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FSU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

2011-2012 YEAR IN REVIEW


FROM THE DEAN I AM PLEASED TO PRESENT THE COLLEGE’S 2011-2012 Year in Review. This edition highlights some outstanding accomplishments of our faculty and celebrates the generous spirit of our alumni and friends. As you read through this report, I invite you to contact the amazing people found within its pages to learn more about the vast impact our College is making globally, in our community and in the lives of our students on campus. I hope you will be inspired to make your own difference wherever you are able. You

All my best,

Marcy P. Driscoll, Ph.D. Dean, College of Education Leslie J. Briggs Professor of Educational Research

can learn more about our transformative opportunities to give on pages 43-48. I send my sincere gratitude to our alumni, friends and donors for your consistent support. Your generosity provides scholarships, fellowships and program support needed in a time where budget cuts are in the spotlight. These donations and gifts allow our best students to have continued success. Thank you for taking the time to read our report. I hope it allows you to discover all that is being achieved here at the FSU College of Education.


3 4 7 9 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 26 27 30

By the Numbers Program Graduation Totals Highlights International Impact Select Faculty Awards & Honors Mickey Damelio: “30 Under 30 Award” T.K. Wetherell: “Leadership Tallahassee Award” Val Shute: “Mack & Effie Endowed Professorship” Cecile Reynaud: “Team Leader for Team USA” Select Faculty Books Published Book Contract with Harvard Education Press

31 33 35 37 38 40 41 42 43 49 50

New Faculty Grant Funding Education & General Expenditures Helping Students Offset Tuition Students Show Their Gratitude Donor Honor Roll How Your Gift Helps Us Grow Why We Give Opportunities to Give Stay in Touch: New COE iPhone App Contact Information

Select Faculty Editorships Select Faculty Journal Articles Faculty Named Editors of Influential Journal

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-2012


22

U.S. News & World Report’s 2012 edition of “Top Online Education Programs” rankings places the University’s College of Education 22nd nationally among online graduate education degree programs for student services and technology.

11

Research and educational centers within the College serve to complement its academic mission by offering support, resources and opportunities for enrichment to Florida State faculty and students as well as the Tallahassee community.

,783 1 46 $19,018,482

10

State-of-the-art facilities are housed within the College, including: Assistive Technology Center, Cyber Lounge, Daily Living Skills Classroom, Graduate Student Carrels, Robert M. Morgan Instructional Systems Multimedia Studio and Science Lab, Teach LivE Virtual Classroom, Learning Resource Center, Tech Sandbox and Sport and Exercise Psychology Lab.

Academic programs offering bachelor’s, master’s, specialist and doctoral degrees, as well as certificates, with many opportunities for face-to-face and online/distance learning.

Students enrolled in the College — 692 undergraduate and 1091 graduate.

Value of funded grants held by education faculty.

120

Faculty members including 13 named professors.

45

Countries represented by our student body.

2

The College of Education has partnerships with two charter schools— The Florida State University Schools, Inc. and The Pembroke Pines FSU Charter Elementary School— that accommodate student clinical placement and research initiatives to strengthen the educational base in the state.

1905

Year the College of Education was founded.

BY THE NUMBERS 3 COE ANNUAL REPORT


2011-2012 COE GRADUATES TOTAL: 779 4


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & POLICY STUDIES MASTER’S

SPECIALIST

DOCTORAL

62

19

15

GRADUATION TOTAL: 96

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY & LEARNING SYSTEMS MASTER’S SPECIALIST

86

31

GRADUATION TOTAL: 144

5 COE ANNUAL REPORT

DOCTORAL

27


SPORT MANAGEMENT BACHELOR’S MASTER’S

100

62

DOCTORAL

7

GRADUATION TOTAL: 169

TEACHER EDUCATION BACHELOR’S MASTER’S

218

132

SPECIALIST

DOCTORAL

5

15

GRADUATION TOTAL: 370 6


Jimmy Pastrano,

Betsy Becker, distinguished

professor and chair of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, receives the prestigious Frederick Mosteller Award.

2011

The inaugural College of Education Week is held in conjunction with FSU Parents’ Weekend. The week — comprised of six days of symposia, presentations and events — celebrated COE students, alumni, faculty, staff and friends.

AUGUST OCTOBER

2012

academic specialist in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, is awarded the “2012 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Distinguished Service Award” at the 24th annual Dr. MLK Commemorative Celebration.

JANUARY

U.S. News and World Report’s

2012 edition of the “Top Online Education Programs” ranks the College 22nd nationally among online graduate education degree programs for student services and technology. The College bestows Distinguished Alumni Awards to Louis Brown, Ph.D. (Distinguished Educator); Christopher Iansiti, M.S. (Business and Industry); Neal Golden, Ph.D. (Elementary or Secondary Schools); Cornelia Orr, Ph.D. (Government and Community Service); David Capuzzi, Ph.D. (Postsecondary Systems); and John V. Dempsy, Ph.D. (Postsecondary Systems).

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Dean Marcy Driscoll

is elected to the Executive Board of the Council of Academic Deans from Research Education Institutions (CADREI).


The Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR)

HIGHLIGHTS

receives a $38 million award to help improve children’s success in the Southeast. The College displays 10 exhibits in the FSU DigiTech 2012 to promote students’ innovative usage of technology in the College. Multiple demonstrations of various tools and technologies wowed the visitors.

MARCH

JUNE MAY

Amy Guerette,

associate dean for academic affairs, receives the “2012 Outstanding Educator of the Blind” award by the Florida Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired.

The College hosts the first-ever

Scholarships and Programs Open House. Students and guests gained information on programs, scholarships and research available at the College of Education.

The FSU Alumni Association honors Mickey Damelio, visiting assistant in Visual Disabilities, as one of the “30 Under 30” Young Alumni making a difference.

Haddy Njie,

an Educational Leadership and Policy Studies doctoral student, travels to the World Bank to receive the Margaret McNamara Fellowship for her doctoral research in Gambia.

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FACULTY LOCATIONS

JAMES KLEIN

Klein’s work includes chairing the COE adhoc committee on global engagement and leading an effort to offer the instructional systems master’s degree in Singapore. Last year, he presented the keynote address at the Conference of Civil Servant Distance Training hosted by the Chinese Academy of Governance in Beijing.

AYESHA KHURSHID Khurshid conducts interdisciplinary research on globalization, international development, and women’s education. She also studies how global policies to educate and empower women in developing and Muslim countries are translated into local contexts. She is currently working on a research project that examines how women teachers and students from rural and low-income communities in Pakistan receive and mobilize class-based cultural capital in a transnational women’s education project. Her second project focuses on a diasporaled development project to examine how the

life histories of the institutional leaders and policymakers based in North America shape the meaning and implications of education for women from marginalized communities in Pakistan. Professor Khurshid’s work on international education and women’s rights, teacher education, multicultural education and child development has appeared in the form of book chapters and journal articles in Anthropology and Education Quarterly, Teaching and Teacher Education, and Infant and Child Development.

ROBERT REISER

Reiser is working to initiate a hybrid instructional systems master’s degree program for adults in Singapore and to establish some joint research projects that will be sponsored by the Singaporean government.

BETSY BECKER & VANESSA DENNEN Last fall, Becker and Dennon presented a workshop on instructional systems research and educational research methods (action research and hierarchical modeling) at Uttaradit Rajabhat University in Thailand.

LARA PEREZ-FELKNER

Perez-Felkner is an associate fellow of the Pathways to Adulthood International fellowship program based in the Institute of Education in London. She will be a visiting scholar at the Center for Khmer Studies in Siem Reap, Cambodia, examining gendered differences in participation in higher education and science fields.

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STEVEN PFEIFFER

In spring of 2012, Pfeiffer served as a visiting scholar at the National Institute of Education, Singapore.


INTERNATIONAL IMPACT TURKEY EGYPT CHINA PAKISTAN KOREA ETHIOPIA THAILAND

FLAVIA RAMOS-MATTOUSSI

Last year, Ramos traveled to Liberia, Angola and Mozambique to conduct Monitoring and Evaluation of Literacy Programs under USAID’s Bureau for Africa. She is currently working on USAID- and UNICEFfunded education projects in Ethiopia, Indonesia and Tuvalu in collaboration with COE faculty. The Center for International Studies in Educational Research and Development at the Learning Systems Institute, a partner with the Research Triangle Institute, is providing technical assistance to two fiveyear projects. Ramos is the principal investigator on the Ethiopia-READ and on the UNICEF-funded Early Grade Literacy Program in Tuvalu, where she went this year with Marion Fesmire; and co-PI (with Jeff Milligan) on PRIORITAS in Indonesia. Several other College of Education faculty are involved with the Ethiopia READ project:

• Jeffrey Ayala Milligan, Ph.D. •
Young-Suk Kim, Ed.D. 
 • Marion Fesmire, Ed.D.
 • Phyllis Swann Underwood, Ph.D. •
Jeanne Wanzek, Ph.D. 


• Elisa (Lisa) Scherff, Ph.D. 
 • Peter Easton, Ph.D. •
Rebecca Galeano, Ph.D. • Erica Pereira Amorim

SRI LANKA

CAMBODIA MALAYSIA

PHILIPPINES

SINGAPORE INDONESIA TUVALU

JEFFREY MILLIGAN

Milligan is the director of the Center for International Studies in Education Research and Development at the Learning Systems Institute and a professor of sociocultural/international development education studies in ELPS. He has more than a decade of experience in conducting educational research and development in the Philippines, principally in Mindanao. He was also the principal FSU investigator on the USAID-funded Decentralized Basic Education 2 in Indonesia (2006-2012) and a two-time Fulbright Fellow (Malaysia 2006, Philippines 1999). He co-directs, with Peter Easton, the Peace Corps Master’s International Program at the COE.

ALYSIA ROEHRIG

FENGFENG KE

Ke is collaborating with researchers in Korea in conducting research on designing computer agents and virtual reality for preservice teacher training. Ke is also hosting international visiting scholars from China and Korea.

Roehrig’s research focuses on teacher quality, teacher professional development and education fostering students’ literacy learning. Since 2011, she has hosted three international visiting scholars: Zeynep Akdag (from Turkey), Satilmis Tekindal (from Turkey) and Amal Zayed (from Egypt). Currently, Roehrig and Tekindal are developing a survey (translated into both English and Turkish) to assess teachers’ and pre-service teachers’ beliefs about the efficacy of diverse classroom management practices.

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FINLAND GERMANY ENGLAND

FRANCE

SUDAN KENYA

MOROCCO

MALI

NIGER

KATHY GUTHRIE

THE GAMBIA

JAMAICA

In May 2013, Guthrie took 14 Higher Education master’s students to London for an intensive week-long course (Practicum in Higher Education) in which they visited four higher education institutions including Oxford, University of Bedfordshire, University of London-Queen Mary, and Foundations of International Education. The group was able to explore current issues in British Higher Education, as well as better understand British influence on American Higher Education. Currently, she is working to take another group in May 2013. 



HAITI

MEXICO

BRAZIL PERU

YUKYOUM KIM CECILE REYNAUD

Sport Management faculty members teach two courses each summer through the FSU International Programs Office. This responsibility rotates throughout the faculty. The courses are International Sport Venues and Issues in International Sport. This past summer the courses included attending events at the Olympic Games in London. Reynaud taught the first half of these two courses and then returned to London for the Paralympic Games where she served as the Team Leader for the USA Women’s Sitting Volleyball Team.

SHERRY SOUTHERLAND

Southerland is currently a member of three editorial boards for international journals – Research in Science Education, International Journal of Science Education, and the International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education.

MOTOKO AKIBA

With a dual-title Ph.D. in Comparative and International Education and Education Policy from Pennsylvania State University-University Park, Akiba’s research program focuses on the examination of teacher policies and reforms around the world. Her edited book, titled “Teacher reforms around the world: Implementations and outcomes,” will be published by Emerald Books in 2013.

Kim has been involved in several research projects that focused on social media, causerelated marketing, fan identification, sport consumption motivation and constraints, service quality, sport product image, and curiosity. His accomplishments in the research areas above include (1) 40 peer-reviewed articles, in top sport- and business-related journals including the Journal of Sport Management, Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, Journal of Management and Organization, International Journal of Sport Communication, International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, and Sport Marketing Quarterly, and (2) 58 research presentations. The presentations have been presented at conferences for the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM), Sport Marketing Association (SMA), International Conference on Sport and Entertainment Business (ICSEB), and International Conference on Service Management.


REBECCA GALEANO Galeano teaches courses in English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and Foreign/ Second Language Teaching Methodology. Aside from working with teachers in the U.S., she has also helped prepare pre-service and inservice language teachers in Mexico and Peru for the last six years. Galeano currently serves as coordinator of the M.O.S.T programs in ESOL and Foreign Language Education and coordinates undergraduate ESOL programs. Her areas of research interest include childhood bilingualism, the development of articulated proficiency based K-12 foreign language programs, and foreign language teacher attitudes toward integrating

culture into language curricula. Currently, Galeano is working on a school reform project with Centros Rurales de Formacion en Alternancia in the Loreto Region in Peru. This school system serves multilingual indigenous students from rural areas in the Peruvian Amazon. She also collaborates on international teacher education projects with FORMABIAP: Programa de Formación de Maestros Bilingües de la Amazonía Peruana. In collaboration with Juan Carlos Galeano from the FSU Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics, she co-directs the FSU International Study/Service Abroad Program in Iquitos Peru.

