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kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 25

kamthisweek

#YKASTRONG

THE HEAT IS ON This weekend, the mercury could crest 40 C and flirt with the all-time high of 41. 7 C

DETAILS AND TIPS ON DEALING WITH THE SCORCHING TEMPS ARE ON PAGES A12-A13

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

Kamloops.ca

Council Calendar Public and media attendance via Zoom only until further notice June 28, 2021 10:00 am - Finance Committee Meeting June 29, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Committee Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing All meetings are currently being held at Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street. The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Notice To Motorists Please use caution when driving in the vicinity and obey all traffic control personnel, signs, and devices in the following area: • Tranquille Road Singh Street to 12th Street • Westmount Drive Westsyde Road to Collingwood Drive • Fleetwood Avenue Southill Street to Desmond Street • 3rd Avenue Lansdowne Street to Lorne Street • Notre Dame Drive Summit Drive to Columbia Street To stay up to date on road work projects, visit:

ATTENTION KAMLOOPS TAX PAYERS!

NORTH SHORE NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN

The deadline to pay property taxes and apply for your Home Owner Grant (HOG) is July 2, and the full 10% penalty for late payments will apply as of July 3. Residents experiencing financial difficulties this year should note that HOGs can be applied for without making a tax payment, which will reduce the tax balance owing. Partial payments before the due date will also reduce the penalty incurred. Look into the BC Property Tax Deferment Program for additional support.

To develop the draft North Shore Neighbourhood Plan, the City is now seeking feedback on a draft vision and strategic directions for the North Shore.

The process for applying for HOGs has changed this year and is now managed by the Province instead of the City. Apply early to give yourself more time to figure out the new process. To apply, visit Gov.BC.ca/HomeOwnerGrant or call 1-888-355-2700. For more information on property taxes, visit:

This builds on work conducted last fall, when the project team engaged the community on their vision and big ideas for the North Shore and gathered feedback on issues and opportunities the updated North Shore Neighbourhood Plan should address. Visit our web page to: • complete the Strategic Directions Survey, open until June 30 (enter to win a gift basket courtesy of the North Shore Business Improvement Association) • view background information and project timelines • subscribe to project updates LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/NorthShorePlan

VIRTUAL CANADA DAY O Canada! Join us from your living room—or anywhere—as we observe Canada Day virtually this year. We're excited to bring you a dynamic and exciting online event that features musical performances, interactive activities, and more! The City has worked with Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc to incorporate messaging into this year’s virtual Canada Day event that encourages education on Indigenous culture and heritage. The in-person Canada Day event at Riverside Park, including the fireworks display, was cancelled by organizers earlier this spring due to COVID-19 public health restrictions. The online event will begin July 1 at 11:00 am. For details on performances, activities, and how to watch the event, visit: Kamloops.ca/CanadaDay

Kamloops.ca/PropertyTaxes

Kamloops.ca/Kammute

DOWNLOAD THESE CITY APPS FOR FREE! MYKAMLOOPS™ APP Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

myKamloops

Report non-emergency issues such as potholes, fallen trees, or broken street lamps. Simply take a picture, confirm the location, add any comments, and submit!

WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WASTE WISE! Sign up for weekly collection reminders and search how to recycle or dispose of hundreds of products and items. Kamloops.ca/WasteWise

FLOWBIRD—PAY FOR PARKING BY PHONE

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

Flowbird is an intuitive and easy-to-use application that allows you to pay for your parking sessions remotely through your mobile phone. Simply select the parking location nearest to your vehicle, select the duration, and confirm payment.

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

HONOURING THE CITY’S LEADERS

A TAXI COMMISSION FOR KAMLOOPS?

RETURNING FROM ACROSS CANADA

KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Awards have been determined

The city is mulling the possibility due to issues with local cab companies

Jessica Hewitt is back with the Long Blades — from Montreal

B1-B9

A19

A27

A5

This artist’s rendition shows what the new Parkcrest elementary will look like once it opens in the spring of 2024. The original Parkcrest elementary was destroyed by fire in September 2019. SCHOOL DISTRICT 73 IMAGE

INSIDE KTW Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A24 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A26 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A27 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A40 Community Leader Awards . . . . . . . . . . . .B1 Art Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B13

TODAY’S FLYERS

KTW Community Leader Awards, YIG*, Walmart*, The Brick*, Shoppers*, Save-On-Foods*, Safeway*, Rexall*, Nature’s Fare*, M&M Meats*, London Drugs*, Home Hardware*, Freshco* * Selected distribution

WEATHER FORECAST June 23: Sunny 32/19 (hi/low) June 24: Sunny 32/16 (hi/low) June 25: Sunny 37/21 (hi/low) June 26: Sun/clouds 40/22 (hi/low) June 27: Sun/clouds 40/22 (hi/low)

NEW PARKCREST ELEMENTARY REVEALED

ONLINE

SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek twitter.com/ KamThisWeek youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

HOW TO REACH US: Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

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School District 73 has revealed its design for a new Parkcrest elementary school. In September 2019, a fire gutted the old school in Brocklehurst and it was later demolished. A cause was never determined. Hundreds of students were displaced, but taken up days later in other school facilities, including George Hilliard elementary. The school’s replacement, set to open by the spring of 2024, will feature a larger gymnasium and other improvements. “Now our school will be restored even better than it was before,” incoming SD73 superintendent Rhonda Nixon said. Construction is expected to get underway this summer. The school was designed by Station One architects, which also designed the ongoing expansion at Valleyview secondary. The single-storey school will measure about 47,000 square feet in size and

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Despite the efforts of Kamloops firefighters, Parkcrest elementary was lost to flames on Sept. 5, 2019. MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW FILE

includes 18 classrooms, three kindergarten rooms and a gymnasium twice as large as its predecessor. It will also feature a neighbourhood learning centre space. The new school also boasts better energy efficiency, is built to LEED gold standards and has an increased capacity

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of 510 students, up from 390. Funding for the school comes mostly from the provincial government, its contribution being $34.84 million. The district itself contributed $300,000 and the City of Kamloops added $2.5 million to the pot for the larger gymnasium for sporting events.

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685 NOTRE DAME DRIVE KAMLOOPS, BC MON-SAT 8:30 AM-6:00 PM 250-374-1135

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com


A6

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS RE-OPENING JULY 5! AVAILABLE BY PHONE & EMAIL MONDAY - FRIDAY 11-3 UNTIL THEN

Travel is the only thing you buy that makes you richer.

You’ve waited a long time to travel again. Why not really indulge yourself and go upscale all the way? Make this vacation one to remember with a luxurious experience. You’d be surprised to learn that there’s not a huge difference in upgrading every aspect of your vacation. Don’t you need a little pampering after all you’ve been through? Haven’t you earned it? We’ve got some fabulous ideas of how to make your next vacation one that you’ll never forget. Contact your Travel Professional today! Marlin Travel Kamloops is the only locally owned and operated travel agency in Kamloops

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Work continues on this residential project downtown at St. Paul Street and Fifth Avenue.

DEVELOPMENT CONSTRAINT IN KAMLOOPS MEANS INFILL IS THE FUTURE ACCORDING TO THE CITY’S PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT SUPERVISOR, ERIC BEACH, AN ESTIMATED THREE TO FOUR PER CENT OF CITY LAND IS AVAILABLE FOR NEW GROWTH, OUTSIDE OF REDEVELOPMENT JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Marlin Travel Kamloops is your trusted travel professional when it comes to travel advice.

(250) 374-8757

237 Seymour St, Kamloops, BC www.marlintravel.ca/kamloops

So-called “no-touch areas,” including agricultural land, open space and parkland, have placed constraints on development in Kamloops. As a result, the city expects new subdivisions to reach maximum capacity in the coming years. On Monday (June 21), the city’s development and sustainability committee received a presentation on land development availability. Utilizing geographic information system (GIS) mapping, the city’s planning and development supervisor, Eric Beach, detailed 32,000 hectares of land inside city boundaries facing numerous land constraints. In addition to agri-

cultural land, open space and parkland, which make up about 70 per cent of the city’s land, Beach explained the city’s topography, including steep slopes and silt bluffs, further restrict development. Removing that land from the mapped inventory of developable land, along with rivers, highways and railways, Beach estimated three to four per cent of city land is available for new growth. “Just kind of painting that picture for you,” Beach said. “There isn’t a whole lot of land for new growth in the city of Kamloops …” Beach detailed plans underway for future development in Aberdeen Highlands, Dufferin, Orchards Walk, Pineview Valley and Juniper West. One can see evidence of development all over the city, from cranes

soaring in the skies to construction workers hammering away from dawn to dusk. Planned road networks resulting from growth will connect neighbourhoods that were at one time, pre-amalgamation, their own communities: proposed to connect are Valleyview Drive and Dallas Drive, Juniper Ridge and Rose Hill and Aberdeen and Pineview. Once those plans are realized, Beach said infill and redevelopment of existing land will be predominant due to the aforementioned constraints. He said those come with their own sets of limitations, including land acquisition and desire by developers to redevelop land. “But as far as a new 100-lot subdivision, in 15 to 20 years, there probably won’t be a lot of those happening here in Kamloops,” he said.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A7

Fulton & Company LLP

We have lived together for a year – are we considered married?

The bodies of Kamloops brothers Carlo and Erick Fryer were found near Naramata on May 10. The body of Kathleen Richardson was found in her Naramata home on June 9. Police believe all three deaths are connected and linked to gang and drug activities.

No, but you may have some of the same rights that legally married couples have, particularly concerning income tax filing and wills/estate planning. If you have questions, we’re here to help.

CARLO FRYER

ERICK FRYER

KATHLEEN RICHARDSON

HEATHER LLOYD

Contact 250.372.5542 or law@fultonco.com

Charges in connection with murders of Kamloops brothers KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Two men have been charged in connection to the murders of two Kamloops brothers, whose bodies were found near Naramata in the South Okanagan on May 10. On June 18, the BC Prosecution Service approved first-degree murder charges against 35-year-old Anthony Graham of Penticton and 32-year-old Wade Cudmore of Naramata. Cudmore has been arrested and remains in police custody, while Graham remains at large. Cudmore is the son of Kathleen Richardson, a 57-year-old woman who was found deceased in her Naramata home on June 9. Police believe her death is connected to the murders of Carlo Fryer, 31, and Erick Fryer, 29, brothers from Kamloops whose bodies were discovered in a remote location on the Naramata Creek Forest Service Road after police received information about an unresponsive person in need of medical attention. While police initially said the slayings of the brothers was not believed to be related to the ongoing gang-related killings

Funerals...just the FAQ’s please. Murder suspect Anthony Graham remained at large as of June 22.

in the Lower Mainland, that viewpoint has changed. “Their homicides are believed to be connected to gang and drug activities, with alleged criminal activities not limited to Naramata, but other areas of B.C, including Northern BC and the Lower Mainland,” said Supt. Sanjaya Wijayakoon of the BC RCMP’s Major Crime Section. “We are concerned that Anthony is a target and those associated to him, or found in his proximity, are also at risk. Anthony, if you see or hear this message, I am asking you to turn yourself into the nearest police station.” On June 9, about a month following the murders of the Fryers, police found the body of

Richardson. Police went to her residence as part of the Fryer investigation and said they believe Richardson’s death to be a homicide connected to the brothers’ deaths. Police suspect all three deaths to be connected to gang activity and the drug trade. RCMP Cpl. Jesse O’Donaghey told KTW on June 18 that while police still believe Richardson’s death to be connected to the Fryer brothers’ murder, it remains an ongoing investigation. Asked if police suspect Graham and Cudmore are connected to Richardson’s death, O’Donaghey would not comment, saying only that police have to be mindful they are now before the courts in the process.

Tired of virtual? Join us in person for a free informative session on how to protect your family BEFORE the time of death. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23 | 10:30 A.M. SCHOENING FUNERAL SERVICE 513 SEYMOUR ST, KAMLOOPS, BC

Registration is required by June 21 as seating is limited. Call 250-374-1454 or email joanie.dunn@dignitymemorial.com

Leave with your questions answered and a little gift from us.

A division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC. A division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

We remain deeply committed to the health and safety of our community by practicing social distancing and observing the highest level of cleanliness at our facility.


A8

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Exceptional work during daunting year

I

n the KamloopsThompson School District, the first of 14 graduation ceremonies began in May at South Kamloops secondary. Graduation took place over five 13-hour days, allowing each student to cross the stage and receive their diploma in front of a small number of guests. These personal, memorable events have played out many times across the district and will end with Valleyview secondary in early July. Graduation is a major milestone in each student’s life and in the lives of their families. Graduates are stepping into an uncertain world, but they are equipped with tools and knowledge to ensure success. The board of education congratulates the Class of 2021 and wishes them all the best in their future endeavours.

RHONDA KERSHAW

View From

SD73

While recent announcements from the Ministry of Education indicate we will see a mostly normal return to school in September, no changes will happen prior to the end of this school year. For the second consecutive year, our school staff are working to ensure graduations provide

a meaningful way for students, staff and families to celebrate this important milestone and to reflect on their experiences throughout their school years. These customized graduations are an example of the innovation that has occurred across the district during this challenging year. While difficult to list all the amazing things that were created and implemented in 2020-2021, we acknowledge the way SD73 staff across the district have found different strategies to stay connected and keep our learners at the centre of what we do. In July, the board will also be celebrating the retirement of secretary-treasurer Kelvin Stretch. His retirement marks the end of a 24-year career with the district, the last 15 as secretary-treasurer. Overseeing an annual budget of close to $200 million, his guidance

has allowed this and many previous boards to feel confident in the financial position of the district, ensuring the focus can remain on the educational needs of students. Kelvin will be greatly missed, but we wish him great joy in the next chapter of his life. The board of education would also like to recognize the leadership of Dr. Terry Sullivan this past year. While he retired from SD73 in 2014, he played a critical role this past year as interim superintendent of schools. We thank him for his steady and thoughtful leadership over the past 10 months. The successful completion of this year, one of the most challenging experienced in the district, is in large part attributable to his calm and competent support of staff at all levels. While the next year will look different, SD73 is well-positioned

for the upcoming changes with the arrival of incoming superintendent Dr. Rhonda Nixon in early July and with Trina Cassidy ready to assume the role of secretary-treasurer in August. Together with the board, I would like to once again congratulate the Class of 2021 and our retiring secretary-treasurer. I also extend my appreciation to each SD73 staff member for their exceptional work in bringing us through an extraordinarily demanding year. We look forward to September, knowing students, families, teachers and staff should plan for a nearnormal return to school. Rhonda Kershaw is chair of the SD73 board of education. Her email address is rkershaw@sd73.bc.ca. SD73 columns appear monthly in KTW during the school year.

Are vaccines for the world really charitable? At the recent G7 summit, U.S. President Joe Biden promised to distribute 500-million doses of Covid-19 vaccines free to the poorer countries by the middle of next year. That’s more than a drop in the bucket, but not much more. A tablespoon in the bucket, perhaps. And the other six Gs (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom) have pledged around the same number of free jabs for poor countries on the same timetable. So, about a year from now, the seven richest Western countries will have given out around one-billion free doses of Covid vaccines. Pretty generous, right?

GWYNNE DYER Actually, No. China leads all G7 countries combined in the number of doses it has delivered to poorer countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Most are sold at close to cost price and, sometimes, for the poorest, with cheap credit as an added attraction. Around half of all the doses going to the less-developed countries are Chinese. China is not sacrificing its own people for this as it has already vaccinated about 40 per cent of its population, roughly the same ratio as the United States.

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey Paul De Luca

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Digital sales: Makayla Peverill Raj Soni PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

DIGITAL DESIGNERS Jackson Vander Wal FRONT OFFICE Front office staff: Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery Rosalynn Bartella CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer

Yet its share of the vaccines used in developing countries is likely to rise even further. Well, good for China. Sure, it’s buying influence with its generosity, but what’s wrong with that? If the G7 countries want to counter it, they shouldn’t resort to cheap propaganda about Chinese vaccines being ineffective (they’re not) and they shouldn’t claim they have to vaccinate all their own people first. Instead, try being equally generous. But “generous” is actually the wrong word. “Self-interested” is a better word because leaving large populations unvaccinated anywhere guarantees new variants will arise, some of them more infectious and/ or more deadly, which will spread into the

countries that think they have made themselves safe. Nobody is safe until everybody is safe. Relative safety would require having 40 per cent of the world’s population vaccinated by January 2022 and 60 per cent by mid-2022 — at a total cost, according to the International Monetary Fund, of $50 billion. The billion doses promised by the G7 for mid- 2022 just don’t cut it — and even an extra billion from China is not enough. Two doses each for five-billion people is what’s needed. Or we can choose to live with the killer variants instead. Read the entire column online at kamloops thisweek.com, under the Opionion tab.

CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

Circulation 250-374-0462

All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

Follow us online at kamloopsthisweek.com

kamthisweek kamloopsthisweek


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CARRIE NEEDS BETTER CARE

DIFFICULT, NECESSARY HEALING JOURNEY Editor: Around the city, I have seen and visited different memorials to the 215 children whose collective “voice” has moved the acknowledgement of the atrocities of the Indian Residential School system from our heads to our hearts. There is the memorial at Tk’emlúps at the site of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, with teddy bears, flowers and shoes. There are 215 orange ribbons tied on bridges and on railings. There are orange hearts in windows. There are shoe jour-

neys that appeared at the courthouse, at Sacred Heart Cathedral and at Kamloops City Hall. There are orange-knotted ties on the altar at St. Paul’s Cathedral. Like the bus banners that proclaim “Lest we forget” and flags flying at half-mast, these memorials remind us that people are hurting and our community is hurting as a very painful part of our history comes to the surface. It’s hard, but necessary, to face this reality and feel these emotions. It is part of our healing journey. Barbara Liotscos Kamloops

Editor: Re: KTW’s story of June 16 detailing a quadriplegic’s problems in securing consistent help from care-aides (‘Carrie is fighting for her independence’): I can vouch for Carrie McAstocker’s struggles with Interior Health. An apparent lack of resources and a tough union make it difficult for the provincial government to provide all but the most ridiculously basic help unless a patient agrees to become at least somewhat institutionalized, ironically at a much higher cost. It is great that McAstocker is able to sweep her floor, despite being a quadriplegic, but the incredibly sad state of affairs is that the current rules don’t allow care-aides to do that and many similar types of duties, leaving others in the community to step up where they shouldn’t have to. I know this because my mother is blind and care-aides, unless they are especially kind, won’t help with her floors and many other tasks. Some are happy to look at a mess while watching rice boil, for

instance, with which my mom doesn’t really need help. The situation just makes her sad, which is why she has declined further help. If people like my mother and McAstocker started demanding the help they deserved, the demand on the system would be even greater. Tom Joseph Kamloops Editor: There are so many of us who want to complain about this decline in service, but many are afraid doing so might land us in more trouble than we now find ourselves. Sometimes the devil you know is better than the devil you don’t know. Every night l am left alone, l weep for those who are quadriplegics and, for whatever reason, are left to spent the night in a wheelchair because they have been told no one could be found to cover their service. And wasn’t that comment in the story from Interior Health a doozie? If that doesn’t make you

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laugh, nothing will. There is so much more one could say. I’m sure the floodgates are now open. D. Wright Kamloops Editor: Carrie McAstocker is not alone in her need for more care from Interior Health. I have multiple sclerosis and live with my cat. I used to get services twice a day. When the pandemic arrived, I understood staffing was going to be an issue, so I went down to one visit at night to help with dinner and commode-cleaning. In February, my care visits were cancelled two days in a row. I was told to have a backup plan if they cannot make it. I have been complaining through the system and spoke to someone in Burnaby. I would love to know if this is happening to people who are paying for this service and if Interior Health is still charging the ministry for the visits anyway. Kim Janzen Kamloops

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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TNRD board votes to begin talks on new library, with an estimated cost of $15 million JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District wants to begin negotiations to develop a new library in Aberdeen at a preliminary estimated cost of $15 million. Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian said he has seen public libraries transform from their traditional sense to social hubs that include storytelling, computers and meeting space. He said the size of space is not as important as what happens inside the library. “I strongly support this,” he said, noting a new library in the Aberdeen/Dufferin area will also have positive neighbourhood spinoffs, such as enhanced retail opportunities. The TNRD board voted in favour of the recommendation during a Friday (June 18) committee of the whole meeting. Decision on next steps will go to the board at a meeting in July. The board also voted to direct staff to pursue grant funding for the new building and to develop a public consultation and engagement strategy. Opposed to negotiations for development of the library were Kamloops Coun. Kathy Sinclair, Sun Peaks Mayor Al Raine and TNRD Area E (Bonaparte Plateau) director Sally Watson. The board heard from the regional district’s chief librarian, Judy Moore, that population growth and demand are driving the need for construction of a new library in Kamloops, which would be the third in the city. Two other libraries are located downtown and in North Kamloops. The proposed third location is across from Aberdeen Mall on Hillside Drive, in a space currently occupied by a parking lot next to Kenna Cartwright Park. The pitch is for a 25,000-square-foot library space, with commercial

The Thompson Nicola Regional District is looking to build a third Kamloops library across the street from Aberdeen Mall.

space and residential units above. The building would be constructed to green standards, with solar panels, big windows, open space and a cafe. It is also proposed to house the TNRD’s mobile library, which is currently stored at the North Kamloops library. The proposal also includes a drive-thru pickup and drop-off area. Christian did not support inclusion of a drive-thru, which the city is generally discouraging in other developments, including restaurants and coffee shops. TNRD Area P (Rivers and the Peaks) director Mel Rothenburger said a new library provides opportunity for contemporary elements, such as lending out of musical instruments. Moore said the library space will be “dynamic.” She said new libraries often include areas like makerspaces, essentially a collaborative work space. She said the library would not seek to compete with Kamloops Makerspace, which is located in the old federal building downtown on Victoria Street West. “But we want to really look at 21st-century and forwardthinking library services,” Moore said. Staff advised the board the regional district has $1.7 million in reserve funds set aside and has eyed capital funding opportunities. The project would be eligible for

73 per cent of costs, excluding the property, under the federal Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. TNRD legislative services director Deanna Campbell said that while staff are optimistic about grant funding, the TNRD would still have to borrow some funds and a loan authorization bylaw, referendum or counter-petition process would be required. She said those details would be provided at a later date, should the project move forward. The board also heard a community fundraising campaign could occur. Coun. Kathy Sinclair told KTW she did not feel comfortable supporting the project at this time, despite her opinion that the library proposal is a positive project and her general support for libraries. Sinclair cited economic uncertainty amid the COVID19 pandemic, increased construction prices and resurrection at some point of Kamloops Centre for the Arts for her reasons to oppose the project. “Trying to fundraise for two capital campaigns would put both in jeopardy,” Sinclair said. “If we’re looking at both of those coming forward in the next five years, I don’t know that a Kamloops citizen would be comfortable supporting both projects, a portion of which would go through taxes. Whether that’s federal or provincial grant funds or property

taxes, it’s all tax dollars.” Sinclair also questioned whether residents in outlying communities would support a library being built in Kamloops. During the meeting, Watson — who also voted in opposition — said Clinton residents utilize library services in the Cariboo Regional District and questioned why they should pay for the TNRD library system. “Somebody’s getting really good service and it’s not us,” she said. TNRD CAO Scott Hildebrand told KTW that if the project were to go to referendum, it would be voted on region-wide. Moore told the board rural communities in the regional district would benefit from the third location in Kamloops as the increased size of the library collection would be shared with smaller libraries. While the only timeline provided to the board in the public meeting was a general five-year-window for construction, Hildebrand told KTW the regional district had thought of holding the referendum during the October 2022 civic election, potentially putting the issue of borrowing on the ballot in order to create efficiencies, as elections and referendums are costly and time-consuming. Christian has also suggested putting the Kamloops Centre for the Arts proposal on the October 2022 civic election ballot after the April 2020 arts centre referendum was cancelled at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is possible to have two projects on the ballot, but Hildebrand questioned whether that would be good for voters. At this stage, it all remains preliminary — with many details yet to be decided and worked out. “We need to put our heads together and make sure we’re making the right decisions,” Hildebrand said.


