Page 1

FROM KAMLOOPS TO DELTA TO THE GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS ON JUST ONE CHARGE Join KTW on pages A16-A17 as we hop aboard the TRAXX Coachlines electric bus kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 35

kamthisweek

#YKASTRONG

RCMP contract will impact Kamloops taxpayers MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops taxpayers will shoulder an increase in police costs in 2022, but how big a bill is still being tabulated. In August, RCMP members ratified their first collective agreement between the federal Treasury Board and the National Police Federation, providing a 23.7 per cent pay increase over six years, retroactive to 2016. Communities across Canada, including Kamloops, are now examining the details of the deal and how it impacts them. The contract covers RCMP members below the rank of inspector — which applies to most

of Kamloops’ 132 officers — as well as reservists, with pay rates changing within 90 days of the contract’s Aug. 6 signing. Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian said the contract will result in a tax increase in 2022 and expects the rise in police costs to be “significant.” “The RCMP will be better served by this new contract — I think it’s been overdue — but the funding of it is going to be something the taxpayers need to be prepared for,” he said. How much of a cost taxpayers will bear remains unclear. Christian said the hit to taxpayers will be offset by annual contributions the municipality has been making to its police reserve fund since 2018 in

anticipation of the contract. “It won’t be the full 24 per cent,” Christian said, noting the city also doesn’t generally operate with its full complement of officers. Michael Helfrich, the city’s business manager for community protective services, said staff are in the middle of assessing the impact of the new contract on the police budget. Christian said he is expecting to receive a report on the new police costs from the finance department in November as budget talks ramp up, noting the amount will depend on the complement of officers Kamloops has had over the contract term, back pay and the mix of ranks at the Kamloops detachment, along with their new

pay scales going forward. “You put all that into a hopper and we’ll come out with a tax increase,” he said. As the new contract was a national negotiation, Christian believes the federal government should be on the hook for the lump sum of back pay Kamloops officers will receive — a point he wants to make with whomever becomes the next member of Parliament for KamloopsThompson-Cariboo following the Sept. 20 federal election. Asked if there was a way around increasing taxes, Christian said the police force could be reduced, but that’s an option he doesn’t think is wise. “I don’t think it would signal the right direction to be reducing

the number of police officers,” he said, noting increased calls for service regarding street-related issues. While the added cost will hit taxpayers, Christian said the pay is needed because of recruitment and retention struggles. Christian said it is his understanding the RCMP is one of the lowest-paying police forces in Canada. “What that means is you don’t get the brightest and best candidates applying to [RCMP Academy] Depot because they could apply to the Justice Institute and wind up in Abbotsford, Victoria or Vancouver [municipal forces] at a lot more money,” Christian said. See POLICING, A6

MEET YOUR MULTI MEDIA MARKETING SPECIALISTS www.kamloopsthisweek.com ktwdigital.com 250-374-7467 | 1365B Dalhousie Dr.

LINDA SKELLY Print/Digital Sales

JODI LAWRENCE Print/Digital Sales

LIZ SPIVEY Print/Digital Sales

PAUL DE LUCA Print/Digital Sales

MAKAYLA PEVERILL Digital Sales

RAJ SONI Digital Sales


Join KTW on pages A16-A17 as we hop aboard the TRAXX Coachlines electric bus kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 35

kamthisweek

#YKASTRONG

RCMP contract will impact Kamloops taxpayers MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops taxpayers will shoulder an increase in police costs in 2022, but how big a bill is still being tabulated. In August, RCMP members ratified their first collective agreement between the federal Treasury Board and the National Police Federation, providing a 23.7 per cent pay increase over six years, retroactive to 2016. Communities across Canada, including Kamloops, are now examining the details of the deal and how it impacts them. The contract covers RCMP members below the rank of inspector — which applies to most

of Kamloops’ 132 officers — as well as reservists, with pay rates changing within 90 days of the contract’s Aug. 6 signing. Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian said the contract will result in a tax increase in 2022 and expects the rise in police costs to be “significant.” “The RCMP will be better served by this new contract — I think it’s been overdue — but the funding of it is going to be something the taxpayers need to be prepared for,” he said. How much of a cost taxpayers will bear remains unclear. Christian said the hit to taxpayers will be offset by annual contributions the municipality has been making to its police reserve fund since 2018 in

anticipation of the contract. “It won’t be the full 24 per cent,” Christian said, noting the city also doesn’t generally operate with its full complement of officers. Michael Helfrich, the city’s business manager for community protective services, said staff are in the middle of assessing the impact of the new contract on the police budget. Christian said he is expecting to receive a report on the new police costs from the finance department in November as budget talks ramp up, noting the amount will depend on the complement of officers Kamloops has had over the contract term, back pay and the mix of ranks at the Kamloops detachment, along with their new

pay scales going forward. “You put all that into a hopper and we’ll come out with a tax increase,” he said. As the new contract was a national negotiation, Christian believes the federal government should be on the hook for the lump sum of back pay Kamloops officers will receive — a point he wants to make with whomever becomes the next member of Parliament for KamloopsThompson-Cariboo following the Sept. 20 federal election. Asked if there was a way around increasing taxes, Christian said the police force could be reduced, but that’s an option he doesn’t think is wise. “I don’t think it would signal the right direction to be reducing

the number of police officers,” he said, noting increased calls for service regarding street-related issues. While the added cost will hit taxpayers, Christian said the pay is needed because of recruitment and retention struggles. Christian said it is his understanding the RCMP is one of the lowest-paying police forces in Canada. “What that means is you don’t get the brightest and best candidates applying to [RCMP Academy] Depot because they could apply to the Justice Institute and wind up in Abbotsford, Victoria or Vancouver [municipal forces] at a lot more money,” Christian said. See POLICING, A6

Fighting for you Paid for and authorized by the official agent of the candidate. cope:225-xx

BillSundhu.ndp.ca

 Bill.Sundhu@ndp.ca  fb.com/BillSundhuNDP  @bsundhu

MEET YOUR MULTI MEDIA MARKETING SPECIALISTS www.kamloopsthisweek.com ktwdigital.com 250-374-7467 | 1365B Dalhousie Dr.

LINDA SKELLY Print/Digital Sales

JODI LAWRENCE Print/Digital Sales

LIZ SPIVEY Print/Digital Sales

PAUL DE LUCA Print/Digital Sales

MAKAYLA PEVERILL Digital Sales

RAJ SONI Digital Sales


Jagmeet Singh and I are fighting for you – and it gets results. In the pandemic, Justin Trudeau had to be forced by the NDP to provide real supports for people: Double the emergency benefit for workers and the self-employed Make sure university and college students received emergency benefits Save people’s jobs and small businesses with a higher pandemic wage subsidy

While the Liberals and Conservatives are protecting billionaires, Jagmeet Singh and I are fighting to make a difference for you: Make life more affordable by reducing costs on prescription drugs, child care, housing and more Build a clean-energy economy that provides better jobs and better wages Close the loopholes and increase enforcement so the richest 1% pay their fair share

Vote NDP this time and help us take on the ultra-rich.

That’s how we can get more done for you.

Bill Sundhu is an accomplished human rights lawyer who has dedicated his life to standing up for fairness and justice for individuals, communities and Canadian values. Bill is a strong advocate for a fair economy, health care, environment – a caring society where no one is left behind. Bill stands for a Canada where everyone pays their fair share, gets their fair share and plays by fair rules.

BillSundhu.ndp.ca

 Bill.Sundhu@ndp.ca  fb.com/BillSundhuNDP  @bsundhu

Paid for and authorized by the official agent of the candidate. cope:225-xx

The last year has shown that when you send New Democrats to Ottawa, we get results. Jagmeet and I will keep fighting for you.


A2

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Ocean Wise Wild Pacific Sockeye Salmon Fillets previously frozen

399 /100 g

BC Fresh Peaches & Cream Corn

BUY ONE, GET ONE

FREE

CANADIAN GRAIN FED

Fresh Boneless Centre Cut Pork Loin Roast

on the cob

4 $3 FOR

BACK TO S CH OOL 199

Annie's Macaroni & Cheese 80% organic ingredients selected 170 g

BC Fresh Gala Apples 3.29/kg

149 lb

Pillsbury Pizza Pops 4's

each

2 $7 FOR

Danone Activia Active Probiotics Yogurt

699

Baked Fresh In-Store Mini Cookies

399

12's

assorted 24 pk

each

each

Marc Angelo Snackissimo

product of Italy 60 g – 70 g

Quaker Dipps Granola Bars 5's

449 each

269

PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 - THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Grow with us a pply onlin e AT FR ES HS TM AR KE T.C OM

SHOP ONLINE

GROCERY PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE NOW! SHOP.FRESHSTMARKET.COM

ABERDEEN MALL 20- 1320 TRANS - CANADA HWY WEST • FRESHSTMARKET.COM

each


PURCHASE 2 OR 3 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

15

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

%

PURCHASE 2 OR 3 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

15

A3

INS TANT SAVINGS *

PURCHASE 4 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

20

%

%

LUXURY REDEFINED INS TANT SAVINGS *

J U LY 2 9 T O O C T O B E R 3 1 , 2 0 2 1 PURCHASE 4 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

PURCHASE 2 OR 3 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

15

20

PURCHASE 5 OR MORE ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

25

%

%

INS TANT SAVINGS *

INS TANT SAVINGS * *

%

INS TANT SAVINGS * *

UNTETHERED

INS TANT SAVINGS * * *

REMOTE ACCESS Preheat. Check cooking status. Personalize settings. Connect to WiFi for real-time notif ications and control your appliance f rom anywhere. †

WALL OVENS

LUX UR Y R E D EFI N E D

PURCHASE 5 OR MORE PURCHASE 4 ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® * APPLIANCES AND DAPPLIANCES OUBLE. SIN GLE. MASTER TH E I N C R E D* IAND BLE WITH RECEIVE RECEIVE AN INTELLIGENT CULINARY EXPERIENCE THAT AWAITS YOUR TOUCH.

25

20

J U LY 2 9 T O O C T O B E R 3 1 , 2 0 2 1

%

%

SEE SALES ASSOCIATE IN-STORE FOR DETAILS AND AVAILABLE QUALIFYING MODELS INS TANT INS TANT SAVINGS * * * SAVINGS * * UNTETHERED

WALL OVENS

L U X U RSAVE Y R E D E F$1300 INED * BUILT-IN SAVINGS % COOK UP THE

25

DOUBLE. SINGLE. MASTER

UP TO

PURCHASE 5 OR MORE ELIGIBLE Δ JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES * AND RECEIVE

THE INCREDIBLE WITH AN INTELLIGENT CULINARY

J U LY 2 9 T O O WHEN C T O BYOU E R 3BUY 1 , 230OR 2 1 MORE SELECT SAVINGS EVENT

KITCHENAID ® MAJOR APPLIANCES*

JULY 29 – SEPTEMBER 29, 2021

SAVE $

L U X U500 RY

EXPERIENCE THAT AWAITS

INS TANT SAVINGS * * *

SAVE $

R E D E300 FINED

YOUR TOUCH.

UNTETHERED

REMOTE ACCESS Preheat. Check cooking status. Personalize settings. Connect to WiFi for real-time notif ications and control your appliance f rom anywhere. †

W SAVE ALL OVENS

100

$

DOUBLE. SINGLE. MASTER

THE INCREDIBLE WITH AN INTELLIGENT CULINARY

EXPERIENCE THAT AWAITS

qualifying on qualifying on qualifying J U LY 2 Built-In 9 T on ORefrigerators O C T Oand B E R 3 1 , Wall 20 2 1 Rangetops, 2 OR PURCHASE 3 4 ORSAVE MORE Y O U R PURCHASE T O Built-In UCH. Ovens, Cooktops, Ventilation, Δ

PURCHASE 1 ELIGIBLE Commercial Ranges* Under-Counter Fridge and Δ Microwaves, Warming Drawers, $Δ ELIGIBLE Ice Makers* Microwave Drawers and select ELIGIBLE ® JENNAIR APPLIANCE Dishwashers* ON THIS U N T®E T HERED SUITE *See Sales Associate for details and JENNAIR list of qualifying models. APPLIANCES JENNAIR ® APPLIANCES AND RECEIVE A LMANY L RECEIVE O VBRANDS E N S BELOW ON AND AND RECEIVE SHOPW OUR SALE

1300

SEE SALES ASSOCIATE IN-STORE FOR DETAILS AND AVAILABLE QUALIFYING MODELS ◊REFRIGERATOR PANELS QUALIFY AS AN ELIGIBLE MODEL

*

10

**

%

REMOTE ACCESS Instant savings equal to 20% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of four eligible JennAir® major appliance.

***

Instant savings equal to 25% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of five or more Check eligible JennAir® major appliances. Multiple purchases must be made at the same time from the same Preheat. cooking participating authorized Canadian JennAir® appliance dealer between July 29 and October 31, 2021 to be eligible. Instant savings will be deducted at time of purchase.

Δ

Eligible major appliances include JennAir® Refrigerators, Refrigerator Panels, Ranges, Wall Ovens, Cooktops, Specialty Coffee, Dishwashers and Ventilation hoods (excluding blowers), Under-Counter Refrigerators, compactors, Built-In microwaves and Warming Drawers. See Sales Associate for qualifying models. Accessories and cartridges are excluded. One claim per household. Offer is not cumulative and cannot be combined Connect to WiFi for real-time with any other offer. Some conditions may apply. Open to Canadian residents only. Offer is not available to dealers, builders or contractors. Discontinued product and B channel products are not eligible. Offer is available on retail purchases only. All models may not be available at all dealers. No substitutes qualify. See Sales Associate and for Details. notif ications control your

15

%

DOUBLE. SINGLE. MASTER †

INTELLIGENT CULINARY

EXPERIENCE THAT AWAITS YOUR TOUCH.

INSTANT SAVINGS *

20

status. Personalize settings.

Appliance must be set to remote enable. Wi-Fi & App required. Features subject to change. For details and privacy info, visit jennair.ca/connected. †

© 2021 Used under in Canada. T H E ®/™ IN C JennAir. RED IB L license E W I T HAll rights A Nreserved.

*

*

Instant savings equal to 15% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of two or three eligible JennAir® major appliances.

KBSN60 8ESS KFDC506 JPA KDTM40 4KPS K V WB606DSS KMBP10 0ESS

appliance f rom anywhere.

%

SEE SALES ASSOCIATE IN-STORE FOR DETAILS AND AVAILABLE QUALIFYING MODELS ◊REFRIGERATOR PANELS QUALIFY AS AN ELIGIBLE MODEL

INSTANT SAVINGS **

Instant savings equal to 15% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of two or three eligible JennAir® major appliances.

INSTANT SAVINGS ***

**

REMOTE ACCESS Instant savings equal to 20% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of four eligible JennAir® major appliance.

***

Instant savings equal to 25% of total retail purchase price (before taxes) based on purchase of five or more Check eligible JennAir® major appliances. Multiple purchases must be made at the same time from the same Preheat. cooking participating authorized Canadian JennAir® appliance dealer between July 29 and October 31, 2021 to be eligible. Instant savings will be deducted at time of purchase.

status. Personalize settings. Eligible major appliances include JennAir® Refrigerators, Refrigerator Panels, Ranges, Wall Ovens, Cooktops, Specialty Coffee, Dishwashers and Ventilation hoods (excluding blowers), Under-Counter Refrigerators, compactors, Built-In microwaves and Warming Drawers. See Sales Associate for qualifying models. Accessories and cartridges are excluded. One claim per household. Offer is not cumulative and cannot be combined with any other offer. Some conditions may apply. Open to Canadian residents only. Offer is not available to dealers, builders or contractors. Discontinued product and B channel products are not eligible. Offer is available on retail purchases only. All models may not be available at all dealers. No substitutes qualify. See Sales Associate for Details.

WiFi for real-time Hwy. to Ashley O F F E236-425-4501 R E X P I R E| S1655 J UEast L YTrans 2 8Canada , 2 0 2Connect 1 . to(next S EE I N - Furniture S T O RHomestore) E F O R | Ddesignerappliances.ca E TA I L S . notif ications and control your Δ

Appliance must be set to remote enable. Wi-Fi & App required. Features subject to change. For details and privacy info, visit jennair.ca/connected. †

®/™ © 2021 JennAir. Used under license in Canada. All rights reserved.

appliance f rom anywhere.


A4

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE

Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

Council Calendar In-person public attendance is permitted. Masks are mandatory. Virtual attendance via Zoom is also an option. September 9, 2021 2:00 pm - Community Services Committee Meeting September 13, 2021 10:30 am - Finance Committee Meeting 2:00 pm - Community Relations and Administration Committee Meeting September 21, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting All meetings are currently being held at Norkam Mechanical Group Lounge (formerly Valley First Lounge), 300 Lorne Street. The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Notice To Motorists Please use caution when driving in the vicinity and obey all traffic control personnel, signs, and devices in the following areas: • Tranquille Road Singh Street to 12th Street • Fleetwood Avenue Southill Street to Desmond Street • 3rd Avenue Lansdowne Street to Lorne Street • Columbia Street West McGill Road to Notre Dame Drive To stay up to date on road work projects, visit: Kamloops.ca/Kammute

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

COMMUNITY CLIMATE ACTION PLAN

INDOOR RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES

BIG MOVES ART PROJECT

The City is committed to ensuring the health and safety of users and staff at the facility and is focused on meeting the safety protocols outlined by the Province and Interior Health. Residents should expect modifications and capacity restrictions and are asked to please be patient and be respectful to staff and other patrons. Pre-registration is required for all aquatic, fitness, gym, track, skating, and drop-in programs. Register now at: Kamloops.ca/PerfectMind Please note that masks are mandatory in all City facilities, including while exercising. For updates on the City's response to public health orders, visit: Kamloops.ca/COVID

While developing the recently-adopted Community Climate Action Plan (CCAP), grade 9 Westsyde Secondary School art students were asked to share their creative visions of the CCAP’s eight “Big Moves”, which outline strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase our resilience to climate change impacts. Local climate solutions were explored using a variety of art media, as well as personal reflections that highlighted the urgent need for climate action and hope for what can be achieved. To learn more, visit the youth art exhibit outside Cunliffe House (262 Lorne Street) in Riverside Park—on display until September 7— or view an online gallery of the student art at: Kamloops.ca/ClimateAction

MANAGING INVASIVE PLANTS Invasive plants spread quickly because the insect predators and plant pathogens that control them in their native habitats do not exist in our region. To mitigate the spreading of invasive plants such as Japanese knotweed, orange hawkweed, and yellow flag iris, follow these tips: • Be careful of sharing plants that are self-seeding, vigorous spreaders, or prolific growers. • Be cautious of ordering plant seeds online or through catalogues. • Be wary of wildflower mixes, as they many contain invasive species. • Grow regionally native plants in your garden. • Never dump garden waste or hanging baskets into natural areas. • Control weeds that grow under bird feeders. Often seeds in bird feeders fall out and begin to grow on the ground beneath, introducing foreign and potentially invasive plants to our environment. • If you discover invasive plants in your yard, contain them within your property to prevent them from spreading beyond. To learn more, visit: Kamloops.ca/InvasiveSpecies

BEAR SMART Black bears are highly dependent on berries from late summer to fall in order to prepare for winter denning. With the high temperatures this summer, many of these berries ripened early and some have already shriveled up on their stems. Bears that have spent the season dodging forest fires and smoke are now being drawn into our communities by for food sources, resulting in a higher number of conflicts. It is natural to feel concern for bears and want to leave water for them and not pick our fruit off trees. Unfortunately, we are doing a disservice to these bears when we allow them to find shelter and food near people. Eventually, a bear that avoided human activity will now become accustomed to it, and then linger in neighbourhoods to feed on human sources of food. When the fruit wanes, the bear may then move to other easy food sources such as unsecured garbage, birdseed and greasy BBQs. This results in a dangerous situation for people and bears. These bears often have to be destroyed by the Conservation Officer Service when their behaviour is deemed a risk to the public. The best way to keep people and bears out of conflict is to remove all sources of food for bears and continue reporting your sightings or conflicts to the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277. Keep your garbage secure until the morning of collection. Pick your fruit and do not let it accumulate on the ground. If you have chickens, beehives or other livestock, protect them using an electric fence. To help educate residents on the City's Bear Bylaw, Community Services Officers will be conducting night patrols between 12:00 am–8:00 am to monitor people placing their carts out prior to 4:00 am.

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FEDERAL ELECTION Q&A CONTINUES Candidates Frank Caputo and Jesse McCormick are featured today

A12-A13

HOW DID GREG STEWART DO?

RESUMING SCHOOL AMID PANDEMIC

Paralympian competed last night. Results at kamloopsthisweek.com

TRU and SD73 are again navigating COVID-19 as classes are set to begin

A30

A14-A15

INSIDE KTW

SIGN OF THE VANDALISM TIMES

Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A19 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A24 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A25 Comics/Crossword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A35 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A37

The destruction of NDP election signs is “a targeted assault that is making people of colour feel attacked and vulnerable in their own community,” according to Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo NDP candidate Bill Sundhu. Other signs, including Green candidate Iain Currie’s, have also been targeted by vandals. Attacks on campaign signs were also seen in the 2020 provincial election, the 2019 federal election and the 2018 civic election. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

TODAY’S FLYERS

YIG*, Walmart*, Staples*, Shoppers*, Save-On-Foods*, Safeway*, Rona*, Rexall*, Pharmasave*, Peavey Mart*, Michaels*, M&M Meats*, London Drugs*, Manshadi*, Home Hardware*, Frescho*, Canadian Tire* * Selected distribution

WEATHER FORECAST Sept. 1 Sun/clouds 23/9 (hi/low) Sept. 2: Sunny 25/10 (hi/low) Sept. 3: Sunny 27/12 (hi/low) Sept. 4: Sun/clouds 26/15 (hi/low) Sept. 5: Sun/clouds 25/14 (hi/low)

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek twitter.com/ KamThisWeek youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

HOW TO REACH US: Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

A5

Resistance to vaccine card plan SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops gym owner said she disagrees with the vaccine card system the provincial government said it will be using as of Sept. 13, but will wait to see if other businesses join her before committing to defying the orders. The proof-of-vaccination system would bar access to certain social and recreational settings and events to people who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19. B.C. residents will have to get at least one dose by Sept. 13 and two doses by Oct. 24 to attend indoor ticketed sporting events, concerts and other performances, restaurants (patio or indoor dining), night clubs and casinos, fitness centres, gyms and highintensity indoor events, conferences, weddings, workshops and meetings and other indoor group-based events such as seniors’ classes and choirs. Ladies Only Fitness owner Delrae Kohnert said the coming system will limit

“Proud to be voted #1. Thank you to our clients and readers!”

her clientele. She wants businesses to be able to decide for themselves who they allow to enter. “What they’re doing is limiting business’ income and it affects nobody else other than the small business,” she told KTW. Kohnert insisted she’s not against vaccinations, noting she may yet comply with the coming vaccine card system, depending on how much support there is among the business community. “Nobody said we’re not going to comply. We’re saying we don’t agree with it,” she said. When asked if she is worried about being shut down by Interior Health, as other businesses have in Kelowna and other areas of the province due to lack of compliance with health measures, Kohnert said she will see how many other businesses come forward. “So, whatever they come up with by Sept. 13, I can guarantee other businesses are going to come forward to be like, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa,’” she said. Another business that has declared it will not check patrons’ vaccination status is The Rock Eatery in Falkland, the Highway 97

community between Kamloops and Vernon. In a Facebook post, the restaurant ownership stated: We respect everyone’s privacy and do not discriminate under any circumstances. All are welcome @therockeatery.” The restaurant ownership said the support has been “incredible,” noting reservations are fully booked this week and next week. The Facebook post has attracted more than 800 comments from the public, with support and opposition to The Rock Eatery’s stance. In addition, a number of social media groups opposed to the B.C. vaccination certificate program have sprung up, with tens of thousands of people joining. When asked if she is worried about attracting unvaccinated people to her gym, Kohnert said she isn’t, noting masks are still being worn inside and there’s enough room to physically distance. Kohnert said that confidence comes from the fact that she hasn’t been notified of a case at her gym in the 1000-block of Victoria Street throughout the pandemic. Eric Davis, BBA, CIWM, PFP© Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor Keith Davis, BBA, CFP®, CIM© Associate Investment Advisor TD Wealth Private Investment Advice T: 250 314 5124 | 1 866 377 1511 eric.davis@td.com | keith.davis@td.com daviswealth.ca

TD Wealth Private Investment Advice T: 250 314 5124 | 1 866 377 1511 eric.davis@td.com | keith.davis@td.com | daviswealth.ca

Davis Wealth Management Team is part of TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. which is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ®The TD logo and other trademarks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or its subsidiaries. 17022873MC


A6

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Policing is single-largest cost in city’s budget From A1

A 2017 press release from the Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada stated RCMP members were 14.4 percent behind comparable police officers in terms of overall compensation. According to the RCMP’s new pay scale, a first-class constable who earned $86,110 annually in 2016 will earn $106,576 by April 2022, while a corporal who made $94,292 five years ago would see a pay bump to $116,702 next year. The new federal contract runs until March of 2023. Given its population size, Kamloops splits police costs with the federal government, with the city picking up 90 per cent of the costs. The total cost for the city’s RCMP contract for officers is approximately $23 million a

year and fluctuates annually, depending on utilization, city officials told KTW. Contractual services for police protection was $22.9 million in 2017, $24.3 million in 2018, $25.4 million in 2019 and a budgeted $27.3 million in 2020, according to the city’s 2020-2024 financial plan. The police budget is the city’s largest line item, accounting for about 12 per cent of the total annual budget. The city is also in the middle of negotiating a new contract for its firefighters — something Christian said he doesn’t think the RCMP contract will impact as those talks are based more on contracts with other fire departments. Kamloops Fire Rescue’s contract and pay scale is based on the average of a number of Lower Mainland fire departments.

• • • • • •

This vacant, privately owned former liquor store property at 346 Campbell Ave., behind the Northbridge Hotel on Tranquille Road in North Kamloops, will be used as the Envision day space for the city’s homeless population — if an agreement can be reached with the landlord. SEAN BRADY/KTW

No deal yet with landlord on day space MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

One of two temporary day spaces for the homeless remains unopened in Kamloops, more than a month after the city announced their creation through local social agencies. The Gathering Place, located in the downtown parking lot of the city’s storage facility for the homeless, at 48 Victoria St W., and Envision, at 346 Campbell Ave. in North Kamloops, were announced by the municipality on July 21. City social, housing and community development manager Carmin Mazzotta told KTW at the time the spaces were projected to open in a week, but the Gathering Place didn’t open until Aug. 16, while Envision has yet to do so. Mazzotta said the non-profits running the North Shore space have yet to finalize a lease for 346 Campbell Ave. with the landlord. Asked what was left to work out with the North Shore location, Mazzotta said he could not comment. Envision is to be operated by a coalition of the Canadian Mental Health Association, ASK Wellness Society, Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society and Interior Community Services in the vacant, privately owned former liquor store property behind

the Northbridge Hotel. CMHA executive director Alfred Achoba told KTW in early August they were on track to open Envision by about mid-August. KTW was awaiting a call back from Achoba as of press deadline on Tuesday. Mazzotta said that while the Envision day space isn’t open yet, the shuttle bus component, which would transport willing homeless individuals from 346 Campbell Ave. to shelters at the end of each day, is up and running. He confirmed the city and CMHA non-profits still endeavour to open the space. Asked when the Campbell Avenue location might be operational, Mazzotta said he could not provide a date. “That’s between the non-profit and the person who owns the site,” he said. “The downtown one was a little more straightforward because we [the City of Kamloops] own the site.” The Gathering Place — operated by the Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society and The Mustard Seed — has been open a little more than two weeks, and, Mazzotta said, in that time there have been “no major issues to report there at this point.” He said he has heard positive reviews from the non-profits involved, noting the city will moni-

tor its progress in the weeks and months ahead to determine the potential for more day spaces in 2022. The two day spaces were granted federal funding from the Reaching Home grant, which the city distributes, to staff the day spaces for four months. Asked if the North Shore’s Envision day space will still run for four months whenever it may open, Mazzotta said that is to be determined and could depend on timing. “These spaces are daytime spaces for people to be in and if that’s getting too deep in to winter, it might not be something that continues on for that full four months, but I think those things can be worked out. There’ll be some flexibility there,” Mazzotta said. Prior to opening, and while operational, the CMHA will meet with the McDonald Park Neighbourhood Association — as it did earlier this summer — to address any concerns, Mazzotta said. The neighbourhood association recently surveyed residents to gather their thoughts on the project and found 65 per cent of 181 respondents do not support the Envision project on Campbell Avenue, citing concerns over potential increases in garbage and drug paraphernalia and property crime in the surrounding neighbourhood.

Cm Wide and 8cm Tall Cm Wide and 8cm Tall

OUR TIME IS NOW – JOIN US

TOGETHERWERISE-RIH.COM


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

TRUCKLOAD SALE ON NOW!

