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KATRINE M. FORGET

Portfolio of Architectural Work 2017


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K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7


TEL |

KATRINE M. FORGET

+1 650 660 4444 kat.forget@gmail.com

EMAIL |

IN |

linkedin.com/in/katforget issuu.com/katforget

PORTFOLIO |

Hi, I’m Kat. I am detail-oriented, reliable and personable. I seek to specifically further my knowledge of: Ecological design in Residential, Interiors + Landscape.

TECHNICAL SKILLS REVIT

PHOTOSHOP

AUTOCAD

ILLUSTRATOR

RHINO

INDESIGN

SKETCHUP

PHOTOGRAPHY

Proficient in Mac + PC interfaces Strong knowledge of MS Outlook, Word + Excel

EDUCATION BACHELOR OF ARCH. STUDIES (HIGH DISTINCTION, CO-OP) | 2014 CARLETON UNIVERSITY, AZRIELI SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBANISM O T TA W A , C A N A D A

STUDY TERM ABROAD | 2012 ÉCOLE NATIONALE SUPÉRIEURE D’ARCHITECTURE PARIS-MALAQUAIS PA R I S , F R A N C E

Experience with LEED + Passive House

WHERE I EXCEL

WORK EXPERIENCE

Enjoy material selection and creative detailing Comfortable and clear communicator Resourceful and adaptable Self-assured yet approachable

12.2016 - Present

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER (RESIDENTIAL) INDEPENDENT T O R O N T O , C A N A D A Design | Submissions to Authorities | Working Drawings | Site Visits

Able to coordinate moving parts with ease

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER / PROJECT COORDINATOR TORONTO, CANADA BAIRD SAMPSON NEUERT ARCHITECTS

08.2014 - 05.2017 3 Years

Project Management | Consultant Coordination | Client Presentations Design | Submissions to Authorities | Working Drawings | Site Visits Construction Administration | Experience in all Phases: SD, DD, CD, CA

04.2013 - 12.2013

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER (INTERN) O T TA W A , C A N A D A PERKINS + WILL Working Drawings | Consultant Coordination Construction Administration

JUNIOR PROJECT MANAGER (INTERN) O T TA W A , PWGSC - PARLIAMENTARY PRECINCT

8 Months

|

Client Presentations

09.2012 - 04.2013 CANADA

8 Months

Project Management | Consultant Coordination | Writing RFPs & TORs Heritage Assessment | Client Presentations | User Group Sessions

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER (INTERN) TELSTORM CORPORATION T O R O N T O , C A N A D A

05.2012 - 08.2012 4 Months

Working Drawings | Consultant Coordination | Interior Design Client Presentations | Site Visits | Construction Administration

Updated 2017-09

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iv K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7


TEL |

KATRINE M. FORGET

+1 650 660 4444 kat.forget@gmail.com

EMAIL |

IN |

linkedin.com/in/katforget issuu.com/katforget

PORTFOLIO |

Hi, I’m Kat. I am detail-oriented, reliable and personable. I seek to specifically further my knowledge of: Ecological design in Residential, Interiors + Landscape.

AWARDS & PUBLICATIONS 2014

2013

2012

Teron Scholarship (Riverdale Townhomes Project) - Finalist Nominee The Murray & Murray Prize In Architecture - 3rd Prize “The Val D’europe Of Disney: An ‘Authentic’ Simulation Of Paris” in Mediating Memory (Columbia University Press)

2009 - Queen Elizabeth II Aiming For The Top 2013 Annual Scholarship 2009 - Carleton University Renewable 2013 Entrance Scholarship (Annual) 2012

Ontario International Education Opportunity Scholarship

EXTRA-CURRICULAR 04.2011 - 04.2014

MARKETING COORDINATOR & STUDENT REP AZRIELI ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ASSOCIATION

3 Years

C A R L E T O N U N I V E R S I T Y, O T TA W A

05.2010 - 04.2012

VARSITY PLAYER / ASSISTANT CAPTAIN CARLETON UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S VARSITY RUGBY

2 Years

C A R L E T O N U N I V E R S I T Y, O T TA W A

GUEST LECTURER SCHULICH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, MBA PROGRAM COURSE: PROP 6550 “SUSTAINABILE CITIES” COURSE: PROP 6200 “DEVELOPMENT PROTOTYPES”

07.03.2016 07.12.2015

S C H U L I C H S C H O O L O F B U S I N E S S , Y O R K U N I V E R S I T Y, T O R O N T O

REFERENCES BARRY SAMPSON PRINCIPAL, BAIRD SAMPSON NEUERT ARCHITECTS

416 363 8877 / (m)416 566 2473 bsampson@bsnarchitects.com

MAURO CARRENO SENIOR ARCHITECT, QUADRANGLE ARCHITECTS

416 598 1240 / (m)416 888 5422 mauro_carreno@hotmail.com

MATT JOHNSTON ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL, PERKINS+WILL

613 564 1160 / (m)613 324 7832 matt.johnston@perkinswill.com

Former Associate, Baird Sampson Neuert

ROBERT SAGE PROJECT MANAGER, OCAD UNIVERSITY

416 977 6000 x.625 / (m)416 806 8241 rsage@ocadu.ca

TOMASZ DEBOWSKI PRIVATE CLIENT, CUSTOM RESIDENTIAL

(m)647 772 2608 tomaszdebowski@hotmail.com

Client of Baird Sampson Neuert

Updated 2017-09

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TABLE OF CONTENTS A: ACADEMIC

P: PROFESSIONAL

A2 ‘Disneyfication’

A3

p.01

p.09

p.11

P1 Schulich School of

P2 Cloud Gardens

p.13

p.17

I1

I2

I3

p.27

p.29

p.31

A1 Riverdale

Townhomes

Business

Selected Drawings + Commissions

of Paris

Park Revitalization

Selected Photography

I: INDEPENDENT

Cartography Centre

P3

‘LightMASS’ Solar House p.19

P4

‘WRAP’ Beech Lake Cottage p.23

Coffee Table

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A1

RIVERDALE TOWNHOMES

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Comprehensive Studio, Residential Mixed-Use, Urban Planning Honorata Pienkowska Fall 2013 / Spring 2014 Ottawa, Canada The Riverdale Townhomes are part of a mixed-use residential development proposed for the site at Bank Street and Riverdale Avenue in Old Ottawa South. The development looks towards existing amenities and ‘neighbourhood favourites’ for its primary sources of inspiration. It has reinvented a space for the area’s pre-existing local food grocer, Cedar’s, and has further incorporated a local goods marketplace within its very center. Both residents of the development and the public are invited to shop, play and eat locally within the first high-density, affordable housing project envisioned for Old Ottawa South. Two primary housing typologies - flats and towns - are linked via a shared exterior space. The townhomes, located along Riverdale Avenue, are oriented according to the city’s primary street grid in contrast to the buildings immediately across them. This maneuver perpetuates the idea that residents may look beyond the buildings opposite the street in order to connect with the Rideau River situated mere minutes from their doorstep. The undulating presence of the towns along the street, in combination with the formalistic “push and pull” strategy used both in elevation and plan, give these townhouses a unique character. Such moments are further emphasized through the use of contrasting materials and playful punctures amidst the facades.

Publications & Awards: Building 22 Student Publication (2014, Carleton University) Finalist Nominee, Teron Scholarship (2014)

1 Property lines and zoning regulations for the site are the first factors to inform the volumetric

potential of the development. Mid-rise and mixed-use developments are permitted along Bank Street, while lower-rise residential proposals are permitted along Riverdale Avenue.

2 Residential units are oriented in such a way as to correspond to the existing city’s street grid. Retail units at grade maintain their orientation toward Bank Street, serving as the primary threshold linking the development to the Traditional Mainstreet.

3 Residential units are pushed back from the street and divided into three clusters along

both streets abutting the development. This allows for natural lighting opportunities and for the creation of exterior space for residents. The opporunity for a local marketplace is also introduced within the central exterior portion of the whole.

4 Along Bank Street, a rise in height is introduced as the development progresses

northward, culminating in a mid-rise tower. This helps to greatly reduce shadows cast within the development, while providing density to the whole. Along Riverdale Avenue, the residential units begin to take the form of stacked townhomes, as they increase in height toward the ‘peak’ of the development. The marketplace takes form at the core of the development’s central exterior space.

5 The stacked townhomes along Riverdale Avenue are further defined into a series of

vertical volumes which respond toward their immediate surroundings. The mid-rise tower to the north of the development is paired with an attached point-access tower.

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Landcape features such as hills and rainwater collection pools are introduced within the exterior courtyard, complimenting the marketplace’s form and program.


200 m

500 ft

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playgrounds PLAYGROUNDS

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parking PARKING

GREENERY

ABOVE Transit, Amenities + Figure Ground Plan BELOW Massing Methodology + Site Analysis OPPOSITE Exterior View of Townhomes from Riverdale Ave.

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THE SUPERMARKET

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MID-RISE TOWER

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THE ‘HEARTH’

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STACKED TOWNHOMES

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GREENHOUSE LOOKOUT

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RAINWATER COLLECTION POOLS & HILLS

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RETAIL AT GRADE

10 KITCHENETTE & LOUNGE

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CEDAR’S GROCER (LOCAL FOODS)

11 UNDERGROUND PARKING ACCESS

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STEPPED FLATS

12 BICYCLE PARKING

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ABOVE Site Plan OPPOSITE ABOVE Exploded Axon. of Stacked Unit Configuration OPPOSITE BELOW Floor Plans of Segment ‘B’ + Site Axonometric


E. E A V AL RD VE RI

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LEVEL 3

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ABOVE Sample of Unit Plans BELOW View of Typical Unit Interior OPPOSITE Axonometric Detailed Section

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• BACKFILL • 60 x 914 x 1219 RIGID MINERAL WOOL INSULATION BOARD, RSI=0.76 (R=4.3) • 64 x 610 x 1219 RIGID MINERAL FIBRE THERMAL INSULATION, RSI=0.76 (R=4.3) • 3 ELASTOMERIC AIR AND VAPOUR BARRIER MEMBRANE • 250 POURED CONCRETE, RSI=0.014 (R=0.08)

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• 13 GLASS FIBRE REINFORCED CONCRETE PANEL, RSI=0.06 (R=0.34) • 76 AIR SPACE, RSI=0.12 (R=0.68) • 18 GA 64x100 Z-BAR VERTICAL AT 610 O.C. • 64x610x1219, WATER REPELLANT RIGID MINERAL FIBER INSULATION BOARD, RSI=1.9 (R=0.36) • 1 MICROPOROUS LAMINATE SELF-ADHERED VAPOUR PERMEABLE WATER RESISTIVE AIR BARRIER MEMBRANE • 16 WATER RESISTANT EXTERIOR GYPSUM BOARD SHEATHING, RSI=0.18 (R=1.0) • 51x152x3658 20 GA STRUCTURAL–AXIAL LOAD-BEARING & WIND-BEARING COLD-FORMED STEEL C STUDS 16 O.C. • 152x413x1219 SEMI-RIGID BATT STONE WOOL INSULATION, RSI=3.96 (R=22) • 10x1200x1370 NATURAL COTTON RADIANT/VAPOUR BARRIER, RSI=0.69 (R=4) • 13x1220x2743 INTERIOR GYPSUM BOARD, RSI=0.23 (R=1.3) • 1 COAT WATER BASED INTERIOR ACRYLIC PRIMER/SEALER • 2 COATS INTERIOR EGGSHELL FINISH 100% ACRYLIC PAINT

F1 - TYP. GROUND FLOOR

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• 6 POLYMER MODIFIED CEMENT PARGING, RSI=0.04 (R=0.2) • 3 REINFORCING FIBREGLASS MESH • 60 X 914 X 1219 RIGID MINERAL WOOL INSULATION BOARD, RSI=0.76 (R=4.3) • 64 X 610 X 1219 RIGID MINERAL FIBRE THERMAL INSULATION, RSI=0.76 (R=4.3) • 3 ELASTOMERIC AIR AND VAPOUR BARRIER MEMBRANE • 250 POURED CONCRETE, RSI=0.014 (R=0.08)

FN1

• 13 LIGHTWEIGHT SPRAY PLASTER FINISH • 2 REINFORCING FIBREGLASS MESH • 150 SEMI-RIGID MINERAL WOOL INSULATION BOARD, RSI=1.4 (R=8) • 200 POURED CONCRETE, RSI=0.014 (R=0.08) • 40 LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE WITH POLISHED FINISH, RSI=0.014 (R=0.08)

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

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G1 - TYP. EXTERIOR GRADE

80 X 260 X 260 PERMEABLE CONCRETE PAVER 50 BEDDING COURSE TYPICAL GRANULAR A STONE DUST 200 COMPACTED GRANULAR A CRUSHED STONE BACKFILL


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ABOVE Front Rendered Elevation BELOW 1:100 Scale Model of Segment ‘B’ OPPOSITE Construction Detail Section at Public Areas (typ.)

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2 km

RER TRANSIT STOPS

MAJOR HIGHWAY

PARIS, ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

5 km

VAL D’EUROPE, ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

A2 K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

THE ‘DISNEYFICATION’ OF PARIS Urban Planning, Critical Thinking, Dissertation Brent Patterson/Michael Herrman (Exchange) Spring 2012 Paris, France

Publications & Awards: Mediating Memory (2012, Columbia University Press)

During the spring 2012 semester in Paris a collaboration took place between Columbia University’s New York/Paris program and the École Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture Paris-Malaquais. The two student bodies met over the course of the semester, in seminar format, to ignite a multicultural discussion and consider the development of Paris from a distinctively international point of view (Columbia), in comparison to the native perspective (Malaquais). The essays produced by a group of third year students at the ÉNSA Paris-Malaquais discussed and researched various themes related to representations of the city. The end result of this collaboration is a rich collection of insights into how the city is perceived, questioned, represented, and the challenge it raises for architecture and urban planning. This publication contains a selection of the best student work produced during this collaboration as selected by Michael Herrman and Brent Patterson. -written by M. Herrman

New Urbanism, which first began in Europe and is now linked to various popular American developments, consists of new approaches to urban planning said to be morphological, pedestrian-friendly and smaller in scale. These features in addition to the movement’s tendency to adopt a pastiche of traditional elements, has garnered criticism for its character of nostalgia and exclusion.

“The Val d’Europe of Disney: An ‘Authentic’ Simulation of Paris” How do recent developments in Greater Paris, such as Val d’Europe in Marnela-Vallée, look to adopt traditional aspects of Paris’ architecture and urbanism, and what strategies are used to do so? Val d’Europe, whose construction is largely overseen by the Walt Disney Company, is a major urban centre situated approximately 35 kilometers east of Paris. It is a highly unique project in France which attempts to unite private developments with commercial and touristic industries. 09

The movement of New Urbanism or “Nouvel urbanisme”, as communicated by planners such a Léon Krier and François Spoerry, is also examined in the text.

The text examines the ways in which newer construction and planning strategies at Val d’Europe imitate various traditional and Haussmannian styles of architecture that were used throughout the history of Paris’ evolution, as well as the consequences that arise from such actions. The research also critically reflects on the issue of authenticity in regards to particular components and methods of construction used throughout the development, demonstrating an evident American leverage on the project’s progression, in respect to both New Urbanism conventions and ‘Disneyfication’ (the superficial simplification of entities, inclusing those associated to architecture). ABOVE Context Map of Paris and Val d’Europe OPPOSITE ABOVE Examples of Parisian vs. V d’E Architectural Language OPPOSITE BELOW ‘Mediating Memory’ Publication


PARIS, FR POPULATION:

2, 240, 621 DENSITY:

21, 258 p / km2 AREA:

105.40 km2

VAL D’EUROPE, FR POPULATION:

30, 132 DENSITY:

586 p / km2 AREA:

51.41 km2

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A3

CARTOGRAPHY CENTRE

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Comprehensive Studio, Residential Mixed-Use, Urban Planning Eric Archambault Spring 2011 Ottawa, Canada The Cartography Centre is an exercise in responsive infill design within the downtown Ottawa fabric. The program constitutes a library and archive for the purposes of housing maps and other cartographic material concerning the city, as well as a bookstore. The specific site for the project is the historic Byward Market, a neighbourhood whose morphology over the course of the last century was studied to help inform the design of the proposed structure. The project’s inspiration draws from experimentation with both vertical and horizontal circulation, influenced by Adolf Loos’ research surrounding the concept of the “Raumplan”, something which has been translated through the use of section and plan drawings.

ABOVE North Elevation BELOW Parti Diagram OPPOSITE ABOVE Floor Plans and Longitudinal Section ‘B-B’

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OPPOSITE BELOW 1:100 Model


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P1

SCHULICH SCHOOL OF BUSINESS EXPANSION

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Project at BSN Architects, Institutional Schulich School of Business,York University Toronto, Canada April 2018

Business schools tend to be architecturally conservative. By contrast, the expansion of the Schulich School of Business is rooted in creative, climateresponsive design which makes manifest its commitment to sustainability. The project provides facilities for graduate programs, research activities, and office and support space. Its mandate is to achieve a sociable environment conducive to formal and informal interchange for learning and research, and to serve as an exemplar of the school’s sustainable values. To this end, the design employs many environmental strategies which are unusual for Canadian academic buildings. For example, the environmental control system is a hybrid of active mechanical systems and passive natural ventilation, driven by a solar chimney. Central to the design is a social hub/event space which also serves as air transfer for the solar chimney. All building windows are operable and triple glazed. Most window frames are fibreglass, which has a higher thermal transfer resistance than typical aluminum frames. The durable, heavy concrete construction’s insulated thermal mass is employed for radiant cooling and heating. The envelope minimizes cold bridging.

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The building’s projected energy intensity is 98 eKWh/m2. Compared to reference buildings in Canada’s Model National Energy Code, this is a 71.4% energy savings, representing a 67.4% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Minimizing unnecessary interior finishes, using fast-growing woods, green roofs, and a solarready design contribute to sustainability. The performance of people within the building is of primary concern. Daylighting of occupied spaces enhances wellbeing, and natural ventilation controls create a learning synergy between the building, its

My Role:

Project + Consultant Coordinator for DD + CD phases Reported directly to Principal / Project Architect

My Focus: Landcsape Design + Interior Design (Revit Model) occupants and operators. Flexible spaces, such as clustered, flat floor classrooms and reconfigurable research pods, ensure longterm adaptability. Extensive lounge areas support private relaxation and study, and promote informal interaction between students, faculty and visiting members of the business community. The Hub’s flexible furnishings and infrastructure can support major outreach events. Located on the main campus entry boulevard, the landmark building provides a dynamic identity for the School. Solar orientation has been optimized for daylighting and shading control, passive energy harvesting, and the solar chimney symbolizes the centrality of sustainability to the curriculum. On the south side, a sunlit courtyard with shade trees provides outdoor amenity. Along the north façade, a continuous colonnade improves pedestrian comfort. The full height glazing of the Hub allows views right through the building to the courtyard, and a bridge lounge at the top of the Hub provides dramatic views out to the campus. Extensive green roofs augment natural cooling through plant transpiration and enhance the natural habitat of the campus. ABOVE View of Front Elevation at Night OPPOSITE Site Plan at Ground Floor Level OPPOSITE BELOW Photos of Construction Progress


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EXHAUST AIR STRIPPED OF HEAT BY HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM, EXITS THRU GRILLES AT GLAZING

DEDICATED OUTSIDE AIR PREHEATED VIA SOLAR CHIMNEY

DAMPER CLOSED

RETURN AIR THRU BASE OF SOLAR CHIMNEY TO HEAT WHEEL/ENERGY RECOVERY AT A.H.U.

HYDRONIC RADIANT CEILING PANELS IN CEILING OF SOCIAL SPACE SUPPLY DUCT PROVIDES TEMPERED VENTILATION AIR

HYDRONIC RADIANT CEILING PANELS IN HEATING MODE

TEMPERED VENTILATION AIR SUPPLIED THROUGH SLOTS IN CEILING PANEL SYSTEM

HYDRONIC ACTIVE SLAB IN RADIANT HEATING MODE

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

TRIPLE GLAZING

HYDRONIC RADIANT SLAB IN HEATING MODE

HYDRONIC ACTIVE SLAB AND RADIANT ACOUSTIC BAFFLES IN HEATING MODE

HYDRO NIC RA DIANT SLAB

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IN HEAT ING MO DE

HYDRONIC RADIANT SLAB IN HEATING MODE


ABOVE Axonometric Drawings of Solar Chimney Above Social Hub Space BELOW View of Social Hub Space from Level 03 OPPOSITE Cross Section At Social Hub Demonstrating Hybrid Active/Passive Mode in Winter

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P2

CLOUD GARDENS PARK REVITALIZATION

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Project at BSN Architects, Civic City of Toronto Toronto, Canada 2018

My Role:

My Focus: Landcsape Architecture, Revit Model

The winning submission to a public design competition, Cloud Gardens Park was originally designed by Baird Sampson Neuert Architects and completed in 1994. The award-winning park is built on air rights belonging to the City over an underground commercial space and garage, rendering it in fact a large-scale green roof. Beginning in 2015, an early conceptual phase of work has involved design exercises with key stakeholders relating to the remediation and revitalizion of this iconic local public space. Presentations to developpers, municipal staff and key urban planning figures amongst the Toronto community required the creation of a BIM model, visual renderings, updated plant lists and technical drawings and details. Several design iterations were presented for analysis, some of which were more progressive, involving the introduction of light wells used to connect the green outdoor space to the underground public concourse below which has contributed to the city’s pedestrian infrastructure for many years. ABOVE Site Plan and Context OPPOSITE Exploded Axonometric Diagram + Section at Lightwell

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Project + Consultant Coordinator for Design Phase Reported directly to Principal

OPPOSITE BELOW Longitudinal Rendered Section (BIM)


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P3

‘LIGHTMASS’ SOLAR HOUSE

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Project at BSN Architects, Residential Single Family Oak Ridges Moraines, Canada December 2017

LightMASS is an experimental house carefully set within its 11-acre site to respond to the unique geomorphology of rolling hills and circular kettle ponds characteristic of the Oak Ridges Moraines. It is designed to take advantage of exposure to sun and wind and use the combined mass of earth and structure to create a convivial domestic realm for the owners that minimizes negative impacts on the land and the need for external energy sources. The clients for the house envisioned a simple and practical country house that would be energy efficient, responsive to the site’s natural beauty, and a support for small scale farming. At the project outset, they expressed a strong preference for the robustness of concrete over wood construction and the design was conceived to take advantage of the material’s “stereotomic” qualities of plasticity and cast surface, as well as the potential environmental performance contribution inherent in its durability and energy-absorbing mass. The house is sited to meet local conservation requirements, avoiding interference with ground water systems and minimizing disturbance of related plant ecologies. Dug into the side of a knoll and maximizing solar exposure, it is designed to face the sun and enjoy views to a nearby kettle pond and heavily treed water course. Its green roofs will return their surfaces to the living landscape of the site, as well as aid cooling in summer and heating in winter using its geothermal exchange system.

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Two long, tilted walls with bent tops organize movement within the simple linear organization of the house and give it a unique identity when approached

My Role:

Construction Administration, Promotional Material Reported directly to Principal

Focus:

Passive ‘Net-Zero’ Systems, Concrete Construction, Revit Model

from the entry drive. The scoop form of the concrete walls gathers daylight into the length of the house and creates a continuous solar chimney utilizing sun energy absorbed into its mass to help drive passive ventilation and heating. Solar thermal panels for heating domestic hot water are integrated into the clerestorey alongside vents for stack ventilation. The walls break open to form the house entry and separate the children and guest wing circulation from that of the main wing . Their long, convex back sides are heavily insulated and close the house to northern winds, as well as views from the neighbours. Clad with ribbed stainless steel, their form alludes to the purposeful elegance of agrarian buildings and their evanescent surfaces will reflect changes in the sky. Designed to provide summer shading, the cantilevered edges of the main roof are thermally broken from climate controlled space so that their cast ceiling surface can visually extend from inside to outside, emphasizing the house’s openness to the landscape while maintaining the lightness of its space and mass. ABOVE View of Front Entry OPPOSITE LEFT Site Plan at Ground Floor Level OPPOSITE RIGHT Floor Plans


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LIVING MASTER BEDROOM BATHROOM PATIO FISH POND WORK ROOM LAUNDRY

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BUILD ZONE/KNOLL WATER COURSE KETTLE POND GREENERY NEIGHBOURING HOUSE

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SUMMER PASSIVE STRATEGIES:

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1. GREEN / ‘COOL’ ROOF REDUCES HEAT ISLAND EFFECT AND HEAT LOAD ON BUILDING 2. SOLAR CHIMNEY INDUCES STACK EFFECT TO ENHANCE NATURAL VENTILATION 3. HIGH MASS CONSTRUCTION/ GROUND SOURCE HEATING/ INFLOOR RADIANT SYSTEMS ARE INTEGRATED TO MODERATE COOLING DEMANDS AND TEMPER INTERIOR SPACE 4. PARTIAL EARTH BERMING REINFORCES THE THERMAL MASS AND INSULATION PROPERTIES 5. ROOF PROJECTIONS AND RETRACTABLE AWNING SYSTEMS BLOCK SUMMER SUN AND ENHANCE INTERIOR DAYLIGHTING

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WINTER PASSIVE STRATEGIES:

6. AUTOMATED VENTS AND OPERABLE WINDOWS RESPOND TO PREVAILING WINDS AND LOCAL MICROCLIMATE OPPORTUNITIES RELATED TO THE NEARBY POND 7. STACK EFFECT BENEFITS EXTEND ACROSS BOTH FLOOR LEVELS USING LOW LEVEL VENTILATION INLETS AND STAIR OPENINGS TO INTERCONNECT SPACES 8. PREVAILING WINDS FROM OPERABLE WINDOWS NEAR WALK-OUT BASEMENT ON WEST FACADE 9. CONCRETE CISTERN INTEGRATED INTO PATIO FOUNDATION DESIGN* 10. VACUUM TUBE SOLAR HOT WATER COLLECTORS*

1. ROOF PROJECTIONS AND RETRACTABLE 5. FLOOR LEVEL INLETS AND PERFORATED AWNING SYSTEMS ENABLE WINTER SUN FIREPLACE DESIGN ENHANCES CONVECTIVE PENETRATION/ SOLAR GAIN AND ENHANCE HEATING CONTRIBUTION AND DISTRIBUTION INTERIOR DAYLIGHTING FROM FIREPLACE 2. HIGH MASS CONSTRUCTION SERVES TO STORE 6. GEOTHERMAL INFLOOR HEATING SYSTEM PASSIVE SOLAR HEAT GAIN COMBINED WITH HIGH MASS CONSTRUCTION 3. THERMAL ENERGY GENERATED BY THE SOLAR ENABLES HEAT STORAGE AND ‘CHARGING’ CHIMNEY IS RECOVERED AND RECIRCULATED DURING ‘OFFPEAK’ HOURS FOR ELECTRICITY AS PART OF THE HYBRID ENVIRONMENTAL 7. THERMAL STRATIFICATION WITHIN LOWER STRATEGY SPACES VENTS TO UPPER LEVEL SOLAR 4. STRATEGIC POSITIONING OF THE FIREPLACE CHIMNEY FOR HEAT RECOVERY USING OPEN OPTIMIZES ITS RADIANT HEAT CONTRIBUTION STAIRWAY /INTERCONNECTED SPACES *Strategies are employed year-round.


BELOW Construction Photographs LEFT Green Roof Detail Section + Sketches OPPOSITE BELOW Sections of Summer + Winter Passive Strategies OPPOSITE ABOVE Axonometric Solar Study

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P4

‘WRAP’ BEECH LAKE COTTAGE

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Project at BSN Architects, Residential Single Family Haliburton Highlands, Canada July 2017

Construction Administration, Promotional Material Reported directly to Principal

Focus:

Passive ‘Net-Zero’ Systems, Concrete + Wood Construction

CottageWRAP is an exploratory adaptive re-use architectural project conceived in the tradition of Aalto’s experimental weekend home. The original 1950 cottage was part of the first wave of weekend dwellings that were built in the Haliburton Highlands when affordable lakeside properties became accessible to working people as a result of rising automobile ownership.

stem adds structural support and houses a fireplace above a high efficiency wood stove. A new bridge spanning from a massive rock hump at the edge the parking court begins a new axis of entry. It passes through a Galvalume clad central volume containing the old kitchen tail that curves up and over the new loft area.

Hand built by the owners, the simple oblong building was constructed entirely from materials available from the local lumber mill. Like many of its contemporaries, it was proto-modern in its open plan and honest interior finishes. Over time, its foundations were heaved, roof worn out, envelope inadequate for extended seasonal occupancy and space insufficient to accommodate multigenerational use. The adaptive re-use strategy was conceived as a socially responsible alternative to the common practice of demolition and rebuilding.

The new ‘wrap’ comprises two distinct pieces that bracket a large 1.5 storey high screened porch. Along three sides, an inhabitable glazed enclosure surrounds the existing living areas and provides a seasonal sitting area with views toward the lake and the “bird-inhabited zone” of adjacent tree cover. This space can be closed off from the core during winter to serve as a thermal buffer while conversely opening unto the screened porch during summer.

The strategy deploys the existing building as the social core of an all season dwelling and entails three simple operations: raising the building on new foundations to create usable space below it; wrapping it with a thin addition to upgrade its exterior envelope; and raising a central portion of the roof to create new loft space with a panoramic lake view.

23

My Role:

A set of repeating “U” shaped concrete piers is designed to receive the steel beams required for raising the existing wood structure while facilitating access for construction. Each provides “serving space”, with new windows, walls and doors between them providing access and views to new living space. Inserted into the open plan of the existing cottage along with a new stair, a central hearth

ABOVE Photograph of Exterior Cantilever OPPOSITE ABOVE Rear View of Cottage From Beech Lake OPPOSITE BELOW Photographs of Constructed Work


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13

11 12 1

10

3

LOFT LEVEL

0 ft

2

10 ft

6

4

2 5 7

9

MAIN LEVEL

8

1

2 3

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

2

6 7

LOWER LEVEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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SCREENED PORCH BEDROOM LIVING DINING KITCHEN BATHROOM ENTRY

8 9 10 11 12 13

WALKOUT PATIO BRIDGE DOUBLE SKIN LIVING SPACE SLEEPING LOFT CLOSET GREEN ROOF


OPPOSITE ABOVE Floor Plans OPPOSITE BELOW Perspectival Cross Section View of Living Space ABOVE Exploded Axonometric Drawing of Structural + Architectural Systems

26


I1

SELECTED DRAWINGS + COMMISSIONS

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Hand Drawings, Drafting, Details, Sketches Various or N/A Ottawa and Toronto, Canada 2009 - 2017

On this spread are excerpts of drawings and details which I have produced over the course of the preceding eight years as both a student and practicing designer. I have included examples of architectural concepts and ideas through the forms of hand sketches, as well as fully detailed hand-drafted drawings to aid in demonstrating an understanding of construction techniques and materials. It is worth mentioning that I also possess significant experience in producing digital construction drawings (AutoCad + Revit), though such examples are not depicted on this spread. ABOVE Conceptual Hand Sketch of Cross-Section RIGHT Hand-Drafted Detailed Axonometric Wall Section Case Study : The Gae House OPPOSITE ABOVE Hand-Drafted Cross-Section and Floor Plans Case Study : The Gae House OPPOSITE BELOW Conceptual Hand Sketch of Axonometric Drawing

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OPPOSITE RIGHT Rendered Graphite Drawing


28


I2

SELECTED PHOTOGRAPHY Digital, Film, Pinhole N/A Ottawa + Toronto (Canada), Hong Kong (China) 2010 - 2017

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Locations: Date:

ABOVE Digital - Hong Kong BELOW Film Photography, Cyanotype Exposure

29

OPPOSITE Film, Pinhole + Digital - Toronto, Ottawa, Hong Kong


30


I3

COFFEE TABLE

K AT R I N E F O R G E T - 2 0 1 7

Type: Client: Location: Date:

Furniture, Design-Build Private Toronto, Canada May 2014

This design-build initiative was undertaken as a means of exploring microscale design ideas for everyday use, while drawing influences from architecture. The design of objects, artifacts and furniture aids toward keeping the creative mind engaged and demands an attention to fine details. The physical building requirement of the project helped inform the design process and provided a platform for experimenting with craftsmanship and materials.

ABOVE Photograph of Finished Work TOP RIGHT Conceptual Hand Sketch of Section

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BOTTOM RIGHT Photograph of Finished Work


KATRINE M. FORGET

TEL |

+1 650 660 4444 kat.forget@gmail.com

EMAIL |

IN |

linkedin.com/in/katforget issuu.com/katforget

PORTFOLIO |

Portfolio of Architectural Work 2017  
Portfolio of Architectural Work 2017  
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