PETER EASTON Over the last two decades, Easton has participated in a variety of research and professional activity overseas including study of: • systems for local capacity development in the Sahelian countries of Africa; • the development of adult education and literacy programs in Africa; • programs to eliminate female genital mutilation in Senegal, Mali and the Sudan for the Wallace Global Fund; • educational programs for street and working children in Brazil and Kenya, plus supervision/ execution of the study in Kenya; • radio education programs in Haitian primary schools for the Education Development Centre;

• vocational education in Morocco and Indonesia for the World Bank; and • costs of the Room to Read girls’ educational enhancement program in Sri Lanka for the American Institutes of Research. Easton has also helped a number of his doctoral students complete research overseas for their dissertations. A considerable part of Easton’s international work has been carried out for overseas professional or international organizations. Much of his post-Peace Corps work in Niger and Mali was undertaken as a member of a French development assistance organization, l’Institut de Recherche et d’Application des Méthodes de Développement (IRAM), headquartered in Paris.

MICKEY DAMELIO, SANDRA LEWIS & MARY FRANCIS HANLINE

Lewis and Hanline serve on the board of directors for Ability Beyond the Horizon, a nonprofit organization established by Damelio that provides support to people in developing countries who teach people who are blind or visually impaired to be more independent. Two years after launching the organization, Damelio made his first international impact trip to Bangalore, India. Damelio embarked on a second international venture last summer at Devnar School for the Blind in Hyderabad, India. This May, Ability Beyond the Horizon plans to sponsor three students from the Visual Disabilities program for their next international service trip to Bermuda.

JAMES SAMPSON

Sampson recently did a study tour to schools in Jyvaskyla, Finland. He is also a visiting professor of Educational Psychology (with specializations in career and educational planning, as well as information and communications technology) at the University of Jyvaskyla. Additionally, he is a visiting professor of Career Development and Management, International Centre for Guidance Studies, School of Education and Social Science, University of Derby, Derby, England.

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AWARDS AND

HONORS

13 AWARDS AND HONORS


SCHOOL OF TEACHER EDUCATION

GEORGE BOGGS

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Carol D. Fisher Award for Research, The University of Georgia Department of Language and Literacy Education

SANDRA LEWIS

PROFESSOR

Elected President of the Florida State University Faculty Senate

AMY GUERETTE

ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Educator of the Year, Florida Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired

JOHN MYERS

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

CUFA Best Technology Paper Award ,
National Council for Social Studies Annual Conference, Seattle, WA

VICTOR SAMPSON

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SCIENCE EDUCATION

• The NARST Early Career Research Award, National Association for Research in Science Teaching • The College of Education Faculty Research Award, The Florida State University • 2012 Outstanding Adult Volunteer Award for Godby High School, Leon County Schools

SHELBIE WITTE

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

• Teaching for Transformation Award, Florida State University Spiritual Life Project • Undergraduate Teaching Award, The Florida State University

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ABILITY BEYOND THE HORIZON: COE ALUMNUS AND FACULTY MEMBER MICKEY DAMELIO RECOGNIZED FOR HIS SERVICE TO THE BLIND BY AGE 29, MICKEY DAMELIO HAD HELPED

empower people with disabilities from Tallahassee, Fla., to Bangalore, India, earning him one of the inaugural “Thirty under 30” awards from the Florida State University Alumni Association.

Damelio is the program coordinator for FSU’s Visual Disabilities Orientation and Mobility program. Last spring, he was recognized for his work as founder of an international nonprofit organization called Ability Beyond the Horizon. Established in 2008, his organization’s mission is to bring research-based methods of working with people who are blind or visually impaired to developing countries. “I created Ability Beyond the Horizon after realizing 90 percent of people with visual impairments live in developing countries, while nearly 100 percent of the people professionally trained to work with them live in a developed country,” Damelio said. Damelio was one of 30 exceptional alumni under 30 years of age selected by a committee of fellow FSU graduates for the honor. “The recipients of this award, the highest honor bestowed upon recent graduates by the FSU Alumni Association, exemplify the inimitable qualities that define Florida State’s freshest alumni — service, leadership, ingenuity and dedication, among others,” said Scott Atwell, the association’s president. Two years after launching the organization, Damelio made his first trip to Bangalore. That summer, he and two students in the Florida State Visual Disabilities program created a network for organizations serving people who are blind in Bangalore. His group successfully trained new educators and facilitated connections

15 AWARDS AND HONORS

through a month-long workshop, which brought together eight teachers from several different organizations aiding people who are blind. Through the creation of this network, a braille book donation program was established providing an ample supply of quality books to which these organizations never had access before. Damelio embarked on a second international venture last summer at Devnar School for the Blind in Hyderabad, India. Twelve teachers, along with other staff, served about 500 children with visual impairments, ages 4 to 21. His efforts in Hyderabad changed the school’s curriculum so that the children have a better chance at achieving a high quality of life, including gaining meaningful employment and living with independence. “There are people doing great work in these countries, but I felt I could bring advanced practices and education-based research to these people that could help them do their work even better,” said Damelio. “And it seems to be working.” Devnar School now dedicates one period a day for the students to learn independent living skills, as well as independent travel with a long white cane. Both are critical life skills for people with visual impairments, and they had not been taught at all previously. The school estimates this change will impact thousands of children with visual impairment as the school continues to expand. Damelio returned to Bangalore for three days last summer to be the guest of honor at the city’s first-ever conference for educators of people with

BY AMBER SMALLEY

visual impairment. The conference was initiated as a result of his work there during the summer of 2011. Damelio held workshops and spoke with policymakers and educators in the fields of special education and visual impairment in India. More than 120 people returned to their classrooms and schools with new ideas and skills derived from methods based in research. Many of these people work with more than 20 students each, making the impact of the conference even broader. Damelio recalls with amusement how he found his passion working in the visual disabilities field. “This field found me. I knew I wanted to do something where I helped people, but I started as an undecided major,” Damelio said. Damelio was working as a salesman in a bed store when he met a teacher of students with visual impairments who sold him on declaring Visual Disabilities as his major. “She never did buy the bed, but I sure found my heart in the work that she did,” Damelio said. “I changed my major just a couple days later.” School of Teacher Education faculty members Sandra Lewis, Mary Francis Hanline and the late Barbara Edwards have all served on the board of directors for Ability Beyond the Horizon. This May, the organization plans to sponsor three students from the Visual Disabilities program for their next international service trip to Bermuda. To learn more about their work in the visual disabilities field, visit:

WWW.ABILITYBEYONDTHEHORIZON.ORG


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & POLICY STUDIES

CAROLYN HERRINGTON PROFESSOR

Elected President of the Association for Educational Finance and Policy

SHOUPING HU

PROFESSOR

Senior Scholar Award, American College Personnel Association (ACPA)

KATHY GUTHRIE ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

• Emerging Scholar, American College Personnel Association • Mentor/Supervisor Award, Hardee Center for Leadership and Ethics in Higher Education, The Florida State University

ROBERT SCHWARTZ PROFESSOR

• Served as conference chair and host for

the 2012 Southern History of Education Society Conference • Elected as a Faculty Fellow of the National Association for College Student Affairs (NASPA) 16


T.K. WETHERELL A Legacy of Leadership LEADERSHIP TALLAHASSEE RECOGNIZED FLORIDA

State University President Emeritus T.K. Wetherell for his decades of dedication to public service Sept. 20 at the organization’s 18th annual Distinguished Leadership Awards at FSU’s University Center Club. Wetherell received Leadership Tallahassee’s 2012 Lifetime Leadership Award, which honors an individual who has made important and substantial contributions to the Tallahassee community for more than 25 years. The recognition is fitting for Wetherell, the first FSU alumnus to become president of the University, and one who has dedicated much of his career to strengthening higher education, particularly in Tallahassee but also statewide. “Anytime you receive recognition like this it is always nice, always a joy and always positive,” Wetherell said. “It forces you to step back and evaluate. Once you do that, you realize your leadership is a result of other people’s work, not just your own.” Leadership, Wetherell said, is about teambuilding. “It is being able to stop and recognize the team around you and what they offer to the group. It is the premise that no one person can solve a problem alone,” he said. “Leaders face different challenges every day because every day is different. It is the ability for leadership to make the best decision for that moment in time by acquiring all of the information and then assessing that information. It is being able to recognize challenges and issues before they turn into bigger problems.” Wetherell enrolled at FSU on a football scholarship, playing for the Seminoles from 1963 to 1967. He went on to earn a doctorate in Education Administration from the College

17 AWARDS AND HONORS

of Education. He returned to his alma mater to serve as president of FSU from 2003 to 2010. His leadership role at FSU was one of many. He served in the Florida House of Representatives from 1980 until 1992; two of those years as House Speaker. From 1995 to 2001, he was president of Tallahassee Community College. He also served as president of the Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF), an association of Florida’s private colleges. Wetherell spoke of a common thread to his actions at all of those institutions. “I work for the betterment of the Tallahassee community and the state of Florida,” he said. During his tenure as president of FSU, the university saw an increase in awarded doctoral degrees, research dollars, academically talented students, and construction. Wetherell created the pioneering Pathways of Excellence, an initiative that works to enhance the university’s standing as a top research and graduate education institution. The Pathways program promotes the hiring of additional faculty members in clusters of interdisciplinary academic themes, as well as substantial investments in new facilities and in graduatelevel programs with an emphasis on creating new interdisciplinary doctoral programs. New research facilities, parking garages, dining halls, three new residence halls, and a $33 million restoration of Ruby Diamond Auditorium are among the transformations that have resulted. Wetherell also put critical work towards the University Center, the College of Medicine and the expansion of the College of Education. “While president of Florida State, T.K. Wetherell and his leadership contributed to the Stone Building expansion project.

Without him, I doubt we would have gotten funding from the legislature. In addition, he provided input during the design process that contributed to the wonderful, award-winning architecture of the building,” said Dean Marcy Driscoll. After stepping down from his presidency, Wetherell returned to the classroom as a higher education professor in the College’s Educational Leadership and Policy Studies department. He also founded and serves as director of the Center for Higher Education Research, Teaching and Innovation (CHERTI). CHERTI conducts and promotes research on issues facing Florida. Wetherell’s legacy is still and always will be visible throughout FSU, TCC, the Tallahassee community, and the State of Florida. “The moments that mean the most go back to my education at Florida State,” Wetherell said. “I was able to receive three degrees. None of this would have happened without those years and the education – to hold the positions I have had, to acquire the jobs I have had. I can go back and look at faculty – Jim Jones, Mel Hardee, Tom King, Mode L. Stone – who were my mentors and led by example.” Wetherell in turn has led, not just by example, but also through attitude and action. As a leader, he finds motivation in something as simple as a phone call he made a long time ago. “After I defended my dissertation, I remember calling my mom on the pay phone. It was a collect call. The operator said, ‘You have a collect call from Dr. Wetherell.’ It was then that I realized I had completed something that was going to set the stage for my future. I work diligently so that generations long after I am gone can have the same experiences I had. That one day they will get to call their mom and say ‘I have a doctorate.’”


BY EMILY HUDSON

18


VAL SHUTE Endowed Professor Helps Define the Future of Learning BY LAUREN VONDERHARR W I T H F U N D I N G F RO M T H E B I L L A N D Melinda Gates Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Florida Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Education, Valerie J. Shute has positioned herself at the forefront of educational psychology research. Shute’s prolific research agenda led to her selection as the Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Endowed Professor of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in the Florida State University College of Education last fall. “Dr. Shute’s impressive record and reputation for truly innovative research makes her an outstanding choice for this year’s Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Distinguished Professorship,” said Marcy Driscoll, dean of the College of Education. Shute is developing new methods for educational assessment and learning engagement. She has five major research projects underway and a sixth scheduled to begin this spring, “The common denominator among the projects is my general passion and research related to making education more effective for the masses, especially disadvantaged youth,” Shute said. Shute’s research involves employing games as a “vehicle for assessment and learning.” As the world has changed, Shute says schools have remained stagnant. As a result, students have disconnected from the learning experience. She cites as evidence a recent report of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. “According to this report, nearly one-third of all public high-school students drop out,

19 AWARDS AND HONORS

and the rate is higher for minority students,” Shute said. “In the report, when 467 highschool dropouts were asked why they left school, 47 percent of them simply responded, ‘The classes were not interesting.’ We need to find ways, such as well-designed digital games and other immersive environments, to get our kids engaged, support their learning, and allow them to contribute fruitfully to society.” Other reasons Shute favors games as assessments are the limitations of traditional multiple-choice examinations and the need for new, complex and enduring methodologies for gauging learning processes and outcomes efficiently and effectively. Shute structures her assessment games to meet three basic criteria: validity, reliability and automation (in scoring). Finally, she points out that games and digital technology have become an integral part of our culture – something that children and their families incorporate into their daily lives already – and they require an array of cognitive skills that are sought-after by employers. “Many games typically require a player to apply various competencies; for example, creativity, problem-solving, persistence and collaboration. The competencies required to succeed in many games also happen to be the same ones that companies are looking for in today’s highly competitive economy,” Shute said. Most of Shute’s work involves the use of games in a process known as “stealth assessment.” The development of a game as a stealth assessment tool starts with drafting a competency model based on a literature

review; that is, defining the competencies to be measured. The next step is to get the model approved by experts. Then, the researcher has to define the specific behaviors a person would have to enact in the game to demonstrate that he or she had attained the determined competencies. Shute describes each project as a team effort involving co-principal investigators Matthew Ventura, Russell Almond and Fengfeng Ke. She also credits the contributions of graduate students Yoon Jeon Kim, Weinan Zhao, Lubin Wang, Tim Wright and Matt Small. “I learn new things every single day from my colleagues and students,” Shute said. Among others to whom Shute attributes her academic success are her doctoral advisor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Jim Pellegrino, who imparted key knowledge regarding individual differences research; her post-doctorate advisor at the University of Pittsburgh, Bob Glaser, who proved how to successfully integrate her interests in cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence and statistics into the creation of intelligent tutoring systems; and Jim Gee, a games/ learning/assessment colleague at Arizona State University, who she says is responsible for facilitating her shift to a more progressive mentality toward educational reform. “Dr. Shute’s teaching and research have greatly enhanced the success of our program,” said Driscoll. “She has become one of the foremost authorities in the field of educational assessment and learning, as well as in related areas in educational psychology.” Shute continually looks to the future for bigger, better and broader goals. Among them is establishing an interdisciplinary


center at FSU for designing quality games that utilize stealth assessments to test a variety of competencies. She foresees linking results to important benchmarks (such as core state standards) and evaluating the programs as a whole for effectiveness. “I love my job and can’t imagine doing anything else, anywhere else,” Shute said. Her words of wisdom for aspiring researchers and academics are simple. “My advice would be three things that work in concert: (a) measure twice and cut once, (b) treat failure as an opportunity to begin anew, more intelligently, and (c) enjoy the ride.”

