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‘Aukake (August) 2019 | Vol. 36, No. 8

T H E L I V I N G W AT E R O F O H A

www.oha.org/kwo

the

awakening "I hear you speaking brah, but I cannot give in." On July 17, 2019 Billy Freitas was one of the kĂźpuna arrested while protecting Maunakea. - Photo: Mikey Inouye


Ha‘awina ‘o lelo ‘o iwi: Learn Hawaiian Ho‘olako ‘ia e Ha‘alilio Solomon - Kaha Ki‘i ‘ia e Dannii Yarbrough In this issue, we will learn paniinoa, pronouns, in ‘o lelo Hawai‘i. Pronouns are words that stand in for nouns, like: I, you, he, she, they, etc. In ‘o lelo Hawai‘i, however, these words are more specific and precise. For example, we can say “we” and avoid the embarrassing situation where the person you are talking to thinks they are included, but you actually meant “my family and I”. Green check marks show who is included in the pronoun.

Au or wau means me or I

‘oe means you

‘o ia or ia means he/she/it

Kaua means we/us, me and you

Maua means we/us, me and one other

‘Olua means the two of you

Laua means the two of them

Ka kou means we/all of us, 3 or more people

Ma kou means we/us, me and 2+ others

‘Oukou means you and 2+ others

La kou means they, 3 or more people

ia mahina a‘e! E ho‘i hou mai i ke

Be sure to visit us again next month for a new ha‘awina ‘o lelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language lesson)!


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‘ŌLELO A KA POUHANA

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MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

A M O ‘ O K Ū A U H A U O F R E S I L I E N C E noun re·sil·ience | \ ri-'zil-yən(t)s \ an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change

Aloha mai kākou, What does resilience look like? From Maunakea to Mokumanamana, we see it throughout the archipelago. We see it in how our community has continued to hold the state accountable for decades of mismanagement on Maunakea. We see it in how the mauna is igniting the reawakening of our lähui to our history, culture, and mana. OHA Trustees and staff recently visited Kaua‘i and witnessed the resilience of our lähui there, as well. In Waipä, Hanalei, Wainiha, and Hä‘ena, families who have been farming rice, then kalo, in the Hanalei Valley for generations, lost everything in a 24-hour deluge of rain. Our people continue to work their “day” jobs at the County or hotels, and return in the afternoons and weekends to silt-filled lo‘i, with their families in tow, to replant, restore and rebuild. Hanapëpë families who have been practicing traditional salt gathering, also for generations, threatened by the expansion of helicopters and tours, continue to protect and preserve what is their traditional and cultural practice and heritage.

And even far to the northwest, we remain a resilient people and ‘äina. On Makali‘i’s recent trip to Papahänaumokuäkea, resilience looks like the eager faces of keiki who planted foods for the journey, reconnecting to the precise way in which our kupuna, traversed the Pacific despite the obvious dangers. Papahänaumokuäkea reminds us that there are pristine places in this world worth protecting. Our resilience is enabled because of our mo‘okü‘auhau, our shared belief and connection to our ‘äina, mo‘omeheu and ‘ohana.

Sylvia Hussey, Ed.D. Ka Pouhana/Interim Chief Executive Officer Ka Pou Nui/Chief Operating Officer

MEA O LOKO TABLE OF CONTENTS Sylvia Hussey, Ed.D. Ka Pouhana, Interim Chief Executive Officer Ka Pou Nui, Chief Operating Officer COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Nicole Mehanaokalā Hind Director DIGITAL AND PRINT MEDIA

Alice Malepeai Silbanuz Digital and Print Media Manager

MO‘OLELO NUI | COVER FEATURE

The Awakening PAGE 14

Kaleena Patcho Communications Specialist

Kawena Carvalho-Mattos Digital Media Specialist

Jason Lees Digital Media Specialist EMAIL/WEBSITES

kwo@OHA.org www.OHA.org www.oha.org/kwo

MO‘OMEHEU | CULTURE

Outfitted for the Ocean PAGE 4

BY STERLING WONG

Key moments of mismanagement paved the way for thousands of Native Hawaiians ascend in protest and protection of Maunakea.

Ikaika Hussey Editor-in-Chief/ Communications Specialist

‘Aukake | August 2019 | Vol. 36, No. 8

EA | GOVERNANCE

Mana Moment PAGE 17

BY KA WAI OLA STAFF

Explore Hānaunaola, the most recent twoweek canoe voyage to Papahānaumokuākea by Nā Kalai Wa‘a and the Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation.

‘ĀINA | LAND AND WATER

INTERVIEW WITH KEKUEWA KIKILOI

Using the Past to Paint the Future PAGE 8

Dr. Kekuewa Kikiloi shares his understanding of mana and how he experienced mana on the Hōkūle‘a while traveling to Nı̄hoa.

Pū‘ōhala Elementary School in Kāne‘ohe is brightening up their campus with a mo‘olelo inspired mural.

BY KA WAI OLA STAFF

@oha_hawaii @oha_hawaii /officeofhawaiianaffairs /ohahawaii

Published monthly by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Suite 200, Honolulu, HI 96817. Telephone: 594-1888 or 1-800-468-4644 ext. 41888. Fax: 594-1865. Email: kwo@OHA.org. World Wide Web location: www.oha.org. Circulation: 64,000 copies, 55,000 of which are distributed by mail, and 9,000 through island offices, state and county offices, private and community agencies and target groups and individuals. Ka Wai Ola is printed by O‘ahu Publications. Hawaiian fonts are provided by Coconut Info. Advertising in Ka Wai Ola does not constitute an endorsement of products or individuals by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Ka Wai Ola is published by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs to help inform its Hawaiian beneficiaries and other interested parties about Hawaiian issues and activities and OHA programs and efforts. ©2019 Office of Hawaiian Affairs. All rights reserved.


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MO‘OMEHEU

CULTURE

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

Two vessels reconnect traditional pathways to Mokumanamana

By Ka Wai Ola Staff

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hui of Native Hawaiians left Kewalo earlier this summer, for a two-week cultural research voyage into Papahänaumokuäkea, supported in part by OHA.

Thirteen members of the Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation (EKF) departed aboard the Searcher, a research and education vessel. Among the expedition were esteemed Native Hawaiian researchers Dr. Pua Kanaka‘ole Kanähele and Kalei Nu‘uhiwa, who together have spent more than a decade studying the traditions, cultural sites and manamana (exponential spiritual power and upright stones) of Mokumanamana and Nïhoa, the two most easternly islands of the Papahänaumokuäkea Marine National Monument. EKF met up in Papahänaumokuäkea with members of Nä Kalai Wa‘a, who departed from Honolulu aboard the traditional voyaging canoe Makali‘i. Together the two groups conducted research on the manamana and their alignments to various celestial features, such as stars, planets and the Milky Way.

“OHA was proud to kökua the efforts of Nä Kalai Wa‘a and Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation in creating the next generation of Hawaiian wayfinders and furthering our cultural understanding and connections to Papahänaumokuäkea,” said Kamana‘opono Crabbe, former OHA CEO/Ka Pouhana. “The ‘ike they returned with will have a profound impact on the cultural foundation of our Lähui moving forward.” The Nä Kalai Wa‘a voyagers lent their wayfinding expertise to assist EKF with better understanding the alignments of cultural sites on Mokumanamana to stars and other celestial phenomenon during the Summer Solstice on June 21. Traditions indicate that the Summer Solstice holds significant mana (spiritual power) and therefore is a critical day for ceremonies. The voyage, called Hänaunaola, was the capstone of a three-year grant from the Administration for Native Americans. The grant helped Nä Kalai Wa‘a grow and preserve their own food, with the goal of provisioning all 14 voyagers for the full length of

Makali‘i sets sail for Mokumanamana with a crew of expert wayfinders. - Photos: Jason Patterson


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MO‘OMEHEU CULTURE

the voyage. The voyage brings new meaning to the phrase “he waa, he moku, he moku, he waa” – a canoe, an island, an island a canoe. Educator Änuenue Punua put it succinctly in a social media post: “My ‘ohana wa‘a is sailing to our küpuna islands provisioned entirely by our communities from Moku o Keawe & ‘ohana throughout the pae ‘äina. No Costco run, no canned goods, no foods that came off of a container.” “If we can provision a canoe, we can provision our homes just the same. This is ‘Äina Momona.” The sail was the first time in 200 years that the route from the heiau Ko‘a Holomoana in Mahukona to Mokumanamana was used to train new wayfinders and voyagers. This voyaging route was a traditional test for appren-

tice navigators. “As a co-trustee of the Papahänaumokuäkea Marine National Monument with the specific kuleana of advocating for Native Hawaiian interests in the co-management of the area, OHA is honored to have a part in supporting our beneficiaries with fiscal support as well as in working through the permitting and other requirements to enter the monument,” said Keola Lindsey, OHA Chief Advocate. “Our goal is to assure that our people have the ability to access the area to conduct activities that perpetuate our cultural and traditional connections to these Küpuna Islands.” Established by presidential proclamation in 2006, Papahänaumokuäkea Marine National Monument is the largest contiguous fully protected conservation

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area in the United States, and one of the largest marine conservation areas in the world. The monument is cooperatively managed to ensure ecological integrity and achieve strong, long-term protection and perpetuation of northwestern Hawaiian Island ecosystems, Native Hawaiian culture, and heritage resources for current and future generations. Four co-trustees - the Department of Commerce, Department of the Interior, State of Hawai‘i and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs - protect this special place. Papahänaumokuäkea Marine National Monument was inscribed as the first mixed (natural and cultural) UNESCO World Heritage Site in the United States in July 2010. For more information, please visit www. papahanaumokuakea.gov.

OHA is proud to kōkua the efforts of Nā Kalai Wa‘a and Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation in creating the next generation of Hawaiian wayfinders and furthering our cultural understanding and connections to Papahānaumokuākea.” — Kamana‘opono Crabbe, former OHA CEO/Ka Pouhana

Voyagers explore the island after successfully taking the rare path to Mokumanamana. - Photos: Brad Wong

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ALOHA ‘AINA LEADER AWARD CLASS OF 2019

The Aloha ‘Āina Leader Awards honor the future of our lāhui by recognizing haumāna for their growing commitments to aloha ‘āina. These up and coming haumāna have accepted the kuleana to work for the benefit of all our communities. Aloha ‘āina has always been a traditional value passed down from older generation to younger, but it has become even more vital in this era of change. The Aloha ‘Āina Leader Awards affirm not only the importance of our cultural values in today’s society, but also recognize the work of the many kumu and mākua who have supported these haumāna throughout the years.

Ka‘ea Alapa‘i Kona, Hawai‘i

Ku‘unahenani Tachera Pu‘uanahulu, Hawai‘i

Haliaka M. Bird Puna, Hawai‘i

Kaley Kalehuakeahika‘alani Hana Kelling ‘Ioleka‘a, O‘ahu

Ke Kula ‘o ‘Ehunuikaimalino

Kanu o ka ‘Āina

Ke Kula ‘o Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u Laboratory PCS

Ke Kula ‘o Samuel M. Kamakau PCS

Haileigh-Jaeden Kihaapi‘ilani Hilo, Hawai‘i

‘Alohikapuamiki‘ala Haia Akina Puna, Hawai‘i

Jenna Akemi Makahinahina Manana, Oahu

Kauiwai Poepoe Mollena Ho‘olehua, Molokai

Ka‘awaloa Kauaula Nānākuli, O‘ahu

Skyler Kaimana Nelson Wailuku, Maui

Kamehameha Schools, Kapālama

Kamehameha Schools, Kea‘au

Hālau Kū Mana NCPCS

‘O Hina i ka Malama

Ke Kula Kaiapuni ‘o Ānuenue

Ke Kula Kaiapuni ‘o Kekaulike

Keala Kahale Kekaha, Kaua‘i

Victoria F.N. Pailate Keaukaha, Hawai’i

Abigail Maluhia Wright Ka‘alaea, O‘ahu

Kaiulani Kaniaupio Wai‘ehu, Maui

Colt Kūpa‘akekeikiikealapono Pawn Aki Wai‘anae, O‘ahu

Ke Kula Ni‘ihau o Kekaha

Ke Ana La‘ahana

Ethan Ramos Ahupua‘a o Kapa‘a, Moku o Puna, Kaua‘i

Hakipu’u Learning Center

Kamehameha School, ‘A‘apueo

Kamaile Academy

Kanuikapono


“It means taking care of our ‘āina while using the same information and techniques that my kūpuna used, and adding a little bit of modern techniques. Continuing to learn about our ‘āina and taking opportunities and possibilities to help take care of our people and our land.”

