Page 1

OUTDOORS 2017

HUNTING DOGS Kansas Trains the Best

Your Guide to Kansas + Cycling + Hiking + Disc Golf + and all outdoor adventures

KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE, PARKS AND TOURISM


KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Arkansas River National Water Trail

F R O M

T H E

S E C R E T A R Y

R E S I LI E N CY ON TH E KAN SAS PRAI R I E

D

escribing Kansas, its citizens, the land and the wildlife, with one word is possible, but it took considerable thought. Kansans are tough, hardworking, friendly, resourceful, independent, stubborn and loyal. Our land is fertile, productive, unforgiving, beautiful, and accommodating. The wildlife and natural resources are abundant, unique, persistent, vulnerable, hardy, and resilient; that’s the word: RESILIENT. All the words mentioned above are accurate, but if I had to boil it down to one word for everything Kansas, it would be resilient. And this year is a perfect example of that. As I write this, we are heading into the 2016 fall hunting seasons, and the forecast is very good. Three years of severe drought destroyed habitat and impacted many wildlife

populations. The drought also made life difficult for farmers, ranchers and their livestock. But we endured. The drought broke in some parts of the state in 2014, rains returned across a large portion of the state in 2015, and last year we saw amazing habitat recovery in many areas. With ample precipitation, habitat conditions, especially for upland bird nesting and brood-rearing, was excellent last spring and summer. Quail and pheasants responded, as well as other wildlife, and we’re anticipating much improved hunting this fall and winter. That’s life on the prairie. Native Americans and our ancestors enjoyed times of amazing bounty and survived grueling conditions – drought, prairie fires, tornados, and blizzards. Those who toughed out the hard times have always been

rewarded when our resilient state came back stronger than ever. For farmers, hunters, anglers – anyone who works and plays outdoors in Kansas – I think optimism goes hand in hand with resilience. I don’t know whether it’s genetic or learned, but I know it’s necessary. It gets easier for those of us who’ve been here for a few decades and experienced the ups and downs. The ups are always worth it. Enjoying the outdoors in Kansas has never been easier or better than it is today. We have fantastic turkey, deer, pheasant quail and waterfowl hunting, and we’ve tripled the amount of land open to hunting with the Walk-In Hunting Access program. Anglers chase walleye, wipers, white bass, largemouth and smallmouth bass, and the slab-sized

crappie found in Kansas reservoirs are legendary. Our state parks are better than ever, offering hiking, biking, horse trails, a long list of special events each summer, and more than 120 rental cabins, which are hugely popular. Thanks to the department’s dedicated staff and the staunch support of Kansas citizens, the quality and diversity of today’s outdoor recreation opportunities are unprecedented. And that diversity does more than keep outdoor enthusiasts busy – it smooths out the ups and downs. Whatever the conditions, there’s always something going on in the Kansas outdoors. I’m proud to be a Kansan and proud of our resilience. I’m also looking forward to enjoying time outdoors this year.

—ROBIN JENNISON

PHOTOGRAPH Deborah Walker

4


6

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

C O N T E N T S

CYCLING

12

BOATING

14

FISHING

17

WILDFLOWERS

18

HUNTING

20 HIKING

22

A two-wheel

Options for

A land-locked

Discover the

An overview of

Stroll through the

Options for natural

state with

families and

state, but with

natural power of

game, locations

woodlands, climbs

getaways across

plenty of paths

sport enthusiasts

lakes of potential

prairie flowers

and seasons

and expanses

the state

P H O T O G R A P H B Y Deborah Walker

10

STATE PARKS

Arkansas River National Water Trail

28

FINDING BEAUTY ON THE

36

THE MAKING OF A

42

WILDLIFE RESCUE

44

ARKANSAS RIVER

HUNTING DOG

A network of experts and

America’s disc golf

A photographer explores the state’s

Kansas breeder-trainers work to

dedicated volunteers steps

hotbed? Right here in

newest addition to the National

provide companions essential to

in when—but only if—outdoor

Kansas.

Water Trails System.

any successful hunt

creatures require care.

DISC IN THE WIND


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Sam Brownback Governor

Robin Jennison

KDWPT Secretary

Linda Craghead

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Keith Sexson

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Todd Workman

KDWPT Assistant Secretary

Andrea Etzel Editor

SUNFLOWERPUB.COM / LAWRENCE, KANSAS

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Nathan Pettengill Editor

Shelly Bryant

Designer/Art Director

Joanne Morgan Advertising Sales

Katy Ibsen

General Manager

MCAPRINT.COM / WICHITA, KANSAS

PRINTER

Cheryl Wells

Account Executive Kansas Outdoors is published by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS, 66612, (785) 296-3479 TTY Hearing Impaired: (785) 296-3487. Periodical postage paid at Topeka, KS,  and at additional mailing offices. Please address publication inquiries to: Toll-free: (800) 678-6424 Kansas Outdoors, 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS, 66612 Website: ksoutdoors.com

OUTDOORS 2017

ON THE COVER

Your Guide to Kansas + Cycling + Hiking + Disc Golf + and all outdoor adventures

HUNTING DOGS

KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE, PARKS AND TOURISM

Kansas Trains the Best

Stormy, a German shorthaired pointer, trains at a field near Concordia. Photograph by Larry Harwood

Please mail all editorial inquiries to: Kansas Outdoors, 1020 S. Kansas Ave., Suite 200, Topeka, KS 66612 e-mail: ksmagazine@sunflowerpub.com The articles and photographs that appear in Kansas Outdoors may not be broadcast, published or otherwise reproduced without the express written consent of Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism or the appropriate copyright owner. Unauthorized use is prohibited. Additional restrictions may apply.

7


Come PLAYwith us in Marion County

Fishing and boating Hunting and hiking Camping and picnicking Marion County Economic Development www.growmarioncounty.com | 620-382-8830

Share Our Sky of Wonder!

• Cedar Bluff State Park, Reservoir & Wildlife Area • Smoky Valley Scenic Byway • Halfway between Kansas City & Denver on 70 WaKeeney Travel & Tourism

877-962-7248 | www.WaKeeney.org Maryl Gottschalk


TravelKS.com

WR ITTE N BY

PH OTOG RAPHY BY

Toni Dixon

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism

THE OUTDOORS IN KANSAS

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Kansas is committed to providing residents and visitors genuine and accessible encounters with the outdoors. The Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism believes strongly that some of our state’s greatest riches are the land and our opportunity to appreciate and enjoy exploring it. The opening section of this publication is dedicated to some of the core aspects of enjoying natural Kansas. You can find more information on each of these activities as well as directions and contact listings at the department’s website, ksoutdoors.com. But right now, we invite you to enjoy exploring Kansas through these pages, to check in on some of your favorite activities and consider trying a few new experiences. Let us know what we can do to assist. We’re eager to help you start your next big Kansas adventure!

C Y C L I N G / B O AT I N G / F I S H I N G / W I L D F L O W E R S / H U N T I N G / H I K I N G / S TAT E PA R K S

9


10

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Rural Douglas County


TravelKS.com

C

ycling in Kansas, for competitive and recreational riders, comes with scenic vistas, a little history and lots of sky. All state parks and many wildlife areas and fishing lakes have hiking trails available for cyclists. There is a growing list of rail-to-trail projects for recreation and an extensive network of trails for mountain bikes. A good introduction is the Landon Nature Trail, a 38-mile pathway on the former MissouriPacific Railroad linking Topeka’s Shunga Trail to Lomax Junction and the Flint Hills Nature Trail east of Pomona Lake. Undergoing development as a trail and wildlife area for non-motorized use, it offers a range of scenery—from wetlands to waterfalls—as well as wildlife encounters and connections to historic landmarks. The trail will be the only recreational trail in America to link the Oregon National Historic Trail with the Santa Fe National Historic Trail.

Another rail-to-trail project is the Blue River Rail Trail in Marysville, which connects to the Chief Standing Bear Trail in Nebraska, on what will eventually be a 68-mile rail-to-trail project from Marysville to Lincoln. The trail is, in part, a tribute to the journey that a Ponca leader took with some of his people, leaving Indian Territory in Oklahoma to bury his son in his people’s homeland in what is now northern Nebraska. In 2012, the International Mountain Bicycling Association designated the Switchgrass Mountain Bike Trail at Wilson State Park as an “Epic” award. This means that the popular, 20-plus mile trail that was originally created by volunteers and the Kansas Trail Council is one of some 55 trails worldwide that meets the organization’s standards for a range of accessible and demanding mountain bike trail features. Read more about this and other mountain bike trails on the ksoutdoors.com website.

For mountain bike enthusiasts, Eisenhower State Park trails take riders from rocky ravines to forests all within a 30-mile route. The Cimarron National Grasslands Trails, in the southwest corner of the state, include the 19-mile Santa Fe Companion Trail and the 10.5-mile Turkey Trail. Winfield City Lake has 4.5 miles of mountain bike trails in the scenic Flint Hills. A 7-mile trail circles the Lake Scott State Park, taking riders through a landscape that is startling woodland oasis on the prairie, a natural canyon where Native Americans, including a group of Pueblo, settled. For history buffs, the trail can be combined with a visit to the El Cuartelejo Pueblo ruins, just off the mountain bike loop. For cyclists with a more competitive spirit, check out the gravel grinding Dirty Kanza 200 in Emporia, Tour of Lawrence street races and Sunflower State Games at Perry State Park.

KANSAS OUTDOORS

HORSE AND BIKE SENSE Good trail etiquette and common sense are required when cyclists, hikers and equestrians share a trail. Experienced bikers are used to yielding the trail, but passing by a horse and rider requires particular care. Call out to the riders with your voice—a bell could startle a horse—and give the horse and rider as much room as possible.

RESOURCES Learn more about the networks of Kansas cycling trails, from rails-to-trails paths to challenging mountain bike excursions, online at kansascyclist.com/trails. For more on the history of Chief Standing Bear, his journey and plans for the biking trail, go online at chiefstandingbear.org

11


12

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Kansas River National Water Trail

S A F E O P E R AT O R S Be safe while boating. You need to take a Boater Education Course if you are between 12 and 20 years old, are unaccompanied and operating a motorized vessel in Kansas.

W

ith more than 150 lakes, 10,000 stream miles and 55,000 ponds, Kansas has some great options for water recreation. There are lots of ways to float your boat— motor boats, fishing boats, ski boats and sailboats. Add in those paddle crafts such as canoes, kayaks and rowboats, and there are plenty of choices when you want to enjoy the water. For a scenic, casual outing, put a canoe in the water at Kaw River State Park and take a long, winding trip that may reward you with waterfowl and other

wildlife. If you like something with more velocity, try skiing on Wilson Lake, one of the clearest lakes in the state, located about 50 miles west of Salina. Or, take out a Jet Ski to roar past the scenic limestone formations at Cedar Bluff Reservoir west of Hays. Kanopolis Lake (or Reservoir) in central Kansas is a delight for family boating excursions. Developed with a marina and stocked with fish, the 3,500 acres of water is surrounded by camping sites and trails developed through Kanopolis State

Park. Kids will love the Slide Cave on the Buffalo Tracks Canyon Nature Trail (reached through a doable one-mile hike), and a boating excursion can easily overlap with a few hours at the beach or a shoreside visit to enjoy the extensive equestrian trails. For some quiet time, try an evening canoe or kayak float trip on the Big Blue River as part of the Little Apple Paddle “glow paddle” event. You can also enjoy paddling down portions of the Kansas and Arkansas rivers that are designated as part of the National Water Trails System.

D R I N K S E N S I B LY If you take alcohol with you on the waters, remember that many factors can change the effect of alcohol while boating. Direct sun, wind, glare off the water, dehydration and the motion of the waves can cause a person to become intoxicated three times faster than on shore. W AT E R I N VA D E R S Keep Kansas’ waters safe by preventing the spread of non-native animals and plants, like zebra mussels, that threaten lake and river ecology and harm native species. They often “hitchhike” when boaters forget to clean, drain and dry their boats and equipment, including minnow buckets, livewells and bilges. Remember to do this every time, on every lake and river. A L L T H E B O AT I N G I N F O For a complete overview of regulations, sites, classes and more on boating in Kansas, go online at ksoutdoors.com/Boating.


Voted a “Best Small Town in Kansas” by the readers of KANSAS! Magazine

10-5pm Wed-Sat | 1-5pm Sun

(785) 887-6148 | www.lecomptonkansas.com


14

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Douglas County State Fishing Lake


TravelKS.com

K

ansas is referred to as the Wheat State or the Sunflower State, but dedicated anglers know Kansas has some fantastic fishing opportunities. In fact, public waters in Kansas include 24 federal reservoirs, 40 state fishing lakes, more than 200 community lakes. There are 10,000 miles of streams and more than 100,000 privately-owned farm ponds, many which, with landowner permission, provide outstanding fishing. Kansas reservoirs offer huge flathead and blue catfish, channel catfish, white bass, wipers, crappie, black bass and walleye. Biologists manage these lakes with length and creel limits, as well as stocking programs to ensure healthy populations and good fishing. The smaller state and community fishing lakes are stocked regularly and provide excellent bluegill, crappie, channel catfish and largemouth bass fishing. Glen Elder Reservoir, also known as Waconda Lake, has rewarded anglers with large white crappie, channel and flathead catfish, wipers, walleye, smallmouth bass, and white bass. Located

near Beloit, the site was once the Waconda Spring, where a resort was built in 1904 and later converted to a health spa until the 1960s. Construction of the Glen Elder Dam and Waconda Lake began in 1964. With more than 12,000 acres, the lake is open to sport fishing year-round. On the north shores, Glen Elder State Park provides boat ramps, full-hook-up campsites, rental cabins, and a marina. If you want trophy-class fish, look no further than Milford Lake near Junction City. Giant blue catfish, some weighing more than 80 pounds are taking anglers’ baits with regularity. Milford also offers excellent fishing for large and smallmouth bass, wiper, crappie and walleye. Milford State Park has boat ramps, a full-service marina, scenic campsites and rental cabins. For smaller waters, visit a community or state fishing lake such as the 109-acre Chase State Fishing Lake, just three miles west of Cottonwood Falls. This gem of a lake is tucked into the rolling Flint Hills grasslands and offers anglers largemouth

KANSAS OUTDOORS

and spotted bass, bluegill, crappie and channel catfish. On those warm winter days, Kansas anglers can cure cabin fever by going trout fishing. Yep, trout fishing in Kansas. Each winter, more than 30 locations receive trout stockings during the trout season, which is Nov. 1-April 15. Trout anglers must have a trout permit during the season, in addition to a fishing license. Summer water temperatures don’t allow trout to survive year-round in Kansas waters, except at two locations: the Kanopolis Reservoir Dam Seep Stream and the Mined Land Lake #30, just west of Hallowell. You can find all trout fishing locations in the current fishing regulations summary. Learn more about Kansas fishing at www.ksoutdoors. com, where you’ll find weekly reports, forecasts, regulations, stocking reports, the current fishing atlas and more. Click on “Fishing” and discover the wealth of fishing opportunities found in Kansas. There’s a lot more to Kansas than just wheat and sunflowers.

FISHING INTRO If you don’t know much about fishing but want to learn, KDWPT offers fishing clinics at state fishing lakes, parks and city lakes, and ponds. The clinics are geared toward children and those who may not have much experience with fishing techniques and tactics. Clinics are held throughout the spring and summer and occasionally in the fall. Depending on the instructor, the classes cover fish identification, management, casting demonstrations, equipment, water safety and even fish cooking. Plenty of time is devoted to baiting the hooks and catching fish, too. If you want to learn more about fishing or get a youngster started, contact the nearest KDWPT office or the Pratt Operators Office, (620) 672-5911.

15


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Purple Coneflowers bloom in Kansas

WI LD FLOWE R S IN KANSAS

W

ildflowers bloom in abundance in Kansas. From butterfly milkweed in orange, red or yellow to white dog’s tooth violets, these beauties dot the prairies, fields, parks and roads of the state. The unspoiled landscapes of Kansas show plenty of floral color, with camas in April to Indian mustard and Spanish needles in October. In addition, you can see the nation’s largest remaining stand of tallgrass prairie, thousands of migrating birds, wildlife and even the iconic bison and the rare prairie chicken.

Start with a visit to Dyck Arboretum of the Plains in Hesston. This open air domain lets you experience the wildflowers of the Great Plains in cultivation, with hundreds of varieties of native and adaptable wildflowers, grasses, shrubs and trees. Learn more about native plant gardening, prairie restoration and conservation, environmental landscaping and more. A great place to glimpse nature’s color palette is along the state’s twelve scenic

If you can’t distinguish Queen Anne’s lace from black-eyed Susans, there are resources to assist. Kansas Wildflowers & Grasses, kswildflower. org, lists wildflowers by color or time of flowering, along with 872 species of grasses, trees, sedges, rushes, ferns and more.

byways, particularly the Wetlands & Wildlife National Scenic Byway through Barton, Reno and Stafford counties.

The Kansas Biological Survey Kansas Wildflowers database includes images of common wildflowers of Kansas with descriptions, common and scientific names, and field guide information. Type the database name into your search browser to view images.

Another view of Kansas’ natural floral beauty is the Western Vistas Historic Byway, a 102-mile route that begins at Scott City and ends at Sharon Springs. Share the wildflowers and the spectacular scenery with turkey, prairie dog, deer, buffalo, pronghorn and more. For an updated list of wildflower tours, search “wildflowers” at ksoutdoors.com

For a historical slant, Lyman Dwight Wooster photographed Kansas wildflowers during the late 1940s through the 1950s. The images from his color slides are shared at kansaswildflowers.org. His equipment was high quality but primitive by today’s standards. He had to set depth of field, the F-stop setting and focus by hand, but the images are lovely, most with a short depth of field and intense focus on flowers in their natural Kansas settings.

17


18

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

HUNTING IN KANSAS


TravelKS.com

I

t’s not a boast, just a fact – Kansas offers some of the best upland bird, turkey, deer and waterfowl hunting in the nation. Hunting is a treasured tradition and rural Kansas is dotted with small communities where the hunting heritage is a normal part of every day life. Kansas land is largely privately owned, and getting access to hunt on private land is a matter of getting to know landowners. However, Kansas has 500,000 acres of state and federal public hunting land more than 1 million acres of private land leased and open to hunters. Additionally, there are about half-amillion professionally managed hunting facilities that provide private fee-tohunt access. The land, a mixture of native prairie and cropland, sets Kansas apart from other states and provides optimum habitat where whitetailed deer, turkey, quail, pheasant, ducks, geese, greater prairie chicken

and other game species thrive. Various hunting seasons start September 1 and carry on through the end of May. One favorite Kansas hunting spot is Webster Reservoir, set in the picturesque Chalk Hills 8 miles west of Stockton. The 1,500acre lake is a stopping place for many species of waterfowl, and the 8,000-acre wildlife area surrounding the lake provides good pheasant, quail, deer and turkey hunting. Webster State Park, located along the lake’s shore, features more than 90 campsites, many that provide water and electric hookups year-round and two rental cabins. For another great base camps, check out Cedar Bluff State Park along Smoky Valley Scenic Byway near Ellis. The 3,500-acres Cedar Bluff Reservoir provides great late-season mallard hunting, and the 10,300acre wildlife area offers excellent deer, turkey and pheasant hunting opportunities. Cedar Bluff State Park provides a more than 90 campsites,

KANSAS OUTDOORS

as well as six rental cabins. In the central part of the state, just 20 miles southwest of Salina along the Prairie Trail Scenic Byway, Kanopolis Reservoir features a state park and 12,500-acre wildlife area along the Smoky Hill River. Hunters will find pheasant, quail, greater prairie chicken, turkey, deer and waterfowl. The scenic area around the lake is marked with Dakota sandstone bluffs and remote canyons. Kanopolis State Park offers 133 utility campsites and four deluxe rental cabins. Learn more about where to hunt and the state parks to base your hunt from at www.ksoutdoors. com. You can buy all your licenses and permits, download regulations and maps and even reserve a campsite or cabin. Whether you are an experienced hunter or eager to make your first outing, Kansas welcomes you with the perfect opportunity.

S AV V Y H U N T I N G Be smart about hunting. All hunters must be certified by an approved hunter education course before they can hunt in Kansas, except those 15 years old or under who are accompanied by an adult. Kansas Hunter Education teaches new hunters to be ethical, safe and knowledgeable. According to ksoutdoors.com, the 10-hour course covers “a variety of topics including hunter responsibility, ethics, fair chase, history of firearms, firearms basics, ammunition, basic gun safety, field safety, bowhunting, conservation and wildlife management, wildlife of Kansas, outdoor emergencies, Kansas hunting regulations and boating safety for hunters.” Courses are offered throughout the year with most held August through October. For more experienced hunters, Advanced Hunter Education classes focus on specific types of hunting such as beginning waterfowl, goose, upland bird, deer and varmint hunting. These classes do not substitute for the required Hunter Education Course. For more information, go online at ksoutdoors.com/ Services/Education/Hunter. SPECIAL HUNTS Special hunts are provided by KDWPT on department lands, including state parks, wildlife areas and refuges. The hunts also occur on walk-in hunting areas, National Wildlife Refuges, city and county properties, and other locations. The number of participants is limited. You can find out more by sending an email to specialhunts@ksoutdoors.com.

19


20

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Pomona State Park

HIKING

IN KANSAS

A

Kansas hike provides fascinating scenery, strolls past historic sites and relaxing family time. All state parks and many wildlife areas and fishing lakes have hiking trails available with a wide variety of terrain, distances and physical abilities. Pick from among thousands of miles of trails and find something suitable for a morning walk, a challenging trek or an overnight adventure. For a unique hiking experience, consider Sand Hills State Park north of Hutchinson. True to its name, the park offers an extensive network of trails that pass through and around sand dunes (as well as wetlands and woodlands). The extensive 1,100-plus acre state park

accommodates 14 miles of trails, including several that are multi-use for horse rides. Beginners and those with young children might enjoy the half-mile Cottonwood Trail—a shady excursion during the warm months! Another great place for hiking, biking and horseback riding is the Flint Hills Nature Trail. This 117-mile trail is managed by the Kanza Rail-Trail Conservancy. It runs from Osawatomie in the east to Herington in the west and passes through communities including Rantoul, Ottawa, Pomona, Vassar, Osage City, Miller, Admire, Allen, Bushong, and Council Grove, each providing a chance for refreshments and small side excursions. But most

importantly, the trail passes through the Flint Hills and its treasure of natural tallgrass prairie. This native grassland provides direct encounters with wildlife and flowers of the ecosystem as well as an understanding of how the plains appeared, smelled and sounded in the years before settlement. A new addition and approach to the trail scene can be found in Lawrence’s Burroughs Creek Trail. The nearly 2-mile paved bike and walking path runs through the city’s historic east side. A private and public partnership, which includes the local history museum and library, is developing a mobile-device app tour to highlight historic interest points along the trail.

FIT FOR A DOG Man’s best friend can join you on several routes, but a particularly good one is the Elk River Hiking Trail, a 11.4 mile point-to-point trail in Elk City State Park. It’s accessible yearround for people and their dogs, who must be kept on leash. OUTDOOR S WOMAN Hike, and a whole lot more at a special womenonly course through KDWPT. The department holds workshops for women, teaching outdoor skills such as orienteering, camping, birdwatching, botany, fishing, hunting, canoeing, wild game cooking and archery. Programs are held each spring and fall at Rock Springs 4-H Center near Junction City. For more information, go online at ksoutdoors.com/Education. TRAIL LISTINGS For a listing of trail options throughout the state, go online to the Kanza RailTrails Conservancy, at kanzatrails.org or to GetOutdoorsKansas.org/trails. ACCE SS I B LE TRAI LS Kansas has a wide range of trails that are ADA accessible and perfect for anyone with mobility concerns. An extensive list with public feedback is available online by the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy at traillink.com/stateactivity/kswheelchair-accessible-trails.aspx.