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY & LEARNING SYSTEMS

AUBTEEN DARABI

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

• Florida State University Innovators Award • Honoree, FSU Transformation Through Teaching Project • Nomin ee, Graduate Teaching Award

JANET LENZ

ASSISTANT-IN

Presidential Recognition Award, National Career Development Association

JAMES KLEIN

PROFESSOR

• Annual Achievement Award, Association for Educational Communications and Technology • Outstanding Service Award, Research and Theory Division, Association for Educational Communications and Technology

SUSAN LOSH

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Elected Chair of the AERA SIG for Advanced Studies of National Databases

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CECILE REYNAUD

SELECTED AS TEAM LEADER FOR VOLLEYBALL PARALYMPIC TEAM USA AS FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY FACULTY and staff were gearing up for the fall semester, Cecile Reynaud was making arrangements for members of the U.S. women’s sitting volleyball team to compete at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. The Paralympic Games are a major international multi-sport event in which athletes with physical disabilities compete.

“I think it was after one of the sets that we lost. I handed the stat sheet over to the coach and stood there staring at our team just wanting one of them to make eye contact with me so I could give them [the stare],” Reynaud said. “I stood there for a while waiting and thinking to myself ‘just turn around and let me look at you,’ but I caught myself and thought, ‘don’t get involved, just walk away.’”

Reynaud, who received her master’s and Ph.D. from FSU and accumulated 636 wins in her 26 years as FSU head volleyball coach, was honored to be selected as team leader for Team USA.

Team USA began its journey to the Paralympic Games with a pretournament in the Netherlands. While there, the team put on clinics in three different cities promoting sitting volleyball, as well as talking about their disabilities and teaching young children what it is to be a disabled athlete.

“I’ve been really fortunate to have been trusted to take on leadership roles, and I just really enjoy it,” Reynaud said. Reynaud, FSU research associate for Sport Management, said her role as team leader at the Paralympics called upon her administrative rather than coaching expertise and that she was chosen for it because of her longtime association with the USA national volleyball program. Her responsibilities included attending nightly U.S. Olympic Committee meetings, making travel and hospitality arrangements for the athletes, ensuring that all team members were dressed appropriately for opening and closing ceremonies, and performing other organizational duties. “I was like the team mom, or the den mother,” she said. “I think my role was really interesting, and I had to hold myself back from making any comments to the athletes or correcting anything. I wanted to make sure I didn’t cross that line between the coach and assistant coach and myself.” Still, as a natural competitor, Reynaud was on the brink of doing just that during the gold medal match against China. COE ANNUAL REPORT 2 12 1AWARDS AND HONORS

“I thought it presented a really good side of the United States and those athletes to share that,” Reynaud said. Reynaud described her experience at the 2012 Paralympic Games, which included seeing Team USA win a silver medal in women’s sitting volleyball, as “phenomenal.” “The atmosphere at the Paralympic Games was truly inspirational. It was an honor to be involved with athletes with disabilities and to see how they manage their lives every day,” Reynaud said. “We always think about someone else, but we could become disabled at any time. You know, we could be in a car accident, we could have an illness, we could have an injury and we would become disabled. And so I think it’s important for people to realize that people with a disability are people first.” For more information on Cecile Reynaud and the Paralympics, please visit her blog at creynaudblog.wordpress.com.

BY PEDRO SALGADO


SPORT MANAGEMENT

CECILE REYNAUD

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

• Nominated for the Servant Leadership

Award by Leadership Tallahassee • Named to the Florida Region USA

Volleyball Hall of Fame • Selected as team leader for Volleyball

Paralympic Team USA

JEFFREY JAMES PROFESSOR (SM)

Keynote speaker at “The Mind of a Sport Fan Forum”— Hosted by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Sam Houston State University

22


WRITING PROS: BETSY BECKER

Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Educational Statistics (EPLS) Synthesizing measurement outcomes through meta-analysis. (With S. Ahn) In G. Tenenbaum, R. Eklund & A. Kamata (Eds.), Measurement in sport and exercise psychology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. (2012)

TAMARA BERTRAND-JONES

Select Faculty Books & Book Chapters Published

MARI HANEDA

Associate Professor (STE) • Some key pedagogic principles for helping ELLs to succeed in school. (With G. Wells). Theory into practice. (2012) • Teacher talk and dialogic inquiry in second language classrooms. (With G. Wells). The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. Wiley-Blackwell. (2012)

MARY FRANCES HANLINE

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

Professor (STE)

Pathways to higher education administration for African American women. (With L. S. Dawkins, M. McClinton & M. Hayden Glover, Eds.). Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. (2012)

KATHLEEN CLARK

Associate Professor (STE)

• Priority, parallel discovery, and pre-eminence: Napier, Bürgi, and the early history of the logarithm relation. (With C. Montelle). Revue d’Histoire des Mathématiques. (forthcoming) • The influence of solving historical problems on mathematical knowledge for teaching. In E. Barbin, S. Hwang & C. Tzanakis (Eds.), Proceedings of the history and pedagogy of mathematics 2012. Daejeon, Korea. (2012)

BRADLEY COX

• Impact of online coursework for teachers of students with severe disabilities: utilization of knowledge and its relationship to teacher perception of competence. (With R. Hatoum & J. Riggie). Research and practice for persons with severe disabilities. (in press) • A rationale and strategy for adapting dialogic reading for children with autism spectrum disorder: RECALL. (With K. Whalon & M. Delano). Preventing school failure. (in press)

SHOUPING HU Professor (ELPS)

Using typological approaches to understand college student experiences and outcomes. (With S. Li). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. (2011)

ALLAN JEONG

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

A developmental typology of faculty-student interaction outside of the classroom. In S. Hu & S. Li (Eds), Using typological approaches to understand college student experiences and outcomes: New directions for institutional research. (2011)

VANESSA DENNEN

Associate Professor (EPLS) • Virtual professional development and 
informal learning via social networks. (With J. B. Myers, Eds.). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. (2012) • Negotiating meaning in a blog-based community: Addressing unique, shared, and community problems. In J. Yearwood & A. Stranieri (Eds.), Technologies for supporting reasoning communities and collaborative decision making. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. (2011)

PETER EASTON

Associate Professor (ELPS)

Sustaining literacy in Africa: Developing a literate environment. Paris, France: UNESCO. (2013)

MICHAEL GIARDINA

Assistant Professor (SM)

• Qualitative inquiry and the politics of advocacy. (With N. Denzin). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press. (2012) • Global dimensions of qualitative inquiry. (With N. Denzin). Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press. (forthcoming) • The Politics of Research. (With J. Newman). In Leavy (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Qualitative Research. New York: Oxford University Press. (forthcoming)

AMY GUERETTE

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Compensatory skills. In C. Allman & S. Lewis (Eds.), Building a foundation for a lifetime: The expanded core curriculum. New York: AFB Press. (forthcoming)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

• A sequential analysis of team communications and effects on team performance. In G. Tenenbaum, R. Eklund & A. Kamata (Eds.), Handbook of measurement in sport and exercise psychology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. (2012) • Sequential analysis of scientific argumentation in asynchronous online discussion environments. (With D. Clark V. Sampson, & M. Menekse). In S. Puntambekar, G. Erkens & C. Helmo-Silver (Eds.), Analyzing interactions in CSCL: Methodologies. New York, NY: Springer. (2011) • Sequential analysis of scientific argumentation in asynchronous online discussion environments. (With D. Clark & V. Sampson). In S. Puntambekar, G. Erkens & C. Hmelo-Silver (Ed.), Analyzing interactions in CSCL methods, approaches and issues: Computersupported collaborative learning series. New York. (2011) • Using flexible belief networks to assess mental models. (With V. J. Shute & D. Zapata-Rivera). In B. B. Lockee, L. Yamagata-Lynch & J. M. Spector (Eds.), Instructional design for complex learning. New York, NY: Springer. (in press)

ITHEL JONES

Associate Professor (STE)

• Service learning in the Pre K–3 classroom: The what, why, and how-to guide for every teacher. (With V. Lake). Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit. (2012) • Active experiences for active children: Science. (With C. Seefeldt & A. Galper) Columbus, OH: Pearson. (2011)

JAMES KLEIN

Professor (EPLS)

The instructional design knowledge base: Theory, research and practice. (With R. Richey & M. Tracey). New York: Routledge. (2011)


JANET LENZ

FRANCES PREVATT

• Career development and planning: A comprehensive approach (4th ed.).(With R. Reardon, J. Sampson & G. Peterson). Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company. (2012) • Vocational choice. (With G. Peterson). In V. S. Ramachandran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Behavior, (2nd Ed). Kidlington, Oxford: Elsevier. (2012)

Succeeding with adult ADHD. (With A. Levrini). Washington, DC. American Psychological Association. (2012)

Assistant-In (EPLS)

SUSAN LOSH

Associate Professor (EPLS)

• Age, generational, and educational effects on American adult public understanding of science. In M.W. Bauer, R. Shukla & N. Allum (Eds.), The culture of science: How does the public relate to science across the globe? NY: Routledge. (2012) • Group behavior in organizations. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education, Inc. (2011)

JEFFREY MILLIGAN

Professor (EPLS)

ALYSIA ROEHRIG

Associate Professor (EPLS)

Motivating classroom practices to support effective literacy instruction. (With E. H. Brinkerhoff, E.S. Rawls & T. Pressley). In N. Duke & B.M. Taylor, Effective literacy instruction: A handbook of practice. New York: Guilford. (forthcoming)

STACEY RUTLEDGE

Associate Professor (ELPS)

The infrastructure of accountability: Data use and the transformation of American education. (With D. Anagnostopoulos & R. Jacobsen). Harvard Education Press. (in press)

JAMES SAMPSON, J

Professor and Associate Dean (EPLS)

Professor (ELPS)

Philippines, Islamic education. In J.L. Esposito (Ed), Oxford Islamic Studies Online. (2012)

JOHN MYERS

Associate Professor (STE)

Developing global citizens: Secondary students’ experiences with ICONS. In B. Maguth (Ed.), New directions in social education research: The influence of technology and globalization on the lives of students. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. (2012)

JOSHUA NEWMAN

Associate Professor (SM)

Sport, spectacle, and NASCAR nation: Consumption and the cultural politics of Neoliberalism. (With M. Giardina). Palgrave Macmillan. (2011)

DEBRA OSBORN

Assistant Professor (EPLS)

• Using assessment results for career development (8th ed.). (With V. Zunker). Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole. (2011) • The Internet: A guide to using the Internet in career planning (3rd Ed.). (With J. Sampson, Jr. & M. Dikel). Broken Arrow, OK: National Career Development Association. (2011)

LARA PEREZ-FELKNER

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

• What happens to high- achieving females after high school? Gender and persistence on the postsecondary STEM pipeline. (With S. McDonald & B. Schneider). In I. Schoon & J. Eccles (Eds.), Gender differences in aspirations and attainment. Cambridge University Press. (in press) • Socialization in childhood and adolescence. In J. DeLamater (Ed.), Handbook of Social Psychology (2nd Ed). Springer Publishing. (in press)

STEVEN PFEIFFER Professor (EPLS)

• Serving the gifted: Evidence-based clinical and psycho-educational practice. NY: Routledge. (2012) • Treating the clinical problems of gifted children. In L. Grossman & S. Walfish (Eds.), Translating research into practice: A desk reference for practicing mental health professionals. New York: Springer Publishers. (in press)

The internet: A tool for career planning (3rd Ed.). (With M.R. Dikel & D. S. Osborn ). Broken Arrow, OK: National Career Development Association. (2011)

LISA SCHERFF

Associate Professor (STE)

Is it worthy? Determining whether The Chocolate War should be taught in English class. In J. Milner & C. Pope (Eds.), Engaging American novels. Urbana, IL: NCTE.

VALERIE SHUTE

Professor (EPLS)

• Games, learning, and assessment. (With F. Ke). In D. Ifenthaler, D. Eseryel & Ge, X. (Eds.), Assessment in game-based learning: Foundations, innovations, and perspectives. New York, NY: Springer. (2012) • Adaptive educational systems. (With D. Zapata-Rivera). In P. Durlach & A. Lesgold (Eds.), Adaptive technologies for training and education. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. (2012)

SHERRY SOUTHERLAND

Professor (FSU-Teach)

• An intentional approach to teaching evolution: making students aware of the factors influencing their learning of microevolution and macroevolution. (With L. Nadelson). In K.S. Rosengran et al. (Eds), Evolution challenges: Integrating research and practice in teaching and learning about evolution. New York: Oxford. (2012) • The educational policy of accountability and women’s representation in science: The specter of unintended consequences. (With S. Bahbah). In M.H. Chiu, D. Treagust & P. Gilmer (Eds.), Celebrating the 100th anniversary of Madame Marie Sklodowska Curie’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry. pp. 225-238. Boston, MA: Sense Publishers. (2011)

DAVID TANDBERG

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

State support of higher education: Data, measures, findings and 
directions for future research. (With C. Griffith). Higher education: Handbook of theory and research, 28. (in press: 2013)

MATTHEW VENTURA

Research Associate (OoR)

Video games. (With V. J. Shute & M. Ventura). MacArthur Report. Cambridge MA: The MIT press. Stealth assessment: measuring and supporting learning in games. (in press)

JEANNE WANZEK

Assistant Professor (STE)

• Oral reading fluency development for children with emotional disturbance or learning disabilities. (With S. Al Otaiba & Y. Petscher). Exceptional Children. (in press) • Efficacy of a reading intervention for middle school students with learning disabilities. (With S. Vaughn, G. Roberts & J.M. Fletcher). Exceptional Children. (2011)


COLLABORATION

Plus Support Equals A Book Contract With Harvard Education Press COLLABORATORS SINCE GRADUATE SCHOOL, STACEY Rutledge and Dorothea Anagnostopoulos began focusing about five years ago on accountability policies in education and soon found their work leading to a conference and a collaborative work to be published by the Harvard Education Press in spring 2013. Rutledge, associate professor of Educational Leadership and Policy at Florida State University, and Anagnostopoulos, associate professor of Teacher Education at Michigan State University, became interested in the

a draft for a book about the infrastructure of accountability. The resulting proposal was met with enthusiasm by the Harvard Education Press, which held out the possibility of a book contract. For the book to become a reality the collaborators needed to gather together and get to work immediately, so Rutledge asked Dean Marcy Driscoll to consider hosting a conference. Driscoll went to work and helped secure the funding and organizational support needed for the 2012 Infrastructure of Accountability conference.

“There are infrastructures, and they are affecting the way teachers do their jobs and the learning opportunities and experiences of kids.” predominance of test-based accountability in the United States, particularly since the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act and the 2009 Race to the Top Initiative. They noted that the trend has spurred states to create large-scale information systems that gather, process and disseminate information on the characteristics and performance of schools, teachers and students, and they found this information infrastructure to be an overlooked dimension of test-based accountability. Believing they had zeroed in on something significant, they enlisted the help of 18 colleagues to develop their idea and generate

2 5 COE ANNUAL REPORT

“It was a wonderful example of the College supporting a faculty member, bringing together ideas and facilitating my research interests,” said Rutledge. “The conference provided invaluable opportunities for the authors to share preliminary versions of their chapters and to further develop the ideas in the volume.” The two-day conference began with an open session in which the authors presented their chapters to a large audience. On the second day the collaborators worked in groups to edit and revise their contributions in a closed session.

“I am really grateful to the dean for her generosity in funding this conference,” said Rutledge. “I think the real asset is that many edited volumes end up being chapters that people have written that don’t necessarily cohere around a central idea. What we were able to do through the conference is bring people together around a central idea. I think the chapters that were produced very much reflect that.” Harvard Education Press released “The Infrastructure of Accountability: Data Use and the Transformation of American Education,” March 13, 2013. “There are infrastructures, and they are affecting the way teachers do their jobs and the learning opportunities and experiences of kids. What are the costs of focusing on data going to be? Who wins in an educational regime where data becomes the metric of performance? Do other elements of education get put on the back burner? Do they become less relevant when data is so critical to what school districts and states are doing?” Rutledge said. “The basic underlying premise of the book is that we really cannot understand accountability policies without understanding the data and computer infrastructures that facilitate them.”

BY KATE CAMPBELL


EDITORSHIPS Select Faculty MOTOKO AKIBA

MARI HANEDA

SUSAN LOSH

Associate Editor, Educational Researcher (2012-present)

• Editorial Board member, 
TESOL Quarterly (2009-2012) • Editorial Review Board member, 
Language Arts (2006-2012) • Reviewer, 
Educational Inquiry, English Education, Journal of Multicultural Education, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Learning, Language in Society, Modern Language Journal, and Pedagogies: An International Journal • Research Strand Coordinator, 
Bilingual, Immersion, Heritage, and Minority Education Strand. The American Association for Applied Linguistics Annual Conference (2013)

Editor-in-Chief, Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society (2012-2016)

Associate Professor (ELPS)

RUSSELL ALMOND

Associate Professor (EPLS)

Reviewer for IES, Early Childhood Education (Fall 2011)

BETSY BECKER

Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Educational Statistics (EPLS) Editorial Board, Research Methods (2009-present)

Synthesis

GEORGE BOGGS

Assistant Professor (STE)

Associate Professor (STE)

Editorial Review Board, Florida English Journal (June 2012)

CAROLYN HERRINGTON

AUBTEEN DARABI

Editor (With J. Grissom). The Struggle for Coherence and Control in Education: The New Politics of Intergovernmental Relations. Politics of Education Association (2011)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

• Editorial Review Board, Computers in Human Behavior (2012-present) • Consulting Editor, Journal of Educational Technology Research and Development (2010-present)

VANESSA DENNEN

Associate Professor (EPLS)

Editorial Board, The Internet and Higher Education (2012-present)

MICHAEL GIARDINA

Assistant Professor (SM)

Associate Editor, Sociology of Sport Journal (2009-present)

Professor (ELPS)

PATRICE IATAROLA

Associate Professor (ELPS)

• Reviewer, Public Budgeting and Finance (2012) • Reviewer, Review of Educational Research (2012)

JEFFREY JAMES Professor (SM)

Associate Editor, Journal of Global Scholars of Marketing Science (2010-present)

JANET LENZ

Assistant-In (EPLS)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

JEFFREY MILLIGAN Professor (ELPS)

Educational Review Board, Educational Theory (2009-present)

JAMES SAMPSON

Professor and Associate Dean (ELPS)

Measurement and Evaluation Counseling and Development

in

LINDA SCHRADER

Research Associate In (ELPS)

• Reviewer, American Journal of Evaluation (2011–present) • Reviewer, Program Evaluation Theory and Practice, Guilford Press (2011)

LISA SCHERFF

Associate Professor (STE)

Co-editor, English Education (2010-present)

JEANNE WANZEK

Assistant Professor (STE)

Editorial Review Board, Journal of Learning Disabilities (2012-present)

IAN WHITACRE

Assistant Professor (STE)

• Cognition and Instruction (2012) • Journal of Mathematical Behavior (2012)

SHELBIE WITTE

Assistant Professor (STE)

Co-Editor, SIGNAL Journal

Editorial Board, Career Development Quarterly (2009-present)

26


JOURNAL

Select Faculty MOTOKO AKIBA

Associate Professor (ELPS)

Teacher salary and national achievement: A cross-national analysis of 30 countries. (With Y-L. Chiu, K. Shimizu & G. Liang). International Journal of Educational Research, 53, pp. 171-181. (2012) Professional learning activities in context: A statewide survey of middle school mathematics teachers. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 20 (14). (2012) Identifying program characteristics for preparing pre-service teachers for diversity. Teachers College Record, 113(3), 658-697. (2011)

AUBTEEN DARABI

MARI HANEDA

Improvement of organizational performance and instructional design: An analogy based on general principles of natural information processing systems. (With S. Kalyuga). Performance Improvement Quarterly, 25(3), 23–35. (2012)

Strangers and professionals: Positioning discourse in ESL teachers’ work. (With J. Nespor). Urban Review. (forthcoming)

VANESSA DENNEN

Associate Professor (EPLS)

Associate Professor (STE)

MARY FRANCES HANLINE Professor (STE)

Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Educational Statistics (EPLS)

PETER EASTON

Identifying the evaluative impulse in local culture: Insights from West African proverbs. American Journal of Evaluation. 33(4). (2012)

Social experiences of preschoolers with severe disabilities in an inclusive early education setting: A qualitative study. (With S.M. Correa-Torres). Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 47, 109-121. (2012) Early intervention services in natural environments: Using routines-based interventions in early childhood special education. (With D. Jennings & J. Woods). Dimensions of Early Childhood, 40, 13-22. (2012)

TAMARA BERTRAND JONES

REBECCA GALEANO

SHOUPING HU

Scaffolding productive language skills through sociodramatic play. American Journal of Play, 3, 324-353. (2011) A slippery slope: Children’s perceptions of their role in environmental preservation in the Peruvian Amazon. International Journal of Educational Reform (IJER). (in press)

Scholarship awards, student engagement, and leadership capacity of high-achieving low-income students of color. Journal of Higher Education, 82, 511-534. (2011) An engagement-based student typology and its relationship to college outcomes. (With A. McCormick). Research in Higher Education, 53, 738-754. (2012)

BETSY BECKER

A partial effect size for regression models. (With A. M. Aloe). Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, 37(2), 278-297. (2012)

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

Teaching and learning: Leadership education through experiential education. (With K. Guthrie). New Directions for Student Services, 140. (2012)

GEORGE BOGGS

Assistant Professor (STE)

Writing ecologies: Material, critical, digital, cultural, and academic perspectives. (With D. Alvermann). Pedagogies: An International Journal, 7(3), 203-208. (2011)

KATHLEEN CLARK

Associate Professor (STE)

History of mathematics: Illuminating understanding of school mathematics concepts for pre-service mathematics teachers. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 81, 67-84. (2012)

BRADLEY COX

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

A culture of teaching: Policy, perception, and practice in higher education. (With K. L. McIntosh, R. D. Reason & P. T. Terenzini). Research in Higher Education, 52(8), 808-829. (2011) Rationalizing neglect: The transfer student experience. (With B. F. Tobolowsky). Journal of Higher Education, 83(3), 389-410. (2012)

GLORIA COLVIN

University Librarian (University Libraries)

Relational communications: Developing key connections. (With M. Vandegrift). College and Research Libraries News, 73(7), 386-389. 2 7 COE ANNUAL REPORT (2012)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

Social media in higher education [Special issue]. (With S. Hrastinski, Eds.). Internet and Higher Education, 15(1). (2012)

Associate Professor (ELPS)

Assistant Professor (STE)

MICHAEL GIARDINA

Assistant Professor (SM)

Of victims and markets: The neoliberal university and the spectacle of civic branding. (With J. Bass & J. Newman). Cultural Studies-Critical Methodologies, 12, 301-205. (2012)

KATHY GUTHRIE

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

Coordinating services to seamless learning: evolution of institutional partnerships. In K.M. Boyle, J.W. Lowery & J.A. Mueller (Eds.), Reflections on the 75th anniversary of the student personnel point of view. Washington DC: ACPA- College Student Educators International. (pp. 57-61). (2012) YouTube: Beyond lectures and papers in leadership education. In C.Cheal, J. Coughlin & S. Moore (Eds.), Transformation in teaching: Social media strategies in higher education. Santa Rosa, CA: Informing Science Press. (pp. 93-113). (2012) Orientation programs: Perspectives of an online format (with C. Futch). Journal of College Orientation and Transition, 19, 49-56 (2012)

Professor (ELPS)

PATRICE IATAROLA

Associate Professor (ELPS)

Effects of high school course-taking on secondary and postsecondary success. (With M.C. Long & D. Conger). American Educational Research Journal, 49(2), 285322. (2012) Determinants of high schools’ advanced course offerings. (With D. Conger & M.C. Long). Educational Evaluation & Policy Analysis, 33, 340-359. (2011)

JEFFREY JAMES Professor (SM)

Service quality at sporting events: Is aesthetic quality a missing 
dimension? (With M. Yoshida). Sport Management Review, 14, 13-24. (2011) The impact of relationship quality on attitude toward a sponsor. (With Y.K. Kim & Y.J. Ko). Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, 26, 566-576. (2011) A societal perspective of sport: Scale 
development in two settings. (With M. Naylor & B. Gordon). Journal of Global Scholars of Marketing Science, 22, 101-116. (2012)


ALLAN JEONG

YUKYOUM KIM

SUSAN LOSH

Developing causal understanding with causal maps: The impact of total links, temporal flow, and lateral position of outcome nodes. (With W. J. Lee). Educational Technology, Research and Development, 60(2), 325-340. (2012)

The influence of relationship quality on sport consumption behaviors: An empirical examination of the relationship quality framework. (With Y.J. Ko & G.T. Trail). Journal of Sport Management, 25, 576-592. [SSCI]. (2011) A conceptual framework for understanding relationships between sport consumers and sport organizations: A relationship quality approach. (With G.T. Trail). Journal of Sport Management, 25, 57-69.[SSCI]. (2011) Factors influencing spectator sport consumption: A case of NCAA women’s college basketball. (With G.T. Trail). International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, 60-82.[SSCI]. (2011) The impact of relationship quality on attitude toward a sponsor. (With J.D. James & Y.J. Ko). Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, 26, 566-576.[SSCI]. (2011) Sport consumer-team relationship quality: Development and psychometric evaluation of a scale. (With G.T. Trail, B. Woo & J.J. Zhang). International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, 12, 254-272. [SSCI] (2011)

Creatures in the classroom: Pre-service teacher beliefs about fantastic beasts, magic, extraterrestrials, evolution and creationism. (With B. Nzekwe). Science & Education, 20, 473-489. (2011) The influence of education major: How diverse pre-service teachers view pseudoscience topics. (With B. Nzekwe). Journal of Science, Education and Technology 20, 579-591. (2011)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

ITHEL JONES

Associate Professor (STE)

The longitudinal effects of kindergarten enrollment and relative age on children’s academic achievement. (With U. Dagli). Teachers College Record. (in press) Theory of mind, material altruism and family context in preschoolers. (With B. Keskin). Journal of Research in Education, 21, 126-136. (2011) The effects of on-time, delayed and early kindergarten enrollment on children’s mathematics achievement: Differences by gender, race, and family socio-economic status. (With U. Dagli). Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice. (in press)

FENGFENG KE

Assistant Professor (EPLS)

Computer game-based tutoring for mathematics learning. Computers & Education. (in press) Games for engaged learning of middle school children with special needs. (With T. Abras). British Journal of Educational Technology. (in press) Online interaction arrangements on quality of online interactions performed by diverse learners across disciplines. Internet and Higher Education. (in press) Constructs of student-centered online learning on learning satisfaction of a diverse online study body: A structural equation modeling approach. (With D. Kwak). Journal of Educational Computing Research. (in press)

YOUNG-SUK KIM

Assistant Professor (STE)

Developmental relations between reading fluency and reading comprehension: A longitudinal study from grade one to two. (With R. Wagner & D. Lopez). Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 113, 93-111. (2012) Componential skills of beginning writing: An exploratory study at the end of kindergarten. (With S. Al Otaiba, C. Puranik, J. F. Sidler, L. Gruelich & R. K. Wagner). Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 517-525. (2011) Considering linguistic and orthographic features in early literacy acquisition: Evidence from Korean. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 36, 177-189. (2011)

Assistant Professor (SM)

JAMES KLEIN

Professor (EPLS)

Design, implementation and evaluation of a nursing simulation: A design and development research study. (With R. Wilson). Journal of Applied Instructional Design, 2(1), 57-68. (2012)

JANET LENZ

Assistant-In (EPLS)

Assessing career readiness in culturally and ethnically diverse populations. (With B. Melvin & J. Galles). Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, 28 (1), 110-126. (Spring 2012)

SANDRA LEWIS Professor (STE)

General education teachers’ ratings of the engagement level of students who read braille: Comparison with peers. (With J.A. Bardin). Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 105(8), 479-492. (2011) The development of accepted performance items to demonstrate competency in literary braille. (With F.M. D’Andrea & L.P. Rosenblum). Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 106(4), 197-211. (2012)

Associate Professor (EPLS)

DEBRA OSBORN

Assistant Professor (EPLS)

How do career centers use social networking sites? (With B. LoFrisco). Career Development Quarterly, 60, 263-272. (2012) Effect of a résumé-writing workshop on résumé-writing skills. (With K. Tillotson). Journal of Employment Counseling, 49, 110117. (2012) An international discussion about crosscultural career assessment. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, 12, 5-16. (2012)

LARA PEREZ-FELKNER

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

Female and male adolescents’ subjective orientations in mathematics and their influence on postsecondary majors. (With S. McDonald, B. Schneider & E. Grogan). Developmental Psychology, 1-16. ISI Impact Factor: 3.214. Retrieved from http:// psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2012-05397-001/ doi:10.1037/a0027020 (2012)

STEVEN PFEIFFER Professor (EPLS)

Current perspectives on the identification and assessment of gifted students. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 30, 3-9. (2012)

BETH PHILLIPS

Associate Professor (EPLS)

IRTs of the ABCs: Children’s letter name acquisition. (With S. B. Piasta, J. A. Anthony, C. J. Lonigan & D. Francis). Journal of School Psychology, 50, 461-481. (2012) Children’s early literacy growth in relation to classmates’ self-regulation.(With L. Skibbe, S. Day, H. Brophy-Herb & C. M. Connor). Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 541553. (2012)

28


FRANCES PREVATT

JAMES SAMPSON

DAVID TANDBERG

Anxiety in college students with ADHD: Relationship to cognitive functioning. (With V. Dehili, N. Taylor & D. Marshall). Journal of Attention Disorders. (in press) Drug and alcohol use in college students with and without ADHD. (With L. Baker & B. Proctor). Journal of Attention Disorders, 16, 255-263. (2012)

Translating career theory to practice: The risk of unintentional social injustice. (With V.C. Dozier & G. P. Colvin). Journal of Counseling and Development, 89, 326-337. (2011) The perceived role of technology in career guidance among practitioners who are experienced Internet users. (With R. Vuorinen & J. Kettunen). Australian Journal of Career Development, 20, 39-46. (2011)

Where politics is a blood sport: Restructuring state higher education governance in Massachusetts. (With C.K. Anderson). Educational Policy, 4(26), 564591. (2012) State capital expenditures for higher education: ‘Where the real politics happens.’ (With E. Ness). Journal of Education Finance. 36(4), 394-423. (2011). The conditioning role of state higher education governance structures. The Journal of Higher Education. (forthcoming) The determinants of state spending on higher education: How capital projects funding differs from general fund appropriations. (With E. Ness). The Journal of Higher Education. (forthcoming)

Professor (EPLS)

RYAN RODENBERG

Assistant Professor (SM)

EU gambling at the intersection of policy and litigation. (With T. Kaburakis). Journal of Gambling Business and Economics, 5(2), 1-9. (2011) The short and long run labor market effects of age eligibility rules: Evidence from women’s professional tennis. (With D. F. Stone). Journal of Labor Research, 32(2) 181198. (2011) Uneven bars: Age rules, antitrust, and amateurism in women’s gymnastics. (With A. N. Eagleman). University of Baltimore Law Review, 40(4), 587-606. (2011) Perception ≠ reality: Analyzing specific allegations of NBA referee bias. Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports Article 8, 7(2). (2011) Crime and punishment in the NBA. (With D. J. Berri). Violence and Aggression in Sporting Contests: Economics, History, and Policy by R. Todd Jewell (Ed.), Springer, 6576. (2011)

ALYSIA ROEHRIG

Associate Professor (EPLS)

The effects of teacher qualification, teacher self-efficacy and classroom practices on fifth graders’ literacy outcomes. (With Y. Guo, C. M.Connor, Y. Yang & F. J. Morrison). Elementary School Journal, 113, 3-24. (2012) Effective teachers and teaching: Characteristics and practices related to student outcomes. (With J. E. Turner, M. Arrastia, E. Christesen, S. McElhaney & L. Jakiel). In T. Urdan, S. Graham, M. Royer & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Educational Psychology Handbook, Volume 2: Individual Differences, Cultural Variations, and Contextual Factors in Educational Psychology. Washington DC: American Psychological Association. (2012)

2 9 COE ANNUAL REPORT

Professor and Associate Dean (EPLS)

VICTOR SAMPSON

Assistant Professor (STE and FSU-Teach)

Argument-driven inquiry as a way to help undergraduate students write to learn by learning to write in chemistry. (With J. Walker). International Journal of Science Education, 34(10), 1443-1485. (2012) Science teachers and scientific argumentation: Trends in views and practice. (With M. Blanchard). Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 49(9), 11221148. (2012)

LAWRENCE SCHARMANN

Assistant Dean and Director (STE)

Evolution and personal religious belief: Christian university biology-related majors’ search for reconciliation. (With M. W. Winslow and J. R. Staver). Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 48, 10261049. (2011)

LISA SCHERFF

Associate Professor (STE)

Developing a critical stance in pre-service English teachers. Journal of Literacy Research, 44(2), 200-236. (2012) Exploring identity(ies) in yummy: The last days of a southside shorty. The ALAN Review, 39(3), 73-79. (2012) The pre-service teachers are watching: Framing and reframing the field experience (With N. R. Singer). Teaching and Teacher Education, 28, 263-272. (2012)

SHERRY SOUTHERLAND Professor (FSU-Teach)

Science teachers’ pedagogical discontentment: Its sources and potential for change. (With S. Sowell & P. Enderle). Journal of Science Teacher Education, 22, 437-457. (2012) A national survey of middle and high school science teachers’ responses to standardized testing: Is science being devalued in schools? (With M. Aydeniz). Journal of Science Teacher Education, 2, 233-257. (2012)

Assistant Professor (ELPS)

MATTHEW VENTURA

Research Associate (OoR)

The relationship between video game use and a performance-based measure of persistence. (With V. Shute & W. Zhao). Computers and Education, 60, 52-58. (2012) Video gameplay, personality, and academic performance. (With V. Shute & Y. J. Kim). Computers and Education, 58, 1260-1266. (2012)

JEANNE WANZEK

Assistant Professor (STE)

Reading interventions with varying instructional emphases for fourth graders with reading difficulties. (With G. Roberts). Learning Disability Quarterly, 35, 90-101. (2012)

IAN WHITACRE

Assistant Professor (STE)

Happy and sad thoughts: An exploration of children’s integer reasoning. (With J. P. Bishop, L. L. C. Lamb, R. A. Philipp, B. P. Schappelle & M. L. Lewis). The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 31, 356–365. (2012)


FACULTY NAMED

EDITORS OF

CAROLYN HERRINGTON ONE OF THE NATION’S FOREMOST EXPERTS ON the politics and policies of educational reform has received an honor befitting her status. Carolyn Herrington, professor of Educational Policy, has been named coeditor of the scholarly journal Educational Researcher for the 2013-2015 volume years. The journal is considered the world’s most important publication for educational research and has the highest impact factor, meaning its articles are cited by researchers in the field more often than those of any other journal. As a rough measure of the prestige with which it is regarded, Educational Researcher’s peer publications in other disciplines would include Science, Nature and the New England Journal of Medicine. “It’s both a tremendous honor and a major responsibility to be entrusted with helping to produce the journal that is so central to my academic field,” said Herrington, a faculty member in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. She added that the decisions made by the new editorial team, which includes co-editor Vivian Gadsden of the University of Pennsylvania and four associate editors, will have a very real impact on educational policy and educational reform throughout the nation. “The central place that education holds in the aspirations of communities and nations has never been so strong,” she said. “Research is fundamental to

INFLUENTIAL JOURNAL

achieving those aspirations. As such, there is a growing appetite for research and its findings among policymakers and the general public. Educational Researcher plays a central role in providing quality research to researchers and to the larger public; it has the potential to broaden its reach even more. We look forward to making that happen.” Herrington’s teaching and research focus on the politics and policies of educational reform with a particular emphasis on the role of the state. She has examined accountability, educational financing, school choice and comprehensive children’s services, among other major topics in the field. A prolific writer, Herrington has more than 50 academic articles, chapters and policy reports to her name. In addition, her research has been funded by such prestigious institutions as the Carnegie Cooperation of New York, the BellSouth Foundation, the Jesse Ball DuPont Fund, the Wallace deWitt Fund, the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, the Institute of Educational Sciences, the Florida Institute of Education, the Florida Legislature, the Florida Board of Regents and the Florida Department of Children and Families. Herrington isn’t the only Florida State faculty member who will be serving on Educational Researcher’s new editorial team. Associate Professor David W. Eccles of the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems will serve as an associate editor for the same

BY BARRY RAY three-year period. Eccles’ research focuses on the cognition underlying skilled and expert performance in real-world domains, including law enforcement, medicine, sports, education, personal finance and the military. “We congratulate Dr. Herrington and Dr. Eccles for having been named as editors of Educational Researcher for 2013-2015,” said Marcy Driscoll, dean of the College of Education. “Their selections to perhaps the most significant journal in educational research reflects not only the quality of work for which they are recognized but also the quality of scholarship that is characteristic of faculty across our college.” Herrington and Eccles are among at least 60 Florida State faculty members who currently serve as editors or editorial board members of peer-reviewed journals within their academic disciplines.

DAVID ECCLES 30


MOTOKO AKIBA

GEORGE BOGGS

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (ELPS)

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (STE)

SHENGLI DONG

CARI FELLERS

Ph.D. earned from Pennsylvania State University

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (EPLS) Ph.D. earned from University of Maryland

AYESHA KHURSHID ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (ELPS) Ph.D. earned from University of Wisconsin-Madison

3 1 COE ANNUAL REPORT

Ph.D. earned from University of Georgia

ASSISTANT IN (EPLS)

Ph.D. earned from Oklahoma State University

JIN KOO VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (EPLS) Ph.D. earned from Florida State University

LINDSAY DENNIS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (STE)

Ph.D. earned from University of Kansas

KATHERIN GARLAND VISITING ASSISTANT IN (STE)

Ph. D. earned from University of Florida

JOHN MYERS ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (STE)

Ph.D. earned from Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto


VISITING ASSISTANT IN (SM)

Ph.D. earned from University of Southern California

LARA PEREZ-FELKNER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (ELPS) Ph.D. earned from University of Chicago

IAN WHITACRE ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (STE)

Ph.D. earned from University of California San Diego & San Diego State University

TOBY PARK ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (ELPS) Ph.D. earned from Vanderbilt University

JANELLE WELLS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (SM)

Ph.D. earned from University of Florida

NEW FACULTY

JASON PAPPAS

32


MOTOKO AKIBA

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (ELPS)

National Science Foundation early career award grant. ($630,468). Principal Investigator. Work Contexts, Teacher Learning Opportunities, and Mathematics Achievement of Middle School Students. (20082013)

BRADLEY COX ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (ELPS)

TG Public Benefit Grant. ($153,323). Principal Investigator. Linking Institutional Policies to Student Success (LIPSS): A Pilot Study.

VANESSA DENNEN

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (EPLS)

Florida Department of Education. ($500,000). CoPrincipal Investigator. (With L. Wicker, PI, and R. Razouk, Co-PI). CSP Dissemination: Online Learning Community. (2012-2014)

REBECCA GALEANO

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (STE)

• Florida State University Council on Research and Creativity First Year Assistant Professor Grant. ($17,000). Principal Investigator. Pedagogy of alternancia in rural schools in the Peruvian Amazon. (2012)

• Florida State University Council on Research and Creativity Planning Grant. ($12,000). Principal Investigator. Pedagogy of alternancia in rural schools in the Peruvian Amazon. (2012) • Florida State University Council on Research and Creativity Multidisciplinary Support Grant. ($24,292). (With S. Southerland, PI, & M. Leeser, Co-PI). Integrates ESOL and Foreign Language: A Curriculum Model for Preparing Math and Science Teachers. (20112012)

AMY GUERETTE ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Florida State University Council on Research and Creativity. ($13,000). Principal Investigator. Addressing the Essential Knowledge and Skills for Preschool Students with Visual Impairments. (20122013)

MARY FRANCES HANLINE PROFESSOR (STE)

U.S. Department of Education. ($1,241,161). Principal Investigator (With Co-Principal Investigator, J. Woods). Personnel Preparation in Early Education and Intervention Project. (20122016)

3 3 COE ANNUAL REPORT

SHOUPING HU

PROFESSOR (ELPS)

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. ($780,000). Principal Investigator. State Merit Aid Program and Student College Choice and Success. (2011-2014)

FENGFENG KE

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (EPLS)

MacArthur Foundation. ($400,000). Co-Principal Investigator. (With V. J. Shute & M. J. Ventura). Stealth Assessment In Portal 2. (2011–2013)

YOUNG-SUK KIM

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (STE)

• Institute of Education Sciences, US Department of Education. ($1,600,000). Principal Investigator. Development of oral and silent reading fluency and its relation with reading comprehension in first through third grade students. (2012-2016)

• National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. ($8,400,000). Co-Investigator (With R. K. Wagner, Principal Investigator). Learning Disabilities Research Center. (2012-2016)

LAURA LANG ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (ELPS)

• Florida Department of Education. ($1,900,000). Principal Investigator. (With R. Schoen & V. Shute). Mathematics Formative Assessment - Common Core State Standards Grades K-3. (2011-2013)

• Florida Department of Education. ($900,000). Principal Investigator. (With R. Schoen & V. Shute). Teacher Lesson Study Professional Development Toolkits. (2011-2013) • Helios Foundation. ($495,000). Principal Investigator. (With R. Schoen). Integrating STEM: Mathematics, Science and Computing. (2011-2013) • Florida Department of Education. ($11,500,000). Co-Principal Investigator. (With R. Razzouk, PI). Teacher Standards Instructional Tool. (2011-2014) • National Science Foundation. ($2,500,000). Principal Investigator. (With M. Mardis, N. Everhart & R. Razzouk). iCPALMS: A Portal for Standards-Based Instruction). (2010-2013)

SANDRA LEWIS

PROFESSOR (STE)

Florida Department of Education. ($489,611). Principal Investigator. Critical Initiatives in Visual Impairment. (2012-2013)


JEFFREY MILLIGAN

PROFESSOR (ELPS)

• Research Triangle Institute/United States Agency for International Development. ($829,000). Principal Investigator. (With co-PI F. Ramos-Mattoussi). Prioritizing Reform, Innovation, Opportunities for Reaching Indonesia’s Teachers, Administrators and Students (PRIORITAS). (2012-2017) • Research Triangle Institute/United States Agency for International Development. ($1.3 million). Co-Principal Investigator. (With PI F. Ramos-Mattoussi). Ethiopia-READ. (2012-2017)

LARA PEREZ-FELKNER ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (ELPS)

• National Science Foundation. ($523,333). Enhancing the Rigor of Evidence on Gendered Differences in STEM Persistence: Female and Male College Students’ Subjective Experiences in Engineering and Computer Science. (2012–2015) • American Educational Research Association. ($32,665). The Role of Perceived Regard on the College Persistence of Underrepresented Minorities. AERA Research Grant. (2010–2012)

BETH PHILLIPS

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR (EPLS)

• Institute for Education Sciences. ($20,000,000). Co-Investigator. (With C. J. Lonigan, PI, & C. M. Connor, PI). Florida State University Reading for Understanding Projects. (2010 - 2015)

• National Institute for Child Health and Human Development. ($8,818,329). Co-Investigator. (With R. K. Wagner, PI). FSU Learning Disability Center.(2011-2015) • United States Department of Education ($38,640,000). Co- Investigator (With B. Foorman, PI). Regional Educational Laboratories: Southeast Laboratory. (2011-2016)

FLAVIA RAMOS-MATTOUSSI ASSOCIATE-IN (ELPS)

• United States Agency for International Development ($1,352,556). Principal Investigator. (With J. Milligan & Y. Suk-Kim). Reading for Ethiopia’s Achievement Developed (Ethiopia-READ). (2012- 2017)

• The United Nations Children’s Fund-Fiji (UNICEF). ($33,017). Principal Investigator. Early Grades Literacy Program for Tuvalu. (2012-2013) • United States Agency for International Development (USAIDIndonesia). ($890,000). Co-Principal Investigator. (With J. Milligan, PI). Prioritizing Reform, Innovation, and Opportunities for Reaching Indonesia’s Teachers, Administrators, and Students (PRIORITAS). (2012- 2017) • United States Agency for International Development (USAIDIndonesia) USAID-Indonesia Subcontract No.186000-524-020105. ($314,873). Co-Principal Investigator. (With J. Milligan, PI). Indonesian Decentralized Basic Education Project, Component 2. (2010-2011)

LINDA SCHRADER

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE-IN (ELPS)

Florida Department of Education, Division of Blind Services. ($46,000). Principal Investigator. Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment Study. (2011 – 2012)

VALERIE SHUTE

PROFESSOR (ELPS)

• Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. ($594,035). Principal Investigator. (With M. Ventura & R. Almond, Co-PIs). Developing stealth assessment models for use in digital games. (2011-2013)

• MacArthur Foundation. ($400,000). Principal Investigator. (With M. Ventura & F. Ke, Co-PIs). Stealth assessment in Portal (2011-2013) • U.S. Department of Education, IES. ($2,056,081). (With F. Rohani, PI, C. Sanfilippo, Co-PI, & Y. Yang). An Alternate Statewide Assessment Strategy that Uses Test Results to Support Learning and Includes Measures of Problem Solving. (2011-2014)

MATTHEW VENTURA

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE (OOR)

• Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. ($594,035). (With V. J. Shute, PI). Developing stealth assessment models for use in digital games. (2011-2013)

• MacArthur Foundation. ($400,000). (With V. J. Shute, PI). Stealth Assessment in Portal 2. (20112013).

T.K. WETHERELL

PROFESSOR AND PRESIDENT EMERITUS (ELPS)

U. S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences (IES). ($2,200,000). (With L. Webb, PI, & The Center for Higher Education, Research, Teaching and Innovation (CHERTI)). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Student Success Skills: A Program To Improve Academic Achievement for All Students. (2011-2015)

GRANT

FUNDING 34


EDUCATION & GENERAL EXPENDITURES

FULL-TIME FACULTY SALARIES

$7,025,724

FULL-TIME STAFF SALARIES

$1,413,307

3 5 COE ANNUAL REPORT


ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTION & SUPPORT SERVICES

$816,037

FRINGE BENEFITS

$2,194,013

ASSISTANTSHIPS & ADJUNCT FACULTY SALARIES & BENEFITS

$1,791,309

BUDGET EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 SOURCE: OMNI FINANCIALS

36


OFFSET

HELPING STUDENTS TUITION BECOMES A PRIORITY

A

college degree has never been more important to career success or harder for most U.S. students to afford.

Public funding for higher education has been on the decline over the last decade, prompting tuition hikes nationwide. Remarkably, the tuition at Florida’s universities remains low — Florida ranked 45th out of 50 states and the District of Columbia last fall. The state’s average $5,626 annual cost in tuition and fees is well below the national average of $8,244, and an even better bargain compared to other top public research universities, which average about $9,500 for tuition. The FSU College of Education (COE) makes tuition for its 40-plus programs even more affordable by providing more scholarship funding to its students than any other college at FSU. An online review of education scholarship funds available at the state’s 11 public universities shows the FSU COE outpacing its Florida peers also. During the 2012 academic

3 7 COE ANNUAL REPORT

year, education students could apply for more than 70 private scholarship funds at FSU compared to 41 funds apiece at the University of Florida and University of Central Florida. Each of the other eight public colleges or schools of education lists on its website fewer than 25 scholarship funds available. “Helping students offset tuition expenses through scholarship support is a priority for the College,” Dean Marcy Driscoll said. “We are committed to helping students with financial need by providing funding so that they don’t graduate under a mountain of debt, and we are very proud of our record in this regard.”

“Scholarships reward academic achievement or service and enable students with financial need to develop their gifts and experience careers and futures they might never have known.” Last year, 166 undergraduate and graduate students received scholarships. Applications as well as award amounts doubled from the previous year. The increase was the result of a longer application cycle and the first-ever COE Scholarships and Programs Open House.

The College of Education offers nearly $300,000 annually in scholarship and fellowship opportunities made possible by generous financial support from alumni and friends.

During the Open House, Office of Academic Services and Intern Support (OASIS) and COE Scholarship and Aid staff members answered questions about college admission requirements and scholarships. COE faculty members were also available to greet prospective students and explain their respective programs and research interests.

“We extend our thanks to the more than 1,300 donors who helped us offset tuition expenses for some very deserving students,” said Courtney Stombock, assistant dean for development.

“We appreciate the continued financial support from our alumni and friends, which allows us to recruit and retain the best and brightest students to carry on the torch for education,” Driscoll said.

BY AMBER SMALLEY


THANK YOU FOR YOUR GIFT Students Show Their Gratitude... NEBI SALIM BAKARE Elizabeth Bell Smith Endowed Scholarship

ANDREA COMBS Lisa Barkin Gootman Endowed Scholarship

ERIN DURHAM-MOORE Gilbert R. Stone Endowed Scholarship

“I am honored to be selected as a recipient of this scholarship. The lack of financial resources nearly prevented me from attending college after graduating from high school. Fortunately, I was able to attend college with a combination of a music scholarship and federal financial aid. I then became the first female in my family to obtain a bachelor’s degree and, subsequently, a master’s degree. With your generous support, I will also become the first person in my family, male or female, to obtain a doctoral degree.“

“While I am truly fortunate to be working and studying in a field I love, it is often difficult to afford school on a small salary. It is for this reason that I am especially grateful for your scholarship. You are enabling me to pursue my passions and make my work life my life’s work.“

“I look forward to using the lessons and opportunities my professors have given us to learn to teach exceptionally in the classroom. I hope to teach and prepare the coming generations, and with your help this dream is that much closer to being a reality rather than a possibility.“

NAIMA BHANA Latin America and Caribbean Scholarship “Being an international student in a foreign country is a rich experience but it is also financially challenging. By awarding me this scholarship, you have lightened the financial burden my family and I have. It is an honor to receive this scholarship, and I promise I will keep working hard to become the best teacher I can be. Teaching is my passion, and it is opportunities like this that make me feel appreciated. I hope one day I will be able to help other students achieve their goals just as you have helped me.“

MARY BUZZETTA Career Advisor Alumni Scholarship “I believe my professional experiences and commitment to the career counseling profession fit well with these scholarship criteria. I am extremely grateful for your involvement in promoting success in the lives of college students and hope to be able to provide this same support to college students in my near future.“

JESSICA CROW Fearless Five Endowed Scholarship “Returning to college after an extended time is hard enough. Being able to financially afford it as a single mother with two children and a class schedule that does not allow for a job makes completing a four-year college degree nearly impossible. Your generosity has allowed my dreams to continue so that I may become a fearless educator.“

JOSE ALEXIS ESPINO DIAZ

Kathryn and David Platt Endowed Scholarship “By awarding me the Kathryn and David Platt Endowed Scholarship, you make me hold the strong promise that I will work very hard and eventually give something back to others, both as a teacher and possibly by creating a scholarship for future students like myself.“

VALERIE FISHER Melvin and Helen Pope Elementary Education Scholarship “I want to express my deepest gratitude towards you and your organization that made this award possible, and even more for granting me the honor of receiving it. I will take this opportunity as serious as I take my dreams and ambitions for my life. Nothing will be wasted, and the association that made this possible will not regret entrusting me with everything it entails. Thank you very much for seeing my efforts and dedication to teaching as important and for having a hand in turning my dream into reality.“

MEGAN GRANT Bruce Ernest Haddad and Dorothy Summers Haddad Memorial Endowed Scholarship “I dream of getting my master’s degree in the future and hopefully teaching at Florida State University. I look forward to what the future brings me, and, for now, it has brought me hope of achieving my goals on the wings of a scholarship I owe to you. I really cannot say ‘thank you’ enough, and those words really do not suffice to express the depth of my appreciation.“

ELIZABETH GRIGG Eleanor and Frank Kaney Endowed Scholarship “Since enrolling in the master’s degree in Visual Disabilities program, I have learned that having a visual impairment simply means learning new and different ways to do things; something I am eager to teach my future students. Because of your generosity, I will be able to focus on learning how to help these students be independent and successful in whatever they choose.“

38


“ ALAINA JOHNSON

Nancy Duran Thomas Scholarship in Early Childhood Special Education

NICOLE REY Broward County/Florida State College for Women (FSCW) Endowed Scholarship

“Thank you for giving me the great honor of receiving the Nancy Duran Thomas Scholarship in Early Childhood Special Education. You are truly helping me to achieve my dreams and get that much closer to truly changing lives. I hope one day you will hear of my accomplishments, and feel pride and happiness that you helped me get there. Thank you for believing in me, and my endeavors and FSU. I am incredibly grateful and will work to make sure that it is put to good use.“

“Your generous scholarship offer has proven to me that I am capable of achieving my dreams and excelling in my field. I hope to continue to make you and the College of Education proud of my accomplishments. Thank you for believing in me and instilling this confidence in me that I never thought I could have. It just makes me realize that all my hard work and studying paid off. I am truly grateful for what you have done for me, and no amount of words could truly express that.“

SAMUEL LLOYD Margaret Spearman Parkman Endowed Scholarship

ERIN M. SAMPSON Herbert J. Reese Endowed Fellowship

“By awarding me this scholarship, you have greatly lightened my financial burden. This allows me to commit myself to the most important aspect of my education, learning through experience. Your benevolence in providing such assistance is inspiring, and as I continue my pursuit to teach future generations I will always remember this moment.“

MARY-CATHERINE MCCLAIN Gary W. Peterson Endowed Scholarship “By awarding me the Gary W. Peterson Endowed Scholarship, I will be able to apply for my pre-doctoral internship, have financial funds to interview at my potential sites and be able to concentrate on what is important to me – education, research, teaching and serving others. Your generosity and financial support has not only fostered the attainment of these goals but also encouraged me to give back to others in my community. You have helped make my dreams a reality, and I cannot thank you enough.“

3 9 COE ANNUAL REPORT

“Currently, I am a full-time teacher, fulltime graduate student, wife and mother to a toddler who suffers from asthma and sickle cell disease. This fellowship is granting me the opportunity to pursue my dreams while maintaining my personal financial responsibilities. Before I was awarded this fellowship, I often worried about the day when I would have to suspend my studies because of my child’s medical expenses. I am forever grateful to you for this opportunity, and my family and I thank you.“


DONOR HONOR ROLL GIFTS OF $50,000 TO $250,000 Ms. Cynthia J. Schumacher (Estate Gift) Mrs. Adelaide L. Ware and Mr. Charles E. Ware

GIFTS OF $25,000 TO $49,999

Dr. Joseph C. Beckham and Ms. Patti Beckham Mr. Paul E. Driver and Mrs. Judy Driver

GIFTS OF $10,000 TO $24,999

Dr. Lawrence R. Hepburn and Dr. Mary A. Hepburn Dr. Robert C. Reardon and Dr. Janet G. Lenz

Miss Jean Fliess Dr. Peter J. Scanlon and Mrs. Lois A. Scanlon

Dr. Michael Shahnasarian and Mrs. Jean M. Shahnasarian

GIFTS OF $5,000 TO $9,999

Pamela S. Carroll, Ed.D. Marvalene Hughes, Ph.D. and Dr. David J. Brinks

GIFTS OF $1,000 TO $4,999

Ms. Diana L. Barnes Mrs. Bertha M. Bolden Ms. Patricia A. Doody Dean Marcy P. Driscoll and Mr. Robin Driscoll Ms. Joan C. Driver Dr. Fanchon F. Funk Ms. Constance B. Gaede Ralph R. Gonzalez, J.D. and Mrs. Barrie B. Gonzalez Dr. JoAnne A. Graf Mrs. Rachel L. Grahe

GIFTS OF $500 TO $999

Ms. Frances T. Achorn Mr. Kevin R. Achorn Dr. Randolph T. Barker and Dr. Sandra B. Barker Dr. Richard E. Brogdon Mrs. Helen M. Callaway and Mr. Larry M. Callaway Peggy Capell, Ph.D. Dr. Tim A. Coley and Ms. Anna C. Coley Dr. John J. Convey and Ms. Shelly Convey Mrs. Jane W. Cooksey Ms. Bettye A. Corcoran Dr. Ricardo H. Dreyfous Mr. Albert L. Driver Ms. Irene M. Driver Dr. Barbara J. Edwards Mr. John V. Eichelberger, Jr. and Ms. Dorothy C. Eichelberger

VADM (R) Gordon S. Holder and Mrs. Patricia A. Holder Dr. Jeffrey D. James and Ms. Valerie D. James Loretta and Leigh Norgren Foundation Mark & Lula Hamilton DeGraff Trust Mr. Joel W. McClure, Jr. Ms. Debra B. McDuffie MetLife Foundation Dr. M. Dianne Murphy Dr. John Frank Nolen, Jr. and Ms. Martha T. Nolen

Dr. Sandra Quesada and Ms. Marcia R. Ferguson Mr. Richard W. Ruch and Ms. Judy L. Ruch State Farm Companies Foundation State Farm Insurance Companies Glenn W. Stillion, Ph.D. and Ms. Judith A. Stillion Dr. James R. Swanson, Sr. and Dr. Lucille A. Swanson Steven E. Wilkerson, Ph.D. and Mrs. Elizabeth Wilkerson

Dr. Linda R. Eshleman Dr. Allen C. Evans Ms. Susanna K. Evans Dr. Myron R. Goff and Ms. Carolyn A. Goff Mr. Tomas E. Herrera and Ms. Christie Raniszewski Herrera Mr. Ralph E. Huck Dr. Patrice M. Iatarola Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Mr. William R. Kochan and Dr. Frances K. Kochan Terrence Leas, Ph.D. and Ms. Loyal S. Leas Dr. Margaret W. Lewis and Dr. Howard E. Lewis Dr. William J. Lewis and Mrs. Anna Jean Lewis Mr. Carl N. Lundblom and Mrs. Bonnie C. Lundblom Dr. Eloise Malinsky

Mrs. Karen L. McClure and Mr. Barry McClure Ms. Marlene E. McEwen Mr. Thomas J. Mills and Mrs. Selby A. Mills Ms. Ann McClure Mitchell Dr. William R. Muldrow and Mrs. Lottie M. Muldrow The Honorable Richard G. Payne and Mrs. Patricia I. Payne Mrs. Catherine R. Pelham Mrs. Patricia J. Rabb Ms. Linda M. Rapp and Mr. Peter D. Rapp Dr. Yvonne C. Rosecrans Dr. Martha K. Ross Mrs. Eleanor G. Sexton Mr. John D. Sullivan, IV Dr. Jay N. Wells 40

IF YOUR NAME OR BUSINESS WAS INADVERTENTLY OMITTED FROM THIS LIST, PLEASE CONTACT COURTNEY STOMBOCK AT 850-644-0565.


HOW YOUR GIFT HELPS US GROW FELLOWSHIPS $52,220 INTERNSHIPS $681

41 COE ANNUAL REPORT

SCHOLARSHIPS $518,745

PROGRAMMATIC SUPPORT $427,491


WHY WE GIVE... THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

FANCHON FUNK Dr. Fanchon Felice Funk Endowed Scholarship Giving back has become a passion for me in my retirement and even before. 

Numerous persons, whom I shall never know, made it possible for me to obtain my education through scholarships and gifts they had

established. 

As an educator, students are our reason for being. Being a part of helping our FSU teacher education students become all that they can become is my pleasure. It’s my turn now to give back.

ROBERT REARDON

It is a way I can support current students and programs I think are important.“

TERRY TRIMBLE

JANET LENZ “In addition to giving me my professional education, Florida State gave me the experience I needed to launch my career and achieve success in my chosen field. I believe in giving back to support the next generation of leaders from FSU.

is grateful for the collaborative relationship with the Florida Council for the Social Studies (FCSS) that dates back to 1953. 2007 marked the 50-year anniversary for the first FCSS statewide conference, and the organization wanted to do something to commemorate their longstanding relationship with Florida State. Sally Steele Day, founder of the FCSS Endowment fund, proposed shifting the focus of the endowment fund from supporting small mini-grants for teachers to major grants that support projects with greater impact. Following negotiations with Dean Driscoll and members of the FCSS Endowment Board, the Florida Council for the Social Studies Fund for Excellence in Social Studies Education was established through the FSU Foundation in the amount of $100,000. Since that time, FCSS representatives have met regularly with College of Education faculty to provide feedback on the direction for Social Studies Education and the Fund for Excellence.

Director Emeritus, The Florida Council for the Social Studies “ The purpose of our gift is to support student scholarships, service and outreach to professional organizations and training for in-service teachers, fellowships, recruitment and research

efforts, resource acquisition, professional presentations and anything else deemed important to the advancement of the quality of Social Studies Education at Florida State University.“

42


PPORTUNITIES TO GIV

GLOBALLY ENGAGED: PROVIDING A TRANSFORMATIVE

STUDENT EXPERIENCE INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION HAS TAKEN THE FOREFRONT AS A huge component of Florida State University’s and the College of Education’s “Big Ideas.” The University and College strive to be leaders in preparing students and graduates to be globally engaged and ready to possess intercultural skills, knowledge and insight needed to be successful in the 21st century. With students from 45 countries, the halls and classrooms of the Stone Building are filled with a rich, cultural background. Students are given opportunities to travel abroad to Iquitos, Peru; Valencia, Spain; London, England; and Indonesia to study and to intern. The College also hosts students from overseas to experience education in their designated degree from our award-winning faculty and to intern in local area schools. Graduate students also travel with faculty all over the world to conduct educational research.

Through the generous support of our alumni and friends, the College hopes to provide need-based assistance for at least 15 students each year to expand their global educational experiences through internships, service projects, and participation in study abroad and exchange programs. International experiences form lasting relationships and provide valuable experiences that help students land jobs after graduation.

Dean Driscoll recently appointed a committee to oversee the College’s global initiatives; allowing new ideas to continue to develop. We look forward to future initiatives that carry the torch for education and that transform education globally. For more information about supporting our global impact, please contact Courtney Stombock at cstombock@foundation.fsu.edu or at (850)644-0565.

BY EMILY HUDSON


SLIDE

COLLEGE SEEKS TO REPLACE THE SUMMER

WITH THE SUMMER BUMP THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION IS TEAMING UP WITH other FSU colleges and the Children’s Defense Fund to help stop at-risk kids from going down the “summer slide.” “Research shows that during the summer months, students can lose up to two or three months of reading ability, resulting in the ‘summer slide,’” said Lisa Scherff, associate professor of Reading Education and Language Arts in the School of Teacher Education. “By providing students with a free, comprehensive program of literacy, enrichment and support, we have the opportunity to not only reduce or eliminate the summer slide but also accelerate students’ skills.” The College’s planned Education Intervention Center will seek to provide a summer bump in place of the summer slide and address some of the challenges faced by at-risk, high-poverty and minority students in obtaining a higher education, a goal that is among the College’s top priorities. The Center will be a community resource, service-learning site and research facility drawing on the strengths of faculty from teacher education and counselor education, as well as the FSU colleges of social work, medicine, communication and information, business, and human sciences.

At the Center, teacher education students will tutor K-12 students in literacy skills including reading, writing, and the use of 21st century media in an environment designed to foster mentorship, leadership and fellowship.

components of the model curriculum are: high-quality academic enrichment; parent and family involvement; social action and civil engagement; intergenerational servant leadership development; and nutrition, health and mental health.

Scherff, who works with adolescents through her summer reading program, recognizes the importance of literacy and language arts education and concentrates on the education of future teachers of these subjects.

To develop the program, the partner school, college, or university must provide each of the elements the CDF requires for Freedom Schools, some of which are: standards of program administration; integrated reading curriculum; staffing; afternoon activities; parent engagement; nutritious meals; evaluation; communication protocols; community outreach; training dates; and a financial commitment.

“Serving the community is integral to the work we do as educators but, equally important, working with children during the summer months increases our teacher candidates’ self-efficacy and helps to make them better, more culturally responsive teachers,” she said. Scherff led the effort to gain the College’s acceptance as a participant in the 2013 Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) Freedom Schools program. The College will work with Leon County Schools’ 50 LARGE to implement the program this summer. CDF Freedom Schools provide afterschool and summer enrichment designed to enhance student motivation and help connect children and families with community resources. The five main

The College is still seeking funds to incorporate the CDF Freedom Schools program and create the Education Intervention Center. If you are interested in making a gift towards this life-changing initiative, please contact Courtney Stombock at: cstombock@foundation.fsu. edu or at (850) 644-0565. Started in 1973, the Children’s Defense Fund is a private, nonprofit child advocacy organization that has worked for 40 years to ensure equal opportunities for all children. For more information on CDF, please visit: WWW.CHILDRENSDEFENSE.ORG.

BY EMILY HUDSON


ENHANCING EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY FOR INNOVATIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING Using innovative technologies to enhance teaching and to facilitate learning is one of the College’s key initiatives. From 2010 to 2012, the College had 11 projects that won FSU technology fees funding, totaling $209,249.99. Additionally, there were about 40 department- and college-wide projects funded by the College of Education technology fees (about $71,000 annually). All projects aimed to integrate advanced instructional technologies into the COE curriculum and expand student-learning opportunities.

VISIBLE ADVANCEMENTS COE classrooms have come a long way in the last 10 years. The College has 24 technology-enhanced classrooms, both in the Stone building and Tully Gym, equipped with a networked desktop computer, laptop drop, touch screen control panel, a DVD/VCR combo, a document camera and an LCD projector. Technology-enhanced classrooms strengthen student learning experiences and facilitate teaching. The College also built a Tech Sandbox, a large room housing the latest educational technologies. The Sandbox helps create a dynamic learning environment where students and faculty can learn and practice using various instructional technologies and tools. The goal is that students will use the Tech Sandbox resources to gain a clearer understanding of how technology can be embedded into real life teaching, learning, assessment and research. The Sandbox currently boasts a SmartBoard, a Smart interactive projector, a Smart 3D doc cam, a 3D area, a gaming area, iPads, e-readers, tablets, LiveScribe pens and other devices.

4 5 COE ANNUAL REPORT

STATE OF THE ART

The College is one of only 22 in the nation to use the TeachLivE (TLE) lab. TeachLivE provides teachers the experience they need without placing any “real” students at risk in the process. In a typical lab session, a student-teacher is placed in a simulated middle-school classroom where virtual students (avatars) — with personalities based upon those typically encountered in a middle school classroom — act out different scenarios according to lesson objectives. The TeachLivE server is housed at the University of Central Florida in Orlando where they provide interactive control of the virtual students’ behaviors, both verbal and non-verbal. Additionally, in Summer 2012, the College replaced all lab computers and installed Faronics, which gives students temporary desktops that are wiped after use to protect against viruses. The College maintains a computer lab with 25 computers in Tully Gym and a Learning Resource Center in Stone Building with a total of 80 computers. The latter also has facilities for reserving materials in various media types, tele- and videoconferencing capabilities, bookable study areas and common study areas designed for collaborative work. Faronics also includes a module called Insight that helps instructors share their computer screens with students. The ability to send and collect files, chat with users, broadcast messages and hold classroom votes and student testing on lab machines greatly enhances the classroom experience. Working with FSU ITS, the College also developed a designated virtual lab for College of Education students. Now students, through the COE Virtual Lab, have 24-hour remote access to a variety of statistical packages. The virtual lab aims to improve the learning experiences of all students, but primarily those conducting research and working on their thesis or dissertation.


2012 TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE All of these technological advancements were highlighted in the College’s second annual Technology Showcase. The showcase was a great success. The event featured presentations related to technology in education from faculty, students, alumni, FSUS colleagues, FSU Office of Distance Learning and guest speakers. It also included exciting presentations on using software and hardware to facilitate learning, teaching, assessment and research in education. The showcase was a testament to the importance the College places on being avant-garde in innovative educational technology. Moreover, the College was one of the most active and well-represented at FSU’s 2012 DigiTech. DigiTech is an event designed to showcase and promote FSU student innovation with technology as well as the many applied technology courses and academic programs at the University.

DONATE TODAY WITH YOUR SUPPORT The College must address the ever-present changes in technology and become a leader in the movement to expand the integration of advanced technologies into the curriculum. We strongly believe these new and emerging technologies and innovative teaching strategies will provide superior professional preparation and development for students and faculty. To support this initiative and be a part of something bold and transformative, please contact Courtney Stombock at cstombock@foundation.fsu.edu or at (850)644-0565.

TECH SPOTLIGHT CAPTAIN OF THE GEEK SQUAD Dina Vyortkina, Ph.D., has played an integral role in the technological advancement of the College. Vyortkina has spearheaded countless technology initiatives, including the acquisition of a campus-wide license to the Qualtrics Research Suite for students and faculty, TurningTech (using personal response systems for instructional purposes) and the creation of the TeachLivE Lab. Foremost among Vyortkina’s contributions, was her role as one of the founders and key contributors to the Blended and Online Learning and Teaching Program. With her help, the College has become a leader in improving online and digital learning. On top of all this, Vyortkina has volunteered her time as the coordinator of the annual Technology Showcase. Vyortkina has two master’s degrees and a Ph.D. from Florida State, and has been working in the College—starting as a graduate assistant in the Learning Resource Center—since 1997. She is the only female member of the University IT Managers Leadership Team and a member of both the FSU Software Licensing Committee and the CPALM Advisory Board (FSUS). Vyortkina also serves as a reviewer for Global Learn Asia Pacific (Global Conference for Learning and Technology). Additionally, she is a reviewer and program committee member for both the Society for Information Technology and the Teacher Education (SITE) International Conference and Ed-Media (World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications).


PPORTUNITIES TO GIV

VETERAN’S INITIATIVE REACHING OUT TO VETERANS AT COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND FLORIDA STATE CAMPUS

HAVING SERVED IN IRAQ AS AN M1A1 determination, and teamwork can To ensure all Florida State tank crewman and in Afghanistan as a Humvee turret gunner, Ryan Taylor knows the value of military experience in preparing a person to contribute to society at home. “Veterans are in a phenomenal position to educate the young minds of coming generations. They bring a skill set to the table that civilians might not otherwise exhibit,” said Taylor, a Tallahassee native who joined the Marine Corps at 17. “Veteran teachers can instill discipline and provide a level of authority and respect that may have otherwise been lost on future generations. They can provide real world examples of what hard work,

accomplish.”

As president of the FSU Collegiate Veterans Association (CVA), Taylor, a Food and Nutrition Science major, is working to make it easier for his fellow veterans to realize their potential by furthering their education. The CVA is a vital part of the FSU Veterans Center. It serves as a vehicle to connect and support enrolled student-veterans, advocate for their needs and educate the community-at-large about the proud service and sacrifice veterans have made. Veterans can face challenges when transitioning from active duty service to civilian education.

student-veterans succeed in their educational endeavors, the University created the Florida State University Veterans Center, which serves as the focal point for all campus veteran support services. The mission of the FSU Veterans Center is to grow and support the FSU veteran community by reaching out to veterans of all generations and actively recruiting veterans looking to transition from military service to college life. University President Eric J. Barron recently announced several new initiatives that will help the university in its efforts to become the most veteran-friendly public university in the nation. The CVA at Florida State already has


empowered student-veterans like no other collegiate establishment in the nation. From admissions to post-graduation employment, the FSU Veterans Center is working to make sure FSU student-veterans are taken care of everywhere on campus. In answering President Barron’s call, Dean Driscoll has taken the step of designating the co-director of the Office of Academic Services and Intern Support (OASIS), Jim Allen, a veteran himself, as the primary liaison to the FSU Veterans Center. This gives the center a direct point of contact for veterans who have questions or need guidance. “At the College of Education, we are always searching for ways to assist our student-veterans and their dependents during their transition from military to student life, such as providing easy access to advising services, addressing

BY KEN HIGGINS

any veteran-specific needs in an expedited manner, and informing them of research and scholarship opportunities. Having a direct, centralized point of contact in the College, while it may sound simple, can often help student-veterans feel that they have a dependable resource they can count on for assistance,” Allen said. The OASIS, which offers a wide array of professional and administrative services to students and faculty in the College of Education, has taken the initiative to revise some of its internal procedures to identify more easily student-veterans when they visit their office for advising, recruitment or scholarship purposes. Advisors at the College of Education have been provided with training and resources specifically for assisting veterans transitioning into and through student life.

These guidelines, developed by the Division of Undergraduate Studies, have helped educate OASIS advisors about the student-veteran population and the considerations involved with helping them succeed. OASIS also frequently communicates with the University’s VA Benefits Office and has linked the COE Scholarships & Aid website with the FSU Veterans Center Scholarship page. “We want our student-veterans to be well-informed about all of the opportunities available to them. Incorporating small changes into how we do things in OASIS allows us to better serve those veterans who have so honorably served us,” said Allen. For more information about supporting the FSU Veterans Center, please visit:

WWW.VETERANS.FSU.EDU

48


FSU EDUCATION IPHONE APP THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION RELEASES NEW MOBILE APP The College of Education (COE) is proud to have launched its very own mobile application. Download the recently released FSU Education iPhone app to stay connected to COE and other departments on campus wherever you go; it has never been easier. With this free mobile app, users can apply for scholarships, make a gift, stay up-to-date with the latest COE and campus news and events, look up COE faculty and staff for easy contact storing, and access lots more with just a few taps. Dean Driscoll believes the app is another step in advancing and staying current with the latest communication trends at the college. “The College of Education works diligently to provide opportunities for communications and networking. Our

new iPhone app allows the College to improve our communication channel with a current technological trend. We are proud to be the first college on Florida State’s campus to release its own app,” says Dean Driscoll. Some of the unique features available in this mobile app are the inclusions of the admissions and scholarship functions. Students can now find all the information needed to apply for admissions to Florida State University and COE programs right at their fingertips. And, once accepted, students can now apply for scholarships right from their phone! The FSU Education iPhone app is now available for download in the Apple iTunes Store.

STAY IN TOUCH WITH THE COE FACEBOOK.COM/FSU.EDUCATION

FSUEDNEWS.COM

TWITTER.COM/FSU_EDUCATION

PINTEREST.COM/FSUCOLLEGEOFED

YOUTUBE.COM/FSUEDUCATION

TINYURL.COM/FSU-EDU

4 9 COE ANNUAL REPORT


CONTACT INFORMATION EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & POLICY STUDIES Robert Schwartz, Ph.D. Professor 1209 Stone Building (850) 644-8169 raschwartz@fsu.edu

Betsy Becker, Ph.D. Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Educational Statistics & Department Chair 3210 Stone Building (850) 644-4592 bbecker@fsu.edu

SCHOOL OF TEACHER EDUCATION

Lawrence Scharmann, Ph.D. Anne and John Daves Endowed Professor & Assistant Dean and Director G107 Stone Building (850) 644-4880 lscharmann@fsu.edu

SPORT MANAGEMENT

Jeffrey James, Ph.D. Professor & Department Chair 1002 Tully Gym (850) 644-4813 jdjames@fsu.edu

OFFICE OF RESEARCH

Robert Reiser, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Research, University Distinguished Teaching Professor & Robert M. Morgan Professor of Instructional Systems 1109 Stone Building (850) 644-6885 rreiser@fsu.edu

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS & ALUMNI RELATIONS Amber Smalley Director 2206B Stone Building (850) 645-4637 asmalley@fsu.edu

DEAN

MARCY P. DRISCOLL

EDITOR & DIRECTOR

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY & LEARNING SYSTEMS

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT & MAJOR GIFTS

Courtney Stombock Assistant Dean for Development 1108 Stone Building (850) 644-0565 cstombock@foundation.fsu.edu

CREDITS WRITERS

EMILY HUDSON NANCY KINNALLY

KATE CAMPBELL KEN HIGGINS EMILY HUDSON PEDRO SALGADO AMBER SMALLEY LAUREN VONDERHARR

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

LAYOUT & DESIGN

AMBER SMALLEY

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

KATE CAMPBELL

KATE CAMPBELL

PHOTOGRAPHERS KEN HIGGINS BRITTANY KNIGHT RAY STANYARD FSU PHOTO LAB

CONTRIBUTORS

BARRY RAY COURTNEY STOMBOCK DINA VYORTKINA


1100 STONE BUILDING 1114 WEST CALL STREET P.O. BOX 3064450 TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32306-4450

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID TALLAHASSEE, FL PERMIT NO. 55

LEARN TODAY. TEACH TOMORROW.

LEAD FOR A LIFETIME.

College of Education Annual Report 2012  
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