina Camp Kawaihae. Hawai‘i Naˉ Kilo ‘A $190,000 The Hana Ola Project will implement a Goodwill Industries of Hawai‘i, Inc. (Year 1 of 2) culturally relevant, community-based program based ¯ Mamo o Mu ¯‘olea - $9,700 Employment Core and Career Na on health and nutrition education, and physical activity - $221,550 7th Annual Haˉna Limu Festival. Maui to reduce the incidence and severity of obesity among Support Services for Native Hawaiians will improve Native Hawaiians, in order to improve their overall well- their ability to obtain higher-wage employment, thereby North Shore Community Land Trust - $7,000 3rd Annual North Shore Food Summit. O‘ahu being, and reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease increasing their economic self-sufficiency. Hawai‘i risk factors. Maui University of Hawai‘i on behalf of Maui College (Year 1 of 2) - $175,000 Kaua‘i Food Bank, Inc. - $38,000 To implement the “Backpack Program” at Hawaiian CareerLink will provide support services, financial literacy and employment readiness workshops, GED

Culture $864,800 Education $2,863,000 Governance $0 Health $1,531,224 Housing $3,456,124 Income $674,550 Land $1,088,200

Grants total

$10,477,898


14

2016

Organization

SPONSORSHIPS

Education Governance

Sponsorships are generally awarded to support various community events that serve or support Native Hawaiians or increase awareness of Hawaiian culture and history.

Culture

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs sponsors events that address the needs of the Native Hawaiian Community. Sponsorships provide funding support to organizations whose programs and events benefit the Hawaiian Community.

Award

Purpose

Location

Bishop Museum

$3,500

Making Waves: 17th Annual Dinner

O‘ahu

Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation

$25,000

Kanawai o Mauna a Wakea Stewardship

Hawai‘i

Hawai‘i Convention Center

$4,950

Sunset Mele on the Rooftop

O‘ahu

Hawai‘i Maoli

$10,000

On behalf of the Hawai‘i Pono‘ï Coalition to support 2016 ONIPA‘A

O‘ahu

Hi‘ipaka

$10,000

Waimea Valley Summer Concert Series

O‘ahu

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation

$3,500

2015 Kama‘aˉina of the Year Award

O‘ahu

Hui o He‘e Nalu, Inc.

$1,000

Cultural and educational activities

O‘ahu

Kama‘aha Education Initiative

$5,000

‘Aimalama Lunar Conference

O‘ahu

Ka‘onohi Foundation

$1,500

Sacramento Aloha Festival in California

Continent

Ke Kukui Foundation

$1,000

“3 Days of Aloha Festival” in Washington

Continent

Let’s Roll Foundation

$1,000

“A Hula Dancers Salute” in Arizona

Continent

Living Life Source Foundation

$10,000

Pasifica Festival 2016 and PAA Conference in New Zealand

Polynesia

Na Koa Opio

$1,000

Makahiki Ceremonies

Hawai‘i

Naˉ Pualei o Likolehua

$5,000

Merrie Monarch

Hawai‘i

Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation

$1,000

“Ho‘omalu ka Lehua i ka Wao” annual dinner

O‘ahu

Pacific Justice and Reconciliation Center

$1,000

Support Native Hawaiian spiritual and cultural based programs in correctional facilities

O‘ahu

Pohai ‘o Kamehameha

$1,000

10TH Annual Kalani Ali‘i Awards

O‘ahu

Waimea Hawaiian Homesteaders’ Assoc.

$10,000

Haˉnau Ke Ali‘i performance touring Moloka‘i and Laˉna‘i

Moloka‘i

West Honolulu Rotary Club

$1,000

David Malo Award Banquet

O‘ahu

Ahupua‘a o Moloka‘i

$1,250

‘Aha Ho‘omoloa Kïhei event to honor UH-Maui College Hawaiian Studies students

Moloka‘i

Ko‘olaupoko Hawaiian Civic Club

$2,500

Kuˉ i ke Kama‘aina Awards & Scholarship Benefit Luau

O‘ahu

Lau Kanaka no Hawai‘i

$500

32nd Annual Scholarship Luau in Arizona

Continent

Mana Maoli

$1,500

Mana Mele Music & Multimedia Academy

O‘ahu

Pi‘ilani Hawaiian Civic Club of Colorado

$1,500

14 Annual Ho‘olaulea in Colorado

Continent

Asian and Pacific Islander Association

$5,000

10TH Annual APIASF Scholarship benefit in New York

Continent

Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs

$5,000

Association of Hawaian Civic Clubs 57 Annual Convention in Nevada

Continent

Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement

$10,000

14TH Annual Native Hawaiian Convention

Hawai‘i Maoli

$10,000

On behalf of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs 56 Annual Convention

Maui

Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund

$20,000

KU‘E: The Hui Aloha ‘Āina Anti-Annexation Petitions

Statewide

National Congress of American Indians

$5,000

NCAI 72 Annual Convention & Marketplace in California

Continent

National Indian Education Association

$2,500

NIEA Convention Pre-Conference Day in Washington, D.C.

Continent

National Indian Education Association

$5,000

NIEA 46

Continent

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian

$10,000

NMAI Annual Native Hawaiian Cultural Festival in Washington, D.C.

Continent

The Biographical Research Center

$20,000

Production of “This Native Daughter” promotional trailer

Statewide

University of Hawai‘i Foundation on behalf of Kamakakuˉokalani

$2,500

United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York

Continent

TH

TH

O‘ahu TH

ND

TH

Annual Convention & Trade Show in Oregon


15

Land

Housing

Health

Organization

Award

Purpose

Location

ALU LIKE, Inc.

$5,000

Gerontology Society of American Conference in Florida

Continent

American Diabetes Association

$10,000

STEP OUT: WALK TO STOP DIABETES

O‘ahu

Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum

$25,000

Voices2015: Moving Health Forward national conference in Washington, D.C.

Continent

Hawai‘i Psycological Association

$1,000

HPA 2015 Annual Convention

O‘ahu

Ho‘omau Ke Ola, Inc.

$25,000

¯ ina Project Aukahi o ka ‘A

O‘ahu

Kualoa-He‘eia Ecumenical Youth (KEY) Project

$1,600

KEY Project 12TH Annual Ko‘olau ‘Ohana Festival

O‘ahu

Lunalilo Home

$3,000

24TH Annual Golf Tournament

O‘ahu

Lunalilo Home

$200

2016 Annual Benefit Lu ¯‘au

O‘ahu

Pacific Islander Health Partnership

$4,500

Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health Summit in California

Continent

PA‘I Foundation

$6,900

Participation at Healing Our Spirit Worldwide Indigenous People’s Conference in New Zealand

Polynesia

Peninsula Conflict Resolution Center

$2,000

Pacific Islander Needs Assessment Project in California

Continent

The Queens Medical Center

$5,000

Everlasting Legacy of Giving Dinner

O‘ahu

University of Hawai‘i, Office of Research Services on behalf of John A. Burns School of Medicine

$23,913

Native Hawaiian Health Improvement Task Force

Statewide

Hawai‘i Habitat for Humanity

$4,000

Tri-State Habitat Conference in Oregon

Continent

Hawaiian Community Assets, Inc.

$2,650

Homeownership Month in Washington, D.C.

Continent

Ho‘olehua Homestead Association

$750

Ho‘olehua & Pala‘au 90th Celebration of Homesteads

Moloka‘i

Wai‘anae Kai Hawaiian Homestead Association

$10,000

On behalf of the Sovereign Councils of Hawaiian Homelands Assembly to support the Annual SCHHA Convention

O‘ahu

Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce

$10,000

¯‘o¯ Awards Annual ‘O

O‘ahu

Ala Kahakai Trail Association

$2,000

Ka‘u¯ community stewardship project

Hawai‘i

Kailapa Community Association

$2,000

To support operational funds

Hawai‘i

Ka¯nehu ¯na¯moku Voyaging Academy

$18,860

Ha¯lau Holomoana voyaging program access trip to Papaha¯naumokua¯kea Marine National Monument

Statewide

Ko ¯kua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services

$750

¯ ina Mālama I Kekahi for Ho‘oulu ‘A

O‘ahu

Kure Atoll Conservancy

$5,000

Support for field equipment for use within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Statewide

National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, Inc.

$10,000

“Human Dimensions of Large Scale Marine Protected Areas” - 10TH Anniversary Reception for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Statewide

Papahana Kuaola

$1,750

3RD annual fundraiser

O‘ahu

The Medical Foundation for the Study of the Environment

$22,180

Intertidal monitoring research in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Statewide

Culture $96,450 Education $7,250 Governance $95,000 Health $113,113 Housing $17,400 Income $10,000 Land $62,540

Sponsorships total

$401,753


16 Office of Hawaiian Affairs | State of Hawai’i

2016

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The following financial statements for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2015 and ending June 30, 2016 were prepared internally by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and were not reviewed by any external auditor. OHA makes no representations as to the accuracy of these financial statements. When audited financial statements become available, they will be available online at oha.org.

Statement of Net Position For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 (Dollars in thousands)

Governmental Activities

ASSETS: Petty cash Cash Held in State Treasury Held in bank Held by investment managers Restricted cash Accounts receivable, net Interest and dividends receivable Inventory, prepaid items and other assets Notes receivable, net: Due within one year Due after one year Investments Capital assets - net

$

8,047 17,643 9,380 184 4,740 40 829 2,447 7,276 334,347 252,871

Total assets

637,806

DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES Total assets and deferred outflows of resources LIABILITIES: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Due to State of Hawai‘i Due to other fund Long-term liabilities: Due within one year Due after one year

2

2,527 $

640,333

$

6,178 3,359 1,564 51,666

Total liabilities

62,767

DEFERRED INFLOWS OF RESOURCES

2,301

Total liabilities and deferred inflows of resources

65,068

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES NET POSITION: Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Restricted Unrestricted

225,290 27,152 322,823

Total net position Total liabilities, deferred inflows of resources and net position

575,265 $

640,333


17 Office of Hawaiian Affairs | State of Hawai‘i

Statement of Activities For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 (Dollars in thousands)

Program Revenues Functions/Programs

Governmental Activities: Board of trustees Support services Beneficiary advocacy *Ho‘okele Pono LLC *Hi‘ilei Aloha LLC Unallocated depreciation Total governmental activities General Revenues: State allotments, net of lapsed appropriations Public land trust revenue Unrestricted contributions Interest and investment losses Nonimposed employee fringe benefits Transfers

Expenses

Operating Grants and Contributions

Charges for Services

Net (Expenses) Revenue and Changes in Net Position

$

2,722 18,582 24,934 372 5,011 2,299

$

5,365 4,417 -

$

958 249 -

$

(2,722) (13,217) (23,976) (123) (594) (2,299)

$

53,920

$

9,782

$

1,207

$

(42,931)

$

3,218 15,100 300 (3,760) 213 320

Total general revenues and transfers

15,391

Change in net position

(27,540)

Net Position: Beginning of year

602,805

Net Position at June 30, 2016

$

575,265

* Represents results of fiscal year January 1 - December 31, 2015.


18 Office of Hawaiian Affairs | State of Hawai‘i

Governmental Funds - Balance Sheet For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 (Dollars in thousands) Public Land Trust

General Fund

ASSETS: Petty cash Cash: Held in State Treasury Held in bank Held by investment managers Restricted cash Accounts receivable Due from other fund Interest and dividends receivable Inventory, prepaid items and other assets Notes receivable: Due within one year Due after one year Investments Total assets LIABILITIES: Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Due to State of Hawai‘i Due to other fund

$

-

$

Federal Grants

1

$

-

*Ho‘okele Pono LLC

$

-

*Hi‘ilei Aloha LLC

$

1

Other

$

Total

-

2

636 -

7,411 8,559 1,930 4,331 1 80

6,145 7,450 184 126 39 -

34 95 1

2,610 179 149

295 9 -

8,047 17,643 9,380 184 4,740 40 230

-

343 666 329,424

2,104 6,610 4,923

-

-

-

2,447 7,276 334,347 $ 384,336

$

636

$

352,746

$

27,581

$

130

$

2,939

$

304

$

500 -

$

5,062 3,059 -

$

129 300 -

$

23 -

$

464 -

$

-

Total liabilities

$

$

6,178 3,359 -

500

8,121

429

23

464

-

9,537

-

80

-

1

149

-

230

-

-

49 20,619 6,610

-

-

-

49 20,619 6,610

-

38,597

-

-

-

-

38,597

59 97 (20)

6,836 3,692 666 294,754 -

(126)

106 -

2,326 -

304 -

6,895 4,093 106 2,326 666 294,754 (146)

136

344,625

27,152

107

2,475

304

374,799

304

$ 384,336

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES FUND BALANCES: Fund balances: Nonspendable Inventory, prepaid items & security deposits Restricted for: Beneficiary advocacy Native Hawaiian loan programs Long-term portion of notes receivable Committed to DHHL-issued revenue bonds Assigned to: Support services Beneficiary advocacy *Ho‘okele Pono LLC *Hi‘ilei Aloha LLC Long-term portion of notes receivable Public Land Trust Unassigned Total fund balances Total liabilities and fund balances

$

636

$

352,746

$

27,581

$

130

$

2,939

$

* Represents results of fiscal year January 1 - December 31, 2015.


19 Office of Hawaiian Affairs | State of Hawai‘i

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS - STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 (Dollars in thousands) Public Land Trust

General Fund

Revenues: Public land trust revenue Intergovernmental revenue Appropriations, net of lapses Charges for services Interest and investment losses Donations and other Non-imposed fringe benefits

$

3,218 213

$

15,100 5,804 (3,760) 284 -

Federal Grants

$

475 483 16 -

*Ho‘okele Pono LLC

$

249 -

*Hi‘ilei Aloha LLC

$

4,452 -

Other

$

Total

69 -

$

15,100 724 3,218 10,325 (3,277) 300 213

Total revenues

3,431

17,428

974

249

4,452

69

26,603

Expenditures: Board of Trustees Support services Beneficiary advocacy *Ho‘okele Pono LLC *Hi‘ilei Aloha LLC

40 1,560 2,101 -

2,682 17,960 21,672 -

1,161 -

407 -

4,947

9 -

2,722 19,529 24,934 407 4,947

3,701

42,314

1,161

407

4,947

9

52,539

-

2,203 157

(156)

137

656

(474)

2,203 320

(270)

(22,526)

(343)

(21)

161

(414)

(23,413)

406

367,151

27,495

128

2,314

718

398,212

304

$ 374,799

Total expenditures Other Financing (Uses) Sources: Proceeds from/to debt Net transfers (to) from other funds Net change in fund balance Fund Balances: Beginning of year End of year

$

136

$

344,625

$

27,152

$

107

$

2,475

$

* Represents results of fiscal year January 1 - December 31, 2015.


HONOLULU 560 N. Nimitz Highway Honolulu, HI 96817 Phone: 808.594.1888 Fax: 808.594.1865 EAST HAWAI‘I (HILO) Wailoa Plaza, Ste. 20-CDE Hilo, HI 96720 Phone: 808.933.3106 Fax: 808.933.3110 WEST HAWAI‘I (KONA) 75-1000 Henry St., Ste. 205 Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Phone: 808.327.9525 Fax: 808.327.9528 MOLOKA‘I Kūlana ‘Ōiwi, P.O. Box 1717 Kaunakakai, HI 96748 Phone: 808.560.3611 Fax: 808.560.3968 ¯ NA‘I LA P.O. Box 631413 Lāna‘i City, HI 96763 Phone: 808.565.7930 Fax: 808.565.7931 KAUA‘I / NI‘IHAU 4405 Kukui Grove St., Ste. 103 Līhu‘e, HI 96766-1601 Phone: 808.241.3390 Fax: 808.241.3508 MAUI 33 Lono Ave., Suite 480 Kahului, HI 96732-1636 Phone: 808.873.3364 Fax: 808.873.3361 WASHINGTON, D.C. 211 K St. NE Washington, D.C. 20002 Phone: 202.506.7238 Fax: 202.629.4446

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KWO - December 2016 | Vol. 33, No. 12