22

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Kaw River State Park

S TA T E P A R K S IN KANSAS


TravelKS.com

W

ith evocative names such as Sand Hills, Mushroom Rock and Prairie Dog (and the attractions to match), how can you resist the outdoor enjoyment that the 26 Kansas state parks offer? Picture a day of camping, boating, fishing, hiking, biking, horse riding or just plain relaxing—and ended with spectacular sunsets and fellowship around the campfire. If you love to camp, the state parks welcome you for overnighters, extended stays and even year-round options. You can choose from primitive tent campsites, utility sites for RVs and cabins with many of the comforts of home, including heating and air-conditioning. The state parks also offer some unique attractions

that simply cannot be seen anywhere else. For example, Mushroom Rock State Park is named as one of the 8 Wonders of Kansas Geography, unique rock formations that resemble mushrooms. These rocks served as landmarks for Native Americans and early pioneers such as Kit Carson. About six miles to the west, in Kanopolis, are four remaining buildings of Fort Harker, a U.S. Army outpost from 1866 to 1872. When you drive to the park, you can approach it along the Prairie Trail Scenic Byway, a 56-mile route that intersects the route of Spanish conquistadors and Swedish immigrants who passed through the land. Lake Scott State Park is beautifully situated in a canyon dotted with

natural springs, craggy bluffs and woods. With 1,020-acres, the park surrounds the 100-acre, spring-fed Scott State Fishing Lake. A 160-acre wildlife area lies west of the park. There is also early American history to explore, with more than 26 archeological sites. A National Historic Landmark is within the park: El Cuartelejo is the remains of the northernmost Native-American pueblo. The Steele home, the dwelling of settlers from 100 years ago, has been preserved much as it was. About a mile south of the park is Battle Canyon, the site of the last NativeAmerican battle in Kansas. The park is along the Western Vistas Historic Byway about 11 miles north of Scott City.

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Cedar Bluff State Park

K A N S A S S TA T E PA R K S PA S S Kansas motor vehicle owners can buy an annual park vehicle permit as part of their annual vehicle registration process. The discounted Kansas State Parks Passport costs $15.50. Also, residents 65 or older or persons with disabilities can buy a park vehicle permit directly from KDWPT. This annual vehicle park permit is $13.75, and regular daily permits are $3.25. S TA T E P A R K S OVE RVI EW For a full listing of detailed information about Kansas state parks, go online at ksoutdoors. com/State-Parks.

23


24

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

ASK A

RANGER

Always leave your campsite cleaner than it was when you arrived. Be careful with fire. Only burn in designated fire rings and never leave a fire unattended. It is always a good idea to have a weather radio nearby. Knowing where to go in the event of bad weather is a must. It is important to have a plan in place if such cases arise.

State Park rangers Anthony Reitz and Michelle Campbell help keep campers safe every day. Here are a few tips from the professionals to make sure you and your family have a safe and enjoyable visit at any one of Kansas’ state parks.

If camping near water or participating in waterbased activities, play it safe and have personal flotation devices readily available. It is imperative to keep your children and non-swimmers safe. “Wear It!” Be courteous to others. You and others are there to relax and enjoy your natural resources. Know the rules and adhere to them. 

Sometimes things break. Please let a park employee know if there are facility issues.  We want you to enjoy your stay, but sometimes we experience breakdowns. The faster we are notified, the faster we can get it fixed for you. We are public servants. Without you, we are without. Don’t hesitate to ask.

You are outdoors. Remember that you share the area with many animals and insects. Keep perishable goods secure in a cooler over night. Nocturnal animals love to find easy meals.

Glen Elder State Park


TravelKS.com

F E AT U R E D IN KANSAS

KANSAS OUTDOORS

We all have our favorites. Each of us will have a favorite shirt, favorite dish, favorite drink and favorite way to enjoy the outdoors. Whatever your favorite outdoor activity is, Kansas has a place to enjoy it and people who will share your interest. Join us in these pages for a photo essay of a trip down the Arkansas River, a long stretch of waterway through the heart of the state. We hope the beauty and peace of these scenes inspire you to make your own journey. Each year, Kansas attracts thousands of hunters to the state. And any hunter knows that any outing’s success depends greatly on the dogs you take with you. Fortunately, Kansas has some of the nation’s finest breeders and trainers of hunting dogs who share their story and their secrets in these pages. Our state is also committed to preserving the habitats and lives of non-game animals, from raptors to turtles. Ahead, you can read about the wildlife rehabilitation groups throughout Kansas who work to nurse animals back to health and return them to the wild. It might surprise some, but Kansas has some of the best disc golf courses and hosts a nationwide tournament of top athletes. See these pages for a sampling of some of the best spots.

ARKANSAS RIVER / HUNTING DOGS / WILDLIFE RESCUE / DISC GOLF

27


28

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Beauty finding on the Arkansas River A photographer explores the state’s newest addition to the National Water Trails System

p ogra phot d n a n Writte

he

eb yD db

a or

h

r ke al W


EQUIPMENT PROVIDED BY Arkanoe Kayak, Canoe & Tube Rental & Shuttle

TravelKS.com KANSAS OUTDOORS

29


30

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

It runs slow & steady Flowing into the state from Colorado and meandering through the middle and south to the Oklahoma border, the Arkansas River is the sixth-longest in the nation. With seasonal changes and flooding, it recreates itself, remolding shores and sandbars. And now, a navigable192-mile stretch of the nearly 1,500-mile river has been designated as the Arkansas National River Water Trail. The designation—made through a partnership between Kansas and the National Park Service—is the second river system in Kansas to be recognized. The first was the Kansas River, from Junction City to Kansas City. The designations seek to celebrate the natural waterway resources and opportunities to enjoy them. There are several access points along the Arkansas River’s picturesque riverbanks, allowing visitors to enjoy fishing, bird watching, wading, kayaking, canoeing and tubing. We asked photographer Deborah Walker to make a day’s trip along the Arkansas, setting out with experts from the Hutchinson-based river excursion company Arkanoe (arkanoe.com). Here, she documents the highlights and natural beauty of the waterway.


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

31

through Kansas.

Arkansas River is the sixth-longest river in the nation


32

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Arkansas River a 192-mile stretch is now designated as the arkansas river water trail

33


34

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Arkansas River allows visitors to enjoy fishing, bird watching, wading, kayaking, canoeing and tubing


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

the making of a

hunting dog

Kansas breeder-trainers work to provide companions essential to any successful hunt

T

Story by David Clouston Photography by Larry Harwood

hey work as a team—but every team has that individual that rushes to the front and sets the pace. Through wheat stubble and dried brush, zigging and zagging, searching for a scent, the bird dog courses, yards ahead of a shotgun-toting handler. Suddenly, the dog freezes on point. A shotgun barks. Another pheasant is harvested. “I would never hunt without a dog,” trainer Scott Young says, adamantly. “Because you will not find the quantity, nor the quality of birds, without a dog. It’s almost impossible—they have half a million scent cells in their nose. If you shoot a pheasant and you don’t kill it stone-cold dead, over 90 percent of the time you’re not going to find it, it’s going to run. If a dog can see or smell a bird, they will find it.” Man’s best friend happens to be the hunter’s essential companion. To provide top-quality hunting dogs, experienced Kansas trainers breed and raise pups, selecting only the ones with the strongest instinctive hunting characteristics. Young, who operates Woodhaven Kennels south of Russell, specializes in working with English springer spaniels. But training for any breed of hunting dog progresses at a deliberate, measured pace. A dog learns from conditioning and association, says trainer Dan Manion, who has 30 years of experience working with hunting dogs and owns Smoky River Gun Dogs near Assaria. “The secret is to make the dog want to [hunt], then teach him that he has to do it,” Manion explains. At Ringneck Kennels near Concordia, Blake and Brianna Wolf raise German shorthair pointers but train a variety of breeds as successful hunters and obedience dogs. “A lot of guys know how to do it. Basically, if you grew up in Kansas and you were hunting, you know how to train a hunting dog,” Wolf says, speaking to Kansas’ draw as a professional dogtraining destination. “There’s a big demand for it. When someone

37


38

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Kansas trainers share essential tips for training your dog to hunt If you’re thinking about acquiring a hunting dog for the first time, or training a pup yourself, Kansas training pros have this advice for you:

Stormy, a German shorthaired pointer, trains at a field near Concordia.

has one hunting dog, they want two. If they have two, they want three. We get the same repeat clients most of the time.” On a July day just after 10 a.m., Wolf takes a sip off a cold 16-ounce Red Bull and relaxes a bit. Today’s work started at 6 a.m. For this 27-year-old trainer, a former construction worker with a wife and two young children, hunting dogs are not just a livelihood but also a part of his heritage. He trained his first dog when he was 16 and then started the business in 2011. His construction experience was critical to making the move to rural Concordia in 2013 and building a new 20-run training, boarding and grooming facility. To date, Wolf estimates he’s trained 35 different breeds of dogs for owners in close to 30 states. At 3,200 square feet, the kennel facility has room indoors to train on obedience and retrieval skills, crucial when the afternoon mercury sizzles. With a pond on his 65 acres and three other ponds on 500 neighboring acres, along with pasture, cropland and Conservation Reserve Program ground, Wolf is equipped to train dogs both for upland game birds and waterfowl hunts. There’s a waiting list and an application process for German shorthair puppies from the litters that Ringneck Kennels breeds annually, each from stock carefully chosen for prime genetic traits. “We want something that goes above and beyond for you, and an owner that goes above and beyond (for their dogs),” Wolf said. Most of the state’s professional hunting dog trainers charge a fee for training and boarding that runs between $500 and $750, with an equal sum as a down payment for immediate costs. “That’s to allow us to have enough birds on hand to get going,” Young says. Puppies purchased from Midwest trainers/breeders typically sell for $500 to $750 in this region.

Think temperament and instinct, as well as breed • A well-trained hunting dog’s value as a family pet for most casual hunters equals their worth as a field companion. That means the dog is wellsocialized and has learned basic obedience commands. • “If we know someone is going to hunt four days, or six days out of the year, we might steer them toward a dog that is a little bit less aggressive,” says trainer Scott Young. “But if we have someone hardcore, they’re going to hunt 20 or 30 days out of the year, we want a dog with a lot of drive, probably a male, but maybe not. The pup I don’t want is the one that goes over by a tree and lays down and sleeps.” • “I like English pointers,” says trainer Dan Manion. “ I like a dog that gets out and finds birds for me, rather than me walking the dog into the birds. I like the intensity of the point.” • Young calls Springer spaniels “the king of pheasant dogs” because they excel at flushing, then retrieving, birds after the shot. The diminutive English cocker excels at finding birds hidden in cover. They are, says Young “like a heat-seeking missile” and make excellent companion dogs. The same holds true of German shorthairs, known for their intense natural prey drive, retrieving ability and quick mastery of commands, says trainer Blake Wolf. No squeaky toys • Puppies pursuing squeaky toys tend to puncture the air bladder making the noise inside the toy. The result, Young says, is the pup clenches the toy tighter in its jaws, trying to make it squeak. Later, when a pup with this tendency retrieves a bird, it may start to consume it rather than giving it up. Introduce the gun sound, but slowly • Pups and young dogs trained at Young’s kennel grow accustomed to the sounds of frequent clay target shoots taking place on the property, Young says. • Wolf and Manion each use a .22-caliber pistol with blanks, fired at random, to get young dogs acclimated to the blast of a shotgun. This works best in a group or pack with older, experienced dogs. • “By randomly firing it, there’s no association with anything,” says Wolf. “The other dogs work the field and don’t [react to the sound] because there’s no bird there.” • Manion says the worst move and riskiest threat of gun-shyness in young, inexperienced dogs is to take them to an unfamiliar gun range. Once a negative association with gun noise is established, he says, it’s a hard trait to break.


TravelKS.com

Blake Wolf trains with Echo, a German shorthaired pointer, at Ringneck Kennels.

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Hunter training usually starts when a dog reaches 10 months; it usually takes two months to complete. Another option is purchasing a “started” hunting dog, usually 9 to 12 months old. These dogs have already had basic obedience training, are proven to have hunting instincts and have begun their field training. Such a dog usually sells from $1,500 to $1,750 or more. Dogs are trained using food rewards, hand signals and often voice and whistle commands. Most trainers also use electronic collars that deliver either a mild shock (about as intense as pulling a hair out of your arm) or a tone or vibration sensation that helps reinforce the handler’s commands. Young, 55, trains dogs with his wife, Roxanne, and their daughter, Caitlin. Together they run a bed and breakfast retreat as well as a sporting clays target-shooting business. Each fall he offers guided hunts. The dogs Young accepts for training—about 10 a year—are primarily from litters raised by the kennel. “They buy a puppy from us, and at about 10 months of age the dog comes back. And we give them a list of obedience skills to work on. If they do their work at home in that 10 months, it cuts off two weeks of work that we have to do,” Young says. The attention to detail doesn’t end when the field-trained dog leaves his care. Each owner receives a three-page list of tips related to giving the dog commands and maintaining top performance on a hunt. “A good hunter will spend the first year paying more attention to the dog and less about ‘Did I get my limit?’” Young says. That period of observation is more for the hunter to learn about the dog’s individual characteristics; the dog already knows what it is doing. “We tell people that when you get a dog from us it’s like driving a Ferrari,” says Young. “In a Ferrari you push a button, and it starts, and then you let the car drive. You just handle the car. It’s the same thing here. We won’t let a dog go if we haven’t done our job. We want our clients to be happy. If you’re happy, you’re going to tell someone else, and they might bring a dog to us. At least they’re going away with a positive image.” Manion, 74, has spent nearly all his life training dogs to hunt. His clients, all by word of mouth and some from as far away as Alaska, fill the 10 runs in his kennel from March through December. His advice? Don’t expect more out of the dogs than they’re capable of giving and be consistent with commands—especially praise. “It’s easier to create good habits than break bad habits,” he says.

39


40

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

e Top h t f o as one e Country. e f i L r Outdoo rtowns in th y b d e Nam itetail Supe Ten Wh

Set your sight on Labette County! For a FREE Outdoor Guide: 1-800-280-6401 Largemouth Bass | Turkey | Deer | World Class Sporting Clays


Wildlife

Rescue A network of experts and dedicated volunteers steps in if—and only if—outdoor creatures require care

Story by Liz Weslander

Photography by Bill Stephens


TravelKS.com

T

hey are there when wild animals need them—a group of licensed and trained wildlife rehabilitators throughout the state, ready year-round to care for injured, ill and orphaned animals found by well-meaning animal lovers. But they also have one important message about their services: if you find an animal in the outdoors, most likely it is better to just leave them be, especially for babies in the wild. Pat Silovsky, director of the Milford Nature Center in Junction City, says that when people find a wild animal they are concerned about, it is a good idea to call a local nature center, zoo or rehab center before doing anything with the animal, so that an expert can help assess the best course of action. “Most young animals don’t need to be rescued,” Silovsky explains. “If you leave them long enough, the parents will come by, and the parents know how to care for them.” Silovsky adds that a common scenario is for people to find a baby song bird on the ground and worry that it is injured or abandoned. However, young birds typically spend 3 or 4 days on the ground after leaving the nest as part of the natural maturation process. “Baby birds do not leave the nest flying like they do in the Disney shows,” says Silovsky. “Yes, that time on the ground is a very vulnerable time for the birds, but you’ve got to let the parents of the bird do their job.” People are also often concerned when they see baby rabbits without a mother, says Silovsky, but mother rabbits only visit their babies a couple times per day and leave their babies for good much earlier than humans might expect. “A baby rabbit is on its own after about 3 weeks, when it’s about the size of tennis ball,” says Silovsky “If their ears are up and the eyes are open, they don’t need help.” If a young animal is in a spot that is not ideal, like the middle of a road or sidewalk or in a yard where a dog or cat might disturb it, Silovsky says it is fine to pick it up and move it to a more sheltered

spot. It is not true that birds or mammals will reject their young once humans have handled them. Nonetheless, the handling of wild babies should be kept to a minimum, as it is stressful to the animal. All of this said, if an animal has obvious injuries or it is clear that they have been orphaned (a dead possum with babies in her pouch is a good example), then certified wildlife rehabilitators are here to help. Silovsky says during the spring, which is considered “baby season,” the Milford Nature Center rehabs countless rabbits and song birds as

Wildlife Rescue Essentials • It is not uncommon for wild animals to leave their babies alone for long periods. • More often than not, the best course of action is to leave a wild animal in the wild. • Human scent does not cause animals to reject their young, but human contact is stressful for wild animals and should be kept to a minimum. • Clues that an animal is injured or orphaned and may need rehabilitation include being presented by a cat or dog, evidence of bleeding or an obvious broken limb, a dead parent nearby. • Whenever possible, call a wildlife rehabilitator before taking any action with a wild animal.

well as baby possums, bobcats, skunks, bats, foxes and squirrels. The center does not rehab raccoons, which Silovsky says is not uncommon for wildlife rehabilitators. “Raccoons carry 87 diseases that are communicable to humans and also have worms,” says Silovsky. “If you want to disinfect a cage after a

raccoon has been in it, you basically have to torch it. It’s just a huge commitment.” In addition to mammals, the Milford Nature Center also rehabilitates birds of prey, which often struggle to survive during the fall and winter months. “Raptors in general have a high mortality rate. One out of five will not make it,” Silovsky says. “If a raptor is not thriving, they will come in dehydrated, starving and underweight. We can give them a second chance and maybe sometimes they will make it. It’s hard being a wild animal.” The process of rehabilitating wildlife centers on fostering animals’ natural instincts, particularly self-feeding. “The hard part is not only transitioning them to self-feeding, but self-feeding on what they would get in the wild,” Silovsky explains. “We teach them to hunt and what to look for by offering them wild-caught food.” The other important factor in rehabilitating animals is limiting their contact with humans, ideally by keeping them in a remote, outdoor area. “It is not a good thing for a wild animal to be habituated to humans,” says Silovsky. “Finding some siblings for an animal to be around while rehabbing is ideal.” A common argument against wildlife rehabilitation is that it is best to let nature take its course, and Silovsky said that there is certainly some need for perspective when it comes to trying to save wildlife. But at the same time, Silovsky notes that compassion is something that we need more of in the world, so she is hesitant to squelch that in people wanting to help an animal. “They can’t all survive, but when that individual animal has come into your life, it’s hard to not help it,” says Silovsky. “By helping, people have a positive experience with wildlife and the outdoors; we hope that helps them become better citizens and to make better choices about the world.”

Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitators in Kansas Operation Wildlife 23375 Guthrie Road Linwood, KS 66052 785.542.3625

Milford Nature Center 3415 Hatchery Dr Junction City, KS 66441 785.238.5323

Raptor Center of Great Bend Great Bend Zoo 2123 Main St.   Great Bend, KS 67530 620.793.4226

Eagle Valley Raptor Center 927 N 343rd St W. Cheney, KS 67025 316.393.0710

Northeast Kansas Wildlife Rescue 2930 SE Meadowview Dr Topeka, KS 66605 785.575.1991 David Traylor Zoo of Emporia 75 Soden Road Emporia, KS 66801 620.341.4365

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Hutchinson Zoo 71500 South Plum Street Hutchinson, KS 67501  620.694.2693 Check for the latest updates or additions online at ksoutdoors.com/ Services/Rehabilitation

43


America’s disc gol f hot bed ? Ri gh t

e in her

sas. Kan

in the

Written by Seth Jones

Photography by KDWPT

Tuttle Creek State Park


TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Disc golf’s biggest event calls Kansas home It was not love at first sight for Doug Dick. No, it took him two tries to fall in love with disc golf. But fall in love he has. That second round of disc golf was so enjoyable that not much later the 59-year-old teacher from Wichita decided to try to play every disc golf course in the state. So how many courses does that mean he’s aiming to play? “When I started in February of 2015, it was 152 courses,” Dick says. “Kansas seems to be buying into disc golf because now the number is up to 205, only a year and a half later. They’re adding courses faster than I can keep up.” Disc golf is a game that is growing across the nation, especially in Kansas. For example, the Glass Blown Open, an annual event held in Emporia for the last 14 years, set a record last year as the largest disc golf tournament ever held, with 1,120 competitors playing across six different courses. (Those numbers eclipsed the previous record holder, a tournament in Charlotte, North Carolina, by some 200 competitors.) Chris “Duck” Dendurent, owner of Duck’s Flying Discs at 813 West 11th Street in Wichita, sees how popular the game is every day he steps into his shop. “On a Saturday, we’ll literally get hundreds of customers, busy from 8 a.m. to 4:30 in the afternoon,” he says. “Oak Park in Wichita gets crowded to the point that you literally have to wait on every hole now. The sport has fantastic growth.”

Dendurent joined the Professional Disc Golf Association in 1995. His membership number is 7,267. Someone joining the PDGA today would get a membership numbering somewhere in the 87,000 range. Why has the game’s popularity exploded? It’s a combination of factors— the ease of getting into the sport, the friendliness of the competition and the affordability of the game.

“It’s fun exercise without a lot of trouble. It’s a challenge whether you’re playing by yourself or with friends.”

follow doug

–Jerry sherwood “I think it’s the easy availability to get out on a course when you want to; it’s easy to work into your schedule, as opposed to ball golf,” says Jerry Sherwood, president of Wichita’s Air Capitol Disc Golf Club. “It’s fun exercise without a lot of trouble. It’s a challenge whether you’re playing by yourself or with friends.” Dendurent says there are only a few disc golf courses that charge to play. Likewise, the equipment is affordable. “Discs run between $10 to $20 apiece. We can get you a driver, a midrange driver, a putter and a bag all for under $100,” he says. “That’s a tenth of what similar equipment will cost in golf. And the same thrill you get in ball golf

The Glass Blown Open, now in its 15th year, welcomes competitors from around the globe. Consider it the Masters of disc golf. It’s the best players, the best courses, and it happens every year in the same place. Emporia, Kansas. The top players from around the world descend upon Emporia every April for the Glass Blown Open. The 2017 edition will be the 15th anniversary of the event. According to Doug Bjerkaas, tournament director, the 2016 event set a record for the largest Professional Disc Golf Association tournament ever, with 1,120 competitors from seven different countries and 43 of the 50 states. (Of these competitors, 845 were amateurs and 275 were professionals.) “Our mission every year is to improve the event,” Bjerkaas says. “We just want it to be an awesome time. Folks plan their vacations around this event.” The event takes place at six different courses, five of them in Emporia, one in nearby Olpe. Bjerkaas says the city welcomes competitors with open arms, offering food and drink specials for participants. The winner of the tournament walks away with a $5,000 purse (which Bjerkaas notes is a huge payday for disc golf) and a beautiful blown-glass trophy, for which the tournament is named. For additional information, visit glassblownopen.com.

You can check up on Doug Dick’s mission of playing every disc golf course in Kansas by going online at PlayKansasDGC.com.

45


46

KANSAS OUTDOORS

2017

Let it fly: The best disc golf courses in Kansas When it comes to the best disc golf courses, opinions differ. Some people want hills and blind shots; others want an easily followed route and water hazards. It’s like opinions: everyone’s got one. But we asked a few avid disc golfers from Kansas for their favorites, and here’s what we heard.

Tuttle Creek State Park

from hitting a good shot? It’s the exact same adrenaline rush in disc golf.” Sherwood mentions that players can play the sport for years. He himself is evidence. “I’m 65 and I credit the sport for keeping me healthy over the years,” he says. “I was out the other day and someone saw me and said it was nice to see someone my age still playing. I told them, there are a lot of guys my age still playing … and the sky is the limit.” Sherwood, Dendurent and Dick all mention that the game is family friendly; they play with their kids. Sherwood taught his son the game when he was only 9 years old. He laughs and admits his son didn’t think the sport was very cool when he was a teenager, but now that he’s an adult, the two again enjoy playing together. Dick agrees. “I’ve seen kids 6 years old playing; I’ve seen 70-year-olds playing,” he says. “It’s a lifetime sport.” So will it take him a lifetime to

state parks ENJOY DISC GOLF AT THESE STATE PARKS

complete his goal of playing every course in Kansas? He’s played 95 of the 205 Kansas courses so far…. “It started out as a two-year project. I wanted to be done before I turned 60,” he says. “That’s not going to happen. To get to some of the far reaches of Kansas and it’s a two- or three-day trip.” Dick now has another goal along with his original of playing every course in Kansas: make the game more accessible to anyone passing through the state. That’s why his website includes a database of all the courses—to encourage others to get out there with him. But by no means has he given up on his goal of playing every course in the state. “Will I ever make it? I don’t know, but I’m going to try,” he says and adds, “Life gets in the way. We welcomed my first grandchild recently.” Sounds like he’ll have a new playing partner to help him on his quest.

THE COUNTRY CLUB OF EMPORIA “It’s truly a test of the skills of the player,” says Chris “Duck” Dendurent. “The lengths of the par threes, fours and fives all offer variety. There are elevation changes and some tricky out-of-bounds.” Sherwood adds, “A variety of challenges—wooded areas, water hazards, open shots and, of course, the Kansas wind.” OAK PARK, WICHITA “It’s a fantastic layout for all skill levels,” Dendurent says. “Plus, it’s in close proximity to my shop.” Doug Dick credits this course as the course that kept him coming back for more after a bad first experience on an unkempt course. “My friends took me to this course and I was hyped,” he says. “The first time there was four of us, we came back soon with five more.” STONE CREEK PARK, DERBY “A good challenge, lots of variety,” says Jerry Sherwood. “There’s room to crank a throw out, but also lots of trees and the challenge of going into the river.” ELMWOOD PARK, NORTON “I won’t give favorites, that’s too hard,” Dick says. “But whenever I’m in Norton, I’ll always stop at Elmwood Park.” OTHER FAVORITES: • Herman Hill Park, Wichita • Jones Park West, Emporia • Jones Park East, Emporia • Airport Park, Concordia

Tuttle State Park, Manhattan; Clinton State Park, Lawrence; Lovewell State Park, Webber; Eisenhower State Park, Osage City; and Pomona State Park, Vassar.


Dogs welcome at lodging facilities

Sherman County Convention & Visitors Bureau

cvb@goodlandnet.com www.visitgoodland.com 785-890-3515 or 888-824-4222

Come to Sherman County for a quality upland bird hunt. Hunt turkey, deer, antelope and more.


48

KANSAS OUTDOORS

RESOURCE GUIDE

2017

STATEWIDE RESOURCES Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism Office of the Secretary 1020 S. Kansas, Room 200, Topeka (785) 296-2281

Colby Visitors Center 350 S. Range #10, Colby (785) 460-7643 Concordia Travel Information Center 130 E Sixth St., Concordia (785) 243-4303

Pratt Operations Office 512 SE 25th Ave., Pratt (620) 672-5911

Dodge City Convention & Visitors Bureau 400 W. Wyatt Earp Blvd., Dodge City (620) 225-8186

Emporia Research and Survey Office 1830 Merchant, P.O. Box 1525, Emporia (620) 342-0658

Franklin County Visitors Center 2011 E. Logan, Ottawa (785) 242-1411

Kansas City District Office 8304 Hedge Lane Terrace, Shawnee (913) 422-1314 Regional Offices Region 1 1426 U.S. 183 Bypass P.O. Box 338, Hays (785) 628-8614 The northwest quarter of Kansas that includes 26 counties. Region 2 300 SW Wanamaker Road, Topeka (785) 273-6740 The northeast quarter of Kansas that includes 20 counties. Region 3 1001 McArtor Drive, Dodge City (620) 227-8609 The southwest quarter of Kansas that includes 28 counties. Region 4 6232 E. 29th St. North, Wichita (316) 683-8069 The south central region of Kansas that includes 13 counties. Region 5 1500 W. Seventh St., Chanute (620) 431-0380 The southeastern quarter of Kansas that includes 18 counties. State-Owned Travel Information Centers Belle Plaine Travel Information Center 770 N. I-35, Belle Plaine (620) 326-5123 Located on I-35 Kansas Turnpike at Milepost 26. Accessible from both northbound and southbound lanes. Goodland Travel Information Center I-70 East Milepost 7, Goodland (785) 899-6695 Located on I-70 at Milepost 7, accessible from eastbound lanes only. Community Travel Information Centers Abilene Convention & Visitors Bureau 201 N.W. Second, Abilene (785) 263-2231 Atchison Area Chamber of Commerce 200 S. 10th, P.O. Box 126, Atchison (913) 367-2427 Belleville Travel Information Center 702 12th St. Belleville (785) 527-2883 Cherokee Strip Land Rush Museum 31639 US Hwy 77, Arkansas City (620) 442-6750

Garden City Travel Plaza 1265 Solar Ave., Garden City (620) 276-3264 Great Bend Convention & Visitors Bureau 3111 10th St., Great Bend (620) 792-2750 Kansas Originals Market 233 Hwy 232, Wilson (785) 658-2602 Hays Convention & Visitors Bureau 2700 Vine St., Hays (785) 628-8202 Lawrence Visitor Information Center 402 N. Second, Lawrence (785) 856-3040 Liberal Travel Information Center 1 Yellow Brick Road, Liberal (620) 626-0170 Lindsborg Travel Information Center 114 N Main (Covered Kiosk), Lindsborg (785) 227-8687 Olathe Mahaffie Stage Coach stop & Farm Historic Site 1200 Kansas City Road, Olathe (913) 971-5111 Wyldewood Cellars Winery 32633 Grapevine Road, Paxico (785) 636-8466

VISITOR SERVICES Watersports 100th Meridian Initiative www.100thmeridian.org The 100th Meridian Initiative is a cooperative effort among state, provincial and federal agencies to prevent the westward spread of zebra mussels and other aquatic nuisance species in North America. Adventure Sports 10922 W. 74th Terrace, Shawnee (913) 962-2323 www.adventuresportskc.com Arkansas City Kayaks 27801 27th Dr., Arkansas City (620) 660-3250 www.arkcitykayakrentals.com Boat US www.boatus.com Boat Owners Association of the United States

Discover Boating www.discoverboating.com The Discover Boating Program is a service of the recreational boating industry, spearheaded by the National Marine Manufacturers Association, with the goal to “help people become boaters.” Friends of the Kaw P.O. Box 1612, Lawrence (785) 312-7200 Kansas River Keepers, float trips and rentals www.kansasriver.org Kansas City White Water Club 1905 W. Oak St., Olathe www.kcwc.org Kansas Canoe & Kayak Association www.kansascanoe.org Kansas River Canoe Co. 1473 Hwy. 40, Lawrence (785) 842-3877 www.campjellystone.com Kansas State Boating www.ksoutdoors.com/Boating Kansas Whitewater Association www.kansaswhitewater.org KC Water Sports 25825 Edgemore Rd., Paola (913) 783-4300 www.kcwatersports.com Lake Adventures Racing 3710 Farnum Creek Rd., Milford (785) 307-1901 www.adventureracekansas.com Lawrence River Trails (785) 296-2009 www.lawrencemountainbikeclub.org Mid Kansas Marine 1114 W. U.S. 54, Andover (316) 733-9889 517 E. 4th Ave., Hutchinson (620) 665-0396 www.midkansasmarine.com Mud Kat Kayaking 2500 Farm Bureau Rd., Manhattan (620) 430-6754 National Water Safety Congress www.watersafetycongress.org A nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting recreational water safety in the United States, the National Water Safety Congress was organized in 1951 in response-to a growing number of recreation related drownings. The Congress promotes two basic approaches to reduce water-recreation fatalities, injuries and property damage— education and enforcement. Ninnescah Sailing Association Cheney Park (316) 729-5757 www.ninnescah.org Pomona Lake Ski Club P.O. Box 73, 21942 S. Berrytom Rd., Vassar (785) 806-4436 www.skipomona.com

Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to increase participation in recreational angling and boating and thereby increase public awareness and appreciation of the need for protecting, conserving and restoring this nation’s aquatic natural resources. www.rbff.org Safe Boating Council www.safeboatingcouncil.org Shawnee Boat and Ski Club P.O. Box 1384, Topeka www.shawneeboatandskiclub.com

Tom Sawyer Bicycle Shop Inc 1960 S. Broadway, Wichita (316) 264-3693 www.tomsawyerbicycleshop.com Turner’s Cycling & Fitness 8909 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park (913) 381-5298 www.turnersbikes.com The Pathfinder 304 Poyntz Ave., Manhattan (785) 539-5639 www.thepathfinder.net Sunflower Outdoor and Bike 804 Massachusetts St., Lawrence (785) 843-5000 www.sunfloweroutdoorandbike.com

Sitzmark Sports 10500 Marty St., Overland Park (913) 341-5330 www.sitzmarksports.com

Hiking Trails

States Organization for Boating Access www.sobaus.org

Kanza Rail-Trails Conservancy www.kanzatrails.org

Up a Creek Canoe and Kayak Rental Lawrence www.upacreek.biz US Army Corps of Engineers www.usace.army.mil US Coast Guard www.uscg.mil US Coast Guard Auxiliary www.cgaux.org US Power Squadrons www.usps.org United State Coast Guard Office of Boating Safety www.uscgboating.org Biking Clubs Coasters Bicycle Club Wichita www.locojoe.com/coasters Earthriders Mountain Bike Club www.earthriders.com Kansas City Bicycle Club www.kcbc.org Kaw Valley Bicycle Club Topeka www.kvbc.org Lawrence Mountain Bike Club www.lawrencemountainbikeclub.org Lawrence Bicycle Club www.lbc/cycling.com Oz Bicycle Club (Wichita) www.ozbikeclub.com Biking Outfitters Bicycle X-Change Shops 908 W. Douglas Ave., Wichita (316) 262-9878 www.bicyclex-change.com Harley’s Bicycles 629 N. Main, Hutchinson (620) 663-4321 www.harleysbicycles.com Tailwind Cyclists 1511 N. Broadway, Pittsburg (620) 231-2212 www.tailwindcyclists.com

Kansas Trails Council www.kansastrailscouncil.org

Equestrian Trails Kansas Horse Council (785) 776-0662 www.kansashorsecouncil.com Bluestem Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Boulder Bluff Horse Trail El Dorado State Park Trail is a scenic stroll through the Flint Hills along the shoreline of El Dorado Lake. An equestrian campground is available in Boulder Bluff Area 1. (316) 321-7180 Cottonwood Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Crystal Trail Milford State Park Open year-round (785) 238-3014 Dune Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Eagle Ridge Trail Milford State Park Open year-round (785) 238-3014 Equestrian Trails Perry State Park The trails start and end in Perry State Park, but some of the trail traverses across the COE Rock Creek public-use area. (785) 246-3449 Horse Trail Eisenhower State Park Open year-round (785) 528-4102 Kanopolis Multi-use Trails at Kanopolis State Park Access from Trailheads A,B,C, D (785) 546-2565 Alum Creek Trails These two trails form an 8.3-mile loop across pastures, through canyons, trees and along creeks. There are two minor water crossings. Open February 1-October 31


RESOURCE GUIDE

TravelKS.com

Horsethief Canyon Trails Two sections of the trail system, referred to as the Horsethief Canyon trails, connect the Rockin’ K Trails to the Prairie Trails. These crossings can be very deep.

The Beyer Ranch 652 8th Road SW, Gridley (620) 836-5080

Prairie Trails Two trails, which are referred to as the Prairie Trails, connect the Horsethief Canyon Trails to the Alum Creek Trails. Open February 1-October 31 Rockin’ K Trails (Access from trailhead A, D) Two 2-mile sections of the trail system are called the Rockin’ K Trails. These are relatively easy trails.

Byron Walker Wildlife Area 8685 W. Hwy 54, Cunningham (620) 532-3242 www.ksoutdoors.com

Pipeline Trail Milford State Park Open year-round (785) 238-3014 Pond Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Prairie Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Randolph Equestrian Trail Tuttle Creek State Park Encompasses a wide variety of terrain offering views of the Flint Hills, the lake and wildlife. Open year-round (785) 539-7941 Rock Creek Horse Trail Clinton Wildlife Area Horse trail is open seasonally, trailhead is in Rockhaven Park. (785) 887-6882 Saddle Ridge Trails Hillsdale State Park Four different loops of trail systems: NW blue trail, SE red trail, SW red trail and the Outlet loop. Vehicle permits are required for entry. (913) 783-4507 Tallgrass Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664 Woodland Trail Sand Hills State Park Open year-round (316) 542-3664

HUNTING Hunting Associations KS Sport Hunting Association www.huntkansas.org Mid America Hunting Association‎ www.magba.com Prairie Wind Hunting Club www.prairiewindhunting.com Hunting Outfitters Bass Pro Shop 12051 Bass Pro Drive, Olathe (913) 254-5200 www.basspro.com Bell Wildlife Specialties 155 West Oak, Harveyville (785) 589-2321 www.huntingkansaswhitetails.com

Buster’s Outfitters PO Box 143, Sun City (620) 546-5777

Cabela’s 10300 Cabela Drive, Kansas City (913) 328-0322 www.cabelas.com Carters Big Island Hunt Club 108 Sr. Joseph St. St. Paul (620) 232-4829 CatDaddy’s Catfishin Adventures 1308 NW Logan, Topeka (785) 357-0934 www.catdaddyguideservices.com Cecil’s Trails End Hunting Lodge 12803 108 Road, Minneola (620) 430-0663 hunttrailsend.com Cimarron Crossing Motel 410 Ave. A, Cimarron (620) 855-2225 www.cimarronmotel.com Clay’s Guide Service 27303 B St., Haviland (620) 546-4149 www.claysguideservice.com Crooked Creek Hunting Ranch 25048 15 Road, Meade (620) 873-7189 Flint Hills Hunts PO Box 838, Winfield (620) 221-3767 www.kansashunts.com Flying W Outfitters 6199 4 Road, Plains (620) 629-0946 Golden Prairie Hunting Service 607 W. Gwinn Court, Sublette (620) 675-8490 Kansas Governor’s One Shot Turkey Hunt 200 S. Main St., Ste. 2, El Dorado (316) 321-3835 www.ksoneshot.com Guide Lines Guide Service 3608 Hackberry Drive, Topeka (785) 267-0065 Hanke’s Hunts 1510 3rd Road, Waterville (785) 562-7157 hankeshunts.com Hays City Sportsmen’s Club 5810 230th Ave., Hays (785) 623-9477 Hickory Creek Lodge 1230 W 570th Ave., McCune (620) 423-5491 www.hickorycreekoutfitter.com Jeff’s Guide Service 100 Lakeview Lane Ellis (785) 650-8263 www.jeffsguide.com JL Bar Ranch 1720 Seneca, Winona (785) 751-4426

K & K Outfitters 317 N 250th, Mulberry (620) 249-3003 www.duckandbuck.com

Rebel Ridge Outfitters P.O Box 752, Syracuse (620) 384-7700 www.rebelridgeoutfitters.com

Kansas Hunting Adventures 112 E. Hazelwood, Waterville (785) 363-2327 www.kansashuntingadventures.com

River Bluff Hunting Company 425 70 Rd., Scandia (316) 258-7969 www.riverbluffhunting.com

Kansas Trophy Hunts 134 E. Main, Sedan (620) 725-4011

Riverview Ringnecks R2, PO Box, Webber (402) 984-3028

Kansas Trophy Whitetails 1539 Indian Rd., Morrowville (785) 265-3360 www.kansas-trophy-whitetails.com

Rock and Rose Ranch 16400 Axelton Hill Road, Randolph (785) 410-7747

LaSada 3721183rd St., Russell (785) 483-3758 www.lasada.com

Rocking K Ranch Hunting 313 NE 150th Ave., Stafford (620) 546-4668 www.ks-hunting-land.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Arrow B Hunting Lodge 1115 Hwy 24, Stockton (785) 425-5030 Ash Creek Upland Game Hunting 269 Pawnee Road, Windom (620) 489-9411 www.ashcreekhunting.com The Barn Bed and Breakfast Inn 14910 Blue Mound Road, Valley Falls (785) 945-3225 www.thebarnbb.com Barrel Springs Hunt Club 416 Railroad Ave., Tribune (620) 376-2701 www.barrelspringshuntclub.com Big Hill Lodge 415 S Liberty, Cherryvale (877) 244-4455 www.bighilllodge.com

Lazy J Hunting Service 400 Orth St., Sublette (620) 675-2338 www.lazyjhunting.com

Saline River Hunting Lodge & Guide Service 20015 260 Ave., WaKeeney (785) 743-5878 www.salinelodge.com

Lone Pine Game Birds 444 90th Road, Toronto (620) 637-2967 www.huntlonepine.com

Sand Wells Outdoors 902 Road S, Hugoton (866) 365-6112 www.sandwellsoutdoors.com

Bluestem Hunting Preserve, Inc. 2301 N. Hwy 11, Kingman (620) 532-6361 www.bluestemhunting.com

Long Branch Creek Outfitters 107 N Marks, Oberlin (785) 475-3439

Shawnee Creek Preserve 2733 NE Center Star Road, Columbus (620) 674-8563

Bruiser Whitetail, LLC 620 Warpole Rd., Olsburg (785) 468-3640 www.bruiserwhitetail.com

Show Me Birds Hunting Resort 6186 SE 20th St., Baxter Springs (620) 674-8863 www.showmebirds.com

Buckshot Inn 117 W. Hwy 36, Smith Center (785) 282-6644 www.buckshotinn.com

Solomon Valley Outfitters LLC 1319 Kansas St., Downs (785) 545-5327

C&W Ranch 4000 S Halstead Road, Smolan (785) 668-2352 www.cwranch.com

McNeil Game Farm and Outfitting 1816 18th Road, Clay Center (785) 632-5040 (785) 447-0629 McPherson Valley Wetlands 967 Mohawk Road, McPherson (620) 241-7669 www.kdwp.state.ks.us Mill Creek Outfitters 35040 Old K-10 Road, Alma (785) 499-2980 Mined Land Wildlife Area 507 E 560th, Pittsburg (620) 231-3173 Monster Bucks of Kansas 664 3 Road, Bremen (785) 337-2396 www.kansashunter.com Muddy Creek Game Birds Muddy Creek Whitetails 8721 NE Brown Road, Meriden 785-484-2325 www.muddycreekwhitetails.com Murphy’s Landing 22030 Hwy 39, Stark (620) 754-3300 www.murphysatstark.com Oasis Hunting R1, Box 110, Deerfield (620) 426-6291 www.oasishunting.com Odyssey Hunts 109 Albert St., Lakin (620) 355-6301 Prairie Outfitters & Excursions 5001 E. Ninth Ave., Winfield (620) 222-8870 www.PrairieOutfittersandExcursions. com Prairie Stars Enterprises 408 S First St Sterling (620) 278-3255

Steve Lloyd Wetlands Area Rt 837, Wakefield (785) 632-6701 www.cckansas.org Timber Hills Lake Hunting & Fishing Adventures 1369 Valley Road, Mapleton (620) 743-4114 www.timberhillslake.com

Blue River Whitetails, LLC 416 N Denver Ave., Hanover (785) 337-2530 www.blueriverwhitetails.com

Camelot Inn 933 N. First, Osborne (785) 346-5413 www.camelotinnosborne.com Cecil’s Trails End Hunting 12803 108 Road, Minneola (620) 430-0663 http://hunttrailsend.com

USI RV Park 2920 E 33rd St., Wichita (316) 838-8699 www.usirvpark.com

Claythorne Lodge 1329 NW 100th St., Columbus (620) 597-2568 www.claythorne.com

Upland Inn 407 S Walnut, Greensburg (316) 250-3038 www.uplandinnhunts.com

The Country Cabins 2534 Kestrel Road, Hiawatha (785) 742-4320

Wild Horse Canyon Bed and Breakfast & The Shady Porch 255 N Longhorn Road, Dighton (620) 397-5914 Wolf River Outfitters, LLC 1315 290th, Hiawatha (785) 741-5218 www.wolfriveroutfitters.com Wyrick Farms 22429 49th Ave., Haviland (620) 338-6701 www.huntwyrickfarms.com

HUNTING/FISHING LODGING Acorns Resort 3710 Farnum Creek Road, Milford (785) 463-4000 www.acornsresortkansas.com

Country Lodgings 4062 O Road, Smith Center (785) 389-6281 Covert Creek Lodge LLC 1982 Co 671 Ave., Waldo (888) 942-3245 www.covertcreeklodge.com Cowboy Way Ranch & Vacations 10075 Shanuk Lane, Westmoreland (785) 456-8626 Cressler Creek Log Cabin 1302 North Road 80 East, Hoxie (785) 675-1295 www.cresslercreeklogcabin.com Dairy Barn Lodge RR 1 Box 20, Atwood (785) 626-3743

49


RESOURCE GUIDE

Proud Past – Brilliant Future Smoke in the Spring State BBQ Championship April 7 & 8, 2017 785-528-3714 (Osage City Hall) www.OsageCity.com

Don’s Guide Service, LLC 308 N Hobart, Glen Elder (785) 545-5651 www.donshuntingandfishingkansas.com

Midwest Outfitters, Inc. 1275 Heritage Road, Washington (785) 325-2577 www.midwestoutfittersinc.com

Double Arrow C Ranch 1209 P Road, Eureka (620) 583-7271 www.doublearrowc.com

Mikey’s Outfitting 1178 U.S. Hwy 24, Stockton (785) 425-7082 www.mikeysoutfitting.com

Double E Pheasant Ranch 2038 15th Ave., McPherson (620) 242-5430

Mom’s House Country Hunting Lodge 610 Road 25, Bird City (785) 734-2549

Doyle Creek Ranch Bunkhouse 2702 110th, Florence (620) 382-4228 http://doylecreekangus.com

Morris Gun Dogs & Guided Hunts 2104 Browning Ave., Manhattan (785) 477-2521 www.morrisgundogs.com

Eckman Hunting Preserve 988 E. 1800 Road, Baldwin City www.eckmanhuntingpreserve.com (785) 830-0034

Murphy’s at Stark 22030 Hwy 39, Stark (620) 754-3300 www.murphysatstark.com

Evergreen Lodge 805 E. Broadway, Jewell (785) 428-3569

Pheasant Hunters Paradise 15068 Road 17, Kismet (620) 629-1342 www.swkansaspheasanthunting.com

Farmyard Lodge 1281 Vale Road, Concordia (785) 243-7336 Flint Hills Adventures, Inc. 1439 Road 29, Elk City (620) 673-4066 www.flinthillsadventures.com Flint Oak 2639 Quail Road, Fall River (620) 658-4401 www.flintoak.com Flying W Ranch LLC R1, Box 11, Clements (620) 340-2802 www.flying-w-ranch.net Refer to directions on site.

America’s Premier Shooting Resort

Featuring Field Hunts, European Driven Shoots, Duck Hunts, 5-Star Shooting Sports. Luxury accommodations and Fine Dining Memberships available Flint Oak, Fall River, KS

620-658-4401

www.flintoak.com

Pheasant Runn Hunting and Guide Service 25047 160 Ave., Collyer (785) 635-2030 www.pheasantrunn.com Pilgrim Ranch Retreat 1895 AA 180th Rd., Cottonwood Falls (620) 344-5991 www.pilgrimranch.com Posusta Lodging 20436 Beatty Road, Lucas (785) 526-7767 Prairie Wings Gamebirds RR1 Box 43, Webber (785) 753-4871

Gasper Farms Hunting 1326 W. 160th Drive, Osborne (785) 346-2697

Rancho Milagro Ranch 2366 Ave. K, Brookville (785) 472-4850 www.ranchomilagroks.com

Iron Gate Lodge 12740 NW Belleview Rd., Oswego (620) 870-9766 www.irongatelodge.net

Ravenwood Lodge 10147 SW 61st St. Topeka (785) 256-6444 www.ravenwoodlodge.com

Kansas Creek Gamebirds 435 80 Rd., Jamestown (785) 335-2381 www.kansascreekgamebirds.com

Ringneck County 2030 Rd. A, Goodland (785) 332-0408 www.ringneckcountry.com Ringneck Ranch 655 Solomon Lane, Tipton (785) 373-4835 www.ringneckranch.net

Kansas Creek Inn 1330 Union Road., Concordia (785) 243-9988 www.kansascreekinn.com Kansas Trophy Whitetails 1539 Indian Rd., Morrowville (785) 265-3360 www.kansastrophywhitetails.com Kuhrt Ranch Resort 2735 Road 75, Edson (785) 899-5306 www.kuhrtranch.com Lazy D Outfitters, Inc. 3330 DD Road, Madison (620) 437-2027 www.lazydoutfitters.com Lil’ Toledo Lodge 10600 170th Road, Chanute (620) 244-5668 www.liltoledo.com The Lodge 250 S. Main St., Hoisington (620) 653-4771 www.purpleprairie.net

Saline River Hunting Lodge & Guide Service 20015 260 Ave., WaKeeney (785) 743-5878 www.salinelodge.com Sappa Creek Lodge R2, Oberlin (785) 475-3720 www.sappacreeklodge.com Shaps Beaver Creek Ranch 6404 Rd 23, Goodland (785) 899-5942 www.shapsranch.com Slate Creek Lodge 403 South West Rd., Wellington (620) 717-1655 Smoky River Rendezvous 115 Belleview., Winona (785) 846-7785 http://smokyriverrend.com


RESOURCE GUIDE Solomon Valley Outfitters 1319 Kansas St., Downs (785) 545-5327 Spearpoint Ranch 1890 N 215th Road, Barnard (785) 524-5330 www.spearpointranch.com Special T Hunting 639 210 Rd., Beloit (785) 529-4081 www.specialthunting.com Spillman Creek Lodge 1125 E Pike Drive, Sylvan Grove (785) 277-3424 www.spillmanceek.com Sportsmens Lodge 2523 Ave. E., Wilson (785) 658-2424 Sunflower Inn 102 Clifton St., Clifton (785) 455-3770 T&C Wildlife Hunt Club 2461 Arrowhead Road, Arcadia (620) 638-4300 www.time2hunt.com The Farm House 22035 160 Ave, WaKeeney (785) 769-5351 The Fin and Feather Lodge 200 E. Kansas, Glen Elder (308) 390-9370 www.thefinandfeatherlodge.com Timber Creek Lodge 1960 W 7th Road, Mankato (785) 428-3601 West Lake Inn 259 West Hwy 24, Downs (785) 454-3345 www.downsks.net Wheatland Hunting Lodge 2589 Hwy K-148, Agenda (785) 732-6498 Wolf Creek Outfitters 20050 Mellard Road, Lucas (785) 525-6200 www.wolfcreekhunting.net

STATE PARKS/FISHING LAKES Cedar Bluff State Park 32001 147 Hwy, Ellis (785) 726-3212 Includes cabins and campsites Cheney State Park 16000 NE 50th, Cheney (316) 542-3664 Includes cabins and campsites Clinton State Park 798 N. 1415 Road, Lawrence (785) 842-8562 Includes cabins and campsites Crawford State Park 1 Lake Road, Farlington (620) 362-3671 Includes cabins and campsites Cross Timbers State Park 144 Hwy 105, Toronto (620) 637-2213 Includes cabins and campsites Eisenhower State Park 29810 S. Fairlawn Road, Osage City (785) 528-4102 Includes cabins and campsites

TravelKS.com El Dorado State Park 618 NE Bluestem Road, El Dorado (316) 321-7180 Includes cabins and campsites Elk City State Park 4825 Squaw Creek Road, Independence (620) 331-6295 Includes cabins and campsites

Tuttle Creek State Park 5800 A River Pond Road, Manhattan (785) 539-7941 Includes cabins and campsites Webster State Park 1140 10 Rd., Stockton (785) 425-6775 Includes cabins and campsites

Fall River State Park 144 Hwy 105, Toronto (620) 637-2213 Includes campsites

Wilson State Park No. 3 State Park Road, Sylvan Grove (785) 658-2465 Includes cabins and campsites

Glen Elder State Park 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder (785) 545-3345 Includes campsites

State Fishing Lakes

Hillsdale State Park 26001 W. 255th St., Paola (913) 783-4507 Includes RV camping and campsites Kanopolis State Park 200 Horsethief Road, Marquette (785) 546-2565 Includes cabins and campsites Kaw River State Park 300 Southwest Wanamaker Road, Topeka (785) 273-6740 No camping Lovewell State Park 2446 250 Road, Webber (785) 753-4971 Includes cabins and campsites Meade State Park 13051 V Road, Meade (620) 873-2572 Includes camping Milford State Park 3612 State Park Road, Milford (785) 238-3014 Includes cabins and campsites Mined Land Wildlife Area 7545 NW Belleview Rd., Columbus (620) 827-6301 Includes cabins and campsites Mushroom Rock State Park 200 Horsethief Road, Marquette (785) 546-2565 No camping Perry State Park 5441 Westlake Road, Ozawkie (785) 246-3449 Includes cabins and campsites Pomona State Park 22900 S. Hwy 368, Vassar (785) 828-4933 Includes cabins and campsites Prairie Dog State Park 13037 State Hwy 261, Norton (785) 877-2953 Includes cabins and campsites Prairie Spirit Trail State Park 419 South Oak, Garnett (785) 448-6767 No camping Sand Hills State Park 4207 East 56th, Hutchinson (316) 542-3664 Includes campsites Scott State Park 101 West Scott Lake Drive, Scott City (620) 872-2061 Includes cabins and campsites

Atchison State Fishing Lake 11692 Pawnee Rd., Atchison (913) 367-7811 Barber State Fishing Lake Medicine Lodge (620) 895-6446 Black Kettle State Fishing Lake Moundridge (620) 628-4592 Bourbon State Fishing Lake 10 miles south of Moran on Hwy 59 to Elsmore, then east 4 miles (620)-449-2539 Brown State Fishing Lake Robinson (913) 367-7811 Butler State Fishing Lake Latham (620) 876-5730 Chase State Fishing Lake 1130 Lake Road, Cottonwood Falls (620) 767-5900 Clark State Fishing Lake Kingsdown (620) 227-8609 Concannon State Fishing Lake Garden City (620) 276-8886 Cowley State Fishing Lake 20467 U.S. Hwy 166, Dexter (620) 876-5730 Crawford State Fishing Lake 9 miles north, 1 mile east of Girard (620) 362-3671 Douglas State Fishing Lake Baldwin City (913) 845-2665 Finney State Fishing Lake Garden City (620) 276-8886 Ford State Fishing Lake Dodge City (620) 895-6446 Geary State Fishing Lake Junction City (785) 461-5402 Goodman State Fishing Lake Ness City (620) 276-8886 Hain State Fishing Lake Spearville (620) 895-6446 Hamilton State Fishing Lake Syracuse (620) 227-8609

KANSAS OUTDOORS

Hodgeman State Fishing Lake Jetmore (620) 276-8886

Shawnee State Fishing Lake Silver Lake (913) 845-2665

Jewell State Fishing Lake 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder (785) 545-3345

Sheridan State Fishing Lake Located 12 miles east and ¾ mile north of Hoxie. (913) 877-2953

Kingman State Fishing Lake 8685 W. Hwy 54, Cunningham (620) 532-3242 Kiowa State Fishing Lake Greensburg (620) 895-6446 Leavenworth State Fishing Lake 24421 Parallel Road, Tonganoxie (913) 845-2665 Logan State Fishing Lake 1.5 mile north and 3 miles west of Russell Springs (785) 726-3212 Louisburg Middle Creek State Fishing Lake Louisburg (913) 783-4507 Lyon State Fishing Lake 2272 Road 250, Reading (620) 699-3372 McPherson State Fishing Lake 2450 Pueblo Road, Canton (620) 628-4592 Meade State Fishing Lake Meade (620) 873-2572 Miami State Fishing Lake 387th St., Fontana (913) 783-4507 Montgomery State Fishing Lake Independence (620) 331-6820 Nebo State Fishing Lake Holton (913) 793-3066 Neosho State Fishing Lake Saint Paul (620) 449-2539 Osage State Fishing Lake Carbondale (620) 699-3372 Ottawa State Fishing Lake Located about 25 miles north of Salina on US-81, and 8 miles east on KS-106. 1079 N. 190th Rd., Minneapolis (785) 658-2465 Ext. 3 Pottawatomie Lake No. 1 and No. 2 State Fishing Lakes Manhattan (785) 539-9999

Sherman Wildlife Area Located 7 miles south, 2 miles west of Goodland. (785) 726-3212 Washington State Fishing Lake Washington (785) 461-5402 Wilson State Fishing Lake Buffalo (620) 637-2748 Woodson State Fishing Lake Toronto (620) 637-2748 State Fishing Reservoirs Cedar Bluff Reservoir 13 miles south of I-70 Ogallah Interchange (exit 135) on K-147 32001 147 Hwy, Ellis (785) 726-3212 Cheney Reservoir Wichita Clinton Reservoir 5 miles west of Lawrence Council Grove Reservoir 1 mile north of Council Grove (620) 767-5195 El Dorado Reservoir El Dorado Elk City Reservoir Independence (620) 331-6820 Fall River Reservoir Fall River Glen Elder Reservoir 2131 180 Road, Glen Elder Hillsdale Reservoir Paola John Redmond Reservoir ½ mile south and 1 mile west of New Strawn (620) 364-8613 Kanopolis Reservoir 33 miles SW of Salina on K-149 and K141 US, Kanopolis (785) 546-2294 Keith Sebelius Reservoir Located at 4 miles west and 1 mile south from Norton

Rocky Ford State Fishing Lake Manhattan (785) 539-9999

La Cygne Reservoir Southeast of La Cygne (913) 795-2218

Rooks State Fishing Lake 1140 10 Road, Stockton (785) 425-6775

Lovewell Reservoir Webber (785) 753-4971

Saline State Fishing Lake North from I-70 exit 249 to Watkins Road, then east 1 mile to Gerard Road, then north ½ mile to entrance. (785) 628-8614

Marion Reservoir Just north of U.S. 56, between Marion and Hillsboro Hillsboro (620) 382-2101

Scott State Fishing Lake 520 W. Scott Lake Drive, Scott City (620) 872-2061

Melvern Reservoir 35 miles south of Topeka on US-75 (785) 549-3318

51


52

KANSAS OUTDOORS

RESOURCE GUIDE

2017

Milford Reservoir 5 miles northwest of Junction City on US-77 Perry Reservoir Perry Toronto Reservoir 15 miles southwest of Yates Center, Fall River (620) 583-6783 Tuttle Creek Reservoir 5 miles notth of Manhattan Manhattan

Bonner Springs Tourism & Events www.bonnersprings.org Cloud County Tourism 130 E. Sixth St., Concordia (785) 243-4303 www.cloudcountytourism.com Coffey County www.explorecoffeycounty.com Colby CVB 350 S. Range, Suite 10, Colby (785) 460-7643 www.oasisontheplains.com Crawford County CVB 117 West Fourth St. Pittsburg (620) 231-1212 www.visitcrawfordcounty.com

Webster Reservoir 1210 9 Road, Stockton Wilson Reservoir Sylvan Grove (785) 658-2551 Rivers and Streams Arkansas River Oxford Neosho River at Chetopa Dam Chetopa Saline River Low-water dam at Lincoln Wilson Reservoir Wildlife Area No boat access Smoky Hill River Kanopolis Reservoir Wildlife Area (785) 658-2465 Salina No boat access Solomon River Beloit Low-water dam at Minneapolis Solomon River (north fork) Glen Elder Reservoir Wildlife Area Solomon River (south fork) Glen Elder Reservoir Wildlife Area *Community Lake resources can be found at www.ksoutdoors.com/ news/Fishing/Where-to-Fish-inKansas

ADVERTISERS BlackJack Kennels 23800 Douglas Road, Chanute (620) 431-7242 www.blackjackkennels.com Bluff Creek Hunting Preserve 755 NW 80 Ave., Harper (620) 254-7773

Independence Convention & Visitors Bureau (800) 882-3606 http://indkschamber.org

Retire to the Flint Hills 501 Poyntz Ave., Manhattan (785) 776-8829 www.retiretotheflinthills.com

Kansas Turnpike Authority www.ksturnpike.com

Rolling Hills Zoo 625 Hedville Road, Salina (785) 827-9488 rollinghillszoo.org

Labette County Tourism 112 South 17th St., Parsons (800) 280-6401 www.visitlabette.com Lecompton Historical Society 319 Elmore St., Lecompton (785) 887-6520 Liberal (800) LIBERAL www.visitliberal.com

Dodge City CVB 400 W. Wyatt Earp Blvd., Dodge City (620) 225-8186 www.visitdodgecity.org

Manhattan CVB 501 Poyntz Ave., Manhattan (785) 776-8829 www.manhattancvb.org

Emporia Area Chamber & CVB 719 Commercial St., Emporia (620) 342-1600 www.emporiakschamber.org

Marion County 200 S. Third St., Suite 104, Marion (620) 382-2185 www.marioncoks.net

Finney County Convention & Visitors Bureau 1513 E. Fulton Terrace, Garden City (620) 276-0607 www.finneycountycvb.com

Norton Chamber of Commerce www.nortonlocal.com

Flint Oak Hunting Lodge 2639 Quail Rd, Fall River (620) 658-4401 www.flintoak.com Fort Scott Area Chamber & Tourism 231 E. Wall St., Fort Scott (620) 223-3566 www.fortscott.com Geary County Covention & Visitors Bureau www.juncitioncity.org Great Bend Convention & Visitors Bureau 3111 10th St., Great Bend (620) 792-2750 www.visitgreatbend.com

Oakley Area Tourism 209 Hudson Ave., Oakley (785) 671-1000 www.discoveroakley.com Osage City 201 South 5th, Osage City (785) 528-3714 www.osagecity.com Overland Park Arboretum & Botanical Gardens 8909 West 179th, Overland Park (913) 685-3604 www.opkansas.org Prairie Band Casino & Resort 12305 150th Road, Mayetta (785) 966-7764 www.prairieband.com Pratt Chamber of Commerce www.prattkansas.org

Hays CVB 2700 Vine St., Hays (785) 628-8202 www.haysusa.net

Pratt Convention & Visitors Bureau (888) 886-1164 www.prattkansas.org

I-70 Association www.kansasI70.com

Ravenwood Lodge 10147 SW 61st St., Topeka (785) 256-6444 www.ravenwoodlodge.com

BLUFF CREEK hunting preserve

Offer guided field hunts by host, Mike Gammill. Enjoy a relaxing day of guided game bird hunting for Quail, Pheasant and Chuckars.

ger 17 and youn hunter. HUNT for ult 1 time FREE panied by paying ad m when acco 50 per gun 1/2 day $1 50 per gun s Full day $2 12 Quail, 9 Chuckar , nt sa ea Ph 6 eded ne if ed id Dogs Prov r gun t $100 pe or Boy Hun 1/2 day Po uded cl No dogs in or 8 Quail 4 pheasant

• YOUTH HUNTS • • CHURCH GROUPS • • ADULTS • • ONE DAY HUNTS •

HUNTING SEASON SEPT 1 - MARCH 31ST 755 NW 80 Ave. | Harper, KS 620-254-7773 | 620-842-2521

Shawnee County Parks & Recreation (785) 291-2658 www.snco.us Sherman County CVB 925 Main St, Goodland (785) 890-3515 Vanderbilt’s www.vanderbilts.com Visit Topeka 618 S. Kansas Ave, Topeka (785) 234-1030 www.visittopeka.com WaKeeney Travel & Tourism (877) 962-7248 www.wakeeney.org


2 017 - 2 0 1 8

TravelKS.com

KANSAS OUTDOORS

53

HUNTING

SEASONS DEER (Permit required) (proposed season dates) • Youth and disabled hunters: Sept. 2-10, 2017 • Muzzleloader: Sept. 11-24, 2017 • Archery: Sept. 11-Dec. 31, 2017 • Regular Firearm: Nov. 29-Dec.10, 2017 SPRING TURKEY (Permit required) • Youth/Disabled Season: April 1 - 11, 2017 • Archery-Only Season: April 3 - 11, 2017 • Regular Season (firearm/archery): April 12 - May 31, 2017 FALL TURKEY (Permit required) • Season: Oct. 1 – Nov. 28 and Dec. 11, 2017 Jan. 31, 2018 PHEASANT • Regular Season: Nov. 11, 2017–Jan. 31, 2018 • Youth Season: Nov. 4-5, 2017 • Daily Bag Limit: 4 cocks in regular season, 2 cocks in youth season • Possession Limit: 16 during regular season; 4 in youth season QUAIL • Regular Season: Nov. 11, 2017-Jan. 31, 2018 • Youth Season: Nov. 4-5, 2017 • Daily Bag Limit: 8 in regular season, 4 in youth season • Possession Limit: 32 in regular season; 8 in youth season GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKEN (Permit required) • Early Season (Greater Prairie Chicken Unit): Sept. 15 - Oct. 15, 2017 • Regular Season (Greater Prairie Chicken Unit): Nov. 8, 2017 - Jan. 31, 2018 • Daily Bag Limit: 2 • Possession Limit: 8

SQUIRREL • Season: June 1, 2017 - Feb. 29, 2018 • Daily bag limit: 5 • Possession limit: 20 RABBITS (Cottontail & Jackrabbit) • Season: All year • Daily bag limit: 10 • Possession limit: 30 CROW • Season: Nov.10, 2017- March 10, 2018 • No Limit FURBEARERS (Hunting and trapping) • Season: Nov. 15, 2017 - Feb. 15, 2018 • No limit • Species: badger, bobcat, mink, muskrat, opossum, raccoon, swift fox, red fox, gray fox, striped skunk, weasel. BEAVER AND OTTER TRAPPING • Season (statewide): Nov. 15, 2017 - March 31, 2018 • NO OPEN TRAPPING OR HUNTING SEASON ON ANY OTHER FURBEARERS COYOTES HUNTING & TRAPPING • Season (statewide): All year DOVE (Mourning , white-winged, Eurasian collared, and ringed turtle doves) • Season: Sept.1 – Nov. 29, 2017 • Daily bag limit: 15 (The daily bag limit applies to mourning and white-winged doves, single species or in combination. There is no limit on Eurasian collared and ringed turtle dove, but any taken in addition to a limit of mourning and white-winged doves must have a fully-feathered wing attached during transport.) • Possession limit: 45

EXOTIC DOVE (Eurasian collared and ringed turtle doves only) • Season: Nov. 30, 2017 - Feb. 28, 2018 • No limit • All Eurasian collared and ringed turtle doves must retain a fully feathered wing during transport RAIL (Sora and Virginia) • Season: Sept. 1 - Nov 9, 2017 • Daily bag limit: 25 • Possession limit: 75 COMMON SNIPE • Season: Sept. 1 - Dec. 16, 2017 • Daily bag limit: 8 • Possession limit: 24 WOODCOCK • Season: Oct. 14 - Nov. 27, 2017 • Daily bag limit: • Possession limit: 9 SANDHILL CRANE (Permit required) • Season: Nov. 8, 2017 - Jan. 4, 2018 • Daily bag limit: 3 • Possession limit: 9

FOR MORE REGULATIONS AND TO VIEW UNIT MAPS, GO TO KSOUTDOORS.COM


51

27

Elkhart

MORTON

STANTON

160

51

270

56

70

270

STEVENS

Hugoton

51

4

83

54

160

Sublette HASKELL SEWARD

144

83

GRAHAM

9

383

40

TREGO

24

23

23

96

FORD

MEADE

283

283

283

54

34

34

154

183

Ashland

154

56

Jetmore

283

Ness City

147

Wakeeney

Hill City

160

60

183

Philipsburg

383

Hays

KIOWA

50

183 156

1

19

4

19

PRATT

156

64

281

8

54

281

42

61

50

ST. John

Medicine Lodge

Pratt

232

BARTON

Great Bend

281

281

STAFFORD

Larned

96

18

281

181

24

RUSSELL

Russel

281

281

Osborne

COMANCHE BARBER

Coldwater

160

Greensburg

183

9

281

Smith Center

OSBORNE

SMITH

8

Wilson

EDWARDS

Kinsley

PAWNEE

36

PHILLIPS

Webster 183

La Crosse

RUSH

ELLIS

70

18

24

Stockton

ROOKS

Prairie Dog

CLARK

Dodge City

HODGEMAN

156

NESS

Meade

Meade

23

98

Dighton

283

Norton

NORTON

Cedar Bluff

Cimarron

GRAY

Hoxie

23

SHERIDAN

123

36

DECATUR

Gove

83

Oberlin

LANE

GOVE

FINNEY

156

Liberal 83

190

160

83

50 Garden City

83

Scott City

83

117

56

28

141

4

SALINE

140

96

61

61

17

HARPER

14

2

Anthony

179

14

Kingman

42

49

177

166

149

77

57

BUTLER

15 15

38

COWLEY

16

9

96

Eureka

170

57

54

LYON

159

OSAGE

470

75

31 Lyndon

99

96 39

Fredonia

99

Sedan

68

57

75

50

39

Iola

166

52

7

65

31

169

146 Erie

7

7

26

69

66

103

57

166

66

96

57

160 Pittsburg 126

54 Fort Scott

239

52

68

150

435

7 69

31

52

135

Columbus 69 CHEROKEE

126

Girard CRAWFORD

3

39

54

BOURBON

3

Mound City

Oswego 59

59

57

LABETTE

101

Parsons

NEOSHO

47

Paola

7

Crawford ALLEN Chanute

169

59

LINN

169

MIAMI

Prairie Spirit Trail ANDERSON

169

68

JOHNSON

69

Hillsdale

35 33

Olathe

Clinton

32 Lawrence 10 DOUGLAS

59

31 Garnet

57

Atchison

73 7 192 Leavenworth 92 59 LEAVENOskaloosaWORTH 635 WYANDOTTE 5 16 24 Kansas 40 City

FRANKLIN

96

160

37

169

MONTGOMERY Coffeyville

96

47

75

4

Ottawa 268

56

Topeka

Burlington

Independence

Elk City

160

Howard

39

WILSON

Yates Center

COFFEY WOODSON

92

Perry

75

4

9

36

DONIPHAN

120 Troy 20

7

73

JEFFERSON

Cross Timbers

ELK CHAUTAUQUA

166

20

159

Holton 116 ATCHISON

75

Hiawatha

73

Pomona

31

4

159 BROWN

SHAWNEE

Kaw

JACKSON

Emporia

Fall River

El Dorado

160 Winfield

77

54

Arkansas City

77

254

62

Seneca

75

Eisenhower

56

GREENWOOD

35

Cottonwood Falls

50

99

63

70

WABAUNSEE

Alma

18

Manhattan

Westmoreland

POTTAWATOMIE

187

NEMAHA

63

Tuttle Creek

Council Grove 177

177

87

99

MARSHALL

13

GEARY

4

CHASE

150

MORRIS

77

113

24

16

9

36

177 40 Junction City 57

177

77

Marysville

77

El Dorado

MARION

196

82

56

Marion

43

18

82

24

RILEY

15

TRAVELKS.COM

81

81

160

55

53

15

35W

35

235

Wichita

Wellington

49

296

96

81

15

15

Abilene

SEDGWICK

50

56

4

Clay Center

15

CLAY DICKINSON

9

148

WASHINGTON

Washington

15

Milford

Newton

HARVEY

SUMNER

44

Hutchinson

Cheney

14

81

104

McPHERSON 35W Mc Pherson

Kanopolis Lyons

Salina

OTTAWA

Mushroom Rock

70

CLOUD

Belleville

Concordia

81

106

Minneapolis

Sand Hills

KINGMAN

RENO

RICE

2

14 ELLSWORTH

Ellsworth

14

156

Lincoln

LINCOLN

181

36

81

Lovewell

REPUBLIC

Glen Elder

9

JEWELL

Beloit

MITCHELL

128

14

Mankato

28

2017

KSOUTDOORS.COM

25

270

GRANT

190

KEARNY

25

SCOTT

383

Oakley

Scott

LOGAN

25

Colby

25

THOMAS

Ulysses

25

Atwood

RAWLINS

Lakin

WICHITA

Leoti

Goodland

Sharon Springs

27

Tribune

27

270

27

Johnson

HAMILTON

Syracuse

50

GREELEY

96

WALLACE

40

SHERMAN

24

CHEYENNE

36

ST. Francis

25

KSOutdoors.com and TravelKS.com for more information on state parks, outdoor activities, events and more.

VISIT

161

KANSAS OUTDOORS

27

54 STATE MAP


FIND YOUR

ADVENTURE one-page at a time with

vol 71 2015 | winter

| issue

SPRING 2016

sas 4 | kan

KANSAS! magazine

om mag.c

| VOL 72 | ISSUE 1 | KANSASMAG.C OM

SUMMER 2016

OM 2 | KANSASMAG.C | VOL 72 | ISSUE

APE the DSC LANISSUE

Native-American Pride FALL

2016 | VOL 72

| ISS UE

3 | KA NSAS MAG.C OM

the

BEVERAGE ISSUE

of years

azine g a m ! s Kansa

celebrate Touring t he don’t-mis h e o ns t our home in Kansa s

$4.99

range

en s / explore gard our national park

n menot to tion erings

gath city / kansas art

$4.99

Buffalo Soldiers

tallgras s filmmaker s

small-ba tc bread ba h keries

Subscribe today at www.kansasmag.com


2017 Kansas Outdoors Guide  

Your guide to Kansas cycling, hiking, disc golf, hunting dogs, and all outdoor adventures.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you