Issuu on Google+

A Horse of a Different Color: Urban Design in the Great Northeast Winter 2017

LA 402 L - Advanced Landscape Design Lab


Laguna Beach, CA

College of Environmental Design Landscape Architecture Prof. Andrew Wilcox

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona


Team Members

Chunguang Pan cpan@cpp.edu

Karla Quevedo kaquevedo@cpp.edu

Lance Hassani lrhassani@cpp.edu

Timothy Tay tmtay@cpp.edu


able of ontents


Project ONE: Morphology Precedent Studies the Unique the Alley the Street the Square

Project TWO: Mapping + Inventory + Vision Readings Trends Mappings Vision

Project THREE: Urban Design Master Plan Vision Statement Framework Diagrams Narrative Diagram Typological Explorations Digital Model Project Calculations Vision Renderings Site Plan


1

roject


Morphology Precedent Studies


1922’s Royal Ontario Museum www.rom.on.ca

R O M 1930’s Royal Ontario Museum www.rom.on.ca

1980’s Royal Ontario Museum www.rom.on.ca

2007 Royal Ontario Museum www.rom.on.ca

Royal Ontario Museum


90 M

the Unique

180 M


Royal Ontario Museum


the Unique


Royal Ontario Museum


the Unique


Brookfield Place


the ALLEY


Brookfield Place


the ALLEY


Looking west along King from York, 1856

King & Yonge, 1896

The Gurney Iron Foundry on King Street West on April 13, 1927. Toronto Archives, S0071, It.4812 (1)

Toronto Central Prision

blogto.com Inglis Factory, manufacturer of waepon for UK during WW2

King Street West / Liberty Village


the STREET


D O

QUEEN

KING WEST VILLAGE

KING ST W

Residential

ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT

Residential Apartment Commercial Open Space

OLD TORONTO

YongeBStA Y

DUNDAS

S P A D IN A

Queen St

commercial zone U N IV E R S IT Y

LANSDOWNE

P A R

residential zone

FRONT

Employment Industrial

GARDINER

Institutional Utiliy and Transportation 5.8km (3.6mi) long street

ALM

E VA

GOR

T.

VE. ON A

ERST

Zoning/ Landuse E. 4

ST.

S ST.

GIVIN

SHAW

AIDE

OND

RICHM

CRAW

T. W. IDE S

TE W

T ST.

IN U

AL K

E.

M

IN UT EW

N AV

10

M

B

CHA

AY SS W 7

M

3

D

GAR

VE. NA A

AVE.

E.

.

ST.

E.

AVE.

EX INER

HAN

VE. TIC A

RSON

ER AV

E AT AV MOW

FERIN

R

LIBE

N WILLIAMS ST. NN LYN E. LIBE RTY ST .

ILL TY V

PRE

EXHIBITION PLACE

N ATLA

JEFFE

ALLAN LAMPORT STADIUM PARK

32

AGE

IN UT EW

AL K

RICOH COLISEUM

DIRECT ENERGY CENTRE

LITTLE NORWAY PARK CORONATION PARK

BMO FIELD

AL K

LIBERTY GRAND

LAKE ONTARIO

LAKE

D.

E BLV

SHOR

BILLY BISHOP TORONTO CITY AIRPORT (PORTER AIR)

ONTARIO PLACE

0.25mi +

T. W. ON S

INGT

WELL

URS

WESTERN BATTERY RD.

STANLEY PARK

+

+ST. W.

KING

BATH

++

. ST. W

STRA

+

FRAS

ST W

V AN A COW

SON

JAME

starts @ W Queen St

A

K IN G

++

SUDBURY SST.

DUF

+

++

+

++

+ 1

QU

ADEL

. ST. W

A

ADEL

ST.

E.

D AV

W.

FORD

FIEL

ONS

BEAC

VE. NE A

VE. CK A

BRO

N ST.

T. W. EEN S

+

. ST. W

6

QUEE

+

OND

RICHM

ends @ Yonge St

LE AV

W. N ST.

QUEE

LE ST.

ARGY

D.

DSTO

GLA

R URT

ERCO

DOV

TRINITY BELLWOODS PARK

17

0.50mi

LIGHT RAIL STATION @ every 200m

King St West/ Liberty Village Site Plan

King Street West / Liberty Village


courtesy of king liberty village design guidelines

Liberty Village Site Plan

1m

RESIDENTIAL BLDG

3m

PLANTER/ PATIO

3m

14m

SIDE WALK

2.5m

KING ST WEST

SIDE WALK

gf

PARK

SECTION

BLDG HT @ 14m

BLDG HT @ 23m

4m

COMMERCIAL BLDG

A

PATIO/ SIDEWALK

King Street West Sections

14m

KING ST WEST

2m

SIDE WALK

z 2m

4.5m

P/A

PATIO

COMMERCIAL BLDG

SECTION

the STREET

B


D u ff e r i n f r o m K i n g S t r e e t i n 1 9 4 9 & N O W

Dowling Avenue from King in the 1940’s & NOW

King Street West / Liberty Village


COMMERCIAL + +

260 King St W

291-299 King St W

300 King St W

RESIDENTIAL

1251 King St W

1439 King St W

1469 King St W

the STREET


Park: where public gathers for recreation and celebration The Corktown Common is a park where people can come to meet and play together. The park contains many programs that cater to the people’s interest. Each of which contains gathering areas, walking paths, marshes for educational use, and greenspace for all to enjoy. The site was transformed from a previous industrialized occupant. T h e t r a n s f o r m e d b r o w n fi e l d b e c a m e an 18-acre park built as a waterfront of Toronto. The Don River borders the Corktown Common. In case of a fl o o d , t h e a r e a o f w h i c h p a r t o f t h e Common can help intercept it. The morphology of the site gives it its form based on the underlying features that border it. For one, the D o n R i v e r o ffi c i a l l y i n t r o d u c e s t h e use of the park but at the same time maintains its uniqueness as a park. The GO transit line is another feature bordering the Corktown Common. And the West Don Lands and Canary District, which are developing neighborhoods. These features come into play and create the accessibility and form of the park itself. The park gives way to d i ff e r e n t e l e v a t i o n a l c h a n g e s t h a n k s to Landscape Architect, Michael Van Valkenburgh. The parks elevational c h a n g e s a d d a n a d d i t i o n a l e ff e c t t o the overall enjoyment. The given site context compared to what’s seen in GTA, has its own uniqueness. Toronto is an engaging city full of bustling people. Having the initial thought of gathering and enjoying stroll in the outdoors, people would set their minds on going to the Corktown Common. The pace slows down just a little bit.

Corktown Common


d.

Don River

Tan nery R

Bayview Ave.

GO Transit

Corktown Common

Figure Ground 0

100

200

300

3D Massing

the Square


Grain Morphology Study High Denisty -

Formality of city reside City Center Lots of people Commercial

Congregation

- leisure walk - gatherings @ pavilion - activation of lifestyle

Enbankment

West Don Lands

- Settle along trails - Industrial railroad tracks - s e t b a c k c i t y fl o o d p r o t e c t i o n

Liability

Corktown Common

- Floods - Water Travel - Pollution

Don Valley Trail

Don River

Flux of Urban Sprawl

An Area of Slowing Pace

Further Slowing Pace

A Complete Halt

Corktown Common

West Don Lands

Corktown Common

Don Valley Trail

Don River


Park Boundary

Downhill Slope

Railroad

1st Level Embankment Protection

Elevation Profiling

Sectioned Diagram

NTS

the Square


The Embankment

Corktown Common


The Pavillion

The Grove Walkway

The Splash Pad

The Marsh

Programs

the Square


2

roject


Mapping + Inventory + Vision


“Shifting Sites� represents a timeline of transitional moments in have been shifting from the those three theories. The first theory is w should be considered integral to the local system because the materi local and regional history influences contemporary ecosystem dynam component ecosystem function. The theories shifting help the ecolog a new metaphors for designer to experiment. The challenge is the rela theories are like the puzzle, we have to check and try different piece site is bounded by the geology and location, which like the puzzle pie puzzle piece we can try fit it into the system. The first piece is consid If we consider the Woodbine project as single project we create a hie same time we losing the connection from the city of toronto. Or we ca information. The site will connect to fit into the site contains, it may

Shifting Sites

by Kristina Hill


n ecological theory and affect the landscape. The ecology theories whether the local ecosystem should be considered a “closed� site or als and energy flows through the site. The second theory is how the ics. The third is that physical landscape patterns are an important gists and designer for future development. The theories shifting create ationship of the undeveloped site and developed surrounding. The to create best fit for the society. Historically we consider the project ece separate from the big picture. The new theories is like the new der the site is independent and separate from the larger ecosystem. rarchy to represent the importance of the Woodbine project, but at an trade the site as a medium, which it allow the people exchange complete the part of the picture.

the READINGS


-the city as it is -Informtation is transformed into a landscape

*image from reading

This crimescape mapping of New York displays the amount of crime in a certain area. it proves how the city has a lot of crime.

As architects or urban designers, mapping c o m e s e a s y i n t h e s e n s e t h a t w e n e e d t o fi g u r e o u t what is around our site and display it in a graphical form. Though, sometimes mappings can become very bare and boring. So how do we make them exciting, yet easily understood? Nadia Amoroso t a k e s a d i ff e r e n t d i m e n s i o n , l i t e r a l l y , t o e x p r e s s h e r mappings. In “The Exposed City: Mapping the Urban Invisibles,” Nadia goes to show how one can change the traditional mappings into a 3-dimensional landscape which reveals the “invisibles” of the city that we otherwise would not see. Nadia takes urban statistics to make a “map-landscape” that is free from legends, text, and lines to display the city as it truly is. She takes the information and transforms it into a landscape based on the values the statistics presented. She goes on to explain that we, as architects or urban designers, “…react immediately to a context by looking at the topography,” (123). In revealing these mapped landscapes, they can become much m o r e i n fl u e n t i a l i n a d e s i g n r a t h e r t h a n a conventional mapping. When getting into detail with these mapped landscapes, we can understand the true form of the city by what we are mapping. For example, when observing the densityscape of New York City, we perceive positive “pullings” that in our mind, we see peaks and valleys. Then, when we examine a crimescape, we notice a hellish underground landscape. These type of maps are easier for us to understand than when looking at a 2-dimensional, conventional mapping.

The Exposed City

by Nadia Amoroso


Positive “pullings” display the population density -become “peaks” and “Valleys”

*image from reading

This densityscape mapping illustrates the urban density of New York City. It displays a vertical landscape that is easier to read.

a hellish underground landscape

*image from reading

This crimescape mapping of New York displays the amount of crime in a certain area. it proves how the city has a lot of crime.

the READINGS


1

Landscape as Urbanisim

by Charles Waldheim


2

In the reading, Landscape as Urbanism by Walter Waldheim, he emphasized that landscape is the most suitable medium to give order t o a s p e c i fi c s i t e . U s i n g l a n d s c a p e architecture as the model in a design process will enable designers to implement strategic solutions in an ecologically sensitive way. The philosophy behind landscape urbanism has emerged in contemporary urbanism. This theory have been favored by world renowned landscape architects and urbanists like James Corner, Ian McHarg and Rem Koolhaas. Landscape architects areusually m o r e fl e x i b l e a n d m o r e fl u i d i n t e r m s of responding to economic changes and social and environmental conditions. Landscape appears to o ff e r a w a y t o c o n s i d e r c o m p l e x urban conditions, one capable of tackling water management, biodiversity and human activity. Our current practices have revolved into narrow minded thinking, which lead us to create spaces that are dominated by gray infrastructures and buildings.

the READINGS


Projected through assu

Projected through expe

Gray World, Green Heart

by Robert Thayer


umption

eriencing first hand

In regards to my reading, Thayer shines upon his judgement of the world around us. “Landscapes that create an illusion of a better world while depriving us of the actual means of achieving it are not sustainable. “ With one of the idea he projects --- a visual ecology. By experiencing the workings of the landscape only then we can see how the environmental behavior works. He talks about how human behavior interprets the world through abstraction, deduction, and discourse. We need to open up our v i e w a n d a c t u a l l y e x p e r i e n c e i t fi r s t hand; all of us that is. This can be the only means of building a sustainable landscape. Another one of his many inquiries calls for the inconsistency and its impacts on the landscape. Technology to be more precise, is the reason why most of us are delusional to the fact that it dicates our sense of landscape sensibility. We won’t be able to identify the aided simulation that creates this fantasy we all enjoy. There are certain technologies that give us the edge to help imbue these ideas but will that help us make that clear choice? Thayer emphasizes that it will always be an illusion as we try to perceive the most perfected one. So by this we shouldn’t be awed by technology but guided by it.

the READINGS


Virtual Reality


the TRENDS


“to create a world where people work to make a life, not just living.�

Building a diverse community between shared spaces is something that WeWork specializes in. WeWork is community-driven company that rents out spaces for people to study, work, or play. WeWork creates this dynamic environment that easily invites others to pursue a membership with them. The founders: Miguel McKelvey, Adam Neumann, and Rebekah Neumann, constructed a place for not only small businesses and entrepreneurs, but for the entire diverse community. One can go from having a membership that acquires him or her a desk at any of their locations to getting a p r i v a t e o ffi c e t h a t i s m o r e a c c o m m o d a t i n g t o t h o s e w h o plan on staying there and/or expanding. WeWork is a place for a workspace, community, and services for a global network of creators ( w e w o r k . c o m ) . T h e y f e a t u r e p r i v a t e o ffi c e s w i t h fl o o r - t o - c e i l i n g g l a s s w a l l s t o c r e a t e a t r a n s p a r e n c y between others though maintaining that privacy one needs. Aside from these spaces, WeWork includes amenities like: super-fast internet, spacious common areas, business-class printers, free refreshments, onsite s t a ff , a n d p r i v a t e p h o n e b o o t h s . T h e i r g o a l i s s i m p l y t o support the community in any way they can. Right now, WeWork is located globally and it is only looking to expand. The founders have created a world for people to work and make a life, not just a living (wework.com). Being a part of WeWork brings some value to your life like having a global footprint, saving time, having a broader community, having a corporate environment, saving money, and having the brand and event platform (wework.com). They value in inspiration, entrepreneurship, authenticity, tenacious, gratefulness, and being in this together (wework.com).

WORKSPACE COMMUNITY SERVICES Founders: Miguel McKelvey, Adam Neumann, Rebekah Neumann

WeWork


l G

f o o l t a pr b o e t sav

ime

r commu e d a o ni br ty ate envir r o o p

co

r

save money

nm

t

t

m

event p and la d tf n a or r b

en

in

the TRENDS


CONNECTED

Just like Toronto’s Greenbelt, this strategy prevents and limits urban sprawl a n d e n c o u r a g e e ffi c i e n t u s e o f t h e l a n d .

1800s Pre-industrial

1900s Industrial

ecologically driverless car

It prevents infrastructure for no extendfor more than one conce block at a time.

2000s Post-industrial

diversity

Urbanism

CONTIGUOUS

COMPACT

Feature organized streets and paths and visual connection within the region.

Post-modern


DIVERSE

ot ession

A development which contains mixture of land uses, building and housing, and architectural types. This prevents unattractive monotonous urban landscapes.

2030s

ECOLOGICAL

Integrates features of the natural landscape into the form of the city in a way that protects and restores environmental elements.

2100s Ecological Age

FROM GRAY TO GREEN

From the Toronto’s urban surface where industrialization and mass transportation of goods used to take p l a c e , n o w b e c o m e s a n u r b a n fl u x i n t e g r a t e d w i t h g r a y i n f r u s t r u c t u r e a n d d o m i n a n t b u i l d i n g . T h e f u t u r e of the city could transform more into an ecological-oriented urbanization where the built environment welcomes and embraces the natural. Perhaps the way forest ecosystems thrive can enlighten designers of our future how to build sustainable cities that is resilient to the unevitable climate change. The future will use nature as the model for g r o w t h , a n d w i l l e m p h a s i z e o n t h e fi e l d o f s t u d y s o c a l l e d b i o m i m i c r y .

the TRENDS


Increasing shade with more trees + permeable surfacing

Climate Resiliency


Source Image: http://urbantoronto.ca/ml

A s f a r a s w e l l k n o w , c l i m a t e c h a n g e i s a w o r l d w i d e p h e n o m e n o n . I t h a s e ff e c t s o n the growth of ecosystems . Milder winters have caused trouble with roads and buildings. I t s a l w a y s s a f e t o s a y t h a t c l i m a t e c h a n g e i s a p p a r e n t i n a l l c a s e s . W e a t h e r a ff e c t s i n duration and random appearances are all that show how drastic changes in weather can be. Toronto has been one of the major cities in climate resiliency. Its one of their city’s initiatives to reduce the vulnerability of natural human systems to actual or expected c l i m a t e c h a n g e e ff e c t s . A n d t h e y c a l l t h i s c l i m a t e c h a n g e a d a p t a t i o n . E x a m p l e s o f t h i s trend include, planting more trees to increase shade and to cool the air, landscaping w i t h d r o u g h t - r e s i s t a n t p l a n t s , o r u s i n g r e fl e c t i v e m a t e r i a l s o n r o o f s o f h o m e s a n d b u i l d i n g s t o r e d u c e t h e u r b a n h e a t i s l a n d e ff e c t . A n d m a k e e v e r y t h i n g m o r e r e s i l i e n t t o e x t r e m e w e a t h e r a n d t o i m p r o v e t h e c i t y ’ s o v e r a l l s u s t a i n a b i l i t y . I f w e a t h e r e ff e c t s w e r e to be extreme at Woodbine, there would be need of measures to protect this entertainment district.

the TRENDS


Downtown Brampton Urban Growth Centre

1

22 KM

P u b l i c Tr a i n s 1 hour 40 min

15 KM

Mississauga city Urban Growth Centre

Urban Growth Centre

Airport

Highways:Existing GO RER Lines GO Lines Union Pearson Express Line Urban Growth Centre Connection Population 2011 Less

More

The Ontario’ and watersheds of Woodbine Race Track p r o t e c t i o n a r e a f o r development in th next 25 year. With horizontal develop project we have to showing the conne record density is 1 Etobicoke Urban g residents/hectare project will reach in near future. Cur our woodbine proj public trans, and f trans. We need cre the travel time fro

Transportation + Popultaion


16 KM

Yo n g e - E g l i n t o n Growth Centre

P u b l i c Tr a i n s 1 hour 20 min

Downtown To r o n t o Urban Growth Centre

Etobicoke Urban Growth Centre

P u b l i c Tr a i n s 1 hour

’s Greenbelt create the permanently protected area of green space, farmland, forests, wetland, Southern Ontario, Canada. The Greenbelt is major step to prevent of urban sprawl, and create r environment sensitive land. But Greenbelt also created major challenge for the urban he great Ontario Area. The projection of the Ontario’s population going to grow by 30.1% over the limitation of sprawl urban development, have to switch to vertical development instead pment. The vertical development will creates urban growth centre. For the woodbine race track o understand the future and connect the project site to the ever grow communities. The map is ection between the urban growth centre to the project site. The mississauga urban growth centre 131 resident/hectare in 2006 and project density will reach 200 residents/hectare in 2031. The rowth centre record density 131 resident/hectare in 2006 and project density will reach 400 in 2031. The downtown Toronto population density record 280 resident/hectare in 2006 and t o 4 0 0 r e s i d e n t s / h e c t a r e i n 2 0 3 1 . T h e p r o j e c t i o n o f t h e g r o w t h c e n t r e w i l l a ff e c t t h e o u r p r o j e c t r r e n t l y m e n t i o n a b o v e g r o w t h c e n t r e d o n o t h a v e d i r e c t a n d e ff e c t i v e p u b l i c t r a n s p o r t a t i o n t o ject. From Mississauga urban growth centre to Woodbine project will take 1 hour and 40 mins in rom Etobicoke urban growth centre to Woodbine project will take 1 hour and 20 mins in public eate a direct route from Mississauga, to Etobicoke then connect back to express line, to shorten m growth centre to the Woodbine project.

the MAPPINGS


H

LEGEND food commercial zones ice skating shopping center high density

Commercial


H H

H

H

the MAPPINGS


CONNECTED DEVELOPMENT

Toronto’s early urbanization was shaped with rectilinear grid s y s t e m s t o r d e r a n d e ffi c i e n c y .

DIVERSE DEVELOPMENT

The current suburban communities in Toronto are deisned in rigns to promote diverse use of the urban landscape. Public spaces are surrounded by detached housing in ring roads model. This development is designed to accomodate mixture of Land uses, building and housing types, and architectural styles.

ECOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT

This approach allowed the natural green spcaes and ravines to converge into the u r b a n i z e d s e t t l e m e n t s a n d fi l l t h e c i t y w i t h more meaning and livable landscapes.

Urban Morphology

This mapping inv started with rectilinea became highly legible themselves and naviga streetscaping made th trade started, is now o urban develops outwar ecologically-oriented m strengthen the natural The result of this indet transform the city into


vestigates the evolution of Toronto’s urban development. The urban form of the city r grid system, this features connected streets, and open sightlines within the region. It to users, the oderly street and building placement helped the people to quickly orient ate with relative ease. However some may argue that the rigidity, rational, clean, orderly e urban movement ver y limiting. The old downtown Toronto, where industrialization and one of the busiest cities that accomodates a much interconnected economic power. As the r d , t h e i d e o l o g y o f u r b a n fi e l d f o r m a t i o n c h a n g e d i n t o a d i v e r e s e a n d model giving more way for nature to thrive. Today, the growth of the city considered to l landscape to freely move around the engineered environment and embrace it’s rigidity. terminant and open-ended design strategy have opened the doors for natural landscape to o a meaningful and livable urban realm.

the MAPPINGS


Hubmerwoods Park

Humber River

Wes P

Hubmer Arboretum Esther Lorrie Park

Preexisting Dra

Wildwood Park

Ecology


Beaumonde Heights Park

Given the site context, the local ecology nearby the site is vast. These include the Humber Arboretum and the many parks along the Humber River. The Humber River seems to be a vital entity as it circulates through the green massing that makes up good part of Toronto’s ecology. This can show how the inclusion of local ecology can be met within this site. This area of greenery is only just a portion of the Green Belt. Wetlands, marshes, forests, watersheds, are just some that are included within Canada’s protect green space --- the Green Belt. The rapid pace of urban development is contained by this ecologi c a l l a n d . T h e G o l d e n H o r s e s h o e , a s t h e y l i k e t o c a l l i t , i s t h e r e g i o n -o f S o u t h e r n Ontario that is densely populated and industrialized. The Green Belt helps counteract that measure to help protect the environment within that portion of Ontario. It’s amazing to see this trend happening. Seen here are, again, the local ecology wraps around the urban surface and directly goes through it. The Humber River plays a big role in prolong the lifespan of these green areas. For this to have a lasting impact shows this is an example of a balance between nature and the urban.

st Humber arkland

Humberwoods Park

ainage Basin

the urban inclusion Legend

Esther Lorrie Park

Site Boundary

O

Local Greenery

ld oo W in

db

SWA Proposed

e

Humber Arboretum

ce

Ra e

rs

u Co Queen Street E. and Kingston Rd. - 36.0 km away from original track

the MAPPINGS


Downtown Brampton Urban Growth Centre

22 KM

Public Trains 1 hour 40 min

Mississauga city Urban Growth Centre

the Combined


H

Yonge-Eglinton Growth Centre

H

H H

Public Trains 1 hour 20 min

Downtown Toronto Urban Growth Centre

H

16 KM

M

Etobicoke Urban Growth Centre

15 KM Public Trains 1 hour

food White Asian South Asian Black Mixed/ Other

Greenlands Population Growth

commercial zones ice skating shopping center high density

the MAPPINGS


3

roject


Urban Design Master Plan


Woodbine will develop into a district that is self-thriving an surrounding ecology. Through the cultivation of sustainabl efforts promoting communal synergy within the district entertainm


nd interconnected within the Greater Toronto Area and the e techniques, Woodbine will be the beacon of regenerative t while maintaining Woodbine’s horse racing legacy and ment values.

the VISION


d e fi n e

Shares same

=

of the sam

d e fi n e

Buildings come in all shapes and sizes - from towering skyscrapers to low-ris H o w e v e r , o n l y a s a g r o u p m a s s i n g o f b u i l d i n g s c a n a c h i e v e f u l l e ffi c i e n c y a s a w o assemble together: rows upon rows of buildings begin to form a system of a colle multi-functioning community is evidently comparable to a forestry ecosystem wh that forest ecosystem that co-exist together in symbiosis to create a harmonious t h a t fl o w s w i t h i n o u r w o r l d . W o o d b i n e w i l l t a k e o n t h e s c h e m e a n d s t r u c t u r e o f a forest work hand-in-hand to make sure no one of its companions are ever fading With this case, buildings will take on that same role. The buildings will be constr and overall be a sustainable factor for Woodbine to be one with climate resilienc will be a district community proven to establish its interconnectivity to the envir Area.

Urban Forest


ed by

qualities

=

me system

ed by

s e n h u t s . E a c h b u i l d i n g c o n t a i n s t h e i r o w n f u n c t i o n a l i t y t o t h e s i t e s p e c i fi c . rkable city. Individually, every building has its own function. Nevertheless, they ective, multi-functional community. The meaning of a collective, h e r e , i n t h e s a m e c o n t e x t , i s d e fi n e d b y a l l t h e c o l l e c t i v e l i v i n g i n h a b i t a n t s o f system. By these means, we see Woodbine as a symbol of the natural system a f o r e s t , fi g u r a t i v e l y , t o a c h i e v e a s e l f - s u s t a i n a b l e u r b a n s y s t e m . T r e e s w i t h i n a and it all depends on the strong connection each tree shares within the forest. ucted to exemplify the works of a forest like providing shade, a noise barrier, cy. The sustainability that follows will demonstrate how Woodbine can be and ronment while maintaining its cultural establishment in the Greater Toronto

the VISION


Urban Forest Analogy - Street Exp

Project Goals


perience - Regenerative Inclusion

the VISION


greenhouse gas emission

CH4 CO2

shelter/storage

extracted resource (consume)

90oF

urban heat island

urban runoff

sewage leaks carbon footprint

CONSUMER

Urban Forest Analogy


CO2

irradiance

intercepted + absorbed + reflected

O2

NO2

CO2 uptake

O2

oxygen release

photosynthesis

habitat

food (produce) sound barrier

energy/ timber

provide sense of community + encourage walking

shade + microclimate + reduce windspeed/heat island

H2O

H2O

H2O soil water + nutrients uptake

erosion control

PRODUCER

the VISION


Khao San Road. Bangkok, Thailand

1:2 Scale

La Rambla, Barcelona, Spain

1:3 Scale

Strøget, Copenhagen, Denmark La Rambla, Barcelona, Spain

1:1 Scale

Street Experience


H : W ratio

Carnaby Street, London, United Kingdo

2:1 Scale

Lan Kwai Fong, Hong Kong

4:1 Scale

the VISION


solar pa

fi x e d s o l a r p a n e angle for maxim year solar energ

hi gh an gl e su m m er su n low

bioswales / permeable pavers

ang

le w inte r

purified water to local aquifer

fi l t e r r u n o ff p o l l u t i o n conserve water improve water quality create habitat

Regenerative Inclusion

sun

warm air


anel

l @ 33.5o mized all gy

green roof

w a t e r fi l t e r / c o l l e c t i o n s y s t e m storm water management habitat urban heat moderation improved air quality farm amenities i r r a d i a n c e r e fl e c t e d

natural ventilation

passive air conditioning controlled temperature energy conservation

rainwater harvesting cistern landscape irrigation grey water agricultural use

the VISION


r

r&d + offices

edu r&d + offices

passive

edu

garden/residential

residential

school / offices

less dense less intense

forbs / grasslands

shrubland

incre

Intensity of Use


retail + food

+

performance

entertainment casino

retail / food

active woodbine station

hotels

entertainment / hotel / plazas

more dense more intense

matured forest

young forest

easing b

iodiversit

y

the FRAMEWORK


microclimate PLANTS

mutual

PLANT SHADE/ MICROCLIMATE

23.5

w

mutual

microclimate

PLANT SHADE/ MICROCLIMATE

Diverse vegetation in forest creates a variety of microclimates available to forest organisms.

street

noise barrier

forest habitat

mutual

noise PLANT NOISE BARRIER/ SCREEN

tree

dense vegetation creates screen and noise barrier to protect forest habitat

fungi

PLANT -TO-FUNGI SYMBIOSIS

both the plant and the fungus depend on this relationship to develop and survive.

Buildings as Plants


BUILDINGS s

23.5 o

o

mutual

mutual

shad

e

office mutual offices

retail

pedestrian street

retail

plaza / community garden

BUILDING SHADE/ MICROCLIMATE

mutual offices

mutual

noise retail

pedestrian street

retail

plaza / community garden / etc

BUILDING NOISE BARRIER/SCREEN

BUILDING UNDERGROUND

the FRAMEWORK


FOOD

community garden

greenhouse/hydroponics

green roof

ENERGY

photovoltaic

geothermal heating & cooling

WATER

rainwater harvesting

URBAN HABITAT

green roof habitat

Ecological Niche

greenwall


farming

vertical farming

Like every other living organism, trees play a vital role in balancing and maintaining the forest ecosystem. A tree’s (Building) niche describes not only the environment where it lives and how it responds to the distribution of resources , but also how it interacts with biotic and abiotic factors in the environment.

the FRAMEWORK


Circulation


the FRAMEWORK


BUILDING TYPOLOGY MATRIX

STANDARD FORMS

Matrix


the Unique

the Unique

the Unique - Axons

the Unique - Sections

the Unique - Axons

the Unique - Sections

UNIQUE FORMS

the TYPOLOGY


6

m 4

D

8x

PRIMARY STREET

Street Scale

S

c

36

d

SECONDAR


d

8

RY STREET

m

x

g4r

THE ALLEY

the TYPOLOGY


4.

1

,90 8 a 0+ c m

16

2

one-block parcel

streets/alley

accessibility

Retail


ys

plaza

bldg frontage

y

the TYPOLOGY


4.

4

,00 5 a 0+ c m

18

2

one-block parcel

streets/alley

accessibility

Offices


ys

plaza

bldg frontage

y

the TYPOLOGY


retail + food r&d + offices

entertainment edu r&d + offices

passive

edu

garden/residential

Carpet Massing

Building Massing


+

performance

t casino

active woodbine station

hotels

Master Site Plan

the TYPOLOGY


Carpet Massing

Master Plan Axonometric


Master Site Plan

the TYPOLOGY


W o o d b i n e w i l l d e v e l o p i n t o a d i s t r i c t t h a t i s self-thriving a n surrounding ecology. Through the cultivation of sustainab efforts p r o m o t i n g communal synergy w i t h i n t h e d i s t r i c t w h entertainme

Woodbine Aerial


n d interconnected w i t h i n t h e G r e a t e r T o r o n t o A r e a a n d t h e b l e t e c h n i q u e s , W o o d b i n e w i l l b e t h e b e a c o n o f regenerative ile maintaining Woodbine’s horse racing legacy and ent values.

the RENDERS



urban forest_2017-02-15-DRAFT