LOCAL NEWS

Between 750 and 1,200 daily cases of COVID-19 under modelling scenarios SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

B.C. could be seeing daily COVID19 case counts of about 1,200 by late September under a “moderate” transmission scenario, according to the latest modelling data released Tuesday afternoon. The updated modelling data mostly revolves around the impacts of vaccination rates currently seen in the province. In a “lower” transmission scenario, B.C. will continue to produce between 500 and 750 new cases per day through September — unless vaccinations increase. Under the “moderate” scenario, and with projected vaccination levels based on recent rates, B.C.’s daily case trajectory will continue to increase, up to about 1,250 cases per day by the end of September. The data also shows the effects of B.C.’s vaccination campaign. One slide shows how those unvaccinated are 12 times as likely to become infected, 34 times as likely to be hospitalized and eight times as likely to die from COVID-19, compared to those who have received two doses. The data is adjusted for age differences. Data also shows cases among

A7

unvaccinated populations on a downward trend within Interior Health. Smaller declines are also present in vaccinated and partially vaccinated populations. Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said with elevated case rates, COVID-19 is affecting the quality of health care in some areas, particularly in Interior Health. “What we’re seeing is this has become a pandemic that is spreading rapidly in pockets of people who are unvaccinated,” she said. Henry said there has also been a “gentle” rise in cases in Fraser Health and Vancouver Coastal Health. Since cases spiked in the province in July, new cases have primarily been in the 20 to 29, 30 to 39 and 40 to 49 age groups, almost entirely in those who are unvaccinated or vaccinated with only one dose. Across the province, between July 27 and Aug. 23, 70 per cent of all cases were among the unvaccinated, while 16 per cent were among the partially vaccinated and 15 per cent were among the fully vaccinated. For hospitalizations, 81 per cent were unvaccinated, six per cent were partially vaccinated and 13 per cent were fully vaccinated.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FACTORY SPONSORED SAVINGS!

$AVE THOUSAND$

EASY FINANCING AVAILABLE STARTING AT ONLY $60/MONTH

CHOOSE FROM: CUSTOM PRE-ORDERS INSTOCK OR PRE-OWNED SPAS

PremiumPoolandSpa.ca

105 - 805 Notre Dame Dr | 236-425-1390 | KAMLOOPS

MOBILE PATROLS GUARD SERVICE ALARM RESPONSE Ronik Security Ltd. has been serving Kamloops since 1972 and is 100% Canadian. We wish to thank our current and future loyal customers during this pandemic season! Our employees are proud to serve for your safety and security.

(250) 828-0511

(24 HOURS)

SERVING KAMLOOPS & AREA SINCE 1972 Fulton & Company LLP

We have a Young Child...

... what should we be thinking about when we do our Wills? Firstly, naming a guardian - if both biological parents die without a guardian in place, then a judge will decide. This can deteriorate into contested lawsuits. Secondly, appointing a Trustee in your Will to manage your child’s inheritance, until your child reaches the age of your choosing. Without this, your child will be entitled to receive their inheritance at age 19. Until then the money would be held by the Public Guardian and Trustee’s office, and be inaccessible for your child's needs. Instead, you choose and appoint a Trustee in your Will. The Trustee can use the inheritance monies at their discretion to pay for your child’s education expenses, care or maintenance general support etc. The Trustee could be the same person as the guardian, or could be another person entirely. If you have questions, contact our wills & estates team - we’re here to help.

MATT LIVINGSTON 250.372.5542 | law@fultonco.com

Mak yo


A8

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

We are stronger together as community

I

n less than one week, 2,000 teachers, administrators and support staff will welcome 15,000 K-to-12 students back in class for full-time learning. Kamloops-Thompson students can look forward to resuming sports, music and other extracurricular activities. While we recognize families and students are excited to see each other in school in September, we know there is some anxiety about what school will look like. Safety remains our top priority. Back-to-school is not quite the normal we had hoped for, but we are confident our health and safety guidelines — continued mask wearing, daily health checks, staying home when sick, a continued focus on hand washing, daily cleaning and disinfecting protocols and other health and safety measures —

RHONDA NIXON

View From

SD73

will keep students, parents and staff safe. The updated COVID-19 communicable disease guidelines for K-12 schools align with current public health advice and were developed in collaboration with the Office of the Provincial Health Officer, BC Centre for Disease Control, WorkSafeBC and the

Education Steering Committee. Based on these guidelines and in consultation with Interior Health, our COVID-19 response committee has codeveloped our SD73 communicable disease prevention plan, which will be available this week as our staff continue to work together to ensure a safe school start-up. While the pandemic protocols for the restart have certainly been top of mind, so has SD73’s role in truth and reconciliation. On my first day in the district, May 28, the devastating news of the discovery of 215 children’s bodies on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School was released. Given that this is an especially vulnerable time for our communities, school and district leaders began the year with professional learning on Aug. 26

to learn how we can continue to move forward with truth and reconciliation. Throughout July and August, the school district’s emergency response committee activated its protocols when evacuation alerts or orders were issued for several of our communities, which also affected the families attending those 11 schools. My heart goes out to those staff and families who work at or attend Westwold elementary and who lost their homes or who were impacted by the fires. District and school staff continue to support those individuals impacted. We will continue to monitor the situation, to work together to ensure the safety of students and staff and to attend to air quality, should it become an issue. In my role as the new superintendent of the Kamloops-

Thompson school district, I marvel at the resiliency of the people in our rural and urban communities. This has been evident in the way everyone has helped each other to persist through the challenges of the past year, which I witnessed first-hand during this summer’s intense wildfire season. There is no doubt we are stronger together as a community. I look forward to continuing to get to know more people and to learn firsthand about our communities throughout the school year. Rhonda Nixon is superintendent of School District 73. Her email address is superintendent@sd73. bc.ca. School district columns run monthly during the school year. To comment, email editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

After a few decades, an Islamist dead-end looms Violent Islamist movements, as current events in Afghanistan demonstrate, have had some success in Muslim countries that have been invaded by the United States. But they have failed everywhere else and the whole Islamist ideology is getting long in the tooth. Revolutionary ideologies rarely prosper after they pass the age of 50. There is much media chatter at the moment about how the Taliban’s victory will inspire like-minded groups elsewhere and lead to a steep rise in terrorist attacks. Some of this is just journalistic panicmongering, but various military and political interest groups will also promote this

ANOTHER VIEW GWYNNE DYER

notion for their own purposes. We will therefore soon find ourselves being urged to engage in a new “war on terror.” It wouldn’t be as big, long and counter-productive as the first one, but much time and money and many lives would be wasted if it got off the ground. So think of this as an aide-memoire on why that would be a very stupid thing to do.

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Robert McAlaster SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly, Jodi Lawrence, Liz Spivey Paul De Luca

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Digital sales: Makayla Peverill Raj Soni PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

DIGITAL DESIGNERS Jackson Vander Wal FRONT OFFICE Front office staff: Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery Rosalynn Bartella CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer

The Taliban are Afghans, of course, but Islamist terrorism is primarily a phenomenon of the Arab world. That is the part of the Muslim world where the rulers are most brazenly cruel and corrupt. Many Arabs have been attracted to Islamism as a possible way to replace those rotten regimes — and some of them have concluded only violence can bring Islamists to power. Nothing remarkable about this. A whole generation of anti-colonial revolutionaries in Africa and Asia reached a similar conclusion, embracing Marxist ideology as their excuse for violence and as a pseudo-

religious guarantor of victory. The big difference is that they won (and then mostly dropped the Marxism), whereas in the Arab world, corrupt tyrants are still in power almost everywhere. The same sold-out ruling families still rule in Saudi Arabia, the Gulf states, Jordan and Morocco. Military regimes like Syria, Egypt and Algeria that came out of bloody coups resolutely smother popular protest. — Read the entire column online at kamloopsthisweek.com, under the Opinion tab.

CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

Circulation 250-374-0462

All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

Follow us online at kamloopsthisweek.com

kamthisweek kamloopsthisweek


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE VACCINATION CERTIFICATE PROGRAM DEBATE Editor: As is becoming apparent, the screws are slowly being tightened on anti-vaxxers. The provincial government is introducing vaccine passports, professional sports team won’t be letting the unvaccinated into the faculty, federal employees will have to be vaccinated and the list goes on. The word is getting out — no vaccination, no party time. Maybe it’s time the 85 per cent who have had at least one of the shots to step up and help out. Before we sit down in a restaurant or enter a shop, let’s ask the question: Is the person serving you vaccinated? Just as anti-vaxxers claim it’s their right whether to be vaccinated, it our right to part with our money where we want. Bob Gamble Kamloops Editor: I do not agree with requiring proof of vaccination for any reason. It is a person’s right to decide

on receiving the COVID-19 vaccination. There has been much financial harm to the small business community. Now the government wants to tell businesses that they can’t serve or offer their services without proof of vaccination from customers. This is against the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Totalitarianism is coming. Gerald Antoniak Kamloops Editor: It has been reported that twothirds of Royal Inland Hospital

emergency room nurses have left their jobs or may have quit the profession altogether. Who can blame them? COVID-19 has caused overcrowding, long waits for nonCOVID treatments — some as long as two years — and fear of sickness and death from COVID19 exposure. No doubt the entire hospital staff share this concern. We all know the solution, but some have no regard for the health of their fellow Canadians and they refuse to get vaccinated. We are not allowed to hunt, fish, drive, practise medicine or law, draw water from a water-

way, construct a building, cut a tree or run a business without a permit. We are not allowed to cross a border without a permit. Most of these regulations are to protect the public in some way. Vaccinations are just another permit allowing the permit holder safe passage, good health and protection for their fellow Canadians, their families, their children and their babies from the disease. You have a choice not to fish, not to drive and not to be vaccinated. Many governments and private employers have made vaccination mandatory for employment in their organizations, save for those with valid exemptions. You have a choice not to work for these employers. Regrettably, COVID-19 is driving us apart. Steve Barnes Kamloops Editor: Coercing people to have a medical procedure is illegal in Canada.

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

Results:

Do you support the provincial government’s COVID19 vaccination certificate program?

Yes: 856 votes No: 531 votes

What’s your take? 38% NO

62% YES

1,387 VOTES

Have you ever travelled for a surgical procedure due to wait times at Royal Inland Hospital?

Vote online:

kamloopsthisweek.com

VOTE FOR BETTER www.iaincurrie.ca | 778-586-7811

It is considered an assault. If the COVID-19 vaccine is really so wonderful, why would government have to resort to coercion to make people take it? Kristin Saunders Kamloops Editor: Proof is a big word when asking a patron to reveal their personal medical information, which is normally kept private between a doctor and patient. The other side of the coin is the server delivering your food and the cook preparing it. Will they be ordered to show you, the patron, proof they have been vaccinated against COVID19? The patron is at risk in that scenario. The Charter is intended to ensure everyone is treated with the same respect, dignity and consideration. The provincial health order doesn’t seem fair with respect to all concerned regarding proof of vaccinations being required to dine out. Les Evens Kamloops

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

IAIN CURRIE

KAMLOOPS THOMPSON CARIBOO Authorized by the Official Agent for Iain Currie


A10

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

A POETIC LOOK AT AN EPIDEMIC THAT WON’T END Editor: Aug. 31 was International Overdose Awareness Day and I would like to share one of my writings on substance use and addiction with the community. I am a street outreach worker with the ASK Wellness Society. I see first-hand the epidemic and the devastation it is causing in our community. These folks are people’s children, parents, aunties, uncles, grandparents and close friends, each with their own stories of suffering and generational trauma. Not one of these folks wished to be here and many are looking

for a way out. The path to treatment needs to be simplified. I see folks literally dying as they wait to get into treatment. We need an easier way and I guess that is my message. We need more treatment beds and immediate access to a safe, dry place for people when they are ready for change. I believe all life has value and potential. Fentanyl Remember, no such thing as safe drugs in the streets. Dealers cutting product with fentanyl ‘cause it’s cheap. A hundred times stronger

than morphine. One dose could put you to sleep. Not talking counting sheep. Real power, six ODs in an hour. Being found in weed, pills, and powder. New fad. Coroner coming to zip you up in a body bag. Four deaths in a month really sad. Kids left with no mom or dad, all because the dope they got was bad. Addiction, an epidemic the black market is glad to have. Streets not a game, chew you up, spit you out if you’re lucky.

Many people die getting high, just trying to feel normal. Prison not the answer, a need for more rehab centres. So, I looked at my own situation I was facing. Waking every day like I was in the movie Groundhog Day. Always the same, mentally drained, suffering chronic pain. Let me be the first to say, I’m an addict. Understand the hesitation in prescribing narcotics. So, forced to go see the street doctor. No degree, but has what I need. I plead, Dear God, please don’t be

fentanyl in these pills I receive. No labels or warning, mixed wrong could be fatal. Talking two extra grains, the size of salt at your kitchen table. Call of a OD. Coroner records another fatality. A young girl, age 16, solutions needed. Funerals continuously being repeated. Takes one line, one innocent looking line. Another family left behind, crying a river of pain, drowning in regret. Death’s never had no respect. Brian Wells Kamloops

CITY SHOULD USE GOVERNMENT FUNDING TO HELP THE HOMELESS Editor: Re: The Aug. 19 story regarding funding the city is receiving (‘City of Kamloops gets $1.47 million for initiatives relating to homelessness’): Just how out of touch is our city council and administration? It really bothers me when I read that the city has land-

ed some government funding to help the homeless situation and, in its wisdom, decides to use it for employee training and to reimburse previous expenses incurred by the municipality. Don’t we have a homeless problem in Kamloops that requires immediate attention and funding? These are taxpayer dollars and deserve to be spent as

intended — to help the homeless, not train city employees. We all deserve more than this from our city administration and council. Ian Cornish Kamloops

Downtown Kamloops Houses Ready for Relocation Together, Kelson Group and Nickel Bros are committed to ensuring this process is as smooth as possible. Kelson Group is pleased to share we are working with Nickel Bros House Moving Ltd. in relocating approximately 12 homes within the new development of City Gardens. This new community of towers, condos, low rise rental apartments, townhomes and commercial space is expected to break ground in early 2022. Nickel Bros has the extensive experience required to move these homes which will be available for purchase over the coming months.

Houses available for purchase and relocation: • • • •

520 530 576 420

5th Avenue 5th Avenue 5th Avenue Nicola Street

• • • •

430 435 443 461

Nicola Nicola Nicola Nicola

Street Street Street Street

• • • •

469 435 451 461

Nicola Street Battle Street Battle Street Battle Street

Deadline to finalize a sale is November 30, 2021.

For more information contact Nickel Bros at 1-866-813-9430 or kamloopsenquiries@nickelbros.com k e l s o n g r o u p.c o m


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

On pace for record number of overdose deaths THROUGH FIRST HALF OF 2021, B.C. AND KAMLOOPS HAVE SEEN RISING NUMBERS OF FATALITIES KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

There have been 1,011 suspected overdose deaths in B.C. through the first half of this year, a fatality rate that would make 2021 the deadliest ever year. In Kamloops, there have been 32 such deaths through the first six months of 2021. Last year, there were 1,728 overdose deaths recorded in B.C., with 60 of those deaths in Kamloops — both of which were the most ever. The latest statistics, covering January through June, were released on Tuesday (Aug. 31), which is International Overdose Awareness Day. In June, 159 British Columbians died as a result of a suspected drug overdose, the ninth consecutive month in which at least 150 British Columbians died as a result of the toxic drug supply. The total number of lives lost between January and June is the highest recorded in the first six

months of a calendar year. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of death in B.C. for those ages 19 to 39. “The deaths of more than 1,000 British Columbians in the first six months of 2021 is a tragic reminder that the toxic illicit drug supply remains a significant ongoing threat to public health and safety in communities throughout our province,” BC Coroners Service chief coroner Lisa Lapointe said. “The data released today highlights the immensity of this public health emergency and the need for a wide-scale response. This includes removing barriers to safe supply, ensuring timely access to evidence-based affordable treatment and providing those experiencing problematic substance use with compassionate and viable options to reduce risks and save lives.” In April 2016, the provincial government declared a public health emergency due to the spike

in the number of overdose deaths. As has been the case since such deaths began increasing in 2016, fentanyl continues to be the primary link to the deaths, as the toxic drug has been involved in 85 per cent in the first six months of 2021. By comparison, fentanyl was involved in just five per cent of overdose deaths in 2012. The BC Coroners Service said cocaine, methamphetamine and etizolam are also present in significant numbers of deaths, noting prescribed safe supply is not playing a role in the ongoing drugtoxicity crisis. “Today is International Overdose Awareness Day, a day in which we remember and mourn the family members, friends and neighbours we’ve lost to drug toxicity,” Lapointe said. “To the thousands of B.C. families grieving the loss of a beloved family member, I extend my heartfelt condolences and my hope that the stories you’ve shared

Much appreciation to Kamloops businesses for making our graduation a success!

DONATIONS: • Changes Hair Studio • Cliffside Climbing Gym • Donna Bowie • Earl’s Restaurant • Emsland Insurance • EXIT Kamloops • Finning Canada • Freeze Athletics • Fresh Street Market • FreshCo • Home Depot • Jacodi Mechanical

Effective September 5, 2021 Increased service on select routes Reintroduction of full service to TRU and K-12 schools For more information, please visit bctransit.com/kamloops

21177

• River City Nissan • KGHM • BC Liquor Stores / Kamloops • Braddick Roofing & Sheet Metal • Linda Turner Personal Real Estate • Strachan Consulting

OF NOTE • 71 per cent of those who died as a result of suspected drug toxicity in 2021 were between the ages of 30 and 59 and 80 per cent were male. • By community, Vancouver has recorded the most deaths, at 329, followed by Surrey (121), Victoria (73), Abbotsford (39), Burnaby (34) and Kamloops (32). • By health service delivery area in 2021, the highest rates are in Vancouver, Thompson-Cariboo, Northeast, North Vancouver Island, and Fraser East. • Deaths due to drug toxicity remain the leading cause of unnatural death in B.C.

Seasonal Service Change

THANK YOU! • Kamloops Computer Centre • La Dolcevita • McDonald’s • Mittz’ Kitchen • Mr. Mike’s Steakhouse • Real Canadian Superstore • Rivershore CDJR • Romeo’s Restaurant • Save On Foods • Simply Computing • South Thompson Inn and Guest Ranch • Sportchek / Atmosphere • Staples • Sun Peaks Resort • The Art We Are • The Noble Pig • Tips and Toes • Uniquely Inspired Marketing • Volkswagen of Kamloops • Zimmer Wheaton GMC Buick

actually stop the deaths,” McBain said. We must push the governments to immediately implement a safe regulated supply of the drugs people need. We must stop the preventable deaths of our loved ones.”

Kamloops Transit

Class of 2021 Sa-hali Secondary Graduates Wish to

CORPORATE SPONSORS:

will continue to influence positive change. Those who died mattered and their loss is felt deeply, and we must continue to urge those in positions of influence across our province and the country to move to urgently implement measures to prevent more unnecessary suffering and death.” Brian Twaites is an advancedcare paramedic and paramedic specialist who has responded to thousands of overdoses in a 35-year career. “Paramedics across B.C. have been responding to an exponential increase in overdoses this year and there appears no end in sight to this health crisis,” Twaites said. “This is someone’s best friend. This is someone’s dad. This is someone’s kid. Every time this happens, the loss is devastating.” Leslie McBain, co-founder of Moms Stop the Harm, said there are solutions to halt the deaths, if government would explore them. “There are viable solutions to

Transit Info 250·376·1216 • bctransit.com


A12

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FEDERAL ELECTION Q&A

Frank Caputo: Conservative Party of Canada Name: Frank Caputo Party: Conservative Party of Canada Campaign office address: 249 Seymour St. Phone: 778-910-1190 Email: team@frankcaputo.ca Social media: Facebook: facebook.com/ frankcaputoktc Twitter: twitter.com/ FrankCaputoKTC Instagram: instagram.com/_ frankcaputo Occupation: Lawyer/Crown counsel; sessional faculty at TRU Faculty of Law Family: Married with a blended family of four kids and two grandchildren

FRANK CAPUTO

Q: In a nutshell, why should voters cast a ballot for you and your party as opposed to your opponents and their parties? A: This election will be a choice between a comprehensive Conservative plan to deliver jobs for all Canadians and restore public finances versus a reckless Liberal plan — supported by the NDP, Greens and Bloc — that would leave Canada with high levels of debt and unemployment. As Cathy McLeod did in four terms as our riding’s MP, I want to work as a team member in government and be a strong voice for the people of the riding. Erin O’Toole and Canada’s Conservatives are the only alternative to secure the future, restore competence, transparency and accountability to government and ensure Canada is never unprepared for a crisis again.

time record high temperatures in Kamloops and elsewhere in B.C., with an unprecedented wildfire season still raging. Do you agree this is due to human-caused climate change? If not, how do you explain the increase in global temperatures and proliferation of extreme weather events across the globe? In either case, what should be done to mitigate the effects of wildfires? A: I believe in climate change and that it has contributed to warmer temperatures locally. I also believe that warmer temperatures have contributed to regional wildfires. A Conservative government will invest in remote sensing and other technology that will improve the early detection of wildfires and better predict fire behaviour. I recently met with residents of Monte Lake and saw the destruction of the fires and heard what they need to rebuild. If elected, I will fight for federal funds to rebuild the community. Canada’s Conservatives have a serious plan to combat climate change that allows us to meet our targets and reduce emissions by 2030, all while repealing Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax.

Q: This summer has seen all-

Q: What is the most important

10 SAVE $20 SAVE $

ON YOUR ON-RIMS

ON YOUR OFF-RIMS

first step government should do in tackling the climate change crisis? A: We recognize that the most efficient way to reduce our emissions is to use pricing mechanisms, but not one where the government pockets your money. We know Canadians can’t afford Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax hike, which lets the government tax Canadians and drives jobs and investment out of the country. We will fight climate change and protect the environment, but we won’t do it on the backs of hardworking Canadians or by hurting our economy. Canada’s Conservatives will work with the provinces to implement an innovative and national personal low carbon savings account. These savings accounts will incentivize Canadians to make greener lifestyle choices that reduce their emissions while also allowing them to decide what works best for them and their family. Q: What would you propose be done to end the pandemic and prevent the next one? A: A future government must not repeat the mistakes made by the Liberal government while propped up by the NDP. The federal government was slow to close borders. It didn’t secure vaccines quickly. It also ignored the warning signs. The first step is to learn from these mistakes, which is why a Conservative government would launch an immediate public inquiry into the country’s COVID-19 response. Conservatives are committed to domestic vaccine and PPE production so we can have a ready supply of critical supplies. We would partner with pharmaceutical companies to increase production of critical medicines and active pharmaceutical ingredients in Canada.

FREE TIRE ROTATION AND TIRE REPAIRS WITH THE PURCHASE OF A SET OF TIRES

Q: Do you support mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of healthcare workers and students and staff in post-secondary institutions? If not, why not? A: Canadians have the right to make their own health choices. Rapid testing is needed for the unvaccinated to protect our most vulnerable Canadians. A Conservative government will require unvaccinated Canadian passengers to present a recent negative test result or pass a rapid test before getting on a bus, train, plane or ship. We will require federal public servants who aren’t vaccinated to pass a daily rapid test. Vaccines are a safe and effective tool to stop the spread of COVID19. We encourage every Canadian who is able. to get one. Vaccine passports and the vaccination of health-care workers, students and staff are provincial issues to be left to the provincial governments. Q: Reconciliation with First Nations remains a major issue. What should government’s first step be in addressing the concerns of the Indigenous population? A: Conservatives have called for a swift timeline and funding to deliver on the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action 71 to 76 involving missing children and providing healing for families. A Conservative government created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission as part of the 2007 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which recognizes the Indian residential school system had a profoundly lasting and damaging impact on Indigenous culture, heritage and language. Canada’s Conservatives acknowledge the deep sorrow and mourning that all Indigenous people and survivors of Residential Schools are experiencing. Our

hearts grieve for the Indigenous communities who are sharing in this trauma. I have met with several Indigenous elders in the past few months. They detail a history in which the needs of Indigenous people have not been heard. If elected, I would want to meet with each Kúkpi7 (chief) in our riding within my first 90 days of election and twice per year while in office. Q: What is the No. 1 issue being raised with you when speaking to voters in the KamloopsThompson-Cariboo riding? A: I’ve spoken with people throughout the riding and the one issue often mentioned is that the cost of everything is going up. Grocery bills are up five per cent and gas prices have skyrocketed. With inflation at the highest level in 20 years and rising, families are struggling to make ends meet. Canada’s Conservatives have a detailed plan to get inflation under control, lower prices and make life more affordable for families. Q: What is the most important step that needs to be taken to begin reduction of the deficit caused by pandemic-related spending? A: We need to review all spending since the Trudeau government decimated the balanced budget in 2015. We must ask whether any new spending is both affordable and necessary. The emergency spending in response to COVID was just the beginning for the Liberals, but they don’t ever want it to end. Canadians can be confident that with Canada’s Recovery Plan, Conservatives will secure their future by recovering millions of jobs and introducing policies that result in better wages and help struggling small businesses get back on their feet.

685 NOTRE DAME DRIVE KAMLOOPS, BC MON-SAT 8:30 AM-6:00 PM 250-374-1135

D#11184

KTW will run two candidate profiles in each print edition leading to the Sept. 20 election. Some may be edited for space. The full Q&A transcripts can be read online at kamloopsthisweek.com.


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

FEDERAL ELECTION Q&A

Jesse McCormick: Liberal Party of Canada KTW will run two candidate profiles in each print edition leading to the Sept. 20 election. Some may be edited for space. The full Q&A transcripts can be read online at kamloopsthisweek.com.

Name: Jesse McCormick Party: Liberal Party of Canada Campaign office address: virtual office Phone: 250-363-9425 Email: info@jessemccormick.ca Social media: Website: jessemccormick.ca Facebook: facebook.com/ jessemccormickktc/ Instagram: instagram.com/ jessecmccormick/ Twitter: twitter.com/jessecmccormick Occupation: Lawyer Family: My partner, Brandi, and I have two children, ages two and four Q: In a nutshell, why should voters cast a ballot for you and your party, as opposed to your opponents and their parties? A: I believe that KamloopsThompson-Cariboo deserves a strong voice in Parliament and I am excited to bring forward my commitment to protect the environment, strengthen the economy and advance reconciliation. I have worked at the heart of decision-making in Ottawa and I know and understand how to ensure that our interests as a riding are prioritized at the national level. I am proud of the work of the Liberal government and, if re-elected, we will ensure that Canada continues moving forward for everyone as we build a strong economy and leave

JESSE MCCORMICK a positive legacy of environmental protection and climate action for future generations. Q: This summer has seen all-time record high temperatures in Kamloops and elsewhere in B.C., with an unprecedented wildfire season still raging. Do you agree this is due to human-caused climate change? If not, how do you explain the increase in global temperatures and proliferation of extreme weather events across the globe? In either case, what should be done to mitigate the effects of wildfires? A: Climate change is real and it is caused by humans. The Liberal Party of Canada is committed to climate action and it has been a central focus of our government since 2015. The wildfires that are impacting so many families and businesses in our riding and province demonstrate the urgency of preparing for and adapting to climate change. I am proud that our party has recently announced a $50-million commitment to help train at least 1,000 firefighters, including Indigenousled fire crews. A re-elected Liberal gov-

ernment will also invest $450 million ahead of the next fire season to support provinces and territories to invest in the equipment needed to fight wildfires and keep firefighters safe. Q: What is the most important first step government should do in tackling the climate change crisis? A: The Liberal government has significantly advanced the important work of fighting climate change and, if re-elected, we will ensure climate action remains a national priority. We will continue work to support the transition to a green economy, put a price on pollution and implement adaptation and resilience strategies to respond to the impacts of climate change. Q: What would you propose be done to end the pandemic and prevent the next one? A: A re-elected Liberal government will continue to listen to scientists and keep families safe and businesses working. From day one of the pandemic, the Liberal government provided a suite of emergency programs for individuals and businesses. We have also committed $6 billion in investments for businesses to help them recover, plan for their futures and invest in themselves. A re-elected Liberal government will continue to support Canadian vaccine production and purchase. We will work co-operatively with the provinces and territories and partner with governments around the world to eradicate the coronavirus. As Dr. Bonnie Henry recently announced, numbers are rising in the Interior Health

region. I urge everyone to keep their families and communities safe by getting their vaccines and adhering to public health orders. Q: Do you support mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of health-care workers and students and staff in postsecondary institutions? If not, why not? A: As the partner of a Kamloops emergency physician and father of two young children, I personally support mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of health-care workers, as well as students and staff in post-secondary institutions. Vaccinations are effective and we must all do our part to keep our communities safe. We need to finish the fight against COVID-19 so we can safely return to enjoying time together with family and friends, while keeping our economy strong. Q: Reconciliation with First Nations remains a major issue. What should government’s first step be in addressing the concerns of the Indigenous population? A: I am Anishinaabe and I am proud to have dedicated many years of my professional career to advancing the rights and interests of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. I believe the first and most important step we need to take as a country is to recognize the right of self-determination. Indigenous Peoples are best placed to determine and implement the solutions needed to address existing challenges and we need to work in partnership with Indigenous Peoples to build a better future.

Q: What is the No. 1 issue being raised with you when speaking to voters in the Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo riding? A: The impacts of climate change and the need for a strong economy are top of mind for many of the people in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo. Voters know the climate is changing and they want to see effective measures implemented in response, while ensuring the strength of the regional economy. Q: What is the most important step that needs to be taken to begin reduction of the deficit caused by pandemicrelated spending? A: Financial investments such as the Canada Emergency Response Benefit were critical to helping Canadians follow public health measures while still covering their family expenses. Those investments will help to ensure that we have a strong economy as we continue our fight against COVID-19. It was a fiscally prudent choice to support Canadians in need during a time of crisis and I am proud of the work of the Liberal government to support Canadians during this time. Most of the programs are time-limited and the investments have been carefully chosen to maintain the fiscal health of our country. We will work hard to implement deficit-reduction measures once we have secured the health and well-being of Canadians.

2002 PORSCHE BOXSTER ROADSTER (#U1943A)

$23,998

16 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

#U1906A • $15,998 +tax or $130 bi-weekly 84 months @ 7.39% OAC

14 HONDA PILOT

#M21020A • $23,998 +tax or $209 bi-weekly 78 months @ 7.99% OAC

18 MERCEDES-BENZ GLA250 17 MERCEDES-BENZ GLE 400 #U1946 • $33,998 +tax or $273 bi-weekly 84 months @ 7.39% OAC

#U1929A • $39,998 +tax or $320 bi-weekly 84 months @ 7.39% OAC

Mercedes-Benz Kamloops, 695C Laval Crescent, Kamloops, BC, Toll Free 855-984-6603, Mercedes-Benz-kamloops.ca Some conditions apply. See dealer for details. Payments based on financing on approved credit with $2000 down or equivalent trade and include all fees & taxes. Total paid: #U1906A $23,600, #M21020A $35,321, #U1946 $49,686, #U1929A $58,240.


A14

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com PRESENTS THE

PRO FOOTBALL PICK’EM LEAGUE

PICK YOUR TEAMS NOW! GRAND NORTH AMERICA PRIZE: Trip for 2 to Hawaii VALUED AT $5,000

KTW 1ST PLACE PRIZE:

500 in Visa Gift Cards

$

Runner-Up, Survivor Pool & Weekly Prizes also available! FREE TO PLAY!

SIMPLY VISIT:

KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM/FOOTBALL POWERED BY

LOCAL NEWS

TRU updates COVID rules SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Thompson Rivers University has made further changes to its return-tocampus plan, with students set to return to classrooms next week. Students, faculty and staff will now be required to self-disclose their vaccination status. Those who aren’t vaccinated or refuse to disclose their status will need to undergo regular rapid testing. Further details of how that status will be disclosed and how often testing will be required have not yet been released. KTW reached out to the university for comment, but was told no one was available until at least Sept. 2 . In a letter to the university community, TRU president Brett Fairbairn said the measures are being taken “to

further support the safety of our university community and a successful return to campus.” Pressure had been building on TRU to implement mandatory vaccinations for those returning to campus, but provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said last week universities do not have that authority. Henry did unveil a mandate that all students living on campus be vaccinated. Some universities in other provinces have made vaccination against COVID-19 a requirement for attending classes. TRU has put itself in league with other members of the Research Universities’ Council of British Columbia, including the University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Simon Fraser University, University of Northern B.C., and Royal Roads University. Proof of vaccination will

Welcome Back!

be required for some, including those using campus housing or in athletics programs. Additionally, proof of vaccination will be required to access door-entry restaurants on campus and events. In conjunction with recent measures from the provincial government, masks will also be required indoors. Fairbairn said in his letter the university will undertake enhanced cleaning measures and use barriers in hightraffic areas. But questions remain over how often students, faculty and staff will need to be tested and what will prevent people from falsely disclosing their vaccination status to avoid the required rapid testing. It’s also not known how on-campus resident international students will comply with the program, with some not able to access the vaccine prior to arriving in Canada.

Classes start 10:30 am, Tuesday, September 7th (except Kindergarten, check your child’s school website for details) Everything new and returning students need to know for back-to-school is at sd73.bc.ca


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

LOCAL NEWS

School to resume without cohorts, quarter system SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Although some questions remain over how students will return to School District 73 schools next week, much of the coming school year will be the same as when kids left school last spring. School District 73 has completed its communicable disease prevention plan, which was developed based on guidelines released by the provincial government and the BC Centre for Disease Control. Those guidelines stipulate that masks be worn by all kindergarten to Grade 12 staff, Grade 4 to Grade 12 students and by all visitors. Some mask exemptions will be made, including for behavioural reasons, identity reasons, when playing a wind instrument, when engaging in highintensity physical activity and when eating or drinking.

The new guidelines also continue the use of daily health checks, which students, visitors and staff must pass to enter a school. Parents are responsible for completing the checks. SD73 superintendent Rhonda Nixon said the district has retained the additional cleaning staff brought on during the first year of the pandemic. Those cleaners, the equivalent of approximately 17 fulltime staff, were accounted for in the budget for the 20212022 school year, which was approved in late April. Nixon also said schools will endeavour to avoid crowded hallways and that ventilation has been designed to industry standards set by WorkSafeBC. One significant change since last year is the shift away from the cohort and quarter system. At Monday night’s SD73 board meeting, Nixon confirmed the district will move back to its semester system.

The quarter system had been used as part of maintaining learning groups, or cohorts, and district staff said the Ministry of Education signalled in May that the system would not be used in the 2021-2022 school year. It’s also not yet clear exactly how notification of new cases or exposure events will work in the new school year. On Tuesday, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said single exposures at schools will no longer warrant notifications. “It will be slightly different this year because the risk is different,” she said. Henry said assessments will be done and, as with any communicable disease, every individual who was put at risk will be notified. “The majority of people felt school-based letters were more anxiety-provoking than helpful, but we absolutely will be keeping schools informed, working

with our school response teams to make sure that every single case in school settings is identified and contacts are managed, and yes, every cluster or outbreak will be reported,” Henry said. That system differs from the exposure-based reporting that was in place last year, which identified, by school, each day where an exposure incident occurred. This year, Henry said, only clusters (a loosely defined term) and outbreaks will be reported. Last year, Kamloops-based medical health officer Dr. Carol Fenton defined clusters as something between an outbreak and an exposure where additional resources are needed, but not to the extent of an outbreak. The district’s communicable disease plan can be found under the “Parents and Students” tab on the SD73 website at sd73.bc.ca.

Outbreak at Kamloops Seniors Village Multiple cases of COVID-19 have been detected at Kamloops Seniors Village following a fully vaccinated staff member testing positive for the virus, leading to an outbreak to be declared by Interior Health. Meanwhile, an internal memo obtained by KTW on Aug. 27 noted there are potential COVID-19 exposure events at three long-term care homes in Kamloops, none of which had as of then resulted in a declaration of an outbreak. The memo did not specify locations. The situation at Kamloops Seniors Village has unfolded over the past two weeks, with staff posting regular updates online. So far, five people — two staff members and three residents of a long-term care unit — have tested positive for the virus.

Women Who Care.

ime t t a h t It's

of

loop m a K r yea

s!

Sandy and Shelby

THE WEALTHY ROOTS STORY At Wealthy Roots you are a name not a number, and they pride themselves on their quick response times and excellent client focused service. Sandy and Shelby come from a family of advisors spanning over 3 generations and have a combined 50+ years of investment and insurance experience.

Services:

• Investment Management • Retirement & Estate Planning • Pension Commutes • Life & Mortgage Insurance • Disability & Critical Illness Coverage • Creditor Protected Investments • & More

Check our website and the kind words our clients have to say

www.wealthyrootsfinancial.org

Think we’re a fit? Book a meeting with us today! info@wealthyroots.org

E ADABL R G E D IO NOW B

LE

DAB -DEGRA OXO

Saturday, September 18th Place your Yellow Bag at the end of your driveway by 9AM

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

250-828-2800 | 500 VICTORIA STREET


A16

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS Open 7 days a week

It’s electric — Bus company travels

NEW MAGAZINES FOR EVERYONE!

One Stop Love Shop

743 VICTORIA ST • 250-377-8808

BEST INTEREST RATES PROTECTED BY: $100,000 CDIC Insured $100,000 Assuris Insured Unlimited Credit Union Insured

RRSP, RRIF, GIC & TFSA 1 Year 90 Day Cashable 0.25% DAILY INTEREST

1 YR.

0.15%

1.35%

2 YR.

3 YR.

1.61%

1.87%

4 YR.

5 YR.

2.02%

2.12% Rates as of August 31, 2021

WE WILL MEET OR BEAT ANY BANK RATE* Some terms and conditions may apply. Rates subject to change without notice. If you would like to receive our biweekly rate report please contact info@bradfordfinancial.org *

THE BRADFORD FINANCIAL TEAM Retirement Income Specialists BRADFORD FINANCIAL SERVICES INC.

736 Seymour St. Kamloops, BC

250.828.6767 1.800.599.8274 VANESSA CULLEN TERRY ABRAHAMS

TRAXX COACHLINES HOPES THE 261-KILOMETRE TRIP THAT ROSE TO 1,444 ROBERT MCALISTER

STAFF REPORTER

robert@kamloopsthisweek.com

It was a ride into the record books. On Monday afternoon TRAXX Coachlines, in partnership with Motor Coach Industries of Winnipeg, made history for both companies by successfully traversing the varying terrain between Kamloops and Vancouver in a full-sized, completely electric motorcoach bus. The 261-kilometre (162-mile) trip between Kamloops — where TRAXX has an office — and Delta included cresting 1,444 metres (4,738 feet) of mountainous terrain along the Coquihalla Highway. Documentation of the completion of the trip will be submitted to the Guinness Book of World Records for possible inclusion under the category of “longest and highest voyage by an electric motorcoach in North America.” After departing Kamloops, the 45-foot, MCI J4500 Charge coach, carrying a small group

of employees from both companies, travelled along the Coquihalla. The vehicle, MCI stated, was “engineered for rugged reliability on all roadway surfaces” and “designed to torque up fast and power through even the steepest road grades.” Thus, the Coquihalla, complete with both steep inclines and declines, seemed like a perfect route for the test. While representatives from MCI seemed confident the bus could complete its task, the results seemed to be surprising, nonetheless. For the trip to be considered a success, representatives explained, the J4500 Charge would have to reach Hope — 164 kilometres (102 miles) from Kamloops — with at least 45 per cent battery power remaining in supply. Thanks in large part to the technology’s regenerative braking system, which helps recover battery power as the vehicle goes downhill, the motorcoach reached and passed Hope with approximately 60 per cent power in reserve.

In addition to being an environmentally friendly vehicle, which produces zero carbon emissions, the J4500 is also whisper-quiet, both inside and out, even while quickly and smoothly accelerating up hill. During the trip, which produces almost no noise pollution on the outside, guests inside the cabin only noticed the slight road noise and vibration from travel. What this equated to for those onboard was a more relaxing experience when compared to traditional diesel-engine coaches, which produce considerable noise and noticeable shaking in the cabin when accelerating or braking. Inside, the seats adorning the cabin are plush and comfortable, each equipped with its own three-point seatbelt for added safety and six ceilingmounted LED screens for informational videos or entertainment. Overhead, each seat has access to basic aircondition controls and lights, with air conditioning power plugs being found closer to the floor, allowing guests to keep charged and

connected, adding to the feel of a luxury ride. With this test now complete and considered a resounding success, what’s next for TRAXX and MCI? According to TRAXX CEO Matthew Cox, “more testing.” Speaking with Kamloops This Week, Cox said TRAXX will be reviewing the results of the voyage with MCI (which had been monitoring the progress from on the bus as well as from a remote location) to analyze the data. While Cox was obviously pleased with the results of the trip, he explained that TRAXX was ever looking forward, exploring different types of green technology, including hydrogen fuel cells, in an effort to make the company more ecologically responsible and environmentally friendly. Currently, he explained, the biggest hurdle the industry faces in implementing green technology is the cost. See A17

info@bradfordfinancial.org

Regular Screening

Regular Screening

Regular Screening

Regular Screening

The best features from around the world

The best features from around the world

The best features from around the world

The best features from around the world

at the

Paramount

The KFS also screens films every weekend at the Twin Rivers Drive-in. Visit thekfs.ca for details.

503 VICTORIA ST

thekfs.ca SPONSORS

Respect

Sept 3 & 25 6:30pm

Green Knight Sept 3 6:45pm Sept 18 6:30pm

Annette

Sept 4 & 24 6:30pm

Stillwater Sept 4 & 17 6:45pm


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

LOCAL NEWS

from Kamloops to Delta on a single charge METRES ON THE COQUIHALLA WILL ENABLE ENTRY INTO THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS RIGHT: This full-sized, completely electric bus, made history by successfully traversing between Kamloops and Vancouver on Monday. The 261-kilometre trip, over mountainous terrain along the Coquihalla Highway is hoped to be documented in the Guinness Book of World Records under the category of “longest and highest voyage by an electric motorcoach in North America.” FAR RIGHT: The 45-foot MCI J4500 Charge coach carried a small group employees of both TRAXX Coachlines and partner, Motor Coach Industries of Winnipeg.

From A16

The typical price tag for a diesel-powered

motorcoach is approximately CDN$600,000. While the cost of a basic, fully electric coach, such as

the J4500 Charge, is currently in the area of CDN$1.3 million. While government

Thank you for voting for us Kamloops! ONE OF THE BEST Produce Stores

rebates and credits are often available to consumers when they purchase electric vehicles, there are no such

rebates, credits or incentives available to Canadian companies such as TRAXX Coachlines.

TK’EMLÚPS TE SECWÉPEMC NOTICE OF NOMINATION MEETING

Notice is hereby given that Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc has called an election in accordance with the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc Custom Election Regulations, for the purpose of electing one (1) Chief and seven (7) Councillors for the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc for the next ensuing term.

Nomination Meeting -- September 25, 2021 -- 5:00 PM TO 8:00 PM Moccasin Square Garden (357 – 345 Chief Alex Thomas Way) Any elector who cannot be at the Nomination Meeting can nominate an eligible person in writing by completing the required Remote Nomination Form and Remote Elector Declaration Form. All electors living off-reserve will be mailed a remote nomination package to the last known address of record. Nominations may be mailed or emailed and must be received by 8:00PM, September 25, 2021. The Nomination Meeting will be held in compliance with current Covid-19 health and safety protocols as required by the BC PHO for the Interior Health Region. Important rules and details must be followed to nominate, second and stand as a candidate for Chief or Councillor. Nomination forms and rules regarding nominations & candidacy in the Custom Election Regulations can be found on the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc website at: https://tkemlups.ca/elections. A copy of the List of Electors is posted in the Band Administration Building located at 330 Chief Alex Thomas Way, Kamloops, B.C. and can also be found on the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc website. All candidates must sign the Oath of Candidate and, within 7 days provide the electoral officer with an up to date: 1. Criminal Record check; 2. Bankruptcy check; and 3 Band Account clearance check. Given under my hand at Vancouver, this 24th day of August, 2021.

Please contact the electoral officer anytime for assistance with anything about the election process:

1675 VERSATILE DRIVE, KAMLOOPS - 250-374-5336

Electoral Officer: Ron Laufer Mobile: 604-715-4777

Email: ronlauferelections@gmail.com P.O. Box 95015, Kingsgate, Vancouver, BC V5T 4T8


A18

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Yew Street Food Hall eyes autumn opening SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

The Yew Street Food Hall is taking shape on Kamloops’ North Shore, set to open later this fall. The 7,000-square-foot facility is located on the bottom floor of the new residential building, The Colours on Spirit Square, at 107 Yew St., right behind the Red Beard Cafe. Two vendor spots remain and, so far, restaurants include those serving up pizza, fresh pasta, vegetarian street food, baked goods and tacos. Development partner Jeff Mitton said the project isn’t going to cater to franchise restaurants, but instead is looking for restaurant concepts from those who might have formerly been serving out of food trucks — or an entrepreneur with a good idea. “We’re willing to listen to anybody who has a concept they want to bounce off us,” Mitton said.

One of the stalls will host the Mitton family business, playing off the success of Mittz Kitchen with Mittz and Co., the anchor tenant of the development. Mitton said the food hall provides a great opportunity for anyone looking to get their food or restaurant concept off the ground without committing to a more costly brickand-mortar location. The space will feature a large community kitchen, two walk-in coolers, prep space and customer seating for 222. Vendors will have to staff their stalls themselves, but communal staff will also work at the hall, including bussers and dishwashers.

Plates and utensils will also be provided by the hall. When asked about the potential of labour shortages for staff, Mitton isn’t convinced the problem will continue. “I always anticipate having problems with staff. I’ve been in this business long enough to see the ebb and flow of how that goes. I think the timing is going to work out well for us,” he said, suggesting the end of COVID-related subsidies, such as the Canada Recovery Benefit, will bring people back into the workforce. Around that time, Mitton said, other restaurants will also begin to slow down and staff may be shifted around to keep them working. With permits just approved and construction ongoing, no firm opening date has been set, but fellow development partner Joshua Knaak told KTW the Yew Street Food Hall’s doors will likely swing open in late October.

WE’RE OPEN

IN PERSON OR ELECTRONICALLY

kies The coo K!! AC B E R A

AUTOPLAN • HOME • BUSINESS • FLEETS • BOATS • RVS SAVE MONEY • NO LINE-UPS • EXPERT ADVICE CITYVIEW SHOPPING CENTRE - 605-1801 Princeton Hwy Kamloops, BC Phone: 250.828.2248 Fax: 250.828.2250 www.emslandinsurance.com


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

COMMUNITY

Craftsman matching donations to wildfire relief fund Craftsman Collision has launched a matching campaign in support of the Canadian Red Cross 2021 British Columbia Fires appeal and the Salvation Army Food Bank in the Okanagan to assist in their efforts to provide

support, comfort and care for those impacted by wildfires. All eligible donations made online at https://craftsman. bz/BCWildfire or at Craftsman Collision’s Facebook page (@ CraftsmanCollision) to the 2021

British Columbia Fires appeal will be matched by Craftsman Collision until Friday, Sept. 3, up to $20,000. In addition, until Dec. 31, the provincial government of is matching all eligible donations.

For example, a small $5 donation goes a long way and becomes $15. As well, all Craftsman Collision locations in Kamloops, Kelowna and Vernon are accepting donations of non-perishable food

items from the community. For each item received, Craftsman Collision will donate $1 to the local Salvation Army Food Bank. In Kamloops, Craftsman is at 453 Victoria St. W., under Overlanders Bridge.

MEMORIES & MILESTONES MEMORIES & MILESTONES Happy 65th Wedding Anniversary Lorraine and Jack September 1, 1956

For all the years of love, hardwork, challenges and fun. Love Jack and all your Family and Friends!

Celebrate The Big Day For details or to place your announcement in next Friday’s paper call 250-374-7467

Mr. Warren T. Zant, previously from Anglemont, B.C. would proudly like to announce his recent wedding to Dr. Maryna Zant (née du Plessis) of Cape Town South Africa. Wedding took place on the Carribean sea in Quintana Roo, Mexico, where they now reside.

Happy 96th Birthday Alfred Levy August 31st

You are having a great life. We Love you Dad, Grandpa, Great-Grandpa

Let Everyone Know For details or to place your announcement in next Friday’s paper call 250-374-7467


A20

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

Professor hopes to educate on climate change MORE THAN 4.6-BILLION YEARS OF EARTH’S CLIMATE EVOLUTION HAS BEEN CONDENSED INTO STEVEN EARLE’S NEW BOOK, A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE EARTH’S CLIMATE ROBERT MCALASTER

STAFF REPORTER

news@kamloopsthisweek.com

A

new book from professor Steven Earle of Thompson Rivers University’s Open Learning division aims to help educate current and future generations about the natural and human-influenced climate change — and the need for each person to do what they can to minimize their carbon footprint. More than 4.6-billion years of Earth’s climate evolution has been condensed into Earle’s new book, A Brief History of the Earth’s Climate, which is available in bookstores and online through New Society Publishers, Chapters Indigo and other retail sites. Earle, who has taught earth science for almost four decades, looks at myths and facts around the processes that affect cli-

5 Watch Battery

$ 00

Taxes and Installation included

We do watches, key fobs, garage door openers, scales, & small electronic devices. If it takes a battery; we do it!

We Use Top Quality Swiss Made Renata watch batteries

mate change, such as volcanic eruptions, plate movement, continental collisions, ocean current changes, volcanic eruptions, a warming sun and more. The illustrated book is a myth-busting guide to the natural evolution of the Earth’s climate, including how and why humancaused global warming and climate change is different and more dangerous and how to counter skeptics and deniers with sound science. Earle, author of the university textbook Physical Geology, now in its second edition, felt that his experience and expertise in earth science enabled him to deliver a unique and essential perspective on the subject. “I have this understanding of how the Earth has evolved in the past and how that has changed our climate in various different ways,” he told KTW. “I have this sort of inside information on how the way the Earth works.” Earle said it is important for people to have an understand understanding of human-caused climate change. He pointed to events such as the heat dome British Columbia experienced in June and July — leading to all-time record hug temperatures in many areas — and the rise in frequency and intensity of tropical storms across the southern U.S. states as just two examples of abnormal environmental behaviour. Earle was careful, but clear, when asked if he believed a connection existed between the historic wildfires across British Columbia and climate change.

Located in Sahali Mall Locally Owned and Operated Jewellery Repairs Done on Location

NOW OPEN

Mon. to Sat. 10 am - 4 pm

“Correlation doesn’t mean there’s a cause there, but it certainly does make sense that as the forests dry out, they become much more susceptible to burning, and so on,” he said. According to Earle, though, humanity still can fix the mistakes which were and are still being made, as they relate to climate change. “A lot of people think, ‘What can the government do now to make a difference>’ or, ‘What can corporations do to change things?’ But really, it’s us that needs to change, every one of us,” he said. Earle suggests small changes that he feels can make a huge difference.

ABOUT A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE EARTH’S CLIMATE: EVERYONE’S GUIDE TO THE SCIENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE As well as recent human-induced climate change and an overview of the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for climate change, the book delves into such areas as: • Understanding natural geological processes that shaped the climate; • How human impacts are now rapidly changing the climate; • Tipping points and the unfolding climate crisis; • What we can do to limit the damage to the planet and ecosystems; • Countering climate myths peddled by climate change science deniers. In addition to his teaching and writings, Earle participates in climate-change research and community engagement with climate-change solutions, including lowcarbon transport initiatives, heating systems and land stewardship.

Buy ice cream, help Mustard Seed KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

www.danielles.ca

In B.C., for example, driving is the singlegreatest source of CO2 emissions. “So, yeah, drive less,” he said. “If you have to drive, drive something smaller, and if you can, drive an electric car.” Earle added that riding a bike, taking a bus and walking are also excellent and alternatives to fossil-fuelled vehicles. A Brief History of The Earth’s Climate: Everyone’s Guide to the Science of Climate Change, is now available in many major book retailers, as well as online through New Society Publishers, Amazon, and other retail sites.

Scoopz Ice Cream Parlour is using those delicious cones to help The Mustard Seed Kamloops fund its programs and services for those in need in the city. The Scoopz Ice Cream Parlour’s Great Ice Cream Sell Off will return from Wednesday, Sept. 1, to Labour Day (Monday, Sept. 6). During that time (or until supplies last), for every ice cream cone purchased at Scoopz, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to The Mustard Seed Kamloops. Scoopz is located downtown in the Sandman Signature Hotel at Lansdowne Street and Second Avenue, across from Riverside Park, and is open

daily from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. In addition to the Great Ice Cream Sell Off, Mustard Seed’s Thrift Store at 342 Seymour St. will be giving customers the opportunity to make a donation of $2 and enter their name in a draw to win two, 1.4-litre tubs of Foothills ice cream from Scoopz. The winner of the draw will be announced on Sept. 15 and will work with Scoopz on the winning flavours. “For years, our family has loved heading to Scoopz on a hot summer evening,” Mustard Seed managing director Kelly Thomson said. “Even though we’ve been longstanding customers, we still haven’t tired all of their amazing flavours.” Scoopz features 48 flavours, available

on regular or waffle cones (gluten-free cone options are available) or in assorted cup sizes. “Our team at the Mustard Seed is so thankful Adrianne Erlandson, Scoopz’s owner, and her family recognize the importance of the work we do in our community, and we deeply thank them for their support,” Thomson said. The fundraiser will help provide nourishing meals and shelter to those in need. “I feel like it’s important to support local organizations like the Mustard Seed, especially these days,” Erlandson said. “We’re seeing a huge influx of those less fortunate needing our support and we’re grateful to be in a position where we can help.”


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

COMMUNITY

The mystery of the missing nature information posters ROBERT MCALASTER

STAFF REPORTER

news@kamloopsthisweek.com

With the recent return of pandemic restrictions, cooler daytime temperatures and thinning of the smoke haze, many people are again spending more time outside. And, while people are out and about enjoying the sights, smells and sounds of the city, eagleeyed citizens may spot posters that are a bit of a mystery. KTW received word of informational wildlife posters appearing on phone poles in and around Riverside Park in downtown Kamloops. On one of the posters in the park — displayed online — was an image of a European starling, accompanied by facts about the tiny bird and a Quick Response (or QR) code at the bottom. People can use their cell-

phones to access more information via that QR code. Who put up the posters, and why, is unclear as the image KTW reviewed did not contain identifying marks or logos.

Upon visiting Riverside Park, KTW was unable to find any signs of the posters. Neither City of Kamloops parks employees, security guards, or Kamloops patrons spoke with at Riverside Park had seen the posters or had knowledge of why they may have been removed. In December of 2020, 35 volunteers completed the 41st annual Christmas Kamloops bird count. Volunteers identified 58 species of birds in Kamloops, reminding residents that even without the unique and informative — and now vanished — posters, nature lovers should still keep their eyes on the skies. If you or someone you know has information about the posters, where others might be or who may have created them, email editor@kamloopsthisweek. com.

Here is where you can get vaccinated There are two more days to attend a drop-in immunization clinic at Northills Centre in North Kamloops for anyone who has not yet received their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, or anyone who received their first dose more than 28 days ago. People can walk-up, register and receive their first or second COVID-19 vaccine. The clinics are in the mall’s food court area and will be held on Wednesday, Sept.1, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday, Sept. 2, from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Anyone born in 2009 or earlier is eligible for immunization. People are eligible for their second dose 28 days after receiving their first dose. People can also get their

Pineview Rentals

IT’S OUR

first or second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by dropping in to an immunization clinic or making an appointment. To make an appointment, register online by visiting the provincial website at www. getvaccinated.gov.bc.ca/, call 1-833-838-2323, or visit a Service BC office listed here, and then book an appointment. For a list of all Interior Health COVID-19 immunization clinics and other resources visit https://news. interiorhealth.ca/news/covid-19-vaccines/. Note: The vaccination clinic at the Tournament Capital Centre is now located on the lower floor at Aberdeen Mall.

big fish sale! Pink, purple, orange, or blue…

September is Here! Time to go PADDLING!

THANK YOU KAMLOOPS

• Kayaks • Disc Golf Set • Inflatable Stand Up Paddleboard FREE WITH RENTALS • Car Carrier • Life Jackets p i n e v i e w re n t a l s . c a • 2 5 0 - 3 1 4 - 7 2 1 2 1857 Lodgepole Drive, Kamloops

When it comes to fish, we have the perfect finned friend for you!

Don’t let these great deals swim away! Sale ends Sept 12

20% off

the regular price on all aqua supplies, including tanks, stands, and filters! Plus check out our selection of tropical and fresh water fish!

905 Notre Dame Dr. 250.828.0810 petlandkamloops.ca

Monday-Sunday 10am—6pm


A22

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FALL IN LOVE WITH A NEW TO YOU RIDE! 2020 FORD RANGER XLT 4X4 SC

STK: KM065 • LOW MILEAGE, LEATHER SEATS, HEATED SEATS, AUTOMATIC EMERGENCY BRAKING, ANDROID AUTO, APPLE CARPLAY!

NOW

q

49,995

$

2019 FORD MUSTANG BULLITT

STK: RM303A • 37,789 KMS 2DR FASTBACK, EXCLUSIVE GREEN COLOR, STEVE MCQUEEN, BULLIT, LEATHER SEATS, COOLED SEATS!

