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kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 16

kamthisweek

#YKASTRONG

Despite pandemic, business licence list grows in Kamloops JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The city’s active business licences continued to rise last year, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, and home-based businesses now make up a third of such licences. During a recent meeting, council heard the number of active business licences in Kamloops remains on a general upward trajectory. At the end of 2020, the city had 6,211 active business licences, compared to 5,999 in 2019, 5,750 in 2018 and 5,796 in 2017. The year 2020 saw a 3.5 per cent increase in active business licences, including 803 licences issued to new businesses, up over 619 licences issued to new businesses in 2019. City of Kamloops planning manager Rod Martin said people are getting creative in starting businesses. “I think it’s people that are just looking at different ways to make money in this kind of unique time,” Martin told KTW. “Maybe if they got laid off from their company and started out on their own, so that’ll be a new business licence starting up. And there’s people moving here from the Lower Mainland, a lot of people can work from home online, that sort of thing. I

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think there’s people moving out of the bigger centres. Move to Kamloops, you can probably get a better deal on housing, which is probably why our housing market is so crazy right now.” Licences issued to homebased businesses are also on the rise, with a six per cent uptick in 2020 over 2019. At the end of 2020, homebased businesses comprised of about a third of all businesses and the city had 2,189 homebased businesses at the end of 2020, compared to 2,060 at the end of 2019. “I think that’s a higher rate of increase than typical,” Martin said. “But I think a lot of that is because of the pandemic — people are finding ways to work from home.” Restaurants have been struggling during the pandemic, but the city has not seen a significant drop in business licences for eateries. The licence type that includes standalone restaurants also includes bakeries, delis and caterers. Martin said the city currently has 256 active business licences in that category, compared to 259 at the end of 2020. In addition, reports indicate the city had 258 such business licenses at the end of 2019 and 256 at the end of 2018 and 2017. “There’s virtually no change,” Martin said.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW The patio outside Tumbleweeds Lounge in the Plaza Hotel downtown gets expanded as health orders limiting business to patio and takeout service only has been extended to past the Victoria Day long weekend in late May.

MORE PAIN ON THE MENU SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

With the ban on indoor dining now extended until after the Victoria Day long weekend in late May, Kamloops restaurants are facing at least another five weeks of relying on takeout orders and patios to keep money flowing in. Mittz Kitchen, downtown in the 200-block of Victoria Street, is one of many restaurants in the city that has expanded its patio out across the sidewalk. Co-owner Steve Mitton said he was able to set up seven tables.

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“That’s about all we can fit. It has cut us instantly in half,” he said. Mittz has managed to retain most of its staff, although with reduced hours. Grants and subsidies have helped, but Mitton said they have also added a lot of overhead, noting some financial relief is not as promised. “This latest one, where they said they’re giving 10 grand, is a load of shit. It’s only five grand,” he said. The Circuit Breaker Business Relief Grant, which followed the health orders announced on

March 30, provides funds based on the number of employees a business has. With five to 99 employees, $5,000 is available. With more than 100 employees, $10,000 is available. “I’d love to see a small business that has over 100 employees,” Mitton said, criticizing part of the latest support measures. Mitton said dealing with the funding and accountants has been part of his brother’s full-time job over the past year, noting the process has created plenty of additional work. See WE’RE, A7 TAKE DELIVERY BY APRIL 30TH

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kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 16

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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CITY PAGE

Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

Council Calendar Public and media attendance via Zoom only until further notice April 29, 2021 2:00 pm - Community Services Committee Meeting May 4, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting May 17, 2021 10:00 am - Development and Sustainability Committee Meeting 2:00 pm - Community Relations and Administration Committee Meeting All meetings are currently being held at Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street. The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Notice To Motorists Please use caution when driving in the vicinity and obey all traffic control personnel, signs, and devices in the following area: • Tranquille Road Singh Street to 12th Street • Dallas Drive Andover Crescent to Peerless Way • Victoria Street 100 block • Westmount Drive Westsyde Road to Collingwood Drive • Oriole Road Glenwood Drive to Curlew Road • Grasslands Boulevard Saddleback Drive to Stagecoach Drive To stay up to date on road work projects, visit: Kamloops.ca/Kammute

Give a City employee a shout out! City of Kamloops employees work hard to make our community a great place for everyone to live and work. Share your kudos and read others’ comments of recognition at:

RENOVATE SMART

TREE COUPONS

ARE YOU PLANNING A HOME RENOVATION?

The City’s annual tree coupons are now available while quantities last. The coupons are valid until June 16 and have a $20 or $50 value, depending on the price of the selected tree.

Renovate Smart Kamloops is a program designed to help homeowners get the most out of their home renovations. Learn how to increase your home’s energy performance and about the incentives that may be available to you.

Home Energy Performance and Carbon Accounting Workshops These free virtual workshops will outline how you can improve your home's energy performance, reduce household energy costs, increase comfort, and reduce carbon emissions.

Upcoming Workshops Carbon Accounting Workshops will be quarterly. The next one is scheduled for April 22 at 5:00 pm. Home Energy Workshops will be monthly. The next one is scheduled for May 5 at 12:00 pm. To learn more or to RSVP to a workshop, visit: Kamloops.ca/RenovateSmart

The Tree Coupon Program supports the City’s goal of increasing our community’s tree canopy from the current 12% to 20%, as identified in the Urban Forestry Management Strategy. Urban trees provide many social, health, environmental, and economic benefits, from removing atmospheric carbon dioxide and absorbing air pollutants to reducing energy consumption and increasing property values. A total of 750 coupons are available on a first come, first served basis to residents within Kamloops’ municipal boundaries, with a limit of one per household. Coupons will only be available at the time of purchase of an eligible tree from a participating retailer or nursery. For more information on tree eligibility, restrictions, and participating locations, visit: Kamloops.ca/TreeCoupon

WOOD STOVE REBATE PROGRAMS Do you have an older, uncertified wood-burning appliance? You may be eligible for rebates!

Wood Stove & Fireplace Exchange Program • Rebate of up to $800 (plus a $300 FortisBC rebate for gas appliances) for homeowners who remove and replace an eligible wood-burning appliance with a new, lower-emission one from an authorized program retailer. • Electrify It! Get fired up about electric! New for 2021: the rebate amount for electric fireplace inserts has been increased to 50% of the appliance to a maximum of $500.