11111 “Being an Aloha Aina leader means no matter what happens you’ll stand for what’s right. Not just for you, but you make a stand for everyone else, your Lāhui, your ‘ohana, ta po‘e kanaka. Ku aku oe no te ola ana o ka Lāhui o Hawaii me ke aloha o na po‘e o Hawaii nei.”

WHAT DOES BEING AN ALOHA ‘ĀINA LEADER MEAN TO YOU? quotes provided by 2019 Aloha ‘Āina Awardees

“Being an aloha ‘āina leader has always been with me. I never intended an award to get recognition for being one. I grew up learning and knowing the responsibilities to take care of and to lead other people. I take those skills everywhere with me and it is just a part of me that is automatic. Being awarded is just the icing on the cake.”

11111 “It means that I have a responsibility to ensure the growth of Hawaiian Language and Hawaiian culture. I also have a kuleana to pass on the ‘ike of our kupuna to the next generation.”


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MO‘OMEHEU CULTURE

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

Using the past to paint the future By Ka Wai Ola Staff

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ucked away in the heart of Käne‘ohe lies Pü‘öhala elementary School, a unique learning community where ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i and English programs thrive together. Recently the elementary school had a vibrant makeover as the students worked with Native Hawaiian Artist Hailey Kailiehu and their community to create a mural. Kailiehu’s unique style of mural-making starts with a storytelling day, where küpuna from the community told mo‘olelo of the ahupua‘a of Käne‘ohe. The students then drew pictures of some of the most memorable stories shared, including drawings

of mango trees and kalo patches. Kailiehu then wove each of the images into a complete piece and worked with the students to paint their images into the mural that now stretches over two large buildings on the campus. “I think when they see their ‘äina around them, through art that is highlighting things that are from our küpuna and things that are very old and has always been there, they respect and they appreciate where they’re from more,” said Kailiehu. The students of Pü‘öhala unveiled the finished mural during a cultural day, at the end of the school year.

Mo‘olelo from küpuna helped to bring the images to life. - Photo: Kawena Lei Carvalho-Mattos

Artist Haley Kailiehu, Pü‘hala staff, and community contributors for the mural project recieve lei and ho‘okupu as a mahalo from the students. - Photo: Kawena Lei Carvalho-Mattos

Pü‘öhala elementary students work together to paint color onto the mural walls. - Photo: Jason Lees


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Our Cultural Gift to the World: Surfing And How to Do It (Sort of) By Keli‘i Collier

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ow foa surf? Das one tough question. There are so many ways to ride a wave and so many types of waves to ride. I got five hundred words, max, to share with you, the concept of surfing. Therefore, this not going be one ripe ice-cold Haden mango that your Tütü Wahine when peel, slice and put in one ziplock bag for you. Going be more like one order of chicken feet at Fook Lam, Chinatown, O’ahu next to Waolani river. They both ‘ono, but just different. Best place for us to start is with our kino. In my opinion the purest form of waveriding is our body in a wave. Das it. But our nature as humans is to evolve. As a result, today, we can stand, kneel, sit or lay down. Thus the birth of the surfing industry, which provides more wave-riding toys den shave ice flavors at Waiola’s. Short, mid, long boards with five, four, tree, two, one and no skegs; SUPs; foils; wave-skis; body boards; hand planes… And foa da O-Geez out dea: knee boards; paipo boards (pae po’o); bully boards; McDonald’s trays; Duck Feet… The tyranny of choice definitely exists. But for me surfing comes down to one vital principle: Paddling. Paddle…paddle… and paddle. And when you tired of paddling, paddle some more. Build that paddling strength. It is the Golden Ticket to The Willy Wonka WaveRiding Factory. Paddle your body with whatever wave-riding appendage you choose. There is no substitution for paddling time. It will save you. O ke kahua ma mua, ma hope ke kükulu1 is an ‘ölelo no’eau. Choose the site first, build after, meaning, learn all you can then practice. Thus, your next step is to

choose your surf spot, find a nice place foa your ‘okole, sit down and watch. Watch how surfers enter the water. Watch where the waves break and where the surfers sit. Watch how the changing tides and winds affect the waves and surfers. Watch their effects. Watch from what direction the waves come and what direction they break. Left? Right? Or both? Learn then practice. Rap Reiplinger expresses both the terror and excitement of catching a wave in his song Fate Yanagi: Point Panic was unreal 90 feet and glassy…hoohoo. But I look back And da wave coming at me Was soooo monsta, Eh, I knew my eggs was headed For dat big omellete in da sky.2 Most of us, including myself, no like catch one “90 feet” wave no matter how “glassy.” But we like have fun. We made it. Now time foa practice. Take all you’ve learned and make your way out to the line up. But here’s my main caveat: Do not upset the existing surfing line-up hierarchy. Stay out da way, catch the scraps, not da sets and heed the wise words of Mr. Miyagi: “Never put passion in front of principle. Even if you win, you’ll lose.”3  1 Collected, translated, and annotated

by Mary Kawena Pukui ; Illustrated by Dietrich Varez. ‘Olelo No’Eau Hawaiian Proverbs & Poetical Sayings. Honolulu, Hawai’i. Bishop Museum Press, 1983. 2 Reiplinger, Rap. Poi Dog. Mountain Apple Records, 1978. 3 The Karate Kid. Directed by John G. Advildsen, performance by Ralph 3 Macchio, Noriyuki Pat Morita, Sony Pictures, 22 June 1984.


MAHALO FOR CHOOSING OHA MĀLAMA LOANS ʻAi Manuahi Farms Kāneʻohe | Akamai Woods Keaʻau Aloha Maiden Cleaning Service Hilo Anela Kai Marine Services, LLC. Kāneʻohe Empire Towing Recovery Kapolei | Fitted Hawaiʻi Honolulu Goldwings Supply Service, Inc. Honolulu Hāloalaunuiākea Early Learning Center ʻEleʻele Liquid Life Keaʻau | Lohea Audio Hoʻolehua Makana Academy Honolulu Nohokai Production Services Inc. Waipahu 808 Cheesecake Kona | Rainbow Falls Connection Hilo Reliant Trucking Inc. Kapolei S & C Trucking Waiʻanae | Typical Hawaiians Kalihi

Low interest loans for Native Hawaiians - BUSINESS - HOME IMPROVEMENT - DEBT CONSOLIDATION - EDUCATION -

LOANS.OHA.ORG 808.594.1888


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POKE NŪHOU NEWS BRIEFS

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitarist Bla Pahinui dies at age 76 James Daniel “Bla” Pahinui passed awat at age 76 in his home in Mokuleia, O‘ahu. He was the second-born son of famous Native Hawaiian artist Gabby Pahinui and like others in his family, Pahinui was known for being a skilled musician and singer. Being left-handed, Pahinui’s style of guitar playing was “upside down and backwards.” He was considered one of the best left-handed slack key guitarists of his time and recorded both solo albums and collaborations with friends and family, such as the 1969 Sunday Mänoa album “Hawaiian Time.” In 2017, Pahinui was given the Hawai‘i Academy of Recording Arts Lifetime Achievement Award for his musical accomplishments. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen Pahinui, his daughter Brandy Clark, his brother Philip Pahinui, and sisters Margaret Pahinui Puuohau and Madelyn Pahinui Coleman.

Acres Available for Agriculture on Maui Mahi Pono is looking for farmers interested in applying for community farming parcels on Maui. The farming company bought former sugar cane land and is now offering parcels for lease, up to ten acres along Maui Veterans Highway in Pu‘unene. The lease rates are $150 per acre per year with the goal of boosting local food production. Mahi Pono is a joint venture between Pomona Farming LLC, a California-based agricultural group, and the Public Sector Pension Investment Board (PSP Investments), one of Canada’s largest pension investment managers. For more information and to apply, visit www.mahipono.com.

Farmers' Market Nutrition Program Offered to Seniors on Kaua‘i

STREAMWATER RESTORATION ON MOLOKA‘I

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operations and has put the ranch up for sale and cannot justify the need for these diversions.” Kawela, Kaunakakai, and Manawainui Streams flow from the island’s lush windward mountain range to the south shore, while Waikolu Stream flows from the mountains to the north shore. All of the streams supported extensive settlement in pre-contact times, and are still used by residents for cultural subsistence practices. These streams also feed the groundwater aquifers that are the island’s source of drinking water and the south shore reef and fishpond ecosystems that are a key traditional food source for residents.

Mauka streamwater diversions are causing kahawai such as Kawela, pictured here, to run dry. - Photo: Courtesy

The Hawaii Foodbank Kaua‘i Branch is hosting its annual Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) in partnership with the State of Hawai‘i – Office of Community Services and the United States Department of Agriculture/ Food and Nutrition Service. This nutrition program grants qualifying low-income seniors with $50 worth of vouchers to purchase fresh produce at participating farmers’ markets.

• Primo Ballesteros • Ueunten Farm • Wirat Farm

Recipients of the program must complete an application to receive $5 voucher booklets, valued at a total of $50. The deadline to apply is Friday, September 20, 2019.

Citizens Demand Restoration of Moloka‘i Stream Flows Diverted by Moloka‘i Ranch

Moloka‘i Ranch, to supply the lands it owns on the island’s west side. Although the Ranch shut down most of its operations over a decade ago and has abandoned many of its stream diversions, it has continued to drain water from Kawela and Waikolu Streams at amounts close to what it used during its heyday. Meanwhile, the Ranch’s Singapore-based parent company has offered the Ranch up for sale. The citizen action initiated today demands the return of diverted flows to the streams, a halt to wasteful diversions by the Ranch, and compliance with procedures to formally abandon and remove the diversion dams.

Vouchers can be redeemed at the following Kaua‘i farmers’ market locations: • Dang Fresh Farm • Hale Puna • Kapa’a Honey Factory • Kauai Glory Farm • Kealia Farm Market • Lanipo Farm • Lei Aloha Tropical • Lin’s Farm • Mariano Farm

In July 2018, Earthjustice, on behalf of community group Moloka‘i Nö Ka Heke, brought legal action before the state Commission on Water Resource Management to restore stream flows to Kawela, Kaunakakai, Manawainui, and Waikolu Streams on Moloka‘i. The streams, located in the central region of the island, have been historically diverted by Moloka‘i Properties Limited, dba

“For over a hundred years, these waters had been diverted miles across the island for cattle and ag operations on Moloka‘i Ranch,” said Moloka‘i Nö Ka Heke member Walter Ritte. “Significant negative impacts to the ahupua'a include the aquifers, the streams and life in the streams, the many fishponds along the shore, limu grounds, fish stocks and the health of the reef. Moloka‘i Ranch has shut down most of its

Vouchers must be redeemed in exchange for fresh produce by Monday, September 30, 2019. For qualifications and an application form, visit http://www. hawaiifoodbank.org/senior-farmers-market

“Returning the water to Kawela ahupua'a will bring back life that it once had before,” said Moloka‘i Nö Ka Heke member and Kawela resident Lohiao Paoa. “It was known to provide for our people in the past, and it’s a crucial part of Moloka‘i’s water future. Kawela Stream deserves respect.” The Moloka‘i community has been battling the Ranch over water rights for decades, resulting in landmark Hawai‘i Supreme Court rulings that benefit all of Hawai‘i and its people in affirming that water is a public trust and not private property. For example, in 2007, the Court made clear that it is private commercial water diverters like the Ranch—not the people who may be harmed—who bear the burden to prove a proposed water use will not harm the water resource and the rights of the public and Native Hawaiians. “Moloka‘i Ranch has been taking water from these streams for far too long with no accountability to the needs and rights of the ‘äina and the people of the island,” says Earthjustice attorney Mahesh Cleveland. “It’s time to return these waters to their natural flow, and for the Ranch to remove or remediate its diversion dams. We are committed to helping the people of Moloka‘i safeguard their water resources and the ecosystems that depend on them, now and for the future.” ¢


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‘ALEMANAKA

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

CALENDAR

CALENDAR LISTINGS

To have a local event listed in our monthly calendar, email kwo@oha.org at least six weeks in advance. Make sure to include the location, price, date and time. If available, please attach a high-resolution (300 dpi) photograph with your email.

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Royal Court Investiture and opening ceremony will new court to carry out their roles throughout all Aloha Festivals - Photo: Courtesy Aloha Festivals PU‘UHONUA O PU‘UHULUHULU UNIVERSITY CLASSES Daily Pu‘uhonua o Pu‘uhuluhulu University is offering free classes for the lähui. There are 20+ one-hour sessions daily as weather and safety permits. Classes range from ‘ölelo Hawai‘i to oli/mele to mo‘olelo to political history to indigenous science practices and beyond. All are welcomed to participate and learn. Eö ka lähui Hawai‘i! E ola! For more info on upcoming classes, follow @puuhuluhulu on Facebook.

the official state team sport, is celebrated at the HCRA State Championship Regatta which culminates the regatta season for 70+ canoe clubs representing 9,500+ paddlers of all ages. The event informally begins with the arrival of the koa canoes to Kaua‘i and ends with naming of the four Division winners on Saturday. Sponsored by OHA.

YOUTH ARTS EXHIBITION 2019 Aug. 2 - 23, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This unique exhibition showcases the work of 250+ youth participating in the Hui’s summer 2015 HCRA State Championship - Photo: arts programming. The result is an Ropati Hebenstreit explosion of vibrant creativity that features the extraordinary possibili- HEIVA I KAUA‘I 2019 ties unlocked by community visual Aug. 3- 4, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. arts education. Free. Hui No‘eau This is a two-day dance, drumVisual Arts Center. ming and music competition and exhibition, which showcases HCRA STATE CHAMPIONTahitian and Polynesian cultures. SHIP REGATTA Competitors enter solo and group Aug. 3, Hanalei Bay dance categories and win prizes Outrigger canoe paddling, for excellence. Vendors sell crafts,

gifts and food. Cultural practices of lauhala and coconut weaving, Polynesian carving and fire knife dancing, shell craft, and lomilomi massage are demonstrated. The event provides a venue for the next generation of Polynesian entertainers to gain performance experience. The event helps preserve and perpetuate Tahitian language, history, legends, music drumming and dancing. Audience participation is encouraged in coconut husking and Tahitian dance contests. Kapa‘a Beach Park. ALI‘I SUNDAY - KAMEHAMEHA EKOLU (III) Aug. 4, 9 to 10 a.m. Ali‘i Sundays are among the many long and honored traditions of Kawaiahao Church, which began about 1914. In the 1970’s our people were embarking on a tidal wave of change. In the midst of circumstance and sensing the urgency to unite Hawai‘i’s people and rekindle their strength and purpose in Ke Akua. We celebrate nine Ali‘i Sundays which are held as part of a larger series of celebrations recognized by the Benevolent Royal Societies, Ali‘i Trusts and the Hawaiian Civic Clubs of which always occurs on Sundays or the

ALOHA FESTIVALS: ROYAL COURT INVESTITURE & OPENING CEREMONY Aug. 31, 4 to 6 p.m. Kicking off the month-long Aloha Festivals, attendees of the Royal Court Investiture & Opening Ceremony will witness the newly-chosen royal court don their colorful traditional cloaks, helmets, head feather lei and other symbols of their reign in a spectacular display modeled after the royal ceremonies of ancient Hawaii. The Royal Court Investiture will be held on the grounds of Helumoa at The Royal Hawaiian’s Coconut Grove, the historic home of Princess Pauahi. From there, guests will follow the procession to Royal Hawaiian Center’s Royal Grove, where traditional hula, chants and musical performances at center stage make for a special evening in the heart of Waikïkï. Sponsored by OHA.

Sunday just before the birthday of the Ali‘i. Join us as we celebrate these Ali‘i and the many blessings from Ke Akua together. NATIONAL HEALTH CENTER WEEK & HEALTH FAIR Aug. 5-9 | Aug 10 Health Fair 9am - 2pm at Punalu‘u Ahupua‘a Farms, 53-270 Kamehameha Hwy Ko‘olauloa Health Center presents a week of healthcare focused activities culminating in a health fair on Saturday, August 10. Come by for free health screenings, Medicaid member support, and cultural workshops. Live entertainment by The Tonga Sisters, Rainbow Uli‘i, and Melelani Entertainment. 3 grand prize raffles and free tote bags for the first 300 attendees. E ola ka lahui! Sponsored by OHA. LED KA‘APANA - GRAND MASTER OF HAWAIIAN SLACK KEY GUITAR Aug. 7, 7:30 p.m. 2011 NEA National Heritage Fellowship Recipient, Ledward Ka‘apana is Hawai‘i’s premier master Slack Key guitarist. His inventiveness and fluidity, versatility in multiple tunings, and playfulness on stage, make him the leading master of this art. Led has been a professional musician for over 40 years. His mastery of stringed instruments

and extraordinary baritone and leo ki‘eki‘e (falsetto) voice have made him a musical legend. His easy-going style and charm have made him a favorite of audiences throughout the world. Every Wednesday evening at Napili Kai Beach Resort on Maui. All Show tickets are open seating. Options for purchase: Tickets $37.99 - $95. Advance ticket purchases can be made at slackkeyshow.com. 2ND ANNUAL ‘AHA MAULIOLA - A NATIVE HAWAIIAN WELLNESS GATHERING Aug. 10, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., University of Hawai‘i, Maui College The ‘Aha Mauliola is a free event to share Maui’s health, wellness and cultural resources with the community offering resource vendors, cultural activities, health screenings, keiki dental services, entertainment, a silent auction, food, crafts, giveaways and more to strengthen the minds, bodies and spirits of the community. Sponsored by OHA. HUI FOR HEALTH – PÄHOA Aug. 14, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Hui for Health – Pähoa connects 250 people with preventative health services, nutritious meals, hot showers, and resources to help them find


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‘aukake2019

MOON CALENDAR

H O O N U I A N A H U L U P O E P O E A N A H U L U

MAUKA TO MAKAI Aug. 31, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mauka to Makai is a two-day, free event for the community of Wai‘anae that celebrates the wealth of land and water through cultural education and activities. Through hands on activities and mo‘olelo for each location, we will transport participants to the old Wai‘anae, a place which was once a thriving farming and fishing stronghold. Ka‘ala Farm & Poka‘i Bay. Sponsored by OHA.

Māhoe Mua - ‘aukake 1–31, 2019

H O E M I

MADE IN HAWAI‘I FESTIVAL PRESENTED BY FIRST HAWAIIAN BANK (25TH ANNUAL) Aug. 16 - 18, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Produced by the Hawai‘i Food Industry Association, this three-day festival is the state’s largest annual emporium of Hawai‘i-made products, featuring apparel and fashion accessories, food products, books, handicrafts and artwork, gifts, home accessories, plants, produce and more. Added attractions throughout the three-day festival are live stage performances by top Hawai‘i music artists as well as cooking demonstrations by some of the state’s top culinary artists. Friday and Saturday August 16 and 17, 2019 – 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday, August 18, 2019 – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission $7. Neil S. Blaisdell Arena. For information visit www.madeinhawaiifestival. com

‘OHANA COMMUNITY WORKDAY Aug. 31, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Join the Maunawili community for a morning of hands-on lo‘i work, learning, and connections. Bring an adventurous spirit, towel, old and comfortable clothes (shorts and t-shirt), plastic bag for wet clothes, water bottle, and hat. No shoes required in lo‘i. Ho‘okua‘äina 916E Auloa Rd Kailua, HI. More info at hookuaaina.org.

A N A H U L U

a way home. Nanawale Community Association. Sponsored by OHA.

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Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Po‘aha

Po‘alima

Po‘aono

Lapule

Po‘akahi

Po‘alua

Po‘akolu

Po‘aha

Po‘alima

Po‘aono

6

7

8

1

2

3

4

5

Hoaka

Kū Kahi

Kū Lua

Kū Kolu

Kū Pau

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Poor fishing

Poor fishing

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Unproductive planting

Plant ‘uala, kalo, mai‘a

Plant ‘uala, kalo, mai‘a

Plant ‘uala, kalo, mai‘a

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Lapule

Po‘akahi

Po‘alua

Po‘akolu

Po‘aha

Po‘alima

Po‘aono

Lapule

Po‘akahi

Po‘alua

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Mōhalu

Hua

Akua

Hoku

Māhealani

Kulu

Lā‘au Pau

‘Ole Kū Kahi

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Excellent fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Poor fishing

MAHI‘AI

9

10

‘Ole Pau

Huna

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

Poor fishing

Poor fishing

Good fishing

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

‘Ole Kū Kahi ‘Ole Kū Lua ‘Ole Kū Kolu

Unproductive Unproductive Unproductive Unproductive MAHI‘AI planting. planting. planting. planting. Plant ‘uala Preparation Preparation Preparation Preparation Plant ipu and day. day. day. day. root plants and kalo MAHI‘AI

Lā‘au Kū Kahi Lā‘au Kū Lua

MAHI‘AI MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Plant ipu, kalo Plant ‘uala, & flowering ipu & fruit plants plants

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Plant kalo, Plant kalo, ‘uala, mai‘a ‘uala, mai‘a & & corn root plants

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Excellent planting

Plant ‘uala & melons

Unproductive MAHI‘AI MAHI‘AI MAHI‘AI planting. Plant mai‘a, Plant mai‘a, Plant mai‘a, Preparation day. ‘ulu & other ‘ulu & other ‘ulu & other trees trees trees

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Po‘akolu

Po‘aha

Po‘alima

Po‘aono

Lapule

Po‘akahi

Po‘alua

Po‘akolu

Po‘aha

Po‘alima

Po‘aono

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Kāne

Lono

Mauli

Hilo

Hoaka

Kū Kahi

21

22

‘Ole Kū Lua

‘Ole Pau

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

LAWAI‘A

Poor fishing

Poor fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

Excellent fishing

No fishing

No fishing

Good fishing

Excellent fishing

Good fishing

Good fishing

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Unproductive Unproductive MAHI‘AI planting. planting. Preparation Preparation Plant mai‘a, day. day. ‘ohe, kō & vined plants

No planting

Plant ipu & melons

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Kāloa Kū Kahi Kāloa Kū Lua Kāloa Pau

MAHI‘AI

MAHI‘AI

Plant mai‘a, Unproductive ‘ohe, kō & planting wauke

Plant dark Unproductive Unproductive Plant ‘uala, planting kalo, mai‘a green planting vegetation

About This Calendar In the traditional Hawaiian calendar, the 29.5-day mahina (moon) cycle is divided into three anahulu (10-day periods): ho‘onui (growing bigger), beginning on the first visible crescent; poepoe (round or full); and emi (decreasing). The traditional names of the Hawaiian moon months and phases may vary by island and moku (district). This calendar uses the O‘ahu moon phases listed in the Hawaiian Almanac by Clarice Taylor. Source: http://www.kamehamehapublishing.org/_assets/publishing/multimedia/apps/mooncalendar/index.html


14 & 15

‘aukake2019

MO‘OLELO NUI COVER FEATURE

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

the

awa k eni ng

Küpuna and their kako‘o use their bodies as barriers to protect Maunakea. - Photo: Ruben Carillo/4 Miles

B y S t e r l i n g Wo n g s thousands of Native Hawaiians ascend onto Maunakea and thousands more rally across the islands, all to demand the protection of the sacred mountain, many in Hawai‘i may wonder how exactly did we get here? After all, 13 telescopes already sit on the mountain. Why is another one causing all this fuss? Native Hawaiians have always cared deeply about Maunakea. At the same time, Native Hawaiians – in the true spirit of aloha – have shared the mauna with science. But we have always wanted a balance: properly-managed development that protected the cultural and natural components of the

expressed concern that scientific, recreational and other social pressures posed “a threat to the priceless qualities” of Maunakea. As a result, he directed the state Department of Land and Natural Resources to develop what would be the first management plan for the mountain. A broad segment of the community participated in drafting the plan. A number of hunting and conservation groups and even Hawai‘i County Mayor Herbert T. Matayoshi called for telescope development to be limited to six: the three existing telescopes and the three slated for completion by the end of the decade. Ultimately, the 1977 Mauna Kea Plan failed to include a limit on

Top: Malia Hulleman and Jamaica Osorio chained to the cattle guard on Mauna Kea Access Road. - Photo: Cody Fay Bottom: The Lähui gets in formation - Photo: Ruben Carillo/4 Miles mountain. What we’ve seen instead is the astronomy development. exact opposite. Over the last 50 years, In 1980, the Hawai‘i Tribune-Herald we’ve witnessed an explosion of astronomy ran a spread on Maunakea that highlighted development on Maunakea at the expense of community concerns over the number of everything else. observatories on the mountain. The article This is not an issue of culture versus sci- noted the sacredness of Maunakea to Native ence. And it’s not strictly about the Thirty Hawaiians, and that “the rarified atmosphere Meter Telescope or any one telescope. on the mountain’s higher slopes and summit The issue is about the continued expan- [...] should not unreasonably be disturbed in sion of an industrial complex on a sacred the name of progress or scientific developplace. It’s about Native Hawaiians reaching ment.” Members of the Waimea Hawaiian a breaking point after decades of govern- Civic Club wrote that while some of their ment officials dismissing their concerns members supported astronomy, others over appropriate management of a site that expressed consternation at the changes to is meant to be conserved. Ultimately, it’s the mountain caused by observatory develabout Native Hawaiians reasserting control opment. Several members, the club said, over a native resource that the state has failed were adamant about “no more building.” to protect. The director of UH’s Institute for Astronomy wrote that he was often asked “How Management Plans many new telescopes are likely to be built Lacking Management on Mauna Kea and, anyway, why are any more needed?” Only six telescopes existed The history of astronomy development on the mauna at the time, half the number on Maunakea is long and complicated. at present. Controlling development is, at the end of Several years later, the BLNR approved the day, the most important component of the 1985 Mauna Kea Management Plan, responsible management of environmen- which allowed for 13 telescopes. This paved tally- and culturally-sensitive lands, in this the way for a flurry of development. New case located in the state’s conservation dis- telescopes such as the two Kecks, the Subaru trict. For decades, the number of telescopes and the Gemini would be substantially larger on the mountain was a seminal concern of than previous observatories on the mountain. Native Hawaiians and non-Hawaiians alike. Construction was so rapid that UH couldn’t Establishing a cap on astronomy develop- keep up. The university had to request retroment took center stage of nearly every effort active approval for four telescope subleases. to establish management plans that balance As the mauna quickly transformed into protecting Maunakea’s natural and cultural an industrial complex, the community’s resources with astronomy. concerns turned into frustration. Nelson In 1968, the state awarded a 65-year lease Ho, of the Sierra Club’s Hawai‘i Chapter, to UH for Maunakea for a single observa- questioned the growth of astronomy as UH tory. In short order, three telescopes were drafted its 1995 Management Plan. erected. “Cleary the people of Hawaii have been In 1974, Acting Gov. George Ariyoshi generous in sharing their mountain with the

world’s leading astronomers,” he wrote. “But apparently even all that development is not enough to satisfy the scientists [...] Moreover, no agency should approve changes to the existing management plan without knowing how many telescopes they are planning for – thirteen? Eighteen? Twenty-five telescopes? Yet the proposal remains – perhaps intentionally – silent on this issue.” The 1995 plan failed to account for observatory development. By the late 1990s, the Native Hawaiian community’s frustration continued to mount, culminating with calls for a moratorium on telescope development. Concerns finally reached the capitol. At the request of the Legislature, the state auditor released the first in a string of four audits over nearly two decades that were highly critical of the state and UH’s management of Maunakea. The initial audit found that: "[UH’s] focus on telescope construction on Mauna Kea’s summit propelled the site into a premier location for astronomical research. However, this emphasis was at the expense of neglecting the site’s natural resources". In 1999 alone, three telescopes were completed. In 2000, UH released its longawaited response to the 1998 audit: its new Master Plan. While the plan detailed future development plans, it was never approved by the Board of Land and Natural Resources, leaving its applicability in question. In 2002, the last telescope to be built on a new footprint was finished, bringing observatory development to the limit of 13 set by the 1985 plan. Nevertheless, UH continued to push for more astronomy development. NASA proposed up to six new, smaller outrigger telescopes that would surround the two 10-meter Keck telescopes. In 2004, two Hawaiian organizations and the Sierra Club’s Hawai‘i Chapter sued. In 2007, a third circuit court judge found that the outrigger telescopes were not supported by an appropriate management plan, leading to the abandonment of the project. In the late 2000s, the university pushed for yet another management plan. It championed its new Comprehensive Management Plan (CMP), and its four subplans, as a game changer in how it would care for the mauna. But despite Native Hawaiians demanding that the new plan provide details on the future of astronomy on the mountain, the CMP failed to fully address the matter. The plan only went so far as to say that UH “foresees” that there “may be” 10 telescopes by 2033, the end of UH’s general lease for Maunakea. After opposition to TMT grew in 2015, Gov. David Ige acknowledged the state had “failed” Maunakea. In 2017, OHA filed a lawsuit against the state and UH for their longstanding mismanagement of the mountain. Maunakea Today Of all the multitude of management plans for the mountain developed over the course of three decades, only one – the 1985 management plan – was both approved by the state and included a limit on astronomy development. Technology has changed dramatically over time with the footprints of newer telescopes exceeding those of the first generation of telescopes on Maunakea. At the same time, existing telescopes are becoming obsolete. Further, many continue to argue that the 13 existing telescopes are too much. Yet despite all of this, the state continues to avoid producing a new comprehensive plan that updates the limit of astronomy development that appropriately balances science with the protection of the mountain’s natural and cultural resources. This single management failure explains so much of what’s happening on the mountain today, why Native Hawaiians do not trust the state’s ability to steward Maunakea, and why so many are so strident against future observatory development. This is why Native Hawaiians are calling for a new management structure for the mountain. This mo‘olelo is how we got here and and will continue to be the mo‘oküauhau of resilience of our Lähui. 

Kūpuna were removed by state officials from their positions at the front line of the Maunakea protest. Many were carried, assisted, and pushed in wheelchairs, as they were arrested and taken into custody. Top & Middle Photo: Dino Morrow / Bottom Photo: Ruben Carillo - 4 Miles

the Pillars of Maunakea On July 17, 2019, the state of Hawai‘i made the decision to arrest more than 30 revered kūpuna (elders) from the front lines of the protest on Maunakea. These kūpuna formed a line across Maunakea Access Road, blocking the pathway forconstruction of the Thirty Meter Telescope. Together they stood firmly in opposition until officers removed them from the road. - Jim Albertini - Sharol Ku‘ualoha Awai - Tomas Belsky - Roberta Benett - Marie Alohalani Brown - Kini Burke - Luana Busby - Daycia-Dee Chun - Alika Desha - Richard Dillion - Peleiholani Edleen - Billy Freitas - Momi Patricia Green - Desmond Haumea - Hooulualoha Hookano - Deena Lokelani Hurwitz - Skippy Ioane - Leilani Ka‘apuni - Maxine Kahā‘ulelio - Ana Kaho‘opi‘i - Nohea Kalima - Kaliko Kanaele - Pua Kanaka‘ole Kanahele - Deborah Lee - Donna Keala Leong - Danny Li - Trustee Carmen “Hulu” Lindsey - Abel Simeona Lui- Liko Martin - Jimmy Nani‘ole - Renee Price - Hawley Reese - Loretta Ritte - Walter Ritte - Raynette Robinson - Mililani Trask - Onaona Trask - Keoni Turalde - Michelle Noenoe Wong-Wilson -

Source: KITV4


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MO‘OLELO NUI

‘aukake2019

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org

COVER FEATURE

NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

k u kia i mauna worldwide Decades of organizing by Maunakea protectors has flourished into a broad demonstration of international support. Here’s a small selection of photos from around the world.

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Bachman Hall. - Photo: Kawena Lei Caravalho-Mattos

Sign-waving at the State Capitol. - Photo: Kawena Lei Caravalho-Mattos

University of New Mexico Curanderismo. - Photo: Courtesy

The George Na'ope Hula Festival in Sacramento, California - Photo: James Doiron

Sign-waving at the State Capitol. - Photo: Kawena Lei CaravalhoMattos

Supporters from Kaua‘i - Photo: Malia Nobrega-Olivera

New York City. - Photo: Kris Kato

Hui Wa‘a Championship Race Keehi Lagoon Photo: Eli Nakahara

O‘ahu Hawaiian Canoe Racing Association Championship Race, Keehi Lagoon - Photo: Jen Romano

Sea Tac/Tukwila. Photo: Candace Kananiokamokihana Marticio-Melendez


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MANA

MOMENT

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In November 2017, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs published Mana Lāhui Kānaka, a multidimensional study of mana: what it is, how to articulate it, and how to access and cultivate it in order to uplift our lāhui. The book and this column share mana‘o on using culture and traditional knowledge as a foundation for how we advance in the world today. To explore other Mana Moments visit www.oha.org/mana.

To further the discussion on mana, Ka Wai Ola asked two questions: 1. What does mana mean to you? 2. Can you share a moment in your life where you felt mana?

M

ana means spiritual power, as I’m sure that’s the answer for everyone, but it’s not just spiritual power. It’s the confirmation of that power through the ancestors. And that confirmation happens when you are pono, you do things correctly, and you are linked closely to the ancestors. So in the past, religion played a huge role in that. It wasn’t just about political power per say, but political power that is driven by spiritual recognition. A good chief wasn’t just someone that could lead, it was someone who could get the blessing of the ancestors, the endorsement of ancestors who are still alive in the afterlife and are trying to communicate with us and trying to direct us. When we talk about leadership today, I think that is one of the things that is kind of missing, that spiritual component and that ancestral component that really validates mana. Its not like you gain it from just doing things necessarily. Its that confirmation that’s needed. Anytime I feel strong ancestral connection, to me that is mana. I think its closely tied to the idea of well, trying to be like your ancestors. I write a lot about this topic because I think that’s core to the Hawaiian identity. Doing the things of your ancestors is essential to defining who you are. It should be as a Native Hawaiian because our whole world view is based on wanting to be like our ancestors. So when you do things like your ancestors, when you research about them, when you evoke their names, when you

‘aukake2019

17

Ka Pono march in Waikïkï, there was just a sea of red. And I remember telling my friend that this was totally different than any other experience I ever had because we like had power now. So we went to that amazing event, participated in the march, and I could see that the lähui was growing. It was gaining power. And then days later I jump on the Höküle‘a and we’re going to do ceremonies at Nihoa, and I was like “this is such a mind trip for me to be on Höküle‘a like this, to be in this traditional manner. We’re going to do chants and prayers and ceremonies on the island in places where our ancestors resided, calling them for help while we gain political power.” I just saw those two events as almost Dr. Kekuewa Kikiloi shares moments of mana in his life at the Kali‘uokapa‘akai Think chant about them, when Tank. - Photo: Jason Lees one event. But I had the luxury of being you remember them and involved in both so I could make that commemorate them in dif90’s it was all the same kind of people at the connection. To me that was when I was ferent ways, those are all things that build that protests. Go to the protests and you see all like, I’m feeling some mana here, but that was identity up in you and brings mana to you. the same people, all the time. So it was kind mana for the lähui, a bigger thing that we are A mana moment for me would be, there’s of like a small resistance movement that was trying to achieve collectively. ¢ a lot of small things obviously because we happening. In fact, the motto was that “kü‘e” have interconnection with them daily. We see that was our motto, to resist. Tap into your mana by downloading a free them in signs of nature, we feel close to them But it was for the first time that I felt it had copy of Mana Lähui Känaka at oha.org/ when we are in particular areas that maybe gone bigger. When I showed up to the Kü I mana. they had a connection too, I see them in my children. There are things like that, that resonate with me. But some of the most powerful moments was when I went to wahikapu, places that were the most sacred. Definitely riding on the Hökule‘a, going to mokumanamana to do rites and ceremonies, for me that’s traveling in the wake of your ancestors and that you can feel them with you. And you know that you’re gaining mana, the collective as a group that is doing the work is gaining mana, and the lähui is gaining mana. One of the things that I really noticed, and this intersects with this idea of political/spiritual mana, in 2003 in the first ceremonial trip up to Nihoa on the Höküle‘a, it was one or two days before that the Kü I Ka Pono march happened. And as a Hawaiian Studies student, up until that time though out the

MANA MOMENT: KEKUEWA KIKILOI Interview with Dr. Kekuewa Kikiloi

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OLA KINO

‘aukake2019

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

YOUR HEALTH

“I maika‘i ke kalo i ka ‘ohā” By Claire Ku‘uleilani Hughes, Dr. PH., R.D.

“The goodness of the taro is judged by the young plant it produces”. ‘Ölelo Noe‘au #1232 (Parents are often judged by the behavior of their children)

I

n early Hawai‘i, older children learned to care for younger ones. Adolescents carried toddlers around and supervised hours of group play. Children’s groups wandered about the village, playing in open areas or along shorelines. Little ones enjoyed playing in tidepools under supervision of adolescents, while other teenagers fished and harvested shellfish and

limu (seaweed) for food. No one worried when children walked to neighboring kauhale (villages) to visit relatives. Visiting children were always included whenever relatives or neighbors fed their children. And, neighbors oversaw comfort and safety of naps for tired little ones. Elder kupuna, today, can tell tales of spending youthful, funfilled, accident-free, summer days at the beach without adult supervision. Hawaiian keiki (children) learned kuleana (responsibilities) early. Keiki learned to sit still and listen quietly to adult instruction, holding questions until a convenient moment…never interrupting the lesson. Keiki were taught not to ask where a person was going, as it was thought to be rude and to bring bad fortune. A fisherman’s child learned this lesson, very early. Keiki were taught never to spit at other children or to beg for anything, as

these were rude and embarrassing behaviors. Keiki learned very early to be disciplined about many things. Then, in early adolescence, children began to assist familyadults in performance of adult kuleana. A long-established system existed among elders for teaching grandchildren. And, elders were respected for having the greatest knowledge and wisdom. In 2019, behaviors of children are still considered direct reflections of families. Misbehaving children bring embarrassment, while courteous children bring honor to families. Hawaiian traditions taught keiki to anticipate needs of others and to relate dutifully to their elders, these behaviors seem to have paled in the process of acculturation in mainstream America. Today, noisy, demanding, rude adolescents are noticeable in public places. Of course, cultural changes in our lives have brought disci-

pline difficulties. Our children are highly influenced by social systems outside of the family, like, social media, rock stars, video games and unruly, misbehaving peers. Today, television, music and movies depict disruptive, disrespectful, rude, even abhorrently violent behaviors, thus, children may be confused about appropriateness of such behaviors. Many new behaviors are absolute opposites of traditional ways within the kauhale(s) of old Hawai‘i. Until recently, Hawaiian elders and families shared kuleana that made the `ohana existence productive, pleasant and safe. Children did daily chores and respected all `ohana and community adults. Grandparents molded the behaviors of their children and taught them family history, chants and family kuleana, while parents did the labor-intensive work of farming, fishing, and kapa-making. Great pride was reflected in family customs and names, as surnames often referred to family achievements and kuleana. Behaviors of children and adults demonstrated their grand-

parent’s successes in perpetuating cultural norms. Our children continue to be our kuleana (responsibility), our hope and the future of the lähui (community). Looking forward, we have kuleana to persist with teaching our children, grandchildren, even, great-grandchildren, Hawaiian traditions. Our kuleana includes helping our keiki to make the best, healthiest, and most productive life choices. Our children and grandchildren continue to be reflections of the family. We want our children to succeed and to produce generations of productive families and communities. Since January 2019, we have repeatedly acknowledged the circle of life as a community, on days celebrating our mothers, fathers, our ancestors, as well as our community heroes and leaders. Let’s use these days of acknowledgement and awareness as inspiration to improve life in Hawai`i…striving for high achievement in all that we do…to elevate and improve lives for our families and community.

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‘aukake2019

PUBLIC NOTICE

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KA WAI OLA CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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By Kawena Lei Carvalho-Mattos

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Ua maka‘ala? Have you been paying attention?

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Answers for this crossword puzzle can be found through out the pages of this issue of Ka Wai Ola. Please do not include any spaces, special characters, or diacriticals (‘okina and kahakö) in your answers. 4 Location on Kaua‘i for salt gathering 5 Hawaiian word for the two of them 7 Hawaiian word for culture 8 Prince Kūhiō's Waikı̄kı̄ beach home 9 Hawaiian word for August 10 "Mana Moment" contributor 12 Acting governor of Hawai‘i in 1974 13 2003 march in Waikı̄kı̄ 14 _________ Health Center, organizer of National Health Center Week 16 Comprehensive _______ Plan 17 Mango variety 18 Composer of the song "Fate Yanagi" 19 Author of surf column 21 Length of the cultural research voyage Papahānaumokuākea 23 Hawaiian word to elect or choose wisely 24 Hawaiian word for villages 26 I ______ ke kalo i ka ‘ohā.

ACROSS 6 Ball hosted by the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu 7 Tallest mountain on Hawai‘i Island 11 Hawaiian word for calendar 14 Hawaiian word for responsibility 15 Name of Marine National Monument 20 Name of the voyage taken to Papahānaumokuākea 22 Native Hawaiian mural artist 25 13 of these currently sit on Maunakea 27 Hawaiian word for pronoun 28 Number of 2019 Aloha ‘Āina Leader awardees 29 Edith _________ Foundation 30 Pop-Up Holiday _________ DOWN 1 He moku, he _____ 2 Official state team sport 3 Kāne‘ohe elementary school with mural

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Across Ball hosted by the Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu Tallest mountain on Hawaiʻi Island Hawaiian word for calendar Hawaiian word for responsibility Name of Marine National Monument Name of the voyage taken to Papahānaumokuākea Native Hawaiian mural artist 13 of these currently sit on Maunakea Hawaiian word for pronoun Number of 2019 Aloha ʻĀina Leader awardees Edith _________ Foundation Pop-Up Holiday _________

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Down He moku, he _____ Official state team sport Kāneʻohe elementary school with mural Location on Kauaʻi for salt gathering Hawaiian word for the two of them Hawaiian word for culture Prince Kūhiō's Waikīkī beach home Hawaiian word for August "Mana Moment" contributor Acting governor of Hawaiʻi in 1974 2003 march in Waikīkī _________ Health Center, organizer of National Health Center Week Comprehensive _______ Plan Mango variety Composer of the song "Fate Yanagi" Author of surf column Length of the cultural research voyage to Papahānaumokuākea Hawaiian word to elect or choose wisely Hawaiian word for villages I ______ ke kalo i ka ʻohā.

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HO‘OLAHA LEHULEHU

Notice is hereby given that the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the County of Kaua‘i Department of Public Works (DPW) proposes to rehabilitate and resurface roadways along portions of Olohena Road, Kukui Street, and ‘Ulu Street in Kapa‘a. This federally funded County of Kaua‘i project is considered a federal action and undertaking, as defined by Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966, as amended (2006). The purpose of the proposed project is to rehabilitate these col-

KAMALU RD INTERSECTION

KAPAʻA BYPASS ROUNDABOUT

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he Hawaiian Civic Club of Honolulu hosted the 2019 Holokü Ball in June at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel Monarch Room. With 329 attendees and $82,000 raised, the event was “very successful,” according to Holokü Ball Chair Maluhia Kauahi. This year’s event was titled “Ka nehe o ke kai hawanawana – The Rustling of the Whispering Sea,” named for a line in the mele Waikïkï Hula. The line refers to Prince Jonah Kühiö

KUKUI STREET

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ROA

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OH

EN

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ʻULU STREET

Kalani‘anäole’s Waikïkï Beach home known as Pualeilani. The dinner included Hawaiian music by Ku’uipo Kumukahi and Karen Keawehawaii, ‘Uhe‘uhene, Walea Music, and Ei Nei. The fashion show included outfits designed by Manaola, Kini Zamora, Iris Viacrusis of Hilo and several others. Nineteen companies purchased corporate tables, which contributed substantially to the large monies raised this year. 90% of donations, plus 20% of interest earned, will go to college and graduate-studies scholarships.

Many of Hawai‘i's leaders and stars attending the ball in showstopping attire. - Photo: Ikaika Hussey

PROJECT LOCATION

Legend

RD

The Area of Potential Effects (APE) is approximately 42 acres, along a total of about 3.1 miles of roadway. The APE extends approximately 10 feet below the surface for most of its footprint, but may be deeper at Konohiki Stream Bridge depending on final project design. Pursuant to Section 106 of the NHPA, Native Hawaiian Organizations and Native Hawaiian descendants with ancestral lineal or cultural ties to, cultural and historical property knowledge of and/or concerns for, and cultural or religious attachment to the proposed project area are requested to contact the County of Kaua‘i. Other individuals and organizations with

Holokū Ball By Ka Wai Ola Staff

ROAD

"

ASS

Generally, all affected roadways will retain their existing geometry. Most work would be conducted within the roadway right-of-way (ROW), but some project actions may extend beyond the ROW. The County of Kaua‘i will obtain easements from affected property owners for project elements extending beyond the ROW. No displacements of existing uses are anticipated by these relocations and easements. The project may include additions or deletions of pedestrian sidewalks, bike lanes, turn lanes, and parking areas. Shoulder widening along Olohena Road may also be included where there is adequate space. Drainage, utility, and roadway safety improvements will be conducted where appropriate, including improvements at Konohiki Stream Bridge on Olohena Road.

ENA

WY

IMPROVEMENTS TO COLLECTOR ROADS, PORTIONS OF OLOHENA ROAD, KUKUI STREET, AND ‘ULU STREET DISTRICT OF KAWAIHAU, ISLAND OF KAUA‘I, AHUPUA‘A OF NORTH OLOHENA, WAIPOULI, AND KAPA‘A

OLOH

KONOHIKI STREAM BRIDGE

BYP

NOTICE OF CONSULTATION SECTION 106 OF THE NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION ACT OF 1966 AS AMENDED (2006)

lector roads that exhibit cracked and damaged pavement. The affected road segments are the following: • Olohena Road – Kamalu Road to 200 feet beyond Ka‘apuni Road (2.5 miles); • Olohena Road/Kukui Street – Kapa‘a Bypass Road roundabout to Kühiö Highway (0.3 miles); and • ‘Ulu Street – Kukui Street to Kühiö Highway (0.3 miles).

Project Area

IŌ H

CULTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT NOTICE Information requested by Scientific Consultant Services, Inc. of past and ongoing cultural practices on 79.098 acres of land in Kalaoa 5th Ahupua‘a, North Kona District, Island of Hawai‘i, TMK: (3) 7-3010:061. Please respond within 30

days to Glenn Escott at (808) 9380968.

NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

KŪH

PÏHA AHUPUA‘A ASM Affiliates is preparing a Cultural Impact Assessment (CIA) in support of an HRS Chapter 343 Environmental Assessment for a 3.26-acre property (TMK (3) 3-2-004:040), situated in Pïha Ahupua‘a, North Hilo District, Island of Hawai‘i. We are seeking consultation with any community members that might have knowledge of traditional cultural uses of the proposed project area; or who are involved in any ongoing cultural practices that may be occurring on or in the general vicinity of the subject property, that may be impacted by the proposed project. If you have and can share any such information please contact ‘Iolani Ka‘uhane ikauhane@asmaffiliates.com, or Lokelani Brandt lbrandt@asmaffiliates.com, phone (808) 969-6066, mailing address ASM Affiliates 507A E. Lanikaula Street, Hilo, HI 96720.

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org

PUBLIC NOTICE

AʻA

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KAP

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KAPAʻA BEACH PARK

demonstrated legal, economic or historic preservation interest in the undertaking are asked to contact the County of Kaua‘i and share information you may have on historical and cultural sites that you may have knowledge of within the proposed APE. Interested participants are requested to contact Mr. Joel Bautista, DPW Project Manager, via email at jbautista@kauai.gov, or by US Postal Service to County of Kaua‘i Department of Public Works, Engineering Division, 4444 Rice Street, Suite 175, Lïhu‘e, HI 96766-1340. Please respond by September 2, 2019.


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OHA Board Actions

21

LEGEND

The following actions were taken by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees, and are summarized here. For more information on board actions, please see the complete meeting minutes posted online at http://www.oha.org/BOT. June 20, 2019

‘Ae (Yes) ‘A‘ole (No) Kānalua (Abstain) Excused

Motion

Motion to move to approve : • The total Operating Budget for the Fiscal Biennium Periods 2019-2020 (FY 20) and 2020-2021 (FY21) as outlined in Attachment #1 to include, • The extension of the Kaka‘ako Makai Revenue allocation policy provision of thirty (30) percent of net revenues (as defined in current policy, see page 11) for OHA’s Legacy Property management until further edits to the Kaka‘ako Makai policy is presented, reviewed and decided upon by the Board of Trustees, but in no event later than September 30, 2019; and, • The approval of 2% across-the-board pay increase of salaries and fringe (see page 17) for FY20 and FY 21 for OHA employees, excluding trustees, based on individual satisfactory performance evaluation.

Motion passes with nine AYES.

Motion to move to approve the appointment of Sylvia Hussey, Ed.D., the current OHA Chief Operating Officer (COO), to serve as the interim Chief Executive Officer (CEO) effective July 1, 2019 until such time as a permanent CEO is under contract with the OHA Board of Trustees (BOT) and officially starts.

Motion passes with nine AYES.

Board of Trustees

Motion to move to approve the formation of a Permitted Interaction Group (PIG) to investigate complaints against a Trustee for alleged violations of the Trustee Code of Conduct involving allegations that the Trustee breached the duty of care and loyalty to OHA and the duty to obey and support the Board’s decisions. Permitted Interaction Group Scope /Purview: The scope/purview of the PIG is to: • Investigate complaints against an OHA Trustee for alleged violations of the Trustee Code of Conduct contained in the complaints, such as allegations involving that the Trustee breached the duty of care and loyalty to OHA and the duty to obey and support the Board’s decisions; • Interview individuals involved in the complaints, consult with others (i.e. Board Counsel, etc.), and perform tasks as necessary to further and complete its investigation; and • Present to the Board a report with its findings and recommendations

Motion passes with seven AYES and two ABSTENTIONS.

Permitted Interaction Group Membership: The membership of the PIG is as follows: • Trustee Brendon Kalei‘āina Lee; • Trustee Carmen Hulu Lindsey; • Trustee John Waihe‘e IV; and • Trustee Kalei Akaka Trustee Lee will serve as the Chair of the PIG and Trustee Hulu Lindsey will serve as its Vice Chair. Permitted Interaction Group Term/Duration: The term of the PIG expires at the completion of the scope/assigned tasks or at the discretion of the Chair of the Board of Trustees, subject to later adjustment.

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SM

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TRUSTEE MESSSAGES

Läna‘i Students Share ‘Ike in ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Note: Trustee columns represent the views of individual trustees and may not reflect the official positions adopted by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees.

Colette Y. Machado Chair, Trustee, Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i Tel: 808.594.1837 Fax: 808.594.0212 Email: colettem@oha.org

—————

Brendon Kalei‘āina Lee Vice Chair, Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1860 Fax: 808.594.1883 Email: brendonl@oha.org

D

uring our June meetings is important to them, and some of on the island of Läna‘i, their favorite things about their we heard classes. Many students from various shared that some of their community favorite parts of the school members and organizayear included OHA-spontions, regarding the work sored activities, such as they are doing on the island Höküle‘a engagement and some of the issues they on Läna‘i, oli workshops face. One of the presentaas part of OHA’s I Mana tions, by students from Ka Lähui series, and the Colette Y. Läna‘i High and ElemenLäna‘i May Day Program. tary School, was especially It was special to get these Machado moving, because we got to mahalo from the keiki of hear as they demonstrated Läna‘i for OHA’s work Chair, Trustee their progress as haumäna in the community, and to Moloka‘i in ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i. know that beneficiaries and Lana‘i Students of LHES there are taking full advanfrom grades Kindergarten tage of OHA programming.

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Leina’ala Ahu Isa, Ph.D. Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1877 Fax: 808.594.1853 Email: leia@oha.org

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Dan Ahuna Trustee Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau Tel: 808.594.1751 Email: dana@oha.org

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Kaleihikina Akaka Trustee, O‘ahu Tel: 808.594.1854 Fax: 808.594.1864 Email: kaleia@oha.org

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Keli‘i Akina, Ph.D. Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1859 Email: TrusteeAkina@oha.org

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Carmen “Hulu” Lindsey Trustee, Maui Tel: 808.594.1858 Fax: 808.594.1864 Email: hulul@oha.org

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Robert K. Lindsey Jr. Trustee Hawai‘i Tel: 808.594.1855 Fax: 808.594.1883 Email: robertl@oha.org

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John D. Waihe‘e IV Trustee, At-large Tel: 808.594.1876 Email: crayna@oha.org

Läna‘i keiki with their kumu after presenting to OHA in ‘ölelo Hawai‘i - Photo: Anthony Pacheco through sixth grade are now being taught ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i by Kumu Simon Tajiri and Hawaiian culture by ‘Anake Irene Davis. Although this is not meant to be a substitute for a Hawaiian language medium education, Läna‘i students have shown an active interest in ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i and Hawaiian culture. It is even said that this is the highest engagement of Hawaiian language and culture in the curriculum in the school’s history. Kumu Simon brings his knowledge and expertise as the former program manager of E ‘Ike Hou iä Läna‘i Hawaiian education summer initiative at the Läna‘i Culture and Heritage Center. The students in the school’s summer program attended our Läna‘i meeting with their Kumu and shared with us one-by-one in ha‘i ‘ölelo why learning ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i

Their Kumu shared with OHA that not all the students are Native Hawaiian. It is so touching that these students have an aloha for the language and culture even if not Hawaiian in their genealogy. I am hopeful that this program will continue to grow and that many more keiki on Läna‘i take advantage of this opportunity. In order for ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i to continue to thrive, we need dedicated speakers to continue to perpetuate our language. E ola mau ka ‘Ölelo Hawai‘i! The Board continues our travel and is next on Moloka‘i Nui a Hina. Our Community Meeting will be on August 7, 2019 and our Board Meeting will be on August 8, 2019. The agenda for these meetings can be found on www.oha.org/BOT once they are filed.¢

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

Government’s Obligation to Spend

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hen people think yes. Has OHA spent trust funds for of the Legislative questionable reasons in the past, yes. branch Does that mean that OHA of our and Trustees should stop governspending money, absoment they typically think lutely not. Does OHA of the creation of laws. need better and more This of course is one of transparent policy, yes. the responsibilities of this Should OHA and Trustees branch; however another stop funding until these is to allocate and spend policies are created, absoBrendon our tax dollars. Congress lutely not. funds Federal programs Most of your TrustKalei‘āina Lee and the Legislature funds ees are working with State programs. As a citithe Administration to Vice Chair, zen, how would you feel strengthen current policy. Trustee, At-large if these bodies of governThey are also working ment told you “in order to create other policies to save money that are muchthey were not needed and going to fund long overdue. anything?” They are workWould you ing together praise them to strengthen for their frugal OHA, they choices or are not using would you be the lack of or outraged that Hawai‘i Houseless community - Photo: unclear policy they had not Sophie Cocke as an excuse as fulfilled their to why they did responsibility not help bento the public? eficiaries. They If someare providing one who was solutions, parelected to repreticipating in the sent me posted a process, and picture of themhelping you, our selves with a beneficiaries in check showing how much had any way they can. been allocated for them to spend to Do not be deceived by political help citizens and did not spend that rhetoric about being a “watchdog.” money I would be outraged. Our We were all elected to be your Trustelected officials should be held to ees and have equal say. To say that a higher standard than just saying one has more, or different say is not “how they could spend the dol- only undemocratic, it is false. To say lars was not clear enough.” We as that constitutional rights are being elected officials should know what broken is not understanding the difis ethical and what is not. If we have ference between fiduciary duty and doubts and or concerns about what individual rights. If someone does is ethical there is a simple phone not know these differences, it has to number: we can call to ask a State make you wonder if an individual attorney if we can or should spend is qualified to be a trustee and have Trust funds. fiduciary responsibility. We should demand that those who Learn all the facts, listen to all represent us maximize every dollar sides, ask questions. Do not believe provided to them. To be proud that just what you read from one person. you did not spend anything and Read what exactly the Trustees are thus helped no one is a travesty that voting on, not what just one person needs to be addressed. Have Trust- says they voted on. Knowledge is ees abused their spending in the past, power: empower yourselves. ¢


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TRUSTEE MESSSAGES

A Trustee’s Call to Listen Carefully, Seeking Knowledge and Understanding…

A skills.

Trustee’s call is to strengthen and build specific gifted skills. Listening and Referring are two such

Listening skills are key when working with beneficiaries of the trust. Good listening comes when listeners are interested in what the speaker has to say, and when they create room for the speaker to share honestly and fully.

Leina‘ala Ahu Isa, Ph.D. Trustee, At-large

relationships with others. They share appropriately from their experiences. They listen carefully, seeking knowledge and Each Trustee is different and brings various gifts and skills to his/her position. But among these, it does not include pontificating but more of servant leadership. Being a very unique position as it is an elected one, they are placed here to have OHA help families that are facing difficulties… some are homeless, some are caregivers, and many are lonely. Listening and responding by Referring with compassion is a major part of servant leadership.

Good listening does not come naturally to everyone, but it is critical. When a person is heard, he or she feels valued and able to share. Queen LiliIt is important uokalani’s when listening to reign can be a another’s story to lesson to each keep the conversaof us. She did tion confidential, not know unless someone’s her future… wellbeing is and advocates, threatened. Trust“We never know ees must how much time understand conwe have, so let fidentiality and us do the best the importance it we can each day plays in building of our lives, and relationships. At love and listen times, the Trust- Kia‘i Lanakila Manguil and Trustee Lei Ahu Isa - Photo: to our people ees can work with Courtesy passionately.” their beneficiaries and find the Aloha Au Iä Oe! resources they need, resources beyond what A hui hou until September, the Trustees can offer. This is where Refer- Trustee Leina’ala Ahu Isa  ral becomes important. Trustees should be authentic in their

Get registered today! For more information visit www.oha.org/registry 560 N. Nimitz Hwy., Ste. 200, Honolulu, HI 96817 Phone: 808.594.1888 | Email: hireg@oha.org

23

Exploring Mission Related Investments (MRI) at OHA

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s you know, the Office MRI’s are investments made of Hawaiian Affairs is directly from the portfolio to tasked with stewarding sustain or grow the value of the the Native Hawaiian portfolio that are aligned with the Trust Fund (NHTF). mission of the organization. A This public trust invests primarhypothetical example of a MRI ily in national and global assets in for OHA would be an equity hopes that its value will grow. This investment in a local business that means that we take money generempowers Native Hawaiians or Dan ated through revenues from Public perpetuates the indigenous culture Land Trust lands here in Hawaii of productivity, while simultaneAhuna and invest it outside of Hawaii. ously generating a market rate of This is generally how foundations return comparable to the global Trustee, Kaua‘i and trusts ensure that the money in markets. Currently, OHA does and Ni‘ihau their funds can find the best deals not have the infrastructure to globally to increase the value of allocate our investment capital for their investment portfolios while minimizing MRI’s. However, the trends in intentional the risk of decreasing the value of their port- investing through MRI’s are increasing in folio. Foundations and trusts then turn around the world of philanthropy and we are gainand withdraw a percentage of the total worth ing confidence that we too can implement of the portfolio annually (usually around 5%) these into our portfolio and align them to to spend on community programs and admin- our mission. istrative costs. For many years this approach has been accepted as a viable way to enhance The value of MRI’s to any foundation the future spending power of the NHTF while or socially minded trust fund is its abilsupporting our mission of uplifting Native ity to align our core resource, which is Hawaiians locally. money, to our social mission, which is to empower Native Hawaiians. Issues such as The catch is, when we invest globally we education, housing, financing, and cultural may end up growing our trust fund but we perpetuation that our people face are infialso end up sending our money (investment nitely scaled, meaning there is no end to capital) outside Hawaii. This poses a conun- these issues. There will always be a need drum for us as on one hand we must grow to facilitate resources so that our people the NHTF but on the other hand we have a have what they need to thrive. Therefore, local mission focused on Native Hawaiians. since the resources we need are needed Therefore, as we deploy our capital, most in perpetuity and therefore are infinitely of it does not remain in Hawaii. It has long scaled into the future, the sources of these been the assumption that investing locally resources must also be infinitely scaled into is highly risky and therefore, it is better to the future. By using the concept of MRI’s make more money outside Hawaii and then we can bring more of our money back home siphon off a percentage back into Hawaii to into the Hawaii capital markets and target align to our mission. Well, the fact is that market rate investments that are aligned no percentage of money siphoned back to to our mission. Year after year there are Hawaii will be enough to address the issues increasingly more high quality investments our people face. The good news is that there locally that empower Native Hawaiians and are investment trends in the field of philan- perpetuate indigenous productivity, and we thropy that is changing the way we grow look forward to playing a larger role in the our trust fund and align to our mission. financing of these. These trends are the development of Mission Related Investments (MRI) and Project It is our priority at OHA to leave no stone Related Investments (PRI). In this article, I unturned in supporting our beneficiaries would like to talk about MRI’s. to thrive. We look forward to keeping you updated on our journey towards excellence.¢

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TRUSTEE MESSSAGES

OHA Needs A Culture of Transparency

T

he state Circuit Court recently ruled that OHA’s limited liability corporations (LLCs) are state agencies subject to the Uniform Information Practices Act (UIPA), a law that allows the public to inspect the records maintained by state and county agencies. Unfortunately, what began as a reasonable request from journalist Andrew Walden to view the LLCs’ records turned into an unnecessary and costly legal dispute. In my opinion, this raises the following concerns over beneficiary resources being used to fight what became a losing battle.

Keli‘i Akina, Ph.D.

Secondly, going to court is costly. While the costs have not been released, one can infer that tens of thousands of dollars, and possibly more, were spent keeping the LLC financial records hidden from the public. To some extent, the LLCs’ opposition to opening their financial books to the public may be part of a culture of resisting transparency that exists within OHA.

Empowering Hawaiians, Strengthening Hawai‘i

But filing a UIPA petition can be burdensome and costly. When Walden used the UIPA to request the LLC check registers and income and expense statements, his request was denied by the LLCs, who claimed that the LLCs weren’t subject to UIPA because they were not agencies of the government.

Trustee, At-large

First, the results could have been anticipated. The ruling handed down in a prior case, ‘Ölelo v. Office of Information Practices, already addressed whether a business entity, such as an LLC, established by a state agency would also be considered a state agency.

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ency website was that if the public really wanted to, they could access the information through the UIPA.

In my November 2018 Ka Wai Ola column, I shared that OHA receIved a failing grade of ‘F’ for its online financial transparency. (See “Following the Money 2017: Governing in the Shadows” by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group). One reason for OHA’s failing grade is that OHA doesn’t provide the public with “a register of online checkbook-level spending.” In September 2018, a proposal was considered by the OHA Resource Management Committee to post OHA’s check registers online as part of a transparency website. It failed for lack of Board support, and one argument made against the online transpar-

Walden then had to mount a legal battle that resulted in his request eventually being granted by the state Circuit Court. But not everyone has the means to do that, and that is the problem to be understood here. OHA should practice greater transparency to ensure access to information which beneficiaries and the public are entitled to. OHA’s duty to promote transparency extends to OHA’s LLCs because ultimately, the LLCs (with the exception of Hi’ipaka, LLC which holds title to Waimea Valley and is profitable) depend completely on OHA for operational funding. That means the LLCs are funded by beneficiary trust funds. And for beneficiaries and members of the public to have to make a request under the UIPA in order to be able to see how the LLCs spend beneficiary trust funds is a barrier to transparency. More importantly, a culture that resists transparency unnecessarily fosters mistrust, and that mistrust may have consequences. Consider for example the increased scrutiny by external agencies such as the state Auditor and Attorney General. Would OHA be subject to such scrutiny if it embraced a culture of transparency in the first place? While a culture of unnecessary secrecy is bad enough, it raises the question as to why so much effort is made to keep information secret, especially after the law says it must be made available to the public. Is there something to hide? That’s a question beneficiaries and citizens need to ask the OHA Trustees.


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TRUSTEE MESSSAGES

Kapu Aloha Mauna Kea

T

here was a gnawing sense in my jobs will be contracted out from the conna’au combined with the urging sortium of international countries (Canada, of my daughters, Na China, India, and Japan) and the Kumu Hula Napua University of California system. Greig and Kahulu TMT will exacerbate cultural and Maluo-Pearson, that compelled environmental harms to our lands me to make the journey to our and our people for their own ecosacred Mauna a Wakea and stand nomic purposes, while our local with our people. For me and my residents continue to struggle ‘ohana, Mauna a Wakea is a sigwith lack of job opportunities and nificant natural resource and a education. Science that is orgasacred site, a source of water used Carmen “Hulu” nized through this transnational in healing and cultural practices project, bringing together various Lindsey and is used as a sacred reposieconomically powerful and geotory for the piko of babies born to politically influential countries Trustee, Maui families connected to the mounwithout a clear commitment to the tain. For generations, my ‘ohana people on whose land the work is took the piko of our being done shares an children to Lake alarming continuWaiau, establishing ity with oppressive my tie to the sacred approaches to mauna. Additionscience and techally, as a child of nology. Moku o Keawe born in Kohala and raised TMT boasts in Waimea, I fondly that its THINK remember riding Fund invests in scithe planes of Mauna ence, technology, Kea on horseback engineering, and with my Papa. mathematics eduTr. Hulu Lindsey was one of the kupuna detained cation on Hawai’i for obstruction of government property in taking a My grandfather, stand for our sacred ‘äina. - Photo: Mahealani Island, hoping Albert Uiha Lind- Richardson that education will sey, discussed his strengthen the father, William island’s workforce Miller Seymour’s, journey escorting Queen and economy so that families and comEmma to Lake Waiau and Mauna Kea. A munities thrive. I question how many significant journey for anyone at the time, Hawaii students benefit from the project he recalls the difficult ascent to Mauna Kea, itself – none come to mind. This leads me where Queen Emma would later bestow the to believe that TMT will actively prioritize name “Kahalelaumämane”; commemorat- students and employees from the coning the shelter found under the mämane sortium of international countries. Pono trees. Shortly after the death of her hus- science practices center around community band and their young son, Queen Emma and indigenous voices and should be done traveled to Lake Waiau for spiritual healing in partnership with those that are directly and rebirth. From a handful of mele writ- impacted, subjecting itself to being accountten to celebrate her journey, we understand able to local people and places. that Queen Emma not only recognizes the healing properties of a place like Waiau and Our mauna is sacred as the highest point Mauna Kea, but reminds us of the value and in the Pacific, its connection to the genealsacredness ascribed to ‘äina. ogy of our people, and as a representation of ea and right to advocate for our ‘äina. It Some astronomers argue that the TMT is through these kinds of realizations that observatory offers an infinite amount of we understand our kuleana to ‘äina; and scientific knowledge, creating 150 perma- for me, my ties to sacred Mauna Kea. I nent positions and 300 construction jobs, stand with other kupuna and our mo’opuna thereby giving back to the local economy. because we will live in, be fed by, will stand However, this rhetoric fails to realize that by, and will aloha this ‘äina. Mahalo for all local people will not attain these special- of you for the outpouring of support. Until ized construction projects; instead these the very last aloha ‘äina.¢

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Ka Wahine Waipahë – Tiona Nadine Harbottle Wailehua (July 10, 1940 – June 29, 2019) She was always quick to reflect on the good example I had before me. I can remember times when I was a little apprehensive about how to approach a situation in just the right way. She would often ask me this question, “What would our Trustee do?” A smile or nearly 25 years, Tiona would appear on her face and it Robert K. Wailehua shared her would then appear on mine. That aloha with all of us here calmed my nerves and I would Lindsey, Jr. at the Office of Hawaiutter these words in some fashion, ian Affairs (OHA). She “Whatever it is, he would do it Trustee, Hawai‘i was a gracious woman, a wahine with aloha.” I usually made a call waipahë who greeted you with after that to whomever I needed to a smile and a sweet greeting of call and would then “talk story” as “Aloha.” In our first seven years here at our Trustee still does to this day. OHA, both Trustee Robert Lindsey and I enjoyed not only her sweet spirit, but also She had years of experience in this job. her sage advice in communicating with our She could have easily told me what to do beneficiaries… and how to do it. our people… She served as an regarding Administrative OHA’s misAssistant to eight sion. OHA Trustees during her tenure “T”, as she at OHA. Howwas graciously ever, she would referred-to, always tell me to always treated follow Trustee our people as if Lindsey’s examthey were her ple and do things own ‘ohana. as he would. She That is what never wanted made her a perany spotlight… fect fit. People she just wanted would call our me to do my best office wanting and learn from to speak with Kama Hopkins and Tiona Wailehua - Photo: Courtesy everyone around our Trustee. As me. I will forhe resides on ever be grateful Hawai‘i Island, he would not always be in for her example of being a servant leader. the office. On occasion, the caller would be Again, she was a true wahine waipahë. frustrated or upset with something OHA did or did not do. She would listen with As I share these reflections about her, patience. She would respond with kindness I can hear her saying, “My darling honey and gratitude and thanked them for call- baby…no need to talk about me. Just keep ing and sharing their concern. I was asked smiling and taking care of our Trustee and sometimes to follow-up with that caller and our people.” I hope to continue to do just obtain more information. When I did, the that. She has now gone on to reunite with person on the other end of the line would others in her family who went on before often ask me to thank “T” for responding her. I can see her smiling and asking them, to them and listening. Her gentle way about “Okay. What work needs to be done over her often came through on the telephone here?” Time to rest, “T”…you have defijust as it did in person. nitely earned it. Aloha nui ä hui hou i ka wä küpono! Earlier this month, we lost our dear Tiona Wailehua who worked with Kama Hopkins and me for our first seven years here at OHA. Kama shares his reflection of “T”. She truly was a gracious woman, a Wahine Waipahë.

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‘aukake2019

HO‘OHUI ‘OHANA FAMILY REUNIONS

www.oha.org/kwo | kwo@OHA.org NATIVE HAWAIIAN » NEWS | FEATURES | EVENTS

FAMILY REUNIONS

E na- ‘ohana Hawai‘i: If you are planning a reunion or looking for genealogical information, Ka Wai Ola will print your listing at no charge on a space-available basis. Listings should not exceed 200 words. OHA reserves the right to edit all submissions for length. Send your information by mail, or e-mail kwo@OHA.org. E ola na- mamo a Ha- loa! 2019 COITO – Reunion on July 18, 2020. Place and time (to be announced at a later time), “Catered Lü‘au”. Ti shirts, tank tops and genealogy books available. Contact Jeanne Kahanaoi, 89-475 Mokiawe St., Wai‘anae, Hawai‘i 96792. Phone: (808) 354-7365. CHARTRAND – Aloha John Francis Carson Chartrand is my Grandfather on my mother’s side. He came to Hawai‘i in the 20’s with the Calvary. He married four Hawaiian women in his life and had many children. Mary Keahi Kaohu, Edith Kapule Kalawaia, Margaret Keanalani Claesene and Helen Brown. My mother Isabelle Leina‘ala Chartrand Kainoa and brother Harold Kalawaia Chartrand had eleven half siblings. In honor of all the Chartrand ‘Ohana that have passed on, to meet Grandpa Chartrand. We want to plan this a reunion. We need everyone to kokua with your current contact info to cuzin Cami Chartrand 446-5098 email Chartrandreunion2020@gmail.com or John Kainoa 244-8428, johnkainoa61@gmail.com. We look forward to hearing from you. Mahalo John. HATORI – The descendants of Kantaro Hatori (Hattori) and Lahapa Halana are planning a family reunion on October 12, 2019 on Oahu. Kentaro and Lahapa Hattori had ten children, all of whom have produced descendants: Henry, Susan, Philip, Albert, John, Anna Jennie, Josephine, Carrie, Pio, and Manasey. Please join us to renew relationships, meet new additions, talk story, play games, eat, and to ensure that our keiki know their ‘ohana. The committee is also in the process of updating our genealogy and want it to be ready by our reunion date. For more information contact your ‘ohana rep or Bobbie-Lynn Molina (808) 754-8564 hatorireunion@gmail.com or Lena Abordo hatoriohana.2016@yahoo.com KAAA REUNION – Saturday, November 9th, 2019, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Zablan Beach, Nänäkuli (across from Nänäkuli Ranch). This is a potluck affair. Everyone come and meet your ‘ohana. This is the last Kaaa Reunion I’ll be having due to health reasons. Ti shirts and tank tops will be available as well as genealogy books. Please contact me Jeanne Kaaa Kahanoi at 808-354-7365. KA‘AUHAUKANE – Na Lälä O Ana Lumaukahili‘owahinekapu Ka‘auhaukane will celebrate our 15th annual ‘ohana ho‘olaule‘a and pä‘ina on Saturday, September 7, 2019, from 9 am to 5 pm, at the Bellows Air Force Station, Picnic Pavilion “5-B.” Deadline to register is Monday, August 26, 2019. To ensure base access, please contact your family representative for everyone attending the potluck lunch. Ana’s makuakane was Kamokulehua‘opanaewa Ka‘auhaukane (k) and makuahine was Pailaka Ho‘ohua (w). Ana was born March 3, 1845, in Ka‘auhuhu, North

Kohala, on Hawai‘i Island. Her date of death was January 30, 1917. Ana’s kaikua‘ana was Kealohapauole Kalaluhi Ka‘auhaukane (w). Ana first married Joseph Kaiamakini Kanoholani (k). They had ‘ekolu kamali‘i: Joseph Kaiamakini Kanoholani (k), Makini Kanoholani (k) and Mary Kaiamakini Kanoholani (w). Later, she married John Von Iseke, they were blessed with ‘umikumakolu kamali‘i: Maria, Elizabeth (Kapuaakuni and McKee),Theresa (Kapiko and Quinn), John Isaacs (Lincoln), Joseph, Antone, Anna, Henry, Louis (Silva), Joseph Joachim (Cockett), Frank (Pereira), Charles (Samerson) and Katherine (Sing). Family representative contacts: Peter Machado 689-0190 (Kapiko and Quinn); Shirleen “Boss” Sturla (619)890-5106 (Iseke and Kanoholani); Louie Peterson Jr 216-9331(Isaacs and Iseke); Colleen Tam Loo 729-8662 (McKee); Puanani Orton 235-2226 (McKee). HEEN/MEHEULA – Calling all descendants of Chung Mook Heen, known in Hawai‘i as Harry A. HEEN married Mary (Mele) Helemika Keaukahalani MEHEULA. Known Children: William Ha‘eha‘e Heen, Afong Waianuenue, Phoebe Kaenaokalani, Moses Keli‘iolono Heen, Eliza (Lulu) Lulukamakani, Ernest Nalanielua; Robert Kanehailua Kekuaiwahia, Edward Kahakelehua, and George Keawe-a-meheula. Harry may have had other wife’s, we are hoping to connect with that ‘Ohana as well. We are in the planning stages but are looking to do a family reunion sometime in 2020 on O‘ahu. Please contact Teave Heen 808-870-7656 teavehee@gmail.com or Curtsi Heen curtis.heen@yahoo.com. WAIPA – The descendants of Waiaha (Kahaipo) Waipa and Pilialoha Kahilihiwa are planning a family reunion on October 11, 12 and 13 at the Haili Tent at Panaewa, Hilo on the Big Island. The following of their 12 children had off-springs: Waiaha Waipa (m. Napua Kaukini, aka Alice Waipa); Leialoha Waipa (m. Kook Fai Akaka; m. Li Tai Ta Ah Hee); Kaamoku Waipa (m. Loke “Rose” Purdy); Limaloa Waipa (m. Kahikini “Lucy” Kaukini); Hanakahi Waipa (m. Margaret Moku); Kanani “aka Puakomela” Waipa (m. Benjamin Ili); Abraham “Apela” Waipa, Sr. (m. Cecilia Kupihe; m. Elizabeth Kainoamakua “Makalia” Kapea). Times and events planned are October 11, 5:00pm - Pot Luck Pupus and Sharing of family trees; October 12, 12:00pm - Workshops, Late LunchEarly Dinner; October 13, 11:00am - Talk story and light lunch. Contact Krissy Santa Maria 808756-4951 or Leona Leialoha 808-315-9977 for more information. ‘IMI ‘OHANA • FAMILY SEARCH CULLEN – Looking for genealogy records for my great grandmother on my father’s side. Mary Cullen 1869-1920 married John Fernandez 1860-

1939. Their daughter Madeline Fernandez Colburn. Please call or text Pauahi Colburn at 722-8400. Mahalo nui.

HUSSEY – The Hussey family (Alexander & Kaaikaula Makanoe) is updating its genealogy book. Please go to husseyohana.org for more information.

ESTRELLA/SOEIRO – I apologize for the latest but the Estrella/Soeiro reunion is cancelled until next summer in 2020. Should you have any questions, please contact: Annette at ulu2ohia3@gmail. com or (808) 896-4902.

KAIWA – Looking for descendants or related ‘Ohana Members of ‘BILL KAIWA’, aka ‘SOLOMAN ANI. Please contact ROBERTA BOLLIG 320-248-3656 or flh63kb@yahoo.com MAHALO!

GRAMBERG – Searching for the descendants or any related ‘ohana of Herman Gramberg and Rose Anakalea. Children of Herman and Rose are Herman “Waha”, Theresa, George, Vivian, Henry “Heine”, Darilynn, and Rosebud. Looking to update genealogical information. Please email gramberg ohana1@gmail.com. Any inforomation shared is greatly appreciated. Mahalo!

KALAUPAPA – Are you looking for an ancestor at Kalaupapa? Ka ‘Ohana O Kalaupapa, a nonprofit organization made up of Kalaupapa residents, family members and friends, might be able to help. We have information on more than 7,000 people sent to Kalaupapa. Contact ‘Ohana Coordinator Valerie Monson at vmonson@kalaupapaohana.org or call 808-573-2746.

HARBOTTLE – I am looking for information on my great-great grandmother. Her name is Talaimanomateata or Kua‘analewa, she was Tahitian and married to or had a child with George Nahalelaau Harbottle. Born in 1815 on O‘ahu and son of John Harbottle of England and Papapaunauapu daughter of Haninimakaohilani and Kauhiaimokuakama. I know from Edward Hulihee Harbottle’s (my great grandfather) Guardianship court case that when his father George died his mother was on Maui and the case was stopped until she could be in court. When she appeared in court she said it was fine if Edward H. Boyd became his guardian. There are family stories that she had come from an ali‘i family of Tahiti and was in Hawai‘i as a ward of the court. I have not been able to substantiate this information. If anyone in the family knows where I might look it would be wonderful to know. Please contact me at waiakaphillips@yahoo.com or call 808-936-3946. Mahalo, Noelani Willing Phillips.

KAMAKAU – Looking for anyone with information on Abigaila Ellen Hakalaniponi (also known as Poni) Kamakau. Born at Kaopipa/ Kaupipa, Kipahulu, Maui on September 3, 1850 and died at Kahehuna (Honolulu) on January 20, 1884. Please contact 808-366-0847 or lruby@hawaii.edu.

HANAWAHINE/KEAUMAU/KEAWE – Looking for the descendants/ancestors of Soloman Hanawahine(1874-1921) and Kane Keaumau Keawe of Ho‘okena, South Kona. Kane later changed her name to Alice Keawe. Together they had the following known children and (spouses); Joseph Hanawahine changed to Kanawahine (Koleka Paauhau), George H. K. Hanawahine Sr. (1st wife: Victoria Kaupu 2nd: Julia Keala), Samuel K. Hanawahine (1st wife: Julia Keauhou 2nd: Miriam Dela Cruz), Mary Hanawahine born Kane (Henry Kaioula), Eva Hanawahine (Henry John Silva), Sophie Hanawahine (Fabiano Kealoha), Katy Hanawahine (Yan Gen Pil), and Rachel Hanawahine (Albert Kamai). Any information on our ‘ohana’s moku‘au‘hau will be valued. Please contact Quiana Danielson-Vaielua by phone 808-371-9660 or email quianakdv@gmail.com. I am the great-great granddaughter of Soloman Hanawahine and Kane Keawe, great granddaughter of Samuel Hanawahine and Miriam, and grand of Naomi Hanawahine.

E Ö Mai

For more information on the Kuleana Tax Ordinance or for genealogy verification requests, please contact 808.594.1967 or email kuleanasurvey@oha.org. All personal data, such as names, locations and descriptions of Kuleana Lands will be kept secure and used solely for the purposes of this attempt to perpetuate Kuleana rights and possession.

KAMEKONA/LOA/KAHAWAI – Searching for genealogy, family members, foster or hänai records for my Great Grandmother, ROSE HIWA KAMEKONA, born June 15, 1909, 1st marriage to George Loa 1927 (one child with/Rose Loa/now Rose Lani), 2nd marriage to Francis Kahawai 1928 - 1929 (three children with), deceased 1935. I am the grand-daughter of Rose Loa/Lani, great grand daughter to ROSE HIWA KAMEKONA. Please call/leave message/text Luana @ (808) 450-0103 or email lkeliikoa3@gmail.com. KEAWE – Looking for genealogy records or family members for my grandmother Hannah Keawe born 1875 in North Kohala, HI. Married my grandfather Henry K. Iaea born 1880 in Ka‘u, HI. Married 1901 Hon. Territory of Hawai‘i birth 18961909. Index by name of mother Keawe Hannah, father Henry K. Iaea - child Elizabeth Kalua born 7/19/1898 in North Kohala. Please call Ned Iaea 808-979-1800 or 808-426-1061. Mahalo! KINA/LINCOLN/BAILEY – We are looking for the descendants of the unions of Meleana Kaimuali‘i Kina (Moloka‘i) and George Walter Lincoln, Nellie Lihue Lincoln and Charles Anson Bailey (Maui), Nellie Lihue Bailey (Maui) and John Domingo Joyce, Pearl “Peachie” Marie K. Bailey (Maui) and West LaFortune, Meleana Wahineho‘ohano Nui (Maui/Moloka‘i) and Samuel Moewale Kaleo (brother to Charles Lui Ko‘oko‘o and Kunewa Moewale). We are planning a reunion for October 2018. Please contact us at: oct2018. reunion@gmail.com or call Phyllis @291-5826, Kanani @ 674-6679, or Moana @ 744-9901. Kuemo (-no)/Kolaimo – Looking for descendants

of Japanese drifters who came to O‘ahu in 1841, much earlier than the first Japanese immigrants came to Hawai‘i. Kuemo or Kuemono (original name is Goemon) came from Tosa, Japan and he naturalized to the Kingdom of Hawai‘i on Jan 10, 1845. He lived in Honouliuli as a farmer from 1847 and seems to married to a Hawaiian lady “Hina” on May 20, 1851 according to marriage record. I am also looking for descendants of Kolaimo, who’s original name is Toraemon of Tosa, Japan and naturalized to the Kingdom of Hawai‘i on Feb 13, 1847. He worked as a carpenter under Mr. Heart, married to a Hawaiian lady and died in O‘ahu. Please contact Harry 808-777-9187 or harryporterkiawe@ gmail.com Mahalo! KEKUKU APUAKEHAU – Looking for lineage from Joseph Kekukupena Apuakehau, 18571936, and Miliama “Miriam” Kaopua, 1857-1919, to Kalaimanokaho‘owaha also known as Kana‘ina nui (Big Island Ali‘i), circa 1778, to Alapa‘i Nui (Big Island King, 1725-1754). Any and all information will be greatly appreciate. Mahalo! Please send email to Miriam: matar02@Hawaiiantel.net. KAUKA – Looking for descendants or related ‘ohana members of Deborah Chan Loy (DOB: about 1885) Please contact Glenn Ventura at gdventura44@gmail.com. Mainly trying to locate sisters of my mother Irene Loy (DOB: 1914) Married John Ventura of Kihei. Sisters: Lillian, Saddie (Sadie), Warma (Velma) and Agnes Kauka. MAKUA – Looking for descendants or related ‘ohana members of Henry K. Makua (year of birth: 1907, Honolulu) Father: Joseph K. Makua, Mother: Mary Aukai, Sisters: Malia and Mele, Sons: Henery and Donald Makua. Joseph and Mary may have orginated from Kaua‘i. Looking for genealogical information. Please contact – emakua.makua@gmail.com. Mahalo! NAGAI/CASTOR/KAMA/MAU/KAUPU – Nagai’s, Castor’s, Kama’s, Mau’s and Kaupu’s are planning a reunion of all first cousins and ‘ohana on October 10–13, 2019 to be held at Pilila‘au Army Recreational Center in Wai‘anae. Please contact Nani Castor-Peck at 206-612-0636 or Tavia Santiago at 808-590-4005 or email Ellen Schaff at chevyxtreme2@yahoo.com. WAIOLAMA – Searching for family members and genealogical records of George (‘Ainaahiahi/ Kaaniaahiahi) Waiolama born about June 5, 1892 in Kahakuloa, Maui. Mother: Kawao Kaainaahiahi Kahakuloa, Maui. Father: (George Sr.) Waiolama of Wailuku, Maui. George Jr. is a half brother of my grandmother Elizabeth “Lizzie” Leialoha Cook. Also, family members of Waiolama on O‘ahu, Helemano area, who was a brother in law of 3x great uncle Konohiki Namahana (Mahoe) (if this is the one and same Waiolama family?). Please contact Sissy Akui at kealohamaiole@gmail.com. Mahalo! 

KULEANA LAND HOLDERS THE KULEANA LAND TAX ordinances in the City and County of Honolulu, County of Hawai‘i, County of Kaua‘i and County of Maui allow eligible owners to pay minimal property taxes each year. Applications are on each county’s web site. Empowering Hawaiians, Strengthening Hawai‘i

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STRONG FLAGS (KÄNAKA MAOLI/HAWAIIAN) (large 3'x5') for your truck or boat ($10.00), T-shirts, tank tops with coat of arms or flag, 4" patches of Hawaiian coat of arms, T-shirts for each island from $10.00, Känaka Maoli Pledge posters for your school, labels, bumper stickers, window decals, etc. Order at www.kanakamaolipower.org or phone: 808-332-5220. THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING A HOME? Call Charmaine I. Quilit Poki (R) 295- 4474 RB-15998. Keller Williams Honolulu RB-21303. To view current listings, go to my website HomeswithAloha.com. Call or email me at Charmaine.QuilitPoki@gmail.com to learn more about homeownership. Mahalo nui. Specialize in Fee Simple & Homestead Properties, 33 years. 

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Profile for Ka Wai Ola o OHA - The Living Water

KWO August 2019 | Vol. 36 No.8  

The Awakening

KWO August 2019 | Vol. 36 No.8  

The Awakening

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