NOW

q

53,995

$

2017 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SAHARA

STK: KM075 • 21,651 KMS 4DR 4X4, LOW MILEAGE, BLUETOOTH, AIR CONDITIONING, ALUMINUM WHEELS, POWER MIRRORS, CRUISE CONTROL!

q

49,995

$

NOW

q

24,995

$

2020 FORD F-150 LARIAT

STK: KM069 • 15,504 KMS, LOW MILEAGE, LEATHER SEATS, LANE KEEP ASSIST, COOLED SEATS, HEATED SEATS, ANDROID AUTO!

STK: KM053 • 11,579 KMS LOW MILEAGE, LEATHER SEATS, BLUETOOTH, HEATED SEATS, PREMIUM SOUND PACKAGE, REAR VIEW CAMERA!

NOW

NOW

q

64,995

$

q

26,741

$

2017 RAM 1500 ST 4X4 CC

STK: RM247A • 84,384 KMS ALUMINUM WHEELS, FOG LAMPS, LOW KM, HEMI MOTOR, TRAILER SWAY CONTROL!

NOW

q

38,495

$

2020 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4DR 4X4

NOW

2013 GMC SIERRA 1500 SL 4X4

STK: TM264AA • 134,500 KMS CREW CAB, BLUETOOTH, ONSTAR, AIR CONDITIONING, STEERING WHEEL AUDIO CONTROL, POWER WINDOWS!

2018 FORD FUSION ENERGI TITANIUM

STK: RM242A • 27,772 KMS SUNROOF, ACTIVEX SEATING MATERIAL CAPTAIN CHAIRS, FORD CO-PILOT360 ASSIST+, TRAILER TOW PACKAGE, COLD WEATHER PACKAGE!

NOW

q

46,995

$

2016 FORD F-150 XLT 4X4

STK: MM270A • 95,471 KMS SUPERCREW CAB, STYLESIDE 5.5 FT. BOX, XTR PACKAGE

NOW

q

33,995

$

2019 FORD F-150 XLT

STK: ZL047AA • 69,472 KMS LEATHER SEATS, LANE KEEP ASSIST, COOLED SEATS, HEATED SEATS, ANDROID AUTO!

NOW

q

57,995

$

2018 FORD F-150 PLATINUM

STK: KM066 • 40,789 KMS, NAVIGATION, LEATHER SEATS, BLIND SPOT DETECTION, PREMIUM SOUND PACKAGE

NOW

q

60,995

$

2020 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM

STK: KM025 • 24,753 KMS NAVIGATION, HYBRID, AUTO, AWD.

NOW

q

38,840

$

2000 CHEVROLET CAMARO Z28

STK: GM258AA • 84,591 KMS LOW MILEAGE!

NOW

q

19,995

$

2013 FORD F-350 4X4

STK: MM270A • 126,859 KMS DIESEL, AUTOMATIC, 6.7 L 8 CYL.

NOW

q

53,995

$

2013 FORD E-450 CUTAWAY

STK: PM086 • 30,032 KMS LOW MILEAGE, PATTERN FRAME, AIR CONDITIONING, AUX JACK!

NOW

q

79,995

$

2018 FORD F-150 RAPTOR 4X4

STK: KM068 • 55,961 KMS, SUPERCREW CAB STYLESIDE 5.5 FT. BOX, HIGH OUTPUT 3.5L ECOBOOST!

q

86,995

$

2019 FORD EXPEDITION PLATINUM

STK: PM084A • 57,355 KMS 4 DR, 4X4, NAVIGATION, SUNROOF, POWER LIFTGATE, HEATED STEERING.

NOW

q

79,780

$

2013 CHEVROLET SONIC LT

NOW

STK: RM119AAA • 146,262 KMS, AUTO, 4DR HATCHBACK, BLUETOOTH, SIRIUSXM, CRUISE CONTROL!

q

7,595

$

2019 RAM 1500 SPORT/REBEL 4X4

STK: JM151AAA • 19,013 KMS LOW MILEAGE, PERFORMANCE STYLING, SPECIAL BADGING, ANDROID AUTO, APPLE CARPLAY, REMOTE START!

NOW

q

57,995

$

2020 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4DR 4X4

STK: RM242A • 27,772 KMS SUNROOF, ACTIVEX SEATING MATERIAL CAPTAIN CHAIRS, FORD CO-PILOT360 ASSIST+, TRAILER TOW PACKAGE, COLD WEATHER PACKAGE!

YOUR FORD VEHICLE SPECIALISTS 2555 East Trans Canada HWY Kamloops Automall DL#5917

NOW

250.372.7101 | dearbornford.com

NOW

q

46,995

$


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

10 AM - 2 PM

CLUB OF KAMLOOPS

PRESENTS

THURSDAY, SEPT 9

FRIDAY, SEPT 10

SUNDAY, SEPT 12

CAIN’S YOUR INDEPENDENT GROCERS

PRINCESS AUTO

CFJC-TV PARKING LOT

A23

THE KIWANIS 2021 TOY DROP PLEASE BRING A NEW TOY FOR A CHILD OR TEENAGER! FOR

$5 50/50 TICKETS ON SALE

AT ALL LOCATIONS & FARMERS MARKET PROCEEDS TO PEOPLE IN MOTION

BRING TOYS BY MOTORCYCLE OR VEHICLE AND GO FOR A RIDE!

SPONSORS:

Kiwanis Club of Kamloops • Broadcast Centre - B-100, 98.3 CIFM, CFJC-TV • Princess Auto • Kamloops This Week People in Motion • Aardvark Pumping Service • Overland Press • Cain’s Your Independent Grocers

BIG KIDS HELPING LITTLE KIDS! BA Brewmaster

BA

DONATIONS OF TOYS

#20-1425 Cariboo Place Kamloops, BC, V2C 5Z3

250-372-2739

• Specialty Compounding • Long Term Care • Medical Supplies

BA Winexpert

#50-1967 E. Trans Can Hwy Kamloops, BC, V2C 4A4

250-314-6629

www.babrewmaster.com

Major Appliance Service | Home Electronic Service

Kristina Gifford, BSc Pharm Owner/Manager kristina.g@kippmallery.ca

706 Mount Paul Way, Kamloops 250-374-9911 - info@valleycustommotorcycles.com

Hansport Princess Auto Player’s Bench Cain’s Independent Grocer Toys R Us

3 Locations to Serve You: 690 Lansdowne Street 250.374.4224 fountaintire.com

Downtown 273 Victoria St 250-372-2531

Landmark Centre in Sahali 207-755 McGill Rd 236-425-0025

Dallas 102-5170 Dallas Dr 778-469-5271

kippmallery.ca We are happy to support the dedicated members of Kiwanis

2400 Ord Road Tel: 250-376-1973 Fax: 250-376-1984

Ph. 250-376-7668 www.integratire.com 160 Leigh Road GREAT LOCATION. GREAT PEOPLE. GREAT COFFEE.

DRAKE SMITH, MSW

210 Lansdowne & 425 Tranquille 250.377.8225 Clearwater: 250.674.303 | Barriere: 250.672.1999

551-11 Ave & Battle St. scottsfamilydiner.ca 250-372-8221

250 372 3424 | fireplacecentre.com

DREAMCYCLE.CA

CINDY’S

MOTORCYCLE MUSEM

445 Seymour St. Kamloops

377 VICTORIA STREET (250) 374-6487

GF8

HOLDINGS

CONSTRUCTION

778-471-5666

707 VICTORIA ST • 250-372-3606

30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

Specializing in: Steel Drywall & Taping T Bar & Suspecnded Ceilings Residential & Commercial

Larry jolicoeur | 250.319.1713 larry.jolicoeur@gmail.com

CLEANING SERVICES 250-3766607

Northills Shopping Centre 700 Tranquille Rd. (250) 312-3323 yourindependentgrocer.ca

250.851.8887 • oktire.com 1020 Victoria Street Downtown Chill restaurant & bar with eats such as burgers, fajitas & pasta dishes, plus several draft beers.

250.374.3141 p:p.250.374.3141 2051 East Trans Canada Hwy 2051 East Trans Canada Hwy rtrperformance.com Kamloops BC, V2C 4A5 www.rtrperformance.com

690 Lansdowne Street 577 Victoria St, Kamloops, BC 250.374.4224 frickandfrack.ca fountaintire.com (250) 851-2030


A24

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

DIG IT: A TRIBUTE TO LESLIE HALL PINDER Leslie Hall Pinder was a Canadian lawyer who successfully argued several influential court cases before the Supreme Court of Canada on behalf of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. She died this past June.

NOLA MARKEY

SPECIAL TO KTW

I

t was with great sadness to learn of Leslie Pinder’s passing on June 12. Pinder was a Canadian lawyer who successfully argued several influential court cases before the Supreme Court of Canada on behalf of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. [Insert photo here] Pinder began her career as a lawyer in British Columbia in 1976 and worked with the Union of BC Indian Chiefs. In 1982, she formed her own law firm with Louise Mandell (Mandell Pinder LLP-Vancouver), working exclusively for Indigenous Peoples. Unique for the times, Mandell Pinder LLP employed only female lawyers. Pinder became involved in cases concerning Aboriginal Title and Rights in 1987. A note on terminology: “Indian” and “Aboriginal” terms are often used interchangeably and are found in colonial policies and legislation (i.e., Indian Act 1876, Constitution Act 1982, Section 35. The term “Indigenous” will be used in this article to refer to First Nations, Inuit and Métis and aligns with the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, implemented by Canada

in 2021. Very briefly, until 1951, the Indian Act made it illegal to obtain funds or legal counsel for advancement of Aboriginal title or rights cases. One of the first major court cases, brought forward by Nisga’a Chief Frank Calder in 1967, argued for the existence of Aboriginal title (Indigenous peoples’ occupation, use and control of ancestral lands prior to pre-contact). By 1973, six Supreme Court justices of Canada recognized that Aboriginal title existed in Canadian law.

Have a heart to give for a heart to live Donate for Cardiac Care “CATH LAB" at RIH

Concerning Aboriginal rights, in 1984, Musqueam member Ronald Sparrow challenged his right to fish traditionally without retaining a food fishing licence. It was argued that Sparrow retained the right to fish on the territories the Musqueam inhabited and fished for centuries, and that their rights had never been extinguished by treaty. The Supreme Court of Canada ruled in 1990 that existing Aboriginal and treaty rights were recognized and affirmed in section 35 of the Constitution Act.

A significant legal court case that Pinder and colleagues worked on included the Delgamuukw trial in 1987. This case was named after Gitxsan Heredity Chief Earl Muldoe that involved B.C. land claims. They lost the initial B.C. Supreme Court case in 1991, as the judge ruled that title was extinguished when the province joined Canadian Confederation. In addition, the judge refused to accept the Gitxsan and Wet’suwet’en elders’ oral history (passed down from generation to generation) as evidence.

The Gitxsan and Wet’suwet’en appealed the ruling and, in 1993, the B.C. Court of Appeal concluded that the government has a duty to consult with Indigenous peoples before they begin any projects that may infringe upon Indigenous rights. The court still agreed with the original ruling regarding title to land. The Delgamuukw case was appealed by Pinder to the Supreme Court of Canada. The result of the 1997 ruling was important as it outlined that Aboriginal title was recognized as a right under the Constitution Act. It also clarified the government’s duty to consult and it affirmed the legal validity of oral history. Pinder’s involvement in the Van der Peet case (1996) also resulted in the ruling that Indigenous oral history is an important type of evidence courts must treat as equal to other types of evidence. Pinder was passionate about defending the rights of Indigenous peoples. She took the lead in arguing several other landmark cases before the

Supreme Court of Canada, which addressed fiduciary obligations of the federal Crown: Guerin v The Queen (1984), Apsassin v The Queen (1995), rulings establishing the Tk’emlúps band’s right to a pre-Confederation reserve land (Jules v Harper Ranch in 1987) and preventing CNR interference with Indigenous fisheries along the Fraser and Thompson rivers (Pasco v CNR in 1984), to mention a few. Pinder’s reciprocal relationship with Indigenous leaders in B.C. enabled her and her colleagues to advance the rights of all Indigenous Peoples across Canada. These important court cases draw upon the work of cultural anthropologists and archaeologists who, at times, act as expert witnesses before the courts. The subsequent legislative changes, such as the requirements for consultation, underlie the process for all archaeological and environmental assessments today.

Nola Markey is a cultural heritage manager and Indigenous anthropologist and archaeologist at the Little Shuswap Lake Band. Dig It is KTW’s regularly published column on the history beneath our feet in the region. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca.

Have a heart to give For a heart to serve Empowering "TRU Nursing Students"

F O R I N F O R M AT I O N , V I S I T: I W I S H F U N D . C O M


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

INSIDE: Pendrel’s world championship swan song | A27

A25

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

Two-year hiatus nearing end for WolfPack Rylee Mugridge and the TRU WolfPack have not seen Canada West action since October of 2019. Much has changed on the roster since then, with head coach Mark Pennington bringing in his first two recruiting classes. The team will be in tough in Week 1 against UBC.

MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

M

ark Pennington will finally be fielding a team of his own when the TRU WolfPack women’s soccer squad returns to the pitch on Friday, Sept. 10, at Hillside Stadium. The defending national champion UBC Thunderbirds — who have never lost to TRU — will provide opposition in the WolfPack’s first Canada West tilt since Oct. 20, 2019, a 4-0 loss to the Trinity Western Spartans in Langley. “There’s no bigger test than that for opening day,” said Pennington, formerly an assistant coach for the Thunderbirds’ women’s soccer team. “We’re going to be really young and inexperienced, but with some really good players. If we can get their mindset right — if you’re good enough, you’re old enough is sometimes the saying.” Pennington was hired in time for the 2019 campaign and inherited a team that was 7-30-4 in the three seasons prior to his arrival and 13-47-7 since joining U Sports in 2014, a span during which it compiled a minus-122 goal differential. TRU, which finished the 2019 season with a record of 2-8-4, was 2-4-3 in its final nine games and in the playoff race until the

Built for life. Yours.

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

final weekend of the season. The COVID-19 pandemic arrived in 2020, along with Pennington’s first recruiting class. League play last year was pre-empted by the virus crisis. Pennington added eight new recruits in 2021, bringing to 16 the number of new faces that will be eligible to make their Canada West debuts against the T-Birds. “Young girls bring good energy and intensity to practise,” said Rylee Mugridge, a second-year midfielder from Maple Ridge. “They’re eager, they’re ready to go and it’s competitive. These

rookies are fighting for starting positions and that helps with the intensity of camp and training throughout the year.” Hawan Abdissa is among the TRU first-year players who are not exactly rookies, part of the 2020 recruiting class that spent last year creating a foundation for the future. “We focused on our growth as a team, building our program and getting to know how each other play, since we did have a lot of recruits last year, as well as this year,” said Abdissa, a winger from Calgary. “I think we are up for the

Don’t forget! Get the FUR-FURFURNACE checked! From top to bottom, we will make sure your furnace is running safely and at peak efficiency to keep you cozy all winter long.

The earlier you call, the more you save!

1-833-215-4575

FOXANDSONS.CA/FurFurFurnace

challenge. Going into that game [against UBC], we’re not going to think of any past results. We are a new team. We have a lot of new players.” Camryn Curts made WolfPack history on Oct. 4, 2019, becoming the first TRU women’s soccer player to notch a regular-season goal against UBC. The T-Birds dispatched TRU 2-1 at Hillside Stadium. Curts is among the small group of veterans running with the Pack in 2021. Recently imposed Interior Health restrictions do not allow for spectators to attend

home-opening weekend, which includes a rematch against UBC on Sept. 11. The WolfPack had big plans to make a spectacle of the weekend, which was to coincide with the institution’s back-to-school barbecue, but those have been postponed. Interior Health is expected to review its restrictions at the end of September. After home opening weekend, the WolfPack’s next home matches are slated for Oct. 1 and Oct. 2 against the Spartans. “I’m really sad the fans can’t be here,” Pennington said. “They’re kind of our 12th man sometimes to push us through and make the atmosphere tough for our opponents. Disappointing on that front, but on the whole, we’re just excited to be back on the field.” Pennington used practices, scrimmages and exhibition play in 2020 to introduce on-field tactics. Smoke from wildfires burning across the province wreaked havoc on the 2021 pre-season schedule, but work continued and players say the hurdles have aided culture building. See PENNINGTON, A30

Furnace 22-Point Inspection THE SOONER YOU BOOK, THE MORE YOU SAVE!

Book Before:

September 17

$59

October 8

October 15

$99 $139

Offer valid until November 30, 2021. Inspection includes heat pumps, if applicable. Cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Fireplace servicing not included.


A26

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Restrictions confusion reigns in Kamloops MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

An Interior Health Authority restrictions flip-flop came after much angst and confusion was expressed from athletes and organizations across the region, including in Kamloops. Kamloops council received an email on Aug. 26 from Interior Health that said team sports are permitted under the health authority’s gathering and events order. An Aug. 23 order from IH banned team sports competition. “We have changed our direction on team sports,” the email said. ViaSport, the B.C. government’s delivery agency for sport, was among governing bodies that influenced IH to reverse its decision on competition, according to multiple sources. Among updated restrictions, which were published on the IH website on Aug. 26: Game play is allowed at all levels, maximum gathering sizes are 100 and 50 outdoors and indoors respectively, and spectator capacity is limited to 100 outdoors and 50 indoors. IH has not returned KTW’s request for comment.

Kamloops Coun. Mike O’Reilly is among those who had problems with the Aug. 23 restrictions. “To me, blanket-wide restrictions like that were acceptable a year-and-a-half ago because we didn’t have time to figure out specific plans,” O’Reilly said. “At this point, we should be able to make more surgical decisions and allow things that can happen in specific areas. I’m equally as frustrated as the next person. Parents are getting extremely frustrated and I believe they should be.” On Monday, Aug. 30, B.C. reported 1,853 new cases of COVID-19 and seven further deaths over the weekend, three of which occurred in the Interior Health region. Interior Health also accounted for the largest portion of new cases, with 707. Sean Smith, business operations and events supervisor for the City of Kamloops, said organizers of about 11 tournaments — worth about $1.5 million to $2 million in spending in the city — slated to be held in Kamloops in September or October were considering cancellation or postponement due to recent restrictions.

The biggest of them all, the NSA Canada Slo-Pitch Co-Ed World Series, which was to bring more than 160 teams to the city, is among five tournaments (Kamloops Senior Slo-pitch, BC Hydro Slo-Pitch, Kamloops Beach Volleyball, Pickleball Connect) that have been cancelled and will not be rescheduled. An NSA representative told KTW that Kamloops will remain home to the Co-Ed World Series for the foreseeable future. “The City of Kamloops has treated us like gold,” the representative said. “Just an incredible relationship. We’re not going anywhere.” Of the other six tournaments/events that were in jeopardy, Kamloops Ladies Slo-Pitch, Westsyde Slo-Pitch, OctoberFest Slo-Pitch and Highland Dance are scheduled to go ahead, Big O Memorial Slo-Pitch is tentatively confirmed to take place and BC Rugby Women’s 7s status is unconfirmed. Sporting groups such as the Western Hockey League’s Kamloops Blazers, TRU WolfPack and BC Football Conference’s Kamloops Broncos were thrown for a loop when the no-competition restric-

tion was put into place, as each have home contests slated for September. It is unclear if the Blazers’ exhibition games this month will go ahead. The WolfPack Canada West home openers on Sept. 10 are scheduled to take place, but spectators are not permitted. The Broncos were scheduled to play one game in August and one game in September at Hillside Stadium, but cannot toil in the Interior Health region under current gathering-size limitations. Those tilts have yet to be rescheduled. If they are to be played in September, they cannot under current restrictions be contested in the IH region. Neutral sites are being considered. The Valley Huskers are scheduled to host the Broncos in Chilliwack on Sept. 11. The Blazers’ regular season home opener is scheduled for Oct. 9. IH restrictions, which will be reviewed near the end of September, will have to loosen or updated directives from the province unveiled if spectators are to be allowed into Sandman Centre. See ROBISON, A30

FEDERAL ELECTION FORUM 2021 MONDAY, SEPT 13 7:00-9:00 PM

Broadcast LIVE on Radio NL 610AM and on Facebook Live at www.Facebook.com/KamloopsThisWeek

Frank Caputo Conservative

Brought to you by:

Iain Currie Green

Corally Delwo People’s Party

Submit your questions in advance to

hello@kamloopschamber.ca

Jesse McCormick Liberal

Bob O’Brien Independent

Bill Sundhu NDP


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Pendrel done after 17 world championships MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Catharine Pendrel has competed for the last time in the elite Cross-Country Olympic (XCO) UCI Mountain Bike World Championships. Pendrel, a 40-year-old Kamloops resident and twotime world champion, placed 22nd in the 2021 women’s world championship on Saturday in Val di Sole, Italy. “Both warming up and in my race I was smiling knowing how much I still love the thrill and fight involved in racing and how a good battle makes you want to get right back to working hard for improvement,” Pendrel said in Facebook and Instagram posts that featured pictures of her smiling and posing with flowers at the finish line. “This is a pretty cool sport and I’m so happy I found it and all the amazing people

in it and happy to still have a couple races left this season!” Evie Richards of Great Britain finished the race in one hour, 23 minutes and 52 seconds to claim her first world title. Pendrel, from Frederiction, finished six minutes and 48 seconds behind Richards and two seconds ahead of U.S. rider Kate Courtney (world champion in 2018 and overall World Cup series champion in 2019) and Eva Lechner of Italy. Pendrel has competed in

WINNING LOTTO NUMBERS

17 world championship races. There are two XCO World Cup races remaining in the 2021 campaign — No. 5, which runs on Sept. 4 and Sept. 5 in Lenzerheide, Switzerland, and No. 6, which runs on Sept. 18 and Sept. 19 in Snowshoe, West Virginia. Pendrel is planning to spend time with family in New Brunswick and will miss the race in Switzerland. She will cap her World Cup career in West Virginia. Pendrel, a three-time

World Cup series champion, has placed 52nd, 23rd, 26th and 21st in four 2021 World Cup races and sits 26th overall in the circuit’s standings. She placed 18th last month at the Olympic Summer Games in Izu, Japan, the result coming about six months after Pendrel gave birth to daughter Dara. Pendrel, a four-time Olympian, won bronze at the 2016 Games in Rio. The Canadian XCO Championships are slated to run from Sept. 24 to Sept. 26 in Baie-Saint-Paul, Que. Pendrel will be aiming to win her seventh national XCO title. Pendrel will finish her season with an Epic Ride event in October. “I haven’t solidified plans for next year, but I hope some sort of racing will always be in my future, whether it is just local or some neat stage races,” Pendrel told KTW in an email.

Starting September 1, 2021

09 10 13 25 41 47 49 Bonus 36 19 20 70 95 Please visit www.lotto.bclc.com for winning numbers.

06 08 09 12 19 26 Bonus 43

04 18 24 69 GUARANTEED $1,000,000 PRIZE DRAW:

77100499-01 Please visit www.lotto.bclc.com for winning numbers.

Call for an ICBC Express Estimate

From totally munched to totally perfect

ICBC LIFETIME GUARANTEE

D A R E D N O T

L I E F

A T W O E V E R S A N S S L I T A I G Y U M A M A L B L A M A A L A S T O N H A R E R I O

E T T A S I O N S

A I R I E S T

L O L Z S A P I A A P P I N G C E D E A R S R U T E K P O P N F I E S W E L E T T E R W O R T I S O S P A T D O U B L E C R R S O A I C E B F F T H R E E F E W I M D S O D O M E M R N A C H O K E A K I T S O U P P O N T H T W S O D O N

250-374-9995

T U M M I E S

E N D O A R E N A

A27

E S T N C U T O U T H L E A B L E T D A N I Y O G A I N N I S I T P E T E A S E D N E R M E R A P E S E A P B A L L E L I E E E Z E R D E N

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A35

City of Kamloops

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS We thank you for your patronage, understanding, and patience as we work together during this unprecedented time. Visit Kamloops.ca/COVID for updates Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

Baby and Parent Dance

The class is designed for caregivers and infants to enjoy movement and music together. Bring your carrier or sling and wear your baby, hold your baby, and bring blanket/play mat to place on the floor. Movements will be at a slower pace and music will be played at a safe, babyfriendly level. Appropriate for any fitness level and babies not yet crawling. Mothers, please consult with your physician before commencing any post-partum exercise. Valleyview Community Hall Tue Sep 21–Dec 7 9:00–9:30 am 12/$108 West Highlands Community Centre Sat Sep 18–Dec 4 8:45–9:15 am 12/$108

Musical Theatre

Ages: 6–10

DISCOVER YOUR COMMUNITY Visit bctransit.com/kidsridefree

Bats are misunderstood and underappreciated. They’re also in trouble from white nose syndrome, a disease that affects hibernating bats. Join community bat coordinator Vanessa Robinson on a journey to learn more about these fascinating creatures. Walk up Tranquille Creek to view bats leaving their roosts, and use a bat detector to “hear” them. There’s so much to discover about bats. This program is in partnership with the Kamloops Naturalist Club Pine Park Wed Sep 14 7:00–9:00 pm 1/$15

Nature Walk: Physical Literacy Talk and Walk

In this program, you will enjoy a 30min talk and demonstration about physical literacy in your home, yard and garden, and in our nature parks. You will learn proper pole walking, climbing and lifting techniques. We will also show you different movement skills with a variety of yard equipment and tools while navigating on different surfaces. You will finish off with a 90min nature park walk.

Peterson Creek Park Tues 10:00–12:00 pm

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1993

969 Laval Crescent | www.cactuscollision.com

A D S F R O L O U D P R O R I N O T A T B D A O R D S O A K B L M R O S S R S T J I E T U N C U S T O T T W H F O U P A W H I T S C E

Discover Bats!

Aug 28, 2021

07 10 16 26 43 48 Bonus 46 03 17 78 89 Please visit www.lotto.bclc.com for winning numbers.

D R I N K I N

Musical theatre will explore singing, dancing, and acting. Your child will learn how to follow a song with basic movement while singing and adding facial expressions gestures. Kamloops Performance Company Thu Sep 9–Dec 16 4:30–5:15 pm 13/$123.50

Aug 27, 2021

Aug 28, 2021

A T W O O D

Kamloops.ca

Sep 14 1/$5


A28

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

R E A L

Clifford Brauner Accredited Home Inspector

E S T A T E

License #47212

250-319-5572 photo: Rebekah Barendregt

KAMLOOPS & AREA • EACH EDITION AVAILABLE ONLINE

250.319.7008 jerri@jerrivan.com

September 1, 2021 | Volume 35 | Issue 35

kamloops.pillartopost.com

Attention Realtors

GET MORE EXPOSURE FOR YOUR LISTINGS! REACH OVER 30,500 HOMES EVERY WEEK

To learn more contact

Paul De Luca

realestate@kamloopsthisweek.com 250-374-7467 1365B Dalhousie Drive

RANCHER STYLE HOMES

CONTACT US FOR PRICING! Adult oriented gated community with on site Secured RV Parking, minutes f rom downtown Kamloops & no GST!

