Kauai Family Magazine Fall 2022

Page 1

The Go-To Resource for Kaua`i Families

Fall 2022

KauaiFamilyMagazine.com

HARVEST FESTIVAL TRICKS & TREATS FUN FAMILY HAPPENINGS

Cover Winner: John Alfiler


Calling all Student Artists! It’s time for the 2023 Calendar of Student Art!! KIUC will be accepting artwork submissions for the 2023 calendar electronically. No physical submissions will be accepted, but most of our traditional rules apply. Visit https://www.kiuc.coop/calendar-contest for more information.

The deadline is Wednesday, October 12, 2022.

KIUC is an equal opportunity employer and provider.


New Beginnings It is never too early to start planning for your future and getting ready for the next chapter in your life. You can start now by opening an account today at Gather FCU. Scholarship applications for 2023 graduating seniors will be available January 1, 2023. Follow us on Instagram @gatherfcu for scholarship updates.

Big shout out to Gather’s 2022 Your Choice Scholarship Recipients, pictured above.

Federally insured by NCUA Federally Insured by NCUA

www.gatherfcu.org

|

808.245.6791


Aloha! I hope all of our Kaua‘i families enjoyed a fun and rejuvenating summer during these unprecedented times! As we prepare for the Back-to-School season, I encourage everyone to be involved in our keiki’s live. Our bright and wonderful children are watching, listening, learning, and growing and will rely on our friends and family for support. It is our responsibility and duty to set good examples and encourage them to further their goals, stay safe, and be healthy. Mahalo nui loa to the publisher and contributors of “Kaua‘i Family Magazine” for continuing to support our families by sharing important information, articles, and available resources. I wish you all the best in the upcoming school year! Study hard, be safe, and have fun! With warmest aloha,

Derek S. K. Kawakami Mayor, County of Kaua‘i State of Hawai‘i

4

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com



Welcome to Kaua`i Family Magazine! The Go-To Resource for Kaua'i Families

Back-To-School Routine, Fall and Other Fun Activities Hooray- the kids are back in school! You the parents, are also settling into a routine, hopefully getting involved in your child’s school. When you know what the kids are doing and learning, it demonstrates interest in them. It’s the parent’s responsibility to step forward If you feel your child has fallen behind. Talk to your child’s teacher and ask for help, if needed. This issue tries to help with a guide to enrichment, health, educational tips, and a trove of good ideas for family fun from Keiki to Kupuna. September 11 is Grandparents Day. It’s great fun when we are involved in our grandkids’ lives- they are so busy with their own activities. With Fire Prevention week coming up, we encourage you to Plan and Practice your Escape on page 59. October is a fun month—it’s all about fall festivals and Halloween. Check out our Fall Family Happenings on page 18 for some great fall events and Halloween activities. If you want to venture out of your neighborhood for trick-or treating, find great places throughout Kauai on page 54. But, I hope you’ll rummage through this issue with a very selective eye, I worry that, as a parenting generation, we spend too much time trying to improve our children and not enough just enjoying them. There, I said it. Mahalo, Kauai for allowing Kaua’i Family to be a part of your ‘Ohana. Happy Fall!

Chrissy

Chrissy Schechter, Publisher chrissys@kauaifamilymagazine.com

CONTACT KAUAI FAMILY MAGAZINE (808) 639-5656 PUBLISHER Kauai Family Magazine ADVERTISING SALES Chrissy Schechter EDITOR editor@kauaifamilymagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES advertising@kauaifamilymagazine.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Meg Knight

FALL 2022 COVER PHOTO T. Fuerte Photography

Contributors Kandi Bloss, Rn, BSN Patrick Ching Todd Fuerte Carol Fujiyoshi, M.D Michael Lutwin, D.D.S. Sarah Lyons Kaulana Mossman Mark Oyama Joel Punzal,OD Heidi Purcell, M.D. Leah Ragsac Lindsey Richardson, MS, LMHC Bernard Riola, M.D. Scott Sims, DVM Next Issue: Holiday 2022 Advertising Deadline: September 15, 2022 Kauai Family Magazine is published quarterly as Spring, Summer, Fall and Holiday editions. Distribution: 15,000 printed quarterly and Digital E-Editions. Public and Private Preschools, Elementary and Middle Schools, Hospitals, Medical and Health Clinics, Libraries, Jamba Juice, Gather Federal Credit Union, Retailers and Community Organizations. Subscription Rate: $16.00 for one year (4 editions) Subscribe at KauaiFamilyMagazine.com Copyright © 2022 Kauai Family Magazine All rights reserved. No portion of Kauai Family Magazine may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Kauai Family Magazine assumes no financial responsibility for errors in advertisements.


contents

FALL 2022

Start Saving for your Child's Future

Cover Winner: John Alfiler Photo by T. Fuerte Photography

WHAT’S INSIDE

12

FALL FEATURES 12 COLLEGE SAVINGS PLAN

22

KAUA`I KUPUNA Ohana Nui and the Ties that Bind

18

FALL HAPPENINGS Fun Family Events

55

KAUA`I KEIKI 2023 Cover Kids Search

26

CAREER CHANGE Q&A with Monty Downs, M.D.

73

KAUA`I PETS Heading to the Dog Park

38

NAVIGATING THE WATERS OF CHILDHOOD Strategies for Handling Bullying

62

KAUA`I SPORTS KIF Fall Schedule & Allstars

76

KAUA`I OHANA Resource Programs From Keiki to Kupuna

Gather FCU Crash Course

54

HALLOWEEN EVENTS Tricks & Treats

26

22

38

Fall 2022

7


State of Hawaii- Department of Education

2022-2023 Official School Calendar

2022

AUGUST

www.kauaischools.org

S

M 1

T 2

W TH 3 4

7

8

9

01

1

21

31

S 6

41

51

61

71

81

91

02

12

2

32

42

52

62

72

82

92

03

13

4

SEPTEMBER 20

F 5

5

6

2 8

9

7

1

August 1, 2022 to December 16, 2022

Students’ First Day 3

August 1

01

1

21

31

41

51

61

71

81

91

02

12

2

32

42

52

62

72

82

92

03

Statehood Day August 19

Labor Day

September 5 1

2

3

5

6

8

Fall Break

7

01

1

21

31

41

51

71

81

91

02

12

2

52

62

72

82

92

October 3-7

Election Day November 8

OCTBER

20

9

4

61 23

30

24

6

31

2 8

9

7

1

3

Veterans Day 5

November 11

4

01

1

21

41

51

61

71

81

91

02

12

2

32

42

52

62

72

82

92

03

Thanksgiving November 24

School Holiday

NOVEMBER

20

31

DECEMBER 20

4

5

6

7

1

2 8

9

1

21

31

41

51

61

71

81

91

02

12

2

32

42

52

62

72

82

92

03

13

January 1, 2023

November 25 3

01

Students’ Work Year 1st Semester

Winter Break

December 20- 31

Christmas

December 25

New Years Day January 1, 2023


MESSAGE FROM PAUL ZINA Kauai Complex Area Superintendent Aloha Kaua’i DOE Ohana! As we open another school year to support students and families on Kaua’i in our public schools, let us remember these three lessons learned from the challenges of the past two years. One, everyone has worked hard to keep our community healthy and safe, and now more than ever we need to support each other’s wellbeing. This is the only way we will continue to stay strong—no matter the stage of the pandemic we are in. Two, school is best in person. We also recognize that some students may need extra support in how they attend school to ensure they are safe and learning as much as possible. And three, schools will respond to the sometimes quickly shifting conditions of the pandemic on a school by school and even class by class basis due to the unique needs of that school’s students, faculty, and staff. I am very excited for the start of this school year! As always, you can find the most current Kaua’i Complex Area updates at our Kaua’i Public Schools launch website at bit.ly/kauaipublicschools. And you can find the most current state HIDOE updates at http://hawaiipublicschools.org. Stay safe, healthy and strong as we continue to support our children and families as one team! Mahalo!

Paul Zina Kaua’i Complex Area Superintendent


Visit Our Advertisers

Kauai Family Magazine is able to provide quality local content because of the continued support of our advertisers.

Support local businesses, and tell them you saw them in Kauai Family Magazine! Big Brothers Big Sisters Kauai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Kauai Christian Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Boys & Girls Clubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Kauai Complex Area DOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 9

Catholic Charities Hawaii. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Kauai Department of Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,77,78,79

County of Kauai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,17

Kauai Island Utility Cooperative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

County of Kauai Office of the Mayor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 County of Kauai Agency of Elderly Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 County of Kauai Department of Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 County of Kauai Fire Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 County of Kauai Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 County of Kauai Department of Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Kauai Made . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Kauai Medical Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Kauai Opio and Keiki Orchestra. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Kauai Resilience Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Leah Ragsac, Realtor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Ma’I Movement Hawaii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61

Fun With Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Garden Isle Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Gather Federal Credit Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 11,12 Grove Farm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70,71 Hale Kupuna Heritage Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Hawaii Health Systems Corporation- Kauai Region 40, 41, 42, 45 Hawaii State Dept of Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Malama Pono Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Mark’s Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Ohana Pacific Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 21 Punzal Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Regency at Puakea Assisted Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Stay at Home Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Healing Horses Kauai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

T. Fuerte Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 7

Jason Blake Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

The Countdown Kauai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 66, 67, 68, 69

Kalaheo Dental Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Wailua Bay Creator’s Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Kauai Adult Day Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 22, 23, 25

Wilcox Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

10

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


By Chef Mark Oyama

Pumpkin Filling Recipe:

4 eggs, slightly beaten 1 (29 oz.) can Libby’s solid pack pumpkin 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 tsp. salt 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. ground ginger 1/2 tsp. ground cloves 2 (12 oz. ea) cans evaporated milk 4 (9-inch) unbaked pie shells or 1 (9 X 13) baking pan Additional ingredients: 1 box commercial cake mix - vanilla/ butter flavored 1 cup chopped nuts 2 sticks melted butter

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 375°F. Prepare pumpkin pie filling and pour into raw pie shells (3/4 full) or into a foil lined baking pan. Sprinkle tops of filling with a layer of dry cake mix, then chopped nuts. Drizzle melted butter over the top. Bake 4 pies or pan of pumpkin crunch uncovered for 45 minutes to one hour or until pies test done when a paring knife inserted comes out clean. Let cool, then refrigerate. Serve chilled whole pies with whipped cream. Flip out the chilled baking pan of pumpkin crunch onto a platter, peel off foil then top with whipped cream. Cut into pieces and enjoy!

Fall 2022

11


The Value of Humility

college It doesn’t matter if you’re a new parent or if you have a child (or children) in high school, there’s one thing that’s universally true: now is the best time to start saving for college. No matter when you start saving, you’ll be setting the stage for your child to attend college and start a lifetime of smart money habits. It’s no secret that the cost of college is on the rise. Since the turn of the millennium, the average cost of a four-year college education has more than doubled. And the trend is continuing. The average cost of a college education has an annual growth rate of 6.8%. Nationwide, most students spend over $25,000 per year on tuition, fees, room and board, supplies, and other expenses. For parents and students alike, those can be some pretty scary numbers. Most people use a combination of savings, loans and scholarships to cover the cost of college. Still, savings and parental support account for the greatest financial contribution to most student’s education. Moreover, children with college savings accounts are six times more likely to attend college than those who don’t.

Photo by T. Fuerte Photography

12

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

So, where to start saving? There are no rules as to how you save for your child’s education. From traditional savings plans to stock and mutual funds, you have lots of options. But the real place to start is by making a plan.


savings

“You’ll never regret saving for your child’s future.”

crash course

1

Make A Plan

A bank or financial advisor is a great resource for setting up a college savings plan. You can do your own research too (educationdata.org is a good resource). Map out your goals, priorities, and resources. Look at your full financial picture and decide what makes the most sense for you and your family. Maybe you need to start small and increase your contribution over time. Or maybe slow and steady is more your speed. Whatever is right for you, make a plan and stick with it. A few popular ways to save for college include: • Hawaii’s HI529 Plan: This statesponsored plan allows tax-deferred growth and withdrawals for qualified education expenses are tax-free. • Coverdell ESA: These custodial savings accounts allow tax-free interest earnings and tax-free withdrawals on qualified expenses. • Stocks & Mutual Funds: Investing in the stock market is a riskier approach, but the upside can be better than a savings account. However, you lose out on the tax benefits of collegespecific savings plans. • Roth IRA: Not just for retirement, you can set up a Roth IRA to save for college, however, withdrawals can be counted as income if you don’t qualify.

There are plenty of other options too. Do your research and find the approach that works best for you.

2

Make It Automatic

Take one more thing off your mind and set up automatic contributions to your savings plan. It’ll ease the stress of remembering to contribute and it will help set a good precedent for your savings future.

3

Check In

As time passes, check in on your college savings account. What’s working and what isn’t? Maybe you need to adjust your contribution. Or maybe you need to look at shifting your approach to saving. While it can be tempting to set-it-and-forget-it, getting the most out of your college savings plan takes a little oversight. Plus, checking in is a great way to keep your children involved in their own future. Monitoring college savings can help teach smart money habits and keep your child engaged in their education. Above all, the most important thing is to start now. You’ll never regret saving for your child’s future.

Fall 2022

13


Find the perfect everything! Local Products made with

Aloha

KAUA'I MADE 2022 EVENTS Aug. 26 - Sheraton Coconut Beach 4pm - 7:30pm Sept. 30 - Sheraton Coconut Beach 4pm - 7:30pm Oct. 1 - Grove Farm Market 9:30am - 1:30pm Oct. 28 - Sheraton Coconut Beach 4pm - 7:30pm Nov. 26 - Kukui Grove Center 10am - 3pm Dec. 3 - Grove Farm Market 9:30am - 1:30pm Dec. 10 - Kaua'i Made Holly Jolly Holiday Fair Sheraton Coconut Beach 10am - 2pm

New! Check it out !

SHOP LOCAL AT ALAKOKO • www.alakoko.com


KAUAI

Farmers Markets (from north to west): Waipa Farmers Market (Hanalei) Tuesdays 3:00pm-5:00pm Hale Halawai Farmers Market (Hanalei) Saturdays 9:30am-12noon Anaina Hou Farmers Market (Kilauea) Saturdays 9am-12noon Kealia Farm Market (Kealia) Mon. & Fri. 3pm-6pm Coconut Marketplace (Kapaa) Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9am-1pm County Sunshine Market (Kapaa) Wednesdays 3pm-4:30pm Grove Farm’s Puhi Park Produce (Lihue) Saturday at 9:30am Pau Hana Market Kukui Grove Center (Lihue) Mon. 3pm-5:30pm Shops at Kukuiula (Poipu) Wednesdays 3:30pm-5:30pm County Sunshine Market (Hanapepe) Thursdays 3pm-4pm Hale Puna Farmer’s Market (Waimea) Thursdays 3:30pm-5:30pm Fall 2022

15


PUMPKIN PUMP HALLOWEEN IS A HAPPY TIME ON THE WESTSIDE OF KAUAʻI!

9th Annual 2022 Harvest Festival returns to its’ celebration of FREE PUMPKINS FREE ADMISSION FREE ENTERTAINMENT RIDES, FOOD BOOTHS, and the EDUCATIONAL TENT Plus so many surprises for our children who enjoy this special holiday of “dressing up” and “carving pumpkins”. The Harvest Festival celebration has a new home at KEKAHA Neighborhood Center Park. Doors open at 10am and will close at 4pm on Saturday, October 15th, 2022. This event will be in its 9th year of celebrating a fun filled family gathering. Although the last two years we adjusted the venue to adapt to the restrictions of the COVID pandemic, we kept our promise to grow and distribute pumpkins to our community island wide. As an organization, people might ask “why did we start this celebration?” The answer is simple. Our group of farms wanted to establish an event that symbolized a “colorful and joyful feeling” for both children and adults to experience as they enjoy the festivities we create. When we see the smiles of everyone that holds one of our pumpkins grown in the fields of Kekaha, our hearts are incredibly fulfilled. Halloween is a magical time on Kauaʻi, and although for us it begins on an October Saturday in Kekaha, as always we will touch every segment of our island home over the remaining 15 days to October 31st. Each year, as the Trick or Treating comes to a close, we are hopeful the festivities our community experiences will last a lifetime as a treasured memory. Always with a joyful spirit, our partners, and our farms, wish our families a ATION POR OR

YSTEMS H S C LT

KA

UA

’ O I R EGI

N

A HAW I I HEA

Happy Halloween 2022!


NS! PKINS!

SATURDAY OCTOBER 15 10AM - 4PM

PUMPKINS!


AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

Hawaii Heart Walk Saturday, August 6, 6:30am-9:30am Puakea Golf Course gabrielle.buist@heart.org

Kaua’i Marathon Keiki Run Saturday, September 3, 7:30am Grand Hyatt Kauai KauaiMarathon.com

Heiva I Kaua’i 2022 Saturday, August 6th and Sunday, August 7, 9:00am- 5:00pm Kapa’a Beach Park Tahitian dance and drumming competition, Food and Craft vendors

Kaua‘i Marathon & Half Marathon Sunday, September 4, 6am-2pm Grand Hyatt Kauai KauaiMarathon.com

Relay for Life Northshore Saturday, August 6, 3:00pm-11:00pm Waioli Park, Hanalei sarah.luchenbill@cancer.org

Waipa Mango and Music Festival Sunday, August 7, 11:00am-5:00pm Hanalei, Halulu Fishpond at Waipa Na Pali Challenge Saturday, August 13, 8:00am-5:00pm Hanalei Pier, 651-7298 napalichallenge@gmail.com Kauai Sand Festival Saturday, August 13, 11:00am-4pm Left of the Hanalei Pier Kauai Keiki Bike & Safety Day Saturday, August 13, 8am-11am Wilcox Medical Center back parking lot. Hundreds of certified helmets will be given away to keiki. 245-1198, www.wilcox.org Kauai Charity Walk Saturday, August 20, 8am-5pm Vidinha Soccer Field

18

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Garden Isle Drag Races Saturday, September 3, & Sunday, September 4 at 7pm www.dragracekauai.com

Battle of the Food Trucks Sunday, September 11, 2pm-6pm Kress Street, Lihue. Purchase tickets: www.downtownlihue.com Hawaii Line Dance Festival & Craft Fair September 16 & 17, 9am-3pm Kauai Veterans Center Info@hldcraftfair@gmail.com Ultimate Hawaii Trail Run Saturday, September 17 Omao Track ultimatehawaiiantrailrun.com Kaua‘i Mokihana Festival September 18 – 24 A seven-day event filled with Hawaiian culture and music. maliefoundation.org

OCTOBER

Walk to End Alzheimer’s Saturday, October 1, 8am Kapa’a Beach Park


Note: Dates & Times May Change Without Notice. Please Call First To Confirm.

Proudly Brought To You By Paws for Celebration Saturday, October 1 Kauai Humane Society Kauaihumane.org Ohana Fit Fest Saturday, October 1, 6:30am-11:30am Prince Albert Park, Princeville Knscf.org/fit-fest Kauai Chocolate and Coffee Festival October 14 &15 Historic Hanapepe Town www.kauaichocolateandcoffeefestival.com Kaua’i Harvest Festival Saturday, October 15, 10am-4pm Kekaha Neighborhood Center Park FREE Pumpkins!! Poipu Wine & Food Festival October 19 - 22 Kauai Community College www.kauaifoodandwinefestival.com National Make a Difference Day Saturday, October 22, 8am-11:30am Lydgate Park A family workday suited to all ages Kauaipath.org 22nd Annual Fall Festival Kauai Christian Academy Friday & Saturday, October 28 & 29, 4pm-9pm Kilauea, www.kcaschool.org Haunted Hale- Drive-Thru Trick or Treat Saturday, October 29, Keiki Hour: 6:30pm-7:30pm Big Kids: 7:30pm-9:30pm Anaina Hou Community Park, Kilauea www.anainahou.org

Trunk or Treat + Glow Show Sunday, October 30, 6pm Kings Chapel Eleele, Lihue www.kckauai.com KVMH Halloween Keiki Parade Monday, October 31, 12 Noon to 1pm Toddlers/Babies ages 3 and under who were born at KVMH. Kauai Veterans Memorial Hospital

NOVEMBER

Halloween Candy Buy Back Tuesday, November 1st, 2pm-5pm Kalaheo Dental Group Kalaheo, www.kalaheodental.com Kaua‘i Veterans Day Parade and Fair Saturday, November 5, 9am-2pm Downtown Lihue Old Koloa Sugar Mill Run Saturday, November 12, 7am to 11am Anne Knudsen Park 5K, 10K, 10-mile runs and non-competitive 5K walk www.oldkoloasugarmillrun.org St. Michael's Craft Fair Saturday, November 12, 9am-1pm St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, Lihue

Fall 2022

19


Mahalo to our healthcare warriors!

Fighting to keep our kupuna safe and protected. ohanapacific.com

,.....

��

STAY AT HOME Healthcare Services

Cj_A�tJ.s/£ REHABILITATION

& HEALTHCARE CENTER

t:

Hale Kupuna

�"' HERITAGE HOME

�euetU�� HEALTH

Vay

CENTER


Rosalina Castelo and Violita Ballesteros


Hawaiian proverb ‘Ōlelo No‘eau # 2178 reads, Mōhala i ka wai ka maka o ka pua, which translates to “Unfolded by the water are the faces of flowers. Flowers thrive where there is water, as thriving people are found where living conditions are good.” Much like the Kalo Plant, how are we living a life of purpose, providing living conditions in which we can all thrive, and creating a culture where generations understand the significance of spiritual and physical well-being for all? Think about it… By Kaulana Mossman, Adult Day Health Program Director

T

he interconnectedness of the Kalo Plant and ʻohana are essential to the foundation and ties that bind us as a community and people. From Keiki to Kupuna, our survival weighs heavily upon our sense of place, belonging, and ability to support each other through every meaningful phase of life. The significance of ʻohana has perpetuated throughout generations, within organizational missions, political campaigns, movies, and so much more. For example, a message so vividly conveyed by characters in the movie “Lilo and Stich” reminds us that ʻohana means family, and family means nobody gets left behind or forgotten.” However, what is its true essence and connection to our islands culture and people? An excerpt from House Bill 1663, designating Kalo as the Official State Plant reads “Kalo intrinsically embodies the interdependency of the past, the present, and the future, the essence of procreations and generations, as the foundation of sustainable practice. Kalo expresses the spiritual and physical well-being of not only

22

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

No matter what makes your heart sing or your spirit’s soar, the kuleana falls upon all of us to take care of each other.

the kanaka maoli and their heritage, but also symbolizes the environmental, social, and cultural values important to the state.” On Hawaii’s state seal, eight Kalo leaves below the shield represent both the health of the land and the health of the state. Leaves of the Kalo plant are also prominently established on the crown of King Kalākaua. It is coveted as sacred and culturally significant to the Kanaka Maoli as a stable source of sustenance for generations and a symbol of the life cycle of ʻohana. “This place is a home away from home” said Rosalina Castelo an attendee of the Kauai Adult Day Health Center. “It feels like one big ʻohana” shared Violita Ballesteros, sister of Rosalina and an attendee of the center. Time spent together at the Kauai Adult Day Center has been a life-changing experience for Rosalina and Violita who says they get to see each other more often than they ever did before. “It’s comforting knowing that I can converse with my sister every day while interacting amongst friends.” The sisters often reminisce over childhood memories while at the center.


Rosalina Castelo and Violita Ballesteros

“I remember us walking barefoot near the train tracks in Lihue. There were mounds of dirt near the mill, we’d dig through the mud presses for mushrooms and take it home to eat.” The ability to socialize and engage in activities together has brought comfort and a renewed sense of belonging for the sisters. “Our community should make sure that every Kupuna, rich or poor, has a place to be and feel special. It’s like a family here,” said Rosalina. How do you define ʻohana? Perhaps it’s a mentor, a sports team or organization, group of friends, traditional family, partner in life, caregiver, or place where kūpuna can gather. Within our core exudes a fundamental need to belong, define our

purpose, establish a safe-haven, and feel like an integral part of something meaningful where we are truly loved. No matter what makes your heart sing or your spirit’s soar, the kuleana falls upon all of us to take care of each other.

For more information 2943 Kress St, Lihue, HI 96766

(808) 246-6919

www.OhanaPacific.com

Fall 2022

23


Take Control of Your Health:

6 Steps to Prevent a Fall Every 13 seconds, an older adult is seen in an emergency department for a fall-related injury. Many falls are preventable. Stay safe with these tips! Find a good balance and exercise program

Look to build balance, strength, and flexibility. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging for referrals. Find a program you like and take a friend.

Talk to your health care provider Ask for an assessment of your risk of falling. Share your history of recent falls.

Regularly review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist Make sure side effects aren’t increasing your risk of falling. Take medications only as prescribed.

Get your vision and hearing checked annually and update your eyeglasses Your eyes and ears are key to keeping you on your feet.

Keep your home safe Remove tripping hazards, i ncrease lighting, make stairs safe, and install grab bars in key areas.

Talk to your family members Enlist their support in taking simple steps to stay safe. Falls are not just a seniors’ issue.

FREE Falls Prevention Program • (808) 241-4470 • www.kauaiadrc.org PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY

COUNTY OF KAUAI AGENCY ON ELDERLY AFFAIRS


Do you need help in making your Medicare Supplement choices? Do you need life or long-term care insurance?

70%

of Americans will need long-term care at some point. Protect your family and your assets.

On-Kauai Insurance Agent HI License #386250

Representing: • Humana • TransAmerica • Ohana Health Plan • Mutual of Omaha • Kaiser and more… Call

JASON BLAKE (808) 652-5210

jblakekauai@gmail.com

Seniors Wanted!

Ongoing

Senior Programs

Classes and activities are scheduled at community neighborhood centers throughout the island.

Some of the classes available include: art, aquatics, ukulele, hula, bonsai, cultural dances, exercise, hanafuda, weaving, quilting, line dance, sewing, crafts, and painting. If you are interested in joining our senior program, contact the Neighborhood Center closest to you. Kauai's ONLY Independent Retirement and Assisted Living Community. All-inclusive air-conditioned apartments including housekeeping, transportation, three gourmet meals, and 24-hour staffing. Centrally located in Lihue.

Call 808.246.4449 for a tour

Kekaha Waimea Kaumakani Hanapepe Kalaheo Koloa Lihue Kapaa Kilauea

NC NC NC NC NC NC NC NC NC

337-1671 338-1122 335-5770 335-3731 332-9770 742-1313 241-6857 822-1931 828-1421

Fall 2022

25


Career Change: 4 Questions with Dr. Monty Downs Medical Director at Kaua’i Hospice “I first started in the Wilcox ER on February 1, 1972. Do the math and you’ll see that it’s been a 50-year run. And the math also shows that I’m 50 years older. Being able to keep up with the challenging ER pace has become difficult for me. The good news for Kauai is that there are some excellent young ER doctors on board and the Wilcox Hospital ER is in top-notch hands. Good news for me personally is that the position of Medical Director at Kauai Hospice recently opened up. I’m not yet ready to stop being a physician, and with the overall pace of work being less hectic, this presents a very fortunate opportunity for me to still use my medical knowledge and experience. I’m certainly having to reboot a bit and to learn some different skills and processes. Fortunately, I’m entering an outstanding organization that my predecessors and future Hospice colleagues have established, and they already have it running smoothly. Systems and protocols are all in place. I very much hope that I will be worthy and that I can help keep Kauai Hospice functioning well in the very important community niche that it addresses. You don’t do anything for 50 years without thinking back to some things you wish you’d done better. To anyone that I caused harm, I am very sorry. To any of you whom I helped one way or another, I am very blessed to have had the opportunity to meet you and help you. Onward and forward.” Monty Downs, M.D.

26

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Photo courtesy of Kauai Hospice

1

What drew you to hospice work in the first place?

I have always enjoyed elderly people, and I’ve always enjoyed trying to help them with their challenges. Not every patient in Kauai Hospice is elderly but they all do have serious and by definition, incurable medical challenges and conditions. In the ER, where I worked for 50 years, we can often get seriously ill people through their illness, and that is spectacular. To


qualify for Medicare Hospice Benefits, however, a patient needs to have the Medical Director state that he or she has a life expectancy of less than 6 months, assuming a tyical course of the illness. Working with people in these situations can still be very helpful to them, and satisfying to us, as we help them live their life as comfortably and meaningfully as possible.

2

What is it about Kauai Hospice that you find so important?

Kauai Hospice is important because our staff has access to medications

and equipment that can help people live with their life-threatening, incurable illness comfortably and meaningfully in their home, and not in a hospital bed with “needles and tubes in every orifice.” Our goal is to make life worth living even though you are in the near-end-of-life part of your life.

3

Do you think end-of-life care is part of the broader discussion going on about health care reform in this country? End-of-life care certainly is part of Fall 2022

27


Career Change: Four Questions (continued) the broader discussion regarding subjected to the most modern, and health care reform in this country. often uncomfortable, treatments! There are different numbers out Please understand, however, there, but I’ve seen it estimated that we’re not talking about that up to 25% of the United curable conditions. Infections States’ total medical expenses are and trauma and such. And in fact, spent in peoples’ last nowadays many cancers year of life. Doctors are curable because of and hospitals do My favorite part of my our great scientific amazing high work is accompanying our advancements. But tech things nurses and social workers and for those cancers and use and other chaplains when they make remarkable conditions their home visits. I love learnhigh tech that aren’t ing about our patients, learnmedications curable—and that may ing about what lives they’ve most doctors increase led, what they looked like in are aware of someone’s their old family photos, when this is the life span by who their family case—I’ll reiterate a few weeks and say that effective members are, etc. even when palliative care (pain someone has an control, nausea control, incurable illness. But spiritual support, family home the administration and side support, etc.) can be at least as lifeeffects of those medications may prolonging as the most advanced make those few weeks be very medicinal agents. uncomfortable. What are your day-to-day The concept of Hospice care, duties as the Kauai Hospice whose emphasis is symptom Medical Director? management and comfort more My day-to-day duties as Hospice so than possibly adding on a Medical Director includes a few weeks of life by undergoing considerable amount of paperwork intense and often uncomfortable and computer work, since Hospice treatments, makes a lot of financial programs have to properly sense as our society tries to gain document to Medicare that our a handle on medical expenses patients are not expected to live that threaten to “break the longer than 6 months from the time bank.” Ironically, it’s been found they were admitted to Hospice. that when comfort is achieved, (If they are expected to live a long people with certain conditions time, Medicare understandably actually live a few weeks longer than people who are being won’t cover any Hospice expenses.

4

28

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


“Dying is a great mystery for all of us, similar to the mystery of who or what we were before we were born. Yes, the mystery can be frightening, but having the time and comfort to process and consider the mystery can actually be a very rewarding time in our lives. “A time for consolidating our love” is how one person/patient recently expressed it.” —Monty Downs And I need to note that some people defy expectations and do live considerably longer than 6 months—and in these scenarios we have to keep re-certifying that their life expectancy remains at less than 6 months. We see this happen when people are receiving meticulous home care from family members). My day also includes working with our most phenomenal and loving staff of 20 people. We have a lot more staff meetings, formal and informal, reviewing our patients and their needs, than is typical for most other medical specialties. It turns out this is very important and very helpful, since there is no doubt that our work could lead to our own depression as we see our patients die under our care, as they inevitably will.

Photo courtesy of Wilcox Health

“We are thrilled and blessed that Dr. Monty Downs is part of our team. He’s not just a remarkable physician who has whole heartedly served patients and our community-at-large for over 50 years, he represents the most important qualities of a hospice medical director—a commitment to excellent endof-life care with dignity and compassion. His unique guitar/ harmonica skills at the bedside will be an added bonus for our patients and families.” Tricia Yamashita, MPH Executive Director Kaua`i Hospice, Inc.

Fall 2022

29


Water Emergency Preparedness Tips By: Kaua'i Department of Water

Tip #1: Stay Connected: • Stay tuned to news reports and Kaua`i County Alerts. The Department of Water also posts the latest water service announcements online via www.facebook.com/KauaiDOW. • To sign up for Kaua`i County Alerts visit www.kauai.gov/kema.

Tip #2: Conserve Water: • A power outage can impact water storage facilities therefore, limiting water use to essential needs only can help to avoid a water service outage. • Turn off appliances that automatically draw water such as irrigation and ice machines. • Collect rainwater to use for non-potable needs. Do not drink rainwater.

Tip #3: Be prepared • Store water as part of your emergency preparedness kit to meet your family’s needs during an emergency.

For more water emergency preparedness tips, visit www.kauaiwater.org.

EMERGENCY KAUA`I COUNTY ALERTS

Water Emergency Preparedness: Store at least 1 gallon of water per person, per day for up to 14 days. Some household members may require more for medical purposes.

To sign-up to receive Kaua`i County Alerts visit www.kauai.gov/KEMA, call 808-245-5455 or 808-241-1800.

During and after a storm: The Department of Water will conduct assessment of water facilities and send out updates for water service advisories, if necessary.

Kaua`i County Alerts is a mass notification service formally serviced by BlackBoard Connect CTY, that sends emergency notifications by phone, text and email. If you have already signed up through Blackboard CTY, you do not need to sign-up for this service again. For more information, call 808-245-5455.

30

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Electronic Waste Recycle

Open to Businesses and Residents for FREE!* visit www.kauai.gov/eWaste or call 241-

6 Days a Week! Puhi Metals Recycling Facility, 3951 Puhi Road, Mon-Fri 7:30AM-3:30PM Operated by Resource Recovery Solutions Phone: 808-245-6919 All material is sent to Prudent IT-Tech Asset Recovery, Inc. located in Ontario, California or other R2 and/or e-Steward certified end destination.

*Large eWaste such as commercial printers and industrial electronics may be subject to packing and handling fee, call 245-6919 for more information Accepted:

Not Accepted:

Computer systems and accessories, cellular phones and accessories, office equipment, and audio & video equipment.

Nontaminated equipment, cracked or broken CRT screens, smoke detectors, and hazardous or non-eWaste items.

Full List available at www.kauai.gov/eWaste


Easy Ways to Improve Memory By Sarah Lyons

Everyone forgets things from time to time, but it seems the more kids you have, the more forgetful you become. Forgetting an appointment or an important deadline occasionally is frustrating, and sometimes costly, but when you notice it happening regularly, it’s time to get organized. What are some easy tips parents can use to improve memory?

Write it Down

Use a spiral notebook to write everything in. You can use them for menu planning, shopping lists, to-do lists, notes from phone calls and doctor appointments, and holiday and vacation planning. Write the date on the front so you can look back if needed. According to a study done at UCLA, taking notes, rather than typing on a laptop, improves memory. So, it follows that taking notes during a meeting, writing to-do, and shopping lists and using paper calendars and planners should help you remember more easily.

There’s an App for That

If you prefer to go paperless, technology offers great tools to help you remember what you have on your plate today. Everything, no matter how trivial, goes on a list or calendar in an app you can use on your phone. Many families like the ease of electronic calendars because they can be shared easily with all family members. You can also utilize the alarm function on your phone. Set alarms and name them for recurring events and select the days you want them to go off. Try alarms for appointments, or as reminders to take medicine or grab the library books for school. The key to using technology effectively is to be diligent about entering the information as soon as it’s received.

Take Care of Yourself

When you are overtired, hungry, or stressed, prioritizing, organizing and remembering what needs to be done can be difficult. A good night’s sleep can do wonders to help improve memory. Similarly, a healthy diet of food low in saturated fats can help keep your mind sharp. Eating empty calories will cause you to feel tired and sluggish, making it difficult to focus. If you are already eating and sleeping well, try adding cardiovascular activity to your day. Exercise can greatly improve memory. Depending on your fitness level, start with 10 to 20 minutes of brisk walking each day to give yourself a boost.

32

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Challenge Yourself

You can improve your memory by doing things you enjoy or trying something new. One way to keep the mind sharp is to take on new challenges on a regular basis. Learn to play the piano or take up knitting, read a book or work on logic puzzles—or simply visit a museum and learn something new. When we keep our minds active and sharp, our memory improves.

Fun activities that improve memory • Learn to play an instrument.

• Read a book or magazine.

• Take up a new hobby.

• Listen to music or audiobooks.

• Learn a new language.

• Play games that involve hand-eye coordination, like tennis or basketball.

• Play logic games and puzzles. • Take up knitting or crochet.

• Play videogames.

• Do crafts and/or scrapbook.

The Art of Multitasking

Parents become great multitaskers. We simultaneously pack school lunches, feed the kids breakfast, watch the news and go through a mental checklist for the day. Although this can be a very useful approach, it also can adversely affect memory. When our minds are occupied with multiple things at once, forgetting one of them is far too easy. With the constant bombardment of information in today’s society, breaking this habit can be hard. Try sitting down for a few minutes in the morning to focus on what needs to be done. Prioritize your tasks, set reminders on your phone, make lists and check the calendar to ensure you don’t miss anything important.

Fall 2022

33


Stay Focused on Your Real Estate Goals! By Leah Ragsac, Kauai Realty, Inc.

The real estate market is moving at a frenetic pace, both buyers and sellers are making quick decisions and are feeling extreme pressure. As the tension rises, it can be easy to overlook the end goal.

Buyer Challenges

Facing tight inventory of available properties, buyers have limited time to tour homes, knowing they must make a quick decision. Compromise on the little things, but don’t settle!

Seller Challenges

Sellers also feel the challenge of the frantic pace. While it is nice to have multiple offers, the highest offer may not necessarily be the best. Pay attention to the details of the contingencies on the purchase contract.

Set goals with your Realtor and revisit those goals throughout the process. Why are you looking to buy or sell? Keep your eye on the prize and recognize that the goal will be worth the effort! 34

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Catholic Charities Hawai‘i (CCH) launched services on Kaua‘i in 1992 in response to the devastation brought by Hurricane Iniki. Throughout the years, Catholic Charities Hawai‘i has evolved to meet emerging needs, offering an array of programs and services to help struggling individuals and families in our community. Our Kaua‘i office is staffed by a small, yet mighty team of 5 who assisted 1,225 households/2,500 people, which included over 1,400 children in 2021. CCH Kaua‘i Programs addresses homeless and housing issues as well as community gap needs: • Housing First • Rapid Re-Housing • Statewide Homeless Emergency Grants • Emergency Solutions Grant COVID Relief • Community Assistance Program for gap needs such as bus passes, youth enrichment, rent/security deposit/utilities, and disaster recovery services

Catholic Charities Kauai Leadership Council: back row L-R Derrick Adams, Tom Strom, David Lister, Rob Van Tassell, CCH Pres. & CEO, Melody Lopez, CCH Kauai Program Administrator; front row L-R: Shantel Santiago, Leadership Council Chair, Leah Ragsac, Leadership Council Vice Chair, Noelle Lau, Edie Ignacio Neumiller

We also provide a gateway to CCH’s statewide service network which includes:

On April 21, 2022, CCH Kaua‘i held an office blessing and 75th Anniversary Celebration to mark the milestone year.

Interstate Compact on the Placement of Children, General Immigration Services, Statewide Resource Families and community partner programs.

Special Mahalo to our CCH Kaua‘i Leadership Council, community partners, volunteers, and supporters who share in our mission of service and advocacy—together we are a community of hope.

CCH Kauai Office Team L-R Triana Baclayon, Melody Lopez CCH Kauai Program Administrator, volunteer Katherine Nally, Frederick Constantino, participant Gregory Preston, and Diana Harvey

Kaua’i Community Office 4373 Rice St., Suite 1 Lihu’e, HI 96766 808-241-HOPE (4673) www.CatholicCharitiesHawaii.org

Fall 2022

35


Uncle Frank directing crews for car removal.

What started as one family’s way to pass time during Covid, is now quickly helping to steer Anahola toward a sustainable and regenerative future. Simple beach clean ups have become large community events and educational excursions. A small family effort has turned into a network of volunteers, organizations, and businesses that help the new nonprofit, called the ʻĀina Alliance, manage the coastal areas and combat illegal dumping and shoreline pollution. Here’s the story of this transformation. While most people sat safely at home due to Covid protocols, the Makepa family would walk to the beach with buckets and pick up trash on Anahola Beach. The buckets would quickly fill up, and much of the trash was too big to fit in the buckets. Next, they brought trash bags. But those would also fill up fast and be too heavy to carry back home. Determined to get more done, they started to bring their truck to load all the trash. But the truck filled up quickly with tangled beach nets, old tires, and other car parts. So they had to take many truck loads off the beach. The youngest son, Wahianu asked, “Dad, why do we keep picking this all up? People just keep throwing trash on the beach and don’t clean up after themselves.” Dad, Jeremie, replied “Would you rather swim in all this trash and get tangled in it while you’re surfing?” Wahianu said, “Oh no, that was so much trash we cleaned up, I would

36

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Volunteers with a trailer load of trash.

get tangled and drown! ” Jeremie said “Ok then, we better continue to keep you and your friends from drowning.” After that conversation, Wahianu had fun picking up as much rubbish as he could find. As time went on, they would notice more people picking up rubbish. Some people with 4x4 trucks would even drag the abandoned cars off the beach! But more abandoned cars would continue to be left on the beaches and along the roads. There was a bigger problem going on here. Many months later, Jeremie became the Fire Captain in charge of the Fire Prevention Bureau. Firefighters complained of the many brush fires that became car fires in the area between Kealia Kai and Anahola. These fires create toxic smoke that is hazardous to the health of firefighters and the community. Drones were flown over the coastline, and over 300 abandoned vehicles were found. Jeremie worked with the Department of Hawaiian Homelands (DHHL), Kauai Police, and other agencies to develop an action plan to fix the problem.


Waika carries a heavy load off the beach.

from his business, A-Town Trucking. Since there were hundreds of cars everywhere, Uncle Frank moved them to block entrances and secure the area. Teachers and students from Kanuikapono school went in to do clean ups and put in some native plants. Leaders from KKOA.org helped to organize big community clean ups. More organizations brought heavy equipment to remove cars from the beach. Surfrider foundation and volunteers came from all over Kaua’i to help pick up rubbish. Some even came from other islands and the mainland to help!

Wahianu shows his beach trash pickup.

First all the people who were polluting the area were asked to leave. Next, teams went in and removed all the trash left at those illegal camps. Third, heavy equipment from the County Public Works and State Forestry made firebreak access roads so that firefighters could put fires out faster. This also made it easier for bad people to come in and dump more cars and trash, so access had to be blocked. Hearing about all the efforts to fix the coastline, Jeremie’s neighbor Frank Cummings, offered to help with equipment

Seeing all this effort and not wanting it to go to waste, Jeremie and Uncle Frank created a new 501c3 nonprofit, called the ʻĀina Alliance. DHHL authorized them as the official steward of this coastal area. They continue to gain partnerships to help the community. Hoakeolapono’s workforce development team is now building checkpoint sheds so that more good people can go in to enjoy the beautiful coastline. Later they plan to develop areas of farming, ranching, camping, and recreation so that the community can benefit. Place based learning for cultural practices and sustainable living are also a high priority. To find out more, and get involved, check their website at www.ainaalliance.com.

Fall 2022

37


Navigating avigating The he Waters aters Off Childhood hildhood

Adolescence is tricky enough for kids, even under the best of circumstances; when issues like teasing and bullying are thrown into the mix, learning to cope can feel downright overwhelming. Instilling confidence and compassion is key in raising happy, successful kids. Sometimes, this requires a team approach. There are a wide range of issues that can negatively affect a child’s academic performance and social development—all of which, in turn, can impact self-esteem.

Strategies For Handling Bullying One of the biggest concerns involves bullying. Children are teased for any number of reasons, ranging from clothing choices and hairstyles to physical appearance. Often, the tormentor is struggling with insecurities of their own, has power or control issues, or is experiencing discord at home. Bullying doesn’t necessarily involve ongoing abuse; often, a single act can cause a child to withdraw, leading to long-lasting repercussions.

The best solution is to educate kids about bullying. The term itself is open to interpretation, ranging in severity from a single instance of being teased to frequent emotional and/or physical abuse. Once kids understand the definition of bullying, they are taught strategies for coping with it. One of the most effective is to ignore the taunting and walk away when it occurs.

38

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

The more kids engage, sometimes that’s what the bully is looking for. Empowering kids who are being bullied is a really important piece. Teaching them to use their “big kid voice” is another form of empowerment. Sticking up for themselves, or others who are being bullied, may be enough to dissuade the bully from acting out. Ignoring somebody who is picking on you is often helpful. If bullying continues, kids shouldn’t be afraid to tell an adult. Teachers are good at monitoring situations and can keep an eye on students during recess and lunchtime interactions. It’s acknowledged the difficulty in convincing children to let a grownup intervene once they reach a certain age because they are afraid of stepping on other people’s toes or being labeled a tattletale. Kids handle it a lot differently than we tell them to because they’re dealing with their peers.


Parents Are Teachers, Too

Parents have an important role to play in bullying prevention, as well. Parents should familiarize themselves with the school’s policies and procedures and be willing to reach out to the school when there is a problem. As role models, they should teach their kids basic skills such as communication, sharing, problem-solving, and dealing with other people. Learning how to handle situations will empower children to advocate for themselves and is a key component in both social-emotional development and conflict resolution. So many kids are being put in schools and expected to get along. Kids aren’t natural learners on how to share and take turns; nobody has taught them how to get along and solve problems. We need to teach that as parents and professionals.

Empathy is the ability to understand what other people are feeling and sense their emotions. By putting yourself in somebody else’s shoes, you’re better able to sympathize with them. There is some debate over whether empathy is a learned behavior or a fixed trait. You’re born with certain traits and genetics, and your environment can either capitalize on that or hinder your potential. The most basic way to teach your child empathy is to practice it yourself. Bond with your child in order to cultivate a trusting, secure attachment. Kids who are brought up in loving, stable environments are better suited to dealing with emotions and coping with stress than kids who lack that parental support.

Children who are empathetic are much less likely to bully others, and will often step in and support friends who are being victimized.

You might be surprised to learn that both self-confidence and empathy can be taught, as well. Putting in the effort can pay big dividends: children with positive selfesteem are confident in their abilities, feel liked and accepted, are proud of their achievements, and value their individuality. They believe in themselves, learn from their mistakes, are more likely to stand up for themselves, and are unafraid to ask for help when needed. They are also more resistant to peer pressure.

Instilling self-confidence isn’t difficult. Praise your kids, focusing on their efforts rather than the results, but don’t overdo it or you’ll condition them to expect it every time. Encourage them to think independently by solving their own problems (but always offer a helping hand if needed). Be a good role model by teaching them that failure is an important part of the learning process, and seek out new experiences together.

As with self-confidence, model empathetic behavior yourself by treating others with kindness and understanding. Acknowledge their feelings and respond with sympathy. Offer positive encouragement when your kids display empathy toward others. We can teach kids how to share, take turns, and communicate, actions that help teach empathy. Another key is to acknowledge and identify emotions. If your child is upset, for instance, don’t dismiss their negative feelings; instead, respond with a statement like, “Oh no, you’re angry.” This helps kids learn to identify emotions in themselves and others and encourages sympathy and understanding. Parenting is often a challenge, but remember, you and your child have access to a support network of skilled individuals trained to help. Teachers, counselors, school psychologists, can all play an important role in your kids’ well-being.

Fall 2022

39


It's all natural...PERIOD The misconceptions and facts of menstruation Menstruation, or having a “period,” is natural! Everyone goes through a stage called puberty as they grow up - In females, part of this involves getting your first period. It is exciting, but can also be confusing. What is normal and what should I expect? Our experts have the answers to many Heidi Purcell, MD Obstetrics/Gynecology commonly asked questions.

THE CLINIC AT WAIMEA • (808) 338-8311

What is a normal period? There is no such thing as a textbook normal period - Variation exists between individuals. Instead, we talk about normal ranges. The average age of menarche (the first period) is about 12 ½ but in some cases start as early as 10 and as late as 16 years old. Normal bleeding is using anywhere from 3-6 pads or tampons per day during your period. Normal periods range from every 21 to 45 days, and should last 2-7 days. In the first two years after menstruation starts, it is common to have more variation between cycles, but they should start to become more regular after 3 years.

At what age should I speak to a gynecologist if I haven’t started my period? Some of us are late bloomers, and that is okay. Women typically start menstruating 2 years after breast developments begins but in general, we recommend seeing a gynecologist if you haven’t started having your period by age 15 regardless of breast development.

How much is “too much” bleeding?

The upper limit of normal blood loss during a period is 80 milliliters, or less than 3 oz. Unfortunately measuring blood loss during your period is incredibly difficult. A more useful rule of thumb is that soaking through a pad or tampon every 1-2 hours is a sign of too much bleeding and can indicate underlying problems. LEARN - REQUEST - SUPPORT www.maimovement.org


What causes irregular periods? So many things! Hormone imbalances and underlying disorders like polycystic ovarian syndrome are the main cause for irregular menstrual cycles in young women. Other health concerns like thyroid disease, infections, extreme stress, or inadequate nutrition can cause irregular cycles as well. Best to check-in with your doctor if your cycles are irregular.

When should I talk to my child about menstruation? We recommend starting the conversation in the pediatrician’s office and at home around 7-8 years old. Providing anticipatory guidance can help prepare your children to know what to expect and that it is a normal process. Talking about how to use menstrual hygiene products is helpful, as is discussing what is considered normal flow.

What causes cramps? During your period, the uterus becomes inflamed and the muscular walls contract to help shed the lining and cause bleeding. This can be quite uncomfortable, but fortunately often responds well to over the counter medications like Ibuprofen. Other conditions such as endometriosis or fibroids can also cause pain, so if the over the counter meds aren’t working, it may be time to see the doctor.

How do I clean the vagina? Is it different after menstruation? The vagina is self-cleansing. There is no need to use any special soap or solutions (referred to as “douching”) inside the vagina as this can disrupt the balance of healthy bacteria and actually cause infection and irritation. Outside the vagina, on the labia, we recommend just water and if necessary a gentle pH neutral and unscented soap. During your period, change your pad every four hours or tampon every eight hours while awake to keep unhealthy bacteria away. Hawaii Health Systems Corporation - Kaua'i Region THE CLINIC AT WAIMEA • (808) 338-8311

Cont' on next page

END PERIOD POVERTY IN HAWAI'I

MA'I MOVEMENT


The misconceptions and facts of menstruation Cont': The misconceptions and facts of menstruation

True/False Questions True or false: Birth control is only used to prevent pregnancy FALSE! We also use contraception to regulate flow, duration and timing of cycles. It is also useful in treating acne, mood swings and pain associated with your period. True or false: Using contraception as a teenager or for a prolonged time will cause infertility FALSE! Sometimes birth control will mask underlying problems though, which is why it sometimes gets a bad reputation. True or False: You can’t get pregnant during your period FALSE! Although it is unlikely, it IS possible, especially if your cycle length is short or irregular. Sperm can live up to 5 days inside a woman’s body. In addition, not all vaginal bleeding is from a period. Don’t get tricked into believing this myth and take precautions to prevent pregnancy if it is not desired. True or False: You can swim during your period TRUE! It may be logistically difficult on heavy flow days, but on regular or lighter flow days using tampons or menstrual cups makes it possible to enjoy the water without a mess and without risking your health.

When should my daughter start going to the gynecologist? What should she expect? It’s great to emphasize that going to the gynecologist is one way to honor your body - both by taking care of it and being healthy. Once she becomes sexually active, or by age 21 (whichever comes first) she should establish care with a gynecologist. If either you or she has concerns about her period, we are always happy to meet for an appointment. Usually a pelvic exam is not needed to start contraception and for many concerns or first-time visits, we don’t need to do any internal examination. Depending on the problem, we sometimes order pelvic ultrasounds or blood work. The first visit is a great time to discuss topics like STD screening, safe sex and birth control. Meet our OB/GYN Team at THE CLINIC AT WAIMEA Call for an appointment at (808) 338-8311 (Photo L/R)

Graham Chelius, MD - Obstetrics/Family Medicine Heidi Purcell, MD - Obstetrics/Gynecology Amy Guyton, MD - Family Medicine w/Obstetrics Surachat Chatkupt, MD - Obstetrics/Gynecology


4 Ways to Approach Boundaries and Expectations with Youth

by Lindsay Fernandez Richardson, MS, LMHC

Studies show that setting boundaries and expectations, or clear limits and rules, is important to help young people thrive. Youth tend to grow into healthier, happier adults when adults use authoritative parenting, a style of parenting that combines boundary setting with compassion and warmth. Here are some ways adults can try setting limits with young people.

1. T alk about rules and consequences both beforehand and when issues come up. • Share the reasoning behind your expectations and take an interest in your child or teen’s feelings. Hearing them out doesn’t have to mean changing limits, and listening to youth can help them accept boundaries. • Try a kind and honest approach over harsh criticism or shaming. Think of limits and consequences as tools for teaching and keeping youth safe. 2. S trive for a balance between supporting youths’ emerging independence and monitoring their whereabouts. • Stay in contact to be aware of their location, what they’re doing, and who is with them. • Set guidelines for where youth can or cannot go, how they communicate, and what time they should return. Respond with fair consequences if they break the rules.

4. Encourage youth to try their best to make choices that reflect their family’s values. • Try saying, “Remember how we talked about looking out for others? Looks like your uncle has a lot of boxes to bring inside. What do you think about offering some help,” or, “I see that you’ve taken more responsibility for your school work lately, and I’m proud of you.” Source: 40 Developmental Assets® www.searchinstitute.org

Scan this QR code for more information and resources:

3. B e a positive role model and support youth in connecting with positive influences. • Demonstrate thoughtful decision making and talk with youth about ways you and others benefit from healthy choices.

Fall 2022

43


FREE

Announce Your Baby’s Birth!

21

MAY 2022

4:36PM

8lbs 10oz

11

APRIL 2022

5:52PM

4lbs 10oz

Francis IV Baniaga

Kannon Kainalu Kinney

Parents: Francisco III and Geraldine Baniaga Siblings: Princess Hannah and Alahna Nicole

Parents: Kristi Sasachika & Chance Kinney Siblings: Kingston, Roman, Royal

20

FEB 2022

11:43PM

6lbs 4.9oz

Rosalie Agnes Lorna Pamela Jean Alohanani O Kokeʻe Hepa- Medeiros Parents: Kahnah Hepa & Kaylee Medeiros-Ramos

It’s EASY and FREE—to share your ‘ohana’s good news. Don’t miss this chance to announce your baby’s arrival and have a wonderful keepsake for your baby book. Email photo and information to births@KauaiFamilyMagazine.com to submit a baby announcement online.

44

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Healthy Moms = Healthy Babies Kandi Bloss, RN, BSN, Maternity Education Coordinator Hawaii Health Systems Corporation – Kauai Region Have you ever wondered why it is important for new moms to receive prenatal education? Knowing and understanding how eating healthy, getting enough rest and exercise, reducing stress and seeing your obstetrician regularly throughout your pregnancy are important to you and your baby’s overall development.

Why is Group prenatal and childbirth education beneficial? Moms can get information about upcoming prenatal and childbirth education classes at their initial visit with their obstetrician. These classes have valuable information on prenatal development, what to expect during each trimester of your pregnancy and the laboring process. Classes focus toward a group setting that encourages building relationships with other parents who are having similar experiences with their pregnancy as you. It is also a safe-zone to ask as many or as little questions as you see fit.

Daily exercise and eating healthy.

Moms are encouraged to put their health first—making healthier food choices like more fruits and vegetables and less sugary foods into their diet. Low impact exercises, yoga or a daily walk also helps to minimize unnecessary weight gain and helps your body prepare for the labor and birth of your baby.

Beginning this fall, the HHSC—Kauai Region KVMH will be participating in the Pregnancy Program from the Centering Healthcare Institute. It focuses on bringing 8 to 10 women all due at the same time together for their care. This allows moms and providers to relax and get to know each other on a much deeper and meaningful level. Members of this group form lasting friendships beyond traditional care. For more information on Prenatal Education and Patient Centering call Kandi Bloss, RN at (808) 651-7898. If you’d like to connect with any one of our obstetricians (Drs. Chatkupt, Chelius, Purcell or Guyton), call the Clinic at Waimea at 808-338-8311, today. Fall 2022

45


Our Fall Favorites

INSPIRE

DEFEND POTENTIAL

VOLUNTEER AS A MENTOR TODAY!

WE INSPIRE

WE ARE A FORCE FOR CHANGE

IGNITE EMPOWER

POTENTIAL

ENROLL A CHILD TODAY

www.BBBSHawaii.org 808-631-8642 egaines@bbbshawaii.org

OUR FUTURE IS BIG

(FREE)

@BBBSKauai @BigsofKauai

Kauai Christian Academy’s 22nd Annual

FALL FESTIVAL

Bay Creator’s Fair Wailua

Family Fun in a carnival atmosphere!

Featuring 38 local Kauai Creator’s making all of their items here on Kauai!

Fri. and Sat., Oct. 28 and 29, 4 p.m. – 9 p.m. Carnival Games, Hay Rides, Local Food Vendors, Amazing Bake Sale, Bounce Houses, and a HUGE Silent Auction!

On the Kauai Christian Academy Campus 4000 Kilauea Rd. Kilauea HI 96754

Visit www.kcaschool.org for more info

br ing t he whole family for a fun day by t he bay

Every 4th Sunday of the month Aug 28th • Sept 25th • Oct 23rd

8:30am - 1:00pm 3-5920 Kuiho Hwy, Kapa’a look for the row of tents!

@wailuabayfair www.wailuabaycreatorsfair.com


Our Fall Favorites

Register online at: www.HealingHorsesKauai.org Email: hhkauai@gmail.com Phone: 808-634-3896 Support provided by Hawai‘i Tourism Authority through the Community Enrichment Program.

Online

SPANISH LESSONS

Ka ua ʻi Fall Camp: October 3 thru October 7th Volunteer Orientation & Training: October 8th & 9th Halloween Photos: October 31st, 2:30pm-4:30pm

nd Keik iO io a p r ‘Ō

tra es ch

Healing Horses Kauai Youth Horsemanship Camp

REGISTER ONLINE NOW!

FREE!

Fall Registration Begins Monday, August 1, 2022 Please visit www.kauaikeikiorch.org to register now!

Boys and Girls Clubhouse, Kapa’a AND Boys and Girls Clubhouse Lihue offer fall classes for ages 7 to 18 years old.

KOKO offers PreK classes on Saturdays at ‘Ohana Christian Fellowship, Kapa’a.

Join us for Fall Break

For Kids Classes begin the week of September 12

West Kauai Club 320-8353

Maestra Ana has been teaching Spanish to children on Kaua’i for over 15 years.

www.FunWithSpanishForYou.com

808-482-1863

Kapaa Clubhouse 821-4406 Lihue Clubhouse 245-2210

October 3-7


ATTENTION YOUNG ARTISTS

FALL Art Contest

to email d n e S by

13th r e b Octo

One of you will win the book Honu and Hina by Patrick Ching and Friends 1

Here is how you can draw the 109 year old Kilauea Lighthouse using a simple three step process: Step 1. Forming:

Form up the lighthouse pressing softly with your pencil making the base like a rectangle that is slightly larger at the bottom than the top. Then put a square where the light casing is, and a triangle for the cap. Put a ball on top of the triangle with a point on it and the oval inside the square for the light. Then make a rectangle doorway with a triangle top and ad the windows and railings.

2

Step 2. Outlining:

Now make anything you want around the lighthouse like birds, clouds, ocean, whales, get creative! When you have things the way you want them, press harder or use a pen to outline your drawing.

Step 3. Shading & Coloring:

3

Figure out what direction the sun is shining on the lighthouse and shade it on the other side. Advanced artists can use reflective light on the shaded side.

Summer Art Contest Winner: Lily Millard, Age 7, 2nd grade Wilcox Elementary

It’s easy to submit your art for our contest. Email us, and include your name, age, grade, school and phone number. eMail your art to: info@kauaifamilymagazine.com


Is Thumbsucking Bad for My Child’s Teeth?

By Michael Lutwin, DDS, Kalaheo Dental Group

Thumbsucking is a natural reflex for children. Sucking on thumbs may make babies feel secure and happy and help them learn about their world.

Once permanent teeth come in, sucking may cause problems with the proper growth of the mouth and alignment of the teeth. The intensity of the sucking is a factor that determines whether or not dental problems may result. If children rest their thumbs passively in their mouths, they are less likely to have difficulty than those who vigorously suck their thumbs. Children usually stop sucking between the ages of two and four years old, or by the time the permanent front teeth are ready to come in. How Can I Help My Child to Stop Thumbsucking? • Praise your child for not sucking. • Children often suck their thumbs when feeling insecure or needing comfort. Focus on correcting the cause of the anxiety and provide comfort to your child. • For an older child, involve him or her in choosing the method of stopping. If these tips don’t work, remind your child of their habit by bandaging the thumb or putting a sock on the hand at night. Your dentist or pediatrician may offer more specific guidance and can even prescribe a bitter medication to coat the thumb or the use of a mouth appliance.

We’re here for you!

Making ends meet is tough. Dr. Lutwin, Dr. Rita, Dr. Stebbins, and our friendly staff are here to make your ohana’s dental care manageable and comfortable.

Rainbow Plaza 2-2514 Kaumualii Hwy., Suite 204 Kalaheo, HI 96741 kalaheodental.com • (808) 332-9445

Make an appointment today at (808) 332-9445 Payment Options:

Services:

• Most major insurances accepted • Interest-free CareCredit monthly financing • In-office payment plans • No insurance? Our membership plan offers preventative services and 20% off other treatments.

• Family Dentistry • Dental Implants • Teeth Whitening • Invisalign • Porcelain Veneers • Tooth Replacement

We love our community! We support local nonprofits, provide school presentations, and host the annual Halloween Candy Buy Back and Keiki Art Contest.

Fall 2022

49


Benefits of Sports Participation

In the US, about 35% of children and teens are overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Childhood obesity can have multiple harmful effects on the body, such as increased risk of cardiovascular disease, bone and joint problems, sleep apnea, as well as social issues like stigmatization. To combat obesity, parents need to make sure their children get enough exercise, and sports provide more than just improvements in body composition and weight.

Here are just a few of the benefits of organized sports: Increase self-esteem – being part of a team allows kids to learn to give and receive praise from teammates and from their coach, which boosts their confidence and self-image. Build strong relationships – when teammates work together towards a collective goal, while sharing the joy of success and struggle in defeat, this builds lasting bonds that can persist even into adulthood. It also teaches children teamwork. Develop critical thinking – each sport

50

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

has their own tactics, strategy, and approaches to consider. Learning to come up with a plan and implementing it teaches children to exercise their mind in addition to their body. Learn how to deal with disappointments – children are taught to improve through constructive criticism, learn to how lose gracefully, and recognize that life isn’t always fair. When a wrong call is made, children are taught to accept it and move on rather than complain and dwell on the error. Appreciate hard work and perseverance – children learn that nothing worth having comes easy. Talent obviously plays a part, but children will quickly learn that hard work and dedication is the best path to success. Have fun – being a kid means having fun, and sports is one way to do that.


By Bernard Riola, M.D., Pediatrician KVMH Waimea, alumnus Saint Theresa School Despite the advantages of team sports, many children today end up spending way too much time glued to the TV and drawn to video games. Here are tips on getting them involved in team sports: Start early – the ideal age to start participation in organized sports, based on attention and ability, is 6-7 years old, although certain sports can begin earlier. Get your kids involved even earlier, by taking them outside each day, even just for a walk, day at the playground, or stroll on the beach. Give them a choice – if a child doesn’t know what they like, try choosing three or four sports, explain what each sport entails, and let them choose. Once they decide on a sport, give them a brief overview on the terminology and rules of the game. Find resources – the Kauai Family Magazine is a great place to start. Ask other parents, teachers, and neighbors what their children do. The Kauai County

website also lists many county - sponsored sports. Discuss with your child – find out if they like running, jumping, throwing, or swimming and try to find a related sport. Show them videos of different sports and see what interests them. Consider whether they might do better in a team sport such as baseball, basketball, and soccer vs individual team sports such as martial arts, track, and swimming. Teach them perseverance – a lot of times children might find themselves discouraged or dislike the rigors of practice and may want to quit. Push them hard to finish out the season. Often it takes time to build skills, make friendships, and see improvement. Having them push through is the first steps towards learning perseverance, which will help them later in life. If at the end of the season they still don’t enjoy it, there are many other sports they can still choose from.

Fall 2022

51


With all the candy and sugary snacks that Halloween brings, why not balance holiday snacking with healthy treats? There’s no need to sacrifice the festive theme- these goodies still bring the fun to your Halloween party.

Cheesy Monsters These calcium-packed monsters are so much fun to eat, the kids won’t notice (or care), that they’re eating a healthy treat!

Halloween Hummus Serve this hauntingly healthy dip at a Halloween party or as an afterschool snack. It’s so easy to make. It’s scary!

52

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


The Kids will love helping decorate for Halloween with these DIY no-carve pumpkin projects that minimize mess and maximize fun!

Magazine Mosaic

Cut pictures and words from old magazines to create a mosaic that represents your unique style.

Spooky Spider

A few simple materials help turn a mini pumpkin into an adorable creepy crawly spider.

Pumpkin Bling

You’ve heard of “Pimp My Ride”, Right? Use your favorite scrapbooking supplies to “bling” your pumpkin.

Fall 2022

53


Kauai Halloween Events

9th Annual Harvest Festival

Trunk OR Treat + Glow Show

Kauai Christian Academy’s 22nd Annual Fall Festival

KVMH Halloween Keiki Parade

Saturday, October 15th, 10am-4pm Kekaha Neighborhood Center Park FREE PUMPKINS, ADMISSION, ENTERTAINMENT! Rides, Food Booths, and Educational Tent

Friday & Saturday October 28th & 29th, 4:00pm-9:00pm Kauai Christian Academy campus. Carnival Games, Hay Rides, Local Food Vendors, Bounce Houses, Amazing Bake Sale and a HUGE Silent Auction! www.kcaschool.org

Haunted Hale- Drive Thru Trick or Treat

Saturday, October 29. FREE Keiki Hour: 6:30pm-7:30pm Big Kids: 7:30pm-9:30pm *No strobes Anaina Hou Community Park, Kilauea www.anainahou.org

54

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

Sunday, October 30th, 6pm FREE Kings Chapel Eleele, Lihue Fun, Candy, Prizes! www.kckauai.com

Monday, October 31st, 12pm-1pm Kauai Veterans Memorial Hospital Toddlers/Babies ages 3 and under who were born at KVMH are invited to show off their costumes.

Kalaheo Dental Group’s Halloween Candy Buy Back

Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2pm to 5pm Get $1/pound of unopened candy (up to 5 pounds). Prize Drawing: $100 gift card to Small Fry Kauai Candy will be sent to our troops via Operation Gratitude. Rainbow Plaza, Kalaheo www.KalaheoDental.com


2023 Does YOUR CHILD want to APPEAR on the cover of Kauai Family Magazine?

The Go-To Resou

rce for Kaua`i Famili

Fall 2022

Cover Winner: John

es

KauaiFamilyMag

azine.com

HARVEST FESTIVAL TRICKS & TREATS FUN FAMILY HAPPENINGS

Alfiler

We’re looking for four children ages 4-11 with big smiles to appear on the cover of a future issue of Kauai Family Magazine!

DEADLINE: November 15, 2022 (Online entries must be received by 11: 59 p.m. on this date)

Contest open to all Kauai County residents. Visit our website to enter contest online beginning August 15th. A $10 registration fee per entry must accompany a recent high quality photo.

S ubmitted photos of 20 finalists will be displayed on our website at www.KauaiFamilyMagazine.com Questions? Email: info@KauaiFamilyMagazine.com Visit our website for complete rules and more information.

Enter online at www.KauaiFamilyMagazine.com


Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy By Carol Fujiyoshi, M.D. Kauai Medical Clinic “Pregnancy weakens the immune system and makes women more susceptible to contagious diseases, including the flu and COVID-19. Vaccinations have been found to be safe for both illnesses and prevent severe complications that can require hospitalization and oxygen support.” Pregnancy is a time when your expectations turn to doing what's best for your baby. In addition to regular visits with your doctor, there are habits you can focus on that promote a healthy pregnancy. For starters, select a variety of healthful foods and eat consistently throughout the day. Exercise regularly—before, during and after pregnancy—to help reduce back pain, constipation and other common health problems. And, make sure you’re up to date on important vaccinations. “Pregnancy weakens the immune system and makes women more susceptible to contagious diseases, including the flu and COVID-19,” says Dr. Carol Fujiyoshi, Wilcox Medical Center chief of staff and section chief of Kaua‘i Medical Clinic’s OB-GYN Department. “We have found that patients who are not vaccinated have more severe forms of the flu and COVID-19,” Fujiyoshi says. “Vaccinations have been found to be safe for both illnesses and prevent severe complications that can require hospitalization and oxygen support.” In addition, Fujiyoshi recommends these three tips: • Take prenatal vitamins. Taking prenatal vitamins during pregnancy supports your growing baby as well as your body as it changes throughout this time. If you’re trying to become pregnant, you can begin taking a daily prenatal vitamin or multivitamin with 400-800 micrograms of folic acid to decrease the chances of

56

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

having a baby with a spinal cord defect like spina bifida. • Monitor your blood pressure. If untreated, gestational hypertension can cause serious complications for both mother and baby, including kidney problems, poor fetal growth, seizures and even death. It’s important to keep an eye on your blood pressure so you can receive preventive treatment early. • Watch blood-sugar levels. Similar to high blood pressure, having high bloodsugar (glucose) levels during pregnancy puts you and your baby at a greater risk for developing health complications. Be sure to have your blood-sugar levels monitored as part of your prenatal care, as gestational diabetes doesn’t have noticeable symptoms. The expert staff of the Women and Infants’ Health Unit at Wilcox Medical Center are available to support parentsto-be through childbirth education, lactation consultation, labor management and newborn care. To schedule an appointment or for more information, visit WilcoxHealth.org/Maternity.


4370 Kukui Grove Street • Suite 115, Lihue HI 96766

808-246-9577

www.mphskauai.org

Serving those in need on Kauai for over 30 years

Services include Clinic Services: Women’s Clinic Transgender Services Tobacco Cessation

Support: HIV Case Management Education:

HIV Testing

Fatherhood/Motherhood is Sacred

STD Testing

Love Notes, Teens &

Hepatitis B & C

Healthy Relationships


Children’s Eye Health & Safety

By Punzal Vision, Dr. Joel E. Punzal, OD

Our keiki are survivors! Our children’s resiliency through the pandemic is commendable. August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month, so now that our keiki are able to resume some normalcy with the back-to-school routine, sports, and extracurricular activities, it is important to set them up with tools for success. Seeing well and keeping one’s eyes protected are paramount to learning and eye health. Here are some helpful tips: 1. Annual eye exams are important to evaluate for refractive error and to maintain good eye health. 2. Over-the-counter blue light glasses are very popular; however, the efficacy varies. Prescription glasses with premium blue light filters will help to ensure that the glasses are providing adequate protection from the harmful light rays on the UV spectrum. 3. Sports goggles or contact lenses can maximize performance for athletes. Call today to schedule your child’s eye exam!

58

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Fall 2022

59


60

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Fall 2022

61


Kauai Interscholastic Federation 2022 Fall Schedules Note: Dates & Times May Change Without Notice

CROSS COUNTRY Day

Date

Event

Site

Time

Sat.

9/10/22

Pre-Season Invitational

Island School

7:30am

Sat.

9/17/22

Week 1

Kauai - Puakea GC

7:30am

Sat.

9/24/22

Week 2

Waimea

7:30am

Fri

9/30/22

Middle School Invitational

RCK - Puakea GC

5:00pm

Sat.

10/1/22

Week 3

Island School

4:00pm

Fri.

10/7/22

Middle School Invitational

RCK - Island School

4:00pm

Sat.

10/8/22

OPEN

Island School

7:30am

Sat.

10/15/22

Week 4

Kapaa

7:30am

Sat.

10/22/22

KIF Championship

Island School

7:30am

Event

Site

Time

BOWLING Day

Date

Wed.

Pre-Season Meeting

Virtual Meeting

6:00pm

Thur.

9/1/22

Week 1

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Thur.

9/8/22

Week 2

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Thur.

9/15/22

Week 3

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Thur.

9/22/22

Week 4

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Thur.

9/29/22

Week 5

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Wed.

10/3/22

Week 6

Kauai Bowl

4:00pm

Wed.

10/13/22

Post Season Meeting

Virtual Meeting

6:00pm

Host OIA

Leeward Bowl

Thur. - Fri. 10/27-28 State Tournament

62

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Photo Credit: Manuel Henriques and Todd Fuerte

Fall 2022

63


FOOTBALL Day

Date

Note: Dates & Times May Change Without Notice Matchup

Site

Time JV 2:00, Varsity 4:30pm

Pre-Season Thur.

7/28/22

Kapaa VS Mililani

Vidinha Stadium

Sat.

8/6/22

Kapaa @ Aiea

Radford HS

Sat.

8/6/22

Kauai VS Pearl City

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00, Varsity 7:30pm

Sat.

8/6/22

Waimea VS Kaimuki

Hanapepe Stadium

7:00pm

Sat.

8/13/22

Kauai vs Baldwin

Vidinha Stadium

Varsity 7:30pm

Sat.

8/13/22

Waimea @ Kekaulike

@ Kekaulike

Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

(Scrimmage)

N on-League Games

64

Sat.

8/27/22

Kauai VS Kapaa

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

9/3/22

Waimea VS Kauai

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

9/10/22

Kapaa VS Waimea

BJB Sports Complex

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

9/17/22

Kapaa VS Kauai

BJB Sports Complex

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

9/24/22

Kauai VS Waimea

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

10/1/22

Waimea VS Kapaa

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

10/8/22

FALL BREAK

NO GAME

Sat.

10/15/22

Kauai VS Kapaa

Vidinha Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

10/22/22

Waimea VS Kauai

Hanapepe Stadium

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

Sat.

10/29/22

Kapaa VS Waimea

BJB Sports Complex

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 30 min after JV

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


GIRLS VOLLEYBALL

Note: Dates & Times May Change Without Notice

Day

Date

Matchup

Site

Time

Tue.

9/6/22

Kauai VS Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

9/6/22

Island VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/9/22

Waimea VS Kauai

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/9/22

Kapaa VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

9/13/22

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

9/13/22

Island VS Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/16/22

Kapaa VS Island

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/16/22

Waimea VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

9/20/22

Kauai VS Waimea

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

9/20/22

Island VS Kapaa

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/23/22

Waimea VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/23/22

Kauai VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Sat.

9/24/22

Playoff, If Needed

6:30pm

Mon.

9/26/22

Playoff, If Needed

6:30pm

Tue.

9/27/22

Kapaa VS Kauai

Kapaa HS Gym

Tue.

9/27/22

Waimea VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/30/22

Kauai VS Waimea

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

9/30/22

Island VS Kapaa

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

10/4/22

Waimea VS Kapaa

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

10/4/22

Kauai VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

10/7/22

Kauai VS Kapaa

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

10/7/22

Island VS Waimea

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

10/11/22

Waimea VS Kauai

Kauai HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Tue.

10/11/22

Kapaa VS Island

Island School Gym JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

10/14/22

Kapaa VS Waimea

Kapaa HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fri.

10/14/22

Island VS Kauai

Waimea HS Gym

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

JV 5:00pm, Varsity 25 minutes after JV ends

Fall 2022

65


66

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Fall 2022

67


68

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Fall 2022

69


Congratulations to the Class of 2022

Best wishes to all the graduating seniors of the Class of 2022! We look forward to a bright future with so many talented local students.

Madhav Collins Doijode

Madhav will be graduating from Kapa‘a High School this May. Madhav continues to engage in service to his community and said, “I want to live a life of helping others, of being a positive force for change.” He has always been fascinated by science and biology and desires to improve the lives of others by becoming a physician. Madhav will be studying at Swarthmore College in Philadelphia.

Aidan Gregerson

A soon-to-be graduate of Kaua‘i High School, Aidan has selected Columbia University in New York City to study neuroscience and computer science. Aidan’s dual fields of study will focus on his desire to practice medicine and wanting to pursue scientific research specializing in computers. Aidan said, “Any advancement in understanding the brain will advance computing and provide the technology necessary to solve the great problems of our time.”

Glydelle Argel Valmoja

Glydelle hails from Waimea High School and will be pursuing a

career as a family nurse practitioner. She will be studying at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in the fall. Glydelle is not only outstanding in academics, but also a leader in serving her class, in student government and as the Battalion Commander of her school’s JROTC program.

70

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com


Grove Farm Scholars! Congratulations to Kaua‘i’s Class of 2022! You’ve endured unprecedented high school years and you all persevered! Grove Farm and our esteemed panel of judges met with nine graduating seniors from Kaua‘i’s three public high schools who applied for the opportunity to receive a $20,000 college scholarship. Each year, the Grove Farm Scholarship Program awards three $20,000 scholarships to local high school graduating seniors who will be attending a four-year university or college. This merit-based scholarship is one of the largest scholarships within the State of Hawaiʻi. The Grove Farm Scholars Program is now in its 13thyear, and the Grove Farm Foundation has awarded $780,000 in scholarships to date. It is always a tough decision to select the three scholars amongst so many talented and deserving individuals. This year, our three Grove Farm Scholars are Madhav Collins Doijode, Aidan Gregerson, and Glydelle Valmoja.

Hoʻomaikaʻi Halau Ka Lei Mokihana o Leinaʻala!

Congratulations to Kauaʻi’s own, Halau Ka Lei Mokihana o Leinaʻala for winning first place in the Wahine ʻAuana, Wahine Kahiko, Wahine Overall and Overall competition in the 59th annual Merrie Monarch Festival in Hilo! This amazing feat comes in the 25th anniversary of HKMOL, and their 10th anniversary of competing in the prestigious festival.

Grove Farm is proud to work with Halau Ka Lei Mokihana o Leinaʻala during their various fundraising events, hoʻike, and restoring areas with native Hawaiian plants used for hula. Congratulations to Kumu Leinaʻala, the beautiful dancers, backstage staff, all the aunties and uncles that had a hand in supporting Halau Ka Lei Mokihana o Leinaʻala over the past 25 years. We can’t wait to see what the future has in store!

Halau Ka Lei Mokihana o Leina’ala return home to Kaua’i with the Merrie Monarch 1st Place Overall trophy

Fall 2022

71


“Freddie”, named after Kauai Humane Society’s Freddie’s Dog Park


Heading out to the Dog Park? Please “PAWS” a minute & read!! Aloha Pet Parents! Here’s some helpful information to make sure your trip to the dog park with your Keiki is safe and “all about” Rover! Please Kokua, read the park rules before you enter the gate! MOST IMPORTANTLY…If your child is afraid of dogs this is not a place to take them to get over their fears. Take extreme caution regarding children attention due to diaper, potty training or just being low to the ground. Strollers are a “NO, NO” due to the dogs curious nature. They might jump up to see what it is, as well as being drawn to all the wonderful smells strollers have. Teach your keiki that they need to stay with you and their job is to help you watch the dog play. Explain that they should not run around, throw things, yell or approach dogs they do not know. If a dog comes up to them and wants to smell them, that it is ok and that is how dogs greet everyone. If a dog is running towards them, stay still, if you run away the dog will think you are playing and it may cause several dogs to follow.

Let your keiki know that if they feel uncomfortable or scared about anything they should tell you right away. Stay focused, over time you will develop relationships with other pet parents. Talking story is another distraction besides watching the dog, your keiki, the phone and so forth. I spoke to several parents who prefer just taking the dog, no keiki’s. They feel more relaxed and get to enjoy the one to one time with Rover. After all, says” thanks for having a play date just for me!!” Quality time is priceless …right down to the minutes you have with the furry ones. Donna & David Pickard “Don’t shop, please adopt” Ruff

Bring Fido - Off-Leash Dog Parks

This is a playground especially for your dog. While it is not recommended, children are welcome however, child’s play is not.

Freddie’s Dog Park

Kaua`i Humane Society 3-825 Kaumuali`i Highway, Lihue (808) 632-0610 khs@kauaihumane.org Hours: Open from 10am-6pm daily Cost: $5 day pass. Two Parks - One for dogs smaller than 30 pounds and one for larger dogs.

North Shore Dog Park

Wai Koa Plantation in Kilauea Kaua`i North Shore Comm. Foundation (808) 240-2670 Email: info@knscf.org Cost: $50 annual membership to Kaua`i North Shore Community Foundation

Wailua Homestead Dog Park

Fall 2022

73


Pets Need Dental Care, Too!

By Scott Sims, DVM

Does your Pet have Bad Breath?

Bad breath isn’t just unpleasant- it can be unhealthy Most of us brush our teeth at least once or twice a day, but our pets … well they aren’t very good at taking care of their teeth without our help. There is no question that good dental care provides a whole collection of benefits to your pet, as well as to you. Poor dental care results in tartar buildup on the teeth and causes gingivitis which is defined as inflammation of the gums around the teeth. This inflammation results in the breakdown of the barrier that keeps the bacteria from the mouth out of the underlying bone and the blood. When bacteria from the mouth invade the bone it can cause serious infections which can result in tooth loosening and loss, or even osteomyelitis (bone infection) of the bones of the jaw and face which in rare instances can be fatal. Bacteria that get into the blood stream tend to settle out on the valves of the heart causing heart murmurs and congestive heart failure. The nasty little bugs also like to settle in the kidneys where they can cause kidney failure. Q. All that being said, what should you do to make sure your pet’s mouth is healthy? A. Regular scaling of the teeth, either using manual or ultrasonic equipment will really help. Legally this is considered surgery and can only be done by a licensed veterinarian or by a veterinary technician under the direct supervision of a vet. Even so there are lay people who do clean small animal’s teeth and as long as they do a good job I personally don’t have a problem with it. Scaling is

74

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

almost always done under some sort of sedation/anesthetic. While scaling isn’t particularly painful it is unpleasant to get down deep under the gums and that’s the most important part of the procedure. Since only veterinarians can use sedatives and anesthetics, it is my opinion that most of the time dentals should be done by vets because the drugs allow the job to be done much more thoroughly. After your pets teeth are cleaned well you can do a lot to keep them clean and postpone needing to have them done again. You can teach almost any dog or cat to allow you to brush their teeth. Use a soft bristle brush (you should do the same on your own teeth). There are special brushes for dogs and cats, including some that fit over your fingertip, but a human brush can be used. The toothpaste can be anything from human paste to special meat flavored paste to just plain baking soda in water. It’s really the mechanics of brushing that’s most important. It takes a little over 24 hours for plaque to form and stick to teeth so you do need to brush at least once a day. Once the plaque has hardened and stuck to the enamel no amount of brushing will get it to come off. Remember that if you’re just getting your pet and they’re youngsters start training them early. It’s a lot easier. One last note and this is really important. If your pet won’t let you brush their teeth don’t force it. They might bite and clean teeth are just not worth getting bitten over. If they’re bad take them in and get them worked on by a professional.


Newton Young Is Kauai’s

DOG WHISPERER Many dog owners have asked, “Do all dogs need to go to an obedience class?” From my view point, not all dogs need an obedience class. I feel the owners need the class more to understand why their dog acts and behave the way they do.

Dogs are “pack animals”, they need a leader in the pack. Your dog will do his best to lead you and everyone in your household, because your family is his pack. Once you understand this pack mentality, you will be able to start training your dog to follow your leadership. (Like pulling you down the street on a leash; he feels he’s leading and you are following him.) This can be changed!!

obedience training classes.

During the year, DFK offers two sets of obedience training classes, one held in the fall and one in the spring. There are four categories of training: Kindergarten Puppy and Novice Obedience are held on Saturdays at the Grove Farm Park in Puhi; Advanced Novice Obedience and Performance Novice Obedience are usually held in the evening at Kmart’s rear parking lot. Each hour-long class meets once a week for 10 weeks. Agility classes are offered once a week for eight weeks starting in June. Registration for obedience classes are held on the second Saturday of February and August and classes start at the beginning of March and September. For more information call the Dog Fanciers of Kaua‘i at 246-6889.

Some dogs are submissive and will follow you on a leash with no problem, but when others approaches the pack, they may snap at them or bark and growl to protect it’s pack. These are a few problems we are able to help dog owners with at our ten week sessions at Dog Fanciers of Kauai. Newton has over 40 years of experience training dogs for American Kennel Club trails and dog shows and is the main trainer of Dog Fancier’s of Kauai. Dog Fanciers of Kaua‘i was founded in 1983 with the goal of improving the quality of life on Kaua‘i by providing dog

Fall 2022

75


Resource Directory Kaua‘i County Access to Health Services Telehealth is a great option to safely continue

COVID-19 Vaccines & Boosters

information, contact your insurance or the

Vaccines are safe & effective at preventing COVID-19 severe illness & death. In Kaua‘i,

Pacific Basin Telehealth Resource Center

vaccines and boosters are widely accessible

!(808) 956-2897

& are available for everyone at no cost. To

If you are uninsured, contact Med-QUEST for coverage. You may be eligible now! To apply,

schedule a COVID-19 vaccine or booster

call !1(877) 628-5076 or visit

§ Ho’ōla Lāhui Hawai‘i !(808) 938-0938

https://mybenefits.hawaii.gov/

§ Kaiser Permanente, Līhuʻe

with treatments & appointments. For more

Other affordable health care services for lowincome families: § Ho‘ōla Lahui Hawai‘i !(808) 240-0100 § Mālama Pono Health Services (MPHS) reproductive health & case management. !(808) 246-9577 § HMSA’s Online Care App: affordable telehealth for anyone 18+ years in Hawai‘i. § The Department of Education (DOE) Health Hotline !(844) 436-3888 § Project Vision: no-cost screening & reading glasses !(808) 201-3937 § BCCCP: Mammograms & cervical cancer screenings !(808) 245-7767

appointment, contact:

!(808) 246-5600

§ Wilcox Medical Center, Līhuʻe WilcoxHealth.org/Vaccine § Kauaʻi Veterans Memorial Hospital (KVMH), Waimea kauai.hhsc.org/ § Samuel Mahelona Memorial Hospital, Kapa‘a kauai.hhsc.org/ § Pharmacies: o Longs – CVS www.cvs.com/immunizations o Costco https://www.costco.com/covidvaccine.html o Līhuʻe Pharmacy !(808) 246-9100 o Safeway Pharmacy

www.safeway.com/pharmacy/covid-

Language assistance may be available at: o Helping Hands !(808) 526-9724 o KDHO Bilingual Health Access !(808) 241-3421

o We are Oceania (WAO) for communities from Micronesia, Marshall Islands, & Palau, COVID-19 helpline !(808) 913-1364

19.html o Walmart

www.walmart.com/COVIDvaccine

Search additional vaccination locations at kauai.gov/vaccine or call the Kaua‘i District Health Office (KDHO) at !(808)241-3495

For more information on resources call !211 - Aloha United Way (AUW) Benefits & services change continuously. For the most up-to-date version, please visit www.kauai.gov/covid-19

76

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

1


HEALTHY FAMILIES: SUPPORT PROGRAMS If you or a loved one is experiencing emotional or mental health distress, please call 24/7 Hawai‘i CARES line at !1(800) 753-6879 or text ALOHA to 741741 for free & anonymous crisis counseling. Multilingual services available. § Child & adolescent mental health services at the Kauaʻi Family Guidance Center !(808) 274-3883

Support for Children, Youth, & Parents § Child and Family Service supports keiki, parents, kupuna, & immigrants !(808) 245-5914 § The Parent Line: free & confidential support on kids’ behavior.

§ Adult mental health & case management !(808) 643-2643

!1(800) 816-1222 § Healthy mothers, healthy babies virtual

§ Catholic Charities Hawai‘i Counseling Center !(808) 520-7721

new-parent support & telehealth lactation services !(808) 737-5805 § Family Hui Hawai‘i: Peer-led parenting

§ Suicide Prevention Resource Center !1(800) 273-8255 o 24/7, confidential support for people in distress & resources for everyone.

§

for Native Hawaiian families. Visit onipaa.org/ or call !(808) 466-8080

o Options for Deaf & Hard of Hearing available. § Support for sexual & gender minorities: § LGBTQ++ tools & information at the Sexual & Gender Minorities (SGM) Resource Hub. § Mālama Pono Health Services: counseling & hormone replacement therapy, & PrEP management !(808) 246-9577 § The YWCA offers LGBTQ support & information !(808) 245-5959 x256 or email matthew@ywcakauai.org

Assistance during crisis

group. Visit FB page or !(808) 230-7112 Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust: Social services

§

The Easter Seals Kauaʻi’s Early Intervention program !(808) 245-7141

§

Hale ʻŌpio: programs, support for youth & families. !(808) 245-2873

§

Keiki to Career: Information for parents & children. !(808) 632-2005 or visit FB

§

page The Boys & Girls Club of Kauaʻi: Contact each Club House for information, o Kapa'a !(808) 821-4406 o Līhuʻe !(808) 245-2210

o West Kauaʻi !(808) 320-8353

§ YWCA: Case management & crisis intervention !(808) 245-6362 / 4144 § Women in Need (WIN): support for women & children with a history of domestic violence,

substance abuse, or incarceration !(808) 245-1996 § Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Hotline: to report a suspect case or for information !(808) 832-5300 or 1(888) 380-3088 § Virtual Family Assistance at www.redcross.org/VFAC or !1(833) 492-0094

Childcare § PATCH (People Attentive to Children) !(808) 246-0622 § INPEACE (Institute for Native Pacific Education & Culture Help) at laciec@inpeace.org or !(808) 245-0045 § Child Care Connection Hawai'i offers assistance for income eligible families !(808) 245-2193

2

For more information on resources call !211 - Aloha United Way (AUW) Benefits & services change continuously. For the most up-to-date version, please visit www.kauai.gov/covid-19

Fall 2022

77


FOOD ACCESS Food resources are available to ANYONE experiencing food insecurity. Please contact the provider & check for eligibility before visiting any center. § Hawai‘i Food Bank-Kauaʻi Branch !(808) 482-2224

§ Kauaʻi Independent Food Bank !(808) 246-3809

§ Mālama Kauaʻi !(808) 828-0685 x23 o Accessible CSA Produce Bags o Food access programs o Farmer support § Other meal programs for Kūpuna & families experiencing houselessness: o Nourish Kauaʻi !(808) 635-3722 o Kauaʻi Economic Opportunity !(808) 245-4077

o The Agency of Elderly Affairs (AEA) provides assistance to seniors !(808) 241-4470

o Our Kūpuna !(808) 400-4506 o Kumano I Ke Ala, Waimea

kumanoikeala@gmail.com

!(808) 346-5348

§ The Kauaʻi Humane Society’s Pet Food Bank can assist with food for pets ! (808) 632-0610

Supplemental Resources § Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) !(808) 274-3371 o After receiving the SNAP card, sign up for the Da Bux Card for 50% discount on qualifying local fresh produce !(808) 437-3044 § Supplemental Nutrition for Women Infants, & Children, (WIC) !(808) 241-3080 § Public Assistance !(855) 643-1643

Pantries & Meals North o St. William Church, Hanalei !(808) 346-2850 o Church of the Pacific, Princeville !(808) 826-6481 o North Shore Food Pantry, Kīlauea. !(970) 618-8889 East o Anahola Beach Park !(808) 826-6481 o Hale Ho’omalu, Kapa‘a !(808) 821-2520 o Kapa‘a Missionary Church !(808) 822-5594 o St. Catherine’s, Kapa‘a !(808) 635-3722 Central o Kings Chapel, Hanamāʻulu !(808) 335-6845 o KEO, Līhu‘e !(808) 245-4077 o Līhu‘e Salvation Army !(808) 245-2571 o Calvary Chapel, Līhu‘e !(808)245-9613 o St. Michaels & All Angels Episcopal Church, Līhu‘e !(808) 245-3796 South o St Raphael Church, Kōloa !(808) 742-1955 o Holy Cross/Sacred Heart, Kalāheo !(808) 332-8011 West o ‘Ele’ele Baptist Church !(808) 332-5906 o Hanapēpē Salvation Army !(808) 335-5441 o Nana’s House, Waimea !(808) 338-0252 o Westside Christian Center AOG, Kekaha !(808) 643-7040 •

For an updated list, !(808) 828-0685 x23 or visit www.malamakauai.org

For more information on resources call !211 - Aloha United Way (AUW) Benefits & services change continuously. For the most up-to-date version, please visit www.kauai.gov/covid-19

78

www.kauaifamilymagazine.com

3


HOUSING AND UTILITY ASSISTANCE The American Rescue Plan allocated more than $200 million in rent, utility, & mortgage assistance programs. Call !211 for information about current programs. Assistance is available to Kauaʻi residents who were financially affected by the pandemic & have fallen behind on their rent, mortgage, electric, water, sewer and gas bills. § HUD can assist low-income residents looking for affordable housing. Find a HUD approved housing counselor !(800) 569-4287 o Senior’s line !(808) 536-0011

§ The Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) offers Emergency Rental Assistance Program & Direct Loan Payments. Visit dhhl.hawaii.gov/covid-19/ or !(808) 620-9500 to speak with a DHHL officer.

§ The County of Kaua‘i and the KFCU offer the Coronavirus Rental & Utility program. Visit https://kauairenthelp.com/ or !(808) 482-3777 § For other programs, contact the County Housing Agency !(808) 241-4444 § Women in Need provides transitional housing opportunities !(808) 245-1996 § Catholic Charities Hawai‘i helps with costs such as rent or utilities, & other services for houseless families !(808) 241-4673 § Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) provides qualifying low-income households with a one-time credit to offset energy costs !(808) 245-4077 § Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) !1(855) 643-1643 § Hawaiian Community Assets provides emergency loans to assist with first month's rent/deposit, past due rent, or mortgage payments. All borrowers receive individualized financial counseling !(866) 824-0448

Other key resources § Hawai‘i State Department of Health. COVID-19 information hawaiicovid19.com/ § Kaua‘i Emergency Management Agency (KEMA) www.kauai.gov/COVID-19 § FEMA’s is offering financial COVID-19 Funeral Assistance. Visit, www.FEMA.gov/funeral-assistance/faq or !(844) 684-6333 or (TTY) 800-462-7585 § Resources for Hawai‘i, Senator Brian Schatz www.schatz.senate.gov/coronavirus § Crowdsourced Hawai‘i COVID-19 Resources www.resilienthawaii.org/ § Hawai‘i Children Action Network Interactive Map for Hawaiʻi COVID-19 Resources covid19.hawaii-can.org/ § Child and Family Services offers support to everyone including kupuna, immigrants, & houseless. o Nana’s House !(808) 338-0252 o Hale Ho‘omalu !(808) 821-2520 § Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i !1(800) 499-4302 o Legal Help & Resources www.legalaidhawaii.org/covid-19legal-help--resources.html. Also available in various languages.

Call !211 - Aloha United Way (AUW) for more information on assistance & resources. Scan here for the online version

This document was updated on 7/1/2022. Services available continue to change. For the most up-to-date information, please check with each provider or visit www.kauai.gov/covid-19 To request changes, please email KauaiHealthPromotion@gmail.com. If you need an auxiliary aid/service or other accommodation due to a disability, please contact 808-241-3495 in advance. Requests made as early as possible will allow adequate time to fulfill request. Upon request, this notice is available in alternate formats such as large print, Braille, or electronic copy.

Fall 2022

4 79


Our family will take care of yours. There’s no need to leave Kaua‘i to receive quality maternity care. From low-risk (with minimal intervention) to high-risk pregnancies, we work with you to honor your birthing plan. We even provide free virtual childbirth classes and a virtual lactation support group. If needed, we also offer immediate and seamless connection to maternal fetal medicine specialists at Kapi‘olani Medical Center for Women & Children. OB-GYN services are also available at the KMC Kapa‘a clinic. WilcoxHealth.org/Maternity.