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS When the temperature climbs into the scorching range, many Kamloopsians head for the South Thompson River at Pioneer Park to cool off with some summer fun. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Mercury expected to hit 40 C this weekend KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

It has been unusually hot and dry this June — and that pattern appears to be in the forecast for the foreseeable future. A heat wave has arrived, with Environment Canada calling for a high of 32 C on Wednesday and Thursday, 37 C on Friday and 40 C on Saturday and Sunday. To get a sense of how hot that temperature is, and how early it might occur, consider that the hottest temperature ever recorded in Kamloops was 41.7 C, and that mark on the mercury occurred twice — on July 27, 1939, and on July 16, 1941. This week’s heat wave is a continuation of a hotter and drier than normal June. The average temperature thus

far this month has been 26.2 C, with the hottest day being June 2, when the mercury hit 36 C. To date, Kamloops Airport has recorded 14.4 millimetres of rain, with the monthly average being 37.4 millimetres. Historically, June is the wettest month of the year in the city, with summer being the wettest season. That data may be turned upside down this year as Kamloops and the Southern Interior are mired in a historically dry spell. Kamloops has recorded its driest spring since 1901 — the second-driest on record. With just 10.3 millimetres of rain falling in March, April and May (known as meteorological spring) Kamloops saw just about

20 per cent of its normal rainfall. On average, the three-month span pours 54 millimetres of rainfall over Kamloops. Both Kelowna and Vernon had record-setting dry conditions and each city has more than 100 years of weather records. Penticton saw its fifthdriest ever spring, while even Lower Mainland locales saw dry conditions, including the driestever spring in Abbotsford. According to Agriculture Canada’s Canadian Drought Monitor, Kamloops is in the “moderate drought” range. Drought conditions are assessed in an escalating range: “abnormally dry,” “moderate drought,” “severe drought,” “extreme drought” and “exceptional drought.”

The lack of rainfall leaves much of B.C. in a precarious position, with the threat of wildfires looming. The amount of rainfall in June is one indicator used to determine how severe a wildfire season might be. But it does not always correlate. In 2017, a fire season that saw 1.2 million hectares of the province burned and tens of thousands of people displaced due to evacuations, just 3.4 millimetres of rain fell in the region in June. But in 2018, another recordsetting year, June precipitation was near the average, with 36.8 millimetres falling. The BC Wildfire Service’s seasonal outlook for June acknowledges the dry conditions. So far, the area burned this

year is below average, but there has been a slightly above average number of fires. “Despite the dry conditions in the south, the amount and average size of wildfires have been relatively low when compared to historical data,” the report reads. “This reduced fire size is likely due to seasonal ‘green up’ of grass and other fuels.” The wildfire service said if current weather trends continue, the province can expect the frequency and size of fires to increase. Last year, a cool and soggy June and July meant the first heat wave of the season, accompanied by a special weather statement from Environment Canada, did not arrive until July 25.

BC Hydro says electricity grid will withstand the heat KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

With high temperatures predicted for B.C. and much of western North America this weekend, concerns are being raised about the larger Western grid — to which BC Hydro is connected — and how it will hold up. Last week, abnormal temperatures in at least 11 states in the western United States sent thermostats soaring above 38 C (100 F). In fact, the National Weather Service announced more than 40-million people

were under a heat advisory or excessive heat warning. As a result of the extreme temperatures, some states felt the strain on their power grids as residents stayed indoors and cranked up the air conditioning to get some relief. In Texas, some power plants had unexpected outages, causing 2.4 million homes to lose power. The Energy Reliability Council of Texas also asked residents to conserve energy to avoid rolling blackouts. In California, the California Independent System Operator

issued flex alerts last week, asking residents to conserve power to reduce the strain on the state’s power grid. With temperatures predicted far above normal this weekend, BC Hydro has said that, despite the pressure across the Western grid, it will be able to continue to deliver power to its customers in the province. BC Hydro has more than enough power to meet the increased demand on its system. And, unlike some of its neighbours to the south who are experiencing extremely

low reservoir levels in some areas, BC Hydro is forecasting normal reservoir levels on average across the province this summer. BC Hydro said it is well positioned with its flexible hydroelectric infrastructure and a surplus of clean generation. The vast majority of the power BC Hydro produces comes from hydroelectric resources, which the Crown corporation said essentially acts as a battery, allowing BC Hydro to ramp generation up and down at a moment’s notice.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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A13

LOCAL NEWS

Here’s how humans can beat the heat KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Interior Health is offering advice for residents as the heat wave is set to bring recordseeting temperatures to the Kamloops region. Excessive heat exposure can lead to weakness, disorientation and exhaustion. In severe cases, it can also lead to heat stroke, also known as sunstroke. The health authority said heat stroke can be a life-threatening medical emergency.

The BC SPCA said people should leave their pets at home when running errands on hot days. KTW FILE PHOTO

NO DOGS IN VEHICLES KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

With the extreme heat comes a reminder from the BC SPCA for people to not leave their pets in parked vehicles. “We can’t stress strongly enough how dangerous it is to leave your pet in a hot car,” said Lorie Chortyk, general manager of communications for the BC SPCA. Last year, the BC SPCA responded to more than 800 calls about animals in distress in hot cars. “The temperature in a parked car, even in the shade with windows partially open, can rapidly reach a level that can seriously harm or even kill a pet,” Chortyk said.

She noted that because dogs have no sweat glands, they can only cool themselves by panting and by releasing heat through their paws. “Dogs cannot withstand high temperatures for long periods, particularly older pets and brachycephalic breeds such as pugs, bulldogs, Boston terriers and others with compressed faces,” Chortyk said. She said SPCA officers are called out to worst-case situations every summer, where a pet is in critical distress or has died after being left in a hot car. Chortyk said people should leave their pets at home when running errands on hot days.

If you see an animal showing signs of heat stroke or other distress, call the BC SPCA Call Centre at 1-855-622-7722 during business hours or contact the Kamloops RCMP at 250828-3000. WHAT TO DO IF YOU SEE A DOG IN DISTRESS IN A PARKED VEHICLE: • Note the licence plate number and vehicle information and ask managers of nearby businesses to page the owner. • It is illegal for members of the public to break a window to access the vehicle themselves; only police and special provincial constables of the BC SPCA can lawfully enter a vehicle.

WHO IS MOST AT RISK? Anyone can suffer from heat-related illness, but some people are at greater risk. Take extra care to check on the following people regularly: • Infants and young children, who rely on adults to monitor their environments and to provide them with enough fluid to drink; • People 65 years or older or anyone who needs assistance monitoring their wellbeing; • People with heart problems and breathing difficulties; • People who exercise or who work outside or in a hot environment. WATCH FOR THESE SYMPTOMS The symptoms of heat-related illness can range from mild to severe. They include: • Pale, cool, moist skin; • Heavy sweating; • Muscle cramp; • Rash; • Swelling, especially hands and feet; • Fatigue and weakness; • Light headedness and/or fainting; • Headache; • Nausea and/or vomiting. More severe symptoms — including high fever, hallucinations, seizures and unconsciousness — require urgent medical attention. Call 911, move to a cool place and

cool the person with water and fanning. AVOID HEAT RELATED ILLNESS • Plan your outdoor activity before 11 a.m. or after 4 p.m. to avoid the most intense sun; • Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids. Water is the best choice; • Avoid physical work or exercise outside in the heat of the day; • If you must work or exercise outside, drink two to four cups of water each hour, even before you feel thirsty; • Rest breaks are important and should be taken in the shade; • Apply sunscreen to prevent sunburn, but remember this doesn’t protect from the heat; • Stay in the shade or create your own shade with lightweight, light-coloured, loose-fitting clothing, a wide brimmed hat and/or an umbrella; • If you’re struggling to keep cool, move indoors to an air-conditioned building or take a cool bath or shower. At temperatures above 30 C (86 F), fans alone may not be able to prevent heat-related illness; • Never leave children or pets alone in a parked car. Temperatures can rise to 52 C (125 F) within 20 minutes inside a vehicle when the outside temperature is 34 C (93 F). Leaving the car windows slightly open will not keep the inside of the vehicle at a safe temperature.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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LOCAL NEWS

Tk’emlúps prepping for archaeological work at burial site MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Notice for Public Hearing

Page 3

Property Location: 2213 Coldwater Drive and 1830 Qu’Appelle Boulevard Purpose: To rezone a portion of the properties from FD (Future Development) to RS1 (Single Family Residential-1) and OS (Open Space) to facilitate a single family residential subdivision and dedication of open space. Questions?

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. (May 18, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 7.1, Attachment “A”).

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, members of the public are not able to attend Council Meetings or Public Hearings in person at this time. Those who wish to participate may access the Public Hearing via the videoconference link provided below. We are also accepting email and mail-in correspondence. Have Your Say: Email

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During the Meeting

legislate@kamloops.ca

7 Victoria Street West Kamloops BC V2C 1A2

Join via Zoom by visiting Kamloops.ca/Participate on June 29, 2021, at 7:00 pm.

Written submissions must include your name and address and be received Page 4 no later than 12:00 pm on June 25, 2021.

Notice for Public Hearing

Written submissions, including your name and address, are included in the Council Agenda and will be posted on the City’s website as part of the permanent public record. Please note that the City considers the author’s address relevant to Council’s consideration of this matter and will disclose this personal information.

A final report on the preliminary findings of what are believed to be unmarked graves of 215 children on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School has been delayed, but is expected to be completed by the end of June. That was the word from Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir of the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation, which has also laid out some of the work it is doing to follow up on the discovery that has drawn worldwide interest and outcry. The band is in the process of contacting archaeologists while drawing up budget estimates for archaeological work and a project plan timeline, according to a press release on the band’s website. The finance department plans to submit to government a comprehensive budget for resources to support the scope of the project. A legal team has also been hired to support the band and more staff are being sought to assist with the overall project. Tk’emlúps is also researching what the Kamloops Indian Residential School originally looked like and is in the early stages of having the area where the remains were found, south of the building, designated a heritage site, the release said. Meanwhile, the band’s language and culture department met with residential school survivors and 13 family representatives to discuss the findings and what comes next, and the band’s museum is also conducting additional research on records associated with the residential school. As for the report on the pre-

liminary findings, Casimir initially said it would be ready by midJune, but in a press conference last week, she said the document is “taking a little bit longer than it should.” She cited “a number of steps and due diligence that’s needed,” but added that the report is still expected to be complete by the end of the month. When asked by KTW, the Tk’emlups band would not give an overview of what the report will entail, but spokesperson Racelle Kooy said advance notice will be given to media when those details are ready to be disclosed. The band announced last month it had found the remains of children who were students of the school, some as young as three years old, with the help of a ground-penetrating radar survey (GPR) on the Victoria Day long weekend. The technology uses radio signals to detect changes in the soil and can be applied to look for the presence of graves, but does not work like an X-ray. The band isn’t yet addressing questions related to the technical aspects of the use of the groundpenetrating radar, with Casimir having indicated that would be shared in the report. The 215 graves are, to the band’s knowledge, undocumented deaths for which it is still in the process of collecting records. According to Kooy, Tk’emlups has involved experts in its recordsgathering efforts, but details on that front are premature. “Certainly, we need those records and there’s a lot of information floating out there,” Kooy said. Asked if all records have been turned over by the Archdiocese of Vancouver — under which the Kamloops Indian Residential School was administered from

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the 1890s to 1969 — as stated previously by Archbishop Michael Miller, Kooy said there are “other records” and “missing pieces” and the band is “not there yet” in regards to its record collecting. The Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate — the religious order that ran the Kamloops Indian Residential School — has said the records from the Kamloops Indian Residential School are with the Royal BC Museum, but added there may be records elsewhere across Canada. Father Ken Thorsen of the group earlier told KTW the Catholic order is looking into where those records may be. Officially, there were 51 recorded deaths at the Kamloops Indian Residential School, according to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation Commission at the University of Manitoba. Its database notes deaths between SALESfrom & INSTALLATIONS 1900 and 1971.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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A15

LOCAL NEWS

Organic pilot set for fall JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

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Kamloops homeowners who have been selected for the city’s curbside organics collection pilot program will receive letters of notification in the next week or so in advance of collection beginning in September. On Monday, the city’s waste analyst, Marcia Dick, provided an update on the program to the city’s civic operations committee. “We selected routes where we know where we expect high volumes, routes where we expect low volumes,” Dick said. “Routes where we know there is wildlife activity, as well as routes that include some laneway collection.” Dick said that, following public consultation this year, the 2,000-home pilot is set to begin. She said some homes were purposefully selected in areas likely to have opposition. Top concerns from residents during public feedback included attracting insects/rodents/ wildlife, new fees and redundant services, as some residents may already compost on their own at home. Dick said the city reached out to other municipalities that have launched similar

programs. She said rodents and wildlife are attracted to organic waste, whether it is located inside a garbage bin or in an organics bin. Dick said residents can reduce odour in their bins by layering wet and dry waste, such as layering dried grass clippings or paper with food scraps. “The communities that have these organics program said, ‘You know, we had bear issues before and we have bear issues now,’” Dick said. “Nobody could say that there was an increase in bear activity because of the program. You need to deal with the organics in the garbage or the organics cart.” Residents who have been selected for the pilot program will be notified of timelines and what to expect. Carts will be delivered at the end of August and collection will begin during the third week of September. Information sessions will also occur during that time. If the city moves ahead with the program after the pilot, citywide implementation is expected to begin in July of 2023. • Editor’s note: If you end up being part of the pilot program, we would love to speak with you. Email jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com.


A16

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Students accepted into TRU law school now on waitlist A NUMBER OF LAW SCHOOLS HAVE FOUND THEMSELVES OVER-ENROLLED, INCLUDING TRU

SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Some prospective Thompson Rivers University law students are upset, saying their offers have been rescinded and they won't be allowed to attend in the 2021-2022 school year after being told their spot in the school’s law school was secure. Several students who applied took to online discussion forums and social media to express their frustration with the issue. TRU, meanwhile, said it is normal to send acceptance letters to more students than there is room for, with the excess typically deferring their acceptance, refusing, not responding to the offer or accepting an offer at another university. TRU law school dean Daleen Millard told KTW that in 2019, the school sent 274 offers, but only filled 114 of its 124 seats. Of those who didn't end up in the class, 103 declined, six deferred to the following year's intake and 64 withdrew. Of those who withdrew, 51 did so after accepting their offers. The same scenario played out last year, with 296 offers going out. In 2020, the law school filled 122 seats, with 140 declining and 48 withdrawing, including 34 who had initially accepted. "From offer to final, actually having the student in the seat, we always see quite a lot of movement," Millard said. While over-offering appears to be a normal practice for the university, what isn't normal is

the number of those who have declined or otherwise pursued other opportunities, leading to an excess of students for this year's upcoming class. Millard said 26 students are currently on the waitlist for spots, after having received acceptance letters. Millard added that all students whose offers were rescinded have been offered a chance to defer their enrolment to the 2022-2023 school year. One student, who contacted KTW, but asked to remain anonymous, said she received an acceptance letter in early April, which she accepted and paid a $500 non-refundable commitment fee. She planned to move to Kamloops to attend school in September, but received notice late last week that her spot was no longer hers. And she's not the only one. Prospective students took to the online discussion group The Canadian Law Forum, where people from across Canada gather to discuss their options and prospects with regards to law schools and the practice of law. Posts were also made to social media. Some comments call the law school's reputation into question and speculate as to how it will impact the university and affected students. One poster commiserated, saying that in the past, by June they had already quit their job, moved house and signed a new lease where they were attending school. "If the U of A did this to me, I would have been in a pretty terrible situation," they wrote.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW After accepting offers to attend TRU’s law school, 24 students have found themselves on the waiting list instead.

But Millard is asking students to reject what she calls misinformation posted online. She said each of the 26 students on the waitlist will be dealt with individually, noting she had been speaking with students over the weekend. "It's better to speak to me than it is to speak to Twitter, because I can offer you solutions. I can work with you to offer solutions. I can even cry with you,” Millard said. “It is still better than speaking to a faceless computer.” It turns out the anomalous year is not unique to TRU. This year's law school cycle had already been noted by

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industry watchers to be more competitive than before, and now several universities in the United States are reporting they have also over-enrolled at their schools. Boston College, for example, reportedly accepted 415 deposits for a school with 250 seats, according to people posting on social media. Millard said she has also heard of similar situations at Duke University, University of Pennsylvania and schools in California and Texas. As for why this is happening, Millard said she can only speculate. "We are in a very difficult

world, post-COVID. Some people experience a euphoria and, for the first time in 18 months, there's hope with vaccinations,” she said. “That, I think, leads to people actually saying they want to do something, to change careers, to embark on a new journey.” Millard believes people may be turning to law to make an impact and are feeling particularly compassionate following a long pandemic. "These are commendable strategies and that is why I really want to work with these prospective students to see how we can assist them as best we can," she said.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

LOCAL NEWS

Traffic light changes downtown have some grumbling JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The City of Kamloops is dealing with complaints that echo lyrics, though not the sentiment, of Roxanne by The Police: “You don’t have to put on the red light.” Coun. Bill Sarai has heard numerous complaints in the wake of traffic optimization downtown aimed at making the area safer for pedestrians. Sarai said recent traffic signal optimization provides pedestrians with a couple of extra seconds to cross streets. At the same time, however, the time span for green lights for vehicular traffic has been cut short. An intersection — Victoria Street and Fourth Avenue was commonly reported — that once allowed several vehicles through a green light now lets a limited number of vehicles to pass before the light turns. The red light race is leading to traffic snarls in the downtown core. “It’s frustrating drivers, it’s causing

safety issues because you’ve got drivers that are turning left and are stuck in the middle of the intersection, with people trying to get around thinking they’ve got five or six or seven seconds to make their way down there,” Sarai said. “Then, all of a sudden, they get there and the lights are turning, so they boot it through the intersection and that’s not safe.” In addition, Sarai said Lansdowne Street was not synchronized similar to that of Seymour Street, where drivers can

He noted optimization implemented on Seymour and Lansdowne streets is working well, but noted some congestion has resulted as a result of train warning signals. In addition, he said, pedestrian intervals on Victoria Street are new and electricians are working with the manufacturers to increase green light timing. “We’re working on that as we speak,” he said. The city is asking for patience from drivers as it works through the process.

travel at the speed limit and flow through a green wave of lights without stopping at a red light. Sarai raised the issue of downtown traffic problems on Monday during the city’s civic operations committee meeting. City CAO David Trawin said the optimization remains a work in progress. The city’s transportation engineer, Purvez Irani, told KTW it is common during traffic signal optimization to require tweaks here and there.

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A18

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS Lincoln Mckoen as seen in an online worship service earlier this year.

Anglican bishop resigns KAMLOOPS-BASED LINCOLN MCKOEN HAS BEEN ACCUSED OF SEXUAL MISCONDUCT KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Accusations of sexual misconduct have led to the resignation of a Kamloops-based Anglican bishop. Lincoln Mckoen resigned from his position following allegations he sent “inappropriate sexualized electronic communications” via text and image to an adult person who is resident outside his jurisdiction and with whom Mckoen was in a pastoral relationship, according to a statement from the Anglican Church of Canada. The communications were said to have been sent on occasions when Mckoen presented himself as a priest, bishop-elect or bishop. The allegations stem from May 27 and Mckoen resigned effective June 10.

According to the statement from Archbishop and Primate Linda Nicholls, the Anglican Church’s national leader, “Lincoln Mckoen acknowledges that the allegations are well founded.” Nicholls wrote in the statement that an interim steering committee has been put in place and the diocese now enters a time of grieving and discernment about its future episcopal leadership. She added that pastoral care is being offered to the diocese and all affected. Mckoen presided over 20 parishes from Merritt to Prince George, including St. Paul’s and St. George’s in Kamloops as diocesan bishop for what the church calls the Territory of the People. He was elected to the role last year and previously worked in Battle

Harbour, N.L., in southern Ontario and at B.C. parishes in Campbell River, Alert Bay, Fort Rupert and Kingcome Inlet. In a June 6 letter to members of the church, B.C. and Yukon Archbishop Lynne McNaughton said she issued an “interim inhibition” to Mckoen, which prohibited him from acting in his ministry role. His resignation came four days later. In her letter, McNaughton said she was appointing an interim steering committee to assume the administrator role left vacant by Mckoen’s departure. The steering committee is composed of five people and McNaughton added the Episcopal ministry would be looked after by herself and two retired bishops.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

LOCAL NEWS

Does Kamloops need its own taxi commission? JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Criticism of the taxi industry was front and centre at last week’s Kamloops council meeting — and the city is now looking at potentially instituting a local taxi commission to oversee operations. During council discussion on renewal of the city’s annual operating agreement with BC Transit, Coun. Sadie Hunter questioned the length of time taken to ensure taxi companies are operating wheelchair-accessible vehicles, which are relied upon by residents with mobility issues. Taxi companies are required to operate such vehicles as part of their taxi licensing, regulated by B.C.’s Passenger Transportation Board. “Quite frankly, it’s ridiculous,” Hunter said. “This impacts people’s lives from day to day and we [the city and BC Transit] just continue to

offer service to them and expand the service in a way that’s just not even feasible or viable.” The city’s public transportation system relies on taxi companies via a taxi saver program, which involves subsidized taxi vouchers provided to people when the HandyDart service cannot accommodate their travel needs. Prior to the pandemic, Hunter said, HandyDart was oversubscribed, meaning it is important wheelchair-accessible taxis are on the road. It appears, however, those taxis have not been reliable. Hunter cited one such taxi facing mechanical issues and another with staffing issues. She said efforts by the city to ensure those taxis are operating have been ongoing for a number of years, to no avail. As a result, People in Motion — an agency that helps people with disabilities — is looking to acquire its own vehicle. The topic also came up dur-

ing a recent community services committee meeting. Coun. Dale Bass questioned how custom transit can be expanded — planned to the tune of $106,000 in January of 2022 — without such taxis now available. Hunter questioned the addition of two new conventional buses, but no plans for a new HandyDart vehicle, which she said could take pressure off need for wheelchair-accessible taxis. The city’s transportation engineer, Purvez Irani, said BC Transit data indicates the HandyDart service is currently meeting demand. Demand has been low, Irani said, as service is utilized by people who are immunocompromised and social programs were suspended during the pandemic. Irani said BC Transit is analyzing the cost to increase the HandyDart fleet, as opposed to continued reliance on the taxi saver program. That analysis came at the request of council, but the infor-

mation is not expected until the end of June. Hunter questioned why council should approve this year’s operating agreement without that information. Both Hunter and Bass opposed adoption of the operating agreement, which was ultimately approved by council. Hunter also put forward a motion, which passed, to discuss the issue with B.C. Transportation Minister Rob Fleming at the Union of BC Municipalities convention in September, noting other communities are likely struggling with accessible taxi service and implementation of the taxi saver program. SAFER RIDES HOME NEEDED? Meanwhile, as the economy works toward reopening, questions are also being raised about the reliability of taxis for safe rides home. Coun. Bill Sarai said council received complaints prior to the

pandemic about limited availability of late-night rides. He made a motion, which passed, that staff investigate the possibility of a local taxi commission, which would give the city more control. Sarai told KTW a taxi commission would allow the city to hold cab companies accountable through fines or other means when it receives complaints. He said the city receives many complaints and is the voice of the people when others won’t listen. “This isn’t just accessibility, wheelchair availability,” Sarai told council. “The issue is going to come back to us like it did a yearand-a-half ago, when everything was open and TRU students were drastically phoning us and saying they couldn’t get a taxi at 11:30 at night downtown to get home in Dufferin — or taxi drivers were picking them up and saying you have to give us cash or we’re not taking you home.” Sarai said a taxi commission would address myriad issues.

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A20

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Former security guard wants to again patrol Rick Eldridge on Victoria Street West, where he hopes to again resume his work protecting area businesses. MICHAEL POTESTIO/LJI

MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCALJOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Rick Eldridge admits he lost his temper, but he wants to be a security guard once again and patrol West Victoria Street, which he said needs better police presence. The former Lapper security guard left the profession when a video surfaced of him kicking a man outside a storage facility for the homeless at 48 Victoria St. W. on March 17. The 25-second clip aired on CFJC-TV a week later, showing a man swearing at Eldridge, who wrestled him to the ground and kicked him before the man stood back up and the situation eventually de-escalated. Eldridge said the video didn’t show what led to the altercation. He said he was trying to move the man, a person he dealt with daily, out of the no-loitering zone at the side of the building, when the man pushed him after he told him to leave. Eldridge said he responded with a knee to the man’s stomach. Eldridge said the man fell to the ground, got back up, continued the argument and spat in his face, leading to what was caught on video. “I lost it. I don’t like people spitting in my face,” Eldridge said, noting he felt he was defending himself when the man spit in his face, though he admitted the knee may have been excessive. The video, however, ruined

his life, Eldridge said, noting he received 20 death threats in a day after it was aired. Feeling unsafe on the job, he gave two weeks’ notice and was reassigned, but said he was fired during that period and had his security guard licence temporarily suspended by the provincial Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General’s Security Programs Division. Jobless and not yet on employment insurance, Eldridge said he lost the apartment he was renting, ending up homeless and sleeping in his car along the route he once patrolled. Eldridge is now hoping to return to security work. He said an investigator is reviewing his licence suspension and has advised he is recommend-

ing the licence be reinstated. If Eldridge does get his licence returned, he wants to start doing his own security work, possibly by securing contracts with individual businesses on West Victoria Street once Lapper’s contract with the municipality, BC Housing and the Canadian Mental Health Association for the area has ended. “I really love these people,” Eldridge said, noting many business owners wrote him letters of support for his licence review. “The business owners on this street are some of the greatest people in this city — they backed me from the get-go, so I want to stay on this street, I want to protect these businesses.” Audra Domich, owner of Audra’s Day Spa on Victoria Street West, said she misses having

Eldridge on patrol. “The only time we ever felt like we had a security guard was when he was there,” Domich said. Domich said he was a constant presence and would check in all the time — which she said hasn’t been the case from other Lapper guards since his departure. Eldridge said he has had assurances from a financial backer to get his security company going, adding that a business along the street is willing to donate space for an office. In the meantime, Eldridge has been handing out cards for the Vision Quest recovery centre in Logan Lake to anyone along Victoria Street West who wants one. He said he wants to see more done to help the marginalized and homeless population, which

he pointed to as causing most of the issues for businesses along the street. Property crime, drug use and nuisance behaviour has become well known along the route that has become concentrated with social-agency supports. Eldridge believes there needs to be better security and police presence in the area. He also feels the RCMP has abandoned the street, citing examples of incidents he has learned of, in which business owners have called police about an incident, but did not receive a response of felt their call was not investigated thoroughly. Earlier this month, Domich said she called both security and police after a man in her parking lot brandished a large knife at her husband before fleeing. She said a half-hour went by before a security guard responded, but noted no RCMP officer has shown up to date to take her statement or seize the knife, which her husband managed to take off the man. Eldridge believes a community police office on Victoria Street West, staffed with just one officer, would deter crime along the street, especially if that constable patrolled periodically with security personnel. “It would bring it down a bit,” he said. “it’s not going to solve it, but they would see a police presence and if he got into trouble, I freaking guarantee there’d be 10 cop cars here.”

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

LOCAL NEWS

No imminent ban on plastic bags in Kamloops MORE DETAILS FROM THE PROVINCIAL AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS ON SINGLE-USE PLASTICS REGULATIONS ARE EXPECTED JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Plastic bags will continue to be permitted in Kamloops stores for the foreseeable future as the city awaits word on the issue from senior levels of government. On Monday (June 21), the city’s development and sustainability committee received an update on a proposed ban on single-use plastic carryout bags,

which was proposed by council two years ago, in the spring of 2019. Since then, both the provincial and federal governments announced initiatives to reduce plastic waste. The city’s sustainability services supervisor, Glen Cheetham, told the committee more details from the provincial and federal governments on single-use plastics regulations are expected toward the end of

the year and staff recommended waiting for that information before implementing a local ban. The committee voted to monitor progress of the initiatives, with staff reporting back with options for local regulations when more details become available. Coun. Kathy Sinclair noted the two years since council discussed the bag ban and reiterated her support for such an initiative. She said the COVID-19

pandemic increased use of disposable items. “I’m looking forward to a fresh start led the by the provincial and federal governments,” Sinclair said. Coun. Sadie Hunter, who chairs the committee, said there had been a trend toward reusable products prior to the pandemic. “Hopefully, as things open up, people will return to that momentum that we had before,” she said.

Coun. Bill Sarai wants the city to help educate local businesses about access to reusable bags. Sarai said businesses are having difficulty navigating suppliers, noting “there is a lot of black market stuff out there.” Businesses can still decide to not use single-use plastic bags, if they wish. Some grocery stores in Kamloops no longer use plastic bags, with reusable bags, paper bags and boxes being the alternatives.

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A22

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Violin soliloquy pays respect to lost souls Evalintine Wright has been playing her violin each day since June 1, dedicating an hour of songs for each of the 215 children found at the site of the former Kamloops Residential School.

MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

The soft, somber melody of a violin can be heard most days at the site of the former Kamloops Residential School. On a sunny Friday afternoon in June, it could be heard coming from the adjacent soccer field where a makeshift memorial of garden lights and shoes was placed in a line as tribute to the 215 children the Tk’emlups band confirmed it found buried on the grounds last month. That music is courtesy of Evalintine Wright, a Kamloops resident who has been dedicating an hour of songs for each of the 215 when she visits the Tk’emlups property — which has been nearly every day since June 1. It’s her way of grieving amidst the shocking news of the unmarked burial sites connected to the former residential school. “They are human beings,” Wright said. “I can’t imagine what

around back down by the shore of the South Thompson River. She’s met many different people from different places during her visits as the property has become a magnet for those looking to express their grief and pay their own respects in the weeks since the news broke. Some people have tried giving Wright cash donations while she’s played. While she would like to see funds raised, she told KTW she’s not collecting any and encourages people to donate directly to a cause supporting survivors of the residential school and their families or to give to the Salvation Army, for which she has volunteered in the past. It’s not the first time Wright’s been compelled to play her violin as a way to mourn. Last May, she played at the site of the makeshift memorial that sprang up along Tranquille Road following the plane crash that killed Snowbirds public affairs officer Capt. Jennifer Casey.

MICHAEL POTESTIO/LJI

[video online] See footage at kamloopsthisweek.com

these kids had been through prior to their deaths.” Wright plays a variety of songs — Amazing Grace, Beyond The Sunset, Nearer My God To Thee, Jesus Loves Me are among some examples — usually repeating a four-song set each day on her violin named Charity. The Filipina woman who’s lived in Kamloops the past two decades said that upon hearing the news she wanted to do something to pay her respects and figured what she could do

was play music. As a person of faith, Wright said she was angered by the news. “God created them, but then these people who proclaim God’s word killed them. That is very saddening,” Wright said. The residential school, which was run by the Catholic Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate on behalf of the federal government. When Wright visits the property of the former Kamloops Residential School building, she’ll

bring tributes such as flowers. She also has a makeshift memorial for the children outside her home, bought orange shirts for her kids and has a car decal all in an effort to promote awareness. Wright said that makeshift memorial has since been removed from the lawn next to the old residential school, so she’s taken to playing her violin most recently at the memorial to residential school survivors outside the main doors of the building or

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Pursuant to Sections 26(3) and 94 of the Community Charter, S.B.C. 2003, Ch. 26, the City of Kamloops (the “City”) is disposing of road consisting of 1.01 ha adjacent to 3467 Tranquille Road, as well as a part of the property at 3765 Tranquille Road consisting of 1.07 ha. The road portion and the property to be legally described as: Road to be closed shown on Bylaw Plan EPP109867, Dedicated on Plan 22115, District Lot A, Group 2, Kamloops (Formerly Lytton) Division Yale District and a part of Lot 1, District Lot A, Group 2, Kamloops (Formerly Lytton) Division Yale District, Plan 19072 (collectively called the “Property”). The City is transferring the Property to Cinnamon Ridge Farms Ltd. to be consolidated with 3467 Tranquille Road in exchange for concrete blocks valued at $8,500 and a statutory right of way for its sanitary force main. For more information, please contact David W. Freeman, RI(BC), Assistant Development, Engineering, and Sustainability Director/Real Estate Manager, at 250-828-3548.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

LOCAL NEWS

Could Kami the Fish mascot ride once again? JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Could Kami the Fish carve out a new home in Aberdeen, overlooking the Thompson rivers? The city is giving $4,000 to Tourism Kamloops to replace a fish sculpture outside its office, which is across from Aberdeen Mall. The municipality’s culture manager, Barb Berger, recently detailed to the city’s community services committee $30,000 in community arts grants, which were reviewed and approved by the city’s arts and culture engagement group. Berger said Tourism Kamloops received the grant to replace a trout sculpture, which is located on a grassy

picnic area between Hillside Court and the parking lot of the Tourism Kamloops office building, formerly the visitor centre. Berger said the sculpture was removed after its tail fell off. Coun. Denis Walsh questioned the need to replace the sculpture, noting the area is no longer home to the visitor centre for tourists. Tourism Kamloops recently shifted to meeting tourists in the community, but continues to operate office space out of the building. Berger said because of electric vehicle charging on site, the area remains busy and the location of the trout — overlooking the North Thompson Valley — cre-

Tourism Kamloops has received a grant from the city to replace a fish sculpture outside its office across from Aberdeen Mall. Coun. Sadie Hunter has suggested replacing it with a sculpture of a vintage Kamloops mascot, Kami the Fish. DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE

ates a sought-after photo opportunity. Pictures of the trout can be found online. Coun. Sadie Hunter suggested replacing the trout with a sculpture of Kami the Fish, a vintage Kamloops mascot that has gained resurgence of late, in part due to memorabilia featuring the

fish sold by Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. Berger said the original trout was made by the Kamloops Woodworkers Guild and she wants to ensure the group is involved. “Kami has a shot,” she said. Other groups that received community arts

grants this year included: • The Kamloops Caribbean Society, which received $8,000 for the Kamloops Caribbean Festival; • Project X Theatre, which received $5,000 for X Fest 2021; • • The Chamber Musicians of Kamloops, which received $5,000

for its 2021-2022 concert series; • The Kamloops Music Collective, which received $5,000 for a music project; • The Kamloops North Shore Business Improvement Association, which received $3,000 for street performers.

Discover WINNERS Summer Contest Al Randall: Scott’s Inn $25 gift card Tim VanGenne: Oyama Zipline 2 passes Dave Stevenson: Aberdeen Mall $50 gift card Rose-Marie Voakes: T’kemlúps Car Wash $20 gift card Brittany Langstaff: Chesters Family Pak Tara Nadalin: Mount Paul Golf, 1 adult pass, 1 junior pass Ross Gibson: BC Wildlife Park passes Cindy Arden: Tumbleweed Toys $25 gift card Sierra Brugger: T’kemlúps Car Wash $20 gift card Lynda Desrocher: BC Wildlife Park passes Laurel Jones: Cordo Resto + Bar $25 gift card Theresa Lockhart: Club Shuswap golf passes Anne Gunderson: Interior White Water Rafting excursion for 2 adults Linda Smith: Fresh is Best Chips and $20 gift card

CONGRATS TO OUR CONTEST WINNERS!

GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY:

INTERIOR WHITEWATER

Mt. Paul Golf Course

EXPEDITIONS

INTERIOR WHITEWATER

EXPEDITIONS


A24

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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COMMUNITY

Women in Wellness: Initiative for Newcomers A new programming initiative for newcomer women and girls. Help us design a physical and social program that meets your needs and desires. Take the survey now at Kamloops.ca/WWIN Available in ‫( العربية‬Arabic), हिदं ी (Hindi), 日本語 (Japanese), 普通话 (Mandarin), Español (Spanish), and English.

Learn more at Kamloops.ca/WWIN

MUG SHOTS OF THE WEEK

ANDERSON, JAMES

Height: 173 cm / 5’08” Weight: 77 kg / 170 lbs Race: Caucasian | Age: 37 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Blue Wanted for: Fail to Comply with Probation Order x2, Assault

BISCHOFF, MASON Height: 183 cm / 6’00” Weight: 77 kg / 170 lbs Race: Caucasian | Age: 33 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Brown

Wanted for: Assault Peace Officer, Obstruct Peace Officer, Possess Break-In Instruments, Fail to Comply with Release Order, Possession of Stolen Property over $5000 x2

BOURLON, MICHAEL

Height: 180 cm / 5’11” Weight: 85 kg / 188 lbs Race: Caucasian | Age: 49 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Blue Wanted for: Theft of Motor Vehicle x2, Fail to Comply with Release Order, Theft of Motor Vehicle, Possess Break-In Instruments

www.kamloopsCrimeStoppers.ca

If you know where any of these suspects are, call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). You can also submit an anonymous tip online at kamloopscrimestoppers.ca. You never have to give your name or testify in court. If your information is used in an arrest, you may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000 These suspects are wanted on arrest warrant not vacated as of 3:00pm on June 16, 2021

CRIME STOPPERS IS SUPPORTED BY

MOBILE PATROLS GUARD SERVICE ALARM RESPONSE Ronik Security Ltd. has been serving Kamloops since 1972 and is 100% Canadian. We wish to thank our current and future loyal customers during this pandemic season! Our employees are proud to serve for your safety and security.

(250) 828-0511 (24 HOURS) SERVING KAMLOOPS & AREA SINCE 1972

Hungry readers eat up Salmon on Toast WITH SUMMER READING CLUBS IN LIBRARIES UNDERWAY, THIS IS ONE CHILDREN’S BOOK YOU WILL WANT TO ADD TO YOUR CHILD’S BOOKSHELF DAVE EAGLES

STAFF REPORTER

dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

I read of a hungry young mollusk, Many tins of salmon he’d demolish. Spread thick on some toast, He would eat more than most. They say slugs don’t belch, I say, bollocks.

M

eet Pug the adorable slug. His love for canned salmon served on toast is what drives Pug’s misadventures. After misplacing his can opener, Pug sets out on a quest to find the missing ingredient for his favourite dish — salmon on toast. His perseverance and determination promote

BOOK REVIEW Salmon on Toast By D.J. Vandor, illustrated by Bonnie Lemaire 38 pages Published by Tellwell Talent the positive character traits often talked about in classrooms when children face adversity. Not your usual bunny rabbit or princess protagonist, this genial gastropod became an instant hit with local primary and kindergarten students when Kamloops This Week introduced Pug and his adventures to get students’ reactions. Here’s what some local kindergarten students had to say about it. “Pug is so cute. I like his sideways eyes.” “Those whales look like they’re flying.”

“It’s funny how Pug throws the salmon tins at the door to try and open them.” The book was such a hit with the kindergarten students that they wanted to hear the story again and again. Students giggled from beginning to end and reacted strongly to the surprise finish — learning that slugs really do burp. For the author’s first effort at writing a children’s book, Douglas Vandor’s story garnered rave reviews from his young audience. See BOOK’S THEME, A25


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A25

COMMUNITY

Book’s theme is perseverance From A24

“I’m especially proud reading it to my two young children, who are six and four,” Vandor said. “When I hear them playing by themselves and they’re repeating lines from the book, or talking about Pug, or trying to pretend to be Pug, or burping — a lot — and thinking ‘It’s OK to burp out loud now,’ it warms my heart.” Grade 2/3 students also took a liking to the hungry critter on his quest for sourcing more salmon, so much so that students wrote to the author, sending along drawings of their favourite parts in the story, many offering their own suggestions for a sequel, as part of their classroom assignment. For many years, Vandor had been living with the character of Pug the slug in his head. Since retiring as an Olympic rowing athlete, Vandor’s first

children’s book has proven to be a success and he is anticipating writing more books. Born and raised in Quebec, at an early age Vandor had a dream of going to the Olympics. Years later, Vandor would find himself winning eight world cups in rowing and three world championship rowing medals, in addition to appearing in three Olympic Games — Athens in 2004 (as a spare), Beijing in 2008 and London in 2012. Vandor, now retired at age 46, lives in Vancouver with his wife and two children. He said writing has always been his pastime, especially when taking time away from training, allowing him to rest his body while exercising his mind. A firm believer in following one’s dreams, Vandor said the theme of perseverance in the book is a message especially

important during this recent pandemic year. Vandor said the story’s character, Pug, illustrates so much of what people young and old alike are going through as they seek out solutions to life’s problems. “It’s the Pug the slug attitude,” Vandor said. “You try thinking outside the box. You try to figure out a way to get things done. You just keep trying. It doesn’t always work, but a lot of times it does.” Recalling his favourite quote that speaks to his life, Vandor replied “Hard work doesn’t guarantee you anything, but without it, you’re going nowhere.” Or, as Pug the slug might say, “When life closes a door, open the pantry.” Salmon on Toast is available online at chapters.indigo.ca, amazon.ca and barnesandnoble. com in paperback, hardcover and e-book.

Summer of reading The BC Summer Reading Club is a free reading program for children, ages five to 14 and runs from June 28 to Aug. 21. The club encourages children to build their reading and literacy skills through the summer months. The summer reading club connects children and families to their local library and encourages children to discover a love of reading. It is a free, fun, family and community-orientated program that brings families

into the library, brings the library to communities and brings communities together to celebrate reading, literacy and libraries. Kamloops readers have the option of visiting both libraries in-person to sign up. The downtown library is at Victoria Street and Fifth Avenue. The North Kamloops library is in the Library Square development at 693 Tranquille Rd. Registration is also available online at bit. ly/35wLJTH.

MEMORIES & MILESTONES MEMORIES & MILESTONES Happy 45th Anniversary Surinder and Mohinder Johal June 11th

Love your family and friends

Congrats Michael on achieving your

Master in Education

in September from TRU.

Celebrate

The Big DAY

Due to Covid you graduated on June 17, 2021.

We are so proud of you.

LOVE Dad, Mom, Danielle, Heidi, Blair and Betty.

For details or to place your announcement in next Friday’s paper call

250-374-7467


A26

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dig It: How DNA can be used to answer questions about ancestry NADINE GRAY

SPECIAL TO KTW

T

he recent findings at the Kamloops Indian Residential School have prompted many questions. There have been questions about what archaeology, and specifically forensic science, can do to assist with supporting the work that may lie ahead. As Kukpi7 (Chief) Rosanne Casimir wrote in a June 10 update: “Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc Chief and Council have met internally and will continue to do so, to plan, organize and determine the best way forward.” The update also indicated a “gathering of forensic archaeologist experts.” One of the tools forensic archaeologists could utilize is deoxyribonucleic acid, commonly known as DNA. This is not to say that DNA studies will be completed, but it is one tool that has been used by forensic experts to connect individuals to family members. However, DNA studies are not without some complications and may not always provide a clear result. DNA is a complex molecule that contains all of

the information to build and maintain an organism. All living things have DNA within their cells and it is the primary unit of heredity in organisms of all types. What this means is that when an organism reproduces, a portion of their DNA is passed along to their offspring. Once DNA is extracted from a sample in the laboratory setting, work begins to track ancestry. Paternal ancestry is seen by looking at the Y chromosome, which fathers pass to their male children. Mothers pass mitochondrial DNA to all of their children. The process can be taken a step further by comparing the 22 non-sex chromosomes from the sample against a comparative sample or several samples. In fact, DNA laboratories hold libraries of samples that are used to compare and determine to which groups in the library a DNA sample is most closely related. The groups in the library are made up of samples from independent research and samples from people who have selfidentified as a member of a particular group — West African, for example. When a DNA sample is sent to a laboratory, that sample is compared with the groups in the library.

laboratories to be tested against a sample. For example, Kwaday Dan Ts’inchi, estimated to have died 300 years ago, was uncovered from a melting glacier in the territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. DNA from Kwaday Dan Ts’inchi was found to have the same common female ancestor as 17 individuals who provided their DNA and continue to reside in the area. In this example, it was mitochondrial DNA, passed from mothers to all their offspring, that provided the connection. Whether DNA testing is used in the work at the Kamloops Indian Residential School is not for scientists, archaeologists or the general public to decide. It is an option. Listening to survivors, acknowledging the grief and trauma that is being experienced and ensuring that support is available is the focus. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW This memorial is located in front of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School on the Tk’emlúps the Secwépemc First Nation.

If anyone has sent their DNA to a company to trace ancestry, the results will read something like you are 23 per cent West African, 42 per cent French, 35 per cent British.

This is based on the probability that the DNA sample is most closely connected to the samples in those three groups. As you can see, the methods for using DNA are

only as good as the data in the libraries. There are DNA laboratories that add new samples to their libraries. Individuals can submit DNA samples to

Nadine Gray is a Kamloops-based archaeologist and instructor at Thompson Rivers University. Dig It is KTW’s regularly published column on the history beneath our feet in the region. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca.

KTW's new weekly video show!

Providing a behind-the-scenes look at the stories of the week from a unique angle Hosted by

Marty Hastings & Chris Foulds

Check it out at facebook.com/kamloopsthisweek or search “Kamloops Last Week” on


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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SPORTS

INSIDE: Skydivers need landing zone to survive | A28

A27

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

Hewitt talks post-skating identity crisis OLYMPIC SILVER MEDALLIST, KAMLOOPS LONG BLADES PRESIDENT STARTS FUNDRAISER FOR CLUB MARTY HASTINGS

Jessica Hewitt: “It has taken a lot of time to adjust and figure out my place in the world.”

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Olympic medallist Jessica Hewitt felt a deep void in 2014 when her speed skating career ended. The chasm reached its basin in 2016 with the death of her father, Gary. “When you’re speed skating, you kind of have blinders on and you’re not really in the real world, if that makes sense,” said 34-year-old Hewitt, the Kamloopsian who won silver in the women’s 3,000-metre relay at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. “It has taken a lot of time to adjust and figure out my place in the world. That loss of skating identity and the loss of my dad was also a loss of identity, in some way. Usually, sports are good for dealing with loss or things that happen in life.” Hewitt seems to have again found her place in the world. She married Pasan Chandraweera in 2016 and poured herself into studies at Concordia University in Montreal. She has since completed her masters in geography and gave birth to daughter Oriah 15 months ago. “She’s starting to run around now, so I’m constantly chasing her,” Hewitt said. “It’s really fun. “It takes a while to get your life back, your life vision on track.” The latest turn is one made possible by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has altered the

way businesses and organizations operate. Montreal resident Hewitt is president of the Kamloops Long Blades, the speed skating club that spurred the Olympian’s rise to the podium in Russia. “Parents are usually on the executive and that comes with challenges,” said Hewitt, who conducts her presidency duties virtually. “There can be a good side to that, but also a bad side. They obviously have conflicts. Everyone thinks their kid is the most important thing and, I mean, it’s understandable as a parent, but it’s nice to have

someone that’s outside of that who can have a strong vision for the whole community.” In a few weeks, Hewitt will begin part-time cultural heritage repatriation work for the Kwantlen First Nation, which has territory that extends from Richmond and New Westminster in the west, to Surrey and Langley in the south, east to Mission and to the northernmost reaches of Stave Lake. The Long Blades’ presidency will give her useful leadership experience, said Hewitt, whose mother, Shelley, is

a Kamloops resident. Long Blades’ founder and coach Sandi Vyse remains with the club, which became the only speed skating operation in town when the River City Racers folded in 2019. “She’s pretty much the heart and soul of the club,” Hewitt said of Vyse, her longtime friend, mentor and coach. Hewitt’s most pressing task is to seek funding for the cashstrapped organization, which has seen a 50 per cent drop in membership, with about 30 skaters remaining. “We’re at risk of losing our

ability to pay for the ice times,” Hewitt said. “If we have bad ice times or don’t have enough ice, that will also put us at risk of not being able to deliver programs. It’s a negative cycle.” Hewitt is asking for donations on a GoFundMe page — under “Covid-19 Kamloops Long Blades Recovery Fund” online at gofundme.com. “We need to raise about 10 grand to make it affordable and also not to cancel ice times,” Hewitt said. “We’ve always prided ourself on being an affordable sport. That’s a big reason why my parents signed me up.”

Honouring Our Grads

All of the staff at Twin Rivers Education Centre, Four Directions Secondary School and the Continuing Education program are thrilled to congratulate our 2021 graduates.

AnnikA Miller

VALEDICTORIAN

We are all very proud of each of you for persevering and achieving your goal. Well done!

ethAn WigglesWorth VALEDICTORIAN


A28

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Skydivers desperate for landing zone MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

With no place to land, the Kamloops Skydivers Sport Parachuting Club is plummeting toward extinction. The not-for-profit club lost its landing area at Fulton Field about two years ago. “The airport was being further developed,” Kamloops Skydivers secretary and treasurer Heather Sutherland said. “We’ve since been trying to find a new area to land. We have not had any luck. That, combined with COVID, has made it extremely challenging to be able to continue to operate.” Since losing its landing area at Fulton Field, the club has been touching down alongside the Thompson River. Sutherland said the ideal fix is to find a landing area near the airport, where Kamloops Skydivers has operated for the past 30 years. That would enable the club to use the airport runway and use the

same radio frequency as airport traffic. “If we are not within radio range of the airport, you, of course, are still flying in commercial airspace, but without that extra security and safety,” Sutherland said. “That’s always a primary concern for us, is safety.” Finding another runway is also an option. “A lot of places, when we’ve talked to farmers or the city or other businesses, are very concerned about potential liability issues,” Sutherland said. “Skydiving is inherently ... most people think, ‘Oh, my goodness, this is so dangerous.’ Liabilty is a big concern.” Sutherland said a waiver skydivers sign before jumps offers protection. “We have only had one attempted lawsuit in 30 years and it was not successful,” Sutherland said. “The lawyer essentially looked at this lady and said, ‘Did you sign this waiver?’ She said, ‘Yes.’ That was the end of it. So it is a good waiver and it has been reviewed by the lawyers, but

that seems to be the No. 1 issue we’re coming up against.” The club is looking for a landing zone on level terrain measuring about 100 metres by 300 metres. The minimum distance for a runway is about 730 metres. Sutherland said the club has two mobile trailers and currently rents space from Progressive Air Services near the airport. “They’ve been great landlords,” she said. “There have been no issues. Absolutely no problem with paying rent, leasing space or providing references.” The club, one of the country’s most venerable, has been in operation for about 60 years. “Kamloops Skydivers has been hanging by a thread to maintain operations by landing on a sandbar by the river,” a club press release reads. “They are in desperate need of a landing zone and, without one, Kamloops and the entire skydiving community is going to lose one of the few, precious clubs and the experience and history it brings to the world of skydiving.”

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Skydivers prepare to land at Fulton Field in May of 2015.

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SPORTS OLYNYK OPTS OUT OF CANADA DUTY

NBA free agent Kelly Olynyk of Kamloops will not play for Canada at an Olympic qualifying tournament that gets underway on June 29 in Victoria. NBA ENTERTAINMENT/GETTY IMAGES

Kelly Olynyk of Kamloops is no longer on the roster of players who will participate in Canada’s pre-Olympic training camp, which is underway in Tampa, Fla. Olynyk, the Houston Rockets’ forward, and Toronto Raptors’ centre Khem Birch were originally on the roster, but were absent from the list last Tuesday. Both will become NBA free agents this off-season. Injured players lose bargaining power, so national duty while not under contract is risky. Canada is preparing for a do-or-die qualifying tournament for the Olympic Summer Games in Tokyo. The six-team tournament will get underway on June 29 in Victoria, with the winner advancing to the Games. Canada’s basketball team has not qualified for the Olympics since 2000. Players will remain with the team until the end of the Olympics if Canada wins the qualification tournament. Canada is planning a pre-Tokyo camp in Hawaii. Toronto Raptors’ bench boss Nick Nurse is coaching the team.

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We thank you for your patronage, understanding, and patience as we work together during this unprecedented time. Visit Kamloops.ca/COVID for updates Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

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A30

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE Matthew Seminoff (left) and the Kamloops Blazers will be looking for a third straight B.C. Division title next season. The Blazers open the 2021 pre-season on Sept. 15 against the Victoria Royals.

Blazers’ pre-season schedule released The Kamloops Blazers will play six pre-season games in the lead up to the 2021-2022 WHL campaign. Kamloops will play host to pre-season tilts on Sept. 15 against Victoria, Sept. 17 against Prince George and Sept. 24 against Kelowna. Game time is 7 p.m. each night. Prince George will host the Blazers on Sept. 18 and Kelowna will host Kamloops on Sept. 25. The Blazers will play their first home game of the regular season on Saturday, Oct. 9. Kamloops will play host to Prince George, a 7 p.m. start at Sandman Centre. The league is aiming for each team to play a full 68-game slate, with arenas at full capacity. The complete WHL schedule will be released on Wednesday. WIST FARES WELL Sela Wist of Kamloops Classic Swimming was in action at the Canadian Olympic Swimming

Tournament Capital Sports

BRIEFS Trials, which wrap up on Wednesday in Toronto. She competed in four events and recorded two personal-best times, placing 16th in both the 50-metre and 100m freestyle events, 17th in the 100m backstroke and 18th in the 100m butterfly. MAKE YOUR BET British Columbia Lottery Corporation is preparing to offer singleevent sports bets and bets on racing and fighting on playnow.com, according to a BCLC press release. The press release was issued on Tuesday following the Senate’s third and final reading of Bill C-218. BCLC will enable playnow.com players to wager on the outcome of a single game or match

after Bill C-218 receives Royal Assent, which is expected in the next few days. The provincial lottery corporation is exploring opportunities to implement single-event sports betting across land-based channels, including casinos and hospitality locations in B.C., according to the press release. BALL HOCKEY IS BACK The Kamloops Ball Hockey League began its shortened season on Monday night. In adult recreation action, the Warriors topped the Alliance 5-2. The Bohnefide Blackjacks thumped the Northstars 11-1 in competitive action. Alex Provencal had a hat-trick and two helpers. The Reapers pulled away from the Bulldogs in the final frame, winning 7-2. Ryan Ignace scored three goals and Jackson Bruce-Fuoco had four assists.

LETTING IT FLY

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Greg Stewart is a safe bet to qualify for the postponed 2020 Paralympic Summer Games, which will get underway on Aug. 24 in Tokyo. Stewart, a 7-foot-2 Kamloopsian, holds the Canadian record in F46 class shot put (16.30 metres) and has recorded the third-longest throw in the world this year (15.81 metres). Stewart told KTW those who qualify for the Games will get official word of team inclusion on July 27. Meanwhile, Patrick Waters of Kamloops was informed last week he has not qualified to compete in swimming at the Paralympics.


A31 THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

R E A L

Clifford Brauner Accredited Home Inspector

E S T A T E

License #47212

250-319-5572 photo: Steve Marshall

KAMLOOPS & AREA • EACH EDITION AVAILABLE ONLINE

June 23, 2021 | Volume 35 | Issue 25

kamloops.pillartopost.com

Attention Realtors

GET MORE EXPOSURE FOR YOUR LISTINGS!

250.319.7008 jerri@jerrivan.com

REACH OVER 30,500 HOMES EVERY WEEK

To learn more contact

Paul De Luca

realestate@kamloopsthisweek.com

ONLY 1 UNIT LEFT Phase 2 at 1405 Springhill Drive

250-374-7467 1365B Dalhousie Drive

Come Enjoy Urban Living. Enjoy Your Space.

RANCH STYLE HOMES

CONTACT US FOR PRICING! Adult oriented gated community with on site Secured RV Parking, minutes from downtown Kamloops & no GST!

Contact us for more info www.SiennaRidgeKamloops.com KIRSTEN MASON Personal Real Estate Corp P: 250-571-7037 E: Kmason@kadrea.com

SHOWHOME OPEN SATURDAYS • 1:00-3:00PM • LOT 204


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com NORTH KAM $450,000 1371 OTTAWA PLACE

RICK WATERS

SELLING?

250-851-1013

CALL ME FOR A FREE MARKET EVALUATION

call or text anytime

with no obligation!

rickwaters@royallepage.ca

HERE TO HELP!

• Occupy or Invest • Possession down possible & leased up until May 2022 • 2 + 2 bedroom suite with seperate laundry • Lots of parking, close to school & transit

NORTH KAM $539,000 1089 BELMONT CRES

27 YEARS

PENDING SALE

EXPERIENCE! Buying or Selling? I will save you time and money!

WESTWIN REALTY

BUYING?

Did you know almost all listings are multiple listings.This means I can show you anything on the market.

• Great family home with 3+1 bdrm 2 baths • Updated furnace, c/air & hot water tank • Park across street & close to elementary • RV parking & room for garage

MORE PICTURES & INFO AT: WWW.ROYALLEPAGE.CA/RICKWATERS

FALL Activity Guide 2021 City of Kamloops

DO NOT BE DISAPPOINTED! BOOK BY JULY 23

2020 City of Kamloops

Fall Activity Guide

Contact Linda Bolton to book your ad for the upcoming Activity Guide

REGISTRATION: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 Online - 6:30 am | In Person/Phone - 10:00 am

250-318-1556 • lbolton@aberdeenpublishing.com

Denise Bouwmeester MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

Cell 250-319-3876 dbinkamloops@shaw.ca denisebouwmeestersales.com

(Kamloops) Real Estate SENIORS MASTER CERTIFIED REAL ESTATE NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST SPECIALIST

$625,000

SOLD • Beautiful 2017 home fully finished • 3 bedroom 2 bath up and suitable down • Fully fenced xeriscaped yard fully fenced backyard, irrigated flowerbeds, hot tub and raised bed gardens • Double garage, central air, covered sundeck, hot tub

Hundreds of nominations for Business Excellence Awards The Kamloops Chamber of Commerce and MNP received more than 360 nominations for the 35th annual Business Excellence Awards. The merit-based awards celebrate innovative entrepreneurs and local community leaders in 16 award categories as determined by an independent selection committee. “With the recent decrease in [COVID-19] cases and restrictions easing, there is a renewed sense of optimism for business owners that, sooner than later, things will return to normal,” said MNP partner Jessy Sra. “Let’s take this opportunity to celebrate those entrepreneurs and businesses that have successfully navigated through these challenging times and come out stronger.”

The Kamloops Chamber of Commerce has recognized ingenuity and determination through its annual awards program since 1986. As the community slowly re-opens and recovers from the effects of the pandemic, the awards will be handed out again via a low-capacity, decentralized event livestreamed from four partner restaurants from across the city, with the help of GK Sound, on Oct. 21. The independent selection committee will now be tasked with reviewing each nominee’s written submission and will conduct an interview with each business. Once completed, the selection committee will provide the scores to MNP, which will tabulate them to determine which ones will become a finalist in each award category.

The finalists will be announced later this summer. “Once again, our team is thrilled to be able to directly support our hospitality partners who have adapted and pivoted, again and again, throughout the pandemic,” said Acacia Pangilinan, executive director of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. “I want to thank all the Business Excellence Awards sponsors. Your ongoing support allows us to advocate for, support and celebrate our local businesses.” The Kamloops Chamber received 367 nominations in 16 award categories, recognizing 95 unique businesses. To see the list of nominations, go online to kamloops thisweek.com and search “More than 360 nominations for 2021 Business Excellence Awards.”

DO YOU HAVE AMAZING

LOCAL PHOTOS? We’re looking for your local photos to use in local publications

20 acres nestled in the heart of Barnhartvale Goes from end of Foxwood Lane to Barnhartvale Road

2274 SADDLEBACK DRIVE $849,900

COMMUNITY

Thank you Denise, for your hard work and dedication in helping us find and acquire our perfect home! As this is the second time we've needed your expertise, we are grateful to you for not only for the sale of our previous home in 2008 but also the purchase of this new one in 2021. We could quite simply, not have gotten to this point without your skill and understanding on so many levels. Our family is forever grateful to have someone as amazing as you, on our side! – The Griffiths

To win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos at:

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on June 30

Follow us on Instagram to vote on the top photos at the end of every month

@Kamloopsthisweek

1 winner selected at the end of each month from majority vote of selected entries. Submitte though www.KamloopsThisWeek.com/photo-contest will be accepted. Physical & emailed copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for more details.


LindaTurner

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • LindaTurnerPREC@gmail.com

250-374-3331 REALTOR® of the Year

$185,000

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

$335,000

Proud Supporter of Children’s Miracle Network

$349,900

D L O S

BROCKLEHURST

$355,000

SUN RIVERS

BROCKLEHURST

BEAUTIFUL CITY VIEWS • Central Location • Walking distance to TRU & shopping • 1 bedroom + 1 bathroom

55+ LARGER 2 BEDROOM UNIT • Custom design for wheel chair bath • Vacant w/Sundeck & mountain view • All appliances & Air Conditioner

207-555 DALGLEISH DR

309-760 MAYFAIR STREET

$485,000

$499,900

$520,000

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

TOP FLOOR, 2 BEDROOM + DEN • 1700 sq ft with 2 levels • Open plan w/Island kitchen on main • Upper floor has 2nd bedroom & bath

D L O S

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

DUFFERIN

$399,900

Adam Popien REALTOR®

$415,000

BROCKLEHURST

NORTH KAMLOOPS

NEWLY RENOVATED & READY • 3 Bedrooms - 3 Baths • Full, finished basement • Parking for 2, Pets & Rentals Allowed

HANDY MAN SPECIAL OR FIX’N FLIP • 3 Bedrm up & 3 3 Bdrm suite down • Detached 20x24 shop + Storage sheds • Lots of Fruit trees & RV parking

2+2 BEDROOMS - 2 BATHROOMS • Full finished basement • Large flat yard • Great investment with RT-3 zoning

3-1658 TRANQUILLE ROAD

1752 BRUNNER AVE

123 MARCEL ST

$569,000

$589,900

$599,900

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

D L O S

NORTH SHORE

DALLAS

BARELAND STRATA LOW $140 FEES • Rancher w/Daylight Basement • 2 Bedrooms + Office & 2 Baths • Parking for 3 - C/ Air - All Appliances

SPECTACULAR RIVER & VALLEY VIEW • Handy Man Special or Great Fix'N Flip • Great yard Plus Detached Garage + Carport • +2 Bedrooms & 2 Baths

AMAZING RIVER VIEW • 2890 sf – 4 Bdrms & Office • New kitchen and Hardwood • LC/Air & Large D/Garage

5 BEDROOMS – 2 BATHS • 2 Bdrm InLaw Suite • Well maintained w/private yard • All Appliances & C/Air

4 BEDROOMS – 2 BATHS • Well maintained & New HW Tank • Island Kitchen w/All Appliances • RV Parking – Private Yard – Big Deck

4-1940 HILLSIDE DRIVE

499 STRATHCONA TERRACE

303-15 HUDSONS BAY TRAIL

767 STEWART AVE

6123 DALLAS DRIVE

304-550 LORNE ST

$599,900

D L O S

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

$659,900

$749,900

D L O S

BACHELOR HEIGHTS

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

$830,000

BROCKLEHURST

NEW BUILD W/2956 SQFT • 5 Bedrms + Den & Finished basement • All Appliances, C/Air included • Landscaping & UG Spklers

STUNNING NORTH RIVER VIEW • Dead end cul de sac location • Updated w/4 Bedrooms & 2 baths • Private fenced yard & S/Garage

CHARACTER HOME DOWNTOWN KAMLOOPS • Fully renovated top to bottom • 3 Bedroom 2 Bath

UPDATED & ELEGANT 4 BDRM HOME • Vaulted ceiling & open floor plan • Large Island Kitchen • Backs on Grasslands

377 SEYMOUR STREET W.

636 DOMINION ST

2047 SADDLEBACK DRIVE

$1,040,000

$1,559,000

LOT FOR SALE

LOT FOR SALE

KAMLOOPS LAKE SOUTH THOMPSON VALLEY

PAUL LAKE

STUNNING GOLF COURSE HOME • Double garage & golf cart garage • Island Kitchen + 4 bedrooms • Amazing basement rec room + theatre

44.6 ACRES BACKING ONTO PARK LAND • Log home & 3 guest cabins • Detached 36x36 shop • Close to Paul Lake and Harper Ski Hill

3544 NAVATANEE DRIVE

1485 PAUL LAKE ROAD

SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

$830,000

BROCKLEHURST

NEW BUILD W/2956 SQFT • 5 Bedrms + Den & Finished basement • All Appliances, C/Air included • Landscaping & UG Spklers 844 CRESLINE ST

VIDEO TOURS

REALTOR®

D D D L L L O O O S S S

TOP FLOOR UNIT • 2 Bdrms + Den - 2 Baths • Appliances & laundry included • Sunrise mountain view 1409-1000 TALASA WAY

D L O S

Kristy Janota

Real Estate (Kamloops)

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

1058 FORDEN PLACE • $549,000 Amazing panoramic view • Great family neighborhood • R-4 Zoned - 5992 Sq Ft Building Lot

• Ready to build your dream home

848 CRESLINE ST

LOT FOR SALE

HEFFLEY

YATES CREEK RD $599,000 • Beautiful quarter section • Halfway between Kamloops and Sun Peaks • Come build your dream home

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


110 A34

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

RECEIVE A FREE NO OBLIGATION WE’VE GONE ONLINE! MARKET EVALUATION See all listings & much more at team110.com CALL 250-851-3110 OR 250-571-6686 TODAY! Proud Sponsor

110

TEAM

Robert J. Iio Personal Real Estate Corporation

Bobby Iio

Jeremy Bates

REALTOR®/TEAM LEADER

Kim Fells

REALTOR®

Team110remax

REALTOR®

team110 - remax

147 ANVIL CR. $799,000

Brent Miller Personal Real Estate Corporation

THE ONE YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR Location • Low Maintenance Landscaping Updated & Move in Ready • Quick Possession

Cell 250.319.7376 brentmiller@shaw.ca

Get all the details and see the video tour of this fantastic home at www.kamloopsproperties.com

D L O S

View our Listings at www.KamloopsProperties.com

Re/Max Real Estate (Kamloops)

QUINN PACHE

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

REAL ESTATE TEAM

250-299-1267 | Quinnpache@royallepage.ca

TRUST | PASSION | KNOWLEDGE

250-682-6252 | lindsaypittman@outlook.com

Quinnpacherealestate.ca

Follow Us! @qprealestateteam

KAMLOOPS REALTY

55-1435 Summit Dr $299,900

15 Galena Ave, Logan Lake $377,400

G N I D N E P • Most central and desired locations in town • Features privacy, updates and a spacious design • No rental restrictions – Great investment property • 3 level split begins with a private entrance • Main level: Open/bright living space, open concept dining and kitchen • Kitchen millwork has been professionally updated • Beautiful sun deck great for entertaining • Upstairs: master bedroom, additional storage • Additional bedroom that features a custom built in closet professionally installed by ‘Imagine The Room’ • Also on the upper level is the main bathroom • New tub and surround along with Riobel fixtures

• Affordable 4-bedroom and 2-bathroom home • Nestled in the quiet peaceful community of Logan lake • Close to school, community centre and all shopping amenities • Main floor: open concept kitchen, dining and living room, gas fireplace • 3 bedrooms and bathroom • Downstairs: large family room, bedroom, bathroom, and utility room • Utility room could be easily converted for a private office or workshop • Over 0.2 of an acre • Backyard is completely fenced • Ample parking for your vehicles, recreational toys, and RV • Perfect for any family or retiree looking to settle down

367 Basalt Drive, Logan Lake $429,000

SOLD • Unique Tudor styled home • Large driveway and a two-door garage =plenty of parkin • Garage provides space for a workshop • Main floor: Beautiful hardwood floors (runs from one end of the home to the other) • Open concept kitchen, living room and dining room; great place to entertain • 3 bedrooms and 1.5 bathrooms • Downstairs: laundry room, bathroom, large family room • Could be easily turned into a suite because of the separate entrance • Back yard connects to green space providing a nice private haven • It is a perfect oasis • Beautiful views of Logan Lake

LINDSAY PITTMAN REALTOR® MBA

MIKE LATTA REALTOR®

250-320-3091 | mikelatta@royallepage.ca

KAYLEIGH BONTHOUX Office Manager/Unlicensed Assistant

778-765-5151 | kayleighbonthoux@royallepage.ca

2004 Monteith Dr $735,000

6640 Old HWY 5 $1,999,900

NEW PRICE

• Fantastic location • Bright, open design with updates throughout! • Upper floor: 3 bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms • Stunning Kitchen has been professionally done by Counters Only • Nice views from your beautiful balcony • Lower floor: 3 bedroom self contained suite with a full bathroom • Own laundry • Current rents are $1900 up/$1700 down • Walking distance to Albert McGowan School and park • Fully fenced yard • Plenty of parking • A/C, HWT, Furnace 5 years old.

• Gorgeous 4100 sq. ft custom built craftsman style home • Spectacular views of the North Thompson River Valley • Located within city limits & 25 minutes to Sun Peaks • 4 bedroom 3.5 bathroom home • 2 covered decks, 1 covered patio • Triple pane glass windows • Easements for future services • 2x8 construction with R28 interior wall insulation • House and shop plumbed for geothermal • Generous master suite and laundry on the main • Guest suite upstairs • Self-contained 2 bedroom walk out inlaw suit with own laundry below • Remarkable 40 acres - 2 pastures equipped with power and water • 2500 sq. ft shop, 8’ x 12’ barn, 10’ x 14’ shanty, 60’ round pen, corrals, tack shack, RV parking, and wood shed • 10 gpm well and two other capped wells


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries NEW LISTING

Call today to book your personal tour!

Sun Rivers

911 9th Green $599,900

• ONE LEVEL LIVING • Quite street in Sun Rivers Golf Resort community • Landscaping done for you

2

2

1,454

Sun Rivers

703 Belmonte Terrace $689,900 • Shows like new • Totally private end unit • Three outdoor patio areas • Triple garage for all the toys

3

Sun Rivers

1826 Ironwood Cres $995,000

• 8,794 sq ft lot tiered with entertaining space including hot tub • Walkout legal suite 1 bed & 1 bath with separate entry and laundry • Recent updates throughout • Black s/s appliances in kitchen, gas range and quartz counters

6

4

3,355

681 Wittner Rd • $1,469,000

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387

3

Sun Rivers

1215 Canyon Ridge Place $1,249,000

• Spectacular views • 1 bedroom legal suite with separate laundry, private entrance and patio • Fabulous excel Kitchen with quartz counters and backsplash

4

232 Sagewood Drive • $749,900

5

4,550

2039 Priest Ave • $399,900

2

• ONE LEVEL contemporary custom home • Panoramic views of river, mountains and city • 12 ft Great Room ceiling, and expansive windows • Outdoor entertainment area with gas fireplace

2,443

NEW LISTING

2

Lower Sahali

63 Thor Drive • $1,350,000

• Executive custom home • Views and amazing private yard • Extensive updating – granite kitchen • Easy suite potential • Unique features throughout – must see to appreciate!

4

4

4,526

1987 Monteith Drive • $719,000

Sun Rivers

507 Pointe Place $899,000

• Riverfront with ultimate privacy • Quiet cul de sac • Immaculate home • Easy Suite Potential • Double Car garage and lots of parking

4

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

Riverfront and Westmount

728 Driftwood $799,000

2,374

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453

2

1,720

Under Construction

Dufferin

1216 Prairie Rose Dr $1,399,000

• Dream kitchen with high-end Fisher Paykel appliances included • Master ensuite with soaker tub & steam shower! • Fully finished walkout basement • Under Construction – Nearing Completion

5

1-137 McGill Road • $334,900

5.5

4,685

10-383 Columbia St. West • $399,900

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

PHASE 3

NOW SELLING Call now for more information

• PANORAMIC VISTAS • MODERN STYLING • ADULT ORIENTED • IRRESISTIBLE LIFESTYLE

“Living out of town, the building process was quite easy. I was able to do everything online” – Tim

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

...selling Kamloops every day™ Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

SUN PEAKS

306 - 970 Lorne Street - Simply one of the most desired locations downtown! Park Place's secure, gated complex has it all with this immaculate 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 898 sq ft apartment. Southwest exposure and a covered sundeck. Heated indoor pool, workout gym, hot tub, sauna, pool table in amenities room, outdoor patio, BBQ, library, wine-making room, woodwork shop, wharf w/boat slips, secure underground parking, car wash & bike storage. All this and it's pet friendly too and within walking distance of city parks! Definitely a must see! $445,000

11-6000 Valley Drive - What a wonderful opportunity to purchase a one-owner townhome in the heart of Sun Peaks Village. Morrisey & Orient Express lifts out your door and village square a 10 minute walk. This 2 storey townhouse has 1,052 sf of living space with 2 bedrooms & 3 bathrooms. Purchase price includes furniture and household items. Strata $476/mth, taxes $2,960/ yr. Outdoor recreation right out your door, now that’s living! $759,900

d l o S

8 - 2171 Van Horne - Commanding views from this 1 owner 5 year old 2 storey townhome in Aberdeen are sure to please. Main floor has it all including master bedroom with beautiful ensuite and laundry. 2nd floor features 1 bedroom, den & storage plus 4 piece bathroom. High ceilings, quartz counter tops, engineered hardwood flooring, upgraded lighting package, stainless appliances & window coverings are just some of the quality features. Pets and rentals allowed with approval. $609,900

13-3220 Village Way - One of the best locations on the mountain. This True ski in and ski out unit is centrally located, minutes from ski lifts, village center and golf course. The location does not get much better. Call Phil for additional details and for viewings. $898,800

2356 Dunrobin Place - 1 owner home with lovely north views, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. A great family home with main floor laundry, nook off kitchen, family and games room down, plus 2 car garage on quiet cul-de-sac. $665,000

2145 Glenwood Drive – Large fully fenced yard (84x232) with a 42x20 detached shop. Centrally located in Valleyview close to schools, shopping, transportation and minutes to the city center. This 4 bedroom 2 bathroom home has had some updates in the past years, including a new kitchen in 2021. For additional information and viewings call Phil 250-318-0100. $749,900

2504 Sunset Drive - Unique opportunity, this ranch style home of 1,703 sf is on a C4 zoned lot in East Valleyview. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, double garage + storage shed and ample parking on the fully fenced yard. $569,900

Call today for your

FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION

KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL:

20-1555 Summit Drive - New to Market at the Wedgewoods! This 2 bedroom + Den & 2 bathroom townhome has seen substantial updates throughout and is a pleasure to show. From the updated kitchen, tile and wood flooring to the interior pine doors, wood and tile bannisters, cozy stone fireplace and much more. Enjoy the media room and large work area on the lower floor. Upper deck and lovely private patio. There is parking for 2 vehicles. This location can’t be beat and is close to amenities and shopping. $479,900

• • • • • • • •

Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) Full-time staff Professional representation Professional Signage Advertising in Kamloops This Week Global advertising on the internet

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca REAL ESTATE (KAMLOOPS)

FOR MORE INFO VIEW ALL OUR LISTINGS, UPCOMING LISTINGS, AND KAMLOOPS LISTINGS AT RALPHREALESTATE.CA W

NE

North Kamloops

405-120 VERNON AVENUE $279,900 • MLS®161766 • Immaculate top floor 1 bedroom + Den, 1 bathroom unit in The Willows (55+) • 1 small pet allowed with strata approval, no rentals allowed • Quick possession possible

D L O S

G

TIN

LIS

South Thompson Valley

South Kamloops

60-3099 SHUSWAP ROAD E $349,900 • MLS®162473

303-550 LORNE STREET $399,900 • MLS®162128

South Kamloops

305-629 LANSDOWNE ST $299,900 • MLS®162730 • Immaculate 2 bedroom 1 bathroom apartment in Riviera Gardens • Pets are allowed with strata permission • Great central downtown location

• 3 bedroom 1 bathroom home in Countryview Estates • Own your own land with a bareland strata fee of $125/month • Quick possession possible

D L O S

• Centrally located 2 bedroom 2 bathroom condo/apartment in Pioneer Landing with over 1400 sq ft on 2 levels • Includes storage locker, 1 parking stall, and 2 sundecks • Quick possession possible

Brock

North Aberdeen

North Westsyde

North Kamloops

1631 SLATER AVENUE $499,900 • MLS®162572

6-2020 VAN HORNE DRIVE $549,900 • MLS®162283

950 SICAMORE DRIVE $549,900 • MLS®162288

385 CHERRY AVENUE $584,900 • MLS®161771

• Very nicely maintained 3 bedroom 1 bathroom home • Single garage + attached 20x11’8 workshop • Great family home and area

• Immaculate and detached 2+1 bedroom 3 bathroom bareland strata • Level entry rancher style with double garage and panoramic views • 2 pets allowed with no size restriction, no rentals allowed

• Great starter or investment property in this 2 bedrooms 2 bathroom home • Close to schools, recreation, and shopping • Great family home and area

• Well maintained original 1 owner home with 3+1 bedroom 2 bathrooms • Very central location close to all amenities • Quick possession possible

ING

W

NE

T LIS

Juniper 1987 KECHIKA STREET $699,900 • MLS®162791 • Great family home and area with 3+1 bedroom 2 bathrooms • Partially unfinished basement with roughed-in 3rd bathroom • Lots of parking including RV parking

tobiano

4-175 HOLLOWAY DRIVE $649,900 • MLS®161869

• Beautifully maintained unit in Lakestar with 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms • Stunning views of Kamloops Lake • Pet & rental friendly with restrictions

Sahali

344 ARROWSTONE DRIVE $699,900 • MLS®162571 • Beautifully maintained and landscaped 3+1 bedroom 2 bathroom home • 1 bedroom basement suite with shared laundry • Great family home and area close to schools and amenities


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

BABY BLUES

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

A setback of some kind may occur this week, Aries. Do not get too worried about it just yet. Adversity can be an excellent avenue toward personal growth.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you may need to postpone a project you were hoping to begin this week. As long as it does not get pushed any further, you should be fine.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 It is easy to get carried away with an idea, Gemini. Just do not mistake obsession for focus. You need to pace yourself if you are going to be effective.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, you are on the move this week, but it is ideal to have a plan and not leave things to chance. Look ahead and see if you can pinpoint potential pitfalls.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 It’s possible to achieve great things this week, Leo. Your accomplishments will ultimately depend on how much you are able to focus on the tasks at hand.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 A financial windfall or a new job opportunity may be coming your way, Virgo. This will be the breakthrough you need right now after a series of setbacks.

OUR TIME IS NOW – JOIN US

LIBRA

JUNE 23 - JUNE 29, 2021 - Sept 23/Oct 23

When someone asks for your help drawing up a travel itinerary, you have plenty of ideas at the ready. Put all of your effort into the task and enjoy the fun.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22

Responsibilities will be easier to handle very soon, Scorpio. The tasks won’t become less difficult, but there are plenty of helping hands ready to back you up.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 You could find yourself in a position where you can take on a leadership role, Sagittarius. Do not hesitate to accept this promotion because it can be great for your career.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Capricorn, you may be easily swayed this week by a smooth-talking stranger. Figure out if this person can be trusted by offering opportunities to prove his or her trustworthiness.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 You may think that an opportunity has passed you by, Aquarius. But don’t get too worried just yet. It’s possible to regain your momentum quite quickly.

PISCES

- Feb 19/Mar 20

You may have to admit that the plan you put in place has a few kinks to be worked out, Pisces. These modifications are relatively simple.

TOGETHERWERISE-RIH.COM


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Writer who created Oz 5. “Obviously,” in slang 10. First word of “A Visit From St. Nicholas” 14. “.?.?. with possibly direr consequences” 17. ____ Berliner, pioneer in phonograph records 18. Lex Luthor, to Superman 22. Raised 23. Bit of asparagus 24. Alternately 25. Lines up 26. Agitated 29. Pricey 30. M.L.B. team with a big “W” in its logo 31. Rx order 32. “Revolution,” to “Hey Jude” 34. Space-scanning org. 35. It may be bitter 36. Like bees 37. Not ____ (mediocre) 39. Clear weeds, in a way 40. Part “missing” from p.s.i. 41. Mystery writer Deighton 42. Words cried after “Go” 46. Abbr. after a price in a Craigslist ad 47. Lt.’s inferior 48. Decidedly 51. Québec’s ____ St.-Jean 52. Soft drink since 1905 54. Young hombre 56. Biblical verb ending 57. Instruments for Israel Kamakawiwo‘ole 60. German auto since 1899 61. “That’ll teach you!” 62. Pigeon English? 63. Basketball champions’ “trophy” 64. Gillette brand 65. Leader of the house? 67. “Love is love,” e.g. 70. Pallid 71. Outlets, e.g. 73. Something that might lengthen a sentence?

74. Moneybags 75. High school hurdle whose first two letters, phonetically, sound like one of its former components 76. Like all the answers with pairs of circled letters, punnily 81. Programming pioneer Lovelace 82. Seasons in Québec 84. 15th birthday celebration 85. Tomtit is another name for it 86. Talks up 88. Classical Icelandic literary work 89. Title letters chanted in a 2011 Katy Perry hit 90. Oldsmobile Cutlass model 91. Financial org. once deemed “too big to fail” 93. Newfoundland, e.g.: Abbr. 94. Serpentine swimmer 95. Root-beer brand 96. Veterans 100. Range within which you can answer the question “Can you hear me now?” 104. Six-time winner of the N.H.L.’s Art Ross Trophy, born in Saskatchewan 108. “24” and “Suits” actress, born in Halifax 111. Princess who says “Why, you stuck-up, half-witted, scruffylooking nerf herder!” 112. Dish served on a skewer 113. Congresswoman Omar 114. Actress Lena 115. Suppliers of the milk for Roquefort cheese 116. Singer Mary J. ____ 117. Moves quickly and lightly 118. Not only that

119. 120. 121. 122.

Rehearsal, e.g., in slang Approvals You can believe it “Likewise”

DOWN 1. Pears with a sweetspiced flavor 2. Part of B.A. 3. Deploy 4. Alberta city named for an eagle-feather headdress 5. Like some birds or dolls 6. Excite 7. Rank 8. Stops talking, with “up” 9. Mettle that may merit a medal 10. Two-player game invented in Toronto 11. Sardonic 12. ____ of Parliament 13. Stops talking, with “up” 14. “Nice burn!” 15. Battle ____ 16. Seasonal destination near Quebec City 19. Program introduced by the Trudeau government in 1984, colloquially 20. Approximate weight of the Liberty Bell 21. Spots 27. Advocacy grp. that filed for bankruptcy in 2021 28. Words at an unveiling? 31. Cry after an award is announced 33. Woman’s short hairstyle 36. Portrayer of Senator Vinick on “The West Wing” 38. Level or bevel 43. Like some outlets 44. Desert planet of “Star Wars” 45. Be batty, in a way? 49. Canuck, e.g., for short 50. Capital of Qatar 52. Like bells in carillons 53. Part of L.C.D.

54. Some salon supplies 55. Like Rochester and Syracuse, but not New York City 58. Novel convenience? 59. Band whose 1999 hit “Smooth” spent 12 weeks at No. 1 66. Sleep stage 68. Overturns 69. “Very high,” on a fire-danger scale 70. Iowa Cubs baseball classification 72. Et ____ (footnote abbr.) 74. Federal regulatory org. 77. Rose or lilac 78. “Where ____ go wrong?” 79. Novelist Gaiman 80. Pound sound 83. Thrown together 85. They might help with changing your locks 87. One with a phony personality? 90. Snake oil, purportedly 92. Passes 95. Central route thru town 96. Leers at 97. Frederick who composed “Camelot” 98. Helps a dishwasher, say 99. One source of oil 100. Cheer 101. Shout, informally 102. ____ Wars, conflicts of 1839-42 and 1856-60 103. It may be perfect or simple, but not both 105. Big elevator maker 106. $15/hour, e.g. 107. What most spiders have eight of 108. Hitchhiker’s need 109. International fashion magazine 110. Climb, as a rope

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A29

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

WORD SCRAMBLE

Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to puzzles

ANSWERS

ANSWER: GUIDANCE

17 HARLEY DAVIDSON ELECTRA GLIDE ULTRA CLASSIC

$20,998 (#M20036B)

14 NISSAN VERSA

#U1908A • $9,998 +tax or $89 bi-weekly 78 months @ 7.99% OAC

18 KIA FORTE

#U1888 • $13,998 +tax or $118 bi-weekly 84 months @ 8.39% OAC

15 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

#M21022B • $18,998 +tax or $166 bi-weekly 78 months @ 7.99% OAC

15 JEEP CHEROKEE

#U1880A • $23,998 +tax or $209 bi-weekly 78 months @ 7.99% OAC

Mercedes-Benz Kamloops, 695C Laval Crescent, Kamloops, BC, Toll Free 855-984-6603, Mercedes-Benz-kamloops.ca Some conditions apply. See dealer for details. Payments based on financing on approved credit with $2000 down or equivalent trade and include all fees & taxes. Total paid: #M21041A $35,353, #U1923A $35,999, #U1934 $46,260, #M20140A $39,871, #U1929A $60,919.


A40

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Antiques

For Sale - Misc

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000/obo 250-3766607.

Art & Collectibles BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca “DOZING LYNX” Robert Bateman 30 3/4”h x 43 1/2W Forest Green mat & dark green frame $250. 250-578-7776

CANADA DAY Kamloops This Week will be closed on Thursday, July 1st, 2021 for the Canada Day Statutory Holiday

“Power of One” Magnificent creation by John Banovich 43”hx50”wide brown wooden frame. $500 Firm 250-578-7776

Bicycles Trek Crossrip Road Bike. Like new. Paid $1950 Asking $1300. 250-5720753.

If you have an upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com

and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

Lost Lost: Natural Buckalder Walking Cane. It is varnished and has initials P.Z. burned in under crook handle. Reward. 778-471-3223.

Personals

For Sale - Misc 2 - Portable A/C units for windows. $200-$250. 250-312-3902. 6pc patio set. $350. 6pc Bedroom set $695. Entertainment centre. $175. 250-374-8285. Battery charger $100. 48” table saw. $200. Angle grinder $100. 250374-8285. Danby 12000 BTU air conditioner $100. 2 Horse Saddles $300/each. Water Cooler Dispenser $40. 250-374-8285. Eagle coffee tables $100, beige rugs $100. 250374-8285. Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712.

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

kamloopsthisweek.com

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462

Marklin Steam Locomotive 55440. In original box with tracks and glass display case. $3,500. 250318-6452. Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Furniture 8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-8517687.

Plants / Shrubs / Trees

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500

Garage Sales

PINANTAN LAKE COMMUNITY SALE Sat & Sun, June 26/27th. 9:00am - 3:00pm. Toys, scrapbooking, Xmas, hshld, clothes, outdoor, handmade jewelry, antler and horseshoe crafts. Just follow the signs in Pinantan. Covid Rules Apply. RAYLEIGH Sat, June 26th. 9am-2pm. 303 Chetwynd Drive. Hshld items, collectables, books, CD’s, DVD’s, small furn and yard care items. Covid Rules Apply.

Apartments / Condos for Rent

Wanted to Buy

Commercial

Stacking Washer/Dryer and Fridge. Newer model preferred. 250-299-6477.

CHOOSE LOCAL

Pets

PRESTIGE

WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 1 issue a week!

Call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

“Our Family Protecting Your Family”

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Houses For Rent

Furnished4bdr&denIdeal Corporate/Crewnsp2blks RIH$4200. 250-214-0909

Do you have an item for sale under $750?

House-sitting

Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 250374-6007.

Call our Classified Department for details! 250-371-4949 kamloopsthisweek.com

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Garage Sales

Concrete Services

IT’S GARAGE SALE TIME Call and ask us about our GARAGE SALE SPECIAL ONLY $12.50 FOR 3 LINES (Plus Tax) ($1 per additional line)

250-371-4949

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

Garage Sale deadline is Tuesday 10 am for Wednesday Paper

For Sale by Owner

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

Tax not included

Tax not included

Concrete Services

Luigi s Luigi’s SMALL

DALLAS Sat, June 26th. 9am-3pm. 5352 Kipp Road. Moving Sale. Covid Rules Apply.

Logan Lake bachelor suites 30mins to hospital. $600/mo. includes internet, hydro, partially furnished. Gord 250-5239433.

Health

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

GarageSale DIRECTORY

Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $10 each obo 250376-6607

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

Fax: 250-374-1033

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Tax not included

Coming Events

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

CONCRETE JOBS

BRICKS, BLOCKS, PAVERS, SIDEWALKS + PRUNING

F R E E E S T I M AT E S !

250.851.5079 • 250.554.1018 Farm Services

Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111 Handyperson For Sale by Owner $55.00 Special The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run in (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops and area every Wednesday. Call or email us for more info: 250-374-7467 classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

1 Day Per Week Call 250-374-0462

THERE’S MORE ONLINE Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

KamloopsThisWeek.com

Handyperson

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more 778-999-4158

www.danshandymanservices.net Handyman for hire. One call for all your handyman needs. Carpentry, drywall, painting, renovations, sheds, decks and fences and more. Free Estimates. Blaine 250851-6055.

Landscaping PETER’S YARD SERVICE Time to trim Cedar Hedges Tree pruning or removal Yard clean-up, Landscaping Licensed & Certified 250-572-0753

Lawn & Garden Reliable Gardener. 30 yrs experience. Cleanups & pruning. Call 250312-3986.

Misc Home Service JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Movers Rubbish Removal and Minor Furniture Repairs 2 Kings 5:15 778-257-4943 jaenterpriseskam @gmail.com

To advertise in the Classifeds call

250-371-4949

Security

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Renos & Home Improvement

Renovations on construction, complete interior and exterior projects. Free estimates. 250-2626337.

Classes & Courses HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. July 10th and 11th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L July 18th. Sunday. P r o f e s s i o n a l outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

RVs / Campers / Trailers 1995 Roadtrek Campervan Dodge 350 152kms. $12,500. 250-318-8187.

RVs / Campers / Trailers

Run until sold New Price $56.00+tax Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, motorcycle, ATV or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Automotive Tires

Rims

4 - R14 Summer tires. 185/65. $295. 250-3743962.

Legal / Public Notices

4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

Parts & Accessories

Pirelli P7 Cinturato Run Flat tires on 17 “ BMW M series rims. $ 850.00. 250-819-0863.

RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread $1388.00 Call 250 319-8784

Motorcycles

2015 HD Electra Glide Ultra Ltd. Deep Jade, 30135kms, Project Rushmore. Added features. $23,995.00 250-828-8994.

Domestic Cars RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00 (plus Tax)

Flat Deck 8ft long x 7ft wide. 40” high for overhead loads. $350. 250577-3155.

Utility Trailers

6ft x 4ft utility trailer 29” deep, 15” tires, spare. Top and side access, water tight. Boat rack. $600. 250-579-5880 All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

Legal / Public Notices WITNESSES NEEDED On Tuesday, June 15/21 at about 3PM a red 2018 Mazda turned into the parking lot at Home Depot on Hillside Drive and side swiped a trailer hitch on a white pickup truck. The driver of the Mazda admits he was at fault but needs the owner of the pickup truck to come forward for a successful ICBC insurance claim. If you witnessed the accident, spoke with the driver and took notes could you please contact me at cell phone 250-6820294.

Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices

A41

RUN TILL

RENTED

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 2:00 PM Tuesday, July 2, 2021 What is Zoning Amendment Bylaw No. 0171, 2021? Bylaw No. 0171 is to change Zoning Bylaw No. 1400 to rezone 5045 Valley Drive (legally described as District Lot 6517, KDYD, EPC1826), as shown outlined in bold on the subject map, from RR-1: Resort Reserve One to TA-1: Tourist Accommodation One to enable a multi-family housing development (in the form of five 6-plexes).

$

All persons who believe that their interest in property may be affected by the proposed Bylaw shall be afforded a reasonable opportunity to be heard at the Public Hearing. Additionally, they may make written submissions on the matter of this Bylaw (via any of the below options) which must be received at our office prior to 4:00 p.m. on the 30th day of June, 2021. The entire content of all submissions will be made public and form a part of the public record on this matter. How do I get more information?

53

00 Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10

Must be pre-paid. Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time private parties only. No businesses. Some Restrictions Apply

A copy of the proposed Bylaw and all supporting information can be inspected from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday (except statutory holidays) at our office from May 25th, 2021 until 4:00 p.m. the day of the Hearing; or please contact us via any of the below options. No representations will be received by Council after the Public Hearing has been concluded. Nicky Braithwaite, Interim Chief Administrative Officer

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

250�371�4949

In Person: 107-3270 Village Way, Sun Peaks, BC V0E 5N0 Email: admin@sunpeaksmunicipality.ca Fax: 250-578-2023

(250) 371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Sports & Imports

1990 Jaguar Red. leather, 4-door, A/C, Power everything. 142,597kms, $2200.00 250-851-0209.

Sports Utilities & 4x4’s

2011 Hyundai Santa Fe AWD. Fully loaded. 5 passenger 2 row seating. C/W winters on rims, trailer hitch. 249,000kms. $9,500.00 250-319-5911

U-Haul Moving & Storage of Kamloops North Shore claims a Landlords Contractual Lien against the following persons goods in storage at 720 Halston Ave., BC, Tel: 250-376-0962. Auction is subject to cancellation at anytime without notice.

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35

Chad Varty Jordan Banks Joseph Olson Erica Earl-Stefan Denise Leclerc A sale will take place on ibid4storage.com. until Friday July 9, 2021. The auction will end at 11:00 AM, unless bidding battle begins. Room contents are personal/household goods unless noted otherwise. Bids will be for entire contents of each locker or U-box unit.

Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

250�371�4949

PAPER ROUTES

AVAILABLE

Legal / Public Notices

ONLINE AGM June 24, 2021 RSVP bcicf.ca

Follow us

@KamThisWeek

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND

GET PAID 250-374-7467

 


A42

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

Employment

Employment

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Legal Assistant / Litigation Paralegal CUNDARI SEIBEL LLP Lawyers

We have an employment opportunity for a

Children’s Circle Daycare Society have a few openings for full time Early Childhood Educators. We are a Non-Profit Society striving for excellence in the care of our children and families. We are a play-based centre that also uses emergent curriculum. We are a union centre and our wages and benefits are per the current BCGEU collective agreement. After 3 months, you would qualify for extended medical and dental benefits at no cost to you. We also offer matched RSP’s up to a certain percentage. Our daycare also subscribes to the new Wage Enhancement program, and you would also qualify for paid holidays after 3 months. Applications must hold a valid Early Childhood Educator License to practice and a current first aid certificate. The right candidate must enjoy working with children from Infants -5 years of age, have strong communication abilities, reliable, dependable. Come and join and be part of our team in a fun and caring environment.

Career Opportunities

Legal Assistant or Litigation Paralegal Experience with personal injury law and academic qualifications strongly recommended but not required ATTN: OFFICE MANAGER mcundari@cundarilaw.com

Technical Director Education & Outreach Assistant (2) For more information or to apply, visit wctlive.ca/postings.htm

PART-TIMEOFFICE

Join our friendly team, 10-20 hours a week. Wide variety of office duties. Training provided.

VALLEYVIEW MINI-STORAGE

Drop off resume: #10 1967 ETC HWY, Kamloops

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER

This position is open to both male and female applicants. Please apply with cover letter and resume to one of the emails below. childrenscircle@ccdaycare.ca or stpauls@ccdaycare.ca or executivedirector@ccdaycare.ca

CLASSIFIEDS Put the power of 8.3 Million

Employment

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at 250-374-0462

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE

DOWNTOWN

CWC

Classified ads to work for you!

• Find qualified employees • Power your website • Sell products fast! • Coast-to-coast or province by province • Select the region that’s right for your business

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

250-374-3853

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

CANADA�WIDE

Business Oportunities

ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

LIZ SPIVEY 250�374�7467

Rte 310 – 651-695 2nd Ave, 660-690 3rd Ave, 110-292 Columbia St, 106-321 Nicola St. – 43 p. Rte 311 – 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 107-237 Battle St, 135-173 St Paul St. – 27 p. Rte 317 – 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(Even Side), 702-799 Nicola St. – 39 p. Rte 318 – 463 6th Ave, 446490 7th Ave, 409-585 8th Ave, 604-794 Battle St. – 27 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave, 763-804 7th Ave, 744-764 8th Ave, 603-783 Columbia St(Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. - 50 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 327 - 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. - 38 p. Rte 328 – 935 13th Ave, Cloverleaf Cres, Dominion Cres, Pine Cres, Park Cres. – 52 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 333 – 1005-1090 Pine St, 1003-1176 Pleasant St. – 34 p. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. – 56 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35-377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 371 – 125-207 Connaught Rd, 451-475 Lee Rd, 7-376 W. St Paul St. – 73 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 400 – 383 W. Columbia St. – 21 p.

Rte 401 – 250-395, 405-425 Pemberton Terr. – 81 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p. Rte 451 – Odin Crt, Whiteshield Cres, Whiteshield Pl. – 39 p. Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 459 – Monarch Crt, & Pl. – 39 p. Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p. Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 480 – 3-183 Chancellor Dr, Sapphire Crt. Sheffield Way, Steeple Crt. – 48 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 511 – Drummond Crt. – 50 p. Rte 523 – 2300-2399Abbeyglen Way, 750-794 Dunrobin Dr. – 73 p. Rte 528 - 1115-1180 Howe Rd, & 1115-1185 Hugh Allen Dr.-47 p. Rte 542 – Coal Hill Pl, Crosshill Dr, Dunbar Dr. – 58 p.

PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN

Rte 564 – 2000-2099 Hugh Allan Dr, Pine Grass Crt & Pl. Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p.

Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 582 – 1540-1670 Hillside Dr, 1500-1625 Mt Dufferin Ave, Windward Pl. – 38 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p.

VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER

Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648, 16521764 Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 19092003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 618 – Big Nickel Pl, Chapman Pl, Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd, 2440-2605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. - 87 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Mo-Lin Pl. - 29 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 714 – 1101-1247 Highridge Dr. - 44 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p. Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p.

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462

Rte 760 – 149-167, 6303-6697 Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 62 p.

BROCKLEHURST

Rte 3 – 2402-2595 Young Ave, - 38 p. Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St, 2412-2680 Tranquille Rd. – 38 p. Rte 18 – 919-942 Schreiner St, 2108-2399 Young Ave. – 56 p. Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 806999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 17091862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Rte 41 – Alexis Ave, 520-796 Singh St, Slater Ave. – 58 p. Rte 43 – Clifford Ave, 1713-1795 Happyvale Ave, 500-595 Holt St, Kobayashi Pl. – 69 p.

NORTH SHORE/BATCHELOR

Rte 137-144-244 Briar Ave, 106-330 Clapperton Rd, Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100-204 Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p. Rte 151 – 1020-1132 7th St, 1024 + 1112 8th St, Berkley Pl, Dundas St, Richmond Ave. – 73 p. Rte 153 – 640-680 Seton Pl, Kemano St. – 36 p. Rte 158 – Cornwall St, Hamilton St, Kent Ave, 1305-1385 Midway St, 1303-1393 Schubert Dr, 601-675 Windsor Ave.- 76 p. Rte 169 - 1212-1258 Linthrope Rd, Southview Terr. – 37 p.

WESTSYDE

Rte 235 – 3440-3808 Westsyde Rd. – 75 p. Rte 240 – 804-941 Dever Dr. – 42 p. Rte 252 – 813-897 Mayne Rd, 815-886 Morven Pl, 2770-2870 Westsyde Rd(Even Side). – 47 p.

LOGAN LAKE

Rte 911 – 242-278 Alder Dr, Aspen Cres, Birch Cres, 185-186 Ponderosa Ave. – 56 p


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Loving Memory of Derek John Galbraith

September 23, 1988 - June 24, 2008

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Loving Memory of

Obituaries

Obituaries

Verna Claire Pippolo

Verna Pippolo passed away peacefully on May 30, 2021. Survived by her children Marion, Jim and Donna; grandsons Logan Pippolo and Ben Pippolo; sister Jean Provost; many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her husband Fred; brother Douglas; sisters Dorothy, Muriel, Florence and Lorraine.

(nee: McKay)

November 1, 1955 - June 18, 1996

Verna was born in Royal Inland Hospital to Angus and June (née Roberts) McLeod. Her family moved from Westwold to their homestead in Campbell Range in 1939. Her schooling began in the one-room Campbell Range School; she graduated from Kam High.

A Wife A Mom Sometimes the hurt is too big for words…..

Forever on our minds and always missed! Hugs and Kisses Love Mom, Dad, Brent, Jess, Niece Devyn Lee and Nephews Derek Roy and Dillon John . Plus all your family and friends!

A Best Friend An Angel Remembered for how you lived your life and touched the lives of those around you, You will live in our hearts and souls forever.

Love Mel, Shane and Adam Obituaries

In Loving Memory of

Ray Bertoli May 16, 1931 – June 22, 2016

I Love You For your thoughtfulness and everything you’ve done to make our life together such a happy loving one.

Today, Tomorrow and Always Phyllis and Family

Obituaries

Obituaries

November 12, 1934 - May 30, 2021

Leanna Catherine Cassidy

A Daughter

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Obituaries

Micheal Humphrey Born July 24 1957, in Kamloops, BC to George and Ada Humphrey. He was one of the 6 (in order) starting with Morris “Moe”, (deceased), George “Joe”, Helen (Nels, deceased) Saemerow, him, Steve, and Christine Resch. Micheal partially grew up on the family farm in Knutsford and was sent to Saskatchewan following a tragedy in the family. Micheal returned to BC in his teens, and met, fell in love with, and married Debby Traub in November 1978, gaining a 2 year old girl, Jennifer and having another, Angela Christine. He was then “adopted” into the Traub “clan” claiming his spot in their family. Greener pastures always called to Mike and marriage didn’t prove any different. After a few years, he continued his journey solo, to follow his passion doing bodywork/painting vehicles, which he did off and on his whole life. Mike was happy being a rebel without a cause and rarely did anyone see him in a bad mood, he loved Mopar, beer, having a good time and family. Mike spent most of his years in the Kamloops area and left behind many siblings, cousins, nieces /nephews and his girls, Angela (Joey, Justice, Alix Caleb) and Jennifer (Jessie, Destiny, Cole and kids). He struggled with cancer for a few years and after a damaging bike incident, was admitted to RIH where he spent his last week in a rapid demise, leaving us to fly with the angels, May 30, 2021.

Verna was a hard worker all her life. Along with their parents, she and her siblings worked on the farm fencing, herding cattle on horseback, haying, butchering, shearing sheep, driving a team of horses - Verna did it all! She was a member of the Kamloops East 4H Beef Club and in 1952 represented BC at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto. She exhibited cattle at the Kamloops Fat Stock Show and the Provincial Winter Fair, winning Grand Champion with her Shorthorn steer in 1953. Verna was an extraordinary horsewoman: she was a barrel racer, she worked the ring at the Kamloops Indoor Rodeo and other rodeos and organized the Grand Entry at the Falkland Stampede. There wasn’t a horse she couldn’t ride. For a number of years she worked for BC Livestock Co-op at the stockyards on Lorne Street, penning cattle on horseback. Verna and Freddie cowboyed for local ranches: Piva’s, Gowan’s, Hamilton’s, Willow Ranch, to name a few. Verna and Fred were married for 54 years. In the 1990s they moved back to the McLeod place at Campbell Range. She was always willing to lend a hand, help a neighbour and they helped her in return. Thank you to the doctors, nurses and staff at Overlander Extended Care Hospital for the care you gave our Mom. A celebration of Verna’s life will be held at the Barnhartvale Community Hall at a future date.

Michelle Christine Mailhot - Gannon

Skylar, Mya, and Leo.

It is with deep sadness we announce on Monday June 7, 2021 Michelle Christine Mailhot - Gannon loving wife, mother, and sister passed away peacefully with her family and dogs by her side after a long courageous battle with breast cancer. Michelle was known for her million dollar smile which brightened up any room she entered. She was passionate about her family especially her two boys Ethan and Elijah. She had an incredible love for the outdoors where she hiked regularly with her dogs

Michelle is survived by her husband Kent, sons Ethan (Camryn), Elijah, and step-son Keenan, sisters Leanna (Brad), Nicole, Natasha (Bob), step-mother Toni (Dan), brother and sister in-laws Kevin, Lynn, Kerry, Colleen, Karen and many nephew and nieces. Pre-deceased by her adoring and beloved grandmother Edna Curry. My wife, friend, and soulmate you are the most amazing, loving, unique person I’ve been so fortunate to have had in my life, rest in peace babe.

We will miss him dearly. RIP dad xo.

Special thanks to the BC Sheriffs Services for their astounding continuous support for Michelle and her family throughout her journey.

Celebration of life to be held at a later date. For details go to: Mikesmem@yahoo.com

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Breast Cancer Foundation or the Kamloops SPCA.

Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

A celebration of life will be scheduled later this year.

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

Obituaries

Obituaries

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Ben Beadle

Dave was born in Powell River to Melvin and Meta Zirul in 1945. Over the years, he lived in Powell River, Kamloops, Victoria, Edmonton, NWT and Prince George. It was in Victoria that he met and married his loving wife of 53 years, Sharon, and it was in Kamloops that they returned together upon retirement, as it was always dear to his heart.

Dad was first and foremost a family man, his family meant absolutely everything to him. He was so proud of all of his children, grandchildren and great grandkids they meant the world to him. Our Dad only had a grade 5 education, was raised in an orphanage, yet he had more common sense than anybody I know and he went through life using that as his guiding factor. He is survived by our Mom, Shirley, married 69 years to the day, and an extended family including: Ernie (Nancy Weatherhead) Beadle, Gary and Joyce Beadle, Carol (Gord Brower) Bailey, Courtenay and Lee Johnston (Reed and Hazel), Lindsay and Thomas Linford (Shia and Gus), Marie (Chris) Bailey (Ava and Parker), Matt Ross, Ryan and Tara Bailey (Bryce), Darrel and Gina Beadle (Charlee), Mandy and Steve Gregorio (Callum and Everett) and Cathy (Dave) Stephanie and Jennifer. Mom and Dad loved the outdoors, camping and fishing, horse back riding in the mountains, exploring and travelling in their truck and camper, truly avid outdoors people. Dad spent his entire working life as a welder/fabricator, and could just about build anything you could imagine. If he could see it, he could build it. Dad was our family rock, always there for each and every one of his family, through good times and bad, he was always there to love and support them. Dad was an inspiration to all that knew him, always had a smile on his face, always ready to lend a helping hand, full of practical jokes and/or cheap shot to get someone’s attention and smile.

We will miss him dearly. Special thank you to Dr. Bantock and Dr. Wynn and all the staff at KSV for going above and beyond the call of duty to take care of Dad during these difficult times. Also a big shout out to the Kamloops Alzheimer’s Society for their wealth of knowledge and help through the education about Alzheimer’s and how to help those affected by this horrible disease. There will be no public service for Dad as per his request, family gathering only.

On March 10, 2021, at the age of 66, the beautiful soul of Bernice Liversedge left this earth to go home. She is lovingly remembered and survived by her mother Lucille Shunter, as well as her daughters Jennifer (David), Katherine (Ted) and Susan (Kyle), as well as her six grandchildren. Bernice spent the first part of her life growing up in Lumby, BC, until she moved to Kamloops where she lived and raised her three daughters and spent time with family and friends. Bernice was an avid homemaker and the ‘original Martha Stewart’ decorating her daughters’ bikes for bike parades, stitching home made Halloween costumes until wee hours of the morning and hosting family dinners at Christmas. She loved canning, hunting and fishing. She loved the arts, was a skilled seamstress, singer and piano player. She was a talented painter, specifically flowers and landscapes. She worked as a logger and lived life on her own terms and forged her own path. She valiantly fought many battles with her health until she died, surrounded by her family. The family would like to extend our heartfelt thanks and gratitude to the Paramedics and Emergency and Intensive Care Staff at Royal Inland Hospital.

Obituaries

It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of David Lee Zirul of Kamloops, BC, on June 4, 2021 at 75 years of age.

Our Dad passed away peacefully, after a comeback of prostrate cancer and frontal lobo dementia resulting from an earlier stroke. He passed away with Mom and all of his family at his side while in care at Kamloops Seniors Village. He defied all the odds and managed to live to see their 69th anniversary, truly a remarkable accomplishment in today’s world.

Bernice Liversedge

Obituaries

David Lee Zirul

October 12, 1931 - May 23, 2021

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

Obituaries

Dave was an incredibly intelligent, skilled, hard working, honourable, and loving man. He was well educated, both formally and informally. He received his B.Sc. Honours at UVic in 1967, and his Master of Science at the University of Alberta in 1970. He continued his thirst for, and accumulation of knowledge throughout his life. He was an avid reader, accumulating extensive knowledge in many areas. Dave was never one to be idle, keeping busy and working on projects (generally for others) right to his last day. He was skilled in woodworking, metal work, lapidary and house repairs (all types). It seemed that there wasn’t a thing he couldn’t fix. He will also be lovingly remembered for sharing his knowledge, skills and abilities with others, patiently teaching wire wrapping and lapidary techniques at the Thompson Valley Rock Shop. Dave’s biggest loves were the outdoors and his family and close friends. He loved hunting, fishing, rockhounding, hiking and just going for a drive and exploring, and loved when he could share these activities with those close to him. Some of his biggest pleasures in his later years were his grandchildren. He only wished for more time with them to see them grow up and to share his hobbies, knowledge and expertise with them as he so freely shared with others. Dave loved his family and friends completely and will be sadly missed by all those he touched. Dave is predeceased by his parents, Mel and Meta, and is survived by his wife, Sharon, his children, John (Chelan) and Allison; his grandchildren, Katherine, Rebecca and Benjamin; and his brother, Graham (Brenda). A Celebration of Life will be held at a future date.

Call to place an announcement

In lieu of flowers, please send any donations to Royal Inland Hospital Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society.

250-371-4949

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

James Richard Martin Boucher 1983 - 2021

James has passed away, leaving us far too soon. James was the beloved and loving son of Dale Bass (Alan) of Kamloops and Mike Boucher (Karen) of London, Ontario, brother to Carrie and Mikey of London, Liam and Sean of Kamloops and step-brother to Graydon (Kelly) Marshall of London. James was uncle to Ethan, Keira, Gabrielle, Gideon, Vedder and Finnley. Jamie will always be remembered for his kindness, thoughtfulness, patience and generosity toward his colleagues and those less fortunate. He spent his early years in London, making many friends who still fondly remember many hours of dark tag, street hockey and bike riding. He left for Kamloops for the final years of high school, making many more lifetime friends, and then returned to London. Jamie is pre-deceased by grandparents Bruce and June Martin and Lucy Boucher. He will long be remembered in our hearts.

A funeral ceremony will be held on Thursday, June 24, 2021, at Hillside Cemetery in Kamloops at 1:00 pm.

Due to current Covid restrictions a memorial service will take place at a later date in London.

Donations in lieu of flowers, can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

In memory of Jamie, do a kindness for someone who needs it.

Pennies

From

Heaven

by Charles L. Mashburn

I found a penny today, Just laying on the ground But it’s not just a penny,                      He said angels           He said when an    They toss a penny down               of your frown So don’t pass by that penny, When you’re feeling blue         That an angel   

Follow us @KamThisWeek

Ask DRAKE Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW! Q. It’s illegal to scatter ashes, isn’t it? A. I get this question often. In a word... no. Now, you have to respect private property laws, municipal and other laws around “disposing” anything. But before you scatter, call us or drop by to discuss this. There are things you need to know before you scatter; afterwards, it’s too late.

Drake Cremation & Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne • 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 • DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Elaine Margaret Chambers (Dale, Maduik) It is with profound sadness we announce the passing of our wonderful Mother on June 13, 2021 after her long battle with lung cancer. Born in Edmonton, Alberta, Mom lived in Kamloops from the age of 10. She leaves to mourn her children Raelle (Mitch) Kendall, Maxine Boisclair, Jim (Jessica) Chambers and Elaine (Gerry) Klein and her beloved grandchildren Mishel, Connor, Braden, Josh, Jacob, Shae, Mckayla, Kyliegh, Ashley, Broden, Hunter, James, Julia, Jillene and Brody and greatgrandchildren Charlie, Taz, Elaina, Silas, Amelia, Wynn, Lyanna. She was the world’s best ‘Nana’. She also leaves behind her brother Jim (Pat) Dale and sister Sharon Roblin, numerous nieces and nephews as well as cherished members of the Maduik and Chambers families. Friends dear to her heart were numerous. Her deep connection with Dolores Daoust and Marlene Sharpe cannot go without special mention. Mom worked as an MOA for Dr. Simon Treissman with whom she had a special bond. She retired in 2010. Mom was a very loving, fun, attractive, intelligent, athletic woman who always supported her friends and family. She travelled quite extensively and was also much admired by the local pickleball community as a gracious player who was also quick to volunteer. A devoted sports fan, her life revolved around playing sports and most notably cheering on those she loved. Her grandchildren meant the world to her and she was ‘Center Stage’ in their lives. She was predeceased by her sister Diana and her husband Doug whose adventures together over the years with the BC Trapper’s Association, were epic. Mom was a very kind, cordial woman and she was dignified and stoic in the face of her diagnosis, right up until her passing. We will never forget how deeply she impacted all of our lives and we will miss her always. Please join us for an open house, outdoor Celebration of Mom’s life on Sunday, June 27, 2021 at her home, 405 McGowan Avenue, from 11:00 till 3:00. Covid protocols will be in place. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Elizabeth (Beth) Ritchie It is with great sadness that we mourn the loss of Elizabeth (Beth) Ritchie, who passed away on May 2, 2021. Beth was a beloved wife, mother, sister, aunt, grandmother and great grandmother. She was born in Cudworth, Saskatchewan on May 24, 1929, the eldest of four children to Sophia and John Saplywy. Drought and the Depression caused the family to relocate west to Trail, BC in the fall of 1941. It was in Trail where she met the love of her life, Al Ritchie, whom she married in 1966 and where they raised their two children, Blaine and Bonnie. In 1970 the family moved to Kamloops where Beth had various careers in fashion, cosmetics and jewellery. Beth was a dedicated mother and a hard worker, which never went unnoticed and resulted in her often finding herself promoted to managerial roles. Whether it was at work or at home, Beth was the lady in charge. Anyone who knew Beth admired her poise, kindness and generosity. Her home would always be open to friends and family where she would make them feel welcome and special. We all fondly remember the gleam in her eye when she opened the door and ushered us in for a warm hug. Beth was a loving wife and mother, a joyous grandma, greatgrandma and a cherished aunt. Her greatest joy was cooking meals for her guests that were better than any you would find on a five star restaurant’s menu. She loved to host family celebrations where she would cook traditional meals for every occasion. Her freezer was always well stocked with borscht and perogies that inevitably found their way to the homes of her guests. There would even be bags of saved bones and scraps for the “great grand-puppies” as she always ensured not a soul was missed or forgotten. Beth was predeceased by her parents; her brother Paul; sister Mary; her son Blaine and two nephews Mark and Branty. She is survived by her loving husband of 55 years, Alvin Ritchie; her brother Karol Saplywy (Elizabeth); her daughter Bonnie; her granddaughter Charisse; her grandsons Dustin (Renee) and Josh (Chantal) and her great-grandchildren Harper, Elliott, Benjamin, Owen and Logan. She will also be missed by numerous nieces, nephews, great nieces, great nephews and of course friends. Beth will forever be a prominent fixture in the hearts of those whose lives she touched.

Laurie Allan Parsons

August 10, 1947 - April 19, 2021

Bruce Allan Miller

Laurie passed away on April 19, 2021 at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice in Kamloops, BC.

Bruce had an unquenchable thirst for life and lived it to the fullest, he will be remembered from his smiling face, hard working mentality, and the fact he would give you the shirt of his back and always lending a helping hand. In addition to being a top-notch friend, and a loving brother and son he loved his children and was overjoyed the day he became a grandfather. We miss Bruce and anyone’s life he touched knows what a heart of gold is, and we know wherever he is, he’s wearing that same wonderful smile.

He is survived by his wife Joanne, son Darren, granddaughters Kaylee and Jaycee, sister Sharon, brother Brian, sister-in-law Judy, sister Sharon Almas, brother Brian Parker, niece Trina, nephews Kevin, Shawn, David John, Benjamin and Matthew, godson Darshan Sidhoo, goddaughter Kendra Gattey and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins.

Bruce is survived by his daughters (Chelsea), (Devon), and (Leanne), their mother (Donna), granddaughter (Cali), and brothers (Everett), (Randy), and (Shawn).

Sincere thanks to Dr. McDonald and staff at the Kamloops Cancer Clinic, Dr. Jason O’Connell and all the angels at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice.

He is predeceased by his parents (Mary) and (Bill), and brothers (Dale), (Raymond), and (Morris).

In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice or the BC Cancer Clinic.

March 12, 1953 - April 16, 2021

The family will be holding a service on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 at Holy Trinity Parish in North Vancouver.

A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date.

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of despair

Obituaries

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Obituaries

Clara (Dacre) Emery

September 25, 1937 - June 7, 2021 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Clara Leone Emery, beloved wife of John Edward Emery and mother of Brenda Christine Emery of Merritt, BC and Stephen John Emery of Langley, BC. Clara and her husband John shared 63 years of marriage together and were long-time residents of Kamloops. Clara is celebrated by many loving memories with her extended family, friends, husband, and children including Brenda (partner Ben Shpeley and daughter Shena Yoshida) and John (wife Mel-Lynda Emery, son Liam Emery, daughter Alicia and son-in-law Jonathan with children Lillian Marjorie and Carlyle Frederick). To her grandchildren and great-grandchildren she was “little grandma”. Clara was an excellent baker, and took great pride in her home and family. Clara cared deeply for everyone in her close circle of family and friends.

She will be dearly missed. Celebration of life October 2, 2021 to be held at the Emery home in Merritt .

Margaret “Maggie” Carter Margaret “Maggie” Carter (née Wilson), born February 25, 1946, passed away peacefully, on June 7, 2021 after a short, courageous battle with brain cancer. When Maggie wasn’t filling her home with warmth, kindness and the smell of fresh cookies, she could be found in her gorgeous gardens, watering and weeding. Maggie leaves behind many family and friends who dearly loved her. A special thank you to the wonderful women of the Beaton Road House. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the B.C. Children’s Hospital. A small, private celebration of life will be held at a later date. For more on this beautiful lady go to legacy.com.

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.


A46

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

VOTING NOW OPEN!

Kamloops’s original and biggest contest to decide who’s the best of the best in our community is now open for voting! Vote for your favourite business today in more than 200 categories to be entered to win an AMAZING #YKAStrong prize package!

WWW.KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM/CONTESTS All ballots must be received or entered online. Employees of Kamloops This Week and their immediate families are not eligible. • Voting ends Sunday July 25, 2021


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A47

SPONSORED CONTENT

Dearborn Ford embraces the future

JUSTIN GROVER General Manager

A Kamloops auto icon is coming to Kamloops’ original Ford dealership. After 20 years in the auto industry and more than 16 years with Kamloops Ford Lincoln, Justin Grover is coming over to Dearborn Ford as the dealership’s new General Manager. “It’s great to be given an exciting new opportunity within the same company in a community that has been

so supportive over the years,” says Justin. “Thank you to the Cam Clark Auto Group for trusting me and giving me this opportunity, and thank you to all those people that offered assistance along the way.” Dearborn Ford, named for the birthplace of Henry Ford which became a major hub of the automobile industry, opened in Kamloops in 1926 with its first location on the 100 block of Victoria Street. Back then the only cars sold at the dealership were the Model T and Model A, and the entire staff included a bookkeeper, two mechanics and a salesperson. The company was a great success, eventually moving to a larger location at 520 Victoria St. in 1945 and then to its current location along the East Trans Canada Highway in Valleyview in 1968 after it was bought by Ron Bacon and Doug Westwood. Today Dearborn, part of

the Cam Clark Auto Group, is a far cry from the two models it sold back in ‘26, with hundreds of new and used vehicles to choose from, including North Americas best-selling truck line in the F-series and its little brother the Ford Ranger. Ford has also answered the call for a light duty truck with the addition of the Ford Maverick which is estimated to be available in the fall of 2021. It’s that forward thinking that has Justin bullish on the future of the automotive industry and Ford in particular. “We’re never standing still,” he said. “It’s about constant innovation and improvement without sacrificing quality and tradition.” The whole team at Dearborn are very excited to see the future under Justin’s leadership and knowledge of business. Congratulations Justin and welcome aboard!

100 block Victoria St. location in 1926

520 Victoria St. location in 1945

Current location at 2555 East Trans Canada Hwy

2021 Escape. Hit More Streets.

SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

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VEHICLE OFFERS: DEALERS MAY SELL OR LEASE FOR LESS. OFFERS MAY BE CANCELLED AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTICE (EXCEPT IN QUEBEC). SEE YOUR FORD DEALER FOR COMPLETE OFFER DETAILS OR CALL THE FORD CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP CENTRE AT 1-800-565-3673. FOR FACTORY ORDERS, A CUSTOMER MAY EITHER TAKE ADVANTAGE OF RAINCHECKABLE ELIGIBLE FORD RETAIL CUSTOMER PROMOTIONAL INCENTIVES/OFFERS AVAILABLE AT THE TIME OF VEHICLE FACTORY ORDER OR TIME OF VEHICLE DELIVERY, BUT NOT BOTH OR COMBINATIONS THEREOF.

DL#5917

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amloops This Week is pleased to present the winners of the third annual Community Leader Awards. These awards recognize people who demonstrate leadership behind the scenes, whose effect is felt as much as it is seen, to give them a chance to shine. Here are the categories we’re recognizing some very worth Kamloopsians in this year:

MENTOR: Makes a positive contribution by being a true leader. An influential counselor, teacher or educator that provides support or sponsorship. Demonstrates a high level of ethics and professional standards, is an inspirational motivator, excellent communicator, good listener and a reliable resource to the community.

COACH: Makes a positive contribution to their sport. Is exemplary in developing skills and confidence in participants. A role model who inspires and encourages high athletic achievement.

COURAGE: This person has risen above adversity or formidable challenges to become a success. As a result, they have had a positive effect on the people around them.

COMMUNITY BUILDER: Someone who has taken the initiative to engage a variety of local residents in an innovative or new community project or event. The initiative may assist different groups to work together, address a gap in community participation, or result in a more inclusive, engaged community.

FRESH IMPACT: This person has been in Kamloops less than 3 years but is already making an impact in the community in a leadership position in business, volunteer work or other community involvement.

VOLUNTEER: This individual makes a positive contribution to the community by volunteering their time to a variety of causes. They are dedicated to making a difference in several initiatives.

ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER: Everyone is talking about the carbon footprint, but this award celebrates a person who is walking their talk, whether it be riding their bike to work yearround, reusing and reducing, and taking great steps in setting an example for others to follow.

YOUTH VOLUNTEER: A youth that is 19 or under that makes a positive contribution in the community through volunteering. Someone who has committed to making a difference to an organization or individual.

As a community newspaper, we’re all about telling stories, and that’s one of the criteria we kept in mind when selecting our winners — inspiring people with inspiring stories. It’s a pleasure and a

privilege to be able to tell these stories in these pages and we’re confident you’ll find them as inspiring as we did. When you’re finished, we think you’ll feel even better about the community you call home. In our business, great ideas like this don’t come to life without the support of community-minded advertisers. We’re so pleased that seven local businesses stepped forward right away to say “yes” to this initiative to make it happen. Our sincere thanks go out to the sponsors of our award categories: • Petland, sponsor of the Community Builder Award; • Runners Sole, sponsor of the Volunteer Award; • Chris Chan, Realtor, sponsor of the Mentor Award; • Johnson Walsh Plumbing and Heating, sponsor of the Courage Award; • BC Wildlife Park, sponsor of the Youth Volunteer Award; • Absorbent Products, sponsor of the Environmental Leader Award; • Venture Kamloops, sponsor of the Fresh Impact Award. Please consider supporting their businesses as they support our awards and our community at large – it’s more important than ever now. Enjoy reading all about these inspiring members of our community. — TIM SHOULTS Operations Manager, Kamloops This Week


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COACH

— BRAD YAMAOKA —

I

n the spring of 2020, parents wanted to get their kids in gear and get their butts off of the couch amid the pandemic. Brad Yamaoka was there to crack the whip. The former CFLer and 2020 Kamloops Sports Hall of Fame inductee is being honoured in the Coach category in KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Awards, nominated for volunteering his time in an endeavour that morphed into the Kamloops Elite Football Academy. “It’s just something I wanted to do to keep the kids busy and

my kid was involved, so it was a little easier for me to deal with that,” Yamaoka said. Organized sports in B.C. were shut down in Match 2020 due to the pandemic. Yamaoka started putting three high school-aged football players through the paces, rudimentary non-contact work that adhered to COVID-19 protocols. “It was basically just running,” Yamaoka said with a laugh. That appealed to other parents. Restrictions eased heading into the summer of 2020, allowing

Yamaoka to register his growing group as a private academy. The gridiron gang grew to about 25 players and competed in two exhibition games last fall against teams from Vernon. “It was good for them to get out,” Yamaoka said. “It was almost a social gathering for them. At the beginning, we had to be careful with all the COVID protocols, but we were able to get them some gym time and into the weight room and onto the field.” Yamaoka was praised in his nomination form.

“His encouragement of young female players has led to at least one young lady playing tackle football longer than she otherwise would have due to her high levels of trust and respect for him,” the nomination sheet reads. “Many young people would have lost interest in the sport without his commitment.” The Kamloops Elite Football Academy operated this past spring, from March until June. “I never expected it [an award], obviously, but it’s always nice to get recognized for something you do,” Yamaoka said.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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COMMUNITY BUILDER

orah DeWalt-Gagnon has been named the winner in the Community Builder category of KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Awards. For the past 10 years, DeWaltGagnon has worked at New Gold’s New Afton mine, currently serving as the mine’s First Nations co-ordinator. She attended Thompson Rivers University and earned an undergraduate degree in business administration. Initially, the plan was to attend law school, but following a summer student opportunity with New Gold, DeWaltGagnon decided to stick around. “I never knew I wanted to work in mining,” she said. “I didn’t really know much about it at the time. But after having an opportunity to work there for the summer, I really enjoyed the culture, the people and the fast-paced environment.” As the First Nations co-ordinator, DeWalt-Gagnon helps Indigenous candidates find employment at the mine. She also provides cultural awareness training at mine sites “just to provide education and awareness … about what it means to be Indigenous,” she said. DeWalt-Gagnon is Secwépemc and was born and raised in Kamloops. Her community contributions go back further from her decade at the mine, too. In 2007, she was named a princess under the Kamloops Ambassadors program, which provides train-

— KORAH DEWALT-GAGNON —

ing and guidance to young women in the community. After receiving mentorship herself, she has since returned to that program as a mentor, addressing new ambassadors about being a female leader and what it has meant for her career journey. These days, her work in community building is looking forward — by nearly a decade. The Beyond New Afton project considers what will happen to the mine, its workers and the community after it closes. “Our hopes are that we won’t have to use this plan and, through exploration, we’ll be able to extend the mine life, but we want a plan we can use at any point in the future, if required,” she said. The plan follows the closure experience at New Gold’s Cerro San Pedro mine in Mexico. DeWaltGagnon embraced the opportunity to learn from that experience and began surveying New Afton employees and community members for their thoughts. To date, more than 65 per cent of New Afton employees have filled out the survey. As a mother of three, DeWaltGagnon said she feels lucky to be able to work where she does, in her home territory. “I’m really grateful for the opportunity that I have to do work that I’m passionate about, all while being able to support my family and live in my traditional territory at Tk’emlúps,” she said.

CONGRATULATIONS! KORA DE WALT-GAGNON has been awarded the

COMMUNITY BUILDER AWARD for 2021

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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VOLUNTEER

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eing nominated — and winning — in the volunteer category in KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Award caught Nikki Lussier unawares. “I was just completely surprised, I was totally caught off guard,” Lussier said. “I”m just really humbled that this nomination came from some people that I volunteer closely with. I’m just really grateful and kind of humbled — and a little bit overwhelmed.” Lussier, of Four Paws Food Bank, said she feels especially lucky that she has excellent volunteer folks around her, along with strong support from within the community and local businesses. Four Paws Food Bank is operated 100 per cent by volunteers and is completely dependent on donations from the community. The pet food bank fills an important need; at times, it arranges emergency veterinary care and provide medications. Four Paws also picks up and drops off animals when needed. Lussier said during to the pandemic, volunteers had to move their operation from the parking lot of The Mustard Seed Kamloops due to physical distancing challenges. Four Paws Food Bank now operates out of the parking lot of the Holy Trinity church, at 109

— NIKKI LUSSIER —

Tranquille Rd. in North Kamloops. There, volunteers serve clients — including support workers on behalf of Interior Health, ASK Wellness Society clients and a wide range of people in the community who need help feeding their pets, for both short-term and long-term stints. “Cats and dogs are definitely the most common, but we also have stuff covered for all the little critters, too,” Lussier said. “We’ve got birds, rabbits, fish, lizards. You name it, we have it.” Lussier has also created a program that supplies small emergency kits of basic pet needs for people accessing the Y Women’s Emergency Shelter. She manages Four Paws’ social media accounts, with Facebook being the primary connection point for clients sourcing food or for people looking for volunteer opportunities. Lussier is responsible for all communications with clients, case workers, community partners and the general public. Her compassion, dedication, support and advocacy for animals and their owners is being recognized as an invaluable contribution and example to the community. Lussier started with Kamloops Four Paws Food Bank in 2018. “I thought it was an excellent fit for how I wanted to volunteer in the community,” she said, noting she

got involved on the fostering side of the food bank, with the shelters, and eventually joined the board. Lussier’s advice for others looking to get involved with a not forprofit organization: “Be super clear on your mandate and not going too far out of it. There’s often a lot of temptation to want to help everybody and you simply cannot do that. Get good at one thing before expanding and make sure you have

the resources to do that. Surround yourself with great people who are committed to the same cause.” Looking forward to post-pandemic times, Lussier said she wants to be able to meet everyone again, noting working separately due to COVID-19 hasn’t allowed volunteers to gather as a group. To learn more about Four Paws Food Bank, or to volunteer, visit its Facebook page.

VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

Congratulations to NIKKI LUSSIER

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who was chosen Kamloops Volunteer of the Year in the Community Leader Awards. The award is sponsored by Runners Sole, who value volunteers in their community.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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YOUTH VOLUNTEER

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— AMANDA McGILLIVRAY —

manda McGillivray had no idea she had been nominated — and no idea how much she would love volunteer work. The former Sahali secondary student has been been honoured in the Youth Volunteer category of KTW’s 2021 KTW Community Leader Awards. The Youth Volunteer Award is given to a person 19 years of age or or under who makes a positive contribution in the community through volunteering. For Amanda, that commitment began when she was just nine years old and volunteering with the Tod Mountain 4-H Club. She has spent the past 10 years involved in 4-H events such as bottle drives and public speaking competitions and in judging and livestock cattle projects. “It’s really helpful in connecting kids from farming and ranching backgrounds,” said Amanda, whose family owns the 100-plusyear old McGillivray Land and Livestock just south of Kamloops. In her spare time, Amanda has also volunteered at A.E. Perry elementary, painting murals with inspirational quotes at the school’s entrance. “I usually go in at the beginning of the school year and maybe once in the fall and before Christmas break and change them up seasonally,” Amanda said. For the past few years, she has been

a volunteer at Royal Inland Hospital’s afternoon auxiliary program, helping to make patients’ stays more comfortable. As a member of that program, Amanda would visit with patients and take orders for the gift shop. Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, that program was halted in March of 2020. “That was sad because I really liked going,” Amanda said, noting she was surprised at how much she appreciated that work. “I really enjoyed going around and talking to patients and hear-

We Appreciate Our Volunteers

ing their stories and hanging out with them,” Amanda said. She said she got involved at the hospital because she wanted to expand her volunteer work to more traditional areas and branch out beyond her own interests via 4-H. She said volunteering is something she enjoys doing because it’s a productive way to spend time and stay connected to the community, while meeting new people and giving back. The soon-to-be 19-year-old is attending the University of Victoria this fall and hopes to get

involved doing volunteer work with the school’s students’ union. Amanda said her advice for other youth looking to get involved in volunteer work is to just dive in and see how it goes. “The biggest barrier that I went through in getting started with volunteering is I was really nervous and apprehensive about starting something new,” she said. “But I think just starting it and seeing what happens is a good mentality to go about it because I surprised myself in how much I enjoyed it and how much it added to my life.”

CONGRATULATIONS TO

AMANDA MCGILLIVRAY

WHO WAS CHOSEN KAMLOOPS YOUTH VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR IN THE COMMUNITY LEADER AWARDS.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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MENTOR

— KRISTA FARADAY —

“I

’m incredibly grateful and honoured,” said Krista Faraday, owner of Academy of Dance. Faraday is the winner of the Mentor category of KTW’s 2021 Community Leaders Award. “I’m totally surprised,” Faraday said. “It’s always been my goal to be a mentor to youth in Kamloops and to my students.” Faraday works with students ages two to 18. She grew up dancing and knew she wanted to be a teacher. At the studio where she was teaching, the owner decided to sell the business. Faraday purchased and re-branded it and started her own dance school. Now, 19 years later, Faraday operates out of three locations — teaching most forms of dance, including ballet, tap, jazz and lyrical, while also offering specialized kids’ programs. She has also become more connected in the community of Kamloops. Faraday sees most dancers start when they are two years old and they continue with her until they graduate from high school. “We watch them fully grow up and go through all their ups and downs,” she said. “It is really something special. It’s something I didn’t really realize it was part of it when I first became a dance teacher and a studio owner. “We’re so much more important

CONGRATULATIONS!

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than them coming in, dancing and then going home,” Faraday said. “There’s a lot more that happens.” Seeing kids make life-long friendships, building connections and supporting families through hard times are what Faraday sees as her role within the dance community. Looking beyond recent pandemic restrictions, Faraday is hopeful traditional performances in front of live audiences will soon return. “We kept them [performances] going during the pandemic as best we could,” she said. “We did lots of stuff virtually and changed the format so that they still felt they were getting that opportunity. It just looked different.” Referring to a return to live performances Faraday quipped: “You’re gonna see tonnes of dances all shaped around the pandemic.” Faraday’s advice for anyone opening a business? “It’s important to believe that you are worth it. Your way is the right way. Just believe in yourself and do it.” As well, she added: “You don’t have to do it all. Decide what you’re good at. Something like bookkeeping, if that’s not your strength, hire a bookkeeper. You can sleep well at night.” As she reviewed the past year, Faraday attributes her business success to her staff and a group of supportive parents.

Thank you for all your time and hard work you truly are an inspiration!


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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COURAGE

— NEIL RACHYNSKI —

N

eil Rachynski says he doesn’t feel brave or courageous, but how he dealt with his cancer diagnosis says otherwise. In the spring of 2018, Rachynski left Kamloops with wife Julie, who was called to Toronto for a work opportunity. The couple’s two adolescent children stayed behind and Rachynski, a former employee of Kamloops This Week, planned on beginning work in the fall. But around that time, he began experiencing flu-like symptoms that lasted for weeks. After visiting walkin clinics and receiving treatment, but not getting better, Rachynski knew something was wrong. “I was run down. No energy. I’d walk down the hall and get fatigued or sometimes dizzy. And it would progress,” he said. His wife took him to the emergency room, where Rachynski repeatedly passed out. Doctors investigated with blood work and X-rays. Rachynski remembers the moment well. A doctor met him in an examination room and told him he had pneumonia. “And I remember thinking, ‘OK, the pneumonia was the good news,’” he said. Rachynski had leukemia, a cancer that starts in the blood stem cells. Treatment started quickly and it turns out his Toronto locale was

pretty ideal. The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre was nearby. But the diagnosis was a big interruption. “Everything stops,” he said. The couple flew their two children out to Toronto to break the news. It was tough news to reveal to family, especially with other effects Rachynski was feeling, such as issues with his vocal chords — meaning his wife was often the one making those calls. Blood transfusions and chemotherapy followed and visitors during an intense six-week period of treatment in hospital had to don masks, gloves and gowns. “I’m a pretty independent person and I found myself very dependent on other people for support,” Rachynski said. “Not just nurses, doctors and lab people, but your family and your friends.” He said messages of support from friends and family helped him through the process. But his own attitude also played a big role. “I remember thinking, there’s all these things I can’t control, but the thing I can control is how I feel about it. I can control my attitude and get on board with the program, make the best of it and try to be positive and decide what my attitude is going to be every day,” he said. Facing cancer was not an easy task for Rachynski and his family. His

wife lost her mother to cancer just a few years earlier. He has also lost a best friend to cancer and the couple’s children lost a friend to leukemia. “So, it was a hard belief for us that this was going to be a happy ending. We hadn’t seen very many happy endings from people in our world,” he said. But the ending to his story is a positive one. The experience changed his outlook on life and,

now, he’s always striving to be better. Rachynski’s leukemia went into remission in 2019 and he returned to live in Kamloops a short while later. He now works for the Thompson Region of Division of Family Practice, which represents family doctors, nurse practitioners and midwives — a job he calls “a real fit.” “I’m very lucky. I’m outrageously lucky,” he said. “I’m aware of that every day.”

COURAGE AWARD

Congratulations to NEIL RACHYNSKI

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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FRESH IMPACT AWARD

Sponsored by

— NIC ZDUNICH —

S

mall-town Saskatchewan native Nic Zdunich came to Kamloops on a whim to be near his sister. From there came myriad opportunities. He ended up studying abroad in Milan, Italy, through Thompson Rivers University and obtained his bachelor of arts degree, majoring in communications. The 32-year-old said he wanted to stay in Kamloops due to the semi-arid desert climate. He is currently working as a community builder for the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce. “Kamloops is just this place that is so full of potential,” he said. Zdunich is being recognized among this year’s community leaders in the category of Fresh Impact, due to his recent arrival in the city. Zdunich said he is honoured to be recognized. His role of community builder entails strategic communications and such professionals usually work in the background, he said — not often the ones in the spotlight. “I’m very touched,” he said. Zdunich said he works on a small, but mighty team at the chamber, which is tak-

ing a long-term view of the community in planning what Kamloops will look like in 2050. He said he works at the intersection of business and community, meeting with members, planning projects and working to raise the profile of the city. One such project currently underway is a parklet, essentially a small green space that will be piloted in parking spaces outside the chamber office, downtown at 615 Victoria St. It is just one innovative project in which Zdunich is involved. His partner works with the Kamloops Food Policy Council and Zdunich said he also has an interest in the issue of food security, stemming from his Prairie roots. Zdunich hails from Kenaston, a farming town of only a few hundred people just south of Saskatoon. It is known not only for its farming, but also for having what is dubbed to be the world’s largest non-melting snowman. Zdunich has travelled a lot since living in Saskatchewan, through studying abroad and otherwise, and plans to continue building community for the foreseeable future in Kamloops.

COMMUNITY LEADER AWARD

CONGRATULATIONS, NIC ZDUNICH Kamloops Chamber of Commerce Community Builder, Nic Zdunich has just been awarded The Community Leader Award for his impact and leadership in business, volunteer work and community involvement.

LEADING THE WAY IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

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ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER — DAN GROESS —

post-Halloween walk home down a candy wrapperladen street in Brocklehurst five years ago got Dan Groess thinking about the environment. The owner of A Groess Underground, an underground location and drain-cleaning business, had just dropped his daughter off at school and decided then and there to make environmentally friendly choices. Groess has been named KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Award winner, which honours an environmental leader who endeavours to reduce their carbon footprint by taking great steps in setting an example for others. Following that fateful walk five years ago, Groess started an annual community cleanup — with exceptions, due to COVID-19. The event is held on Earth Day in April, with Groess and a team of volunteers picking up trash in the Brocklehurst area. He hopes to now expand the annual cleanup city-wide. “I’m just one guy, but I’m able to cleanup all of Brock in one day with the help of my community members and friends,” Groess said, noting he is looking forward to getting everyone together again for future community cleanups as pandemic restrictions ease. Groess has also demonstrated envi-

ronmental consciousness in a number of distinct ways through his business. He has replaced toxic drain-cleaning chemicals with a high-pressure hot water flush to remove grease and debris, which is more than just better for the environment. “If I can replace those draincleaning chemicals, which don’t do that great of a job in the first place, if I can replace that with water, one house at a time, I’ll be making a difference,” Groess said. Groess has a solar panel fastened to his truck, meaning he can run his equipment off solar energy. He has

also made the switch from diesel to kerosene in his pressure washer. “It’s a little bit more expensive, but it’s definitely a better, cleaner burn and I don’t have to use as much,” he said. To celebrate his five years in business last month, Groess is now part of the City of Kamloops’ Adopt a Road program, taking on Windbreak Street and Tranquille Road from Windbreak to Kamloops Airport with a minimum of three cleanups per year. Groess said he had time to think on that walk home five years ago, deciding he could be doing more to help

out with the environment and wanting to serve as an example for his daughter and the community at large. “We’ve been talking about litter for years and it doesn’t seem like anything is changing, so be the change you want to see,” Groess said. Groess said he was ecstatic, humbled and honoured when he learned he had won the environmentalist award in KTW’s 2021 Community Leader Award. “The environment has always been a big part of my life and anything I can do to protect it is our mission statement,” he said.

CONGRATULATIONS TO DAN GROESS

WHO WAS CHOSEN ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER OF THE YEAR IN THE COMMUNITY LEADER AWARDS.

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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

THE AWARD-WINNING PROJECT RETURNS!

Last year, Kamloops showed just what a kind community it was in Kindloops - a special project produced by Kamloops This Week and presented by Valley First, a division of First West Credit Union. We asked for your submissions of random acts of kindness, published them weekly This project was recognized as the winner of the Ma Murray Community Service Award by the BC and Yukon Community NewsMedia Association earlier this month. That’s a testament to our community as a whole pulling together to help each other through the most challenging time of our generation. While we are beginning to emerge from the global crisis caused by COVID-19, we continue to suffer the effects that prolonged isolation from others, economic uncertainty and fear bring. We need to keep being reminded what a kind place we can be - and need to be.

So we’re bringing it back. All you have to do to participate is give the name of a local individual who’s done something kind for someone else in Kamloops. We’re going to publish those submissions in Kamloops This Week every week for the next 5 weeks, and pick one random submission each week. The person who performed that act of kindness and the person who nominated them will each get a $25 gift certificate to a local restaurant. On July 28, we’re going to put all the entries together into a special commemorative edition, celebrating all the acts of kindness that have been nominated, and pick one random entry. The person who performed that act and the person who nominated them will each win a prize of $500 worth of gift certificates to local restaurants!

Celebrate kindness with us in Kamloops with Kindloops.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE:

Go to www.kindloops.com OR Enter via social media - put your nomination in Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and just tag Kamloops This Week (@kamthisweek) and include the hashtag #kindloops in your post

Your past Kindloops stories included: CAROL LODGE: Marg Marshall organises rides to medical appointments, delivers meals to shut ins, and has made masks for Covid 19. She also has made scarves & pillows for cancer & chemo patients as well as cleaning the wigs at the wig bank. The list of Marg’s contributions to our community at Rivershore is a long one and Marg is always the first one with her hand up to volunteer.

GISELA RUCKERT: In response to your call for suggestions of people to profile for Kindloops, there is an amazing chalk artist that has been creating beautiful sidewalk art during the pandemic near the top of Thor on the north side. Lots of inspirational and hopeful sayings. I’ve attached a photo I took of one of my favourites. Here area a few more, taken by Paula Schmidt (cc’d here). The first one is a bit hard to read, but it’s lovely: Fairy Tales are more than true; not because they tell us that Dragons exist, but because they tell us that Dragons can BE BEATEN.

HELENA PAIVINEN: Being kind does not always appear in exactly the same way. Sometimes it can be as subtle as a light touch, barely imperceptible except to the person in need. In other instances it is loud and quite brash, like a drive through birthday parade during COVID -19. Or maybe it’s about consistency...... like Steve Wade showing up, on a daily basis to give us a laugh on the Caremongering Kamloops page on Facebook. You make me smile. To some, your daily posting of humour may not qualify as being kind but to me they scream up one hell of a storm! Every day you take a moment to reflect upon how to make a stranger’s life better. You take a minute each day to post something fun. To me, that is kindness in it’s fuzziest warmth form......making someone smile, giving them a laugh, a chuckle or two. It is a priceless as love. It lightens up what can sometimes seem like a seemingly endless loop of nothing but heavy, grey and depressing, continuous groundhog dog days.


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

TRAVEL

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Editor’s note: As the COVID-19 pandemic has placed much travel on hold, restrictions are easing. Kamloops This Week is pleased to publish weekly Travel columns as people begin planning to emerge from the pandemic and travel once again.

250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dallying in the dales in Yorkshire, England MARGARET DEEFHOLTS

SPECIAL TO KTW

travelwriterstales.com

I

have the strangest feeling that I’m on camera in a movie shoot. It is a mild summer afternoon and, at any moment, I expect to see Claude Greengrass, stubby-jowled and in his shabby overcoat, emerge from the Aidensfield Arms with his mongrel dog at heel. Across the street is the Scripps Garage, where I reckon Bernie Scripps can be found fiddling with the engine of an old car. This is the small village of Goathland in Yorkshire, which faithful viewers like myself know as Aidensfield from the popular TV series Heartbeat. The village green has a line of shops and sheep grazing on a patch of grass, just as they do in the opening credits of the show. It feels a little unreal to be standing here, but I’m thrilled nonetheless. And then there’s Askrigg. Think the TV series All Creatures Great And Small — a favourite for those of a certain vintage, like myself. Askrigg is where it was filmed in the 1970s and 1980s. Author Al Wright wrote these autobiographical tales with pseudonyms for the characters and locales. Askrigg became Darrowby on the TV screen. Our tour coach draws up in front of what used to be door to the Skeldale House surgery and the church where veterinarian James Herriot married his sweet-

WIKIMEDIA PHOTO The fishing community of Staithes on the North Yorkshire coast is bathed in warm light from a sunset. From historic architecture to rolling village greens, the rural landscape of Yorkshire, England tempts the traveller with its simple British charm.

heart, Helen Alderson is just up the street. The Drovers’ Arms pub (now called The King’s Arms) is where James and the Farnon brothers, Tristan and Sigfried, would quaff a pint or two. And they still do — but only in a series of photographs displayed on the walls of the pub. Back on the tour coach, we head to the coast, driving through Yorkshire’s rural landscape —meadows white-freckled with sheep and farmhouses encircled by hand-built uneven stone walls. Fitful sunlight and wisps of cloud cast drifting shadows across lavender-covered moors. We wind through small villages with red-roofed brick houses, their gardens bursting

with blooms — geraniums, hollyhocks and roses — past ivycovered inns and venerable old stone churches. We roll into the town of Whitby, its old ruined abbey high on a hill, silhouetted skeletal and gaunt against the sky. It’s what inspired Bram Stoker’s Dracula and I have no problem imagining a bloodthirsty vampire lurking there on a dark moonless night, with a banshee wind screaming across the lonely hillside. As if to dispel any such ghoulish thoughts, the sky suddenly clears and the Abbey is bathed in bright afternoon sunlight. At the town’s square, a bronze Captain Cook, high on his pedestal, looks benignly down on throngs of visitors.

It is from here that he sailed off to distant lands and I’m gratified to see Canada’s plaque commemorating the 250th anniversary of his birth at the base of the statue. Houses, jigsawed against each other, cluster at the foot of the hill and a flotilla of little pleasure boats, including a mock pirate ship, sail jauntily along an inlet between the hill and the town’s pavilion. Whitby, with its souvenir shops and restaurants, is buzzing with activity, but it is the abbey that whets my curiosity. The Abbey Museum is at the end of a large cobbled courtyard and I gather from the information pamphlet that the first building here was a monastery founded by Abbess

Hildy in 627A.D. Nothing remains of that original structure and the present abbey dates from the 11th century, with several changes and additions in the Gothic style taking place through the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries. Up close to the ruins of the silent abbey, my imagination conjures up Benedictine monks in procession, their chants echoing against these walls. The empty arches and crumbling window frames, far from being spooky, have a scarred, jagged dignity. As I sit on a bench in their shadow, I am filled with a sense of awe at the power of faith and prayer that endured over the centuries in this sacred place, high on a windswept hillside. I glance at my watch. It’s time to walk the 199 steps from the abbey down to the town below and grab something to eat before boarding the homeward-bound tour bus. The scene from the top of the stairs is a jumble of red-roofed houses, tossed helter-skelter like miniature Lego blocks. The occasional church spire spikes the sky, the street on the waterfront teems with ant-sized figures and toy-like boats anchor along the water’s edge. I leave Yorkshire with regret, but beguiled by its many legends, its pretty market towns and its varied landscapes, I shall be back some day. Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent newspaper article syndicate. For more information, go online to travelwriterstales.com.

MEET YOUR MULTI MEDIA MARKETING SPECIALISTS www.kamloopsthisweek.com ktwdigital.com 250-374-7467 | 1365B Dalhousie Dr.

LINDA SKELLY Print/Digital Sales

JODI LAWRENCE Print/Digital Sales

LIZ SPIVEY Print/Digital Sales

PAUL DE LUCA Print/Digital Sales

MAKAYLA PEVERILL Digital Sales

RAJ SONI Digital Sales


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WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Kidvertising 2021

A

265 Lorne Street | 250.828.1095

Grow with us we’re hiring

dvertising and marketing has an impact on all of us from an early age. From Saturday morning cartoons to ads for Sea Monkeys and X-Ray Specs in the back of your comic books to singing along with jingles on the radio, for better or for worse, we have all been exposed to advertising early and often. Today’s kids are smart, savvy, more brand aware

(and more exposed to advertising messages than any generation) before them. So we decided to work with them to teach them a bit more about the world of advertising – and also to point out the value of shopping locally. The result is this special section you see here today – Kidvertising. We partnered with two classrooms of bright young people in Grades 5 and 6 at Pacific Way Elementary and Aberdeen

Elementary schools. We asked the students to create ads for local businesses of their choice, and we took those ad drawings – more than 60 different ads – to the local businesses and offered to run them in this special section. For every business that bought an ad, we’ve taken $50 from the cost of each ad and are presenting it to the school’s Parent Advisory Council to use to support activities at their schools.

SHOP ONLINE GROCERY PICKUP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE NOW! SHOP.FRESHSTMARKET.COM

ABERDEEN MALL 20- 1320 TRANS - CANADA HWY WEST • FRESHSTMARKET.COM


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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COMMUNITY

TNRD wants you to take Internet speed test In a bid to understand broadband needs throughout the region, particularly those in rural areas, Thompson-Nicola Regional District residents, businesses and others are encouraged to take part in an online internet speed test. All TNRD residents can go to https://performance. cira.ca/bc to perform a quick Canadian speed test. Community data collected will be used to analyze the speeds that residents in the region are actually experiencing, compared to the internet speed data published on the federal government’s National Broadband Internet Service Availability Map. The speed test data will be collected and analyzed by Tanex Engineering,

Familar vine gone as museum facelift begins KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

which has been engaged by the provincial Ministry of Citizens’ Services, Northern Development Initiative Trust and the Union of BC Municipalities to collect the speed test data from all around BC.

The more tests that are completed, the more robust the data about internet speeds experienced throughout the region. For more information, go to www.tnrd.ca/ruralbroadband.

The Kamloops Museum and Archives building, downtown at Seymour Street and Second Avenue, will receive a facelift as part of required building maintenance. The work is intended to preserve the architectural heritage of the original, mid-century modern building, which is now almost 65 years old. Crews will be repairing damaged wood and removing aging signage. Drafty windows will be replaced with tightly sealed units using UV-protected glass to help preserve the museum’s valuable collection and artifacts, all of which require storage in temperatureand humidity-controlled environments. To accommodate foundation work and repainting of the museum, the familiar vine on the west side of the building has been removed and will be

replaced by new greenery at the front of the building. “The removal of the vine was a sad necessity,” said Matt Macintosh, the city’s museum curator. “It’s been a dynamic, living part of our building. We’ve been advised that its root system poses inevitable risks for the building and, by extension, the museum collection. “So it was decided that now — in and among other work intended to prevent larger future costs — was the best time to take it down.” Work is anticipated to take up to three months to complete. The museum will remain open during the work and museum visitors will not be impacted. The KMA is open during regular operating hours, with access to the archives available by appointment only. Learn more online at kamloops.ca/ KMA.

Logan Streifel - Gr. 6, Pacific Elementary

236-425-BIKE (2453)

1683 Trans Canada Hwy • Kamloops districtbicyclecompany.com


B14

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KAMLOOPS ART PAGE

W

elcome to the weekly Kamloops Art Page. With the COVID19 pandemic upending society — socially and economically and dominating news for the foreseeable future — we understand pandemic fatigue can set in for even the most ardent followers of current events. While continuing to cover all pandemic and non-pandemic-related news, KTW has also worked hard at featuring positive stories from the crisis, tales that capture the essence of humanity, be it volunteers sewing thousands of masks for health-care workers or musicians offering up weekly free concerts online. This page is an attempt by KTW to

bring some colour into the lives of our readers via artwork created locally. We hope to, on a weekly basis, use this page to showcase works by various Kamloops artists, with between one and three pieces displayed. Thanks for reading Kamloops This Week and we hope this page can help ease the stress of this uncertain era in which we are living. Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have any questions or suggestions relating to this page.

Email editor@kamloopsthisweek. com if you have submissions for Kamloops Art Page.

Camp Grafton, by Stella Dusik, Grade 7, R.L. Clemitson elementary

Untitled, by Ariana Leduc-Sjodin, Grade 6, Haldane elementary

Have a heart to give for a heart to live Donate for Cardiac Care “CATH LAB" at RIH

Point Painting, by Nevaeh Turenne, Grade 4, South Sa-Hali elementary

The Jungle Tiger, by Mika Sorokopud, Grade 4, Pacific Way elementary

Have a heart to give For a heart to serve Empowering "TRU Nursing Students"

F O R I N F O R M AT I O N , V I S I T: I W I S H F U N D . C O M


WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B15

FRANCA MURACA

FAITH

NOTARY PUBLIC Departure of the Israelites was painted by David Roberts in 1829. It illustrates the story of Israelite enslavement and departure from Egypt. WIKIMEDIA CREATIVE COMMONS

• Will and Estate Planning • Incapacity Planning • Real Estate Transactions • Notarizing Documents

T: 778-696-4LAW E: info@muracanotary.ca 301-619 Victoria Street muracanotary.ca

OFFICE CLOSURE

Kamloops Urgent Care Clinic

Today, if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts

I

t was about 25 years ago, when we only had our first two sons, that I had the boys in the old Sears store when it was downtown on Lansdowne Street. Mother’s Day was nearing and the boys and I were looking for something for their mother. We found a waffle iron that made heart-shaped waffles. Frances enjoyed using it for many years. The common joke around the home was that when the waffles were cooked a little too long, we were having “hardened hearts” for breakfast. The waffle iron long ago quit working, but the memory lingers on. The headline of this column is taken from the experience of Israel during at least two times in their history. The first time is found when Israel had been miraculously delivered by God from slavery in Egypt. As Moses led the very large company out from Egypt and toward the land of Canaan, the Israelites began to complain. When they came to Canaan the first time, they sent out 12 men to

JOHN EGGERS You Gotta Have

FAITH

scout out the land. God had promised a land of plenty, a land flowing with milk and honey. The dozen men went into the land and found it was surely a land of plenty, but the nations that inhabited it were a fierce people. Ten of the 12 men said there was no way they could subdue the land, but two of the 12 — Joshua and Caleb — believed God and believed they could overcome it. The voice of the 10 prevailed over the report of the two and Israel began a period of wandering in the wilderness for 40 years. The people wept and rejected the promise of God. They hardened their hearts. Later in Israel’s history, around the time of King David, there is

recorded in Psalm 95 verses seven and eight — the same words from God. It is written: “Today if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts.” In other words, don’t reject the promise of God, don’t turn away from him in unbelief. God loves us and wants to forgive us and bless us and be our God and be a help to his own. We know this love by the fact Christ died on the cross for our sins. Fast forward and we come to the book of Hebrews in chapter four. Hebrews was written in the first century AD. Verse seven quotes this same phrase: “Today if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts.” The author is writing about rest given from God for the believer in the Lord Jesus. It is a promised rest the believer looks forward to that is eternal. This is at least the third time we find this truth from the Bible, seeing that the reference from Psalm 95 is looking back to Numbers 13 and 14. In Matthew 11, verse 28, Jesus said, “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy

laden, and I will give you rest.” Rest from the burden of sin and a sure promise given of everlasting life in Heaven. The sad part is so many refuse to believe God. There is a verse in Job 14 and 33 that says, “God speaks once, yea twice, yet man perceives it not.” In Psalm 19, we read how God has even spoken through his creation. The first verse of Psalm 19 says, “The heavens declare the glory of God.” There is a whole lot more in that Psalm about the witness of creation to the great works of the living God of the Bible. Today, if you will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. God has certainly spoken to the world, but have we hardened our hearts? John Eggers is an elder in the assembly that meets in Westsyde Gospel Hall in Kamloops. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and include a headshot of the author, along with a short bio. Send it via email to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

Kamloops Urgent Care Clinic will permanently close on Wednesday, June 30

It has been our privilege to serve you

Thank you for the opportunity to provide residents in Kamloops and the Thompson Region with primary health care services for these past 15 years. Yours in good health, the KUCC team

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Join us online Saturday 6:30 pm & Sunday 9 am & 11 am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call 250-374-7467

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

In these unprecedented times10:00am we are worshiping remotely via our Facebook Sunday Mornings

pageTranquille livestream on 422 Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

Sundays at 10am. All are Welcome

www.northshorecalvary.com www.northshorecalvary.com

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca


B16

WEDNESDAY, June 23, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FASTEST TURTLES ON EARTH! Buy your ticket today for the 2021 VW Turtle River Race! September 11, 2021 • Riverside Park, 700-block Lorne St.

RACE 1 • 1:00 PM 1ST PLACE TURTLE – RACE 1: • Montana Hill Guest Ranch 3 Night Stay • $1000 Save On Foods GC • $500 Aberdeen Mall GC • Mount Paul Golf Course package • Shuswap Water Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals package • Interior White Water Expeditions package • Oyama Zipline package

Benefitting the charities of the 2021 KTW Christmas Cheer Fund • Chris Rose Therapy Centre for Autism • Kamloops Brain Injury Association • Kamloops Therapeutic Riding Association

2ND PLACE TURTLE – RACE 1: • YMCA-YWCA Family Pass • Surplus Herby’s Camping package • Club Shuswap Golf package • Ocean Pacific Adventure Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals 2X1 Day pass 3RD PLACE – VALUE $1,500 • 500 gift certificate to Twisted Olive/Mittz Kitchen • $500 gift certificate to Brown’s Social House • $500 gift certificate to Earl’s Restaurant

RACE 2 • 2:00 PM 1ST PLACE TURTLE – RACE 2: • Montana Hill Guest Ranch 3 Night Stay • $1000 Save On Foods GC • $500 Aberdeen Mall GC • Mount Paul Golf Course package • Shuswap Water Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals package • Delta Hotel Stay • Weber Portable BBQ • Oyama Zipline package 2ND PLACE TURTLE – RACE 2: • YMCA-YWCA Family Pass • Surplus Herby’s Fishing package • Club Shuswap Golf package • Ocean Pacific Adventure Sports package • Kamloops Water Sport Rentals 2X1 Day pass THIRD PLACE – VALUE $1,500 • $500 gift certificate to Twisted Olive/Mittz Kitchen • $500 gift certificate to Brown’s Social House • $500 gift certificate to Earl’s Restaurant

DON’T WAIT – THESE TURTLES WILL BE GOING FAST! DRAW DATE SEPT. 11, 2021 BUY YOUR TURTLE TICKETS $10 EACH SINGLE TICKETS 1,500 AVAILABLE FOR EACH RACE

AVAILABLE

VALUE PACK OF 3 FOR $25

Online at www.turtleriverrace.com Or at the till at any Save On Foods location

150 AVAILABLE FOR EACH RACE BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Chances are 1 in 650 for each race (total tickets for sale) to win a grand prize. Problem Gambling Help Line 1-888-795-6111 www.bcresponsiblegambling.ca

BC Gaming Event Licence #128715 #128717

Know your limit, play within it

19+

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