Wood Stove Scrap-It Program • $200 rebate for homeowners who remove an uncertified wood-burning stove (without replacing it). • Pre-registration is required to determine program eligibility. For a list of authorized program retailers and to find out if you quality for rebates, visit: Kamloops.ca/WoodStove

SECURITY ALARM SYSTEM BYLAW NO. 10-38 AMENDMENT On April, 13, 2021, Council adopted amendments to the Security Alarm System Bylaw to reduce the number of RCMP service calls resulting from false alarms by the users of security alarm systems. The bylaw no longer allows property owners to appeal fees resulting from false alarms, but the charges for the first offence have been removed in order to use this as an opportunity to educate alarm system users. To learn more about the bylaw and associated fees, visit: Kamloops.ca/CommonBylaws

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Staff-Shout-Outs

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KFR’S LATEST RESCUE MISSION

A GRAND VISION FOR NORTH KAMLOOPS

LACE UP THOSE RUNNING SHOES

Antique fire truck saved from auction site in the nick of time

Imagine an expanded Rivers Trail and pier where bridge pilings now sit

It is Week 7 of training for the amended Boogie the Bridge event

INSIDE KTW Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A23 Art Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A33 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A35 Comics/Crossword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A47 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A49

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WEATHER FORECAST April 21: Sunny 22/8 (hi/low) April 22: Sun/clouds 17/6 (hi/low) April 23: Showers 16/7 (hi/low) April 24: Showers 13/7 (hi/low) April 25: Showers 15/7 (hi/low)

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KAMLOOPS WOMAN SAYS SHE IS FRUSTRATED THAT GARBAGE-STREWN ENCAMPMENTS CONTINUE TO BE A PROBLEM ALONG RIVERBANKS michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

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A Kamloops woman said she is fed up with garbage left from homeless encampments along the Thompson River after helping clean one up over the weekend when City of Kamloops staff did not attend when called. Sandy Seibel, who lives on Royal Avenue in North Kamloops, noticed a tent had been on the beach in nearby McArthur Island, near the boat launch, for weeks. On Sunday at about noon, she came across another person cleaning out its contents and decided to help out. The tent was filled with numerous items, garbage and an estimated 150 discarded needles. Seibel initially tried phoning the city’s community services department, but was told the message would be passed along to staff on Monday morning. She said she was told no one was available to respond unless it was a emergency. Seibel said she felt it was an emergency given the tent contained used needles and was on a well-used beach. She also reached out to ASK Wellness Society, but wasn’t able to get a response until Monday, when a needle pickup hotline number was relayed to her via Facebook. “Everybody’s got banker hours when this isn’t a Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. problem,” Seibel said. “We’re not getting the support

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North Kamloops residents pitched in and cleaned up this used needle- and garbage-filled tent that was on the riverbank in McArthur Island. Sandy Seibel is upset the city did not reply to her concern on the weekend. SANDY SEIBEL/FACEBOOK

we need when we need it.” Having called the bylaws department and cleaned garbage numerous times over the years, Seibel said the fact the encampment situation never seems to improve is frustrating. She opined that social service agencies need to take more responsibility for the people they serve. Community services manager Tammy Blundell said city staff must give people living in temporary shelters time to pack up and leave before dismantling an encampment. That process was underway in this situation, she said, with a notice being left at the encampment last Thursday when the

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encampment’s occupants were not there. Blundell said staff were waiting until Monday before taking action, but didn’t get the chance. The notice found by Seibel, however, indicated staff would return last Friday to dismantle the tent. Blundell said she does not know why no one attended last Friday, but suspects staff were redirected to other priorities. She said weekend response is currently on an emergency basis. Asked what constitutes an emergency for the bylaws department, Blundell noted assisting the RCMP or Kamloops Fire Rescue in securing a scene.

“It may be a priority for a resident, but when it comes to bylaw we have to reprioritize,” Blundell said. The city’s bylaws department doesn’t have weekend shifts as it transitions to its new community services model, which has also left it short-staffed, Coun. Dale Bass told KTW. Bass said she feels for people impacted by such encampments, but added that, given the current status of the department, the best people can do on weekends is leave a message and let staff address the problem on the following Monday. Bass, who chairs the municipality’s community services committee, said she understands the issue is urgent for residents, but noted it’s not an emergency as the problem exists in many neighbourhoods. “It’s garbage — dangerous, toxic garbage sitting on the ground. If you walk away from it, it’s not a problem,” Bass said. The city is adding staffing to increase to seven days per week service from community service officers, but Blundell noted they are still in the hiring process. “We are going to 24/7 coverage, but it probably won’t be until the end of the summer,” Bass said. ASK Wellness executive director, Bob Hughes said he would like to extend his agency’s services, such as outreach and cleanup, to evenings and weekends, but noted the funds are not available and resources are already stretched thin.

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STAFF REPORTER

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The provincial government has attempted to clarify the rules on its restrictions on travel in B.C. as it seeks to stop the spread of the COVID-19 virus. On Monday, Premier John Horgan announced plans to limit people from travelling outside of their health authority, with random roadside checks and fines for those breaking the rules. However, on Tuesday, Public Safety Minister released a statement clarifying the move. “We are examining the use of periodic roadblocks only set up at places like BC Ferries or on Highway 1 leaving the Lower Mainland, to discourage recreational travel,” Farnworth said. “There will be no random individual stops. Our intention is to discourage recreational and leisure travel, not punish people, and we are not interested in disrupting commuters and people going about their lives.”

More information on the travel restrictions is expected to be released this Friday. The new and extended measures come as a result of growing pressure from hospitalizations due to COVID-19, according to B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix. Data from December 2020 to March 2021 presented on Monday shows hospitalizations are up among multiple age groups, including 20-29 and 50-59, but a steady decline has been seen for those age 70 and older. Monday’s case update reported 441 people in hospital, including 138 in critical care. Eight further deaths were also reported over the weekend, including a young child less than two years old. “Although this child had pre-existing health conditions that complicated the illness, it was the virus that caused their death,” said Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry when reporting the death. The child lived in the Fraser Health region and

was receiving care at BC Children’s Hospital. A total of 2,960 new cases were reported over the three-day weekend period. By health region, that figure includes 696 cases in Vancouver Coastal Health, 1,845 in Fraser Health, 108 in Vancouver Island Health, 211 in Interior Health and 100 in Northern Health. B.C. has extended its “circuit breaker” restrictions for another five weeks, including the indoor dining ban, limits on social gatherings and group fitness classes. “All of these measures are designed with one purpose in mind — to get us all, all 4.9 million British Columbians — to the end of the pandemic,” Horgan said. The province has also lowered the age of eligibility for the AstraZeneca vaccine to 40. Previously, only those ages 55 to 65 were eligible, following the suspension of the vaccine’s use due to potential blood clot issues. Late last week, after further review, Health Canada said the vaccine is safe to use for ages 18 and older.

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KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

By the end of this week, all British Columbian adults will have been able to register to receive their COVID-19 vaccine. The province has vowed to vaccinate its entire adult population by the end of June. The new registration timetable and age groups: • Monday, April 19: 40 and up • Tuesday, April 20: 35 and up • Wednesday, April 21: 30 and up • Thursday, April 22: 25 and up • Friday, April 23: 18 and up There are three ways to register: online at https://www2.gov.bc.ca/getvaccinated.html, by phoning 1-833-838-2323 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. each day or by visiting a Service BC location. In Kamloops, that office is in the

Kamloops Law Courts, downtown at Columbia Street and Fourth Avenue. Once a person registered, they will receive a confirmation email, advising they will be contacted when it is time to book a vaccination appointment. Those ages 40 and older can also get the AstraZeneca vaccine at participating pharmacies. Meanwhile, Interior Health has now surpassed 230,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered throughout the health region. The vaccine rollout is a co-ordinated effort between Interior Health, the First Nations Health Authority and First Nations communities. To April 19, health-care workers have administered 220,216 first doses and 13,775 second doses of vaccine to people throughout the Interior region, for a total of 233,991 administered doses.


