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IG TALES

Issue 2 2013

The Official Publication of the Kansas Pork Industry

Doing All We “Can” The Power of a Name


PQA PLUS SITE STATUS REBATE PROGRAM The Kansas Pork Association and the National Pork Board are encouraging all producers to become PQA Plus certified and achieve PQA Plus Site Status. The purpose of this program is to encourage producers to be proactive in providing the best possible care for their animals and show commitment to the ethical principles of pork production as outlined in the We Care responsible pork initiative. Having a PQA Plus advisor review your operation can both improve the well-being and productivity of animals in your care by noting changes or additions that may not otherwise be noticed. The Kansas Pork Association is offering a $100 rebate to Kansas Pork Producers completing a PQA Plus Site Assesment. The funding is available on a first-come-first-serve basis. The following requirements and stipulations apply: • Producer must have all site status paperwork completed. • Rebate amount may not equal more than the total assessment cost. • Rebates available on a first-come, first-served basis only as funds are available. Please do not delay! Please contact Tim Stroda at kpa@kspork.org or (785) 776-0442 with questions or to see if funds are still available.

Please work with your PQA Plus advisor to complete the form below. Then, detach and mail to the address on the form.

Name of producer: ___________________________________________ Farm name: ________________________________________________ Organization (if contract grower): ________________________________ Mailing Address: _____________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Premise ID# or PQA Plus number ________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________________________ E-mail:______________________________________________________

Please return form and a copy of PQA Plus site assesment certificate to: Kansas Pork Assocition PQA Plus Rebate Program 2601 Farm Bureau Road Manhattan, KS 66502

FOR ADVISOR USE ONLY Date of assessment: ____/____/______ Total assessment cost: $__________ PQA Plus Advisor (Print) ______________________________ (signature) _____________________ PQA Plus Advisor phone: ____________________


Pig Tales

The Official Publication of the Kansas Pork Industry

Issue 2

President-CEO Tim Stroda tims@kspork.org Director of Industry Relations Jodi Oleen jodio@kspork.org Director of Communications Amanda Spoo amandas@kspork.org 2013 KPA Board of Directors Chairman: Michael Springer - Neodesha Jim Crane - Liberal Kevin Deniston - Scott City Daniel Gerety - Seneca Jerry Morris - Sedgwick Scott Pfortmiller - Stafford Jim Nelssen - Kansas State University Pig Tales is the official publication of the Kansas Pork Association. The publisher cannot guarantee the correctness of all information or absence of errors and omissions, nor be liable for content of advertisements. We reserve the right to edit or refuse all materials. KPA does not guarantee or endorse the performance of any products or services advertised within the publication. All Pig Tales inquires should be directed to: Kansas Pork Association 2601 Farm Bureau Road Manhattan, KS 66502 Phone: 785-776-0442 Fax: 785-776-9897 www.kspork.org

4 President’s Message 5 KPA Volunteer Calendar 6 Doing All We “Can” KPA celebrates Kansas Agriculture Day at the Capitol 8 Nutrition Without Boundaries KPA attends MINK 2013 9 The Power of a Name New naming system just in time for grilling season 10 See it, Stop it! Animal care starts with you 12 Industry Updates 14 Have an Event? KPA’s interactive finishing barn available for checkout

On The Cover

Grilling season is upon us! Why not try Grilled Ribeye Pork Chops with Easy Spicy BBQ Sauce? Find this great recipe on page 15. Check out porkbeinspired.com for more great pork recipes.

Pig Tales • 3


President’s Message Tim Stroda, President-CEO As I’m sure you’ve heard, we have another industry challenge in a swine disease that is new to the United States. Below is a statement from the National Pork Board. Veterinarians and researchers across the country are working to diagnose, confirm and track any patterns the disease has shown to help mitigate its effects. This is a very fluid situation. As I’m writing this, there has not been a confirmed case in Kansas, but there are confirmed cases in four surrounding states. That’s not good news. Until there is more information, the best advice I can find says to revisit your biosecurity plans with your employees. Please pay close attention to truck cleaning. As we get updated information, it will be posted on the News page of your website – kspork.org. National Pork Board Statement on Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV) The United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has been identified in the U.S. for the first time through testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory. This is not a new virus, nor is it a regulatory/reportable disease. Since PEDV is widespread in many countries, it is not a trade-restricting disease, but rather a production-related disease. PEDV may appear clinically to be the same as transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus with acute diarrhea. Producers will need to work with their herd veterinarian with if any TGE-like symptoms appear and as always, maintain strict biosecurity protocols.

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Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a virus similar to transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE), another disease only affecting pigs. It is not zoonotic, so therefore it poses no risk to other animals or humans. Also, it poses no risk to food safety.

PEDV has been identified in the U.S. in a small number of herds. The virus is not a new virus as it was first recognized in England in 1971. Since then, the disease has been identified in a number of European countries, and more recently in China, Korea and Japan.

USDA, State Animal Health Officials, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians and veterinarians at the National Pork Board are actively monitoring this disease and will make recommendations to producers as necessary.

PEDV is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and may appear to be the same as transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus with acute diarrhea within 12 to 36 hours of onset. Herd veterinarians remain well versed in managing TGE-like diseases.

Laboratory testing is the only way to diagnose PEDV.

As always, producers who see any signs of illness in their pigs should notify their herd veterinarian immediately to address the issue.

PEDV does not affect pork safety. Pork remains completely safe to eat.

Pig Tales


We Care

KPA Volunteer Calendar Looking for something fun to do with the kids this summer? Or maybe you just love pork, people and volunteering? We have just the job for you! Your association participates in 1—2 events per month, reaching hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of Kansans. The goals with these events are two-fold. First and foremost, KPA is working to promote the pork you produce by providing educational resources for cooking, recipes and coupons to Kansas grocery shoppers. Secondly, KPA is building on relationships within our communities. This relationship building will help us maintain our freedom to operate and show local community members how valuable your farm is to your community. Want to volunteer? Contact Jodi Oleen at at 785-776-0442 or jodio@kspork.org for more information.

June

July

June 25 Independence Blood Drive Local volunteers needed to visit with donors and hand out pork sandwiches. This serves as a way for farmers in the area to say thank you to those in the community who give blood.

July 13 Tractor Days Ag Hall of Fame Volunteers needed to visit with families about how pigs are raised at booth with model barn.

Time commitment: 2-3 hours plus travel to/from event

July 24 Dodge City Blood Drive Local volunteers needed to visit with donors and hand out pork sandwiches. This serves as a way for farmers in the area to say thank you to those in the community who give blood.

Time commitment: 4 hours plus travel to/from event

Time commitment: 2-3 hours plus travel to/from event

August

September

August 5 — 6 Hutchinson Blood Drive Local volunteers needed to visit with donors and hand out pork sandwiches. This serves as a way for farmers in the area to say thank you to those in the community who give blood.

September 14 KSU vs University of Massachusetts Football promotion at Bill Snyder Family Stadium, handing out samples before the game from the We Care trailer provided by the National Pork Board. Each volunteer will receive free tickets to the game.

Time commitment: 2-3 hours plus travel to/from event

Time commitment: 4-5 hours plus travel to/from event

Stay Connected with Us https://www.facebook.com/KansasPork

http://www.youtube.com/user/KansasPork https://twitter.com/KansasPork Pig Tales • 5


Inspiring Consumers

Doing All We “Can” The Kansas Pork Association celebrates Kansas Agriculture Day at the Capitol By Amanda Spoo

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COURTESY OF KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

he state of Kansas celebrated its largest industry during Kansas Agriculture Week, March 12 — 19, as declared by Kansas Governor Sam Brownback. “From the food we feed our families, to the clothes that keep us warm and the renewable energy that helps power our state, Kansans are affected by agriculture 365 days a year,” Brownback says. “Celebrating Kansas Agriculture Week gives us an opportunity to reconnect with and learn more about today’s agricultural sector and to thank the farmers and ranchers who serve our state.” The Kansas Pork Association joined in the celebration and was a sponsor for events that took place on March 19, for Kansas Agriculture Day in Topeka, which was held in conjunction with National Agriculture Day. The Neighbor to Neighbor statewide food drive was held in the weeks leading up to Kansas Ag Day, beginning on February 18, hosted by the Kansas Department of Agriculture, Dillon’s Food Stores, Harvestors – The Community Food Network, the Kansas Food Bank, the Second Harvest Community Food Bank and the Kansas agricultural community. At the conclusion of the drive on Kansas Ag Day, Secretary of Agriculture Dale Rodman announced that 58,000 meals were raised statewide. He was joined by leaders in the Kansas agricultural community to conclude the drive by participating in a “BackSack” program volunteer project, which provides backpacks of food to low-income children for the weekend. The group packed 400 backpacks for local children. Kansas Ag Day celebrations continued on March 19 at the capitol building, with a panel on a “Dialogue on Kansas Agriculture” that featured leaders in the agricultural industry to discuss current topics on nutrition, animal care, food safety, environmental stewardship, education, technology and the economy. Following the panel, attendants enjoyed a Kansas Ag Day Reception and heard remarks from Governor Brownback and Secretary Rodman. “The Kansas Pork Association was proud to be a sponsor for the Ag Day event. By working with the Department of Agriculture and other agricultural organizations, we can multiply the efforts of Kansas farmers to help our neighbors and remind our communities how important agriculture is to the state,” says Tim Stroda, KPA President-CEO. 6

Pig Tales


Inspiring Consumers KPA Hosts Food Drive in Manhattan In support of the Neighbor to Neighbor statewide food drive, KPA worked with KDA and Dillon’s Food Stores to organize a local food drive on March 16, 2013 at the Dillon’s Westloop location in Manhattan. Each person that donated three or more items to the food drive received a $5 — off fresh pork coupon. Overall, 150 coupons were handed out and the drive filled the food bin and a grocery cart with food items for donation. KPA staff was joined by DJ Rezac and Nicole Allen student volunteers from Food For Thought, a Volunteers Nicole Allen and DJ Rezac are joined by a student organization at Kansas State University. Made Dillon’s employee [center] at the food drive. up of undergraduate, graduate, veterinary students and young alumni, Food For Thought is a grass-roots organization that strives to bridge the gap between consumers and agriculture. The group was also a participant in the Pork Checkoff ’s Operation Main Street media training program in 2011. For more information on Food For Thought, check out their blog at bloggingfoodforthought.blogspot.com and find them on Facebook and Twitter (@fftgroup.)

Pig Tales • 7


Inspiring Consumers

Nutrition Without Boundaries KPA attends 2013 MINK conference

Attendees of the 2013 MINK conference represented dietetic associations from Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and Kansas.

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Pig Tales

Kansas Pork Association was a sponsor of the Foundation and Networking evening event.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAUN CLOUD

I

n today’s rapidly changing environment, many dieticians and health professionals question how to stay ahead of those changes in order to do their jobs. The 2013 MINK Conference, attended by more than 500 members of the Missouri Dietetic Association, the Iowa Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Nebraska Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Kansas Dietetic Association, provided training and networking opportunities to develop skills in communication, collaboration and innovation in nutrition and health practices. The program theme, “Nutrition Without Boundaries,” reflected on a scope of those opportunities. The Kansas Pork Association attended the conference held April 4-6, 2013 in Overland Park, as a booth exhibitor and event sponsor. Attendees were provided with updated materials from National Pork Board, toured the model hog finishing barn and played trivia games for prizes. As a sponsor of the Foundation and Networking evening event, activities included a “Flip the Chop and Win” game, hors d’oeuvres, raffle ticket prizes and continued networking. KPA was able to direct much of its conversation toward focusing on the new sustainability information graphic on hog farming, also featured here on this page. KPA directed its conversation toward information and educational resources on sustainability in hog farming, utilizing new graphics from the Pork Check off. “The barn was a starting point to open conversations and show how pigs live when farmers use barns to care for them,” says Jodi Oleen, Director of Industry Relations. “We know that it is families that own and operate the farms, but many of our customers do not. After a quick look Attendees of the 2013 MINK confrence participated in “Flip the Chop and Win.” into the barn, many participants had questions. There were many great conversations that were prompted by the barn. Many in attendance had misperceptions about today’s agriculture.”


Inspiring Consumers

The Power of a Name New naming system just in time for grilling season

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his summer, as we visit the meat case to stock up for grilling season, things might be looking a bit different. After two years of research by the National Pork Board, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and other meat industry partners, a new naming system for pork and beef cuts has been developed to make it easier for consumers to understand what they are buying and how to cook it. The new system, approved and supported by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service is a voluntary program that implements new simplified names for 14 cuts of pork, many that align with consumer-friendly beef cut names. These changes provide the opportunity to redefine how pork is marketed and reshape how consumers shop for pork. The recommendation for labeling does not suggest removing the old names, but instead encourages an update that includes both the new and old, as well as an added line that offers tips for the cut’s best preparation method. The new pork names go with a shift in how pork is cooked, says Traci Rodemeyer, director of pork information with the National Pork Board in Des Moines. Because trichinosis is no longer a problem in U.S. hogs, in 2011 the Department of Agriculture changed the recommended cooking temperature for pork from 160 degrees to 145. Once pork could be pink, a pork chop could be cooked just like a steak. How to Cook Pork PERFECTLY “Porterhouse steak and a Porterhouse chop Cook to Internal Average Recommended Temperature Thickness/ Cooking Time Method Cut Pork’s Most Cuts are very similar in howPopular they cook. Ribeye is Weight a high-quality beef cut, so Ribeye will mean that for pork consumers as well. The top loin is now theNew NewNam Yorkes chop,” Rodemeyer for says. to Look case inRoast;the Meat Shoulder Steak; Shoulder Shoulder Tenderloin (Roast at 425°F)

2 - 5 Ibs.

(minutes per Ib. OR total minutes)

145°F

2 Ibs. roast = 20 minutes (per Ib.) 3½ - 5Ibs. roast = 15 minutes (per Ib.) 20 - 27 minutes (total)

½ - 1½ Ibs.

145°F

Loin Back Ribs

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

Spareribs/ St. Louis-Style Ribs

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

½ - 1½ Ibs.

145°F

20 minutes (total)

Broiling 4-5 inches from heat

Tenderloin

Porterhouse, New York and Ribeye Chops; thin

¾ inch

145°F

8 - 9 minutes (total)

OR

Porterhouse, New York and Ribeye Chops; thick

1½ inch

145°F

12 - 16 minutes (total)

Grilling Over direct, medium heat; turn once halfway through grilling.

Barbecuing Over indirect medium heat (285°F).

Sautéing Add a little cooking oil to a pan; sauté over medium-high heat and turn once halfway through cooking time.

Shoulder Steak

½ - ¾ inch

145°F

20 minutes (total)

1½ inch

145°F

12 - 16 minutes (total)

Loin Country-Style Ribs; bone-in and boneless

1½ inch

145°F

12 - 16 minutes (total)

145°F

2 Ibs. roast = 20 minutes (per Ib.) 3½ - 5Ibs. roast = 15 minutes (per Ib.)

New York Roast; bone-in and boneless

2 - 5 Ibs.

Shoulder Roast; bone-in

3-6 Ibs.

Tender

45 minutes (per Ib.)

Loin Back Ribs

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

Spareribs

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

New York Chop; thin

¾ inch

145°F

8 minutes (total)

Ribeye Chop; thin

¾ inch

145°F

8 minutes (total) 6 - 8 minutes (total)

½ - ¾ inch

145°F

Shoulder Roast; bone-in

3-6 Ibs.

Tender

2 - 2½ hours (total)

Loin Back Ribs

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

------

Tender

1½ - 2 hours (total)

½ - ¾ inch

145°F

20 minutes (total)

Spareribs/ St. Louis-Style Ribs Shoulder Steak

bone-in

Country-Style Ribs; bone-in

Loin Chop Bone-In

Shoulder Country-Style Ribs

Sirloin Chop; bone-in and boneless Braising Cook, covered, with a liquid at a simmer; turn once halfway through cooking time.

bone-in

Rib Chop, Bone-In

New York Chop

Porterhouse Chop

Porterhouse Chop

Ribeye Chop, Bone-In

Sirloin Chop; boneless

Ribeye Chop

Rib Chop, Boneless

Ribeye Chop

LOIN

Roasting Roast at 350°F, unless otherwise noted. Roast in a shallow pan, uncovered.

followed by 3-minute rest

SHOULDER

New York Roast; bone-in and boneless

Loin Back Ribs

Loin Country-Style Ribs; Loin Country Style Ribs; boneless Topbone-in Loin Chop, Boneless New York Chop

Sirloin Chop, Boneless

New York Roast

Sirloin Chop

Tenderloin

©2013 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA This message funded by America’s Pork Producers and the Pork Checkoff.

©2013 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Checkoff Program.

For recipe ideas visit: www.PorkBeInspired.com

http://www.meattrack.com 0313

145°F Medium Rare............................................ Warm, Pink Center 150°- 155°F Medium..........................................Warm, Slightly Pink Center 155°- 160°F Medium Well..................................Hot, White Center 160°F + Well-Done.............................................. Hot, Tough and Dry

For more information visit:

SIDE

Temperature/Color Guide

http://www.porkretail.org St. Louis-Style Ribs

Spareribs

Pig Tales • 9


Inspiring Consumers

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Press release and graphics originally shared on www.SeeItStopIt.org

he Center for Food Integrity and the U.S. pork and dairy industries have launched ‘See It? Stop It!SM Animal care starts with you.’ a proactive demonstration of agriculture’s commitment to farm animal care. The initiative empowers, and in fact, demands that if signs of animal abuse, neglect, mishandling or harm are witnessed, anyone working on a farm or in a farm setting has an obligation to report it immediately. Though it is uncommon, when animal abuse, neglect, harm or mistreatment takes place, it is essential to give animal care providers resources to swiftly report what they witness. The ‘See It? Stop It!’ initiative provides several options to enable employees to speak up to stop animal abuse. Ultimately, empowering animal caretakers and giving them responsibility to report animal abuse immediately will help assure the best care for animals. “As the nation’s oldest animal protection organization, the American Humane Association (AHA) has a long history of involvement with programs that help assure The See it? Stop it! initiative is facilitated by proper animal care,” said Kathi Brock, National Director of the Farm Animal Program for AHA. “It is critical for farm management to set clear expectations The Center for Food Integrity, with funding for animal care and to have zero tolerance for animal mistreatment. We believe ‘See It? Stop It!’ provides the provided the pork andand dairy industries. tools toby help setU.S. those expectations a mechanism for reporting abuse which supports the proper care of America’s farm animals.” The initiative demonstrates to the public that farmers are committed to good animal care and calls on anyone who witnesses abuse to stop it immediately. This includes those who are on farms to videotape animal production activities. Stopping and reporting abuse quickly is the right thing to do for animals, and it demonstrates that those involved in livestock production understand their obligation to provide sound animal care. Demonstrating this commitment is important to maintaining public trust in today’s animal agriculture. “Those in agriculture are understandably frustrated by undercover videos. The actions of a few captured on video can taint public perception of the entire livestock community,” said Roxi Beck of the Center for Food Integrity. “Taking action to stop abuse demonstrates a genuine commitment to do what’s right for the animals on farms.” It is the duty of farm leaders to convey the level of commitment they have to responsible animal care, while

RAISE AWARENESS

EMPOWER EMPLOYEES TAKE ACTION

10 • Pig Tales

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and will not be tolerated. The See it? Stop it! initiative operates • Proper animal care is the responsibility of every individual who Inspiring Consumers is around with theanimals. following values:

Highlights the integrity of the farm’s philosophies on responsible animal care who work with or around animals to immediately report any signs of animal abuse, empowering employees

See neglect, it? Stop it!: harm or mistreatment.

• • Individuals working with or around animals have an obligation Animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling are unacceptable to reportfarmers any signstoofsupply deliberate animal “We depend on more than 11,000 independent livestock poultry us and weabuse, believe they andimmediately willand not be tolerated. Helps staff understand their important role in share our commitment to proper animal treatment,” said Dean Danilson, Vice President of Animal harm, neglect or mishandling to a supervisor or Well-Being other animal protection Proper animal care is the responsibility of every individual who Highlights the integrity the farm’s philosophies Programs for TysonofFoods. “Initiatives like ‘See it? • Stop it!’ andresponsible our own for FarmCheck™ auditcare. program individual enforcement ofon-farm proper animal is around animals. are additional wayscare we can assure our customers and consumers we’re producing food responsibly. In fact, on responsible animal • Thorough, ongoing and consistent employee training and rereporting animal mistreatment is one of the key elements of FarmCheck™.” Provides clear direction on how to report instances • training Individuals working with or around animals have an obligation are critical to responsible animal care and area necessary Both the U.S. pork and dairy industries have provided funding for the initiative and feel it is great way to to immediately report any signs of deliberate animal abuse, of animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling Helpsexpand staff understand their important role in components of a comprehensive animal care program. upon their already strong animal care programs. harm, neglect or mishandling to a supervisor or other animal“The protection Pork Quality Assurance® (PQA Plus® program outlines best practices for proper animal care,” individual responsible for enforcement of proper animal care.said Sherrie Niekamp, director of • Thorough, ongoing and consistent employee training and reanimal welfare for the Provides clear direction on hNational ow to report instances training critical to responsible animal care are necessaryby Pork Board. “The ‘See it? Stop It!’ The Seeareit? Stop it! initiative isand facilitated of animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling components of a How comprehensive animal care program. initiative meshes well with the core to implement the See it?

EMPLOYERS HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO: The Center for Food Integrity, with funding principles of PQA Plus that pork

it! initiative yourindustries. farm: provided by Stop the U.S. pork andon dairy producers haveand followed for the moreimportance of proper and • Provide education promote than 20 years.” The See it? Stop it! initiative highlights responsible animal care. SM

EMPLOYERS HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO: RAISE AWARENESS

• • • • • •

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“This initiative confirms the your level ofsaid commitment to animal commitment of every farm owner and manager to do what’s right for animals,” Dallas Hockman, How to implement the Seevice it? Encourage and enable employees to immediately report any signs of well-being. Your participation in this president of governmental regulations for the National Pork Producers Council. “‘See it? Stop it!’ expands upon Stop it! initiative on your‘We farm: animal harm,‘We neglect or program, mishandling. theabuse, industry’s Care’ which is grounded by ethical principles and well-being practices. Care’ initiative, combined with industryProvide education and promote the importance of proper and helps further establish a culture that ensures proper animal care.” The See it? Stop it! initiative highlights certification or animal care stated, responsible animal care. Provide accessible and reliable contacts that Health have immediate Betsy Flores, Senior Director, Animal and Welfare, for thespecific National Milk Producers Federation level commitment to animal programs, helps you maintain food “Care animals could be more important to farmers. Having a your system in of place to contact any of several authority toof address reports of not animal care concerns. Encourage and enable employees to immediately report any signs of authorities is imperative and ‘See it? Stop it!’ provides that resource. well-being. Your participation in this This initiative combines well with the dairy safety and demonstrates to consumers animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling. industry’s National Dairy FARM Program: Farmers Assuring Responsible ManagementTM to ensure the wellTake swift action to correct all instances of inappropriate animal care. initiative, combined with industryyour commitment to animal care and being of animals in our care.” certification care the well-being. Additional the program, an employerspecific checklist, guidance or foranimal integrating Provide accessible information and reliable about contacts that have including immediate Ensure employees who raise concerns in good faith are not penalized. program into existing programs, posters for use inprograms, barns andhelps guidance on employee you maintain foodtraining is authority to address reports ofanimal animalwell-being care concerns. available at www.SeeItStopIt.org.

EMPOWER EMPLOYEES TAKE ACTION

safety and demonstrates to consumers • Take swift action to correct all instances of inappropriate animal care. your commitment to animal care and well-being. • Ensure employees who raise concerns in good faith are not penalized. Visit www.SeeItStopIt.org to access materials to help you implement the initiative on your farm, including:

rticipation in the See it? Stop it! initiative. No list of participating farms will be published for the public, rs are encouraged to promote their participation and advocate for others to join the initiative.

Employer Checklist – provides you with guidance on how to raise awareness, empower employees and take action, if necessary. Employee Agreement – ensures employees understand their role in maintaining initiative outcomes. Visual Aids – help employees understand how the initiative serves as an extension of your animal care goals and commitments, and

ist – provides you with guidance on how to raise awareness, empower employees and take action, if necessary. ent – ensures employees understand their role in maintaining initiative outcomes. employees understand how the initiative serves as an extension of your animal care goals and commitments, and n on how to report instances of animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling.

provide information on how to report instances of animal abuse, harm, neglect or mishandling.

opIt.org to access materials to help you implement the initiative on your farm, including:

There is no fee for participation in the See it? Stop it! initiative. No list of participating farms will be published for the public, but farmers are encouraged to promote their participation and advocate for others to join the initiative.

Pig Tales • 11

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Inspiring Consumers

Groups Want ‘Comprehensive’ FTA with EU

Industry Updates

A coalition of U.S. food and agricultural organizations led by the National Pork Producers Council is urging the Obama administration to press the European Union From National Pork Producers Council to negotiate a “comprehensive” free trade agreement, including addressing sanitary-phytosanitary (SPS) barriers to trade. In a letter signed by 47 organizations sent to U.S. Trade Representative nominee Mike Froman, the coalition expressed concern with a resolution approved U.S. Agriculture Benefits from Japan in last month by the European Parliament that in TPP Talks negotiating the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Increased pork exports resulting from a TransPartnership (TTIP) with the United States the EU Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement would create should maintain the “precautionary principle” for SPS more than 20,000 direct and indirect U.S. pork-related issues. Precautionary measures are implemented based jobs, with the vast majority generated by Japan alone, on the mere identification of potential risk or, worse, on said the National Pork Producers Council at a press public perception and political considerations rather than conference held April 15, 2013. on science-based risk assessments. The World Trade The TPP is a regional trade negotiation that Organization requires member countries’ SPS measures includes the United States, Australia, Brunei to be based on scientific risk assessments. Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New “Precaution in the EU has become a pretext for import Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which account protectionism under the pretense of consumer safety,” for a combined 30 percent of global GDP. Japan wrote the coalition in its letter. “Such non-science-based already has free trade agreements with seven of the 11 measures have become the most challenging barrier to TPP countries: Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, U.S. food and agricultural exports to the EU.” Singapore and Vietnam. The Obama administration Examples include certain restrictions on production agreed to accept Japan into the trade negotiations. methods that negatively affect exports of U.S. meat, “Increasing pork exports are important to many poultry and dairy products; discriminatory and more Americans than just pork producers,” says NPPC trade-restricting product labeling requirements; and Vice President and International Trade Counsel Nick regulatory barriers to biotechnology that restrict U.S. Giordano, who pointed out that more than 110,000 corn, soy and processed corn and soy product exports. U.S. jobs are generated by U.S. pork exports. “We The coalition said SPS issues must be addressed as expect having Japan join the TPP will likewise provide part of the negotiations, not simply left to some future increased market opportunities and more jobs for us.” consultative mechanism as some EU parliamentarians Japan’s economy is second only to China’s in the have suggested. Additionally, SPS provisions region, and it is the fourth largest U.S. agricultural negotiated under the TTIP must be enforceable. export market overall. U.S. food and agricultural If certain sectors or measures are excluded from exports to Japan in 2012 totaled $13.5 billion. Japan is the TTIP, said the coalition, or placed into a “future the top value export market for U.S. pork, accounting negotiation” category, the agreement likely will fail to for almost $2 billion in 2012 sales. win the support of the food and agricultural sector. NPPC was joined at the press conference by The coalition reiterated its call for the the American Farm Bureau Federation, Cargill administration to use the Trans-Pacific Partnership Incorporated, the National Milk Producers Federation, negotiations and other recent U.S. free trade the National Potato Council and the U.S. Dairy agreements as models for talks on the TTIP. Export Council. Last week, those groups and more Released May 20, 2013; National Pork Producers Council than 70 other food and agricultural organizations sent a letter to President Obama, urging the administration to welcome Japan into the TPP talks. Released April 15, 2013; National Pork Producers Council

12 • Pig Tales


Inspiring Consumers This new program will support food manufacturers, cattle operations, dairies, hog and poultry farms and The Food Manufacturers Immigration Coalition other year-round agricultural employers. praised the introduction of legislation that would assist “An effective occupational visa system may be the in establishing a stable workforce that can help sustain most important barrier to illegal immigration,” the the rural communities where farmers, ranchers and coalition says. “The right visa system with the right food manufacturers grow and process the nation’s and screening tools will in effect be a ‘virtual border.’ The world’s food supply. ‘Agricultural Guestworker Act’ and the creation of the The “Agricultural Guestworker Act,” introduced H-2C program would serve the diverse interests of the by House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., agriculture and food manufacturing industries and will replaces the impractical H-2A program with a sensible boost the modern agriculture labor market.” guestworker program. The new program, known as Since not all agriculture jobs are the same or H-2C, modernizes and streamlines the agricultural require the same level of skill and experience, the guestworker program and would be administered by the H-2C program would give employers the opportunity U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the federal to invest their time in training workers for jobs by agency that understands the unique needs of America’s allowing them an initial stay of 36 months. Workers food manufacturers and farm and ranch operations. would then be required to leave for up to three months. The existing temporary programs for general labor After the period of leave, each H-2C visa holder skilled workers are for seasonal labor only. Under the would only be required to leave once every 18 months. “Agricultural Guestworker Act,” the H-2C program This would provide farm labor stability and would would offer workers and employers more choices encourage illegal farm workers to identify themselves in their employment arrangements, creating more and participate in the H-2C program. flexibility and making it easier for workers to move Released April 26, 2013; National Pork Producers Council freely throughout the marketplace to meet demands.

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Have an event?

KPA’s interactive finishing barn is a tool that is available to checkout for events to help viewers engage in hands-on learning. These events include, but are not limited to, school visits, open houses, OMS presentations and county fair or meetings. The display, which can be used for any age audience, includes the barn, signage, educational materials and talking points for those sharing the the barn with the public. The barn is complete with an office, visible pens, a nipple waterer, a working curtain and features messaging about modern barns. KPA encourages individuals interested in using the barn display to schedule their requests with Jodi at jodio@kspork.org or call 785-776-0042.

Public Notice

By the Kansas Pork Association and the National Pork Board

The election of pork producer delegate candidates for the 2014 National Pork Producers (Pork Act) Delegate Body will take place at 1:00 p.m., Monday, July 8, 2013, in conjunction with an Executive Board meeting of the Kansas Pork Association at the IGP Executive Conference Center, 1980 Kimball Avenue, Manhattan, KS 66506. All Kansas pork producers are invited to attend. Any producer, age 18 or older, who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted. For more information, contact Kansas Pork Association, 2601 Farm Bureau Road, Manhattan, KS, telephone 785/776-0442.

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14 • Pig Tales


Inspiring Consumers

Grilled Ribeye Pork Chops with Easy Spicy BBQ Sauce

Prep Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 30 minutes Ingredients 4 ribeye (rib) pork chop, about 1-inch thick salt and pepper, to taste olive oil, for brushing grill grate Chive Mashed Potatoes: 3 russet potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1-inch cubes 2 tablespoons chives, chopped 3 tablespoons heavy cream Spicy BBQ Sauce: 1 teaspoon olive oil 1/2 yellow onion, chopped 1/4 cup ketchup 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Preheat the grill over medium high heat and brush with olive oil. Season the chops with a generous amount of salt and pepper on both sides. Place pork on the grill for 8-9 minutes, turning once halfway through, until cooked to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F. Remove pork from the grill, tent it with foil; let it rest for 3 minutes. Add potatoes to a pot with water, over high heat and boil for 15 minutes. Drain the water and add the heavy cream. Mash the potatoes until smooth. Stir in the chopped chives, salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a pot over medium heat. Sauté the onion until soft and add ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire, vinegar, and cayenne. Simmer for 15 minutes so the sauce thickens and turn off heat. Once cooled, puree the sauce in a blender. Serve the chops alongside the potatoes and a spoonful of BBQ sauce. *Oil is not included in the nutritional value since it’s for brushing the grill, vs. the chops Yield: 4 servings

Pig Tales • 15


PIG TALES

The Official Publication of the Kansas Pork Industry

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Support the Association by becoming a member or advertising in Pig Tales!

Become a member today! Visit our web site, www.kpa.org or call the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 to get a membership or industry partner form. For advertising rates, sizes and deadlines, please contact the KPA office at (785) 776-0442 or e-mail kpa@kspork.org.

Pig Tales Issue 2 2013  

Pig Tales is the official publication of the Kansas pork industry. The magazine is published and managed by the Kansas Pork Association.

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