Contact us for more info www.SiennaRidgeKamloops.com KIRSTEN MASON Personal Real Estate Corp P: 250-571-7037 E: Kmason@kadrea.com

SHOWHOME CLOSED FOR THE SEPTEMBER LONG WEEKEND


LindaTurner

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

A29

www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • LindaTurnerPREC@gmail.com

250-374-3331

$135,000

REALTOR® of the Year

$159,500

Proud Supporter of Children’s Miracle Network

$174,900

$199,900

$299,000

REALTOR®

REALTOR®

$299,900

D L O S

QUIET 55+ MOBILE W/2 BED & 1 BATH • Good parking & yard with shed • Open floor plan w/vaulted ceilings • All appliances & C/Air included

3 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNIT • Completely updated throughout • Corner lot with great yard

3 BEDROOM APPLE VALLEY MOBILE • Big Fenced yard • 1 pet allowed • Updated beauty with all appliances • Park will sign site lease

SPACIOUS 2 BDRM, 2 BATH MOBILE • Large fenced yard w/gardens & shed • All appliances & 2 AC units included • Parking for 2-3 vehicles

TOP FLOOR CORNER CONDO AT DALLAS TOWN CENTER • 1 Bedroom 1 Bath, compact + modern • Pets and rentals allowed

1 BED 1 BATH CONDO IN SUN RIVERS • Updated unit with custom sit up bar • Strata allows pets and rentals

17 MARS DRIVE

33-1375 ORD ROAD

45-1375 ORD RD

16-240 G&M ROAD

521-5170 DALLAS DRIVE

3401-1040 TALASA COURT

$370,000

$445,000

$474,900

$569,000

$599,900

$619,900

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

BROCKLEHURST

• D/Garage plus 17 ft driveway • Open floor plan w/Island kitchen • C/Air & All appliances included

1044 SELKIRK AVE

903-9TH GREEN DRIVE

401-885 UNIVERSITY DRIVE

$775,900

$819,900

$830,000

HURRY! WON’T LAST LONG • 3 bdrm rancher • Immaculate & Updated top to bottom • S/Garage, fenced yard & RV parking • All new appliances, C/Air, UG spklers

TOTAL CUSTOM UPDATE • Stunning open floor plan • Hardwood floors/200 amps • New plumbing, furnace & AC

1410- 1000 TALASA WAY

507-712 SAHALI TERRACE

532 MCGOWAN AVE

$695,000

$724,900

$749,900

ABERDEEN

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • 3 bdrms up & 2 bdrm suite down • Hardwood floors & Large kitchen • Large fenced yard & C/Air

RANCHER W/PANORAMIC VIEW • Great location close to TRU & shops • 4 Bdrms, 2nd kitchen for in-law suite • Well maintained C/ Air-C/Vac-UG Spklers

4953 RIVER ROAD

2435 DRUMMOND COURT

410 DUFFERIN TERRACE

$830,000

$1,040,000

$1,275,000

BROCKLEHURST

SOUTH THOMPSON VALLEY

ABERDEEN

NEW BUILD W/2956 SQFT • 5 Bedrms + Den & Finished basement • All Appliances, C/Air included • Landscaping & UG Spklers

STUNNING GOLF COURSE HOME • Double garage & golf cart garage • Island Kitchen + 4 bedrooms • Amazing basement rec room + theatre

848 CRESLINE ST

3544 NAVATANEE DRIVE

VIDEO TOURS

EXECUTIVE 2 STOREY W/4BDRMS UP • Quality throughout plus upgrades • Triple garage & RV parking • In-Law suite, View & Great Location

SAHALI

NEW CRESTON HOUSE TOP FLOOR UNIT • 2 Beds/2 Baths /2 parking stalls • Spectacular north valley view • Custom upgrades throughout

TOP FLOOR W/PANORAMIC VIEW • Classy 2 Bedroom/2Bath unit • Vaulted ceilings w/skylights • 2 parking stalls + 8x8 storage

PRITCHARD

SUN RIVERS

SUN RIVERS

TRUE RANCHER W/2 BEDROOMS & DEN

TOP FLOOR WITH STUNNING DECK & VIEW • 2 bedrooms, den & 2 baths • Classy open plan w/granite kitchen • C/Air-All appliances

RIVERFRONT W/TONS OF RV PARKING • 3 Bdrm & 2 Bath, 2yrs old home • Built over a full 41x29 shop • Comes w/all appliances & C/Air • Quonset plus detached garage

DALLAS

Adam Popien

BROCKLEHURST

D L O S

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

Kristy Janota

NORTH KAMLOOPS

SUN RIVERS

NORTH SHORE

Real Estate (Kamloops)

SUN RIVERS

ABERDEEN

BROCKLEHURST

EXECUTIVE 4 BDRM 4 BATH BEAUTY • Full finished basement • Designer kitchen w/ Breakfast bar • C/Vac + all appliances

NEW BUILD W/2956 SQFT • 5 Bedrms + Den & Finished basement • All Appliances, C/Air included • Landscaping & UG Spklers

925-9TH GREEN LANE

2202 GREENOCK PLACE

844 CRESLINE ST

LOT FOR SALE

LOT FOR SALE

LOT FOR SALE

RANCHER W/PANORAMIC VIEW

• Hardwood floors & open floor plan • 2+2 Bedrooms - 2 1/2 Baths • Daylight walk out basement

BLIND BAY

LOT 46 ST. ANDREWS ST. • $138,800 • 0.35 acre LOT in Shuswap Lake Estates • Golf course and lake nearby • All utilities at lot line

KAMLOOPS LAKE

SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

HEFFLEY

YATES CREEK RD $599,000 • Beautiful quarter section • Halfway between Kamloops and Sun Peaks • Come build your dream home

722 GIFFORD COURT

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


A30

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

RICK WATERS

250-851-1013 call or text anytime

rickwaters@royallepage.ca

www.kamloopsthisweek.com NORTH KAM $539,000 881 PEMBROKE AVE

SELLING? CALL ME FOR A FREE

MARKET EVALUATION with no obligation!

HERE TO HELP!

SOLD

SPORTS

• Clean c/air with 3+2 bdrms, 2 baths • Updated roof, furnace & hot water tank • New Kitchen counters & title backsplash • Huge 64x130 lot with Alley access • Zoned for suite with potential

NORTH KAM $439,500 1371 OTTAWA PLACE

28 YEARS

EXPERIENCE! Buying or Selling? I will save you time and money!

WESTWIN REALTY

BUYING?

Did you know almost all listings are multiple listings.This means I can show you anything on the market.

• Occupy or Invest • Possession down possible & leased up until May 2022 • 2 + 2 bedroom suite with seperate laundry • Lots of parking, close to school & transit

MORE PICTURES & INFO AT: WWW.ROYALLEPAGE.CA/RICKWATERS

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

ON NATIONAL DUTY

Greg Stewart of Kamloops was scheduled to compete in shot put at the Paralympic Winter Games in Tokyo on Tuesday after KTW’s press deadline. Go online to kamloopsthisweek.com for results.

PENNINGTON TO REMAIN PATIENT From A25

Congratulations

GLENN DREGER August photo contest winner To win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos at:

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on September 29

Follow us on Instagram to vote on the top photos at the end of every month

@Kamloopsthisweek

1 winner selected at the end of each month from majority vote of selected entries. Submitte though www.KamloopsThisWeek.com/photo-contest will be accepted. Physical & emailed copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for more details.

“It’s just so nice to be back,” Mugridge said. “The last year was so hard for athletes — any level, any age, any sport. “There are still a few things we are fighting through — smoke, COVID, pandemic — but this team is resilient and we have to bounce back.”

The WolfPack women’s soccer team has reached the playoffs once, in 2015, when it was thumped 6-1 by UBC in Round 1. Is there a bit more pressure on Pennington to produce victories this year, now that the roster is composed mostly of his recruits? “Possibly,” he said.

“I think I’ve still got a little bit of leeway and time here. It takes time to mould, but I’m really excited to see where we are. “We’ll be young and naive, at times, but we’re hoping their quality, athleticism, ability and game sense kind of pulls them through.”

Robison says WHL needs packed barns From A26

“We were expecting 100 per cent capacity,” WHL commissioner Robison told KTW of WHL regular season action, which gets underway on Oct. 1.

“Obviously, we require 100 per cent capacity in order for our franchises to continue operating. It’s been a very difficult period of time working through last season, a

TEAM

shortened season, but without spectators.” Group chats featuring those involved in recreational sports leagues have been rife with confusion since gathering-

110

size limitations were introduced and the competition flip-flop was complete. Contact local organizations to determine the latest on those leagues.

RECEIVE A FREE NO OBLIGATION WE’VE GONE ONLINE! MARKET EVALUATION See all listings & much more at team110.com CALL 250-851-3110 OR 250-571-6686 TODAY! Proud Sponsor

TEAM

110

Robert J. Iio Personal Real Estate Corporation

Bobby Iio

REALTOR®/TEAM LEADER

Jeremy Bates REALTOR®

Kim Fells REALTOR®

Team110remax

team110 - remax


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A31

Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries NEW LISTING

Call today to book your personal tour! North Shore

407 120 Vernon Ave $224,900 • 1 Bedroom top floor unit with in suite laundry • Close to shopping and restaurants • 55 and over • Quiet Location

1 UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Sun Rivers

768 Gifford Court • $689,900

1

3

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453 Dallas

751

4112 Rio Vista Place $899,000 • Choose your finishing Selections • Completion Fall 2021 *Panoramic Views • Rancher With Finished walkout basement • Yard maintenance included

4

2533 Sandpiper Drive • $599,900

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387

506 – 5170 Dallas Dr. $429,900 • Bright and welcoming top floor condo • Open concept kitchen with new 2021 stainless steel appliances • Beautiful mountain views

3 NEW PRICE

Lower Sahali

3,084

2245 Paul Lake Road • $945,000

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

28 – 712 Shuswap Road • $339,900

1,158

63 Thor Drive $1,297,000 • Executive custom home • Easy suite potential • Views and amazing private yard • Extensive updating – granite kitchen • Unique features throughout – must see to appreciate! 4

1215 Prairie Rose • $1,399,000

2

4

4,526

306- 510 Lorne Street • $489,900

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

FINAL PHASE

NOW SELLING Call now for more information

• Stunning views • Modern, high quality finishings • Expansive decks & private patios • Lock n’ go Living

“Loved that we could put our own personal style in our home.” – Roxanna

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


A32

Denise Bouwmeester

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

Cell 250-319-3876

(Kamloops) Real Estate SENIORS MASTER CERTIFIED REAL ESTATE NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST SPECIALIST

dbinkamloops@shaw.ca• denisebouwmeestersales.com

$625,000

20 acres nestled in the heart of Barnhartvale Goes from end of Foxwood Lane to Barnhartvale Road

40-1525 ORD RD - FOOTHILLS $348,000

• 2 bedrooms & 2 baths • Garage, good driveway and Patio area bare land • Strata with $100 strata fees

1520 STEELHEAD RD in Thompson River Estates - $620,000

1302 OTTAWA PLACE

39 HIDDEN VALLEY MOBILE HOME PARK

$325,000

$225,000

• So many updates in this beautiful 3 bedroom 2 bath half duplex. • Brick fireplace, updated kitchen, appliances, bathrooms, flooring, blinds, windows, furnace & heat pump. • New roof.

• Beautifully updated with 3 bedroom and 2 baths • Updated windows, kitchen, appliances, flooring, bathrooms, furnace and central air • Yard is a paradise with lots or privacy and a nice garden shed

2378 VALLEYVIEW DRIVE $599,900

"Working with Denise, I felt reassured at the very beginning, well selling the house. She was straight forward, organized, honest and empathetic will every move she made.

SOLD

SOLD • 1 acre landscaped with underground sprinklers • 3500 sq ft home with 7 bdrm and 5 bath • Birch hardwood floors/ceramic tile and crown mouldings • Formerly Desert Sands Bed & Breakfast and could easily be started up again with domain names saved • Double garage and shop

SOLD

Thank you Denise so much!"

• Lovely Valleyview location with great yard • Great room with rock fireplace • 3 bedrooms and 2 baths • Suitable

- Lea

QUINN PACHE

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

REAL ESTATE TEAM

250-299-1267 | Quinnpache@royallepage.ca

TRUST | PASSION | KNOWLEDGE

250-682-6252 | lindsaypittman@outlook.com

Quinnpacherealestate.ca

Follow Us! @qprealestateteam

KAMLOOPS REALTY

1601 Balsam Place $299,900

100-800 Valhalla Drive $399,900

G N I D N E P • Prime building lot • Neighborhood of Juniper Ridge West • 0.27 acre lot • Perfect place to build your dream home • Experience the peace and natural surroundings, and the city and mountain views • Conveniently located approximately 5 minutes from Valleyview and 10-15 minutes to the city center, major shopping, Royal Inland Hospital and the University • City water and sewer at property line.

• Ready for a spacious and affordable place to call home? • Features: bright and open floor plan, close proximity to amenities • Main: Living, kitchen and dining areas, two bedrooms, full bathroom • Lower: Two generous sized bedrooms, full bathroom, large rec room, laundry • Lots of room for storage • Windows, electrical and more have been updated!

81-2582 Sandpiper Dr $449,900

SOLD • If you have been waiting for the perfect place to call home at an affordable price this townhouse is for you! • 1470 sq ft of finished and fully renovated space • This End unit is turn-key and stunning • Main floor: welcoming layout; spacious kitchen, dining and living room area • Off the living room is access to large fully fenced backyard • Upper floor: 3 bedrooms and a large, full bathroom • Lower floor: Renovated Family Room, another bathroom, a workshop space and laundry • Located in the heart of Westsyde with an abundance of parks and trails • Rentals allowed, and pets with restrictions

LINDSAY PITTMAN REFERRAL PARTNER - REALTOR® MBA

MIKE LATTA

REFERRAL PARTNER - REALTOR®

250-320-3091 | mikelatta@royallepage.ca

KAYLEIGH BONTHOUX Office Manager/Unlicensed Assistant

778-765-5151 | kayleighbonthoux@royallepage.ca

819 Arlington Court $939,000

4373 Clearwater Valley Rd $1,099,000

NEW PRICE

• Custom built home is sure to impress • Close to 4000 sq ft and a mortgage helper! • Grand entranceway features 18 ft ceilings and opens up into a large living area • Main floor: spacious kitchen, two dining areas, an office, laundry and access to the two car garage! • 2nd Level: 5 bedrooms, a jack and jill bathroom between two rooms, and additional 4 piece bathroom • Master bedroom features a spacious walk-in closet, oversized ensuite and its own private sun deck • Private, level, backyard with garden, storage shed, and concrete patio • Self contained 1 bed daylight suite, with separate access = great income

• 58 acre property • Zoned RL-1 9 (rural) and C-4 (recreational commercial) with potential to expand • Main building - Main floor: Open design kitchen, living room and dining room, 2 bedrooms, 2 ½ bathrooms • Upstairs: 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms • Operational restaurant space (sat 34 people in/52 people on patio) • Laundromat with potential to convert to 2nd residence • Property was an operational 9 RV site • 2 group camping areas with electrical hook up • 1 main water fill station and a sani dump station • Property is fenced, and cross fenced for animals • Currently has Bison on the property • Boasts a 40 GPM well with a preapproved commercial septic system


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A33

...selling Kamloops every day™ Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

INGROUND POOL

466 Robson Drive

- Pride of ownership is evident in this tastefully updated home. This 4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom home has seen extensive updates in and out including interior and exterior door, windows, shingles, flooring, kitchen with large island and stainless appliance package. The kitchen overlooks the family room with Gas F/P with stone accents and built-in cabinets. The formal living and dining areas have lovely wood floors. There is access from the dining and family area to decks finished in tile overlooking a beautifully appointed back yard with patios overlooking the heated inground pool. The lower level has a large family work/gym area with separate entry to the backyard, 2 extra rooms that could be used as bedrooms or hobby rooms. There is also a 2 car attached garage as well as ample extra parking. Call Phil for additional details.

11-6000 Valley Drive - What a wonderful opportunity to purchase a one-owner townhome in the heart of Sun Peaks Village. Morrisey & Orient Express lifts out your door and village square a 10 minute walk. This 2 storey townhouse has 1,052 sf of living space with 2 bedrooms & 3 bathrooms. Purchase price includes furniture and household items. Strata $476/mth, taxes $2,960/yr. Outdoor recreation right out your door, now that’s living! $759,900

1937 Glenwood Drive - is centrally located in Valleyview and within walking distance to schools, city bus and shopping. Features of the main floor - 3 bedrooms, 5 piece bathroom, 2 piece ensuite, spacious kitchen with stainless appliances. The updated lower floor could easily be suited with a separate entrance, 2 bedrooms/ den, generous family room with adjoining kitchen, wired stove/ fridge, 4 piece bathroom, laundry room. Fenced yard with heated inground pool. $759,900

2356 Dunrobin Place - 1 owner home with lovely north views, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. A great family home with main floor laundry, nook off kitchen, family and games room down, plus 2 car garage on quiet cul-de-sac. $665,000

2504 Sunset Drive - Unique opportunity, this ranch style home of 1,703 sf is on a C4 zoned lot in East Valleyview. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, double garage + storage shed and ample parking on the fully fenced yard. $559,800

OFFERED AT $719,900

2145 Glenwood Drive – Large fully fenced yard (84x232) with a 42x20 detached shop. Centrally located in Valleyview close to schools, shopping, transportation and minutes to the city center. This 4 bedroom 2 bathroom home has had some updates in the past years, including a new kitchen in 2021. For additional information and viewings call Phil 250-318-0100. $719,900

d l o S

SUN PEAKS

13-3320 Village Place - One of the best locations on the mountain. This True ski in and ski out unit is centrally located, minutes from ski lifts, village center and golf course. The location does not get much better. Call Phil for additional details and for viewings. $898,800

d l o S 306 - 970 Lorne Street - Simply one of the most desired locations downtown! Park Place's secure, gated complex has it all with this immaculate 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom apartment. Southwest exposure and a covered sundeck. Heated indoor pool, workout gym, hot tub, sauna, pool table in amenities room, outdoor patio, BBQ, library, wine-making room, woodwork shop, wharf w/boat slips, secure underground parking, car wash & bike storage. All this and it's pet friendly too and within walking distance of city parks! Definitely a must see! $438,800

Call today for your

FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION

KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL: • • • • • • • •

Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) Full-time staff Professional representation Professional Signage Advertising in Kamloops This Week Global advertising on the internet

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


A34

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca REAL ESTATE (KAMLOOPS)

FOR MORE INFO VIEW ALL OUR LISTINGS, UPCOMING LISTINGS, AND KAMLOOPS LISTINGS AT RALPHREALESTATE.CA ING

W

NE

South Kamloops

305-629 LANSDOWNE ST $299,900 • MLS®162730 • Immaculate 2 bedroom 1 bathroom apartment in Riviera Gardens • Pets are allowed with strata permission • Great central downtown location

W

NE

T LIS

South Thompson Valley

#43-768 SHUSWAP ROAD E $425,000 • MLS®163771

• Very well maintained 3 bedroom 2 bathroom original owner home in Sage Meadows • Just under 1500 square feet and lots of parking including large single garage • 1 pet allowed with park approval. No rentals allowed

G

TIN

LIS

Pineview Valley

#48-1760 COPPERHEAD DRIVE $589,000 $589,000 • MLS®163808

• Beautifully updated 2+1 bedroom 2 bathroom bare-land strata in Pineview Valley • Completely renovated throughout including custom kitchen, bathrooms, flooring, and more • 1 dog/cat allowed with strata permission. 6 rentals allowed

Bachelor Heights

1783 BEARCROFT COURT $975,000 • MLS®163672 • Beautifully updated 4+1 bedroom 4 bathroom home in Bachelor Heights • Vaulted 9’ ceilings and amazing views • A must to view!


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Confound 6. Sarcastic internet laughter 10. Most Times Square signage 13. Performance check 17. Dark hair and a warm smile, for two 19. Samoan capital 20. To’s opposite 21. Full-length 23. Something that bugs criminals? 25. Blabberer 27. Duplicitous 28. Musicianship 30. ____ dress 31. Pasture 32. Signed off on 33. Ukr. or Lith., formerly 34. Places for development 36. Corn kernel, e.g. 38. Actress Merrill 40. Genre for BTS or Blackpink 43. Added to the staff? 45. Alerts 48. ____ of lies 49. Aquafina : PepsiCo :: ____ : Coca-Cola 52. #$%& and @%¢! 55. Practice whose name means, literally, ‘‘union’’ 57. Words before ‘‘before’’ 58. ‘‘Deck the Halls’’ contraction 59. Symbol on the Connecticut state quarter 60. Stop along the highway 61. Quite 64. Finished brushing one’s teeth, say 66. Racial-justice movement since 2013, in brief 67. ‘‘Really, though?’’ 68. Word in many font names 69. Betray .?.?. or a hint to four answers in this puzzle 73. ____ the Cat (fictional feline of children’s books) 74. Thin incision

75. Some $200 Monopoly properties, in brief 76. Set of 50 on the Argo, in myth 77. Coaxed (out of ) 79. Insurance giant bailed out in 2008 80. Word before cap or pop 81. Awesomest bud 82. Spirit in Arabian myth 83. Arizona county or its seat 85. Pushing up daisies 90. Neighbor of Mozambique 92. Nonwriting credentials for Conan Doyle and Chekhov, informally 93. Seller’s need 95. Artificial habitat 97. Abolitionist Lucretia 98. The avant-garde ‘‘artists’’ Congo and Pierre Brassau 100. Hedy of the 2017 documentary ‘‘Bombshell’’ 103. Kind of chip 105. Question of perplexion 108. ‘‘The Raven’’ writer’s inits. 109. Like 110. Big believer in the freedom of assembly? 112. Press ____ 113. What the beleaguered are behind 115. Classic folk story that teaches a lesson of sharing 118. Be up for some biking? 120. Fast runners 121. Advanced math degree? 122. Ninny 123. Sternutation 124. Real cutup 125. Landscaper’s supply 126. In the past 127. ‘‘As You Like It’’ forest

DOWN 1. Novelist Margaret 2. Absorb the beauty of, as a scene 3. Lacked the gumption to 4. Gladly, old-style 5. Jazzy James and Jones 6. First law-enforcement org. in the U.S. to hire a female officer (1910) 7. Nail-polish brand 8. List of performers 9. Star man? 10. Half of a ’55 union merger 11. ‘‘That’s enough arguing out of you!’’ 12. Lip-puckering 13. Things that may be rubbed after din-din 14. Playwright Will who was a 2005 Pulitzer finalist 15. Crew implement 16. One getting special instruction 18. Ink holders in pens and squid 22. ‘‘Just like ____!’’ 24. Like morning people vis-à-vis night owls, around dawn 26. Response to ‘‘How bad was it?’’ 29. Extends, in a way 35. Lead-in to call 37. Cause for an onslaught of yearly txts 39. ‘‘If the pessimists are right .?.?.’’ 41. Stroke 42. East: Ger. 44. Wednesday, but not Friday 46. Accelerator particles 47. Overwhelm 48. Some tax breaks 50. Boos and cheers 51. Light 53. Latin list ender 54. Some Hershey candies 56. Bought in 61. Time-consuming assignment to grade 62. Xanax alternative

63. Monthly publication of the National Puzzlers’ League, with ‘‘The’’ 64. More convinced 65. ‘‘The Magic School Bus’’ was its first fully animated series 66. Sound at the end of December, appropriately? 67. Beach with a girl who ‘‘swings so cool’’ 70. Part of many a corsage 71. Bite site 72. Job to do 78. High-quality cannabis, in slang 80. ‘‘Success!’’ 81. Decorate 82. ‘‘I. Can’t. Even.’’ 84. Spain’s Duchess of ____ 86. Classic novel with the line ‘‘You must be the best judge of your own happiness’’ 87. Environmental opening 88. When repeated, a reproof 89. Overturned 91. Most chiffonlike 94. Figure out 96. Not thinking 97. The Supremes’ record label 99. Bad temper 100. Makeup target 101. Where a ‘‘Married at First Sight’’ contestant meets his or her mate 102. Language in which ‘‘kia ora’’ is a greeting 104. Up on 106. Confused responses 107. Fight site 111. Long runs? 113. ‘‘A man’s character is his ____’’: Heraclitus 114. ‘‘Suds’’ 116. Prefix with classical 117. Prof’s degree 119. Post on Insta

1

2

3

4

5

17

6 18

23

7

8

9

10

45

46

41

64

68

69

74

58

59

83

84 90

66

95 101

110

115

124

87

92

93

73 78

88

89 94

97

98

104

111

116

120

77

86

103

109

72

82

96

102

105

112 117

56

67

81

91

51

60

76

85

50 55

71

80

37

44

54

75

79

36

53

70

16

31

49

65

15

22

30

48

57

14

26

43

47

63

13 21

35

42

52

62

29

34 40

12

25

33 39

11

20

28

38

100

By Aimee Lucido and Ella Dershowitz

24

32

61

THINK TWICE

19

27

A35

106

107

113 118

121

122

125

126

99 108

114

119 123 127

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A27

SUDOKU

WORD SCRAMBLE

Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to the heart.

FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

ANSWERS

ANSWER: PULSE

KTW's new weekly video show!

Providing a behind-the-scenes look at the stories of the week from a unique angle Hosted by

Marty Hastings & Chris Foulds

Check it out at facebook.com/kamloopsthisweek or search “Kamloops Last Week” on


A36

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

BABY BLUES

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, this week will challenge your flexibility. It’s possible you will have to change plans on the fly to accommodate developments at work or at home.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, rather than trying to figure out why everyone is acting as they are, accept things and go with the flow. You will be much happier for it.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 You are capable of dealing with intense emotional energy most of the time, Gemini. So when someone needs a friend to confide in, you are the right person for the job.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

LIBRA

Cancer, normally you are an easygoing person. But something this week has you rattled and you may be all fired up about it. Redirect that energy to some projects around the house.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

SEPTEMBER 1 - SEPTEMBER 7, 2021 - Sept 23/Oct 23

This is a great week to bring your mind into focus and set a firm plan for the next several months, Libra. Now is the time to make an important decision.

SCORPIO

Leo, try to stay away from conflict this week; otherwise, you may be pulled in one direction or another. It is important to remain neutral, especially at work.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

- Oct 24/Nov 22

Capricorn, keep conversations light and away from any controversial topics as you meet new people in the days ahead. Let them take the lead in conversation.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Scorpio, if your emotions suddenly seem more intense, you may need to change your social circle and find one that aligns better with your point of view .

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

Virgo, don’t worry too much about what other people consider to be right and wrong. Stick to your ideals and you won’t be guided off course. You will find someone in your corner.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20

There is a great deal of opportunity and potential to follow through on some major projects this week, Aquarius. It’s up to you whether you’re looking for work or fun.

PISCES

Strong forces may be working against you, Sagittarius. But you won’t let them derail your plans. Stay the course and things will work out just fine.

- Feb 19/Mar 20

Pisces, this may be an eventful week marked by some disruptions to your normal routine. Stay calm in the face of conflict.

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE 250-374-7467

circulation@kamloopsthisweek.com


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

Coming Events Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Announcents

Tax not included

Announcents

LOOKING FOR THE FAMILY OF MARY STASICA GLADISH. She was born in 1914. She married Nicolaus (Nick) Gladish on July 21, 1934 in Montréal, Quebec, and died in Kamloops, BC in 2002. Mary was the daughter of Victoria Kotowicka, who died in 1951, and Andrew Stasica, who died in 1927.Victoria and Andrew immigrated from Poland in 1913 and settled in Montréal. Mary had three siblings: Wanda, who died in Sault-SteMarie in 2012; Joseph (Joe), who died in 2003 in Chicago; and Julia (my grandmother), who died in Montréal in 1998. Please contact Josée St-Martin by email at stmartin_jo@yahoo.ca if you have any information.

Personals

Exercise Equipment Heavy duty exercise bike $130. 250-579-8864

If you have an upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com

and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

LABOUR DAY Kamloops This Week will be closed on Monday, Sept. 6th, 2021 for the Labour Day Statutory Holiday. Classified Deadline is Tuesday, Sept. 7th at 10:00am

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

1 Day Per Week Call 250-374-0462

Lost Lost: Natural Buckalder Walking Cane. It is varnished and has initials P.Z. burned in under crook handle. Reward. 778-471-3223.

To advertise call

250-371-4949

For Sale - Misc Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Antiques Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

Art & Collectibles BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca “DOZING LYNX” Robert Bateman 30 3/4”h x 43 1/2W Forest Green mat & dark green frame $250. 250-578-7776 “Power of One” Magnificent creation by John Banovich 43”hx50”wide brown wooden frame. $500 Firm 250-578-7776

2 Horse Saddles $300/each. 250-374-8285 5x3 glass patio table and 2 chairs. $50. 250-3769208. 6pc patio set. $250. 6pc Bedroom set like new. $575. 250-374-8285. Antique china cabinet $800. Ivory Wingback chair. $75. Yamaha Piano $50. Guitar $45. 4-seater beige couch. $100. 250376-4161. Battery charger $75. 48” table saw. $150. Angle grinder $75. 250-3748285. Do you have an item for sale Under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details! 250-371-4949

Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $6,000/obo 250-3766607. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 30,000 for $2,000/obo 250-3766607.

1950s ladies bike for sale. $50. 250-376-4473

NINTENDO SWITCH LITE a case and the game prison architect. $250. Call or text Nolan 250 318-1092.

Trek Crossrip Road Bike. Like new. Paid $1950 Asking $1300. 250-5720753.

Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Bicycles

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

Fax: 250-374-1033

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500 Tax not included Some restrictions apply

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Furniture

Commercial

8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541.

CHOOSE LOCAL

Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-8517687.

Plants / Shrubs / Trees Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $10 each obo 250376-6607

Wanted to Buy Used fishing gear plus rods and reels, reasonably priced. Eric phone back about reels. 250-554-1675.

“Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Houses For Rent

Furnished4bdr&denIdeal Corporate/Crew nsp 2blk RIH $4400. 250-214-0909

Peace of mind pet care and house sitting. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 250374-6007.

Health WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 1 issue a week!

Call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

For Sale by Owner $55.00 Special

The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run in (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops and area every Wednesday. Call or email us for more info: 250-374-7467 classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

GarageSale DIRECTORY Garage Sales

Garage Sales

ABERDEEN Friday & Sat, Sept 3/4th. 9am-3pm. 759 Hugh Allan Drive. Lots for Everyone. DOWNTOWN 2 Family. Saturday, Sept 4th. 8am-2pm. Back Alley at 629 Columbia St. Please park on Columbia St or 6th Ave. No parking in alley please. Antiques, collectables, tools, mirrors etc. Something for Everyone. MONTE LAKE Saturday/Sunday and Monday. Sept. 4-6th. 9am-4pm. 3122 Vernon Hwy. Hshld, sporting etc.

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

Tax not included

Tax not included

Concrete Services

Luigi s Luigi’s SMALL

CONCRETE JOBS

BRICKS, BLOCKS, PAVERS, SIDEWALKS + PRUNING

F R E E E S T I M AT E S !

250.851.5079 • 250.554.1018 Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

IT’S GARAGE SALE TIME Call and ask us about our

GARAGE SALE SPECIAL ONLY $12.50 FOR 3 LINES (Plus Tax) ($1 per additional line)

250-371-4949

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

Garage Sale deadline is Tuesday 10 am for Wednesday Paper

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111 Handyperson

Classes & Courses HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. September 18th and 19th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L September 12th. Sunday. Professional outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

RVs / Campers / Trailers

Farm Services

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

Concrete Services

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

Handyperson

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES

Run until sold New Price $56.00+tax Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, motorcycle, ATV or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* $56.00 (boxed ad w/photo) $35.00 (reg. 3 line ad)

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Automotive Tires

Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more 778-999-4158

www.danshandymanservices.net

Landscaping

Security

PETER’S YARD SERVICE

CHOOSE LOCAL

Time to trim Cedar Hedges Tree pruning or removal Yard clean-up, Landscaping Licensed & Certified 250-572-0753

Misc Home Service JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Movers Rubbish Removal and Minor Furniture Repairs 2 Kings 5:15 778-257-4943 jaenterpriseskam @gmail.com

“Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

Pirelli P7 Cinturato Run Flat tires on 17 “ BMW M series rims. $ 700.00. 250-819-0863.

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916

kamloopsthisweek .com

RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread $1388.00 Call 250 319-8784


A38

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

Motorcycles 2017 Harley Davidson Road King Milwaukee 8 engine. 35,000kms. $17,000/obo. 250-6823152.

Domestic Cars RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00 (plus Tax)

(250) 371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Employment

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Employment

Huge Demand for Well Trained Dental Receptionists Become a Dental Receptionist in only 5 months. Dental Receptionists would be working in Dental Clinics and potentially specialty clinics such as orthodontists, pediatric dentistry, periodontist, endodontist, oral surgeons’ offices & prosthodontists.

1994 Ranger. 4.0L. Fair rubber, hitch, new brakes. $4600. 778-220-7372.

Community Workforce Response Grant offering full tuition funding for eligible BC Residents who are either unemployed or have precarious employment.

Rims

4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

Parts & Accessories Flat Deck 8ft long x 7ft wide. 40” high for overhead loads. $350. 250577-3155.

Limited Seats available – First come First Serve! Call Now: 1-877-315-5241

Utility Trailers All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

This program is supported by the Province of British Columbia

Business Oportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Employment

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at 250-374-0462 Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

250-374-3853 Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE

DOWNTOWN

Rte 311 – 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 107-237 Battle St, 135-173 St Paul St. – 27 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35-377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI

Rte 400 – 383 W. Columbia St. – 21 p. Rte 401 – 250-395, 405-425 Pemberton Terr. – 81 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p. Rte 451 – Odin Crt, Whiteshield Cres, Whiteshield Pl. – 39 p. Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 459 – Monarch Crt, & Pl. – 39 p. Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p.

Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 485 – 690 Robson Dr, 2020 & 2084 Robson Pl. – 50 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 503 - Fleming Circ, Hampshire Dr. & Pl. & Hector Dr. – 51 p. Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 509 – 459-551 Laurier Dr, Shaughnessyhill. – 46 p. Rte 511 – Drummond Crt. – 50 p. Rte 523 – 2300-2399Abbeyglen Way, 750-794 Dunrobin Dr. – 73 p. Rte 528 - 1115-1180 Howe Rd, & 1115-1185 Hugh Allen Dr.-47 p. Rte 542 – Coal Hill Pl, Crosshill Dr, Dunbar Dr. – 58 p. Rte 544 - 2070-2130 Van Horne Dr., Holyrood Cir. & Pl. – 23 papers

PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN

Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p. Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 582 – 1540-1670 Hillside Dr, 1500-1625 Mt Dufferin Ave, Windward Pl. – 38 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl,

Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p.

SUNRIVERS

Rte 870 - Sagewood Court, Drive, & Lane & 100 Sunrivers Dr.-36 p. Rte 872 - Mariposa Crt, 400576 Sunrivers Dr, Trillium Court, Drive, Place & Lane - 39 p.

VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER

Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 620 – MacAdam Rd, McKay Pl, Pyper Way, 2516-2580 Valleyview Dr. – 63 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. - 87 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Mo-Lin Pl. - 29 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 714 – 1101-1247 Highridge Dr. - 44 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p. Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p. Rte 760 – 149-167, 6303-6697 Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 62 p.

BROCKLEHURST

Rte 1 – Argyle Ave, Ayr Pl, 10631199 Crestline St, 1008-1080 Moray St, Perth Pl. – 94 p. Rte 3 – 2402-2595 Young Ave, - 38 p. Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St,

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462

Employment

Employment

EXPERIENCED, FULL-TIME, LICENSED

AUT0BODY PAINTER

Well established, independently owned mid-sized collision shop seeking new team member. Full-time, busy year round. Great benefits, work environment and team atmosphere. We can pay either a straight time hourly rate or flat rate off of the repair estimate. You are paid 100% of the hours on the repair sheet, no clawbacks. We spray Glasurit 90 line top quality water borne base coats. Will consider an apprentice with a reasonable amount of booth experience.

Drop in to meet Reid or call 250-374-9995

Starting October 4th for Kamloops Residents.

Trucks - 4WD

Employment

2412-2680 Tranquille Rd. – 38 p. Rte 18 – 919-942 Schreiner St, 2108-2399 Young Ave. – 56 p. Rte 19 - Downie Pl. & St., Moody Ave. & Pl. & 23072391 Tranquille Rd. – 50 p. Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 806999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. Rte 30 – 1810-1897 Fleetwood Ave, 995-1085 Southill St. – 29 p. Rte 31 – 1008-1095 Desmond St, Inglewood Dr, Newton St, Oxford St. – 55 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 17091862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Rte 41 – Alexis Ave, 520-796 Singh St, Slater Ave. – 58 p. Rte 43 – Clifford Ave, 1713-1795 Happyvale Ave, 500-595 Holt St, Kobayashi Pl. – 69 p.

NORTH SHORE/BATCHELOR

Rte 137-144-244 Briar Ave, 106-330 Clapperton Rd, Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100-204 Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p. Rte 151 – 1020-1132 7th St, 1024 + 1112 8th St, Berkley Pl, Dundas St, Richmond Ave. – 73 p. Rte 153 – 640-680 Seton Pl, Kemano St. – 36 p. Rte 158 – Cornwall St, Hamilton St, Kent Ave, 1305-1385 Midway St, 1303-1393 Schubert Dr, 601-675 Windsor Ave.- 76 p. Rte 169 - 1212-1258 Linthrope Rd, Southview Terr. – 37 p.

WESTSYDE

Rte 235 – 3440-3808 Westsyde Rd. – 75 p. Rte 240 – 804-941 Dever Dr. – 42 p. Rte 252 – 813-897 Mayne Rd, 815-886 Morven Pl, 2770-2870 Westsyde Rd(Even Side). – 47 p.

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1993

250-374-9995

969 Laval Crescent | www.cactuscollision.com

CLASS 1 DRIVERS NEEDED KAMLOOPS $3500 SIGNING BONUS: CLASS 1 HIGHWAY LINEHAUL COMPANY DRIVERS $2500 SIGNING BONUS: 5 TON P&D OWNER OPERATOR $2500 SIGNING BONUS: CLASS 1 LOCAL CITY DRIVER

Follow us @Kam ThisWeek

Applicants for linehaul should have a minimum of three years class 1 highway/mountain experience; winter driving experience a must. We offer above average rates and an excellent benefits package. In addition, we are offering a signing bonus (conditions apply). To join our team of Professional Drivers, please send your current resume and drivers abstract to: careers@vankam.com If you have any questions regarding the position, please contact Alana at 604-587-9772 We thank you for your interest in Van Kam; however, only those being considered will be contacted regarding an interview. “Van Kam is an Equal Opportunity Employer Committed to Environmental Responsibility” www.vankam.com

WEBBER LAW Expanding Lawfirm requires: 1. Receptionist 2. Legal Assistant 3. Lawyer Send Resume to: Roger Webber Webber Law #209 – 1211 Summit Drive Kamloops, BC V2C 5R9 roger@webberlaw.ca tel: (250) 851-0100 fax: (250) 851-0104

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER

PAPER ROUTES

AVAILABLE

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND

GET PAID 250-374-7467

 

Catch your next job in our employment section.

To advertise in Employment call 604-630-3300


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Cook Wanted

Scott’s Inn Family Restaurant Salaried position for up to $52,000 per year + tip outs + Company Benefits. Send resume to General Manager at: atish.scottsinn@gmail.com

In Memoriams

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

A39

In Memoriams

In Loving Memory of Edward Joseph Boisclair

December 30, 1936 - September 5, 2011

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35 Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

250�371�4949 kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

CANADAWIDE

CLASSIFIEDS Put the power of 8.3 Million

10 Years ago our hearts were broken when we learned you had left us high on a mountain.

CWC

Classified ads to work for you!

• Find qualified employees • Power your website • Sell products fast! • Coast-to-coast or province by province • Select the region that’s right for your business

ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

We miss you more than words can say your big hugs, huge smiles, sparkling eyes, wonderful laughter and songs. One day we’ll all meet again – until then… We will think of you fondly when we lovingly remember you, dad. Love your children Colette, Monette, Stacie, Duane, Kevin and Darren and our families.

In Loving Memory of Henrich Freund

January 24, 1932 September 4, 2019

In Loving Memory of

Irving (Doc) Heron

January 8, 1930 – September 2, 2010

LIZ SPIVEY 2503747467

Gates of memories will never close... How much we miss you no one knows. Days will pass away into years. And we’ll think about those memories with silent tears.

We Love and Miss You Forever Karl, Hilda and families.

As it dawns another year, Thoughts of you are always near.

Forever Loved, Kay, Darcy, Don, Sophie and Maja.


A40

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

Obituaries

Obituaries

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

SANDRA MURRAY COOK (née West) October 26, 1942 - August 20, 2021

Sandy left her “home room” for the last time on August 20, 2021. She joins the people, horses, dogs and cats that have preceded her. It is with profound sadness, tempered with a certain measure of relief, that we announce her gentle passing with husband Craig and niece Angela, each holding a hand, as she quietly slipped away. Her struggles with the relentless ravages of dementia were finally over. We take comfort in knowing she will be joining her beloved parents, sister Shannon, and brother-in-law Brian as well as the friends that have gone before. Sandy is survived by Craig, her husband of 56 years, sister Pat, sisterin-law Laurel (John), nieces Angie (John), Christie (Craig), Kathleen (Casey), Heather (Riaz), nephews Rob (Kat), Michael and numerous grand nieces and nephews. Sandy was pre-deceased by her wonderful parents, Murray and Louisa, parents-in-law Bill and Grace, sister Shannon and brother-in-law Brian. Sandy was born and raised in Vancouver, BC. She attended and graduated from King Edward High School (subsequently ravaged by fire). She enrolled in the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia and graduated in 1965 with a degree in Education (Commerce major). She met husband Craig while at UBC and they married in 1965. They moved to Kamloops that year, where she commenced a teaching career at Kamloops Secondary School. Her full-time teaching career spanned some fifteen years. She subsequently retired from full-time teaching but substitute-taught in the District for a short time thereafter. Sandy was passionate about teaching and took immense pride in her profession. She taught the office skills of the day – typing, shorthand, accounting and office practice and worked diligently to place her students in post-secondary positions in the business world. If anyone is “born” to a vocation – it was Sandy as “teacher”. She had all the requisite skills necessary for proficiency in the profession – a thorough knowledge of the subject, articulate delivery skills and compassion, empathy and patience in imparting it to her students. Many a former student approached her in later life and acknowledged and thanked her for her positive effect on their lives. In moving from Vancouver to Kamloops in 1965, Sandy and Craig sought a locale where they could pursue their respective professions yet enjoy a particular lifestyle on a country property where they could have the horses, dogs and cats that were so central to their lives. Kamloops offered this and after a 5 year search, they found it. They were blessed to live their dream existence for 46 years on a Barnhartvale property, planned and developed for horses. Sandy loved all animals with a particular love for all things “equine”. Growing up in Vancouver, she dreamt of having her own horse one day. During those early childhood years, she spent the entire two week tenure at the Pacific National Exhibition (having been let in free of admission by her Aunt Ada, who was employed by the PNE) doing two things – eating the free food giveaways at the Food Court and hanging out at the Horse Barn. Sandy took great pride in establishing an Equine Studies Program at KSS. Many a child, or teen, had their first exposure to horses thru her activities. She owned, rode and schooled many horses over the years. She bought our niece, Angie, her first pony and subsequently introduced all of her grand nieces and nephews to the world of the horse. She honed her own equine skills by attending numerous clinics, journeying to Mexico on two occasions in the ‘70’s to attend a renowned riding academy in San Miguel Allende. She qualified as a Club Coach through the program offered at Okanagan College in Kelowna. She was Secretary of the BC Cutting Horse Association for some 10 years and was awarded the Affiliate Buckle of the Canadian Cutting Horse Association for her contributions to the sport of cutting. Whether it was an elegant dressage horse, an athletic cutting horse, a spirited thoroughbred or a backyard pony – she loved ‘em all. Horses were at the core of her being. During the mid-90’s, a crisis arose in Sandy and Craig’s lives which

is so illustrative of her character and her capacity for love and caring. Craig was stricken with a deadly form of pneumonia, which is usually fatal. From September 1994 to February 1995, some 4 months, Sandy made the 20 mile trip to RIH to visit, nurture and care for Craig during his 76 days in ICU, followed by 2 months in step-down and rehab units. That episode is so demonstrative of Sandy’s love, her character and resourcefulness – “they don’t make ‘em like that every day”. Age and circumstances necessitated less strenuous activities in later years. Sandy and Craig took up cross-country skiing in winter and wilderness canoeing and kayaking in the warmer months. They had many memorable trips to Myrtle Lake, the Nechako River, The Nation Lakes, the Milk River, Kingcome Inlet, the Broughton Archipelago and Haida Gwaii. They also traveled to Newfoundland, Scotland (she was very proud of her Scottish heritage) and extensively in the United States. Only in the last 5 years did Sandy and Craig take up residence in their Valleyview home. The insidious progression of her affliction necessitated a move to Kamloops Senior Village in 2020, where she resided until her passing. Sandy’s was a life well-lived: a loving childhood and upbringing, a good marriage, a successful and rewarding career and an extensive group of supportive friends. The family wishes to acknowledge and thank those who were as kind and caring in these last difficult years – our niece Angie, friends Anna, Steph, Heather, Dale, the gang at Kirsten’s Hideaway – Kirsten, Cheri, Ang & Rhonda – Carl & Joanne, Bob & Mary Lynn, Verne & Phil, Frank & Judy, Gary & Sandra. Lastly, the kind and compassionate staff at Kamloops Seniors Village, with particular kudos to Megan, Christie and Brenda. Forgiveness is begged for any unintended omissions. One of Sandy’s favourite comments, so much so that she made a note of the following – “As long as there’s memories – No one ever dies” Sandy provided those memories and as we know, she is merely “ AWA’ ” (A Scottish expression of a leaving) It is the intention, indeed the wish, of the family to have a celebration of a life well-lived. Given the COVID restrictions recently announced, those plans are in abeyance at present and the effectiveness and success of those measures shall determine whether or not that is possible. Should you wish to make a donation in Sandy’s memory, some of her favourite causes were the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation, the SPCA, the Alzheimer’s Society or a charity of your choosing. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

250-377-8225


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Barbara Anne Gauthier It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Barbara Anne Gauthier of Kamloops, BC, on August 7, 2021 at Royal Inland Hospital surrounded by family. Barb was born October 11, 1948 in Richmond, a beautiful daughter to Fred and Marion Stephens, and made her way to Kamloops in 1979. Barb loved flowers, and worked at flower shops in Richmond and Kamloops before opening Barb’s Bouquets with her husband Maurice, which they ran together in Kamloops from 1996 - 2019. Barb was a ray of sunshine to everyone who met her and had a love of life and sparkle that will be greatly missed by all that knew her. She was dedicated to family, her church and God and always had a kind word for those who met her. She was preceded in death by her parents and the father of three of her boys, Larry Dent. She is survived by her loving husband Maurice, her four sons James Dent (Jennifer), Chris Dent (Angie), Kevin Dent (Marsha) and Jeff Trump; her brothers Richard and Gordon Stephens, and father of her son Jeff, Ernest Trump. She will be lovingly remembered by her many grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and the countless friends that she has made along her journey. A Funeral Service will be held to honour Barb, however due to the Covid-19 restrictions it will be by invitation only.

GIVE LAVISHLY LIVE ABUNDANTLY By Helen Steiner Rice The more you give, The more you get, The more you laugh, The less you fret,      The more you live abundantly, The more of everything you share, The more you’ll always have to spare, The more you love,

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

William Ernest Smith William Ernest Smith, long-time resident of Kamloops passed away peacefully in Royal Inland Hospital on August 15, 2021, at the age of 88. Bill was born in Nelson on August 13, 1933. The family moved to Trail, where he was raised by his loving parents Alfred and Marie. He will be deeply missed by his three daughters Teri (Randy), Shelley (Neil) and Tracy (Dale), his six grandchildren Jason, Billy, Martin, Tyler, Graham, Katherine, nine greatgrandchildren, his sister Diane as well as many cousins, nieces, and nephews. Bill was predeceased by his parents Alfred and Marie and his brother George. Bill’s first job was working for CP Rail in Trail and at that same time enjoyed working as a volunteer at the Warfield Fire Department. He had several trades but was best known as an accomplished boat builder. You can still see a boat or two he had a hand in building running the rivers in the Lower Mainland. Bill also owned a Fibreglass business where in addition to boats and camper tops his creative mind took him into designing fibreglass dune buggy bodies and bathtub boats for the Nanaimo to Vancouver races in the sixties. He also fabricated a fibreglass paddle board before they were popular! He enjoyed all sports and participated in baseball, volleyball, and golf. He had a keen interest in BC History, Railroads (the KVR), bird watching, rock hunting, gold panning and working on his boat, a 1930s clinker. He was also an avid reader and enjoyed woodcarving. A private family gathering will be held.

Arnold Stacey

Arnold was born in Vancouver, BC on December 20, 1935 where he later began a lifelong career with the BC Government helping to care for those who needed him. Arnold married his sweetheart “Bunny” on September 1, 1960 and was a loving and devoted husband and father who enjoyed teaching his children many of the life skills each of them carried into adulthood. He will be deeply missed by his family, friends, and all who knew him “His love lives on”. Arnold chose to have no service as a spiritual man of no specific denomination. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Enriches us from day to day.

Mom passed away peacefully on August 20, 2021, just shy of her 97th birthday. She leaves to mourn her loving daughter and son-in-law, Joyce and Rusty (John) Gibbins, (Kamloops), her brother William (Lorane) McGregor, (Bonnyville), her sister Barbara Adair, (Edmonton), sisters-in-law Alice McGregor, (Drayton Valley) and Betty Phelan, (Edmonton) as well as many nieces and nephews. Mom was predeceased by husbands, Peter Phelan (1954) and George Servage (1993), brothers John and Robert McGregor, sister-in-law Connie McGregor, brothers-in-law Don Adair and Tom Phelan. Mom was born, Ellen Jane Elizabeth McGregor in County Down, Northern Ireland. She was fondly known as Nellie by many friends and family. On arriving in Canada, she lived in Vermillion, Iron River, Bonnyville and Edmonton, Alberta. Mom moved to BC in 1996 and to the Desert Gardens in Kamloops where she was involved in the strata council and senior’s activities. Our thanks to Mom’s dear and long-time friend, Doris Ringer and to Bonnie Tindall for her excellent home support. Mom lived the last three & half years at the Pine Grove Care Home where she so enjoyed the ongoing activities. Our immense gratitude to Marichu and Kim and all the exemplarity staff at Pine Grove for their care and support. Mom has requested cremation and no service. Should you wish, donations can be made to Pine Grove Lodge Resident’s Society, 313 McGowan Avenue, Kamloops, BC, V2B 2N8. Miss you, Love you, Mom Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

William Alexander Lowe - “Sweet William” It is with deep sorrow that we announce the passing of William Alexander Lowe on Wednesday, August 25, 2021 at 7:03am at the Delta Hospice at the age of 89 years. Born September 6, 1931 in Victoria, BC, Bill passed away after a courageous battle with Bone Cancer. He leaves behind his wife Dorothy Lowe, son Tod Lowe (Erin), granddaughters Taylor and Sydney Lowe, brothers Jack and Bob Lowe and sister Mary Lou Marshall, in addition to many cherished cousins, nieces and nephews. Bill was predeceased by his mother Mary Goodacre (Bowker). Bill was known as a very hard worker and was well respected in the Kitchen Cabinetry Industry for more than 30 years in both Kamloops, BC and Washington State. A devote lover of horses and horse racing, he enjoyed visiting horse race tracks whenever possible. Bill was a long-time member of the Masonic Lodge, as well as past President of the Richmond Lions Club. During his free time Bill could often be found out on his boat fishing or crabbing while enjoying a cold Budweiser and a cigarette. May you now rest in peace and

without pain.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the BC Cancer Society in Bill’s name.

That life is good, For only what we give away,

Obituaries

September 21, 1924 - August 20, 2021

Arnold Stacey passed away August 28, 2021 in Kamloops, BC at the age of 85 knowing his family loved him dearly. Arnold is survived by his wife and the “Love of his Life” Marilynne “Bunny” Stacey (née Taylor); his children; son Dan Stacey, daughter Colleen (Barry) Love and son Chris (Amber Geissler) Stacey along with four grandchildren Kent, Gavin, Tatum, Reece, three step grandchildren Weylin, Aideon, Nathaniel, sister-inlaw Robyn (Paul) Adams, numerous nieces and nephews; including, Ross and Carin Stacey, Jeff and Todd Adams. Arnold was predeceased by his parents William and Florence Stacey and many of his siblings of note his brother and sister-in-law respectively Ed and Judy Stacey who stood with him and Bunny on the day they married.

Obituaries

In Loving Memory Ellen Jane Servage (née McGregor, Phelan)

December 20,1935 - August 28, 2021

    And friends are kind,

Obituaries

A41

Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone!

There will be a private service held on September 8, 2021 at 1:00 pm at the All Saints Anglican Church in Ladner, BC. Written condolences can be sent to 305-1118 55th Street, Delta, BC. V4M-3J8. kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com


A42

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

Josephine Anne (Joanne) Delaney Josephine Anne (Joanne) Delaney passed away peacefully in her home on Tuesday, August 17, 2021at the age of 66 years. She is predeceased by her beloved husband Martin, her parents Vincent and Mary, her brother James and sister Maryanne. She is survived by her adoring daughter Bridget (Murray) Lute, her son James (Cassie) Delaney, her grandchildren Hunter, Hudson and Harlow, and her siblings Vincent (Vicki), John, Edward (Olga), Gerard (Mary) and Michael (Janine). She also leaves behind many cousins, nieces and nephews. Joanne was born in Peterborough, Ontario, the youngest of eight children. She was always proud of her family and would frequently visit and spend time in the family home where she grew up. Joanne became a registered nurse at the age of twenty and went on to have a long and successful career. Joanne met the love of her life, Martin, in Brule, Alberta in 1980. Martin thought that he was meeting his buddy Derrick’s aunt. Imagine his surprise when aunty Joanne turned out to be a beautiful 25-year-old nurse. Two years later they had two children who couldn’t have been blessed with a better Mom. The love and tenderness she showered on her children was carried forward to her grandchildren, who also couldn’t have asked for a better grandma. Above all else Joanne loved spending time with her family, which always included ‘the animals’. She was an exceptional knitter, artist, singer, chef, scholar, nurse and friend. Joanne loved a good murder mystery and a good piece of chocolate, which she would enjoy while up at the lake with Martin.

Our hearts are aching, but we will live our lives in a way that makes her proud.

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Lori Jean Dempsey

March 27, 1965 - August 20, 2021 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Lori Jean Dempsey on August 20, 2021 after a year long courageous battle with cancer. Lori is survived by her mom, Sandra Dempsey, sister Jamie (Mark) Wilk, brother Gary (Sue) Dempsey, her very special nieces and nephews, Taresa (Joe) Knuit, Korinna (Ted) Wagner, Kristopher Wilk, Tyler (Megan) Dempsey, Harrison Dempsey, and the joys of her life, her great nieces and nephews, Kaden and Riley, Lincoln and Corbin, Sullivan, Eve and Margot. Lori was predeceased by her dad and her rock, James Dempsey. Lori was born in Kamloops, BC and graduated from Norkam Secondary School. During her school years she was involved in many activities including, figure skating, and track and field. After graduating she continued an active lifestyle with yoga, hiking, walking, biking, swimming, slow-pitch and hockey. She loved playing with the Dempsey family co-ed hockey team in fun tourneys! Lori enjoyed challenging herself with Run Club and at Nelly’s Executive Fitness meeting like-minded people who became like family. She was always ready for adventures, be it outdoors, concerts, or of course shopping!!!

Should you wish, donations can be made to the BC Cancer Foundation, BC Children’s Hospital or Kamloops Hospice Association.

Donations in memory of Joanne may be made to the charity of one’s choice.

Forever in our hearts...

Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Condolences may be expressed at schoeningfuneralservice.com

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of our Mom and Nana, Gail Diane Sandison of Kamloops, BC on August 21, 2021. She passed away peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer. Mom was born on June 26, 1956 in Port Alberni, BC. Mom worked as Registered Nurse and most recently a Mental Health and Addictions Worker but she was most proud of her children and grandchildren. She is survived by her mom Josephine Bayer, her daughters Kimberley (Cory) Hill, Erin (Jimmie) Earle, grandsons and camping partners Devin, Nolan, Reid, Corbin, granddaughter and colouring bestie Aria, sister Donna ( Brad) Miller, niece Carrie Eising and family and nephew Brandon Miller and family. Mom made many friendships along the way in Surrey, Williams Lake and finally Kamloops. She was a beloved Mom, Nana, daughter, sister, niece, aunt and friend she will be missed by all that knew her. Thank you to those who helped her on her journey. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to RIH Foundation Cancer Care or Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice House.

May 23, 1923 - August 18, 2021 Born and raised in Consort, Alberta, Elaine lived in Kamloops, Victoria and Abbotsford. A fabulous woman who touched many lives. Witty, intelligent, creative, curious, fun, kind and loyal. She will be greatly missed by her daughter Cynthia, son Graham, grandchildren Pamela, Catherine, Andrew, Avery and Eli, nieces and nephews, and loving folk from all of her 98 years of living. In celebration of Elaine donate to a charity of your choice and raise a glass to her at happy hour.

In Loving Memory of John (Jack) Francis Bailey

March 22, 1931 - August 23, 2021 Jack, honey, I miss you so much. You gave me 26 happy years. You are a wonderful person; caring, down to earth, and generous. You will always be the love of my life.

Lori was special to many - to know her was to love her. She had an infectious smile and will be missed dearly by all who knew her. The family extends a special thanks to all the doctors, nurses and the caring staff at hospice. In keeping with Lori’s wishes, the family will be having a private celebration of life.

Francesco “Frank” Angelo Pelle July 7, 1932 - August 26, 2021

With profound sadness the Pelle family announces the passing of Frank on August 26, 2021, at the age of 89. Frank was an amazing husband, father, grandfather and great grandfather and will be forever missed by his wife Peggy of 40 years, four children: Linda (Lyle), James, Frankie and David, step-children: Norman, Pat (Sheila), Dennis (Barb), Ken (Corinne), Penny Lee (Jay), eleven grandchildren, eight stepgrandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Frank was predeceased by Shirley (children’s mother), daughter Deborah and stepson Richard. Frank was born in Passburg, AB, moving to Sirdar, BC at 1 year old. He graduated from Creston High School, learned wireless training for CN then decided to change his trade to Saw Filing which continued for 50 years. He started his own business in Terrace, BC called The Saw Clinic which he had for 10 years. Frank was a Lion member for 25 years attaining many awards and accolades. After moving to Chase, BC he was still involved with the Lions.

Obituaries

Elaine Mae Holliday (née McFetridge)

No matter the employment Lori gave her all. She had a variety of jobs from food and beverage to plumbing and heating and teaching young skaters through the Peter Puck program. She completed her career with the KPMG team, a position she so enjoyed.

We would like to extend our deepest thanks to Dr. Wiltshire, Dr. Van der Merwe, Dr. Davis, Dr. Farrell and Dr. Michaels, as well as the P3 Community Team, RIH Cancer Clinic and Safeway Pharmacy. Each one of you helped our family more than we can ever express. Our gratitude is endless.

Gail Diane Sandison

Obituaries

We love and miss you. - Natividad (Naty) Bailey, and all our family. A Funeral Service will take place on Saturday, September 11, 2021, at 1:00 pm. At the Church on The Hill, 237 Jasper Drive, Logan Lake, BC. COVID restrictions will apply. The family wishes to extend many thanks to Dave and Mickey Drake, Bill and Cathy Froment, Pastor Steve Pederson, Pastor Carey De Jong, and to Geoffrey Tompkins and Kim Nobert of Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services; you’re the best! Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

David Craig Rabidoux 1953 - 2021

An informal gathering for family and friends will be held on Saturday, September 11, 2021 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm at 147 Carson Crescent, Kamloops.

A Celebration of Life will be held at the Creekside Senior Centre in the spring of 2022.

Please bring your memories and any photos to share.

Share memories and condolences of Frank online at www.fischersfuneralservices.com

Refreshments will be served.

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Tom Wallace March 20, 1926 - August 25, 2021 The family of Tom Wallace with great sadness announces the peaceful passing of our beloved husband and father on August 25, 2021. He will be deeply missed by his loving wife of 69 years, Doreen, who was at his bedside. His sons Alex (Kathy) of Vernon, Greg, better known as Spike in Kamloops, Todd (Susan) of Comox, and daughter Dale of Kamloops, seven grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. Tom was born and raised in Burnaby, the youngest of 6 siblings. He graduated from UBC with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree in 1947 and took a position as a Range Agrologist in Kamloops in 1947. Tom became well respected in the ranching community in the Kamloops area as the Agrologist-in-Charge of the Kamloops Branch, until his retirement in June 1983. Tom received numerous awards and recognition for outstanding performance and achievement for furthering the science and art of range management. He was a Director and President of the Society of Range Management, served as President of the B.C Institute of Agrologists, and was a Councillor with the Agricultural Institute of Canada. Tom was an active member in the community, serving as a Councillor in the Town of Valleyview for 12 years, and as a City of Kamloops Alderman for 2 years. Tom was the first Chairman of the Valleyview Community Association and served for many years. He was active in the Kamloops Lions Club, Toastmasters Club, Boy Scouts, and the Kamloops Wine Club. In his retirement Tom and Doreen enjoyed travelling to Europe, the United Kingdom and the South Pacific. He was an avid supporter of the Kamloops Blazer’s and along with Doreen hosted annual welcoming and end of season events for the players and staff. As a result he had many long lasting friendships with many of the Blazers’ alumni. Tom enjoyed his time with family and his lovely backyard. He was renowned for hosting annual BBQ’s for the BCFS community and friends. In 1954 Tom and Doreen built their family home Valleyview, that was ‘so far out of the city’ at that time, where they continue to reside. Tom was an accomplished mason and rock wall builder. The family made endless trips to the McLure area in search of the perfect rocks for his rock wall projects as he landscaped the yard. Tom was kind and caring and always ready and willing to help. He enjoyed most sports, curling until age 91, camping, fishing and being outdoors. In keeping with Tom’s wishes there will be a celebration of life gathering at a later date. In lieu of flowers, those who wish can make a donation to the RIH Foundation, Cardiac Care Unit, or to the Cattlemen’s Martin Riedemann Society, #4-10145 Dallas Drive, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 6T4 or donate on CanadaHelps.org in Tom’s memory, would be appreciated. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Peggy (Agnes) Erickson Peggy Erickson passed away on August 27, 2021 at Ridgeview Lodge. She was born 94 years ago in Wilkie, Saskatchewan to her parents Nick and Lena Franko. Her sister and best friend, Marian, was born a couple of years later. During her high school years, the family moved to Wynyard, Saskatchewan. After graduation she moved again, this time to Saskatoon where she met and wed newspaper man Sherman Erickson. It was there that her three children were born. Sherman’s work then led to a move to Vancouver. As the children got older, Peggy went to work; first at Eaton’s, then at Antrim Industries, and finally at Douglas College. After 50 years in Vancouver, and following the death of her husband, Peggy moved to Kamloops where her son resided. These past ten years have been spent at Berwick and Ridgeview Lodge. As the child of Ukrainian parents, and one who grew up during the depression and WWII, Peggy worked hard to achieve, and was eventually proud of her accomplishments. She became a talented seamstress, gardener and painter. She had an eye for beautiful fabric and colour. Through it all, she never lost her love for Saskatchewan. Peggy was predeceased by husband Sherman, and leaves behind children Don (Debby), Carol (Marcel), Susan (Tim), as well as six grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. Our thanks to Dr. Wynne and the staff of both Berwick and Ridgeview for their support over these past years. A private family remembrance is planned.

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

A43

Obituaries

Boyd Morrison Sherman Boyd Morrison Sherman of Merritt, BC, born April 17, 1926 on the family homestead near Melita, Manitoba, passed away, gently, surrounded with the love of his family in Kamloops, BC on August 25, 2021 at the age of 95. Survived by his loving wife of 70 years, Alice; son Bo and his wife Cathy Cormack of Longview, Alberta; daughters Darlene Danis and her husband John of Penticton, BC; Sandy Price and her husband Lyn of Merritt, BC; Lexi Sherman of Lower Nicola, BC; Kerry Escobedo of Vernon, BC and Allison Semenoff and her husband Gary of Kamloops, BC. Also survived by thirteen grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. He is also survived by many nieces and nephews, as well as numerous friends and relatives. He is predeceased by his father Edward Sherman, his loving mother Grace Bates, brothers Dean and Beverly Sherman and his sister Marion Massey. He was modest about his achievements, and there were many. His most significant was that he was a great husband and a wonderful dad, granddad and great granddad. He was a loyal friend, had a wicked sense of humour, was a gifted story teller, was compassionate and loved a good game of cards. He loved life!

Rest easy Cowboy, your entry fees are paid! Thank you to the nurses and care aides of Merritt Home and Community Care and the nurses and staff at Overlander Extended Care Hospital. These people were so kind to our family and we truly appreciate it. A Celebration of his life will be announced at a later date when COVID restrictions are eased. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Ty Pozzobon Foundation, PO Box 21082, Prince Albert, SK S6V 8A4 Please note that you want the donation in memory of Boyd Sherman. Arrangements entrusted to Merritt Funeral Chapel. On-line condolences and more detail of Boyd’s life story will be available at www.MerrittFuneralChapel.com

Leanna H. Kazakoff Leanna H. Kazakoff of Kamloops passed away on Monday, August 16, 2021 at 69 years of age. She is survived by her loving husband Ben Kazakoff, son Len (Jennifer Leask) Kazakoff, grandchildren Chayse (Ross) Waddel and Mia Kazakoff, great grandchild Everleigh Waddel, and siblings Robin, Chris and Tina. She was predeceased by her mother Sarah Jeanne “Laverne”, father Terrence Joseph Taphouse and brother Shawn Taphouse. Leanna was raised in the Lower Mainland, leaving home shortly after graduation. At the age of 18 she met the love of her life, Ben. After moving around, they eventually settled in Kamloops around 1980. Leanna worked in retail at the Hudson Bay for 25 years. Her passion was family and friends. Any event, big or small, she was always there to support and encourage. “Grama” as she was most commonly called, could always be heard in any crowd for her boisterous cheer and famous “cackle” laugh. The bond between her daughter-in-law and two granddaughters was unparallel and will never be forgotten. Upon retirement, she enjoyed most weekends camping and boating at Kamloops Lake. A Celebration of Life will be announced at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

THE TIME IS NOW If you are ever going to love me, Love me now, while I can know The sweet and tender feelings Which from true   Love me now         I’m gone And then have it chiseled in marble, Sweet words on     If you have tender thoughts of me,          am sleeping, Never to awaken, There will be death between us, And I won’t hear   So, if you love me,      Let me know it while I am living

THERE’S MORE ONLINE Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

KamloopsThisWeek.com

      


A44

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

Obituaries

Obituaries

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Robert (Bob) Rothery In loving memory of our dear Dad, Grandpa and Friend. The roads were getting rough and the hills harder to climb, with his daughter by his side, Bob passed away peacefully at Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, BC on March 16, 2021. Our hearts are warm knowing he left our world holding my hand and transitioned to a new beautiful place where he was welcomed and embraced by loved ones he had missed and longed to see again. We’re sure his heart is whole again. Dad is survived by his dear friend and former spouse, Shaun Perry; his daughter Michelle Rothery, his son Daniel and Mindy Rothery, and his five grandchildren; Aidan, Mya, Julian, Jacob, and Mackenzie. He was predeceased by his parents Doris and Jacob Rothery, and his younger sister Marilyn Rothery. Dad was born in Vancouver, BC on August 26, 1944 but spent his youth in Nelson, BC where he was fondly known as Bobby by friends and family. As a young adult he moved to Fort St. John and soon after roots were settled in Kamloops, BC and he met and married Shaun. It was here in Kamloops (in a small community Rayleigh), they made their home. Bob spent many of his years working at Wosk’s Furniture store in Kamloops where he built many wonderful friendships. He was a people person who loved to talk and get to know others, so long as they weren’t interrupting him watching a game on the TV. Before retirement Bob spent a few years behind the bar at McCracken’ Pub, again he got to enjoy the close friendships and conversations with many. Bob loved his friends and family deeply. He was gentle, generous and welcoming. He made many friends over the years and he gave what he could to those he loved. Bob was a long-time sports enthusiast. He played baseball, shot pool, curling, betting on horses races, golfing, skiing, fishing, bowling, and if playing with you he handed you a gracious loss. There wasn’t many sports he didn’t play at some time in his life, and when visiting him there was always sports playing on the TV. Bob loved nature; enjoyed many fishing trips to the Queen Charlotte’s, hunting trips with his buddies, and sipping on his beer or coffee watching the deer rest under his apricot tree. Following Dad’s wishes, a private cremation has occurred. At a later date Dad’s ashes will be laid to rest on a special hill of his dear friend’s ranch where he always felt peaceful and happy when visiting. Our family wishes to send a special thank you to the staff at RIH for their care and compassion. In lieu of flowers etc., please do an act of kindness to someone in Bob’s memory. I Invite you all to raise a glass and toast to a life well lived and to all the love and memories we shared. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

THERE’S MORE ONLINE KamloopsThisWeek.com

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Grief is love Persevering Lissa Joan Goodman (née Fowler) May 11, 1960 - March 23, 2021

On the afternoon of March 23, 2021after a hard fought battle with Multiple Myeloma, the world said goodbye to an amazing person. Lissa passed peacefully at home with family by her side. Lissa touched many lives and will be deeply missed, forever loved and never forgotten. Lissa was wife and best friend to husband Howie for over 40 years, mother to sons Thomas (Krista) and Peter (Kimberly), and Nona to Annelissa and Charlie. Lissa is also survived by her mother Carol Fowler, and brothers Ross and Martin (Eva). Also left to mourn are her brothers-inlaw Cliff (Ying) and Stu (Margaret) as well as sister-in-law Joli (Brian) Digby plus five nieces and one nephew. Lissa was predeceased by her father Robert and in-laws Chester and Claudette Goodman. Lissa was born in Toronto and moved with her family to BC in 1971, first to Coquitlam, then to Burnaby. I first met Lissa in 1976 and we were friends and partners ever since. If I live to be 90, I will have known her half my life. Lissa was more of a second mother to K bear and Kimmy G. She made them feel like part of the family right from the start. They are her daughters and friends and always will be. Lissa was employed by the City of Kamloops since 1994, first as a guard in the city holding cells, and later as a DES clerk. She treated everyone with compassion and empathy regardless of their circumstances, and was well respected by her co-workers. Lissa was a natural swimmer and was most at home in or on the water. She also enjoyed running and was a volunteer with Runclub. We travelled to different cites for half marathons and other events. Other vacation spots included Hawaii, Las Vegas and Mexico. Winter sports included skiing and snowshoeing. Lissa refused to let her condition define her or run her life. She took control from day one and did what was necessary to live her life with quality and dignity. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. No flowers please, instead a donation to your favourite charity.

Hunny bunny, thank you for choosing me to be in your life, thank you for an amazing family and thank you for being you. Condolences may be sent to Drake Cremation and Funeral Services.

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.

Obituaries

Obituaries

Ask DRAKE Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW!

Q. What is a Drake Wake? A. Some people want to just say goodbye to Murray in a comfortable but natural way. We provide the Drake Wake. People seem to like it.

Drake Cremation & Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne • 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 • DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

THE ANGEL ON YOUR SHOULDER

By Jackie Huston Lena, Wisconsin There’s an angel on your shoulder Though you may not know she’s there, She watches over you day and night And keeps you in her care. There’s an angel on your shoulder Watching you learn and grow Keeping you safe from danger And nurturing your soul. She’ll be there through your triumphs She’ll dance on clouds with pride, She’ll hold your hand through disappointments and fears, Standing faithfully by your side.          And stood up for what was right. In your life you’ll be faced with decisions and trials And she’ll shine down her guiding light. Life holds so much in store for you, So remember as you grow older, There are no heights you cannot reach ‘Cause there’s an angel on your shoulder. Bereavement Publishing Inc. 5125 N. Union Blvd, Suite 4 Colorado Springs, CO 80918

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of Despair


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

A45


A46

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRESH. HEALTHY. LOCAL.

weekly flyer LARGEST SELECTION OF KAMLOOPS GROWN PRODUCE!

Thursday, September 2nd - Wednesday, September 8th 2021 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

#2 - 740 Fortune Drive, Kamloops

OLIVER BC GROWN

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

CANNING FIELD & ROMA TOMATOES

98¢

HEFFLEY FARMS CORN

88¢

$24

/LB

/25LB CASE

/COB

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

GREEN CABBAGE 58¢ $19 /LB

/35LB BOX

RED BEETS 78¢ $19 /LB

/25LB BAG

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

CARROTS 78¢ $19 /LB

/25LB BAG

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

RED ONIONS 88¢ $6.98 /LB

/10LB BAG

BUTTERCUP SQUASH 58¢ $19 /LB

EGGPLANT

$1.58/EACH

WALLA WALLA ONIONS 88¢ $8 /LB

/10LB BAG

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

/35LB BOX

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

GREEN PEPPERS 78¢ $19 /LB

/25LB BOX

JALAPENO PEPPERS $2.98 $29 /LB

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

WHITE POTATOES

/10LB BOX

$3.98/5LB BAG

YELLOW COOKING ONIONS

$1.98/3LB BAG

WINFIELD BC GROWN

MACINTOSH APPLES $17 98¢ /LB

/18LB CASE

WINFIELD BC GROWN

BARTLETT PEARS $1.28 $19 /LB

/18LB BOX

OLIVER BC GROWN

RED PEPPERS $1.98 $33 /LB

/25LB BOX

WINFIELD BC GROWN WINFIELD BC GROWN

NECTARINES $1.98 $29 /LB

/18LB BOX

WINFIELD BC GROWN

SUNRISE APPLES 98¢ $17 /LB

/18LB BOX

NEW SPRING/SUMMER STORE HOURS

WINFIELD BC GROWN

PRUNE PLUMS $1.48 $25 /LB

MONDAY 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM

/18LB BOX

FREESTONE PEACHES $1.98 $27 /LB

NU LEAF (2021) CHERRY JUICE

$24.98/3L BOX

ABBOTSFORD BC GROWN

/18LB BOX

STRAWBERRIES $55

$6

/PINT

/12LB FLAT

TUESDAY - SATURDAY

SUNDAY

8:00 AM - 7:00 PM

TEMPORARILY CLOSED

REVEN & RETTELSWEN LIAME RUO ROF PU NGIS

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN

!NOITOMORP ro ETADPU ,REYLF A NO TUO SSIM

NEW CRO P!

moc . T EK RAM ECUDO R P FA E LUN

KAMLOOPS BC GROWN KAMLOOPS BC GROWN


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B1

KAMLOOPS ART PAGE Welcome to Kamloops This Week’s Art Page, where we showcase creations from artists of all ages. Submissions can be sent via email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com.

Twyla-Lea Jensen of Spirit Soul Treasures created this resin pyramid, which holds the cremains (ashes) from a woman’s parents, mixed into the heart, which is in the top and the tip of the pyramid. Jensen says it’s a creative way to memorialize a loved one and a unique addition to one’s home. The base houses a lightbulb, which shines blue-coloured light throughout it.

Astronomushroom, Olivia Schulte, Grade 7, Dallas elementary.

Untitled, Sean Boose, Grade 6, Westsyde elementary.

Deep at Night, Helen Nguyen, Grade 6, Arthur Hatton elementary.

PROUD TO SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY OF KAMLOOPS

SAHALI 1210 Summit Dr 250.374.6685 WESTSYDE 3435 Westsyde Road 250.579.5414 BROCKLEHURST #38 - 1800 Tranquille Rd. 250.376.5757 LANSDOWNE #200-450 Lansdowne St. 250.374.4187 VALLEYVIEW #9 - 2101 E. Trans Canada Hwy 250.374.4343

saveonfoods.com


B2

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

A Labour Day read for the resting worker Kamloops This Week first published this article on March 16, 2018. Its subject matter makes it an ideal article to reprint on this page today. Rod Mickleburgh marvels at one of the many surprises he found when he researched his book On the Line: A History of the British Columbia Labour Movement, which was published in 2016. Back in the day, when the province was seeing many strikes largely in the industrial sectors— “those historic struggles,” he said — they were all lost by labour. “Unions didn’t win any major strikes back then,” the longtime labour reporter said. There were no legal protections and employers would react to a strike by hiring private security, bringing in police and the militia, recruiting strike breakers and firing everyone walking a picket line. Mickleburgh, a labour reporter at the Vancouver Sun and Vancouver Province and a

When leaving a job, it is important to exhibit a certain measure of grace and etiquette. Leaving a job with dignity and mutual respect can benefit you in the short and long term. • Speak with a supervisor first: Make sure your boss or immediate supervisor learns of your plans to leave the job first. Do not gossip or suggest to coworkers that you’re ready to leave. It’s unprofessional if a supervisor hears of

your impending departure from others. • Provide ample notice: Even if it is time to move on, ensure your current employer has plenty of time to interview potential replacements and train someone to take your place. This ensures an easy transition for all involved and can show your employer you have the company’s best interests in mind. While two weeks’ notice is the standard, if you have held a position for some time, extend the courtesy to three

weeks or more, if possible, to truly leave a positive legacy. • Check company policy: There may be strict rules in place and protocol to follow. • Don’t shirk responsibilities: It can be tempting to slack off when another job awaits. However, you never know when you might need a referral or even a new job. Leaving a bitter taste in the mouth of your employer at the end of your work history can put a black mark on your

SUPPORTING SUPPORTING SUPPORTING STUDENTS STUDENTS SUPPORTING AND THE TRU AND THE TRU STUDENTSSTUDENTS COMMUNITY THE TRU AND THE AND TRU COMMUNITY COMMUNITY COMMUNITY

ABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACH • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER • ABORIGINAL STUDENTS ABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACH • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER • ABORIGINAL STUDENTS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC PLANNING AND REVIEW COORDINATOR • ACCOMMODATIONS SERVICES SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC PLANNINGSERVICES AND REVIEW COORDINATOR • ACCOMMODATIONS ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE CLERK •AND ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CLERK • ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • ADMISSIONS REGISTRATION OFFICER •• ADMISSIONS ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION OFFICER • ADMISSION OFFICER • ADMISSIONS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC ADVISOR • ADVANCEMENT ASSISTANT • ADVANCEOFFICER • ADMISSIONS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC ADVISOR • ADVANCEMENT ASSISTANT • ADVANCEMENT COORDINATOR AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR • ALUMNI CHAPTER LIAISON • ALUMNI RELATION MENT COORDINATOR • AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR • ALUMNI CHAPTER •LIAISON • ALUMNI RELATION ABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACHOFFICER • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER ABORIGINAL OFFICER •STUDENTS ASSESSMENT CENTRE•CLERK ASSISTIVE • ASSESSMENT CENTRE CLERK ••• ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST AUDIT•AND ARTIC-TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST • AUDIT AND ARTICABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACH • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER ABORIGINAL STUDENTS SERVICES SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC PLANNING AND REVIEW COORDINATOR • ULATION ACCOMMODATIONS OFFICER • ATHLETIC AND RECREATION ASSISTANT • ATHLETICS AND RECREATION COORABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACH • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER • ABORIGINAL STUDENTS ULATION OFFICER • REVIEW ATHLETIC AND RECREATION ASSISTANT • ATHLETICS AND RECREATION COORSERVICES ACADEMIC PLANNING AND COORDINATOR •PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE ACCOMMODATIONS ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC• ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS DINATOR •ANALYST AWARDS• ADJUDICATION CLERK • BUSINESS ANALYST • BINDERY PERSON • BIOSAFETY SERVICES SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC PLANNING AND REVIEW COORDINATOR •SUPERVISOR ACCOMMODATIONS DINATOR • AWARDS ADJUDICATION CLERK •PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE BUSINESS BINDERY PERSON • BIOSAFETY ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS CLERK • PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION OFFICER • ADMISSION OFFICER • BOOKSTORE BUYER • BOOKSTORE CASHIER • BOOKSTORE RECEIVING/DISTRIBUTION ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS OFFICER • BOOKSTORE BUYER • BOOKSTORE CASHIER • BOOKSTORE RECEIVING/DISTRIBUTION CLERK •OFFICER ASSISTANT • ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION OFFICER OFFICER •ADMINISTRATIVE ADMISSIONS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC ADVISOR • ADVANCEMENT ASSISTANT •ADMISSION ADVANCE- SECRETARY CLERK ••TECHNOLOGIST BRANDING • BUILDING CLERK • ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION • ADMISSION CLERK • BRANDING SECRETARY • BUILDINGASSISTANT SYSTEMS • CAMPUS ACTIVITY SYSTEMS CENTRE TECHNOLOGIST • CAMPUS ACTIVITY CENTRE OFFICER • ADMISSIONS • ACADEMIC ADVANCEMENT ADVANCEMENT COORDINATOR •SUPERVISOR AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR •ADVISOR ALUMNI• CHAPTER LIAISON •CLERK ALUMNI RELATION • •CAMPUS CASHIER • CAMPUS COORDINATOR RECEPTIONIST/CLERK • CAMPUS RECREATION COORDINATOR OFFICER • ADMISSIONS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC ADVISOR • ADVANCEMENT ASSISTANT • ADVANCECLERK • CAMPUS • CAMPUSLIAISON RECEPTIONIST/CLERK • CAMPUS RECREATION COORDINATOR • AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR • CASHIER ALUMNI CHAPTER •• ALUMNI RELATION OFFICER ••ASSESSMENT CENTRE•CLERK • ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST AUDIT AND ARTIC-TECHNICIAN CAMPUS SERVICE • CAREER EDUCATION MENT COORDINATOR • AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR • ALUMNI CHAPTERMENT LIAISON ALUMNI RELATION CAMPUS SERVICE TECHNICIAN • CAREER EDUCATION ASSISTANT EDUCATION WEB AND ASSISTANT • CAREER EDUCATION WEB AND OFFICER CENTRE CLERK • ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST AUDITCOORDINATOR AND ARTIC- • CAREER ULATION •OFFICER ATHLETIC AND RECREATION ASSISTANT • ATHLETICS AND •EVENT RECREATION COOR• CARPENTER • CARPENTER COORDINATOR • CONTENT SPECIALIST • CLIENT OFFICER • ASSESSMENT CENTRE CLERK • ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST •ASSESSMENT AUDIT •AND ARTICEVENT COORDINATOR • CARPENTER • CARPENTER COORDINATOR • CONTENT SPECIALIST • CLIENT ULATION • ATHLETIC RECREATION ASSISTANT • ATHLETICS ANDPERSON RECREATION COORDINATOR •RECREATION AWARDS ADJUDICATION CLERK • BUSINESS ANALYST • BINDERY • BIOSAFETY TECHNOLOGY SERVICES SUPERVISOR • COORDINATOR ULATION OFFICER • ATHLETIC AND RECREATION ASSISTANT • ATHLETICS ANDOFFICER COOR-AND TECHNOLOGY SERVICESANALYST SUPERVISOR • COORDINATOR INTERNATIONAL AGENTS RELATIONS AND – INTERNATIONAL AGENTS RELATIONS AND DINATOR ADJUDICATION CLERK • BUSINESS • BINDERY PERSON • –BIOSAFETY OFFICER PERSON •• AWARDS BOOKSTORE BUYER COMMUNICATIONS • BOOKSTORE CASHIER • BOOKSTORE RECEIVING/DISTRIBUTION COMMUNICATIONS COLLABORATION TECHNOLOGY DINATOR • AWARDS ADJUDICATION CLERK • BUSINESS ANALYST • BINDERY • BIOSAFETY • COLLABORATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST •• COMMUNICATIONS COORDINA- SPECIALIST • COMMUNICATIONS COORDINAOFFICER • BOOKSTORE BUYER • BOOKSTORE CASHIER • BOOKSTORE RECEIVING/DISTRIBUTION CLERK • BRANDING SECRETARY •TOR BUILDING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIST • CAMPUS ACTIVITY CENTRE AND TOR • CONFERENCE MARKETING COORDINATOR • COPYRIGHT SPECIALIST • COPYWRITER • OFFICER • BOOKSTORE BUYER • BOOKSTORE CASHIER • BOOKSTORE RECEIVING/DISTRIBUTION • CONFERENCE MARKETING COORDINATOR • COPYRIGHT SPECIALIST • COPYWRITER • CLERK • BRANDING SECRETARY • BUILDING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIST •RECREATION CAMPUS ACTIVITY CENTRE CLERK • CAMPUS CASHIER • CAMPUS RECEPTIONIST/CLERK CAMPUS COORDINATOR CO-OP STUDENT • • CLERK • COURSE MATERIAL PURCHASING • CREDENTIAL COORDINATOR • CLERK • BRANDING SECRETARY • BUILDING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIST • CAMPUS ACTIVITY CENTRE CO-OP STUDENT • CLERK •••CAMPUS COURSERECREATION MATERIAL PURCHASING CREDENTIAL COORDINATOR • CLERK • CAMPUS CASHIER • CAMPUS RECEPTIONIST/CLERK COORDINATOR • CAMPUS SERVICE TECHNICIAN • CAREER EDUCATION ASSISTANT • CAREER EDUCATION WEB AND CULINARY ARTS COORDINATOR AIDE • CULINARY ASSISTANT • CULINARY KITCHEN AIDE • CURRICULUM CLERK • CAMPUS CASHIER • CAMPUS RECEPTIONIST/CLERK • CAMPUS RECREATION COORDINATOR CULINARY ARTS COORDINATOR • •CULINARY ASSISTANT •WEB CULINARY • CURRICULUM CAMPUS SERVICE TECHNICIAN • CAREER EDUCATION ASSISTANT EDUCATION AND KITCHEN EVENT COORDINATOR • CARPENTER • CARPENTER COORDINATOR • CAREER CONTENT SPECIALIST CLIENT ASSISTANT •• CURRICULUM AUDITOR • CURRICULUM • CAMPUS SERVICE TECHNICIAN • CAREER EDUCATION ASSISTANT • •CAREER EDUCATION WEB AND ASSISTANT • CURRICULUM AUDITOR • CURRICULUM GOVERNANCE OFFICER • CURRICULUM MEDIAGOVERNANCE OFFICER • CURRICULUM MEDIA COORDINATOR CARPENTER ••CARPENTER COORDINATOR • CONTENT SPECIALIST •• CLIENT TECHNOLOGY SERVICES SUPERVISOR COORDINATOR – INTERNATIONAL AGENTS RELATIONS AND PRODUCER CURRICULUM MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPER EVENT COORDINATOR • CARPENTER • CARPENTER COORDINATOR • EVENT CONTENT SPECIALIST ••CLIENT PRODUCER • CURRICULUM MULTIMEDIA AGENTS DEVELOPER • CURRICULUM PORTFOLIO COORDINATOR • • CURRICULUM PORTFOLIO COORDINATOR • TECHNOLOGY SERVICES SUPERVISOR • TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR – INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS • COLLABORATION SPECIALIST • COMMUNICATIONS COORDINACUSTOMER RELATIONS ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR TECHNOLOGY SERVICES SUPERVISOR • COORDINATOR – INTERNATIONAL AGENTS RELATIONS AND CUSTOMER RELATIONS ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR SPACE PLANNING AND DESIGN • CONTRACT SPACE PLANNING AND DESIGN • CONTRACT COMMUNICATIONS • COLLABORATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST • COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR • CONFERENCE AND MARKETING COORDINATOR • COPYRIGHT SPECIALIST • COPYWRITER • TRAINING COORDINATOR • DATA ANALYST SUPPORT • DATA MANAGEMENT RECORDS • DELIVERY SUPPORT COMMUNICATIONS • COLLABORATION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST • COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATRAINING COORDINATOR • DATA ANALYST • DATA MANAGEMENT • DELIVERY TOR • CONFERENCE AND MARKETING COORDINATOR • COPYRIGHT SPECIALIST • COPYWRITER •• RECORDS CO-OP STUDENT • CLERK • •COURSE MATERIAL PURCHASING • CREDENTIAL COORDINATOR • DELIVERY SUPPORT OFFICER • DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR • DIGITAL CONTENT TOR • CONFERENCE AND MARKETING COORDINATOR • COPYRIGHT SPECIALIST • COPYWRITER ASSOCIATE • DELIVERY SUPPORT OFFICER •ASSOCIATE DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR • DIGITAL CONTENT CO-OP STUDENT • CLERK • •COURSE MATERIAL PURCHASING • CREDENTIAL COORDINATOR • MEDIA PRODUCER CULINARY ARTS COORDINATOR •SPECIALIST CULINARY ASSISTANT • CULINARY KITCHEN AIDE • CURRICULUM SPECIALIST • DIGITAL DISABILITY SERVICES ADVISOR • DIVISIONAL SECRETARY CO-OP STUDENT • CLERK • COURSE MATERIAL PURCHASING • CREDENTIAL COORDINATOR •ASSISTANT DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER • DISABILITY SERVICES ADVISOR • DIVISIONAL •SECRETARY CULINARY ARTS COORDINATOR • CULINARY • CULINARY KITCHEN AIDE • CURRICULUM • CURRICULUM AUDITOR • CURRICULUM GOVERNANCE OFFICER • CURRICULUM MEDIA EDITOR • DONOR STEWARDSHIP AND •PROSPECT RESEARCH CULINARY ARTS COORDINATOR • CULINARY ASSISTANT • CULINARY ASSISTANT KITCHEN AIDE • CURRICULUM • DONOR STEWARDSHIP AND PROSPECT RESEARCH TECHNICIAN EDITING AND COPY- TECHNICIAN • EDITOR • EDITING AND COPYASSISTANT ••CURRICULUM AUDITOR • CURRICULUM GOVERNANCE OFFICER • CURRICULUM MEDIA• •E-LEARNING PRODUCER CURRICULUM MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPER • CURRICULUM PORTFOLIO COORDINATOR RIGHT SUPERVISOR FACILITATOR • E-LEARNING SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • ELECTRICIAN • ASSISTANT • CURRICULUM AUDITOR • CURRICULUM GOVERNANCE OFFICER • CURRICULUM MEDIA RIGHT SUPERVISOR • E-LEARNING FACILITATOR • E-LEARNING SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • ELECTRICIAN • PRODUCER •RELATIONS CURRICULUM MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPER • CURRICULUM PORTFOLIO COORDINATOR • SUPERVISOR CUSTOMER ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR SPACE PLANNING AND SPECIALIST DESIGN • CONTRACT ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS • ENERGYCOORDISPECIALIST • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION COORDIPRODUCER • CURRICULUM MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPER • CURRICULUM PORTFOLIO COORDINATOR • ELECTRICAL SYSTEMSSPACE SUPERVISOR • ENERGY • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION CUSTOMER RELATIONS ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR PLANNING AND DESIGN •• ENROLMENT CONTRACT TRAINING COORDINATOR • DATA ANALYST • DATA MANAGEMENT RECORDS •NATOR DELIVERY SUPPORT SERVICE OFFICER • COORDINAENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH COORDINACUSTOMER RELATIONS ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR SPACE PLANNING AND DESIGN • CONTRACT • ENROLMENT SERVICE OFFICER • ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH TRAINING • DATANATOR ANALYST • DATA MANAGEMENT RECORDS ••TOR DELIVERY SUPPORT ASSOCIATE • DELIVERY SUPPORT OFFICER • DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR DIGITAL CONTENT • AND EVENTS AND SALES COORDINATOR • EVENTS TRAINING COORDINATOR • DATA ANALYST • DATA MANAGEMENT RECORDS •COORDINATOR DELIVERY SUPPORT TOR • EVENTS SALES COORDINATOR • EVENTS CATERING COORDINATOR • EVENTS ANDAND CATERING COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND ASSOCIATE • DIGITAL DELIVERY SUPPORT OFFICER • AND DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR •MARKETING DIGITAL CONTENT SPECIALIST MEDIA PRODUCER • DISABILITY SERVICES ADVISOR • DIVISIONAL SECRETARY ASSISTANT • EVENTS COORDINATOR • EXAMS LIAISON OFFICER • EXAMS SUPERVISOR ASSOCIATE • DELIVERY SUPPORT OFFICER • DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR • •DIGITAL CONTENT MARKETING ASSISTANT • EVENTS COORDINATOR • EXAMS LIAISON OFFICER • EXAMS SUPERVISOR SPECIALIST • DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER • RESEARCH DISABILITY SERVICES ADVISOR • DIVISIONAL SECRETARY • DONOR STEWARDSHIP AND PROSPECT TECHNICIAN • EDITOR • EDITING AND COPY• EXTENSION SERVICES COORDINATOR • FACILITIES SPECIALIST • DIGITAL MEDIA PRODUCER • DISABILITY SERVICES ADVISOR • DIVISIONAL SECRETARY • EXTENSION SERVICES COORDINATOR • FACILITIES CLERK • FIELD EDUCATION ADVISOR • FIELD CLERK • FIELD EDUCATION ADVISOR • FIELD DONOR AND PROSPECT RESEARCH TECHNICIAN • EDITOR • EDITING ANDASSISTANT COPYSUPERVISOR • E-LEARNING FACILITATOR • E-LEARNING SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • ELECTRICIAN • EDUCATION • FINANCIAL ANALYST • FINANCIAL COORDINATOR • FINANCIAL OFFICER • DONOR STEWARDSHIP AND PROSPECT RESEARCH TECHNICIAN • •RIGHT EDITOR • STEWARDSHIP EDITING AND COPYEDUCATION ASSISTANT • FINANCIAL ANALYST • FINANCIAL COORDINATOR • FINANCIAL OFFICER RIGHT SUPERVISOR • E-LEARNING • E-LEARNING SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • ELECTRICIAN ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS SUPERVISOR • ENERGY SPECIALIST • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION COORDI• FLORICULTURIST •• GRAPHICPROGRAM DESIGNERSUPERVISOR • GROUNDSKEEPER • HOMESTAY PROGRAM SUPERVISOR RIGHT SUPERVISOR • E-LEARNING FACILITATOR • E-LEARNING SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • ELECTRICIAN • •FACILITATOR FLORICULTURIST • GRAPHIC DESIGNER • GROUNDSKEEPER • HOMESTAY ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS SUPERVISOR • ENERGY SPECIALIST • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION COORDINATOR • ENROLMENT SERVICE • ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH COORDINA• HR ASSISTANT• HR OFFICER• ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS SUPERVISOR • ENERGY SPECIALIST • ENGAGEMENT AND RETENTION COORDI- OFFICER • HR ASSISTANT• HR OFFICER• HRIS COORDINATOR •COORDINAINDIGENOUS MENTORHRIS ANDCOORDINATOR COMMUNITY • INDIGENOUS MENTOR AND COMMUNITY NATOR •RESEARCH ENROLMENT SERVICE OFFICER • ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH TOR • EVENTS ANDCOORDINASALES COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND CATERING COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND COORDINATOR • INDIGENOUS LIAISON •INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ANALYST • INSTITUTIONAL NATOR • ENROLMENT SERVICE OFFICER • ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND COORDINATOR • INDIGENOUS LIAISON •INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ANALYST • INSTITUTIONAL • EVENTS AND SALES COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND CATERING COORDINATOR •ANALYST EVENTS AND MARKETING ASSISTANT • EVENTS COORDINATOR EXAMS LIAISONREPORTING OFFICER • DATA EXAMS SUPERVISOR •• INSTITUTIONAL REPORTING COORDINATOR • INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN • TOR • EVENTS AND SALES COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND CATERING TOR COORDINATOR • EVENTS AND ANALYST • ••INSTITUTIONAL COORDINATOR INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN • MARKETING ASSISTANT •COORDINATOR EVENTSDATA COORDINATOR EXAMS LIAISON • EXAMS SUPERVISOR • EXTENSION SERVICES • FACILITIES CLERK • FIELD•OFFICER EDUCATION ADVISOR • FIELD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY • INTERNATIONAL MARKETING ASSISTANT • EVENTS COORDINATOR • EXAMS LIAISON OFFICER • EXAMS SUPERVISOR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OFFICER MOBILITY OFFICER•OFFICER INTERNATIONAL STUDENT MOBILITY OFFICER• INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXTENSIONASSISTANT SERVICES••COORDINATOR • FACILITIES CLERK •COORDINATOR FIELD INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION ADVISOR • FIELD FINANCIAL ANALYST • FINANCIAL • ADVISOR FINANCIAL OFFICER • INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE • IT CLIENT SUP• EXTENSION SERVICES COORDINATOR • FACILITIES CLERK • FIELD•EDUCATION EDUCATION ADVISOR FIELD ADVISOR • INSTITUTIONAL AND EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE • IT CLIENT SUPEDUCATION ASSISTANT • FINANCIAL ANALYST • FINANCIALPLANNING COORDINATOR • FINANCIAL OFFICER • FLORICULTURIST • GRAPHIC DESIGNER • GROUNDSKEEPER • HOMESTAY SUPERVISOR ANALYST • ITCOORDINATOR SERVICE DESK ANALYST • IT SYSTEM SUPPORT COORDINATOR • JOURNEYPERSON EDUCATION ASSISTANT • FINANCIAL ANALYST • FINANCIAL COORDINATOR • FINANCIAL OFFICER PORT ANALYST • IT SERVICE DESK ANALYST PROGRAM •PROGRAM IT PORT SYSTEM SUPPORT • JOURNEYPERSON •• FLORICULTURIST • GRAPHIC DESIGNER • GROUNDSKEEPER • HOMESTAY SUPERVISOR HR ASSISTANT• HR OFFICER• HRIS COORDINATOR INDIGENOUS MENTORPLUMBER-GASFITTER AND COMMUNITY • LAB •SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • LEARNING ANALYST • LEARNING FACILITATOR • FLORICULTURIST • GRAPHIC DESIGNER • GROUNDSKEEPER • HOMESTAY PROGRAM SUPERVISOR PLUMBER-GASFITTER ••• LAB SUPPORT TECHNICIAN • LEARNING ANALYST LEARNING FACILITATOR •COORDINATOR HR ASSISTANT• HR OFFICER•LIAISON HRIS COORDINATOR INDIGENOUS MENTOR COMMUNITY •INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ANALYST • INSTITUTIONAL • AND LEARNING STRATEGIST • LEARNING SYSTEMS STUDENT SUPPORT ASSOCIATE • • HR ASSISTANT• HR OFFICER• HRIS COORDINATOR • INDIGENOUS MENTOR AND• INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY • LEARNING STRATEGISTTECHNOLOGY • LEARNING ANALYST MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS STUDENT SUPPORT MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATE • COORDINATOR •• INDIGENOUS LIAISON •INFORMATION • INSTITUTIONAL DATA ANALYST INSTITUTIONAL REPORTING COORDINATOR • INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN • LEASING MANAGEMENT CLERK • LIBRARY CLIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE • LIBRARY SERVICES SUPCOORDINATOR • INDIGENOUS LIAISON •INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ANALYST • INSTITUTIONAL LEASING MANAGEMENT CLERK • LIBRARY CLIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE • LIBRARY SERVICES SUPDATA ANALYSTPROPERTY •TECHNICIAN INSTITUTIONAL REPORTING COORDINATOR •OFFICER• INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN • • LIFELONG INTELLECTUAL OFFICER • INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PORTENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR AND ENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR • MAILPERSON • DATA ANALYST • INSTITUTIONAL REPORTING COORDINATOR • INSTRUMENTATION • PORT COORDINATORMOBILITY • LIFELONG LEARNING AND COORDINATORLEARNING • MAILPERSON • INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OFFICER • INTERNATIONAL OFFICER• INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISOR • INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE • IT CLIENT SUP- ANALYST • MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION STRATEGIST • MEDIA ANALYST MARKET RESEARCH INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OFFICER • INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY OFFICER• INTERNATIONAL STUDENT MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST • MARKETING AND COMMUNICATION ADVISOR • INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE • IT CLIENT SUP- STRATEGIST • MEDIA ANALYST

4879 members are support staff CUPE 4879 membersCUPE are support staff at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) inLake, Kamloops, Williams Lake, and other 79 members members are support support staff in Kamloops, Williams and other 79 are staff rt locations B.C. Our work is integral pson Rivers Rivers University (TRU) locations across(TRU) B.C. Our work across is integral pson University for post-secondary students to earn ops, Williams Williams Lake, and and other other for post-secondary students to earn ops, Lake, their certificates, diplomas, degrees, and acrosstheir B.C.certificates, Our work work is isdiplomas, integral degrees, and across B.C. Our integral secondary students to to earn earnapprenticeships. apprenticeships. We directly support We directly support secondary students he e students, faculty, the administration, and ificates, diplomas, degrees, and students, faculty, the administration, and ificates, diplomas, degrees, and the TRU facility. Our members are proud ceships. We directly support theWe TRU facility.support Our members are proud ceships. directly . to providethe services faculty, the administration, and to the provide services that benefit wholethat benefit the whole faculty, administration, and community. facility. Our members members are are proud proud ns acility.community. Our e services that benefit the whole ee chservices that benefit the whole CUPE 4879workers represents 600-700 workers CUPE 4879 represents 600-700 ty. ty. at TRU including employees such as utility

employee record. • Take co-workers’ feelings into consideration: Be open and honest with coworkers, but do not gloat that you are leaving the company and they are not. And, if anyone has strong feelings about your departure, accept their point of view and do not react outwardly. Take things in stride as much as possible. When leaving a job, always be courteous and considerate toward current employers.

Happy Labour Day

HAPPY LABOUR DAY!

from the Kamloops and District Labour Council.

fficer

RU

mines, in logging camps, on the docks, in canneries, in farming, in sawmills, as guides — all those sectors key to building the province’s economy. “They were glad to work for wages,” Mickleburgh said. “And that myth they don’t like to work, that they’re just lazy, it’s just absurd.” While Mickleburgh found the workers then benefitted from their employment and were able to buy better clothes, tools and houses, he noted that does not minimize “the terrible things” happening to them. Residential schools, he added, operated in the 20th century. Mickleburgh was commissioned by the B.C. Labour Heritage Centre to write the book. It’s big — there are more than 200 photographs — and it covers about 150 years of the movement, documenting how it influenced the province’s economic, political and social fabric. Order it from Chapters or independent bookstores.

Employ grace and class when leaving a current job

ER

­

senior writer for the Globe and Mail before he retired, pointed to a strike by coal miners on Vancouver Island. It was one of the longest in the province, running from 1912 to 1914. “And, in the end, the strike was lost and they never worked again,” Mickleburgh said. It wasn’t until the Second World War, and the need for workers, that the federal and provincial governments started to pass laws compelling employers to recognize unions and bargain contracts with them. “It’s so inspiring, those workers. They kept fighting them and those employers were really ruthless, those great captains of industry,” Mickleburgh said. Another thread in the labour movement history of B.C. that Mickleburgh said he was unaware of — and wishes more people knew about — is the role the First Nations played in the economy of the province in the 1880s. They were the workers in the

cope 491

Join us online on the Labour Day weekend at kdlc.ca SUPPORTING

ABORIGINAL LIFE SKILLS COACH • ABORIGINAL TRANSITION PLANNER • ABORIGINAL STUDENTS SERVICES SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC PLANNING AND REVIEW COORDINATOR • ACCOMMODATIONS ASSISTANT • ACADEMIC ADVISING SUPERVISOR • ACCOUNTANT • ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/RECEIVABLE CLERK • ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT • ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION OFFICER • ADMISSION OFFICER • ADMISSIONS SUPERVISOR • ACADEMIC ADVISOR • ADVANCEMENT ASSISTANT • ADVANCE-


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

Celebrating Labour Day KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The first Monday in September has been an official holiday in Canada since 1894, and in the United States since 1892. But the origin of Labour Day came 20 years before that, when unions started holding parades and rallies in Toronto and Ottawa to celebrate the successful 1872 Toronto printers’ strike — the original “fight for fairness” that won major changes including the decriminalization of unions in Canada. Today, Labour Day marks the unofficial end to summer and the start of a new school year for children in Canada and the United States. It is a day of rest and, for unions and labour activists, a day to celebrate the accomplishments of the labour movement and the benefits of having a union at work. But, as is the case with most holidays, the origins of Labour Day come from the struggles of working people and the demand for fairness. In this case, it was the movement to establish a nine-hour work day (the standard was a 12-hour work day and a six-day

work week) and a strike by printers in Toronto in the spring of 1872 to get it. Sensing a political opportunity to win support among Canada’s growing industrial working class (just months ahead of a federal election), Prime Minister John A. Macdonald passed the Trade Union Act, which legalized and protected union activity in Canada. The strike ended shortly afterward. Unions — now legal — began to demand fair wages, working hours and safer workplaces. The political class recognized that working people, as voters, were interested in issues that impacted their lives. On July 23, 1894 the government of Canada under the leadership of Prime Minister John Thompson passed a law making Labour Day official. Today, hundreds of communities across Canada and the United States hold picnics, parades, concerts and marches to mark the day. Unions also keep the tradition of using Labour Day to advance workers’ rights and advocate for changes for the lives of working people and their families.

THANKS TO OUR TEAM

This Labour Day, we’d like to thank our 629 employees for their continued commitment to health and safety in the workplace.

New Afton values your feedback. If you would like to get in touch, please call 250-377-2100 or email info.newafton@newgold.com. WWW.NEWGOLD.COM TSX AND NYSE AMERICAN: NGD

Labour Day is

UNIONMADE Karen Ranalletta, President

Trevor Davies, Secretary-Treasurer

cupe.bc.ca

B3


B4

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

ON LABOUR DAY, LET’S RECOGNIZE BC NURSES AND ALL WORKERS www.bcnu.org

BC’s nurses and front line workers are working tirelessly. With gratitude, let’s acknowledge and support their resiliency and dedication to safe patient care.

Defending and Rebuilding an inclusive B.C. Looking for work-life balance? Better pay? Improved working conditions? Join our union, make the change! #BuildBackBetter. Contact us at Unifor2000@unifor2000.ca or call 604-408-0746

Our members work here. Labour Day Ad 2021 KTW 4.875 x 6.indd 1

Learn more at BCGEU.CA/JOIN

Happy Labour Day! Thank you to the thousands of BCGEU members and other essential workers on the frontlines of COVID-19. Workers are the key as we emerge from the pandemic stronger and safer.

2021-08-11 12:41 PM


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

save-on-foods presents:

[share with us]

EYE ON COMMUNITY

B5

If you have a photo of a charity donation, a grand-opening picture or other uplifting images, email them to

editor@kamloopsthisweek.com,

with “eye on community” in the subject line.

CHARITY CALENDAR

Share It Forward with Save-On ONGOING The Canadian Imperial Bank of Canada is making available financial relief, advice and support to clients affected by wildfires. The bank is offering: • Flexible CIBC credit card bill monthly payment options; • Re-amortizing mortgages to lower interest rate temporarily; • Special payment arrangements and deferrals on loans and lines of credit; • Conversion of Aventura points into cash payment for applicable credit cards; • Debt consolidation for more manageable payment. CIBC customers impacted by wildfires and in need of banking assistance should call 1-888-997-0929. SEPT. 12 The fifth annual Kamloops Multiple Myeloma March will take place in person at Pioneer Park. at 9 a.m. The national 5K walk raises funds for research and access to innovative medications that will increase life expectancy and move the needle toward a cure for patients impacted by myeloma. For more information, email ridgerunner@telus.net.

ENSURING KITTENS FIND GOOD HOMES: PetSmart in the Aberdeen Village partnered with the Kamloops Humane Society for a recent kitten adoption event. Checking out a tabby kitten were Patrick Curley and kids Brooklyn, 4 (left), and Weston, 2. For more information on the Kamloops Humane Society, including future kitten adoption events, go online to kamloopshumanesociety.ca. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

When your body is subjected to allergens it creates histamines that cause sneezing, itchy eyes etc. and thus the need for antihitamines. Come in and find out how to stop those histamines from forming in the first place.

Want to know more? Come in and see us.

Healthylife Nutrition healthylifenutrition.ca • Sahali Mall • 250-828-6680 Shop our new online store! shop.healthylifenutrition.ca

4th Meridian Art & Vintage Visit our Gallery & Shop for art, antiques & unique gifts: #104 1475 Fairview, Penticton

(east entrance, inside the Cannery Trade Centre)

Open Friday & Saturday 11 - 3 Spring Cleaning?

Quality Antiques, Pottery, Fine Art & curious items

WE ARE BUYING:

Inquiries: info@4thmeridian.ca

www.4thmeridian.ca

@4th.meridian.art.vintage @4th.meridian.art.auctions


B6

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FASTEST TURTLES ON EARTH! Buy your ticket today for the 2021 VW Turtle River Race! September 11, 2021 • Riverside Park, 700-block Lorne St.

RACE 1 • 1:00 PM 1ST PLACE TURTLE – RACE 1: • Montana Hill Guest Ranch 3 Night Stay • $1000 Save On Foods GC • $500 Aberdeen Mall GC • Mount Paul Golf Course package • Shuswap Water Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals package • Interior White Water Expeditions package • Oyama Zipline package 2ND PLACE TURTLE – RACE 1: • YMCA-YWCA Family Pass • Surplus Herby’s Camping package • Club Shuswap Golf package • Ocean Pacific Adventure Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals 2X1 Day pass

Benefitting the charities of the 2021 KTW Christmas Cheer Fund • Chris Rose Therapy Centre for Autism • Kamloops Brain Injury Association • Kamloops Therapeutic Riding Association

3RD PLACE – VALUE $1,500 • 500 gift certificate to Twisted Olive/Mittz Kitchen • $500 gift certificate to Brown’s Social House • $500 gift certificate to Earl’s Restaurant

RACE 2 • 2:00 PM 1ST PLACE TURTLE – RACE 2: • Montana Hill Guest Ranch 3 Night Stay • $1000 Save On Foods GC • $500 Aberdeen Mall GC • Mount Paul Golf Course package • Shuswap Water Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals package • Delta Hotel Stay • Weber Portable BBQ • Oyama Zipline package 2ND PLACE TURTLE – RACE 2: • YMCA-YWCA Family Pass • Surplus Herby’s Fishing package • Club Shuswap Golf package • Ocean Pacific Adventure Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals 2X1 Day pass THIRD PLACE – VALUE $1,500 • $500 gift certificate to Twisted Olive/Mittz Kitchen • $500 gift certificate to Brown’s Social House • $500 gift certificate to Earl’s Restaurant

DON’T WAIT – THESE TURTLES WILL BE GOING FAST! DRAW DATE SEPT. 11, 2021 BUY YOUR TURTLE TICKETS $10 EACH SINGLE TICKETS 1,500 AVAILABLE FOR EACH RACE

AVAILABLE

D OUT$25 PACKS VALUE OFSO3LFOR VALUEPACK

Online at www.turtleriverrace.com Or at the till at any Save On Foods location

LL AVAILABLE

STI KETSRACE E TIC SINGL 150 AVAILABLE FOR EACH BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Chances are 1 in 650 for each race (total tickets for sale) to win a grand prize. Problem Gambling Help Line 1-888-795-6111 www.bcresponsiblegambling.ca

BC Gaming Event Licence #128715 #128717

Know your limit, play within it

19+


WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B7

FAITH

Can prayer and politics be an election combo?

T

he writ has dropped and election fever has been raising political temperatures for some time. Designated lobbying groups have been busy on the internet and phones for a few months. A few of them have already published voters’ guide to candidates who would maintain and advance their particular causes. But in the upcoming weeks, a point of contact of enormous and eternal significance with the electorate would be missing in election publicity affairs and glad handling — that of reliance on divine intervention. If the word of God is to be believed, that “the authorities that exist have been established by God,” then it makes sense that the highest authority, namely God almighty, be made at least a consultant and perhaps even an appellant on behalf of the aspirants to Parliament Hill. Honestly, I have had my candidate and party picked since even before the writ was dropped. Now, as a campaign observer, I wait on tiptoes to expedite that person’s victory, releasing my daily prayers in the process. The Bible urges us to pray for national leaders before they arrive on Parliament Hill and take their seats. It urges us to invoke blessing upon their steps preparatory to the climb. Notwithstanding scandals and controversies or fighting among parties on both sides of the pipeline or vaccination issues, other national spectacles, small or big, have been greatly besmirching and simply annoying. Therefore, in the next few weeks, a bit more soul searching, before casting our ballots, might be helpful in order to check a candidate’s moral, ethical and spiritual stances. Can Canada raise a sleeping moral majority that is waiting to be set loose? I believe it can and should. Is it time to restore spiritual values in public life? Doing our own things and the resultant spiral of vicious degenerative cycles of brokenness in society emanate from the society’s failure to understand man’s need of God. The right of religious people of all faiths to influence Canada’s public and political process can still slow down, if not prevent, ero-

NARYAN MITRA You Gotta Have

FAITH

sion of godly ethics so essential to democracy. Seeking God’s kingdom and his righteousness was a slogan of Jesus in his ministry on Earth. When he spoke of the kingdom of God, Jesus was not only referring to the general sovereignty of God over nature and history, but also to that specific rule over his own people, which he himself had inaugurated and which begins in anybody’s life when he humbles himself. It is not clear why Jesus distinguished between his kingdom and righteousness as twin, but separate, objects of priority in our godly quest. God’s rule is a righteous rule. Therefore, in the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus taught us to hunger and thirst for righteousness, to be willing to be persecuted for it and to exhibit a righteousness greater than that of the phony law-keepers, namely the Pharisees. The difference between the two lies in the fact that God’s kingdom exists where he is consciously acknowledged. To be in his kingdom is synonymous with enjoying his salvation. But God’s righteousness is a wider concept than God’s kingdom. It includes individual and societal righteousness, as well. Because God is righteous, he desires righteousness in every human community, not just in the Christian community. For some years in recent past, Christians have been looking to politics and politicians to save Canada. We thought that the right prime minister, the right parliament and the right Supreme Court judges would ensure that religious rights would be respected. We saw ourselves as heirs to the Christian political tradition that fought for women’s right to

vote, an end human trafficking and all-round welfare for all. Is it time to take stock of both national politics and our spirituality, to reflect and chew the thought whether our political convictions have produced the desired results? Things are hardly better. Social statistics are largely unchanged. Divorces are growing. More children are growing up in single parent homes or in foster care. More and more Canadians are living in intractable poverty. Educational achievement is hardly soaring. People of goodwill in all faith traditions can disagree about income splitting, health-care policies or the war of words to solve the Afghanistan and Middle East problems. These disagreements prevent relationships and fellowship of hearts. The time is now to develop greater intimacy with God and follow a way to be humble in God’s sight, starting with our politicians and national leaders. Perhaps we would be a better electorate if we eschew red hot politics in order to focus more on practising compassion. We need to spend more time studying the Sermon on the Mount and less time scrutinizing party platforms. And, along with that, let us keep our eyes and hearts open in preparation to choose men and women “who are known to be full of the Spirit and wisdom …” (Acts 6:3) — the real servants of people who elected them. “I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions and thanksgiving be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Saviour, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.” (1 Timothy 2:1-4, ESV, in the New Testament).

NATHAN DUNLAO/UNSPLASH

FRANCA MURACA NOTARY PUBLIC • Will and Estate Planning • Incapacity Planning • Real Estate Transactions • Notarizing Documents

T: 778-696-4LAW E: info@muracanotary.ca 301-619 Victoria Street muracanotary.ca

Places of Worship KAMLOOPS

Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Narayan Mitra is a volunteer chaplain at Thompson Rivers University. His email address is ryanmitra225@gmail.com. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.

Weekend Gathering Times Saturdays at 6:30pm & Sundays at 10:00am in-person & online through Labour Day weekend 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca

To advertise here, please call 250-374-7467


B8

WEDNESDAY, September 1, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

If you can read this, help someone who can’t. Reading can change a life

Help support family & children’s local literacy programs.

Donate online all month!

SCAN TO DONATE

www.Raise Reader.ca Phone: 250-374-7467 or 1-800-637-READ (7323)

Mail in: 1365B Dalhousie Dr, Kamloops, BC V2C 5P6 cheques payable to “Literacy in Kamloops” Watch for our special Raise a Reader section in Kamloops This Week on

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 For more information, visit www.raiseareader.ca SPONSORS

FUNDS RAISED SUPPORT FAMILY & CHILDREN’S LOCAL LITERACY PROGRAMS.

Profile for KamloopsThisWeek

Kamloops This Week September 1, 2021  

Kamloops This Week September 1, 2021

Kamloops This Week September 1, 2021  

Kamloops This Week September 1, 2021

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded