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Katya Manjossova Creative Director Katya is an award winning graphic designer, who is very passionate about design and horses. She is very active in equestrian product development market. Katya has started several successful brands for the equine industry and helped many companies to market their products and services. Katya was born in Russia, where she successfully competed as a junior rider in show jumping, training at the Olympic Complex - Bitsa in the heart of Moscow. She was invited to study in the USA in 1991, and consequently has made this her home.

Originally from England, and a 3rd generation equestrian. At the age of 5 began riding and continued with her love of horses. She moved to USA in 1985, and has lived west of Atlanta since 1999 with her 2 daughters Joanne and Jacqueline, and with her partner Mike since 2007. Their home is a farm in Villa Rica that offers boarding and training. Both daughters are avid Eventers, and Penny has joined Chattahoochee Hills Eventing as one of the organizers for the International 3 star event in May. Her background is engineering, design and advertising sales. She is very excited to join Katya Manjossova in taking City Horse Connections around the country bringing together all equestrians of all disciplines.

CITY HORSE CA

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Penny Morse Managing Director, Sales and Editor

Atlanta Horse Connections magazine is now a part of City Horse Connections an equestrian network bringing equine world together, one city at the time ...

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About the Publishers:

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...more locations are coming - get connected...

For more information or to request a media kit Please contact us at 770-316-8655 /atlantahorseconnections

All articles and pictures are owned and copyrighted by City Horse Connections, a subsidiary of JJP Group, Katya Manjossova, and Penelope Morse. Reproduction of copyrighted material, without prior permission of the copyright owner, is illegal according to 17 U.S.C. Reproductions of copyright materials apply not only to traditional works such as books, photographs, drawings, etc., but also digital media such as music, movies and software.


Contents

HUNTER JUMPER EVENTING DRESSAGE WESTERN N AT U R A L HORSEMANSHIP ART AND E N T E R TA I N M E N T FA S H I O N BARN HELP WELLNESS


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

By Penny Morse Villa Rica, Georgia

farm

It is not every day a state of the art Hunter/Jumper facility appears in Villa Rica, Georgia. A small town, divided by I-20, west of Atlanta, and 24 miles from the Alabama/Georgia state line. Harrison and Danielle Ford were introduced to a beautiful piece of property, and realized this was the opportunity they had been looking for, to build a facility to their specifications and the location was conveniently located. They have both been successful in the Hunter/Jumper world for the last 20 years, as trainers, competitors and Danielle, also as a professional braider. It hasn’t always been an easy road for them, losing their farm 5 years ago, due to the owner’s misfortune, and along with that went their clients, but they have continued on with hard work and dedication, and rebuilt their clientele. Harrison and Danielle have been located in Palmetto, but will be moving to Villa Rica in November, with their daughter, Sophie, 2 staff and their horses.

HUNTER JUMPER

When you arrive at Hillford farm, you immediately realize you are at an establishment that has been designed with forethought and flair. The farm sits on a modest 13 acres, but has been designed to be efficient, utilizing every square inch. The barn is made up of 14 standard stalls, 4 extra large stalls, plus Danielle’s personal stalls. Each stall has the Stable Comfort flooring system and Barn Kooler Fans. The stall fronts, by Saratoga Stalls, are impressive, reminding one of the large barns in Europe. There are 3 wash racks and climate controlled tack room with lounge, laundry room and bathroom. The indoor arena is an impressive 165’ x 80’, with a rock dust and sand footing, with jumps by Burlingham Sports. The outdoor arena, styled after one of the arenas at HITS in Ocala, has weather resistant jumps by Eurimports Equestrian from Germany, on an all weather footing, and a shaded pavilion. There are eleven four-board fenced grass paddocks, and two with all weather footing so turnout in inclement weather is available. HillFord Farm, Inc.


Harrison and Danielle Ford

The installation of the Kraft Equine Treadmill separates this facility from most. It is refreshing to see the effort going into the welfare of the horse as well as the training. This facility, once open is going to be a perfect example of how a barn should be. It is easy to assume successful professional riders to be unapproachable; however we found Harrison Ford to be welcoming and pleasantly down to earth. He and his wife are professional, knowledgeable, caring, dedicated to the sport, and not afraid of hard work. With only 2 staff, horses in training, and 35 shows a year to attend, everyone at Hillford Farm works hard and efficiently. We look forward to seeing the success of Harrison and Danielle Ford at their new location.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Construction of a new Hunter/Jumper facility in Villa Rica, Georgia

Harrison has graciously agreed to share his knowledge and thoughts as a columnist with this publication. We are excited to see how his business develops in the West Georgia area.

HUNTER JUMPER

www.HillFordFarmGA.com


HUNTER JUMPER ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

IEA… FROM A YOUNG RIDER By Sarah Ann Bowman

IEA is great (Interscholastic Equestrian Association) for many reasons. I love hanging out with my friends while improving my riding and showing many different horses. Another thing I like is that you draw a horse to show, which means no one has a nicer, more expensive horse. I ride on the North Cobb Christian IEA team (one more reason to love my school). My mom, Robecca Bowman and Lindsay Haselden coach the school team along with the North Atlanta Equestrian team. I just spent the last few days at two IEA shows at the Georgia International Horse Park with eight good friends. We did everything together all weekend including: getting show ready, loaning clothes, eating, riding, holding horses, staying at hotels, seeing a movie and encouraging each other. First day was the Eastside/A-Step-Away show, and the second day was the Strong Rock show.

This is good advice for any horse show. Thank you Amanda.

HUNTER JUMPER

I also got to meet Amanda Garner, author of “A Parent’s Guide to IEA“. She gave me a few tips: • Listen to your coach (Even if it is your mom) • Believe in your coach • Keep it simple and basic • Ride straight • Use your corners


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

HUNTER JUMPER

Taken for a ride in Greece by Carolyn, FEI International Jumping Judge

JUDGING I have come to the conclusion that I must be accident prone, at least when it's a question of first times. The first time I was ever asked to preside over a ground jury took me by surprise. A string of unfortunate incidents left the authorities that be with no other choice but to ask me to bail them out, being as I was next in line in the national judge hierarchy. There weren't many show jumping judges in Greece at that time, and fewer still who were experienced enough to act as president of a ground jury. Three presidents were needed for three ground juries on the same day. You see, there were two final rigional events held simultaneously in northern Greece, that is Thessaloniki, in the northern area of Attica, near Athens, and also in the southern area of the same province of Attica. Each region would declare and award the overall winners of the athletic year for each class. One colleague, an international judge, had gone abroad, another had just lost her mother the day before and had to arrange a funeral, and a third colleague was tending her small son in hospital. Could I step in? The show ground was at a club in Chalkida, a town a hundred miles north east of Athens on the long thin peninsular off the east coast of mainland Greece. The two hour journey is a delight, especially in the Spring. The wild flowers have to be seen to be believed, the lower slopes of the mountains are dotted with mauve clumps of thyme and rosemary. Wild marigolds spread unimpeded over all open ground and the sides of the roads are

interspersed with bright specks of poppies. You can turn a corner and come across the sight of a whole hillside flush with a carpet of poppies. Pink campion abounds, twisting its way up telegraph poles and tumbling through hedges, while wild artichokes and thistles proudly raise their purple heads from amidst the tall grass and wild oats. Poplars point skyward here and there in the middle distance, giving variety of form and balance to the overall picture. This is the season when lemon and orange trees come into blossom. The scent is a heavy, heady sweetness that could never be matched by any Chanel, Ricci or Rochas. I turned right, off the country road and entered a narrow lane with precariously deep ditches to either side. “How on earth do the truck drivers with their precious loads of livestock manage to manoeuvre along these paths?” I muse to myself. Chalkida has a picturesque riding club situated in the countryside outside the town. Narrow lanes take the visitor between vineyards and orchards of fig and pistachio until a sharp turn to the left leads them down to an area camouflaged among rows of elm trees and banks of wild flowers. Rising up behind the arena and collecting ring is the glass-fronted clubhouse, perched high on a rise and bordered by a wisteria, which weaves its tendrils of mauve among the elms. The extensive veranda of the club affords a wonderful bird's eye view of the whole competition ground.

When I finally arrived at the Chalkida riding club, the course had been built and was awaiting my approval. My first problem came with the appearance of the other two judges, both competent judges but neither willing to speak on the microphone, despite being native speakers of Greek. I must explain here that three is the usual number of judges on a ground jury, both at international and national level. However, the duties differ slightly. At an international competition, Judge 1 is the President, who has responsibility for the bell and overall management of the smooth running of the competition. Judge 2 takes care of the timing, oversees the time keepers, keeps a hand held stop watch and also must oversee that the final results are correct. The third judge is the one who carefully watches the course ridden by each rider and calls out the faults. Apart from the judges, there is a speaker, often a professional, in the jury box and a secretary is present to write the score sheets. Now at national level in Greece, and other countries in Europe that I know of, there are three judges who do everything, including speaking on the microphone and writing the score sheets. There is, however, a time keeper who operates the electronic timing equipment. In other words, each judge has to do two jobs.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

So here I am with two other judges who will not speak on the p.a. system. I, although not a native speaker of Greek, often do this job myself but in this case, with responsibility for the whole show plus the bell, I could not possibly speak on the microphone all day as well. This situation resulted in me starting the day by scouting around for a speaker. I had one unsolicited offer, which I promptly turned down; he was notorious for getting progressively drunk as the day wore on and what could start out as lucid announcements were in serious danger of degenerating into slurred speech and lewd remarks. Then I struck lucky. A member of the Board of the Hellenic Federation, who was fond of speaking publicly and was good at it, turned up. She saved the day for me. Or, at least, part of it. There was more trouble ahead. As the regional finals, an extra member of the ground jury was needed, someone from the federation, the Man with a Laptop! In those early days we didn't usually have access to a computer! This VIP with the software could provide us with the overall annual scores thus producing the champions for the year in each class. This essential person had left his departure from the capital too late and he had got snarled up in the weekend traffic. From the turn off on the national highway until the town of Chalkida, some 30 miles, the cars were bonnet to boot, or hood to trunk as you would say in your language. A mobile phone call informed us of his probable late arrival.

HUNTER JUMPER


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Inspecting the course with the course designer

Meanwhile, the first class went ahead without too many hitches. There were the usual hiccups, which have become almost commonplace in this country... “I have just arrived; could you put me near the end of the starting list?” said the person who popped her head around the corner of the judges' box. “In the circumstances, yes, but you will have to go in your original position if you reach the jump off,” I replied.

HUNTER JUMPER

“Can you ask the farrier to come to the first warm up area? My horse has cast a shoe. Oh and please can you change my position on the starting list?” “There is a Porsche blocking the entrance for the trucks. Can you make an announcement to ask the owner to move it?” “I am riding two horses in this class but they are only three horses apart on the starting list. Can you change the order of one to give me more time to warm up the second horse?” “You can either go at the beginning with one of them or we will wait for you on your second horse.”

“That car I asked to be moved is a CORSA, not a PORSCHE!!!”

countries. Of course, even we have computers now, if they arrive in time.

“Ooops, sorry, we misheard,” we replied, giggling.

All these calculations had to be done three more times, at the end of each class. Alkis and the laptop never made it; he gave up after two hours in the jam, turned around and went back the other way. When we had finally made the last announcements, presented the prizes and the three winners were taking their laps of honour, I just flopped down on my seat, exhausted. Eight hours of intense concentration had drained me and I was feeing like a zombie.

The first class was drawing to a close but there was still no sign of Alkis and his laptop and the time was approaching when we needed to calculate the winners. I realised that I would have to do it myself by hand. This was going to be no easy task. The results worked on the System called T + I, that is the winner of each competition gained a number of points equal to the number of competitors who finished the course plus one, the second placed rider gets the same number minus one, the third minus two and so on. Consequently, it was impossible to start counting the points until the last rider had finished. Then you had to add together each rider's total number of points over the whole season. But it was not as simple even as that; each rider had the right to disregard his two worst scores. All this demanded considerable mathematical skills, time and quiet. The last was an impossible request with so many people popping in and out with enquiries, namely who had won which position etc. I wonder if the system works like that in other

I dragged myself down the steps of the judges' box, then up the stairs to the clubhouse. A cool gin and tonic was just the remedy I needed as I took my place at a table. Conversation was buzzing around me as I began to relax and gazed out of the window at the leafy dusk beyond. “Congratulations!” came a voice from behind, “But I have only one criticism. Why did it take you so long to give the results of the winners? Everyone was impatient and getting annoyed.” That was the closest I have ever come to committing murder!!! I smiled.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

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HUNTER JUMPER

Cell: (404) 202 - 7196 www.WestbrookeFarm.com

Westbrooke Farm Amenities:


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Choosing your next superstar by Clayton Fredericks I recently read an interesting article on Eventing Connect (www.eventingconnect.today) with the heading, Medal winners – produced not bought. The article highlighted the statistic that eight out of the nine medal-winning horses were produced by their podium partners. While this did not come as a shock to me, having been based in Europe for 20 years and seeing first hand the system the top riders in the world use to produce their next superstar it does raise the question…

How do you find these superstars? Although most people know me for my riding career and the successes I have had competing in Eventing, it may not be so well known that I have also been involved in sourcing a number of young horses both for myself to compete and for re-sale to clients all over the world. Horses sourced and produced by me include: • Ben Along Time (Winner of Rolex CCI4****, Twice World Cup Champion, Team Silver Medallist from Beijing Olympics 2008 and Individual Silver Medallist from the World Equestrian Games 2006) • Bendigo (Winner of Saumur CCI3***, Jardy CIC3***, Renswoude CIC3*** and competed at the 2012 London Olympics) • Nullabor ( Placed at Burghley and Luhmuhlen CCI4****, British Open Champion)

Horses sourced by me and produced by others include: • RF Smoke on the Water (Marilyn Little’s 4**** Eventer) • Baxo (Placed 4th with Annie Ho at the Asian Games 2014) • Chatwin (Frankie Thieriot’s 6 year old, recent winner of the CIC1* at Woodside) • Rendesvous with Charly (Undefeated with Elinor MacPhail in 2013, Placed 3rd at Red Hills CIC2**) • Catchascatchcan ( Sara Kozumplik Murphy’s 7 year old, most recently placed 4th in the CIC2** at Plantation)

EVENTING

Ben Along Time, World Cup Final Deauville 2008 Photo Credit - Tim Nicholls

Photo by Linda Shier Sports Image Times


Temperament

Temperament is of primary concern. The horse has to want to do the job.

Confirmation and Soundness

Eventing is a sport of endurance and they must be able to stand up to the years of training and competition required to produce a top class horse. Of course no horse is perfect but seek veterinary advice on what could be detrimental to the future.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

After looking at thousands of young horses from all over the world over the years I have developed a checklist on which I base my decisions.

Movement

Obviously they need 3 good paces but emphasis should be on the canter and how naturally the horses carry themselves on the hind leg. When you ride the horse for the first time they should feel loose and soft through their whole body.

Style over the fence

Obviously the horses I look at are young and inexperienced and can make mistakes but I look for a good technique and most importantly the horse has a desire to jump what is in front of them cleanly.

Hopefully this advice will help you find your next Superstar!

EVENTING

Some readers may have noticed that I did not mention any reference to what percentage of Thoroughbred I look for in a horse. While this has recently gained some media attention in the US as a result of the performances at WEG 2014 it should be pointed out that my two most successful horses, Ben Along Time and Bendigo had 50% and 40% of Thoroughbred blood respectively, much below what has been recently suggested by some is the ideal amount. I do not give much weight to what percentage of blood the young horses I am looking at have or really what breed they are. I am more interested in the quality of the horse and how it covers the ground and then make sure I produce the horse with the correct training and fitness to be prepared for competition.


EVENTING ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE


As the saying goes, ‘Time flies when you are having fun’, and time is flying by, so we must be having fun! The time has come to plan for the 2015 3 Star International Event at Chattahoochee Hills. This Event will allow you to over indulge in graceful Dressage, Cross Country and the exciting Show Jumping finale that promises to take your breath away!

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Chattahoochee Hills International 2015 Join us May 14th - 17th for this electrifying event!

We have raised the bar for 2015, with extra fun events, including the Pony Grand National, the Bareback Puissance, and Team Mechanical Bull Riding. Our Vendor Village will be larger with a more diverse selection of vendors, which means excellent shopping opportunities! The food will be as delectable as ever with even more choices. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing will also be teaming up with Atlanta Horse Connections, once again, giving all Sponsors and Vendors an opportunity to advertise at a discounted rate. CHC International’s goal is to showcase the historic equestrian Olympic sport of eventing as a true festival in the country, while introducing it to new fans and emphasizing its uniqueness with new added entertainment and amenities.

EVENTING

Chattahoochee Hills Eventing is located on Olympic Three Day Event rider Carl Bouckaert’s farm in Chattahoochee Hill country. This 8,000-acre equestrian paradise is filled with well-established rolling pastures, lakes, and woodlands that run 12 miles along the Chattahoochee River. The facility hosted the U.S. Eventing Association’s (USEA) American Eventing Champions (AECs) for three years.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

EVENTING

For those who just now getting to know this sport: 3 day eventing is also referred to as a Horse Triathlon. A 3 phase equestrian sport, designed to test the training, ability and strength of both horse and rider. Originally a race between Berlin and Vienna, subsequently developed by the French to become the ‘Raid Militaire’ as an extended training event for the cavalry in the 1800’s.

This went on to become part of the Olympics in 1912, but only male military officers were allowed to compete until 1952 when it was opened to civilian men. Finally in 1964 women entered the competition. Only in Equestrian sports do men compete against women equally. The competition is made up of the Dressage Phase, the Cross Country Phase and the Show Jumping Phase. The event is modeled on the ability of cavalry officers to fight in battle as well as endure covering long distances encountering major obstacles. Today there are no battles fought, but the event asks a lot of both horse and rider.

Please Contact: Event Director: Hugh Lochore Phone: 770.892.2117 Email: chatthills@aol.com Sponsorship Inquiries: Penny Morse Phone: 770.316.8655 Email: designonpenny@yahoo.com www.chcinternational.net www.chatthillseventing.com


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

PEMF Therapy What is PEMF or Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Frequency Therapy? It is a pulsed electro-magnetic field wave that penetrates the body deeply at the cellular level. Simply put, it is a “massage for the cell membranes” How does it work?  It bathes the cell membrane with electrical pulses making them more permeable 

Opens up cell channels to allow blood flow, oxygen, nutrients and proteins to absorb more easily and speed the release of toxins

What are the benefits?  Increased Circulation

Enhanced Muscle Function

Decreases Inflammation

Reduces Stress

Bone Healing

Blood Oxygenation

Katharina’s horses Water Lilly & Q Star, “Having heard only wonderful results about PEMF several years ago while living still in Germany, I finally had the chance to get it applied on my horses here in the US. A handful of sessions really have helped my Holsteiner mare to overcome suppleness and bending issues so far. I'm super excited to see what else it will do to help us in our future training! A huge thanks to Kathy and Todd! Give them a call today to see and feel yourself!”

What applications does it have?  Pre Event Protection & Post Event Recovery 

Can reduce and sometimes eliminate the use of pain & anti-inflammatories

Pull hoof abscess in one or two sessions

Overall Health Management

Sandra’s horse Sinjin, “It really helped bring an abscess to a point that he could get relief. Had been fighting this abscess for weeks. Thank you so much!”

Kathy & Todd Clark Certified Practitioners K) Phone: 404-309-1175 T) Phone: 404-457-3067 E-mail: horsesnmotion@att.net

EVENTING

Located in Villa Rica, Georgia


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

dressage is fun! by Yvonne Barteau

Since this is a small column and we all have so much to learn I want to be sure and give you one important tip each month. Something that could help your riding even if you do not work with a trainer as often as you would like. Also, although the tip will always be dressage related, you will find that when all is said and done, riding is riding and horses are horses. So, even if you do not compete in dressage the tips I share may be relevant to your every day riding.

Yvonne Barteau KYB Dressage

Wait! That will be my first tip. Regardless of what tack your horse is wearing or what clothes you have on, if you break it right down, riding IS riding, and horses ARE horses. The principles of balance, obedience submission and learning to answer a systematic aid process apply to any riding discipline and to every horse and rider and are not dressage specific. It is important to think of yourself as a horseman or woman first and a dressage rider second.

One principle of riding that applies to all disciplines is that Horses want peace. If they comply with your wishes and they find peace by doing so you will be able to get your point across and you too will be a horse trainer to some degree. Timing and dose age of the aids will of course be a factor in all of your horse work and it is the best trainers and riders who, upon observation, have the most control over their timing and dose age of the aids along with the knowledge that horses want, and will work hard, for a moment of peace. We all want information via books, Internet or lessons, but soaking information in can only get you so far. Application is more important and most people simply do not practice enough, especially with the above ideas in mind. So, if at first you don't succeed...change your timing or dosage of the aids...remember that horses work for peace... and you probably need more practice! We will put more "dressage stuff" in next issue! Happy Riding!

DRESSAGE

Yvonne Barteau is a lifetime horsewoman with a unique and varied background. She started out in the hunter jumper world but after high school moved to the standardbred racetrack for a total of six years, starting as a groom and eventually becoming a trainer. Her time on the track taught her much about horse care, lameness and fitness. She then spent years re training problem horses before moving to the Arabian Nights Dinner Theater where she met husband Kim Barteau and become a principle trainer and feature performer in the enormously popular show. Since leaving the dinner theater Yvonne has focused mainly on dressage and is a USDF Bronze Silver and Gold Medalist finishing fifteen horses to the Grand Prix level. Many students of KYB Dressage the business Yvonne and Kim started in Maple Park Illinois with partner and friend Ginna Frantz of Grand Prix Equestrian, have earned their USDF medals and a variety of other year end awards. Yvonne is also an award winning freestyle designer and author of two books. Ride the Right Horse, her book on equine personalities won the 2007 AHP Equine Book of the year award and her new training book, written from the horses perspective is being published by Trafalgar later this year. Photo by fireandearthphoto.com


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Whether you ride for pleasure or competitively, owning a horse is a substantial commitment. The horse people at Lisa Seger Insurance can help you protect the emotional and financial investment you’ve made. Lisa Seger Insurance offers:

• Horse mortality & medical/surgical plans • Independent trainer / instructor liability policy • Farm package & liability only policies • Excess/umbrella liability

Sincerely,

Pagan

Pagan Gilman (770) 283-7344 pagan@lisasegerinsurance.com

www.lisasegerinsurance.com

DRESSAGE

Insurance can be a very confusing issue, but I am here to make it simple for you and make sure you have the right coverage for your specific needs. I look forward to hearing from you and anticipate seeing you at the shows and in the barns.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Destination... Florida by Alexandra Duncan Owner of ADressage International Dressage horses

DRESSAGE

Lights, camera and action are the thoughts that are immediately associated in my mind with Wellington, Florida. The Wellington Winter Season is a huge stage crossed by over 5,000 horses, 2,800 riders with competitors from some 31 countries with US $6 Million in prize money at stake. Wellington has become the Oscars of the horse world for the US as it covers world class competition for jumping, dressage and polo. The show grounds are a short distance from most private barns with a lucky few who have stables within the show grounds. Wellington caters and accommodates virtually every rider/horse pair from entry level, children’s classes to FEI world ranked riders at the highest levels of equestrian sport. There is literally an event for everyone. Wellington has two impressive show areas for the riders, the spectators and the horses certainly know they are “on show”. W.E.F is the jumping area with multiple arenas and stabling all set in lush

landscaped grounds. Shopping at W.E.F is akin to Rodeo Drive for horse people with a fantastic array of goods for all pocket books. W.E.F also provides a topical and insightful lecture series during the season. I will mention Horsewear Ice Vibe products and the launch of their new Sports Vibe Horse Blanket as I was a participating speaker for them. Apologize for the commercial but I do use their products and can attest to the fact that I have witnessed excellent improvements in my horses. Last season I also attended a very practical lecture on equine nutrition. Lunch is provided at the lectures and you can view the jumping classes at the same time. The lecture series is well thought out and provides a wonderful opportunity for participants to both learn and exchange views with one another.


I started riding at age 3 and entered in my first dressage championship at the age of 6 on my pony who was in one word a “character”. From then on horses have been my passion. I competed through the FEI pony levels, graduating to the NAJYRC Championships winning 2 gold medals, 1 silver and the Fiona Bond Award of Excellence. In 2006 I competed at the Young Rider World Championships in Germany where I placed 4th in the world. Europe was an eye opener in many ways. Consequently I moved to Europe in the Spring of 2009 spending the next 4 years training with some of the top coaches in Sweden and Holland. My objective was to both learn and teach myself to bring through to the Grand Prix level my then 5 ½ year old Dutch Warmblood Gelding, Vitall, that I purchased as a 5 year old in Germany.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Dressage is held on the Global Dressage grounds where I spend most of my time competing. Again the facility is “state of the art” with superb footing in the rings which gives the horse and rider great confidence. There is a “one of a kind” covered arena, the main CDI stadium and various other arenas for warm up and competition. Apart from the Grand Prix CDI’s the national shows, which run during the season, enable younger and less seasoned horses to obtain ring time to build competition awareness, familiarity with spectator venues and the judges comments undoubtedly help focus the riders on their horses strengths and weaknesses relative to adapting their training programs.

During the period I was fortunate to compete again at the Young Rider World Cup in Frankfurt and at Achen, Germany among many other events. Wishing to be closer to my family in Canada the decision was made to move to Wellington, Florida as it offered European level competitions. Thus in December of 2013 I left Europe with 6 horses, 2 dogs and multiple horse trunks. It took a little time to adjust to the US/Florida culture and weather after spending 4 years in Europe. But I am delighted with the move. Wellington has a great sense of community and my horses have all settled in after their first Florida (wet) summer. My mini Wellington oasis is a 5 acre property with a 14 stall barn situated ten minutes from the show grounds that my family has leased. The environment is both peaceful and relaxing for myself and the horses.

Wellington has its social side (time permitting) with a range of fine restaurants that will suit any critical palette. The Coach House needs no introduction as the primary party venue for Wellington’s equine set. I am very much looking forward to the 2014/2015 Wellington Season, visiting with my contemporaries, old friends from Europe and most of all continuing to learn and challenging myself and Vitall to be the very best we can be.

DRESSAGE

I am competing at the Grand Prix level with Vitall and I am progressively bringing forward the younger horses which I will campaign during the 2015 Winter Season. Teaching is also a passion as I find it enormously rewarding to see students light up with joy when they master movements and click with their horses.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

MITJA DEMITRIJ ČERNAČ announced exciting new book, “Piaffe Passage and Work in Hand” Pulling from his experiences as a Grand Prix level dressage trainer, Mitja Demitrij ČERNAČ addresses training the horse’s learning abilities coupled with enjoyable exercises to improve self carriage. Mr. Cernac’s new edition of “Piaffe-Passage and Work in Hand” is filled with beautiful, useful illustrations of correct carriage as well as depicting the horse using his body improperly. He provides exercises for correcting muscle weakness which in turn leads to imbalance.

DRESSAGE

Cernac writes, “The new FEI rules regarding Piaffe and Passage lay greater weight on these movements as well as transitions between the two, so it is of utmost importance to perform them well. This is a book that is drawn on over forty years of experience and is solely dedicated to explaining the difficult Grand Prix dressage movements of Piaffe, Passage and Work in Hand. On almost one hundred pages this book explains comprehensively the several possible approaches to Piaffe and Passage.This book guides you on what is correct, how to begin so the horse will be capable of understanding and thus performs correctly. It shows the causes of common faults and training deficiencies, how to avoid or once done, how to correct them. The main object is the correct approach through the understanding of bio-mechanics as well as physics (dynamical weight distribution). It is explained how the systematic work from beginning on Hand through Piaffe to all different transitions in Piaffe and Passage leads to success. Visit www.demitrij.com for video book presentation


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

$39.95 FREE SHIPPING with PROMO CODE KMGA15 DRESSAGE

To Order an English version of the book please contact: katyamanjossova@gmail.com or call 770-896-3637


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Western Dressage a contradiction in terms? by Cheryl Pritchard In the three years I have been involved in Western Dressage, I’ve heard the phrase “Western Dressage a contradiction in terms” quite a lot, but my answer is very simple; “Western Dressage is the melding of Classical Dressage training with the spirit and values of western horsemanship.” Western Dressage allows the western horse that is trained with lightness, subtle cues and true partnership between rider and horse to shine. The horse will need to have some of the classical dressage principles such as cadence, balance, self-carriage and precise riding.

One of the best things about Western Dressage, is that horses from all breeds are able to train and compete successfully. This has been quickly recognized by several breed associations, who have added Western Dressage to their normal show competitions. Several classical dressage competitions are already adding Western Dressage classes. Also, there is a common misconception that Western Dressage is just a discipline for horses that cannot be successful in Classical Dressage. In my barn alone I have several Classical dressage horses that are not suitable for Western Dressage because they cannot achieve the collection and cadence needed for a true western jog and lope. I also have, several stock type horses that are excelling at Western Dressage, but do not have the large movement of a warmblood horse necessary in Classical Dressage. On the flip side, horses that cannot compete on the Western Pleasure circuit may not be able to compete in Western Dressage. The Western Dressage horse will need to have impulsion with active hock movement which is not always typical in Western Pleasure competitions.

WESTERN

If Georgia is a reflection at how fast and popular Western Dressage is growing across the country, it will not be long before additional higher level tests will be added. Current show levels include: collection and lengthening at the walk, jog and lope, leg yielding, shoulder in, haunches in, half passes, turn on the forehand, turn on the haunches. The Western Dressage Association of Georgia is already planning more clinics, demonstrations and events in 2014 and in 2015. There are several trainers in GA who will be glad to help you and your western horse shine in Western Dressage. Try it, I guarantee it will put a smile on your face. Until next time- Enjoy the Journey!


Cheryl Pritchard has combined her background in Classical Dressage with Reining to excel at Western Dressage. She owns and operates a successful Show Barn. Her clients compete at the local and National level. Her clients range from adults to children, advanced to beginner and also Special Needs Riders. Cheryl’s training methods encompass both Classical Dressage and Western Horsemanship to ensure lightness, willingness and a well rounded trained horse. She is also an accomplished clinician and a National Breed judge. Her website is www.SimplyDunFarm.com. Cheryl can be reached at (404) 583-6066 or Cheryl@theHorseBusiness.com.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Meet Cheryl

Western Dressage Association of America – www.westerndressageassociation.org

Western Dressage Association of America WDAA Western Dressage Association of Georgia wdageorgia.org

WESTERN

Western Dressage Association of Georgia


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Your horses do WHAT? By Heather Johnson • Ringgold, GA

So what is reining? I get that question a lot. If it’s a horse person asking I usually reply that it’s like dressage with a western saddle and speed. If it’s a non-horse person, I try saying it’s like ice skating with horses. Neither answer is quite right, but it can start some great conversations about what reining is.

4 consecutive spins to the left and to the right. For this maneuver the horse should keep his hind end in one place, and cross his outside front leg in front of the inside one. “Spinning like a top” so to speak.

Reining started out the way of many of our western disciplines. Cowboys out on the ranch or at a show, showing off the athleticism of their mounts. Could they gallop hard then come back to a calm lope? Change leads on a dime? How far could they slide? Eventually there was a need for an official group, and in 1966 the National Reining Horse Association was born. Since then it has grown into an international organization, and is the first western discipline recognized by the FEI. Reining is now a part of the World Equestrian Games.

At least 3 sliding stops, 2 of which will have a rollback after them. In a sliding stop the horse gallops down the arena, and when asked to stop, locks his hind legs underneath him and sits back to slide on the special slide plates they wear on their hind feet. At the same time he paddles with his front legs, allowing the stop to continue as long as his impulsion allows. After coming to a halt and hesitating, the horse picks his front end up and completes a 180 turn, loping out over his tracks, thus completing his rollback. This is considered the signature move of a reining horse.

What are the maneuvers a reining horse has to perform?

I hope this explains a little more what a reining horse does. I happen to think it’s just about the most fun you can have on a horse!

WESTERN

3 circles on each lead, 2 large galloping circles that will take up about half of the arena, and 1 smaller collected lope circle that will be a half to a 1/3 of the large circle.

One lead change each direction. Credit is given for a clean correct change.


Heather Johnson began riding at the age of seven and discovered her abiding passion for horses. With over 14 years experience training and showing horses, Heather invests her considerable knowledge and enthusiasm for the sport with every horse she trains. A champion herself, Heather understands the discipline and dedication required to achieve the competitive edge of a winner. Having spent many years as a all-around trainer before devoting her time exclusively to reiners, she has a unique approach to training a reining horse.

Trainer: Heather Johnson Photo by: Boss Mare Photography

Her accomplishments include: 10 Time Congress Champion 7 Time Res Congress Champion 2011 NRHA Novice Open Level 1 World Champion 2011 NRHA Novice Open Level 2 Res World Champion 2009 NRHA Novice Open Level 1 World Champion 2009 NRHA Inter Open Res World Champion 2004 NRHA Inter Open Res World Champion NRHA earnings of $174,000+

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Meet the trainer

WESTERN


In quiet places greatness is bred

Join Our Winning Team! Creekside is a world class reining facility in Northwest, Georgia. We offer the whole package, from the first ride to the show ring. We have a great selection of young or seasoned horses for sale. All are welcome! Training, lessons, sales and breeding services all available.

Training • Breeding • Lessons • Sales Heather Johnson - Trainer Ringgold, GA 706-847-2014 www.creeksidereining.webs.com


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Ride with ACTHA for Fun and Charity! By Vanessa Vidal

N AT U R A L H O R S E M A N S H I P

When my friend Danielle Ayan asked me to join her for a competitive trail ride sponsored by the ACTHA (American Competitive Trail Horse Association) in the Fall of 2013, I jumped right in, no questions asked. I was all but too happy to spend time with my horse, a friend, and to do something new and different. At the time, I had absolutely no idea what I was getting into, but four ACTHA rides later, I’m glad I accepted the invitation. My Friesian gelding and I ride English, and while dressage is what I love the most, Warwick seems to be interested in everything but dressage. So to compromise and keep my horse mentally happy and physically sharp, we’ve travelled outside of the dressage arena to go trail riding, play horse soccer, and participate in a couple of local obstacle challenges and hunter paces. We had never done a trail challenge before, but I figured that my 6-year old gelding and I had enough miles under our belts that we could give it a try. ACTHA is a national association that organizes trail ride competitions all across the USA. These rides are hosted by individuals, clubs, or organizations that want to raise funds for charitable organizations, most of which focus on horses in need. Today, hosts, sponsors, and riders are flocking to ACTHA sanctioned rides across Georgia and around the country. And for good measure, ACTHA rides provide a venue where riders of all ages and levels can enjoy their horse, savor the wonderful scenery that every location has to offer, as well as learn and show off their horse’s talents.

What I love the most about ACTHA rides is that it’s an event that is enjoyed in a group environment, so it’s a great opportunity to gather your horse friends and family members for a day of fun and learning. The trail is usually an easy 5 to 10 miles with a minimum of six obstacles. So you ride out with a group at a designated time, and throughout the trail ride you will stop at six obstacles, each one with a judge that will give you a score based on how you navigate through the obstacle according to the division you are in. There are 4 divisions: Open, Pleasure, Junior, and Buddy. Ribbons and prizes are awarded for 1st - 6th place, as well as buckles and end-of-the-year prizes. Most of the obstacles are natural and use the terrain as much as possible, and may include water crossings, opening gates, stepping over a bridge, and going up and down a hill. Some hosts really go out of their way to make the obstacles fun and different, and sometimes quite inventive, like the time they strung a “fake” deer and passed it between two trees, or when I had to pour water from a pitcher into a glass, and carry the glass at a trot without spilling it. It was summer time, and my horse was a lot more interested in drinking the water than watching me pour it in a glass! What I love most about the rides is that they are casual and the judges are supportive. If any obstacle is too challenging you can simply forego it, and judges really appreciate any effort you make. It’s supposed to be a fun learning experience, and the judges and organizers certainly go out of they way to make it exactly that. Photography by www.eye-on-images.com


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How dedicated are the hosts and sponsors? Kim Franklin who hosted the ride at Falconwood Farm in Covington greeted me at the end of my ride with a water bucket ready to sponge off my Friesian. Warwick is a non-sweater; therefore, any activity in the summer has the potential to turn into a dangerous situation. Kim knew about his condition and went above-and-beyond to ensure that he was cooled down quickly and that our ride ended on a positive note. On my second ever ACTHA ride at R-Ranch in the Mountains in Dahlonega, Warwick and I showed up alone. I had not been able to rally anyone to go with me on the 60+ mile trip - each way. Needless to say, I felt a little nervous and out-of-sorts among unfamiliar faces and without a group to ride with, but the uneasiness was very short lived. Sandra Stephenson who hosted the ride welcomed me with open arms, introduced me to people, got me into a group to ride out, and before I knew it, I was talking, laughing, and having a blast! These are the type of people you’ll meet at ACTHA rides. While the riders are predominantly western trail riders, they are welcoming of everyone. When Warwick and I show up, we tend to stand out; at 17’2, he cuts quite a figure. I also ride him in my dressage saddle, so we don’t exactly blend in. But I’ve always felt welcomed by both riders and hosts, who seem to appreciate seeing different breeds of horse and riders from other disciplines join in. I’ve told many of my rider friends about it, and everyone that’s tried it has loved it. Most importantly, Warwick and I enjoy every minute of it. I can’t think of a better way to spend a day with my horse than riding along beautiful scenery, and to be surprised and delighted at the obstacles that are waiting for us, just like a Christmas gift waiting to be opened.


Photography by www.eye-on-images.com

N AT U R A L H O R S E M A N S H I P

No matter what your discipline, level, or age, participating in an ACTHA ride is a great experience. It’s an opportunity to learn about yourself and your horse, to enjoy the company of other equestrians, and to discover beautiful surroundings, all while having lots of fun and supporting a charitable cause!

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I’ve never been prouder of my horse than when he’s done something I never thought he’d be capable of doing. Given his large size, some of the obstacles come with their own sets of challenges, such as the time we were supposed to ride through a wall of colorful streamers that were hung on a wooden bar between two trees. Every other horse going in front of us seemed to handle it just fine, but when we got close to the obstacle, surprise! The bar was hanging eye-level to my horse. Not skipping a beat, Warwick bent his head down to go through the colorful streamers…while I hung off flat on his neck trying not lose my head, literally! Or the time we tried to go through a maze on the ground that was so tight, that the only way for him to go through it was to do a series of shoulder ins and turns on the forehand. The one time I successfully tricked my horse into doing dressage during a trail ride.


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Working Student Pointer’s by Dee McMaster I have to say it has been a pleasure to be asked to write a column. I was glad to help out, and since my working student blog seemed to hit on a great deal of interest, I decided my first column will be pointers for working students who want to make the experience count/work. So here we go: THE DAY YOU ARRIVE, even if it is after things around barn are done, or if you DON’T have to be at work till the following day, offer to help. It makes a great impression when working student offers to help before they unpack. Obviously, get your own horse situated first. GET TO KNOW THE HORSES, their names, and where they go, what they eat, as fast as you can. It both impresses the trainer, and it shows an ability for you to learn facts quickly. TREAT THE FACILITY AS IF YOU OWN IT. Don’t leave your trash laying around the barn or in the golf cart. Clean up after yourself. Most barns are so busy, that something as silly as leaving a coke can sitting on the picnic table by the arena, gets to be annoying.

BARN HELP

UNDERSTAND, you are probably NOT the first working student this rider has had. They could probably sit you down and write a book with you on the horror stories of the kids that have come before you. So if you have a thin-skinned nature, you might want to rethink the whole working student experience. IF you are fortunate enough to get your lesson, on your horse, or theirs, during the work day, don’t take 2 hours to get your horse ready. One of our pet peeves here, is our horses coming out of the grooming area, still having shavings in tails, faces not wiped off, feet not picked. Then when time for the working student’s horse to come out, it’s groomed to the 9’s. Treat the barn owner’s horses like they are yours. If for some reason you end up where the barn owner doesn’t care that the horse comes out covered in mud, don’t laugh, they exist, remember, they are still not going to be thrilled you took 2 hours to get your horse ready.

Be on time. Write down what you might forget. If you are suppose to feed lunch at noon, feed lunch at noon. Set an alarm, do whatever it takes, but get the chore done. WATER. I can not stress enough, do not allow water buckets to be dirty, empty and clean them thoroughly before refilling. If you see a bucket without water- refill it. Trust me, you want to earn kuddo points from the trainer, that is one way to get their attention. STALLS. Keep them clean. If you see a pile, grab a fork, scoop it it, and get out. It takes 5 seconds, saves on shavings, and shows a great work ethic. STAY OFF THE PHONE. I don’t care if you are going to be an expectant aunt - KEEP OFF FACEBOOK, KEEP OFF THE PHONE. ASK QUESTIONS. Not questions like, “where does the pitchfork go?”, “should I put shaving in this stall?”, but no one minds questions that help out the day to day operations of a farm. Ask at the beginning how they like the stalls bedded. What the policy is on boots on turn out. Know before you start, at least basic stuff. Most of the barns I know, have no problem if you send a note asking before you get there. I have even had girls ask for a dossier on each horse, complete with pcitures. IF IT DOESN’T WORK OUT, don’t go around bad mouthing the barn. Believe me, it makes you look way worse then the person you work for. Sure someone is going to always be out there, and be a gossiping Susan, but the person it makes look bad, is you. BE THE LAST PERSON TO LEAVE. Find some small thing to do that shows you do care. Clean the isle, hang the halters nicely, just something small, to show you care.


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BARN HELP


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The art of horse Kennesaw, GA by R. Zaudke Wilkins

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Photo by: Eye on art photography

Emerging artist Rachael Zaudke Wilkins has been enthralled with animals and nature since early childhood. She began her horse career at the age of nine while working on her girl scout “equestrian badge”. Over the next decade, Zaudke competed American Saddlebreds on a national level as a youth and then graduated to the amateur ranks as a young adult. Her focus on the equine led her from showing horses to teaching and training, and eventually to explore the horse form in her art classes at Murray State University, in Murray, Kentucky. She graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2003, with a double major of metalsmithing, emphasizing on small sculpture, and fine art print making. Her passion for the horse form has evolved in stages, each revealing the different aspect of the animal. Capturing the enormity of the horse while exploring the mass and stature of the equine, some of her figures are abstract while others retain a classical form.

a word from the artist

Nature is my muse. Opposing textures, the tilt of a head, or simply the way a jaw and neck join. These captured moments of nature and everyday life is what I strive to create. I am drawn to creating the animals I admire both personally and from afar. Different aspects of each animal enchant me. Most often I

The horse continues to be a reoccurring theme in my body of work. I started riding horses at a young age and went on to compete at a national level in shows across the country. It is the outstanding brilliance, strength and sheer mass that I am intrigued by most in these particular animals. I am constantly striving to capture the essence of what enchants me most about horses. Even when a horse is standing still, one will notice the twitch of an ear, a flare of nostrils, or the ripple of muscle to discourage a fly. It is this simple glimpse of the equine I am constantly trying to convey in each of my creations. www.zaudkesculpture.com

A R T • E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Fascinated by the animal world, Zaudke sculpts a variety of creatures, often finding inspiration in her local environment. From spotting deer in the wild to coping with the disfigurement of her college dog, Zaudke sculpts from the heart – empowering her animal form with the spirit of the animal itself.

find it is texture, mass and the relationship of environment and animal which triggers the creative impulse. I then pull from these resources and create an object that captures the special essence of that particular animal. I pay a small amount of attention to the anatomy and proportion, often exaggerating different aspects of each animal to form an abstract finished product.


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On the Bit. Catherine Book review by Sabrena Burnett Atencio Sabrena has been a classical dressage enthusiast, rider, trainer, and instructor for over 20 years .

A R T • E N T E R TA I N M E N T

She also writes a dressage blog at: www.bettersodressageblog.com

Annette Kinnear invites her readers to join her in a thrill ride by introducing an adventure that truly does not fit in any one simple genre “box.” This novel is a thrilling, psychological, and a mysterious tale filled with dark twisted political plots by use of international powers as well as brilliantly perverted and torturous tactics that create a romantic illusion. Kinnear leads the reader into a page-turning exotic journey on a beautiful dark stallion.

Catherine Zitgow, a beautiful headhunter in the business world, inherits from her late father a unique encrypted list of some of the world’s greatest specialists in the fields of science and biological warfare. Unbeknownst to her, the value of this list, in the wrong hands, is her own life. However, she has clout in being the only person who can decode the encryption. When abducted by a group of insurgents and taken on a brutal journey that temporarily lands her in a prison camp in the Amazon, her only hope for survival is “the voice” that she hears during a phone call that assures her safety if she just follows the orders that are given to her. Her captor Rivas Romero, a brutally handsome and accomplished equestrian as well as expert in psychology, is disciplined, ruthless, and charming beyond imagination. He is a master of many skills, but reining in Catherine proves to be a bit harder than he anticipates. Even under the watchful eye of Rivas’s own manipulative, psychotic maternal figure Maria Santa Cruz, the mastermind of this evil plot, Rivas is unable to keep Catherine on task with deciphering the code, regardless of whether he lavishes her like a princess or tortures and humiliates her. What Rivas is able to create is a lust in Catherine that cannot be satisfied with sex alone; this lust may prove to be his own demise.


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The compassion you feel for the tortured Catherine is often jerked back into irritation by her label whore, self-absorbed, business-savvy existence. She can never take the easy route and follow instructions without getting tangled up in her own self-destructive pattern of infuriating Rivas by taking off on his prized stallion that she is not competent enough to control. She also has a habit of throwing a fit and getting put back in environments with varying disciplinary conditions; none of the luxuries are offered to her, them being just a few feet away from her prison. When on task, Catherine performs passionately, whether she is working the business side of deciphering the database or being a good riding student under the expert instructions rewarded to her by Rivas, a former student at the Cadre Noir. During this rollercoaster ride of manipulation, it is a miracle that Catherine does not completely break down after numerous months; her love for the dark horse and lust for the dark man ultimately drive her desire to survive when all of her other options seem futile.

Annette Kinnear

A R T • E N T E R TA I N M E N T

If I had not known that there was already a second book in the series, I would have been disappointed at the abrupt ending of this brilliantly written adventure. It was refreshing to find such a thrilling, incredibly graphic, and perfectly delivered book that is sure to become a favorite for the adult horse enthusiasts who are brave enough to go for a ride that races the reader through the pages with its fast-paced twists and turns that keep you hanging on until the very last page. Annette Kinnear delivers the haute ecole of a thrill ride that will leave you chomping at the bit for the next book in the series.


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Ride in Style by Penny Morse

FA S H I O N

Whether you are ahead of it, behind it, follow it or hate it, Fashion is part of life and part of the Equestrian World. Textiles and styles have advanced to a whole new level, and like it or not it is going to keep changing. The traditional look is still alive and available, but for those of you who are hungry for something other than beige and tweed the equestrian fashion world is your oyster! All the big fashion houses have their take on how the young rider should look today. Gucci, Gloockler, and Hermes all have their look, with the Hollywood price tag, but what is available for us regular fashionistas? Luckily it is now all about ‘the bass’. Translation, you do not have to be 5’10” and a size 2 to fit into a pair of breeches that look cool. Textiles have made incredible advances over the last 10 years, and luckily for most of us found a way to introduce us to Lycra and Spandex. It may take a few try ons, but I can pretty much guarantee you can find a pair of breeches in any color that fits like a glove, for a reasonable price. Even jeans for our Western counterparts have found the advantage of Lycra in the denim to rid us of the waistband gap. Will we miss the days of buying a new pair of jeans and lying in the bath tub with them on so they would mold to our ‘shape’. It certainly wasn’t fun then, I doubt if anyone would want to do it today!


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FA S H I O N


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FA S H I O N


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FA S H I O N

So the breeches now fit and they can repel water and white breeches no longer show dirt. Yes it is possible to go to a show and not have to take 4 pairs because after the first ride you resemble a toddler who has just found his first mud puddle! So what about the shirts? I really do not think they can come up with any other designs than they have now. They are all technical fabrics, every shirt will fit. Hot or cold, there is one for you. Backless, vented, short sleeve, long sleeve, moisture wicking, dirt repellant, they have you covered. Show Jackets have been given equal attention and they are no longer the heavy woolen unflattering hacking jackets of the past, but light, easy care fitted and stylish show coats of the 21st Century. What about tradition though? We didn’t lose that. There are still the lovely tweed look jackets for hunting along with the traditional

black jacket for showing, but with a little extra something. I personally blame Ralph Lauren for all of this. His idea of combining the equestrian look with his designs influenced the Horse World to ‘step it up’. Color and bling! The “diehards” swear they will never wear anything other than beige, and would never be seen in bling. That is until they actually try it on. Of course, let’s not forget that the lycra and the spandex has performed an incredible change to the butt area so when they look in the mirror and see that touch of bling on the pocket that accentuates that newly formed butt, well, life is never the same. Now let’s look at the colors. That navy with just a touch of red welting on the pocket looks rather stylish and is really quite complimentary to the butt and to the tummy that has miraculously flattened due to the magical Lycra and spandex. The

choices available are unimaginable. It is similar to watching the children go cross country in their array of colors equal to the rainbow. Bottom line, if there is a color you like, you will find it. For all of you animal print lovers out there, yes I mean you, the designers did not forget about you. I thought it might be too much, but I saw them being worn by a middle aged lady, and it was obvious those breeches made her feel like a movie star! They looked great, so always remember, don’t knock it till you’ve tried it! For everyday riding there are the matching vests, so light you can hardly tell you are wearing it, except the chill has been eliminated. Fashionable Down coats for the awfully cold weather, and on no way resemble the winter coat worn by Farmer Dan, but you will be much warmer.


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Color also surreptitiously influenced the design of show jackets. Velvet collars, thank you once again Ralph Lauren, have been around for a while but now welting, and colored collars with matching color on the pockets? Pink show jackets? What has happened to the world? Well, with due respect to Ralph Lauren, Europe happened. Black and navy have dominated the show arena for years, and it was safe, but riders did not want to look safe anymore! The top riders always had their snazzy red coats to wear, and the rest of the circuit wanted that look. Bright blue, pink, teal and don’t forget the bling. Helmets changed shape, are no longer just velvet and looked sophisticated! Let us not forget the bling! Yes, bling on the helmet and bling on the boots. Of course, one has to learn when is enough is enough! Less can be more!!! Tradition is tradition and the shad belly will still be in black or navy but they have evolved to look pretty with the subtlety of color and bling. They are made of the new fabrics so the rider does not melt in the heat of summer, or freeze in the winter.

I promise you will catch yourself smiling, and you will want to try more. After all there is nothing wrong with coming over to the Bright Side!

For more information on featured products please join HKM Georgia USA Facebook or call 770-896-3637

FA S H I O N

Thankfully, today you can look great, which always makes you feel good which in turn helps you ride better, stay in your budget and look as stylish as the next rider. You can dress for the climate, dress for yourself and look fabulous. If this new modern look makes you sigh and long for the good old days, well quietly, when no one is looking, go and try some of those new breeches that make you look taller, thinner, feel good and look in the mirror.


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Cypto Aero continues to inspire healthier equine diets

WELLNESS

by Anna Frensemeyer It's been about 10 month now since we ran the first ton of Crypto Aero, a year since I first had the dream to make a healthy horse feed. I remember precisely when I received that phone call, that the sample was ready to be send for analysis last November. I was at the mechanics, waiting for my car to be fixed, yet again. Aero was still alive and would be for about another month, but he was not well. I wanted a feed that would be clean- free of GMO, molasses, soy, barley, corn, and any chemicals. It should have some goodies in it, things that would help horses with their most common issues.


Being a very scientific minded person, I had to make sense of it all. I knew it was a fantastic feed, but I didn't want to take credit where it wasn't due. I did more research. In the end it all made perfect sense. Essentially I took out all the bad stuff, and replaced it with good stuff. The ingredients are very simple and they are whole food. Let's start with the process of digestion. The first step of digestion is chewing. When you feed a whole food, horses are forced to chew it. That increases amylase levels and saliva, which is essentially bicarbonate. The amylase aids in proper starch digestion in the foregut, and the saliva buffers the acids. This is a fundamental component of digestion that is lost when feeding pelleted or extruded feed. Just imagine the difference between eating an apple versus apple sauce and how fast your body will convert each into glucose, how much longer it will take you to eat the apple and how much more you will be chewing. It is also the reason that metabolically challenged horses do so well on this feed, which is something I didn't necessarily expect. Slowing down the entire process of ingestion and digestion by feeding whole foods, also slows down the rise of blood sugar. Due to the increased amylase from the chewing, the hindgut is also protected form receiving any undigested starch, as it is properly and slowly digested in the foregut. The hay pellets in the feed further stabilize the acidity in the cecum and whole oats are 87% foregut digestible. Because they eat and digest so much slower, the body is also more able to absorb all the nutrients, and many people report feeding much less while maintaining the same energy level and weight of their horses. The vitamins and minerals in this feed are also provided by whole food and are therefore 100% absorbable and the horse can utilize every bit of it. When we feed artificial vitamins and minerals, we most likely are overfeeding them, which causes very tired kidneys, water retention and toxic livers.

Rice Bran Oil: The gamma-oryzanol in Rice Bran Oil is a natural anti-ulcerative. While there are many tests performed to diagnose colonic ulcers in horses, none of them are very reliable and unfortunately colonoscopies are not an option for horses. The L-Glutamine in the dried green cabbage provides the most important building block to grow a healthy intestinal lining and repair damaged tissue.The Brewers yeast aides the hind gut in growing healthy bacteria. Many skin issues are related to allergic reactions, very possibly caused by the tremendous increase of soy protein in our equines' diet. Spirulina has been shown to shift the bodies immunity from allergy-mediated to defense-mediated. This means the body is less likely to release the cells that cause and allergic response while strengthening the body's immune system. It is also contains every essential vitamin and amino acid. Horses will display improved willingness to work when their joints hurt less. Rose Hips have the exact same anti-arthritic effect as Glucosamine without the possibility of causing hind gut ulcers, irregular heart beat, water retention and diabetes when given in high doses. They protect cartilage and help to rebuild cartilage. Many Crypto Aero users report improved hoof health and hoof growth. Flax, Rose Hips and Sunflower Seeds are excellent supporters of healthy hoof growth. When we feed our horses vegetable oil, which is mainly corn oil, we support every acute and chronic inflammatory process. Balancing the Omega 6 fatty acids with anti-inflammatory Omega 3 fatty acids is essential in helping our equines feel their best. The omega-3 : Omega-6 ratio in Crypto Aero is perfectly balanced. The recommended ratio is for the omega-3 to be 5-10% of the omega-6. In Crypto Aero the ration is 0.47 : 4.9

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A lot of horses will display anxiety and are less willing to perform as the acid building up in their stomachs while not grazing is splashing against painful ulcers, mostly in the epigastric area.

The enzyme called papain in the papaya increases salivation which buffers stomach acids. It also strengthens the intestinal lining over time to make it more resistant to ulcers. Holistic veterinarians prefer treating ulcers with papaya as it does not inhibit vitamin B12 and calcium absorption, nor does it make your equine more prone to intestinal infection like the omeprazole alternative does.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

It never dawned on me what a tremendous difference the feed would really make. Then the first few testimonials came in. People emailed their stories and some called. While I thoroughly enjoyed them, I figured people were just trying to be nice. I had the strong suspicion they would have to be exaggerating. But they kept coming. Everything from summer sores that finally healed, years of diarrhea that subsided, horses with anhydrosis that started sweating again, cushings horses that finally shed out, bad tempered horses that enjoyed work again, nervous horses that finally calmed down, hard keepers finally put on weight, EPM horses that improved, horses didn't bleach out in the summer- they just kept coming.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Soy has been studied extensively over the last few years and has been shown to cause vitamin E, K, D, B12, calcium, magnesium, manganese, copper, iron, and zinc deficiencies, an increased chance of breast cancer, infertility, allergies, a wide array of digestive issues, low birth weight, hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer. Eliminating soy from your horse diet alone, will greatly improve its health. So it all makes sense now and is actually quite basic. The feed reestablishes a proper digestive process, there is nothing in it that is harmful for horses, and all the good stuff is completely absorbable and provided by a whole food. I am so very grateful to my horse, Crypto Aero, who inspired me to make this feed. It still often brings me to tears when people call me or email me with their stories and it makes me so very proud of him. While quite a few top GP jumpers and dressage horses are eating Crypto Aero, the thoroughbred world, was a difficult one to to break into. I was often advised to simply give up on that side of the industry and to keep my focus on the show horse world. Yet, since my Aero was an OTTB, I simply couldn't and am so happy and excited to say that there are quite a few broodmares and babies growing up on Crypto Aero and there is even a few horses at Santa Anita now that will thrive on this feed and hopefully inspire others to make the switch.

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To view the full list of ingredients, testimonials, and guaranteed analysis, please visit our website at www.cryptoaero.com.


"I love how my horses look, feel and shine on this wonderful feed..look at my 2yr old who has only been on it for three weeks. She has "blossomed" from the inside out! All my horses don't just shine, they reflect!! I am feeding less than half of what I used to feed of premium* commercial processed feed. HUGE savings, and NO supplements." -Dana Clarke, GA.

"My horses have been on Crypto Aero for three months now, and the positive changes in all of them are pretty astounding! I have always tried to find the most healthy and natural feed for my horses , and the last few years I have been taking all soy, corn or GMO products and by products out of their diets. Crypto Aero has such the right combination of beneficial ingredients for performance, muscle building, and most importantly where it all starts… a healthy digestive system.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

testimonials

All of the horses have had an increase in hoof growth, (mine are all barefoot, and wear a healthy amount off just through their work, but noticeably needed a trim this time), and their underlines are dramatically different. Noticeably less distention in a couple of my horses that have always looked like they had a “hay belly” even though they eat with slow feeders . Their coats have all blossomed with dapples, shine, and a softer feel. And performance wise, they all seem to be “just right” on this feed. Hotter ones a bit cooler, and cooler ones have a bit more energy! Thank you for making such a terrific feed!!!" Shannon Peters

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" I have been feeding Crypto Aero for about 6 months now. I was interested in the feed because I noticed a tremendous difference in my own health and well being when I switched to a healthier diet. It has done the same thing for my horses. I noticed an improvement in how they look as well as how they feel when I ride them. They have better focus, longer lasting energy while staying level headed, their coats look better, and their hooves have improved. Some hard keepers finally put on weight. In the beginning I fed about the same amount of the previous feed I used, but now I feed significantly less. I rode the mare in this picture in her very first Derby at Spruce Meadows. She went clear and was not the least bit tired. If you haven't tried this feed, yet, I recommend you do. All my horses in training are on it. " - Hector Florentino


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Hippotherapy and Therapeutic Riding By Sara Tradewell, COTA/L “Hippotherapy? You give therapy to hippos?” “Occupational therapy…that’s helping people find jobs, right?” “What’s the difference between hippotherapy and therapeutic riding?” I hear all of these questions, and more, on a fairly regular basis. I work at Chastain Horse Park in Atlanta, both as a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant, Licensed (COTA/L) in the hippotherapy program, and as a PATH Certified Therapeutic Riding Instructor. (As a lifelong horse person, I really couldn’t ask for better jobs!) The purpose of this article is to address some of the most frequently-asked questions about hippotherapy and therapeutic riding. First, let me briefly define occupational therapy. An occupation is not just the job you do at work, it’s any life activity that has purpose and meaning. That includes daily activities such as bathing, dressing, grooming, driving to work, going to school, socializing with friends, walking your dog, cleaning your house, doing homework, folding your laundry, etc. An illness, injury, or disability that interferes with these “jobs of living” is where occupational therapy comes in. OT works to restore or compensate for skills that were lost, or in some cases never learned, by using a variety of treatment methods. “What about physical therapy?” you ask. “I broke my leg, and I had to have eight weeks of PT. Isn’t that kind of the same thing?” OT and PT are different. PT mainly addresses issues of mobility. Having a leg in a cast and hobbling around on crutches is not normal human movement. To restore your mobility, you have to learn to put weight on your injured leg again, regain flexibility in joints that were immobilized while the leg was in a cast, regain strength in muscles that weakened from not walking, and regain a normal walking (gait) pattern. PT helps with all of those things. OT and PT frequently work hand in hand. A good example is that the PT gets the patient walking, and the OT gets them walking around the kitchen to prepare a meal.

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“OK, that’s cool,” you say. “Now, what’s this ‘hippotherapy?’ Why isn’t it just called ‘horse therapy?’” “Hippos” is the Greek word for horse. Since much of our medical terminology is based in Latin or Greek, we have “hippotherapy” as our term for an OT, PT, or speech therapy (ST) treatment that uses the movement of a horse to achieve therapeutic goals. Therapists and therapy assistants must attend multi-day, hands-on seminars offered by the American Hippotherapy Association in order to learn how to assess a horse’s movement, and how to match that movement to the needs of our patients. It’s important to note that all three types of therapy (OT, PT, and ST) can only be performed with a doctor’s prescription, whether or not a horse is used. A patient must meet certain criteria to participate in hippotherapy. It is up to the evaluating therapist to decide if hippotherapy will be incorporated into the treatment plan.


“Wait a minute. You said speech therapists use hippotherapy, too. How can riding a horse help a person learn to talk?” Amazingly, the movement of a horse can do wonders to stimulate the speech centers of the human brain. However, talking is only one part of communication. Talking is expressive language. We also have receptive language: Our ability to understand what is communicated to us. There is also the use of facial expressions and other non-verbal communication, as well as conversation: The ability to participate in an exchange of information. A speech therapist can use the horse’s movement not only to elicit sounds and words, but to initiate interactions with the goal of improving functional communication in all of its subtleties. “OK. How is hippotherapy different from therapeutic riding?”

Therapeutic riding has an extremely broad application. As long as an individual can safely participate in the learning process, and has no contraindications (medical conditions that make horseback riding unsafe), therapeutic riding is helpful for an almost endless variety of disabilities and diagnoses, both physical and psychological. One example might be an adult who had a traumatic brain injury and now has trouble with memory and concentration. Guiding a horse around an arena requires concentration on the task at hand, as well as a working memory of riding aids. Another example might be a young child who lost a parent to cancer, and has been feeling sad and withdrawn. Learning to ride a horse, preferably with another child or two of similar age, provides a social outlet. It also provides an opportunity to explore emotions through the horse. The horse might be in a grumpy mood, a stubborn mood, or a happy and excited mood, and the child will have to adapt and change her riding aids accordingly. She can further apply this to herself and learn how to cope with her feelings. Therapeutic riding instructors should be PATH Certified, meaning they have gone through an intensive learning process and passed teaching and riding exams. (PATH = Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, formerly NARHA). While hippotherapy can only be done by a licensed therapist or therapy assistant, PATH instructor certification is open to all.

“Are hippotherapy and therapeutic riding covered by insurance?” In most cases, OT, PT, and ST are at least partially covered by insurance. Hippotherapy is a treatment method, not a therapy discipline in itself. As long as your insurance covers the OT, PT, or ST, the treatment methods used are of little consequence. However, the use of hippotherapy often incurs costs beyond what an insurance company will reimburse, leaving the patient to cover the balance. The person who does the billing for your therapy provider should be able to give you this information ahead of time. Therapeutic riding, on the other hand, is not covered by insurance. However, there are charitable programs and funds for individuals with disabilities that may reimburse the cost of therapeutic riding and other recreational/therapeutic activities. When you call a therapeutic riding center to inquire about lessons, the center can tell you which programs and funds you might be eligible for. Hippotherapy and therapeutic riding are two different ways in which horses can help heal our bodies and minds. My hope in writing this, and future articles, is to explain and de-mystify the how’s and why’s of equine-assisted activities. Our next article will explore the therapy horse in detail: What we look for, and why the ideal horse is not only hard to find, but worth his weight in gold. Stay tuned to Atlanta Horse Connections!

WELLNESS

We already know that hippotherapy is when an OT, PT, or ST chooses to use the movement of a horse as a treatment strategy for a patient. In hippotherapy, the rider does not always control the horse. The horse is most often led at speeds and directions chosen by the therapist to achieve the desired effect on the patient’s body. A patient must meet certain criteria to participate in hippotherapy. It is up to the Therapeutic riding, on the other hand, teaches riding skills. It is best defined as adaptive riding lessons, or teaching horseback riding and horsemanship skills to

individuals with special needs. It is a recreational therapy rather than a medical therapy, and requires no prescriptions or referrals.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

It’s also important to note that hippotherapy is just one of many treatment strategies a therapist can use to help a patient. Hippotherapy is generally chosen for its unique benefits to the human body. A horse’s walk transfers movements to a rider’s pelvis and hips in a way that closely approximates a normal human gait. The challenge of maintaining balance while seated on the back of a moving horse activates a rider’s core muscles. What daily activities require a person to have a strong, stable core? How often do we need to have strength and flexibility in our spine, pelvis, hips, and knees? When do we need a good sense of where our body is in space, and how to move it efficiently? Hippotherapy can be a good choice for a patient who needs help in any or all of these areas.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

What Is Pilates or Contrology? “Contrology is complete coordination of body, mind, and spirit. Through Contrology you first purposefully acquire complete control of your own body and then through proper repetition of its exercises you gradually and progressively acquire that natural rhythm and coordination associated with all your subconscious activities. This true rhythm and control is observed both in domestic pets and wild animals - without known exception.� Return To Life Through Contrology, by Joseph H. Pilates

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Developed by Joseph Pilates, Contrology is a systematic, progressive regimen of exercises intended to develop the body's strength, poise and functionality. The focus of Pilate's many exercises is on core stability, strength in lengthened muscles and independent motion of muscle groups. It may be done on specialized apparatus or on a mat. Various props may be added, such as the fitness circle, hand weights or resistance bands. Each exercise is particularly well suited to modification to meet the needs of individuals. Classical Pilates maintains a focus on a traditional order of exercises that create a true circuit training experience. Each part of the body is worked with an engaged and supportive core. As the student grows stronger, the exercises become more distal, creating long, lean muscles. Often exercises are modified to further challenge a student's balance, creating a conscious core connection to each of the limbs. It's that

connection that allows independent motion and control of the limbs. Over time these core connections become ingrained and subconscious allowing for even more fluid, controlled motion. At the heart of any Pilates workout, one finds the six Pilates Principles: Centering, Concentration, Control, Precision, Breath and Flow. What Can Pilates Do For You? As riders, we not only struggle with the quirks and limitations of our own bodies, but we must do so in constant motion while maintaining a focus on the animal beneath us. It is all too easy to become too tight in some areas, whilst being too loose in others. This leads to position problems, which results in poor balance, inconsistent or confusing aiding, frustration and loss of confidence. We have all been instructed in the importance of an independent seat and aids, but how do we get there when all of our effort is spent trying to maintain balance amidst a maelstrom of motion? The body is more than the sum of its parts. Each action of the limbs has repercussions throughout the body, unless we use our core connection to isolate the changes in force and balance that have been created. Common problems encountered by riders include hanging on the reins while giving leg aids, gripping tighter with one leg or the other during turns or lateral movements, turning toes out on one leg, posting with the hands. All of these issues are generated by a lack of core connection,

both through the abdomen and the shoulder girdle. When the limbs are being used to balance the rider, they cannot move reliably and independently. Balance must come from the center! When our core is toned and engaged, our limbs are liberated, our upper arms will find their way to our sides, our legs will hang long and even and our pelvis can settle into a secure and neutral position. Pilates is ideal for developing this kind of dynamic strength. Because it focuses on the many small postural muscles, Pilates creates resiliency within the core. There is flexibility, but also integrity, such that changes in balance do not cause unintentional postural deviations. We can hold the center, regardless of what is happening beneath us. Over time, the connected core will become second nature. At this point, it becomes much easier to concentrate on refining our aids and building a quality contact. It opens the door for true lightness in riding, when both rider and horse are in harmonious balance. When a rider is steady, even and balanced in the saddle, even the lightest aid has discernible meaning to the horse. This all starts with mindful, controlled movement, both in and out of the saddle, just as described by the six Pilates Principles: Centering, Concentration, Control, Precision, Breath and Flow.


One Leg Circles For flexibility, tone and core supported independent movement of the hip: • Begin lying on the mat with your arms at your sides, firmly pressed down. • Raise one leg to a vertical position (some bend in the knee may be necessary at first). • Reach long through the flexed heel of the grounded leg, as you cross the raised leg over the midline of the body, then circle it around and back up to the starting position. The emphasis is on the crossing of the midline and the stabilization of the hips and shoulders. • Use the core to stop the hips from rocking and lifting off the mat. 6 reps, then reverse the direction; change legs.

ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Three Essential Exercises You Can Start Today

Serratus Push Ups For stability in the shoulder girdle, and a quality contact: • Come to a forearm plank position, with shoulders over elbows and one straight line from head, hip to heel. The abdominals should be drawing in and up, while the shoulder blades glide down the back. • With control, lower only the chest toward the floor, then lift back up. The movement should be isolated in the shoulder area. Start with 5 reps, then add on.

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ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

Mermaid For a cleaner canter depart, and clearer lateral aids: • Come seated on the mat with knees bent and legs stacked on the left side of the body. • Do not collapse the side body. Sit tall out of the hips. Grasp the left ankle with the left hand and raise the right arm straight up to the ceiling. • Drawing the abs in and up, exhale as you reach the right arm overhead to the left, deepening into the left side body. Repeat this action three times, then bring the arms to a T. Lift the left arm up to the ceiling and walk the right arm out on the mat, bending the elbow and reaching the left arm long overhead. As you reach with the left arm, press deeply into the left hip to make a long arch of the body. Practice both motions as though you were between two panes of glass. Switch sides.

No matter your fitness level or riding level, Pilates can offer a safe, effective workout guaranteed to improve your core connection, and bring a new sense of balance and ease to your ride. To find a certified instructor in your area, go to PilatesMethodAlliance.org.

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“In 10 sessions you will feel the difference; in twenty, you will see the difference; in thirty, you will have a whole new body.” – Joseph Pilates KINNI PETERS is a Certified Pilates instructor and dressage rider located in Carrollton, GA. She offers private or group Pilates sessions at clients' homes (or barns) and teaches Pilates equipment classes at Body & Mind Pilates in Carrollton. She may be found on Facebook at Centaur Pilates.


ATLANTA HORSE CONNECTIONS • 10TH ISSUE

HORSE AND FARM M A R K E T I N G Marketing and Graphic Design for Equestrian Professionals

GRAPHIC DESIGN • LOGOS • FLYERS WEB DESIGN • FLYERS • ADVERTISING WELLNESS

katya manjossova | 770.896.3637 | katyamanjossova@gmail.com


Atlanta Horse Connections - 10th Issue  

Atlanta Horse Connections' goal is to share the inside stories of Georgia based equestrians. You will see narratives from various discipline...

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