4 LIFE GREG KAROWAY

SALES & INSTALLATIONS 21, 2021 A7 GREGWEDNESDAY, KAROWAYApril (250) 819-2117 SALES & INSTALLATIONS

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LOCAL NEWS

‘We’re still licking our wounds’ From A1

Data on exposures in restaurants has been made available by the province for only two health regions — Vancouver Coastal Health and Fraser Health. But that data showed significant differences between the two regions. In Vancouver Coastal, a large majority of workplace cases in February and March occurred in restaurants, bars and lounges. But in Fraser Health, the same category comes third after industrial/ manufacturing sites and fitness/gym facilities. Data for Interior Health was not made available, but last week, Interior Health chief medical health officer Dr. Albert de Villiers said restaurants and other workplaces have not been a significant source of transmission in the region. Jennifer Fey, owner of the North Kamloops Greek restaurant Minos, has managed to keep on minimal staff, but has felt the effects of the ban, especially without a patio. “I think it sucks and it’s full of shit because everything else is open. You can go to the gym, you can go to the mall, you can go swimming,” she said. Fey said Minos inquired with the city last year about a patio, but was denied due to space restrictions at their location in the 400-block of Tranquille Road. Alchemy Brewing, meanwhile, will be closing its downtown doors at least until

UNAPPETIZING MENU • March 20, 2020: Restaurants/pubs close • May 19, 2020: Restaurants/pubs reopen • March 31, 2021: Restaurants/pubs close to indoor dining • ?: Restaurants/pubs reopen to indoor dining May due to recent staffing issues — on top of the ongoing struggle of staying afloat with only a patio available at the pub in the 600-block of Victoria Street. Al Renner, who owns the brew pub with his wife, said his experience with patio space to date has been “horrible.” “We’ve actually only spent money,” he said. “It’s really hard. We’re struggling.” Thankfully, the money spent on patio work has come through grants and targeted funding, which Renner said has been vital to the business’ survival. “That’s the only reason the doors have been open,” he said. Renner said he plans on continuing work on the patio as staffing issues are sorted while the indoor dining ban continues, but he expects to have things ready in early May. But when business at Alchemy does resume, Renner still anticipates it to be slow. He estimates only 60 to 65 per cent of

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diners are going out now, compared to pre-pandemic levels. “Ultimately, everybody is just doing anything they can try to get by until this is over, and then they’ll sort it all out in cleanwater2017@gmail.com the next two years,” he said. cleanwater2017.ca At Fox’n Hounds Pub in Sahali Mall, which does not currently have patio cleanwater2017@gmail.com space, owner Al Deacon said he’s effeccleanwater2017.ca tively facing a 100 per cent closure dur•Custom Fabrication ing the indoor dining ban. • Mobile Welding “We don’t have a patio, so we’re trying • Aluminum • Steel to survive on curbside pickup only,” he • Pressure Pipe said. So far, Deacon said the business he CALL OR TEXT FOR has done curbside isn’t enough to cover A FREE QUOTE the wages of his staff. And the losses he’s already faced don’t help, either. When the indoor dining ban was first announced, Deacon had just completed a large grocery order the day before. As a result, he sent about $4,000 in perishable groceries to local shelter organizations, such as the Mustard Seed Kamloops. “We’re happy to support the community, but we’re still licking our wounds from that. We can’t afford to be giving our groceries away every four to six months,” he said. Deacon said he will soon be meeting with a health inspector to determine how and if the restaurant’s former smoking room can be turned into a patio space and said he’s also looking at adding tents to further expand that area.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

THE KTW EDITORIAL

OPEN UP DISCUSSION ON AUTISM ISSUE Most people are aware of April being Daffodil Month, in support of the Canadian Cancer Society. It is also Organ Donation Awareness month. Some may not know April also marks World Autism Month, a time to bring people more aware of one of the fastest growing and most commonly diagnosed neurological disorders in the country. The 2018 National Autism Spectrum Disorder Surveillance System Report estimates autism’s prevalence as one in 66 children in Canada. This includes one in 42 boys and one in 189 girls. Its prevalence in Canada has increased by more than 100 per cent in the past 10 years. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is such a complex disorder that no two people on the spectrum are alike. A common explanation is that “if you have met one person with autism, you have met one person with autism.” The theme the United Nations General Assembly chose for World Autism Awareness Day in 2021 is Inclusion in the Workplace: Challenges and Opportunities in a Post-Pandemic World. The social isolation we have experienced globally due to the pandemic has magnified the unique difficulties of individuals and families with members who are neurodivergent. This year’s global theme was chosen to place focus on obstacles people with autism face, such as discriminatory hiring practices and workplace environments. Slowly, employers in developing countries are turning toward inclusivity in their hiring practices. We all need to take the time to learn about ASD. It is an important first step in opening up the discussion on the issue. Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey Paul De Luca

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Digital sales: Makayla Peverill PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

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CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com Circulation 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

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Kudos to COVID caregivers

I

f Dr. Bonnie Henry gave permission, I would hug all of the moms and dads I know, along with those caring for seniors. The pandemic has put us all in the difficult position of survival mode — maintain one’s health, maintain one’s employment, maintain one’s sanity. For others, there is a multiplier effect — maintain two or more people’s health, maintain finances for two or more and keep face, in order to maintain collective sanity. This group of COVID caregivers has been floundering, due to simple math, since the onset of the pandemic. They are not paid for their work, they do not receive extra support and they are tired. Try keeping your life raft afloat with more passengers. It’s a lot more paddling. Individuals can get a feel for how the COVID caregiver multiplier effect works by multiplying their own pandemic situation by two or more. It amounts to at least twice the work. Think of all those extra groceries to be scrubbed last March. It amounts to at least twice the anxiety. Think not only of your own two hands to wash, but those other two, four or six hands. The financial stakes are higher when others rely on your income. That is just the start of what this group has been going through. Teachers and care-aides work in roles that protect our young and elderly. Their efforts and plights have

JESSICA WALLACE Another

VIEW

been well-documented and I tip my hat to them in honour of their ongoing work. (I truly don’t know how teachers can get kids to put down a smartphone in class, let alone wear a mask, distance or wash their hands properly.) I also dedicate this space to the men and women at home, navigating the pandemic while caring for others between the cracks. Consider all of the seniors who had been waiting to enter long-term care prior to the pandemic. Terrified of their loved one going into a home — which, at some point, seemed more like a prison sentence — some families have been making it work at any cost, despite the deterioration of their loved ones’ health and concern about them contracting COVID-19. Try explaining health restrictions to someone with dementia, who has done something the same way for

their entire lengthy lifetime. Meanwhile, though play dates, babysitters and children’s activities were once plentiful, parents haven’t had a break. They’ve also endured being the bad guys when Johnny’s parents let Johnny do this, but mom and dad said no. Parents need a date in one of those restaurant dining rooms that are closed or perhaps deserve their own Very Important Parents section on outdoor patios. While we’re at it, let’s make sure there are crayons and colouring sheets on those patios for kids to use to ease some stress. Some parents wait on bated breath to learn if their child will go to school the next day. Maybe their boss is empathic when there is a COVID19 exposure at a school. Maybe they aren’t. It has resulted in steps backward for women in the workplace, with females often still earning less than men, and making the financial equation simple when determining who should be the fallback child-care provider. Dr. Henry has acknowledged inequity in the ways public health orders have impacted people. That is an understatement. Some people have given up a lot. Others have given. Let’s remember them as we all grow tired — and let’s continue to take care. jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @KTWjess


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Robyn Goddard and son Ryder.

KEET BOOGIE BEAT GOING Editor: My 10-year-old son Ryder was eager to continue with his goal of running the 10K Boogie, which we did recently. Thank you to Jo Berry and the running group of wonderful ladies for the cgeers and thanks as ran past them. You ladies rock and are an inspiration, as always. Next weekend, we run the 5K with Ryder’s sisters. Keep up the awesomeness. Robyn Goddard Kamloops

THE FUTURE FOR ALL IS ELECTRICAL

Editor: KTW global affairs columnist Gwynne Dyer needs to get out of writing about the horse and buggy technology and write about what is really happening in the world of electronics, transportation and the economy. The world is moving toward electrical energy to power its economy. Much of our electrical energy comes from coal, gas and hydro sources. Consequently, we are polluting the environment. The focus now is on clean production of electrical energy from solar, atomic, wind and other clean sources, but even these are

not without risk. A paradigm shift is taking place in transportation, but the globalists refuse to modernize and have hitched their profits to the past polluters. This thinking has been with us since 1850s. Oil and copper barons marginalized everything electrical, including Nikola Tesla’s innovative plans for an electrical world that only now is becoming a reality. Tesla electric vehicles, Maglev motors, atomic and nitrogen power, solar and wind power is revolutionizing the world of electric power production. Transportation is going electric. Ships,

automobiles, power plants, passenger airliners — mass transportation has started a new Industrial Revolution powered by electricity, which we need to embrace in Canada. We need to make Canada the producer of her own electronic products, rather than be a shipper of raw materials so that someone else makes the products we then import. Dyer’s vision for Canada will place our future generations into being servants of those who have accepted the paradigm shift. Walter Trkla Kamloops

ORGANIC COLLECTION PLAN IS A POOR IDEA Editor: The city’s plan for curbside organic waste collection is a bad idea. For many years here in Kamloops, citizens have been urged to compost on their own and a great many have done so, myself inclusive. Just drive by Kamloops Airport and you will see compost barrels in the big community garden in the area. These compost barrels can also be found elsewhere in the city. We’ve also been encouraged not to put

For more letters, go online to kamloops thisweek.com composted foodstuffs and the like out at curbside. Obviously, this is to avoid attracting bears and other animals that might be

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

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No: 829 votes Yes: 715 votes 1,544 VOTES

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attracted to the odours. The city’s plan is not a well thought out idea as would placing compostable materials for pick up at roadside not also attract animals? The idea would present more problems than it is worth. Do we really want to see more bears and cougars, with their keen sense of smell, in our town for the composted smorgasbord? Such a program would be a waste of tax dollars. Les Evens Kamloops

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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ter, encouraging “missing middle” housing, densification through compact single-family lots and maintaining the Eighth Street corridor as an auto-oriented gateway to the North Shore. As the area continues to densify, concerns about transport of dangerous goods was raised by multiple councillors. In addition, Sarai expressed concern about the busy area connecting North Kamloops, Batchelor Heights and Westsyde, where vehicles merge onto Eighth Street to get to Ord Road, Batchelor Heights or Westsyde. City of Kamloops development director Marvin Kwiatkowski said the city is working on a joint study with ICBC for the Eighth Street/Ord Road/Batchelor Drive/Westyde Road intersection. In addition, the city is starting a study that will look at the feasibility of a second crossing over the Thompson River, west of Overlanders Bridge. The city plans to go back to the public for further consultation, before finalizing the North Shore Neighbourhood Plan later this year.

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Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian said the city has done a good job creating access to the South and North Thompson rivers, downtown and along Schubert Drive. “We’ve really done nothing on the Thompson River,” he said, noting with proper design, the city could better utilize that area. Councillors Dieter Dudy and Bill Sarai expressed support for the pier concept, with Sarai saying he has heard interest for such a concept from the public. “I’m hoping in my lifetime I get to see that,” he said. Coun. Arjun Singh expressed concern about concepts in the plan displacing residents. He cited ongoing housing affordability issues in Kamloops. “We don’t want to gentrify to the point we are displacing folks,” he said. Other concepts identified in the plan include a new neighbourhood park space in the Schubert Drive area, improved connectivity, multi-family housing near Kamloops Airport, protecting smaller-storefronts in the Tranquille Market Corridor (similar to that on Victoria Street) to maintain area charac-

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Old bridge pilings in the Thompson River could one day be utilized for more than just a canvas used to cheer on the Kamloops Blazers. As the city continues work to update its North Shore Neighbourhood Plan, preliminary ideas were presented to council during a committee of the whole meeting on Tuesday morning. Envisioned for those old bridge pilings is a pier that extends onto the Thompson River. The pier would front a commercial area, creating a boardwalk as part of a Riverfront District, with the goal improved access to the riverfront. It would also connect to a proposed Rivers Trail extension from Royal Avenue to Overlanders Bridge. City community planning supervisor Jason Locke said land acquisition, public investment, a feasibility study and consultation with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans would be required. “One of the big ideas here that could complement the Rivers Trail connection is a riverfront boardwalk and pier extension using the old remnant bridge piers that are in the Thompson River,” Locke told council. The concept encompasses the Riverdale Trailer Court, lots fronting Tranquille Road from the overpass to Palm Street, the Henry Grube Education Centre and Overlander Park. The concept, as detailed in a report to council, also reimagines part of the area as an industrial arts district for makerspaces, utilizing live and work units (combined living and workspaces), expanded urban agriculture and redevelopment of the Riverdale Trailer Court to include a mix of housing options.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

A look at public washroom repair costs Portland Loos are designed specifically to prevent problems that are commonly experienced with public toilets. They are designed to discourage crime with graffiti-proof wall panels and open grating.

JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

As the City of Kamloops looks toward grant funding to install Portland Loostyle public washrooms downtown and in North Kamloops, KTW looked into the costs associated with public washrooms previously built by the city, which have totalled about $660,000 in construction and repairs. The city has said it has been costly to repair its public washroom facilities, due to vandalism. Portland Loo-style bathrooms are designed to be impervious to vandalism. The following financial details were provided to KTW by the city’s civic operations department. Construction of three community washrooms downtown in recent years totalled $575,000. Community washrooms were constructed at Heritage House in Riverside Park in 2015-2016 at a cost of $183,000 and at 48 West Victoria St. and 340 Victoria St. in 2018-2019, totalling $392,000 for both. In addition to construction costs, the city has paid additional repair costs, due to recent vandalism. Examples of vandal-

ism have included plugged toilets, fixtures ripped from walls, exterior doors damaged from attempted break-ins, a fire and a door propped open in one location on a cold night, causing pipes and fixtures to freeze. As a result of such vandalism, the city paid an additional $86,200 in 2020 and 2021 to the end of February. Further broken down, the city paid in 2020: $16,200 to repair the Heritage House washroom, $14,100 to repair the 340 Victoria St.

washroom and $11,550 to repair the washroom at 48 West Victoria St. In the first two months of 2021, the city paid $850 to repair the Heritage House washroom, $22,800 to repair the 340 Victoria St. washroom and $20,700 to repair the 48 West Victoria St. washroom. In addition to construction and repair costs, the city spent $90,000 to clean and maintain the three washrooms in 2020 and spends $11,000 per month on security of the washrooms.

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When Kamloops Fire Rescue was notified that this 1951 Seagrave 66E aerial ladder fire truck was being offered for sale, the rescue mission began.

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SEVENTY-YEAR-OLD KAMLOOPS FIRE TRUCK SAVED FROM BEING SOLD JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Q

uick work by firefighters has saved a piece of local history. The City of Kamloops had listed for sale through BC Auctions, an online site, a 70-year-old antique fire truck, which had been stored at its Mission Flats yard. The truck had been collecting dust and the city sought to get rid of it, with an auction notice published on April 12 for the 1951 Seagrave 66E aerial ladder fire truck. It is not a standard fire truck, but essentially a boom truck capable of deploying water. A public works employee in charge of getting rid of the old fire truck said the city needed space at the yard and nobody seemed to want the vehicle. He said the truck had been in storage for many years. Proceeds from the sale would have gone into city coffers. Kamloops Fire Rescue Chief Steve Robinson said the truck was gifted to the city in 2008 via a Vernon resident’s will. He said there was originally an initiative to restore it. KFR Capt. Ed Allen was involved in that initiative and said he was not aware the city was planning to sell the fire truck, due to miscommunication that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. He was surprised to learn of the potential sale when notified by KTW, citing the historical significance of the truck, which dates back to a growing

Kamloops pre-amalgamation. In 1951, Allen said, the new truck arrived downtown, coming by rail from the East Coast. He said cities are required to have certain-sized fire trucks when population targets are met. At the time, Kamloops was growing, necessitating need for the sizeable Seagrave. Allen said the city utilized the truck until the mid-to-late-1970s, at which time the city replaced it, selling the original to the BC Transportation Museum in the Lower Mainland. Retired fire captain Dave Costain, who still lives in Kamloops, drove the truck as a rookie firefighter in 1974. The BC Transportation Museum later closed and a resident in the Okanagan purchased the old fire truck and put it in storage. Allen said former KFR fire chief Neill Moroz was involved in getting the vehicle back to Kamloops, which has two other historical fire trucks, about a century old, located in the KFR Museum at Fire Hall No. 1 in Sahali. The 1951 Seagrave was eventually willed back to Kamloops and has been waiting to be restored ever since. As of April 15, the city had received 15 bids for the old truck, with a high offer of $2,033.88. The auction was set to continue until April 21. However, once notified of the item placed for sale on the auction site, the notice was withdrawn on April 16. Robinson said KFR spoke to the city and had the truck pulled from BC Auctions. He said the firefighters’ union is planning to find a place to store and restore the truck, likely

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funding restoration through volunteer donations and Local 913. The truck still runs, but will need time, money and storage to get back into shape. The truck has sat idle for multiple decades and needs, at the least, brakes and a new paint job. Once restored, it could be utilized in events, such as the annual Santa Claus Parade, Allen said. Decisions about the truck’s restoration fate have yet to be made — such as potential fundraising and grant applications. The vehicle may be restored by a local antique car club. Allen said he is grateful the truck will remain in Kamloops. “If it had gone, we’d have never gotten it back,” he said. DID YOU KNOW? Chief Steve Robinson said Kamloops Fire rescue still uses vehicles like the 1951 Seagrave 66E aerial ladder fire truck, but noted the capabilities of a modern fire truck would far exceed those of the 1951 version. The oldest working truck in KFR’s fleet can be no more than two decades old, due to insurance requirements. The oldest frontline truck would be 15 years old, with vehicles graduating to reserve service for another five years. Robinson said it is hard to get parts for old trucks, but if antiques like the 70-year-old 1951 Seagrave can be brought back to life, they would only be used ceremonially. “You would see it in a parade and that’s really about it,” Robinson said.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Budget doesn’t impress McLeod, Sundhu JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

After seeing details of the federal budget, Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo (Conservative) MP Cathy McLeod said the Liberal government lacks fiscal concern. Bill Sundhu, the local NDP candidate in the next federal election, was equally unimpressed. McLeod said the government’s focus is on big programs, arguing a large gap in the budget is an absence of initiatives to create wealth and jobs. “I think someone called this a spending-palooza,” McLeod told KTW. McLeod said she and the federal Conservatives agree Canadians need continued support during the pandemic. However, she said part

of the reason the support continues to be required is due to a failure by the government on the vaccine rollout. Vaccinations are directly linked to the budget, in both the eyes of McLeod and Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, who also criticized the government’s vaccine rollout on Monday during budget talks. O’Toole said the budget does not answer calls from provinces for more vaccines. McLeod said vaccines and the budget are linked. “If you look at countries like the United Kingdom and others, where the population is vaccinated, they are starting to reopen,” McLeod said. “We need to continue to provide support long past when some other countries might need to do the same thing.”

As a result of the spending, the federal deficit is projected to reach $354 billion. McLeod said the debt being taken on in one year by the Liberal government is more than that accumulated by every prime minister ever in Canada — combined. Included in $101.4 billion in planned stimulus spending is a national $10-a-day day care program, similar to one that has existed for years in Quebec and one that has been promised in British Columbia by the NDP government, though not yet implemented. The child-care plan was the headline-grabbing announcement of the federal budget and is expected to save families hundreds of dollars monthly per child in day care costs, by about 50 per

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cent as early as 2022. McLeod said that due to ballooning debt, the kids receiving such child care are going to be paying for the program as adults. She is also skeptical such a program will come to fruition, noting the Liberals have promised a national childcare program for many years. McLeod plans to reach out to Sun Peaks Mayor Al Raine in order to understand how a foreign homebuyers’ tax may impact the resort municipality. Sundhu said promises made do not necessarily mean they will be promises kept. “We’ve learned a lot about Justin Trudeau in the last few years,” Sundhu said. “He says pretty words, with no intention of acting on them. The Liberals have been promising child care

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Weddings are a wonderful event to attend. Watching a bride and groom exchange vows and become husband and wife is definitely a reason to celebrate. While more than 40 per cent of those unions won’t last, everyone at a wedding, along with the newlyweds, of course, are hopeful for their future. Every marriage has a different story — as do the ending of those nuptials. Some end in divorce and some end with the death of a spouse. There is, however, another circumstance I have dealt with several times and, I have to admit, I did not realize how common it is. Some of you reading this will no doubt have an opinion on it, but until you have lived through it yourself, it is pretty tough to judge. I am talking about dating while your spouse is still alive, but I am not referring to clandestine cheating. When two people get married, it is pretty much a given one person is going to get sick. When that illness is Alzheimer’s, it’s a horrible situation for the healthy spouse to watch their husband or wife deteriorate before their eyes. People with dementia can live for many years and there are various levels of progression of the disease. Typically, when the ailment gets so bad that the spouse doesn’t even know you any more and require 24/7 assistance, the painful decision comes when they need to be put into a care home.

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Herein lies the quandary. If the healthy spouse is active, fit, has a lot of life left to live and would like to have companionship, good conversation, a dance partner, a crib partner, someone to golf with, a travel companion or even romance, I don’t think there is anything wrong with that. Some people may never want for another partner, but some will — and both situations are absolutely fine. The spouse in a care home could live another 10 years or they could be gone in two months. What really matters is that the healthy spouse is truly ready to meet someone new. I have met men and women who have been divorced for 10 years and they still carry anger and resentment. They are not in a good place to meet

IS

someone new. Yet I have met men and women who have been widowed and looked after their ailing spouse for years. This is an opportunity for them to get out and live life now. I don’t think there is any magic number for widows/widowers that is appropriate before looking to meet a companion. For all we know, a couple may have these discussions with each other before sickness falls on either of them, and I think it’s the most loving gesture when a spouse gives their blessing for their partner to move on when the time comes. Maybe the spouse will never want to, but the option is there. I read The Long Goodbye, a book about Barry Peterson, a CBS correspondent whose wife, Jan, became sick with early-onset Alzheimer’s at age 55. If this topic is of interest to you, I suggest reading that book. There are no guarantees in life and, as we have seen during this pandemic, life is fragile. What matters is that we live happy, healthy lives and, as we go through our days, try to do the next right thing. Only you, and nobody else, can determine what that right thing might be. If you are in a good place in your life and you wish to meet someone new, I would love to hear from you. Send me an email at holmes@ wheretheheartis.ca.

for decades, Pharmacare for 24 years, a federal minimum wage for a few years. If he had any intention to do it, it would already be done. Canadian voters don’t appreciate being fooled by promises that sound good on the campaign trail, but are abandoned as soon as Liberals are elected.” McLeod said she was glad to see in the budget extension of business wage and rent subsidies, due to ongoing impacts of the pandemic. The government is also keeping the Canada Recovery Benefit in place. The program was a replacement for the initial $2,000 a month program for people out of work due to the pandemic, who were not covered by employment insurance. While the benefits will continue, they will be

made less generous come July, dropping to $300 per week from $500 now. Extending the CERB, and a similar benefit for people who had to leave their job to care for someone, will cost $2.5 billion. The government will extend both the wage subsidy and the rent subsidy until the end of September; the deadline the Liberals have given for when they expect all Canadians to be fully vaccinated. The wage and rent subsidies will be extended under the same terms it has operated under since it was last overhauled, gradually tapering off as businesses get more of their revenue back. The government is also adding a time component, gradually phasing out the benefits through the summer months.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

LOCAL NEWS

B.C. budget 2021: Deficit to grow due to COVID COVID-19 RECOVERY SPENDING AT HEART OF DOCUMENT; DEFICIT $5 BILLION LESS THAN FORECAST TOM FLETCHER

BLACK PRESS

B.C.’s current COVID-19driven deficit is coming in at $8.1 billion, not the $13.6 billion that was projected, but the province has much more borrowing ahead to recover from the pandemic. Finance Minister Selina Robinson laid out the NDP government’s three-year budget on Tuesday, calling for a further $19 billion in borrowing to build up the health-care system and carry on support programs for individuals and businesses. Income and property purchase taxes have pushed provincial revenues higher than forecast. “The swift development of effective vaccines, together with stronger than expected economic activity in 2020 has improved the outlook,” Robinson told reporters in a virtual budget presentation from Victoria.

Overall spending will increase by $8.7 billion over the three years of the budget, including “permanent funding increases” for health care, education, justice and public safety services and opioid and substance abuse prevention. Deficits are forecast to be $9.7 billion in the fiscal year just beginning, declining to $5.5 billion in 2022-2023 and $4.3 billion in 2023-2024. Among those permanent increases is an additional $175 per month in income and disability assistance payments, on top of $150 from previous NDP budgets, and a $50 increase in the seniors’ supplement. Spending commitments also include another $100 million to continue B.C. Recovery Benefit payments of up to $1,000 per family and $500 for individuals, announced before last fall’s election. The program has paid out $1.2

billion without requirement to show pandemic income loss, and remains open for applications until June 30. Uncertainty over B.C.’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic continues to weigh on the province’s forecasts. The finance ministry has included pandemic and recovery contingency funds of $3.25 billion in 2021-2022, $1 billion in the following fiscal year and $800 million in 2023-24. In health care, contingency funds of $1.5 billion for 2022-2023 and $2 billion for 2023-2024 are included “for caseload pressures and priority initiatives that may require funding in future budgets.” Health Minister Adrian Dix said this week that rising numbers of COVID-19 patients coming into hospitals have already resulted in some patient transfers and scheduled surgery delays, and bed

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capacity is nearing its limits as coronavirus cases have been running at close to 1,000 per day. After the B.C. economy shrank by 5.5 per cent in 2020, the budget predicts it will expand by 4.4 per cent in 2021, and then grow by 3.8 per cent in 2022. From 2023 to 2025, the growth forecast is 2.1 to 2.5 per cent per year, below the government’s private sector forecast council except for 2025, when the province expects to see LNG Canada’s natural gas exports begin. OVERDOSE CRISIS AND MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORTS B.C. has earmarked a historic half-billion dollars to focus on mental health and addiction services over the next three fiscal years, as part of the province’s 2021 budget. “The COVID-19 pandemic is not the only health emergency facing our province,”

Robinson said. A majority of it, $330 million, will go towards substance-use treatment and recovery services in the province, including $152 million to address the opioid crisis and for the creation of 195 new treatment and recovery beds. Robinson noted the COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the importance of mental health, including the challenges faced by youth. As part of an additional $97 million to be spent on mentalhealth initiatives for children and youth, 15 more school districts in B.C. will see integrated teams of mental-health and substance-use clinicians and Indigenous workers be able to provide quicker, more direct support to students. Foundry centres that offer mental health and substance use services for British Columbians aged 12 to 24 will also double, from 11 locations to 22.


A16

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

Masters of Golf Winner CONGRATULATIONS

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Fire crews battle wildfire near Merritt FIRE ACTIVITY NOT UNUSUAL THIS TIME OF YEAR; WEATHER WILL DETERMINE SEASON’S SEVERITY IN COMING MONTHS SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

DIANE NOGER!

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Diane entered our Masters of Golf contest where Eldrick Tont “Tiger” Woods was voted the all time master of golf. Thank you to everyone who entered and stay tuned for more contests on kamloopsthisweek.com #wereinthistogether #wearelocal #ykastrong

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B.C. wildfire crews continue to tend to a fire burning 18 kilometres northwest of Merritt that has grown to 100 hectares in size. Fire activity elsewhere in the Kamloops Fire Centre remains low, however, with 10 active fires and only one blaze of note. The Petit Creek fire near Merritt was sparked on the weekend and quickly grew on Monday due to high winds. There was no lightning in the area, so the BC Wildfire Service has assumed it to be a human-caused blaze. Evacuation alerts were issued on Monday by the Thompson -Nicola Regional District for properties in the Canford and Miller Estates subdivision, in electoral areas N and M. On Tuesday, the wildfire

SAFE JUST BECAME

SAFER

service said it had dispatched 42 personnel, two pieces of heavy equipment and two helicopters to fight the flames. The Kamloops Fire Centre has seen 1,646 hectares burned to date. Fire information officer Gagan Lidhran said that while early season fire activity is not unusual, unseasonably warm temperatures as of late are drying out ground fuel that has not yet had a chance to green up or take on moisture from precipitation. “With warm temperatures and windy conditions, there’s still a risk for fires to spread quickly, so we’re asking the public to be extremely cautious with any type of open burning,” Lidhran said. The fire danger rating for the region was pegged at low on Monday, while most of the northern part of the province was given a moderate rating.

Lidhran said that rating may not account for the fact that, currently, the region is still seeing deep temperature drops overnight, with fuels needing to reheat during the day in order to become more dangerous. “That won’t be the case for the rest of the season,” she said. The wildfire service is currently predicting a normal wildfire season, according to its seasonal outlook released on April 12. Precipitation in the coming months will be a key factor in predicting the severity of this year’s wildfire season, Lidhran said. Mother Nature may lend a hand later this week as, following a stretch of sunny and warm weather, showers and cooler temperatures are expected on Friday and through the weekend.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

LOCAL NEWS

Pickleball court expansion at Riverside Park nearly done TWO EXISTING TENNIS COURTS WILL BE HOME TO SIX NEW PICKLEBALL COURTS, AS THERE ARE NOW 17 PUBLIC TENNIS COURTS AND 10 PUBLIC PICKLEBALL COURTS ACROSS KAMLOOPS JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The city is nearing completion of additional pickleball courts at Riverside Park. City of Kamloops parks manager Jeff Putnam said the city spent $75,000 to replace two existing tennis courts, located on the west side of the downtown park, with six new pickleball courts. Putnam said the sport has experienced “explosive growth” and the city is working with user groups to ensure there is sufficient infrastructure. With the expansion, Riverside Park will have a total of 10 pickleball courts, up from the existing four courts. Riverside Park will have two remaining tennis courts after

the pickleball court expansion is completed. “It’s going to be a real hub, pickleball centre for Kamloops down there,” Putnam said. In addition to the 10 pickleball courts at Riverside Park, McDonald Park in North Kamloops has four pickleball courts, for a total of 14 city pickleball courts. Putnam said the city completed its Recreation Master Plan prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, noting the plan recognized pickleball had seen explosive growth and tennis had started a slow rebound. Since the pandemic, however, Putnam said more people are playing tennis. The city has a 17 public tennis courts: • Exhibition Park east of downtown (3);

The new pickleball courts in Riverside Park are expected to be completed in a couple of weeks.

• Rae Mor Park in Rayleigh (2); • Brocklehurst Park (2); • McBeth Park, between TRU and Lower Sahali (2); • Dufferin Park (2); • Rose Hill Park (2); • Riverside Park downtown (2); • Westsyde Centennial Park (1);

Mom & Me

LOOKALIKE CONTEST Are you one of those mother-child pairs that’s always told you look alike? Well, here’s your chance to cash in on those shared genes. As Mother’s Day approaches, we’re inviting moms and kids who look exactly alike to enter our annual Mother-Child Look-alike Contest. The winning pair will receive prizes from Safeway and Brock Centre Liquor Store! In addition to the prize, the winner’s picture — as well as those of several runners-up — will appear in the paper on Mother’s Day.

TO ENTER THE CONTEST, GO TO

kamloopsthisweek.com/contests Photo submissions will be accepted until noon Thursday, April 29. As soon as the submission period ends vote for the mother-child pair they think looks the most alike on this page until midnight Monday, May 3.

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• Cowan Park in Sagebrush (1). In addition, Putnam noted a private tennis club downtown, the Kamloops Tennis Centre, has eight courts. Putnam said current tennis infrastructure is keeping up with demand. “We’re playing catch-up with pickleball and now, with tennis, it’s getting busier, but I

think we’re OK,” he said. Putnam said resurfacing of the Riverside Park courts and net installation is almost finished. The area remains closed, but Putnam said the new courts are expected to be completed in a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, as the pickleball players await their new downtown court space, Putnam said the city has allowed the Kamloops Pickleball Club to put down temporary lines in tennis courts throughout the city. Some pickleball players regularly use tennis courts to play pickleball, employing their own nets. Putnam said it is allowed, but added pickleballers are asked to give the city’s recreation department a “heads up.”


A18

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Police arrest robbery suspect in Southgate area incident KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The suspect in

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shortly afterward at the Star Lodge on West Columbia Street. At 12:45 p.m. that day, Kamloops Mounties went to a store in the 1300-block

of West Trans Canada Highway after receiving a call about a man, carrying a firearm, holding up the business. The suspect was spotted fleeing on foot

ROAD CLOSURE AND REMOVAL OF DEDICATION BYLAW NO.18-400 (Adjacent to 3467 Tranquille Road) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on May 4, 2021, Kamloops City Council will consider adopting Bylaw No. 18-400, a bylaw to authorize the closure of road and removal of dedication as a highway shown as being a part of road dedicated on Plan 22115, D.L. A, Grp. 2, K(FORMERLY LYTTON)DYD, as shown by the map on the right and outlined on the March 9, 2021, Council Memo viewable at this link: https://kamloops.civicweb.net/ filepro/documents/128204 The bylaw is available for viewing on the City’s website at this link: https://kamloops.civicweb.net/filepro/ documents/129614 Inquiries may also be directed to realestate@kamloops.ca or by calling 250-828-3548. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, members of the public are not able to attend Council meetings in person at this time. All persons who wish to register an opinion may do so by: • Email to legislate@kamloops.ca or • Mail-in correspondence to Legislative Services, 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 Written submissions must include your name and address and be received no later than 12:00 pm on Friday, April 30, 2021. Written submissions, including your name and address, are included in the Council Agenda and will be posted on the City’s website as part of the permanent public record. Please note that the City considers the author’s address relevant to Council’s consideration of this matter and will disclose this personal information.

about two kilometres away, near Laval Crescent and Notre Dame Drive in the Southgate business area. The investigation moved toward Lower Sahali, where Beattie elementary was placed on a hold and secure procedure while police searched the area. RCMP Const. Crystal Evelyn said multiple officers and the police dog unit responded and tracked a suspect back to the Star Lodge on West Columbia Street. A man known to police was arrested in connection with the robbery and for being wanted on warrants. Police seized a BB gun in the process. “Any use of a firearm in a criminal offence, including one that turns out to be an imitation firearm, is extremely concerning and presents a very high-risk to police and the general public,” Evelyn said. MOUNTIES STOP DRIVER FLEEING HOSPITAL WITH SICK BABY

Kamloops Mounties say an infant in need of medical attention is back in Royal Inland Hospital after being taken from the facility against medical advice. Const. Crystal Evelyn said police were called just before 2 a.m. on April 14. She said the infant had been taken from the hospital against medical advice related to the baby’s survival. Evelyn said that, due to concerns for the baby’s life, officers found and stopped a vehicle carrying the baby, then provided medical assistance to the newborn until paramedics arrived. “Thanks to the partnerships between police and those in both the health and family services sectors, including BC Emergency Health Services, the newborn was located and safely returned to the medical facility, as required to help assist in the infant’s survival,” Evelyn said. “At last check, the baby was in stable condition and the appropriate

family supports were engaged.” The police investigation into the infant’s removal from the hospital is ongoing and police are not releasing further information. TWO TEENAGERS ARRESTED IN BROCKLEHURST RCMP Const. Crystal Evelyn said police responded to the call just before 3 p.m. in the 900-block of Windbreak Street on April 14. Two teens were said to have trespassed on a school property, and when asked to leave, allegedly made threats. One of them, Evelyn said, showed signs of having an eagerness to start a fight. The area is near Brocklehurst middle school and Kay Bingham elementary, but police have not disclosed at which school the teens were said to have caused the disturbance. Police located and arrested two teens, who were taken later released with conditions and a court date, pending the

investigation’s completion and potential charge recommendations, Evelyn said. STOLEN CAR RECOVERED AND SHOTGUN SEIZED A stolen vehicle led to Kamloops Mounties seizing a firearm from a motel room on April 13. Const. Crystal Evelyn said the incident occurred at about 2:30 a.m., when an officer on patrol noticed a vehicle, reported as stolen out of Surrey, parked at the Country Motor Inn on Comazzetto Road in Valleyview. Evelyn said the vehicle was unoccupied, but during the course of the investigation, police were able to associate it to a motel room, where two people were arrested. Seized from the room were firearms — including a loaded sawedoff shotgun and ammunition — and suspected drugs. Those arrested were later released and the investigation is ongoing.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

LOCAL NEWS

Accused in kidnapping/robbery dies in prison ROBERT RENNIE WAS AWAITING TRIAL ON CHARGES STEMMING FROM THE FEB. 14, 2019, INCIDENT MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

A man charged in connection with a Valentine’s Day robbery and kidnapping spree in Kamloops in 2019 has died in custody, while awaiting trial. Kamloops This Week has learned that Robert James Rennie, who was on the Kamloops RCMP’s most wanted list, passed away at the North Fraser Pretrial Centre in Coquitlam on March 12. Rennie, 33, had a bail hearing the day before his death, which was adjourned. The charges against him were stayed by the Crown on the afternoon of March 12. Both the BC Coroner’s Service and BC Corrections confirmed a death occurred at the facility on March 12, but did not confirm the person’s identity,

It's that t

ROBERT RENNIE citing privacy reasons. Another source confirmed to KTW the deceased was, in fact, Rennie. While they would not confirm the identity, BC Corrections and BC Coroners said they are investigating the March 12 death. “BC Corrections is investigating and will complete a review of the circumstances,” a spokesperson for BC Corrections told KTW in an email. The spokesperson said the coroners service is also investigating “as they do in all unex-

pected and/or unnatural deaths” and look to determine how, where, when and by what means the individual came to their death. It is not clear at this time how Rennie died. “As this is an open investigation, we are unable to provide any additional information,” a BC Coroners spokesperson told KTW via email. Rennie had been on the lam for nearly a year when he was arrested by Vancouver Police during a 2 a.m. traffic stop on March 1. He was wanted on a Canadawide warrant for charges of armed robbery with a firearm, forcible confinement and an assault causing bodily harm — all stemming from the Valentine’s Day incident in 2019. Rennie was one of three men arrested in connection with a series of incidents, involving robbery, kidnapping and assault,

mloo a K r a e y f ime o

spanning between Feb.13 and Feb. 14. The other two men — Michael Mathieson and Justin Daniels — have since been sentenced. Mathieson, 38, is serving six-and-a-half years in a federal prison, while Daniels, 40, pleaded guilty last August and was sentenced to seven-and-a-half years in a federal penitentiary. The robbery and kidnapping took place in the midst of a violent gang war and involved people active in the Kamloops drug trade. Police stumbled upon the kidnapping in progress in the early-morning hours of Feb. 14, 2019, while monitoring a wiretap as part of a separate, ongoing investigation. The violent spree began hours earlier, when a man was beaten and robbed inside a suite at a Sahali motel. That was followed by a visit to

a downtown motel, where assailants held a couple against their will and lured an acquaintance to the scene with the promise of money. The target arrived with his girlfriend and another man and both men were robbed, with the woman taken against her will to Kelowna. There, she was handed over to a driver to be taken back to Kamloops and, on the drive back, was rescued by police during a high-risk traffic stop in Falkland. Mathieson, Rennie and Daniels were arrested separately on three different days later that month. Rennie, who had obtained bail following his arrest, fled from a halfway house in April 2020 and failed to show up for his trial last September, before being apprehended this past March.

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A20

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Fundraiser for Ferris as kidney search continues Four-year-old Ferris Backmeyer has Mainzer-Saldino syndrome — a rare disorder involving kidney failure, vision loss and misshapen bones, which she was diagnosed with just days following her birth. If you want to check out the silent auction and help the Backmeyer family with costs related to Ferris’ care, go to Facebook and search “The Backmeyer Family Silent Auction.”

MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

A fundraising effort for a Kamloops toddler in need of a kidney gets underway this weekend via social media. