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Kaua`i's Go-To Resource for Engaging Families

SPRING 2018

For Keiki to Kupuna

2018

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Keiki Cover Winners, Chaxtyn Mano'i & Adriana Soares - KauaiFamilyMagazine.com


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Welcome to Kaua`i Family Magazine! Kaua`i’s Go-To Resource for Engaging Families

Your opinions, please!

CONTACT KAUAI FAMILY MAGAZINE (808) 639-5656 PUBLISHER Kauai Family Magazine ADVERTISING SALES Chrissy Schechter EDITOR editor@kauaifamilymagazine.com

This year our staff at Kauai Family Magazine set out to design an annual contest to point local families to the most family-friendly businesses and services on Kauai. The result with Kaua`i Family Favorites, relies on nominations and votes from our Kaua`i parents to determine your favorites islandwide. Let us know about your family favorites by visiting www.Kauaifamilymagazine.com/ familyfavorites Nominate businesses as often as once a day until April 15th. As the publisher, we want all parents to know that we are your partners in helping to make sure that our `ohana have everything they need for a safe, healthy, and productive life in our community. We also hope that you find this issue of Kauai Family Magazine informative and useful. Mahalo Kaua`i for allowing Kauai Family to be a part of your `Ohana.

Chrissy

Chrissy Schechter, Publisher chrissys@kauaifamilymagazine.com

We are proud to print at CREEL Printing Please recycle. Share Kaua`i Family Magazine with your `ohana and friends

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES advertising@kauaifamilymagazine.com

SPRING 2018 Cover Photo KAUAI LIFE, Photo & Film Contributors Kandi Bloss RN Patrick Ching Monty Downs M.D. Luke Evslin Carolyn Jabs Malia Jacobson Brooke Kanna Theresa Koki Harriet Lerner Michael Lutwin, DDS Mary Navarro, MA, LMFT Ashley Owens Chef Mark Oyama Caryn Sakahashi Jasmine Yukimura Next Issue: SUMMER 2018 Advertising Deadline: March 15, 2018 Kauai Family Magazine is published quarterly as Spring, Summer, Fall and Holiday editions. Distribution: 15,000 printed quarterly and Digital E-Editions. Public and Private Preschools, Elementary and Middle Schools, Hospitals, Medical and Health Clinics, Libraries, KIUC, Jamba Juice, Kauai Community Federal Credit Union, Retailers and Community Organizations. Subscription Rate: $16.00 for one year (4 editions) Subscribe at KauaiFamilyMagazine.com Copyright 2018 Kauai Family Magazine All rights reserved. No portion of Kauai Family Magazine may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Kauai Family Magazine assumes no financial responsibility for errors in advertisements. COVER PHOTO Keiki Cover Winners Chaxtyn Mano`i & Adriana Soares


contents

SPRING 2018

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Cover Winners Chaxtyn Mano`i & Adriana Soares

Photo: Kaua`i Life Photo & Film

SPRING FEATURES 18

SPRING HAPPENINGS Fun Spring Events for the Whole Family!

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3 TIPS FOR PICKY EATERS Fun Ways To Introduce New Foods!

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PUBERTY: A Parent’s Survival Guide!

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2018 FAMILY FAVORITES Picked By Parents. Vote Now!

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WHAT’S INSIDE 28

KAUA`I KUPUNA

Quality Care for Loved Ones

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KAUA`I KEIKI

Spring & Summer Activities

72

KAUA`I SPORTS

Logan Kashima

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Spring 2018

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Message from Mayor Caravalho & DOE Superintendent Bill Arakaki Aloha Kaua‘i! We are well into the New Year and looking forward to a spring season to rejuvenate our mind, body, and spirit! Soon our schools will enjoy spring break, and I encourage our families to use this time to engage our keiki in fun and educational activities. New experiences will help to develop their skills and talents and build their confidence. Mahalo to Kaua‘i Family Magazine for continuing to be a resource for our families here on the Garden Isle. There is a wealth of opportunities for every member of the family, from keiki to kupuna! Our community prospers when we work together in the spirit of ALOHA! Aloha Pumehana,

Bernard P. Carvalho, Jr. Mayor, County of Kaua‘i Happy New Year 2018! Now, as we look forward to 2018, we will continue the path for transformation set forth by State Superintendent Ksihimoto’s by carrying out Hawai‘i’s plan for the federal Every Student Succeeds Act to advancing the goals of the Strategic Plan through our high-impact strategies: school design, student voice, and teacher collaboration. We are rejuvenated and focused on strategies and systems in support of teaching and learning, so all students are prepared for careers, college and the workplace. We must remember that what makes Kaua`i a special place is our unique values and qualities within the diverse cultures and families.   Together we can make a difference in having all Keiki reach their fullest potential and to attain their dreams and goals. Together we will support them to be creative, curious, courageous and confident throughout life’s challenges.   “All Keiki will SUCCEED and Together we CAN!  Kaua`i – STRONG! Sincerely,

William N. Arakaki Kauai Complex Area Superintendent


County of Kaua`i Proposed ADOLESCENT TREATMENT AND HEALING CENTER By Theresa Koki, Life's Choices Kaua`i Mayor Bernard P. Carvalho Jr. has kept former Mayor Bryan Baptiste’s dream alive by including the Adolescent Treatment and Healing Center as a priority in the County of Kaua`i Holo Holo 2020 vision. Based on advice of his Blue Ribbon Committee, Mayor Carvalho has expanded this vision to include an assessment center and outpatient services to provide the continuum of care for youth and their family to recover and heal on Kaua`i. The Adolescent Treatment and Healing Center (ATHC) will be a public facility serving adolescents and their families, as well as the entire community of Kaua`i. It will consist of an integrated treatment and healing center with the capacity to provide a comprehensive, collaborative, community-based, clinically-sound, and family-centered infrastructure for delivery of mental health and substance use related supportive services to adolescents. Life’s Choices Kaua`i, an agency of the County of Kaua`i, proposed to develop the ATHC on a 5.825 acre parcel along Maˉ`alo Road, between Hanamaˉ`ulu and Lihu`e, in the vicinity commonly referred to as Kapaia. This rural location was chosen because of its distance from residential neighborhoods and the tranquil surroundings that complement the array of substance abuse treatment services, agricultural training programs, and family focused recreational activities that will be provided at the ATHC. The center will offer residential longterm care and outpatient treatment for adolescents with mental health and substance use disorders. It will bring together a broad constituency of stakeholders that are focused on

providing (1) mental health/substance use assessment services; (2) day treatment programs; (3) residential and outpatient treatment, with an aftercare component for all levels of care; and (4) family counseling support. The County plans to contract with an experienced service provider or a coalition of providers to operate the facility. The Hawai`i State Department of Education will provide a parttime teacher. The school/ educational component will be based on the State of Hawai`i, Department of Education (DOE) curriculum, structure, and testing, and will include Summer school sessions. Culinary arts, physical education, life skills training, agriculture/ farming and other vocational training and cultural opportunities will be incorporated into the educational program as well. The ATHC will serve as a beacon of hope for our entire community by providing a new standard of treatment and healing on Kaua`i that is guided by the philosophy, “Where healing begins, hope is discovered, and opportunities unfold” If you have any questions, please call Theresa Koki at 808-241-4925.

Spring 2018

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Our Family Fun Favorites

SavE tHE DatE!

Kaua‘i KeiKi Bike & Safety Day Saturday May 5, 2018 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. In the Wilcox Medical Center back parking lot (past Same Day Surgery) • Helmet Fit Station • Bike & Skateboard Safety Inspection Stations • Bike & Skateboard Skills Enhancement Courses • Drawings for Free Bikes and Skateboards • Hundreds of certified helmets fitted and given away to keiki, for FREE*

Free helmets are for children while supplies last. Please have keiki first sign in at the registration table where he or she will be given a passport that will be stamped at various stations. Completed passports are eligible to enter a drawing to win a free bike or skateboard!

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County of Kaua’i Article Title presents

Keeping Your Community Safe We invite you to come and hear what the County is doing to help keep your communities safe for keiki to kupuna. Kaua’i Police Department will provide information on Internet Safety and The Neighborhood Watch Program The Office of the Prosecuting Attorney will share information on The Drug Nuisance Abatement Unit and how they work closely with KPD Life’s Choices Kaua’i will provide the public with an update on the Adolescent Treatment and Healing Center and share information on Coalition Building Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 6 Waimea Neighborhood Center Thursday, February 15 Koloa Neighborhood Center Wednesday, February 21 Kapa’a Middle School Monday, February 26 Līhu‘e Neighborhood Center To request sign language interpreter or materials in an alternate format or for questions, contact Maile Murray at (808) 241-4926 or mmurray@kauai.gov at least seven days prior to meeting.

www.kauai.gov/lifeschoiceskauai


ens ley Ow By Ash SSD, LDN ,C MS,RD

3 Fun Ways to Introduce Your Picky Eater to New Foods Do you ever feel that you serve the same foods to your family over and over again?  Or have you ever introduced an unfamiliar food or a new recipe and there was whining, moaning and tears? Is your family in a food rut and you don’t know how to change things? Here are some simple and fun ways to bring new foods to the table.

Involve your children with new foods before they show up at the table. Take a look at the

photo of bananas, kiwis and tangerines. If your children have never ever seen a kiwi, try letting them touch it and tell you what it feels like on the outside. You could have them guess

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what color is on the inside of the kiwi and let them watch as you peel it and see if their guess was right or not. For older children, you could show them this photo and have them arrange the pieces of the fruit to try to replicate the image.  If you had put the cut up kiwi slices in a bowl and served it on the table, your child may have found this new and unfamiliar food alarming, squealed and said the black dots on the kiwi   look like bugs.

Introduce a new food or an unfamiliar recipe by serving it with a familiar food.  Children like routine, safety, and security, and this fact is true even when it comes


to food. It may seem shocking to you that little kids can make such a big deal about a new food or dish, but their reaction to something new and strange on the table is just part of the developmental process. You could soften the blow further by serving the new and unfamiliar food with not just one, but two of their favorite foods. And don’t be surprised if they still do not want to try your new recipe. Children often need to see a new food numerous times before they are willing to try it. Also, seeing you eat a new food overtime can lessen their fear to try it.

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Be very casual and relaxed when introducing the new food. For example, if your

kids do not eat the kiwi, don’t scramble to find something else for them to eat. Be assured that they will not go to bed vitamin C deficient. It is our job as parents to put a variety of nutritious foods on the table, but it is their job to determine if they like it or not. As one pediatric nutrition professor said years ago, can you name one food you don’t like? Why do we think it is necessary for our children to like every single food? You will find that children’s likes and dislikes change over time.  

Spring 2018 11


Article Title

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Kaua`i’s Easter Events King’s Chapel KAUA`I’S BIGGEST EASTER EGG HUNT

The Easter Bunny, the Easter Story, life size puppets, Kidz Dance Team, prize giveaways and thousands of candy filled Easter Eggs.   FREE Family Event Friday, March 30th, 2018 12:00 noon Hanapepe Football Stadium 9:00 a.m. Kapaa Ball Park 4:00 p.m. Vidinha Soccer Field Children up through 5th grade Pre-Register online www.kckauai.com

FREE Easter Hot Lunch, Easter Egg Hunt

Easter Sunday, April 1st, 2018 Kapaa Beach Park 10:00am-1:00pm Ohana Christian Fellowship Church invites the homeless community to come to Kapaa Beach Park on Sunday, April 1st between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. for a free hot lunch. There will be free clothing, household goods and linens, plus activities and an Easter egg hunt and crafts for keiki.

Prince Albert Park

4334 Emmalani Drive Princeville Saturday, March 24; 2:00 p.m. Family Easter Celebration Hosted by the Princeville Community Association Events Committee. Bring the kids to meet the Easter Bunny and hunt for confetti Easter eggs in the park. This FREE event will kick off with an Easter Parade. Put springtime decorations on your bikes, wagons or golf carts and join the Parade. Gather at the Pavilion. Contact: www.princevillecommunity.com

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Visit Our Advertisers

Kauai Family Magazine is able to provide quality local content because of the continued support of our advertisers.

Support local businesses, and tell them you saw them in Kauai Family Magazine! Education & Schools

Sports, Camps and Theatre

St. Theresa School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Kauai Dance Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Hawaii Technology Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Puakea Junior Golf Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Kawaikini Charter School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Kauai Academy of Creative Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Alaka`i O Kaua`i Charter School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Kahili Adventist Preschool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Kauai Christian Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Keiki Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Head Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Camp Good News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 KPAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Anaina Hou Mini Golf & Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Hawaii Children’s Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Patch Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Na Kamalei Godly Play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Kauai Complex Dept of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 79 Patrick Ching Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Health & Medical Services Kauai Adult Day Health Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26, 28, 31

Festivals and Events Shrek, The Musical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Kauai Keiki Bike & Safety Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Community Partners

Garden Isle Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Kauai Community Federal Credit Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Stay at Home Healthcare Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Kauai Restoration & Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Hale Kupuna Heritage Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Mark’s Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 46

Mary Navarro, MA, LMFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Grove Farm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 74

Regency at Puakea Assisted Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Hawaii Dairy Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

McKenna Recovery Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Kauai Life Photo + Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 5

Crane Eye Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Kauai Island Utility Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Kalaheo Dental Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Wilcox Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 80 Jason Blake Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 HMSA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40, 41 Hawaii State Dept of Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

County of Kauai Department of Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 County of Kauai Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Life’s Choice’s Kauai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 9 County of Kauai Office of the Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Malama Pono Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

County of Kauai Lifeguard Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Ohana Restoration Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

County of Kauai Department of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Hui Ho’omalu Foster Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

County of Kauai Parks and Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Child and Family Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 53

Kauai’s FM97 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

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ey Pines� k o “P

Asian style meatballs coated with crispy rice noodles Meatball mixture:

Ground turkey Minced garlic Minced ginger Green onion, chopped Egg, beaten

1/2 pound 1 teaspoon 1/2 teaspoon 1 teaspoon 1 each

Cornstarch Oyster sauce Soy sauce Sesame oil Chili sauce - optional

2 teaspoons 1 Tablespoon 2 teaspoons 1/2 teaspoon 1/4 teaspoon

Additional ingredients:

Vermicelli noodles (or bean thread noodles) 1 package Oil for frying

Directions:

Combine ground turkey with rest of ingredients. Shape into small balls (ping pong size or smaller) and chill for 1 hour. Roll meatballs into broken (dried) vermicelli noodles. Heat frying oil in a deep pot to 360 - 375 degrees. Drop a few balls at a time and fry until cooked through. Noodles will puff up during frying. Serve with nampla or sweet chili sauce.

Spring 2018 15


Puberty:

A Parent’s Survival Guide

Ahhh… puberty. The inevitable time in our lives where our emotions are like roller coasters, our body is sprouting hair in all kinds of places, and the confusing time where one minute we demand independence whereas the next we are enjoying cuddles with our parents. When does puberty begin? On average, girls start puberty earlier than boys — between ages 8 and 14, with the average age being 11.  Boys tend to start showing signs of puberty about a year later than girls — between ages 9 and 15, with the average age being 12.

Think back on your own teen years. Remember your struggles with acne or

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your embarrassment at developing early — or late. Expect some mood changes in your typically sunny child, and be prepared for more conflict as he or she matures as an individual. Parents who know what’s coming can cope with it better. And the more you know, the better you can prepare.

Talk to kids early and often. Today’s youth have access to a lot more than the basic “birds and bees” information. It’s


important to bring this up with kids before they see it.

From It’s NOT the Stork for preschoolers by Robie H. Harris (Candlewick Press, August 2006) to The Teenage Body Book Consider starting the conversation with for teens by Kathy McCoy and Charles your child before he or she starts learning Wibbelsman (Penguin Random House, about it at school or from social media. August 2016), there are helpful books to read with your child no But don’t overload them with information — just Share memories matter what age you decide to introduce him answer their questions. of your own or her to conversations If you don’t know the about puberty and answers, get them adolescence. from someone who does, hormones. There are There’s nothing like a trusted friend or also excellent resources your pediatrician. like knowing that online for teens, such as the Center for Young You know your kids. mom or dad went Men’s Health and You can hear when your the Center for Young through it, too, child’s starting to tell Women’s Health. jokes about sex or when to put kids more attention to personal Put yourself in your at ease. appearance is increasing. child’s place. Practice This is a good time to empathy by helping your jump in with your own questions such as: child understand that it’s normal to be a bit concerned or self-conscious, and that Are you noticing any changes in it’s OK to feel grown-up one minute and your body? like a kid the next.

Are you having any strange feelings? Are you sad sometimes and don’t know why? A yearly physical exam is a great time to talk about this. A doctor can tell your preadolescent — and you — what to expect in the next few years. An exam can be a jumping-off point for a good parent/ child discussion. The later you wait to have these talks, the more likely your child will be to form misconceptions or become embarrassed about or afraid of physical and emotional changes. And the earlier you open the lines of communication, the better your chances of keeping them open through the teen years.

Give your child books on puberty written for kids going through it.

Pick your battles. If teenagers want to dye their hair, paint their fingernails black, or wear funky clothes, think twice before you object. Teens want to shock their parents and it’s a lot better to let them do something temporary and harmless; save your objections for things that really matter, like tobacco, drugs or alcohol or permanent changes to their appearance. Ask why your teen wants to dress or look a certain way and try to understand how your teen is feeling. You also might want to discuss how others might perceive them if they look different — help your teen understand how he or she might be viewed. Share memories of your own adolescence. There’s nothing like knowing that mom or dad went through it, too, to put kids more at ease.

Spring 2018 17


February, March, April and May

FEBRUARY

Waimea Town Celebration February 17-25 KCC Annual ACF Breakfast Sunday, February 18 7:00am, All you can eat menu Adults $24.00 at the door and Children 5-10 $7.00.  Kauai Community College

MARCH

Annual Bum Run Saturday, March 10 4:00pm Poipu Bay Golf Course 3 mile fun walk/run Sign up at active.com. Contact: 240-6425 St. Patrick’s Day Bingo Party Tuesday, March 13 10:45 – 12 noon Princeville Community Center RSVP 826-6687 Prince Kuhio Celebration Saturday, March 17 11:00am-5:00pm Anahola Beach Park County Spring Fun Program March 19-23 Ages 5 – 11 More information visit www.kauai.gov/parks

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Hawaii Junior Golf Day Saturday, March 24 Various Golf Courses 8:30am- Registration, Clinics- 9:00am-11:00am A fun and Free introductory Golf experience for juniors of any age Register online at HSJGA.org or call 808-532-0559 Kauai Seniors Golf Club Tournament Saturday, March 24 Wailua Golf Course Golfers 50 years and older are welcome to play. Contact: Bob 245-3680 Walk MS Saturday, March 31 Kapa’a Beach Park 4:00 PM

APRIL

Grove Farm Community Swap Meet Saturday, April 7 8:00am – 1:00pm Grove Farm Puhi Park Admission is free. March for Babies Saturday, April 7 Registration 6:45AM, start 8:00am Lydgate Park STEPS/ Parent & Child Fair Saturday, April 7 9:30am -1:00pm Kukui Grove Center


Note: Dates and Times May Change Without Notice Please Call First to Confirm

Brought to you by

Annual Kauai Garden Fair Saturday, April 7 9:30am – 2:00pm Kaua’i Community College Garden Island Orchid Society Spring Show Friday, April 13 Saturday, April 14 9:00-5:00pm United Church of Christ Hanapepe Keiki Fun Day & Fitness Challenge Saturday, April 14 Kapaa Beach Park 10am - 6pm, Food / Crafts 808-755-5763 Youth Amateur “Burn Out Suicide” Samoan Fire Knife Competition/ Exhibition Saturday, April 14 Kapaa Beach Park 6pm - Pau 808-755-5763 Jungle Run and Family Fun Day Sunday April 15 Wai Koa Loop Trail in Kilauea. 7am-7pm 4.5 mile run/walk & 1.7 mile student run/walk Family Fun Day to follow at Anaina Hou Community Park. Info kilaueaschool.com  Bethany (808) 634-2536 St. Theresa School Carnival Friday April 20, Saturday April 21 Kekaha Lydgate Earth Day Saturday, April 21 7:30am-12:00pm Lydgate Park

Relay for Life of Kauai Saturday, April 28 6:00pm to 6:00am Hanapepe Soccer Field Kalaheo School Spring Musical, Alladin Friday, April 27 Saturday, April 28 Friday, May 4, Saturday, May 5, 7:00 pm Kalaheo School Cafeteria

MAY

Kauai Keiki Bike & Safety Day Saturday, May 5 8:00am -11:00am Wilcox Medical Center back parking lot May Day by the Bay Saturday, May 12 10:00am to 5:00pm Wai`oli Beach Park, Hanalei 2018 Visitor Industry Charity Walk Kauai Saturday, May 12 Vidinha Stadium Soccer Park Walk starts at 7:00am-11:00am charitywalkhawaii.org/Kauai 652-8924 Bike to Work Day Friday, May 18 Commute to the Lihue Civic Center 6am from Kapaa Neighborhood Center 6:45am from Puhi Park

Spring 2018 19


Our Favorite Keiki Spring & Summer Fun

Hawaii Children’s Theatre Summer Stars Registration begins online:  March 1st, 2018 Program Dates: June 18th to July 29th with performances July 26th-29th Time: Morning, afternoon and full day program available Ages: 5 and up No previous theatre experience necessary Scholarships available. For more information: visit hawaiichildrenstheatre.org or call 808-246-8985. Ask about new Spring Programs

Kauai Academy of Creative Arts Summer Program Details: Classes will include art, ukulele, dance, taiko drumming and more Ages: 6-14 years Dates: June 18-July 13, 2018 Times: Monday- Friday Morning: 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Afternoon: 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. All Day: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Location: Island School Register online: Kauaicreativearts.org 346-8000.

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STEPS Parent/Child Fair Saturday, April 14, 2018 9:30 AM to 2 PM FREE Kukui Grove Center Stage area Annual event that highlights services available to parents of children ages 1-8 years of age including a lot of fun activities for the keiki. Contact: Mary Lou Kelley 246-0622

Kalaheo’s Drama Club presents: Alladdin Jr. Friday April 27, Saturday April 28, Friday May 4, Saturday May 5 at 7 pm. Sunday, May 6 at 4 pm. Admission: Preschool through Fifth grade $1. Grades 6th - Adult $5.

Camp Good News Kauai Dates: July 9-13, 2018 Ages: 5-15 Batsite: www.CampGoodNewsKauai.org   Batphone: 808.639.9675 Batcom: Jimmy@CampGoodNewsKauai.org Batcave: (top secret)


Our Favorite Keiki Spring & Summer Fun

Kauai Dance Center

*FREE Trial Class Ballet, Hip Hop, Lyrical, Spanish dance Ages: for all ages and abilities Days: Monday thru Saturday Time: 12:30pm-6pm Contact: Jennifer Bell-Grey Location: Nawiliwili/Lihue 3285 Waapa Rd Princeville community center 808-823-9588 www.kauaidancecenter.com info@kauaidancecenter.com

County of Kauai Spring Programs Mayor’s Youth Track Meet April 7th & 8th, 2018 Vidinha Stadium Open to boys & girls (Elementary and Middle School) Contact: James Kealalio at 822-0511

Puakea Junior Golf Academy Dates: March 19-23, 2018 Ages: 5-12 Days: Monday-Friday Time: 8:00am- 12noon Location: Puakea Golf Course Contact: Glen Tamagawa 808-245-8756 gtamagawa@puakeagolf.com www. puakeagolf.com

Kauai Police Activities League (K-PAL) Boxing / Kickboxing: Lihue and Hanapepe K-PAL Boxing Gyms Boys and Girls Ages 5-18 Jiu Jitsu Self Defense: Kapaa Youth Center Boys and Girls Ages 5-18

Spring Break Fun Dates: March 19th thru March 23rd, 2018  Ages: 5-11 Fee: $40.00 Location: Lihue & Kalaheo Neighborhood Centers Registration online: Parks and Recreation homepage • www.kauai.gov/parks  Contact: Jason Caldeira (Kalaheo NC): 332-9770 Andra Ota (Lihue NC): 241-6858

All Girls Boxing: Kapaa Youth Center and Lihue K-PAL Boxing Gym Chess with the Chief: Kauai Police Department Head Quarters North Shore Basketball Kilauea Gym Boys and girls ages 5-12 Contact: Sergeant Lance Okasaki kpal@kauai.gov 808-241-1647

Spring 2018 21


Preparing for Pregnancy

By Kandi Bloss, RN Wilcox Medical Center

Pregnancy is an exciting time for parents-to-be. It also can be a pretty scary time, especially for first-time moms and dads who don’t know what to expect over the course of the next nine months. And what about after baby arrives? That raises a whole different set of questions. The answer to easing unnecessary stress and worry? Attend a childbirth class. “Childbirth classes help parents feel less fearful about the upcoming birth of their child,” says Childbirth Educator Kandi Bloss, RN, international board-certified lactation consultant and certified lactation counselor at Wilcox Medical Center.

“Childbirth classes help parents feel less fearful about the upcoming birth of their child.”

childbirth process and also give them new knowledge. Evidenced-based information is always changing as more research is done,” Bloss says. Class discussions center on newborn care, as well as topics that include: • Healthy pregnancy habits, such as diet and exercise. • False versus true labor. • Warning signs of pre-term labor. • Stages of labor. • Timing of contractions. • Medication options. • Relaxation and breathing techniques. • Cesarean birth. • Postpartum care. • Breastfeeding. “I give a tour of our maternity unit, and we usually have an anesthesiologist, an obstetrician and a pediatrician come speak and answer questions as well,” adds Bloss, who also leads a free Breastfeeding Hui support group for moms with newborns and babies up to 12 months old. “Our ultimate goal is a healthy mom and healthy baby,” Bloss says. “Our staff members at Wilcox are here because they love helping patients and supporting patients through the birth process.”

Bloss leads the four-week Childbirth & Parent Education class series at Wilcox that prepares participants for labor, birth and early parenthood.

Childbirth classes are held on consecutive Tuesdays from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

“Even for second- or third-time parents, classes can help remind them of the

For full information and upcoming dates, visit WilcoxHealth.org/Maternity.

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Call 245-1441 or 245-1433 to register.


Announce Your Baby’s Birth! Announce Your Baby’s

!

It’s easy - and FREE - to announce your baby’s arrival and have a wonderful keepsake. Email baby’s photo, name, date of birth and time, weight, parents’ names to: births@KauaiFamilyMagazine.com.

Baby girl, Sanoemekamaluhia Makanaonālani Fernandez Born November 15, 2017 Time- 1-36pm Weight- 6lbs 2oz, Length- 19 inches Parents- Amber & Byron Fernandez Siblings- Kekamaepili ‘Iokepa Lono Fernandez, Ka’ililani Himeni Kamaha’o Fernandez

Baby boy, Zhayd Lucas Kaleikaumaka'okalani Kamanuwai Born July 18, 2017 1058 pm Weight 7lbs 7oz Lenght 19 inches Parents Sherilyn Higa & Sean Cruz-Kamanuwai Siblings Big Sisters Talia, Kaila & ZhariAni

Baby girl, Ayva Quinn Kealohilani Remigio Born July 25, 2017 @520 am Weight 7 lbs. 7.7 oz. Length 20.5 inches Parents Shawn & Ashleigh Remigio

Baby boy, Kai’eo Nakanaokalani Daligdig Born September 18, 2017 at 351am Weight 10lbs 0.7oz 21 12 inches Parents Kawai Contrades and Kevin Daligdig Big brother Gavin Daligdig

Baby girl, Maileah Alessia Kuuleilani Moulton Dela Cruz November 30th @505pm, 7lbs;18in Parents Leah Moulton-Dela Cruz and Doren Dela Cruz. Siblings Nicolai, Kenai, Lucius, Zefiyah

Baby boy, Aksel Masaru Onaonake‘alaokamaileikalīhau‘iaekauanoe Bernhardt Born October 15, 2017 at 557am Weight 7lbs 9oz 19.5 inches long Parents Tehani and Jesse Bernhardt Siblings Makai and Khloe.

Baby girl, Mila Keiko Okasaki born on October 21, 2017 at 412 a.m., 7 pounds 7.3 ounces, 20 inches long. Parents are Lance Okasaki and Allison Arakaki, and big sister Aila Okasaki

Spring 2018 23


LF

From the

From the

Our Picks

Some of our favorite books for your family. 10 Easter Egg Hunters: A Holiday Counting Book by Janet Schulman Preschool “Wake up, Bunny, move those legs. You’ve not much time to hide those eggs!” The Bunny is on the move. Help your child find all the eggs the Easter Bunny has hidden in time for the Easter Parade.

Bob, Not Bob!

by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick Kindergarten

Little Louie has a bad cold and a communication problem. When he, with his stuffed-up nose, calls for mom, Bob the dog comes running. And that’s just the beginning of this hysterical story that the authors say is best “read as though you have the worst cold ever.”

Peekaboo the Poi Dog

by Wendy Kunimitsu Haraguhi Grades 1-2 What should a poi dog do on a rainy day? Peekaboo picks up her favorite beach towel and instantly she is flying off the Pali, windsurfing in Kailua and heading anywhere her imagination can take her in this locally published and adorably illustrated book.

The Kids’ Guide to Cooking Real Food with Your Family by Sally Sampson Kick start your resolution to eat healthier with this guide to cooking with your entire family. In addition to factoids about kitchen chemistry, history and smart choices, some recipes add ways for kids to customize their creations.

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Chop Chop


By Michael Lutwin, DDS

Follow these tips to help keiki Malama their Mouth: Make it Fun! To get kids brushing Eat Healthy! and flossing for the recommended two minutes, two times a day, use your smartphone. Choose a fun, two-minute tune and let kids rock out while they brush.

Go to the Dentist! The ADA recommends that children go to the dentist no later than their first birthday, and then at least twice a year. Make this fun too! It’s critical that kids get a good impression of the dentist to encourage a lifetime of dental wellness. Watch cartoons and read children’s books about the dentist. Talk positively about the dentist to get kids excited. Take a teddy bear to appointments, and reward children afterward.

Limit sugary foods and drinks (like fruit juices), and stick to water, highprotein snacks, leafy greens, and dairy products. Cheese can protect tooth enamel so enjoy this healthy treat.

Set A Good Example! Your kids look

up to you, so if you drink soda all day, skimp on flossing, and don’t visit the dentist, your children will pick up on that message. Eat right, practice good oral hygiene, and don’t smoke or use tobacco products – your kids are watching. Dental health is an important part of your overall health. Malama your mouth!

Spring 2018 25


26 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


kupuna KAUA`I

INSIDE: Quality Care and Respite for Loved Ones Why is Physical Exercise Important for the Elderly? 7 Ways Technology Can Bring Your Family Closer How to Prepare For and Survive a Nuclear Fallout Photo by Lindsey Phelps


Photo by Lindsey Phelps

Article Title

Quality Care and Respite for Loved Ones Mrs. Dolores “Dolly” Alpeche, born and raised on Kaua’i, at the age of 88, finds herself enjoying life, meeting new friends, and staying active. In her younger days, Dolly was primarily a housewife and as her children got older, worked at Big Save then Liberty House. Her children remember her mostly as a housewife as she stayed at home to care for her eight children, four boys and four girls, before entering the workforce. Five of her children live on the mainland and three are here on Kaua’i. Dolly’s husband passed away over 25 years ago and she has been living on her own since then. She was quite independent until about 2 years ago when she fell and was hospitalized for her fall and other illness. Dolly’s daughter, Stephanie, tends to her many needs such as cooking, cleaning, and keeping her updated with appointments

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and finances. Stephanie works full-time as well as provides childcare for her grand-daughter twice a week. To ease some of the responsibility and for the safety of their mother, Stephanie along with her siblings, decided to try Kauai Adult Day Health Center, and in May 2017, Dolly was enrolled. Stephanie notes that it’s getting more difficult


By Jasmine Yukimura Kauai Adult Day Health Center

dealing with the changes she sees with mother needing more reminders and risks for falling. Having some respite and peace of mind that mother is at the Center is a big help. Stephanie says that mom enjoys coming to the center. She recalls that on Christmas day, Dolly was waiting for the paratransit to bring her to the center as she wanted to attend that day.

the community. We provide respite for families so that they can continue to work and stay healthy. Our goal is to keep our clients independent and active in the community by allowing them to do as much for themselves as possible, and choose and participate in the activities that appeal to them, under the supervision of well-trained and caring staff.

Dolly enjoys activities such as daily lunch walk, Blackjack, socialization, arts and crafts, and cooking. In January, Dolly enjoyed an excursion to Kauai Coffee Company, sampling different coffee flavors, with her friends at Kauai Adult Day Health Center. Adult Day Health Centers provides a supervised daytime program for the elderly and disabled adults in the community by offering a well-rounded and stimulating program of recreational, social, creative, educational, and therapeutic activities in a in a facility where clients are monitored by trained staff and licensed nurses. Adult day care is a great option over sitting at home in front of a TV or for those who cannot stay home by themselves. At the end of the day, clients return home to their family. Adult day care eliminates or puts off the need for assisted living or premature institutionalization. Kauai Adult Day Health Center’s services and program enrich the community’s culture by keeping our kupuna and disabled adults at home and active in

For more information about our program, please contact Kauai Adult Day Health Center at (808) 246-6919.

Spring 2018 29


Why Is Physical Exercise Important for the Elderly?

By Caryn Sakahashi Kauai Adult Day Health Center

Photo by Lindsey Phelps

Physical activity is vital at any age, but as you grow older, changes set in that make exercise even more crucial. Conditions that typically develop with aging can be delayed when you stay active. Physical activity can even extend life expectancy. When you grow older, bones can become If you are elderly and fighting the brittle and the muscles shorten. An psychological effects of aging, exercise elderly person can lose the balance may be the key to giving you drive and and coordination that they have had energy. A sedentary lifestyle can affect their entire lives. Stretching routines will you at any age. Take part in an exercise lengthen muscle tissue and help prevent program to help fill some of the hours. wasting and shortening. Exercise can An ordinary walk when you feel blue will reduce incidents of enhance your spirits. arthritis and osteoporosis Exercising at even Exercise will also improve by increasing bone cognitive functions. a light intensity As you age, your memory density and joint range of motion. will raise the heart may not be as clear as it once was. Exercise Regular exercise helps rate and improve can help improve to keep the heart muscle mental focus. overall fitness. in shape. Exercising at even a light intensity will Even if traditional raise the heart rate and improve overall programs will not work because of fitness. Cardiovascular training for the physical constraints, you can still be active. elderly increases respiratory intake and Wheelchair fitness DVDs and stretching helps fight common illnesses, such as can improve your health and help fight a cold or the flu. Blocking of arteries off illness. Many problems associated can occur when you grow older. Exercise with growing older will improve if you stay can help reduce the risk by lowering active, as long as your doctor gives you blood cholesterol. the OK.

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Spring 2018 31


Ways Technology Can Bring Your Family Closer Most parents can agree that it’s a good idea to set aside technologyfree family time. At the same time, it’s also helpful to remember all the ways technology can bring families closer. Young people, in particular, filter much of their experiences through their phones, so turning phones off for extended periods of time may actually cause them to feel less connected. 32 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


By Carolyn Jabs Here are a few ways technology can enhance family togetherness. Whenever possible, use the simplest apps so as many people as possible can participate. 

Plan reunions.

1

Using an app like Party Planner for the annual family reunion will help you manage the details, from inviting guests and tracking responses to delegating tasks and budgeting. Entering necessary information may take a little time, but it lays the groundwork for future reunions.

2

relatives. Notifications can be set to alert smartphone users when a new text arrives, or turned off so multiple texts don’t become bothersome.

5

Start a family media channel.

your next family reunion, the holidays and other occasions. Ask everyone old enough to talk to make suggestions. Of course, there are plenty playlists available on sites like Pandora and Spotify, but it’s a lot more meaningful — and fun — to juxtapose grandma’s favorites from the 1940s with the latest Justin Bieber jam.

Establish a blog or a social media group, and limit access to extended family and special friends. Invite kids, cousins, aunts, uncles and grandparents to participate, providing whatever support they need to get connected. Encourage everyone to post inside jokes, recipes, memories and bits of family lore. To make people more comfortable with sharing heartfelt or silly sentiments, establish a simple rule: What appears on the site can’t be shared anywhere else without permission.

Chat long distance. Schedule video

Play games. Ask preteens for the

Tune up. Build a family playlist for

3

chats with distant loved ones. Group chats can sometimes feel awkward so encourage family members to take turns. Do a little coaching so kids are prepared to thank relatives for gifts or demonstrate what they can do with a new toy. Ask questions that prompt elders to share memories and stories.

4

Set up a group text. If video

chatting makes family members selfconscious, try using GroupMe, a free app that allows everyone in the family to see the same text messages. GroupMe works with every smartphone platform. Give it a try in your immediate family, then expand the group to include cousins and other

6

best family-friendly games or find apps that simulate classics like Scrabble and Checkers. Help grandparents sign up so they can play across the room — or country. Consider creating customized games for your family. For example, try making up a scavenger hunt that involves taking photos connected with family traditions.

7

Collect photos. Set up a password-

protected site on a photo-sharing platform like Flickr, Instagram or Google Photos, then send the link to everyone in the family. Ask family members to upload their favorite photos and videos to create a collective album.

There are, of course, plenty of other ways technology can make family time fun and meaningful. Embracing these possibilities with an open heart makes it more likely that everyone will participate and enjoy these experiences together.

Spring 2018 33


TWO GREAT REASONS TO LISTEN TO FM97 RADIO.

Article Title

BB Choi Ron Wood

When not on the golf course, Ron Wood “gets you up” in the morning, while B B Choi “drives you home” at night. Plus, get the latest news, play fun contests and enjoy the best music around. Guaranteed.

Still Kauai’s 1st Radio Choice. 34 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


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Keikiclubhouse@msn.com

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Representing: • Humana • TransAmerica • Ohana Health Plan • Mutual of Omaha • Kaiser and more… Call

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Spring 2018 35


After hearing multiple people comment that they did nothing because they thought they were going to die, Luke Evslin and Tanya Gamby compiled information from various reputable sources on ways that families can protect themselves. Given that we are unlikely to be in the direct impact zone, there is a lot that families can do to minimize their risk.  Psychological resiliency is strengthened when people feel empowered to protect themselves. 1)

The Hawai’i Emergency Management Agency (HEMA) writes that the risk of a nuclear attack was significantly higher during the Cold War than it is today. But, we are more vulnerable today than we were during the Cold War (because of a lack of fallout shelters, because the launch could come out of the blue, and because of the rogue nature of North Korea). The variables are too unknown to try and quantify what that risk is (less than 5%? less than 1%?), but, there is clearly some possibility that Hawai’i will be the target of a nuclear attack. It’s not high enough to spend our lives in fear, but, in my opinion, it’s high enough that we should know what to do.

2)

It’s not clear what North Korea’s nuclear capabilities are, and the blast radius depends on a lot of factors (such as altitude of detonation and geography). But, it could be somewhere around 1-4 miles. HEMA estimates that the likely target would be Honolulu. Regardless of where it hits, the large majority of Hawai’i residents would be far outside of the blast radius but within the path of radioactive fallout. So, the purpose of the alert isn’t to kiss your loved ones goodbye, it’s to seek shelter.

3)

We’d have 12-15 minutes from the initial alert until impact. For most people in most places, that’s enough time to find a decent shelter. If you’re driving,

36 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


By Luke Evslin get out of your car. It will provide little protection and the electronics could be fried because the blast acts as an electromagnetic pulse— so it’s not likely to get you anywhere after the blast.

5)

There are two primary types of radiation. Thermal radiation occurs for the first few seconds during the initial blast and moves at the speed of light. While the effects of thermal radiation depend on the size and altitude of the blast, a 1megaton bomb (which is likely larger than North Korea's capabilities) can cause temporary blindness at up to 13 miles, mild burns up to seven miles away, and

severe burns up to 5 miles away. Any barrier, including clothing and even newspaper, can help protect against the effects of thermal radiation.

6)

for the majority of Hawai’i residents, it may be possible to seek better shelter after the initial blast. A rough guideline cited by numerous online sources is that if you see a distant mushroom cloud, to extend your arm and raise your thumb to the cloud. If the cloud is bigger than your thumb, then you are in a zone of potential fall-out and have 10-15 minutes from the time of detonation to possibly seek better shelter. While the highest risk for acute radiation sickness are unsheltered people within a 10-20 mile radius from the explosion, a guideline circulated by FEMA clarifies that fallout can still pose a long-term health risk for hundreds of miles in either direction.

Nuclear fallout is created from radioactive dust particles that get launched as much as 5 miles into the air from the explosion. Once in the jetstream, they can travel at more than 100 miles per hour for hundreds of miles. This means that

So EVERYONE in Hawai’i should seek shelter, regardless of where the detonation occurs.

7)

The good news is that radioactive fallout decays at an exponential rate. From the DOD’s US Army Survival Manual, “Without shelter, the dosage received in the first few hours will exceed that received during the rest of a week in a contaminated area. The dosage

Spring 2018 37


Prepare for a Nuclear Fallout Continued received in this first week will exceed the dosage accumulated during the rest of a lifetime spent in the same contaminated area.”

mandatory requirements as valid reasons for exposure. Decontaminate at every stop.

8)

So, the takeaway is SEEK SHELTER. The following picture (taken from the HEMA Guide linked below) is helpful. The US Army Survival Guide clarifies that an underground shelter covered by 1 meter or more of earth provides the best protection against fallout radiation.” And the FEMA guide (linked below) recommends seeking shelter in a basement, large multi-story structure, parking garage, or tunnel. The FEMA guide clarifies that “single-story wood frame houses without basements and vehicles provide only minimal shelter and should not be considered adequate shelter” for areas of high fallout.

We all should know where a concrete structure (whether it’s a hotel, neighborhood center, hospital, government building, etc) is within 12-15 minutes of our work or home. In the event of an alarm, go there.

9)

And finally, don’t panic if you get sick. Small doses of radiation can cause vomiting and nausea, and if proper precautions are taken, they can go away in a short time.

The first day is by far the worst, and staying in a shelter for just two days is likely enough to save your family. The US Department of Homeland Security (linked below) writes that radioactivity levels fall by 90% in 7 hours and 99% in 2 days.

Here’s the exposure timetable from the Army Survival Manual (linked below) • Complete isolation from 4 to 6 days following delivery of the last weapon. • A very brief exposure to procure water on the third day is permissible, but exposure should not exceed 30 minutes. • One exposure of not more than 30 minutes on the seventh day. • One exposure of not more than 1 hour on the eighth day. • Exposure of 2 to 4 hours from the ninth day through the twelfth day. • Normal operation, followed by rest in a protected shelter, from the thirteenth day on. • In all instances, make your exposures as brief as possible. Consider only

Resources: n US Army Survival Manual: https://books.google.com/books… n Hawai’i Emergency Management Emergency Preparedness Guide: https://dod. hawaii.gov/…/HI-EMA-PUBLIC-BMP-working-brief-NO… n FEMA Disaster Guide: https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast n Homeland Security Guide: https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/prep_nuclear_fact_ sheet.pdf n FEMA Circulation: https://www.fema.gov/media-librarydata/20130726-1821-25045-3023/planning_guidance_for_response_to_a_nuclear_ detonation___2nd_edition_final.pdf

38 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Protect yourself from mosquito bites

PREVENT

Rat lungworm disease is caused by a parasite, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is spread by rats. People can get rat lungworm disease by accidentally eating slugs and snails infected with the parasite found on unrinsed, raw produce. People can also get sick by eating undercooked snails, freshwater crabs, prawns, frogs, or crayfish that are infected. You can help prevent rat lungworm disease by doing the following:

WASH PRODUCE: Thoroughly inspect and rinse all fruits and vegetables under running water. For leafy greens, check each leaf carefully for slugs and snails, and wash carefully.

KILL SLUGS & SNAILS: Apply slug bait according to label directions. Keep pets and children away from the poison. Throw away dead slugs and snails. Do not touch them with your bare hands; use gloves.

Protect yourself from mosquito bites

CONTROL RATS: Use bait and traps to catch rats. Follow label directions. Keep pets and children away from the poison.

COOK FOOD: Boil snails, freshwater crabs, prawns, frogs, and crayfish for at least 3-5 minutes before eating.

COVER TANKS & CONTAINERS: Cover and protect your catchment tank. Always cover your drink containers to prevent slugs and snails from crawling inside. Avoid drinking from your garden watering hose.

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS Not everyone will have the same symptoms. Symptoms usually start 1 to 3 weeks after infection. Illness can last for 2 to 8 weeks or longer. • Severe ongoing headache • Nausea and vomiting • Neck and back stiffness

• Tingling or painful skin • Low-grade fever • Although rare, coma and death

Children may have behavioral changes such as unusually bad temper, mood changes, or extreme tiredness.

See your doctor as soon as possible if you think you may have been infected.

For more information call the Disease Reporting Line (808) 586-4586 or visit: www.health.hawaii.gov

The Department of Health provides access to its programs and activities without regard to race, color, national origin/ancestry-including language, age, sex-including gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, color, religion, or disability. Write or call the Affirmative Action Office at P.O. Box 3378, Honolulu, HI 96801-3378 or at (808) 586-4614 (voice/TRS) within 180 days of a problem.


Article Title

Food, Family, Fun – All in One Check out HMSA’s Well-Being Hawaii blog. Read inspiring stories, watch helpful videos, join the conversation, and more. Mix it up Make this recipe in a jiffy for an easy, healthy snack.

Tropical Trail Mix

1 cup cashews 1 cup almonds ½ cup chopped dried mango ½ cup coconut flakes ½ cup banana chips Mix ingredients together in a bowl. Store in an airtight container.

Visit wellbeinghi.com.


Article Title “I want the best doctors and hospitals for my family. For me, that means HMSA.”

At HMSA, we’re committed to giving you and your family access to the highest quality care. Find your HMSA health plan today at hmsa.com.

1010-10186


Save water, don’t waste water, fix a leak today! By Kauai Department of Water

Did you know? The average leaky toilet can waste about 200 gallons of water per day? That’s more than 6,000 gallons of water being wasted, per month! Finding and fixing common household leaks; such as leaky valves and dripping faucets is an important part of being a responsible water user. These small repairs are often easy to fix and can pay for themselves in water savings on your next bill.

red circular dial located on the face of the meter.

One way to check for household leaks is to use your water meter. Here’s how:

The Kauai Department of Water will be celebrating its annual “Fix a Leak Week” awareness event from March 19 - 23, 2018, as part of the Environmental Protection Agency’s national WaterSense program. To learn more about Fix a Leak Week, conservation tips or Department of Water services, visit www.kauaiwater. org or call the Department of Water at 245-5400.

Step 1: Turn off all water access in your home; including faucets and plumbing fixtures. Step 2: Locate your water meter outside, lift metal cover to view and identify the Low Flow Indicator; a small

Step 3: Monitor the Low Flow Indicator for at least 12 minutes. If the indicator spins during this time, you probably have a leak.

Receive a FREE LEAK detection kit!

From the Department of Water. Visit our lihue office & join us in honoring

Water has no substitute…

Conserve it!

Did you know? At a rate of one drip per second, a leaky faucet can accumulate more than 3,000 gallons of water wasted per year. That’s enough water to take more than 180 showers!

42 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

4398 Pua Loke St. Lihue, HI 96766 www.kauaiwater.org


Recycle on Kauai Sponsored by the County of Kauai Programs shown here are for residents only, except where noted.

CORRUGATED CARDBOARD

(flatten cardboard)

STEEL & TIN CANS

NEWSPAPER

PLASTIC & ONLY

GLASS BOTTLES & JARS

ALUMINUM CANS, FOIL, PIE/FOOD PANS

MIXED PAPER: JUNK MAIL, MAGAZINES, PAPERBACK BOOKS, FOOD/SODA BOXES, PAPER BAGS & ENVELOPES

Recycling Bin Locations HANAPĒPĒ HANALEI KAPA‘A KEKAHA KĪLAUEA

Refuse Transfer Station 4380 Lele Road Hanalei Transfer Station 5-3751 Kūhi‘ō Highway Kapa‘a near the football field 4900 Kahau Road Kekaha Landfill 6900-D Kaumuali’i Highway Kaua’i Community Recycling Services* 5-2723 Kūhi‘ō Hwy Open Tuesday & Friday • 8 am–4 pm ONLY

LĀWA‘I

Lāwa‘i behind U.S. Post Office 2-3675 Kaumuali’i Highway

LĪHU‘E

Līhu’e in back of Kmart • 4303 Nāwiliwili Road

PO‘IPŪ

Brennecke’s Beach Broiler 2100 Hoone Road

WAIMEA

Waimea Canyon Park 4643 Waimea Canyon

*Commercially generated items accepted

FREE Electronic Waste Recycling Recycle your electronics 6 days a week at the Puhi Metals Recycling Center located at 3951 Puhi Rd. Monday-Saturday 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Free to residents and businesses. See the County website at www.kauai.gov/ewaste or call 245-6919 for more information.

Compost at Home Call for a free compost bin, 241-4841 FRUIT & VEGETABLE SCRAPS, EGGSHELLS, COFFEE GROUNDS, CARDBOARD, LEAVES, SHREDDED PAPER, YARD WASTE

More recycling programs available - see website www.kauai.gov/recycling or call (808) 241-4841


10 Great Ideas Revealing Baby’s Gender Now that you’ve got the color combination decided and chosen the theme to use, the next decision is how to communicate the big news to everyone. Food Reveal:

Pop a Balloon:

The most common way to announce the “winner” is a cake cutting or cupcake biting, followed down the list by cookie breaking.

Since Mom is about to pop, it’s fitting to use a balloon. You can pop a balloon filled with carefully colored confetti, or pop a balloon filled with paint using darts or even a bow and arrow!

Balloon Release: Coming in at a close second is the balloon release. Whether the balloons float up, or fall down, it’s a moment of suspense for everyone.

Smoke Fountains: These are a fun way to show off the news as long as you are outside! Place them around the grounds, light them all at once and enjoy the show! Smoke fountains are a great way to announce the gender of your baby. They also make for some really cool photos!

A Scratch Ticket: Every ticket a winner! A fun way to get everyone involved and have them all scratch at the same time. DIY a scratch ticket or purchase them for your theme. Giraffe scratch cards from Burlap and Babies.

Chalk Bombs: These are a fun spectator sport! You can create chalk bombs as baseballs that are hit, or balls that are dropped.

44 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com 44 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

A Silly String Fight: If your party is out of doors then I say go for it! Most everyone has fun with silly string and I can envision this becoming an epic battle!

Confetti Poppers: These poppers are a great party favor. Mom and Dad can pop them alone or give everyone a chance to play.

Piñata: A party classic, the piñata is as versatile as the balloon! Using a pull string it can reveal colored confetti, candy, or mini balloons.

Harry Potter: Who can doubt the Sorting Hat with pink baby shoes underneath? The Sorting Hat is always right! This is a clever and unique way to announce what you’re having for Harry Potter fans.


MAKE IT:

TREAT-FILLED EASTER EGGS

Kids will wonder how the Easter Bunny got these sweet treats inside these colorful eggs? Older kids, elementary-aged and up, can get wrapped up in this craft. The next question, how do you get the treats out?

Materials n 1 cup liquid starch n 1/2 cup flour

n Embroidery floss. (you’ll need 1-2 skeins for each egg) n Balloons wrapped chocolates or similar-sized treats

Directions 1. Mix flour with liquid starch. 2. Insert a wrapped chocolate, or two, into a balloon. An adult can hold the balloon open so kids can drop in the candy. 3. Blow up the balloon slightly until it resembles an egg. Knot the end. 4. Place the thread in flour/starch mixture. Keep the skein near the mixture and immerse several feet of floss at a time. 5. Pull out the floss, remove excess liquid with your fingers and wrap the balloon. 6. After you used the entire skein that was in the bowl, unravel a few more feet from the next skein and place it in the bowl. 7. Keep going until the egg is covered with enough floss so that the holes are too small for the wrapped candy to fall out, but large enough so the candy is visible. Make sure you can poke the tips of a scissors through the holes as well. 8. Let the thread dry for 24 hours. 9. Use your fingers or a dull pencil tip to gently loosen the thread from the balloon. 10. Use the scissors to poke the balloon to let the air out. Then snip the balloon open and remove from the egg.

Tips We used Sta-Flo liquid starch at Longs Drugs. When we put the entire skein of floss in the liquid it got tangled. Don’t cut the skein as you go because the loose ends stick out. It’s best to use the entire skein without cutting it, immersing a few feet of thread in the starch at a time. Photos by Shelby Longley

SPRING Spring 2017 2018 4545


LET’S

R B A E L T E CRL’S AND BOYE

GI

’S

DAY

TOGETHER

GIRL’S DAY

BOY’S DAY

Treat your special someone on Girl’s Day with a special treat from Mark’s Place! Call in early to reserve a special Girl’s Day treat for pick up on Friday, March 2, 2018.

Treat your special someone on Boy’s Day with a special treat from Mark’s Place! Call in early to reserve a special Boy’s Day treat for pick up on Friday, May 4, 2018.

March 3, 2018

May 5, 2018

1610 Haleukana Street - Puhi Industrial Park www.marksplacekauai.com

245-2522 46 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


2018

W

BY

E

D

NO

K PIC

y l i m a F avorites F PARE

O NTS • V

TE

Tell us about the local things you love. Kauai Family Magazine’s Family Favorites campaign is all about the things we love on Kauai. You the parents choose who is the best of the best for our keiki. From favorite restaurants, shops and party venues to physicians and family services, we ask for your help to pick this year’s Family Favorites

Go to KauaiFamilyMagazine.com and vote now!

Spring 2018 47


ATTENTION YOUNG ARTISTS!! Spring Art Contest Senildto ema by

15tthhe book l i r p A ick win

1

ill atr you wHina by P ds f o One nu and nd Frien Ho hing a C

Parrot fish…

2

Parrot fish are called Uhu in Hawaiian. They are colorful and eat coral.

Draw the Uhu

Step 1: FORMING- form up the Uhu using ovals and circles. Remember to press softly at this stage in case you need to erase lines. Step 2: OUTLINING- outline the Uhu adding details at this stage. Step 3: SHADING and COLORING Finally color the Uhu using crayons or colored pencils.

Email your art to: info@kauaifamilymagazine.com by April 15th. One of you will win the book Honu and Hina by Patrick Ching and Friends.

It's easy to submit your art for our contest. eMail us, and include your name, age, grade, school and phone number.

3


Article Title

Holiday Winner! Miley Cox 5th Grade Kalaheo elementary

Kaua’i Family Magazine thanks all the young creative artists for their participation. Everyone’s a winner with us!

Gecko | Honorable Mentions

Adelaide Scarbo Age 7, Grade 2 Kalaheo Elementary School

Blake Parmentier Age 5 Hi'ilei Preschool

Kelie Lum Age 6, Grade 1 Kalaheo Elementary School

Keira Parmentier Age 10, Grade 6 Kilauea School

Stella Fornari Age 8, Grade 2 Wilcox Elementary

Kaitlyn Lum Age 9, Grade 4 Kalaheo School

Spring 2018 49


Growing Up Online

What to Consider Before Using GPS to Track Your Kid

Sooner or later, most parents lose a kid — usually for only a few minutes. A toddler figures out how to open an unlatched door. A kindergartener heads off to investigate something in another grocery aisle. A schoolage child gets confused about the pick-up location. Even if it’s brief, the experience can be heart-stopping. And it has given rise to a whole new industry — GPS tracking for kids. For kids, this can be a problem. Experts point out that tracking devices can encourage both passivity and a false sense of security in children and parents. As parents find themselves counting on surveillance, they may be less intentional about helping kids anticipate and avoid risks. Instead of learning what they need to know to confidently and safely navigate a risky world, kids depend on that panic button that summons Mom or Dad. That said, there are situations in which a tracker can be very useful — think amusement parks, or kids who walk to

50 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

and from school. Before purchasing the technology, consider these questions. What does it do? Some trackers, like Trax, do nothing but show location. They can be attached to children, elders, pets or even a laptop that wanders off. Many units resemble watches or flip phones. Some, like the AmbyGear SmartWatch, include games or virtual pets. What’s the technology? Tracking units that use GPS depend on satellites, and some provide coverage anywhere on the planet. Other devices use cellphone


By Carolyn Jabs networks and won’t work if a child wanders out of range. My Buddy Tag uses Bluetooth technology with limited reach. The most accurate devices, like the wherecom KidFit, use a combination of technologies. What does it monitor? At the very least, a tracking device should monitor location. Some send a signal at intervals; others allow continuous tracking that may drain the device’s battery. Many units make it possible to set up safety zones or geofences and send an alert if the child goes beyond those boundaries. Is it complicated? For very young children, simplicity is a virtue. Tinitell, for example, consists of a band with a button that, when pushed, calls pre-programmed numbers until someone picks up. How long is the battery life? Even the best tracker won’t work if the battery is dead. Find out how long the battery lasts, how it has to be charged and whether there’s a low battery alert. The Lineable smartboard, for example, is a simple, inexpensive wristband tracker with a battery that can last an entire year.  Is the device secure? If you have to sign in to get information about your child’s

location, it’s possible for other people to sign in too. What precautions has the company taken to prevent hacking? What alerts will you get if there is a security breach? What kind of communication is possible? Some units have a panic button a child can press. Others allow one-way communication. More expensive devices, like the GizmoGadget from Verizon, provide two-way communication. Is it kid-proof? Some kids can handle delicate equipment and others can’t. Choose a GPS unit accordingly. PocketFinder, for example, is built out of almost indestructible plastic. The koRex Babysiter claims to be waterproof.  How much does it cost? Tracking devices range from $40 to $200. Many also require a service contract that can cost $4-$40 per month. Before signing with a new service, check with your cellphone provider for a better deal. Are there special features for special kids? AngelSense is designed to provide layers of protection for children with special needs. dokiWatch allows parents to schedule reminders or deactivate distracting features.

Of course, by the time a child is old enough for a smartphone, the tracking question is moot. Smartphones double as trackers when apps that monitor where children are and what they are doing have been installed. Parents and older kids need to think carefully and talk frequently about the intersection between privacy and trust. Some kids may benefit from additional supervision, but parents must keep their eyes on the ultimate goal — raising children who are responsible and confident enough to make their own decisions about staying safe in a complicated world.

Spring 2018 51


Get a Head Start for Your Keiki to Enter Kindergarten Ready to Learn

Are you looking for a preschool for your keiki? The Child & Family Service (CFS) Head Start program offers no-cost preschool to eligible children, ages 3 – 5, on Kaua’i Island. CFS Head Start provides children with activities that help them grow mentally, socially, emotionally and physically. Our Head Start staff recognizes that parents are the first and most important teachers of your children.  They will welcome your involvement in Head Start activities, and will work as partners with you to help your child progress.  CFS Head Start staff members offer your child love, acceptance, understanding, and the opportunity to learn and to experience success.  Head Start children socialize with others, solve problems, and have other experiences which can help them become self-confident.  Your children will also improve their listening and speaking skills. The CFS Head Start staff partner with families to ensure children are on track for healthy development and ready for learning by performing vision and hearing tests, ensuring access to regular health care and assisting in tracking immunizations. The program has on staff a nurse available to assist with coordinating individualized

52 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

health care needs. Nutrition activities and accessing dental care are also offered as well. A mental health professional is available for children and families to assist with social and emotional development. Head Start children spend time in stimulating settings where they form good habits and enjoy learning through playing and working on tasks with classmates.  Your child will leave CFS Head Start more prepared for kindergarten, excited about learning and ready to succeed.  CFS also offers Early Head Start for your infant and toddler. Through island wide home-based home visiting, Early Head Start provides prenatal support services to expectant mothers and their families, as well as educational services for children zero to three years of age. To find out if you are eligible for CFS Head Start or Early Head Start, contact Child & Family Service at 808-245-5914 or visit www. childandfamilyservice.org/headstart.


Article Title

Spring 2018 53


Accepting K3 applications for the start of 2018!

808-828-0047 4000 Kilauea Road Kilauea, HI 96754 www.KCAschool.org

• Life-changing, Christ-centered education that inspires the hearts and minds of students.

• K3 through 12th grade • 8:1 average Student to Teacher ratio • 10 acre campus 1 mile from Kilauea Lighthouse • Impeccable safety record • Excellent test scores • Students are known in the community for their character, integrity, work ethic, and servant leadership

• We accept Preschool Open Doors

and Pauahi Keiki Scholars PreK subsidies

Kahili Adventist Preschool has moved to Kapaa! • Accepting students ages 35 months through 6 years. • Full time and part time students accepted.

Hours of operation: 7:30 AM to 5 PM Monday – Friday

(808) 634-5423

kahiliadventistpreschool@aol.com Transportation available between Lihue and Kapaa

54 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Find out more about the future of learning and see if HTA is the right fit for your family. Call or visit our website today!

myhta.org 808-676-5444 n Statewide Public Charter School n Tuition-Free n HTA’s Blended Learning Model o   Face-to-Face Instruction o   Virtual Instruction  o   Independent Learning

We provide the opportunity for every learner to Soar To Success: Spiritually, Academically, Physically, and in Service to Community. Strong academics, Christian based teachings, and 21st century technology are tools we use to create tomorrow’s leaders.

Preschool - 8th grade Nationally Acclaimed Renaissance Lighthouse School Tuition assistance is available

sttheresakauai.com

Spring 2018 55


FREE Parent Participation Preschool

Enroll In

Keiki Steps Today

For children ages birth thru 5 and their caregivers Preference is given to Native Hawaiian Children and Families

Learn and Grow with Your Child! ❖ Learn And Grow With Your Child

Participate in activities alongside your child as their first teacher

❖ Engaging Activities

A variety of hands-on learning experiences that promote your child's whole development

❖ Field Trips

Engage and Inspire your children by learning And Growenvironments With Your Child ❖ Learn in different Participate in activities alongside your child as their first teacher

❖ ‘Ohana Nurturing

Activities ❖ Engaging Building relationships and strengthening A variety of hands-on learning experiences that knowledge for whole the whole family promote your child's development Field Trips ❖❖ Success

Engage and Inspire your children by learning Ensureenvironments that you and your child are ready for in different

school and schools are ready for your children Nurturing ❖ ‘Ohana Building relationships and strengthening knowledge for the whole family

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Kapa‘a and Kekaha

Ensure that you and your child are ready for school and schools are ready for your children

Elementary School Cafeterias

Monday - Thursday 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

For more information: For more information: deannas@inpeace.org deannas@inpeace.org For more information:

www.inpeace.org www.inpeace.org info@inpeace.org

www.inpeace.org

@inpeacehawaii @inpeacehawaii

Register Today!

(808) 320-9100


Christ Memorial Episcopal Church

Na Kamalei Godly Play

All Are Welcome! Sundays, 9 a.m. 2509 Kolo Road, Kilauea, HI 96754

Need Help Paying for PRESCHOOL? The Dept. of Human Services operates the Preschool Open Doors Program, which helps eligible low and moderate income families’ statewide pay for preschool for up to one year prior to the child’s kindergarten entry. They provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool with the opportunity to gain essential skills in preschool in order to be successful in school and in life. Applications accepted January 2 through March 29.

For information, please visit patchhawaii.org or call 791-2130

808-482-4824

ChristMemorialKilauea@gmail.com www.ChristMemorialKauai.org

NO CHILD SHOULD WAIT.

NOT ON KAUA’I

TAKE PART OF COMMUNITY.

DO FOSTER CARE. It’s our kuleana. Be there for them TODAY.

• Room/Board reimbursement, Medical/Dental coverage provided for each child, in addition to an array of support services • Funding for this program is provided by the State of Hawai‘i Department of Human Services

www.pidf.org

808-346-8184

Spring 2018 57


How to Handle Whining and Talking Back

Science has proven what parents already know: Whining is the most annoying sound on earth. A recent study published in the journal Evolutionary Biology found that when compared to other forms of speech, including baby talk, whining was uniquely distracting, causing listeners to tune in to the whining at the expense of other tasks. Another study found that whining was more distracting to people attempting to solve a simple math problem than the sound of a table saw. Then there’s back talk, whining’s older and even more irritating sibling. While managing these frustrating utterances is a part of parenting, here are age-by-age tips to help dial down distracting and disrespectful communications.

Early Years Whine Time Whining is tough to ignore for a reason. According to a study by Evolutionary Biology, it serves an evolutionary purpose, attracting a primary caregiver’s attention

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just as a child leaves babyhood. In other words, it’s a way to attract babying once a child no longer requires it. That’s also why whining peaks at ages 3 and 4, and why it’s so often directed at a child’s primary caregiver. How should parents and caregivers respond to this cringe-inducing but biologically normal behavior?


By Malia Jacobson First, remember that whining tots aren’t necessarily being disobedient. It’s easy to think that children are being uncooperative when they’re really just acting their age. Good behavior is encouraged through positive parenting strategies, such as developing strong and affectionate parent-child relationships, offering descriptive praise and giving attention to positive behavior.

communication skills through negotiation and taking turns, and encouraging teens to advocate for what they feel are fair rules and consequences.

Teen Years School Rules

While younger children often reserve their most irritating whining and back talk for their parents, teens might act out toward a teacher or authority figure as Elementary Years a way to appear tough in front of peers. Sounding Off While parents may be shocked to hear that their formerly angelic child told You’re waiting at home for your fiftha teacher to “blank off” (you fill in the grader to step off the school bus, eager blank), it’s important to keep a level head. to hear about her big test that day. After Support the school’s she’s arrived home and disciplinary plan and shed her backpack A recent study don’t double punish, and coat, you gently published in the journal doling out additional inquire about how she consequences at did on the test. Her Evolutionary Biology home. Grounding your eyes roll to the ceiling found that when teen for mouthing off and she retorts, “Um, compared to other forms at school is redundant how do you think?” if a punishment was of speech, including before flouncing to her already given at room and slamming baby talk, whining was school. Instead, allow the door. Disrespect uniquely distracting, the situation’s logical often appears during causing listeners to tune consequences to elementary school as tweens begin to in to the whining at the deliver the lesson. For example, when a teen chafe at authority, test expense of other tasks displays a bad attitude boundaries and try out toward a teacher, that new social personas. teacher is less likely to grant the teen an Just because it’s normal doesn’t mean extension on homework. parents should let it go unchecked. At this age, children are trying to grasp for some control in their lives. Back talk is often an indicator of feeling disrespected, unheard and powerless. It may also be a signal that parents should do more listening and less talking themselves. Holding family meetings to help tweens feel heard, building respectful

Parents should also model appropriate behavior. For example, don’t bad-mouth your child’s teachers or shirk the school’s rules, even if they are rules that you don’t happen to like. This parental selfdiscipline demonstrates to teens that there are some rules we all need to follow, like it or not.

Spring 2018 59


KAUA`I

TEEN

By Brooke Kanna

Be Inspired ❋ Be Innovative ❋ Be You

Tips for Applying to College

As a high school senior with great career aspirations, I wanted to take college applications seriously, to ensure that I could get the most out of it. Here are a few words of advice for those of you applying to college soon: Start early! Research schools you think you might want to attend so you can see what the requirements are from a freshman applicant.  Try to apply for early action to hear back from them sooner!

Include a variety of achievements and contributions in your application. You don’t have to exaggerate your accomplishments to impress the admissions office; try to be yourself, utterly and honestly–now that’s impressive!

Better your GPA and your SAT/ ACT scores to increase your chances of getting accepted and qualifying for scholarships!

Remind your counselor and teachers about submitting your required documents ahead of time so they will be able to submit quality work.

Check that the colleges you apply to offer a field of study in your interest.

Stay organized by keeping all of your essays and responses in one place.

Make a list of the schools you would like to attend, starting with more challenging or selective schools and working your way down to a few easier schools to get into.

Don’t let finances keep you from applying to your dream college. There is a large number of scholarships to apply for, as well as financial aid

Apply to schools you never thought you would apply to, because you never know!

Think about the top three attributes you would want to find in your future college or university.

Applying to college and awaiting acceptance can make senior year seem like a rollercoaster, but it’s all part of the ride, so don’t forget to have fun and enjoy those last moments of highschool!

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LOVE NOTES

A Free Relationship Workshop for Youth LOVE NOTES is geared towards older teens and young adults who are at risk of an unplanned pregnancy, troubled relationships, or who are already pregnant or parenting.

LOVE NOTES aims to help young people make wise relationship and sexual choices—choices that will help them, rather than create barriers, for achieving their education, employment, relationship, and family goals. To sign up for the next session please contact Brandi Bartholomew at 808-246-9577

Malama Pono Health Services is delighted to serve the Women of Kauai with our Women’s Wellness Clinic. We offer a variety of women’s services including pap smears, pregnancy testing, birth control, breast exams, mammogram referrals, family planning referrals, and STD/HIV/HEP C testing and treatment. We now accept insurance as well as offer low cost options for uninsured and under insured patients.

Need Help? Turn to Us.

To schedule an appointment please call 808-246-9577 or visit us at 4366 Kukui Grove Street, Suite 205 Lihue HI, 96766. Check us out on the web at www.mphskauai.org

Spring 2018 61


Article Title

5 Great Ways Performing Arts Can Benefit Your Child If your child has a busy academic schedule, enrolling them in performing arts may seem to come down the bottom of the priority list. But there are many reasons why performing arts should play a key role your child’s education, be it in school or as an extra curricular activity. In many studies, researchers are now linking in the arts to better child development and higher student achievement. HIGHER ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

instruction from adults and respect authority.

Studies such suggest schoolchildren exposed to drama, music and dance are more proficient in reading, writing and math. Children also learn to take

CONFIDENCE & SELF-PRESENTATION SKILLS

62 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

One of the most obvious benefits of performing arts is the development of


skills in self-presentation. A child must learn how to present him or herself in front of an audience, be it big or small. They develop the ability to converse with adults in a mature manner. Participation in the arts allows them to grow their self-esteem and self-confidence, developing poise and learning to overcome anxieties. Performing arts are also about social interaction and cooperation. Your child will no doubt make life-long friends with those who share the same passion as they do. 

A MEDIUM FOR SELF EXPRESSION The arts allow for deep self-expression from a child’s heart. It can help them make sense of their emotions and develop new ideas to express themselves. For example, musical children may find their “happy place” when they are playing songs to themselves that reflect their emotions. Or maybe the dancer is better able to express their emotions through physical movement rather than vocally. Performing arts are also great exercise – even opera! A singer must be physically fit and have a good lung capacity to reach and hold notes for a period of time. Some performing arts are based on cultural history, which may allow a child to connect with their ancestry or ethnic background

PROBLEM SOLVING & PERSEVERANCE Performing arts help teach children both self-reliance as well as collaboration with others in order to reach a goal. They learn that there are many different pathways to develop a skill. For example, a child learning a musical instrument may also participate in an orchestra to open them up to another style of music and performance to benefit their solo work. Performing arts develop reasoning and creative thinking, as well as motivation, concentration and teamwork. 

EMPATHY & COMPASSION Performing arts help promote interpersonal skills. Some of the previously mentioned benefits can come through participation in sporting activities, but performing arts also promote and develop certain skills and characteristics such as empathy and compassion for others. The creativity involved in performing arts extends to emotional creativity and can open children to new ways of seeing the world. In group settings, there’s less of a focus on winning or losing, and more about working together as a team towards a shared performance goal, as well as the child’s individual journey of development. For example in musical theater, children may have to learn to work behind the scenes as well as on stage. By having to carry out a variety of tasks and roles, they are able to look at the world from different vantage points.  Whether it’s acting in a play or performing in a dance, encouraging your child in performing arts is a great way to create a well-rounded education.  

Spring 2018 63


Suicide On Our Beautiful Garden Island

By Mary Navarro MA, LMFT

I have been struck over the past few months by the ongoing issue of suicide and how often this choice is being considered or made by the residents of Kaua`i, especially among our teens. Teresa Koki with Life’s Choices Kaua`i would be better off without them, and that recently stated that since 2012, there have most people probably won’t even really been 15 adolescent deaths due to drug miss them! addiction and suicide. And this number We have a solid team of caring and trained does not include attempts or serious professionals on Kaua`i to help when threats. Suicide deaths on Kaua`i include you are trying to help all age groups and have someone who is feeling a devastating impact Hope is the missing on their friends and key factor. Hope that so bad that they are thinking about ending family forever! The things or people in their life. It is important danger or threat that a their lives will change to take any verbal threat person you love might or improve. Hope that of suicide very seriously, consider suicide seems these problems will be even if you doubt the to loom very large these resolved. Hope that person really means days. Despair is being their pain will lessen it. Do not try to handle experienced by many. the situation alone. Get I consider teens to be help!! Teens need to talk to a trusted adult. especially vulnerable as they face a myriad With a caring and understanding approach, of serious challenges and disappointments they will use a standardized assessment every day. And, they have not yet learned procedure to determine if the person is in that they will live through the crisis that danger of hurting themselves. They will take faces them at that moment. the appropriate action to keep them safe. Hope is the missing key factor. Hope that Adults can call the Crisis Mobile things or people in their lives will change or Outreach (CMO) at 1-800-753-6879. improve. Hope that these problems will be After your initial call, a professional resolved. Hope that their pain will lessen. from the Kaua`i CMO team will be A person can feel overwhelmed by the fear that Life will never get better, the world dispatched to your home.

64 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Got GotLocal LocalMilk? Milk? Hawai‘i Hawai‘i Dairy Dairy Farms Farms believes believes in in providing providing opportunities opportunities for for ourour island island keikikeiki to thrive, to thrive, including including access access to fresh, to fresh, locallocal milkmilk that’s that’s sustainably sustainably produced. produced. To learn To learn moremore about about our proposed our proposed pasture-based pasture-based dairydairy farm,farm, sign sign up today up today at: at: www.HawaiiDairyFarms.com. www.HawaiiDairyFarms.com.

Spring 2018 65


The #1 Life-Changing New Year’s Resolution

By Harriet Lerner

Here’s the number-one most important New Year’s resolution in a word — well, two words.

If you think about it, kindness is everything. Love, of course, is everything too. But unlike love, which is something that strikes or that we grow or fall into, kindness is something that we choose. Unlike love, kindness can be practiced. We can practice kindness even when we are feeling decidedly unloving. Acts of kindness are hardest to practice with those difficult people in our lives who evoke our anger, frustration, disappointment, and the whole range of painful emotions that make us human. Yet it’s here that kindness is most essential, because these folks are likely to be our parents, in-laws, relatives, partners, children, and close friends. It is in our most important and enduring relationships that we are least likely to be our best selves. Kindness is what the world needs more of. It is not optional, not an “extra.” It is rather a human necessity. Plus, it’s good for us. Meditation practices focusing on loving kindness have been shown to have a wealth of positive effects, from health benefits, like better control of blood glucose and less inflammation, to an increase in social connectedness. Kindness changes the structure of your brain.  Two centuries ago, the novelist Henry James said these words: “Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the

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third is to be kind.” Today, more than any other period in my lifetime, there is less kindness in public life, which trickles down and invites people to be less kind in our personal lives. Never in my lifetime has the subject of kindness carried such weight. “Be kind” is the most important New Year’s resolution that any of us can make. In almost every interaction that we have, we either diminish or enhance another person. The practice of kindness includes being kind and compassionate to yourself, as well. Kindness is not some kind of sentimental pap requiring us to please and placate others, to hold relationships in place as if our lives depended on it, or to accommodate to unfair circumstances. Life requires us to take difficult actions, to speak difficult words, and to confront injustice and unfairness where we see it.  But this is what I know to be true. Everything that can be said can be said with kindness. Every tough position we have to take can be taken with kindness. No exceptions.


Article Title

Ke Ala Pono-Kauai

Call For Help Now 246-0663 Private Comprehensive Addiction Treatment The McKenna Recovery Center provides you a broad scope of private and confidential addiction evaluation and treatment expertise and resources in one place to address the complex needs of your loved one. Despite the limited access to psychiatrists on Kauai, you will benefit from a full time physician and nurse practitioner with indepth experience with addiction and psychiatry.

We are your One Stop Shop for addiction evaluation and treatment:  We serve you and your loved one with a medical and spiritual approach to problems with alcohol, prescription medications, and other drugs  You have the expertise of a full time medical director who trained in Harvard, board certified in psychiatry and addiction medicine, with 35+ years experience  Your senior citizen with medication or alcohol problems could see a nurse practitioner with psychiatric, addiction, and geriatric experience  Your adolescent will be counseled by a former high school counselor dually trained in addiction counseling  Adult and Adolescent Programs  Medication Assisted Detoxification and Medication Assisted Treatment are possible and considered, as appropriate  You, the family are included in the process from the start and receive education and support for everyone to heal

4374 Kukui Grove St., Ste. 104 Lihue, HI 96766 www.mckennarecoverycenter.com

FOUNDED 1977


Kaua'i Ocean Safety and our Newly Operational Roving Patrol Units Although this issue is considered the Spring issue, it will actually be coming out when winter surf conditions still prevail. Studies of ocean conditions show that winter swells from the North can be pretty much counted on to end on Memorial Day, May 31st, and resume on Labor Day in early September. Some rogue swells are possible during the summer months but they are rare. And during the long 9 month season, the Northern swells certainly won’t be pounding in every day, but that is the season for them. I use the word “North” because “North” and “Winter” conditions go hand in hand when discussing swells that come to Hawaii. Many or most of these swells are spawned by storms way up in Alaska and the Aleutians, and therefore they bear down on us from the North and they tend to affect the North and West sides of our islands. It can be a gorgeous day here but, if there was a big storm up in Alaska 5 days ago, our north and west shores can get pounded. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day (i.e. summer months) is when swells are more likely to hit Kauai from the South, from storms generated south of the equator. Another huge factor in assessing Kauai’s beach conditions are our trade winds.

68 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

These are locally generated and have to do with the earth’s rotation and the winds that can be generated by this rotation in conjunction with atmospheric conditions. We have trade winds about 70% of the year, and these can prevail


By Monty Downs, M.D. President Kaua`i Lifeguard Association

at any time of the year. Sometimes they’re what I call “honkin’”, that is 25 mph or greater. And sometimes they can be gentle, 10-15 mph. These gentle trades are what make Hawaii so outstanding, with breezes that are pleasant and cool as compared to some tropical islands where it’s stifling hot. Trade winds tend to impact the Eastern shores, although they can come in from different angles which can cause warparound chop conditions on Northern and Southern beaches as well. The honkin’ winds can stir up very rough beach conditions, and even the gentle ones can create 3-5 foot waves that (a) are fun for boogie boarding and body surfing and (b) can set up subtle rip currents that can cause trouble to unsuspecting oceangoers. The other 30% (or so) of the time we have what are called variable winds or southerly winds. These also can be honkin’ or can be gentle, and they tend to affect our

south and western shorelines, and our north and east beaches can be very calm during these conditions. I wrote all this in order to set up the real topic of this article, namely our newlyoperational roving patrol units. We always have our 10 stationary Lifeguard towers, and now we have three roving units, one for the Southwest District, one for the East District, and one for the North District. The Lifeguards manning

Although the roving concept has been in existence since the early 1990’s, when our Lifeguards first began using Jetskis to rescue people at remote beaches, the formal introduction of roving units only started in the last 18 months. these units are sometimes in their truck towing a jetski, and sometimes they are on a Jetski, patrolling — as an example — the Poipu areas between shipwrecks and the harbor area. Although the roving concept has been in existence since the early 1990’s, when our Lifeguards first began using Jetskis to rescue people at remote beaches, the formal introduction of roving units only started in the last 18 months. I would say that there are still wrinkles to be ironed

Spring 2018 69


out. It’s not always clear, for example, as to whether to be driving in the truck or patrolling on the ski. But…This program has proved to be a Lifesaver! There have already been any number of times when the roving unit was perfectly positioned to make a fast and critical response to an incident at a remote beach. The minutes that were saved resulted in lives that were saved, plain and simple. Our Ocean Safety Supervisors and Administrators are very knowledgeable about the weather patterns I alluded to in the first paragraphs of this article. Not only of the patterns but of the exact conditions each and every day. Based on this knowledge they make decisions regarding where to deploy the roving units. We had a great incident in late December where the Eastside was

70 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

flat and the Northshores were being pounded by huge winter surf. The Supervisors therefore made the decision to pull the the East District unit and add it to the North District. Sure enough, a critical — in fact very critical — event unfolded at Anini as 2 unsuspecting swimmers got pulled out from the seemingly gentle lagoon and into the monster waves breaking on the outside reef. Lo and behold one of the roving units was right nearby, got to the scene in a matter of moments, 2 people were saved from otherwise certain death. How about that! There are many other facets to our ocean safety efforts, both professional and lay. This article is to celebrate our professional roving patrol units and our men and women who supervise them and who staff them. Mahalo. Photo credit Terry Lilley


Article Title ample, It’s not always clear, for ex as to whether to be driving in the truck or patrolling on the ski. But‌This program has proved to be a Lifesaver!

LIFEGUARDED BEACHES Haena Beach. . . . . . . . . . . Northshore, Haena

Kealia Beach. . . . . . . . . . . . Eastside, Kapa`a

Hanalei Pavillion. . . . . . . . . Northshore, Hanalei

Lydgate Beach. . . . . . . . . . Eastside, Wailua

Hanalei Bay Pine Trees . . . Northshore, Hanalei

Poipu Beach. . . . . . . . . . . . Southshore, Poipu

Kee Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . Northshore, Haena

Salt Pond Beach. . . . . . . . . Westside, Hanapepe

Anahola Beach. . . . . . . . . . Eastside, Anahola

Kekaha Beach. . . . . . . . . . . Westside, Kekaha

Spring 2018 71


Q

Q

Q

Photo By Naea Oda

Article Title

Loganashima K

Logan Kashima Lihue, HI, Age 13 Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School- 8th grade Logan was the first and only player from Kauai to get scouted and advance to participating in the US Club Soccer National Identification and Development (id2) Program held at Grande Sports World at Casa Grande Arizona in December 2017. From there she was joined by other talented players from all around the United States. Logan recently returned home, and we caught up with her to ask her a few questions!

Q

What did you learn from the id2 A A Q Arizona Training Camp?

A

We as players absorbed lessons A Q in teamwork, leadership, and perseverance.

Q

What your favorite A was A Q part about the soccer experience at the Casa Grande Sports World event in Arizona? Q

Q

A

I enjoyed a lot of talented A meeting Q players from the United States, including Hawai’i.

Q

Do you see soccer in the future A A Q for you?

A

I would hope so. I started playing A Q soccer when I was around 5 years old. Developing a life long love for this sport and the thrill of competition hopefully will get me further and will help me accomplish more later in life.

72 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Q

What is soccer to you?

A

Soccer is not about how many goals A Q were scored or if your team won the game. It is about having fun and enjoying the sport.

Q

What words describe you as A A Q soccer player?

A

I would describe myself a fast, A Q energetic, reliable, aggressive and a calm team player with coordination.

A

A

Q

Mom, Nita Kashima- “My husband and I are very proud of Logan’s accomplishments. She loves participation in different kinds of sports. In all, she excels as an athlete. I would like to especially thank Cougars coach, Jeff Mendez: who has been coaching for 25 years and has been coaching Logan since 6 yrs old and until now."


sports KAUA`I

INSIDE:

KIF Spring Sports Schedules Softball Baseball Tennis Golf Boys Volleyball Track Photo By Naea Oda


Proud to Sponsor the 2017-2018 Spring KIF Sports Schedules BASEBALL - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue. Thur-Sat

2/20/2018 Pre-Season Meeting Kauai HS Library 6:00 p.m. Waimea HS Invitational Waimea HS/Hanapepe TBA

JV Schedule Sat.

2/3/2018

Mon. Mon. Mon. Sat.

Varsity Schedule Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Wed. Sat. Tue. Wed. Tue.

Waimea VS Kauai Kauai VS Kapaa Kapaa VS Waimea 2/5/2018 Kauai VS Waimea 2/12/2018 Waimea VS Kapaa 2/19/2018 Kapaa VS Kauai 3/3/2018 Kauai VS Kapaa Waimea VS Kauai Kapaa VS Waimea

Waimea Canyon Park Waimea Canyon Park Waimea Canyon Park Vidinha Stadium Kapaa HS Vidinha Stadium Kapaa HS Kapaa HS Kapaa HS

10:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m.

3/10/2018 3/14/2018 3/17/2018 3/21/2018 3/24/2018 3/28/2018 3/31/2018 4/4/2018 4/7/2018 4/11/2018 4/14/2018 4/18/2018 4/21/2018 4/25/2018 4/28/2018 5/1/2018 5/2/2018 5/15/2018

Hanapepe Stadium Kapaa HS Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Hanapepe Stadium Kapaa HS TBA TBA Vidinha Stadium Hanapepe Stadium Kapaa HS Hanapepe Stadium Kapaa HS Vidinha Stadium

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m. 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m. 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m.

Kauai HS Library

5:00 p.m.

Waimea VS Kauai Kapaa VS Waimea Kauai VS Kapaa Kauai VS Waimea Waimea VS Kapaa Kapaa VS Kauai Playoff Playoff Kauai VS Waimea Waimea Vs Kapaa Kapaa Vs Kauai Waimea Vs Kauai Kapaa VS Waimea Kauai VS Kapaa Playoff Playoff Playoff Post-Season Meeting

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m. 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m. 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break 3:30 p.m.

State Tournament Wed. - Fri. 5/9-11/18 Host: ILH – Hans L’Orange Field & Les Murakami Stadium

74 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


SOFTBALL - 2017-2018 Day

Tue.

Date

Matchup

Site

2/20/2018 Pre-Season Meeting Kauai HS Library

Thur-Sat

Waimea Invitational

Time 6:00 p.m.

Waimea Canyon Park TBA

JV Schedule Sat.

2/10/2018 Waimea VS Kauai

Kapaa HS

10:00 a.m.

Kauai VS Kapaa

Kapaa HS

12:00 p.m.

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS

2:00 p.m.

Mon.

2/12/2018 Kauai VS Waimea

Isenberg Park

5:30 p.m.

Mon.

2/19/2018 Waimea VS Kapaa

Kapaa HS

4:00 p.m.

Mon.

2/26/2018 Kapaa VS Kauai

Isenberg Park

5:30 p.m.

Sat.

3/3/2018

Kauai VS Kapaa

Waimea Canyon Park 10:00 a.m.

Waimea VS Kauai

Waimea Canyon Park 12:00 p.m.

Kapaa VS Waimea

Waimea Canyon Park 2:00 p.m.

Waimea VS Kauai

Waimea Canyon Park 5:30 p.m.

Varsity Schedule Wed

3/7/2018

Sat.

3/10/2018 Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

Wed.

3/14/2018 Kauai VS Kapaa

Isenberg Park

5:30 p.m.

Sat.

3/17/2018 Kauai VS Waimea

Isenberg Park

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

Wed.

3/21/2018 Waimea VS Kapaa

Waimea Canyon Park 5:30 p.m.

Sat.

3/24/2018 Kapaa VS Kauai

Kapaa HS

Wed.

3/28/2018 Playoff

TBA

Sat.

3/31/2018 Playoff

TBA

Wed.

4/4/2018

Kauai VS Waimea

Isenberg Park

Sat.

4/7/2018

Waimea Vs Kapaa

Waimea Canyon Park 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

Wed.

4/11/2018 Kapaa Vs Kauai

Kapaa HS

Sat.

4/14/2018 Waimea Vs Kauai

Waimea Canyon Park 1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

Wed.

4/18/2018 Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS

3:30 p.m.

Sat.

4/21/2018 Kauai VS Kapaa

Isenberg Park

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

Mon

4/23/2018 Playoff

Tue

4/24/2018 Playoff

Wed

4/25/2018 Playoff

Tue.

5/15/2018 Post Season Meeting Kauai HS Library

1st game 10:00, 2nd game after 30 minute break

5:30 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

State Tournament Tue. - Fri.

5/2-5/18

Host: OIA – McKinley HS – Rainbow Wahine Stadium

Spring 2018 75


SPRING KIF SPORTS SCHEDULES BOYS VOLLEYBALL - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue.

2/20/18

Pre-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

6:00 p.m.

Tue.

3/13/18

Kauai VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kapaa

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Fri.

3/16/18

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Island

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Waimea

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Island

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kauai

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Kauai

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Island

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Tue.

3/20/18

Fri.

3/23/18

Tue.

3/27/18

Fri.

3/30/18

Sat.

3/31/18

Playoff

Mon.

4/2/18

Playoff

Tue.

4/3/18

Kauai VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa Vs Island

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea Vs Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kauai

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa Vs Kauai

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea VS Island

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Waimea Vs Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island VS Kapaa

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Island

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Island Vs Waimea

Island School Gym

JV 5:00, Varsity no earlier than 6:30

Kauai HS Library

5:00 p.m.

Fri.

Tue.

Fri.

4/6/18

4/10/18

4/13/18

Tue.

4/17/18

Fri.

4/20/18

Mon.

4/23/18

Playoff

Tue.

4/24/18

Playoff

Wed.

4/25/18

Playoff

Tue.

5/15/18

Post-Season Meeting

State Tournament Thur. - Sat.

May 3-5, 2018 Host: OIA

76 www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Week 44


TENNIS - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Tue. Sat.

2/20/18 3/3/18

Sat.

3/10/18

Sat.

3/17/18

Sat.

3/31/18

Sat.

4/7/18

Sat.

4/14/18

Matchup

Mon. 4/16/18 Thur. - Fri. 4/19-20/18 Tue. 5/15/18 State Tournament Thur. - Sat. May 3-5, 2018

Site Kauai HS Library Hanapepe Courts KCC KCC Kauai Lagoons Kauai Lagoons KCC Kauai Lagoons KCC Hanapepe Courts KCC KCC Hanapepe Courts Kauai HS KCC & Kauai Lagoons Kauai HS Library

Host: OIA - CORP

Week 44

TRACK - 2017-2018 Day

Date

Matchup

Tue. 2/20/18 Thur. 3/1/18 Thur. 3/8/18 Thur. 3/15/18 Thur. 3/29/18 Thur. 4/5/18 Thur 4/12/18 Thurs. 4/19/18 Fri. 4/27/18 Tue. 5/15/18 State Track Championships Fri. 5/11/18 Sat. 5/12/18

Day

Date

Site

Pre Season Meeting Qualifying Meet #1 Qualifying Meet #2 Qualifying Meet #3 Qualifying Rotary Meet Qualifying Meet #4 Qualifying Meet #5 KIF Championship (Trials) KIF Championship (Finals) Post Season Meeting

6:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Time

Kauai HS Library Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Vidinha Stadium Kauai HS Library

6:00 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 5:00 PM

HHSAA State Track (Trials) 2:00/3:15 HHSAA State Track (Finals) 3:00/5:40 Host: ILH – Kamehameha - Kapalama – Kamehameha - Kapalama

GOLF - 2017-2018 Tue. 2/20/18 Sat. 3/10/18 Sat. 3/17/18 Sat. 3/24/18 Sat. 3/31/18 Sat. 4/7/18 Sat. 4/14/18 Sat. 4/21/18 Fri. 4/27/18 Sat. 4/28/18 Tue. 5/15/18 State Tournamant Tue-Wed 5/8-9/18 Thur-Fri 5/10-11/18

Time

Pre-Season Meeting Waimea VS Kauai Island VS Kapaa Kapaa VS Waimea Kauai VS Island Kauai VS Kapaa Island VS Waimea Kauai VS Waimea Kapaa VS Island Waimea VS Kapaa Island VS Kauai Kapaa VS Kauai Waimea VS Island Seeding Meeting State Qualifying Tounament Post-Season Meeting

Matchup

Site

Pre-Season Meeting Match #1 Match #2 Make up, if needed Match #3 Match #4 Match #5 Match #6 Qualifying 1 Qualifying 2 Post-Season Meeting

Kauai HS Library

Girls Boys

Host: ILH Turtle Bay Host: ILH Turtle Bay

Wailua Wailua Kauai HS Library

Time 6:00 p.m. 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00 5:00 p.m.

Spring 2018 77


py Mothers' Day p a " "H Hau'oli La Makuahine!

Mother's Day is Sunday, May 13th

Why not do something nice for Mom with these special coupons!


State of Hawaii- Department of Education

2017-2018 Official School Calendar

2018

MARCH

2018

FEBRUARY

2018

JANUARY

www.kauaischools.org

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

1

2

4

8

9 10

5

6

7

3

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

1

2

4

8

9 10

5

6

7

3

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

2018

APRIL

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

2018

January 8, 2018 to May 31, 2018

New Year’s Day (observed) January 1, 2018

Martin Luther King Day January 15, 2018

Presidents’ Day February 19, 2018

Spring Break

March 19-23, 2018

Prince Kuhio Day

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March 26, 2018

29 30

1

2

3

Good Friday

6

8

9

10 11 12

7

4

5

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 MAY

Student’s Work Year 2nd Semester

March 30, 2018

Memorial Day

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

May 28, 2018

27 28 29 30 31

1

2

3

8

9

Last Day for Students

4

5

6

7

May 31, 2018


healthier is our family taking care of yours There’s no need to leave Kaua‘i to receive quality maternity care. From childbirth education to lactation consultation, labor management and newborn care, the experts at Wilcox Health are here for you. We even offer a free maternity app called Ha¯pai. Download yours to get the tools and resources every growing family needs. Call 245-1441 to schedule a tour and learn more, or visit WilcoxHealth.org/Maternity.

A FREE maternity app

#LiveHealthyKauai

Kauai Family Magazine Spring 2018  

Kauai's Go- To Resource for Engaging Families

Kauai Family Magazine Spring 2018  

Kauai's Go- To Resource for Engaging Families

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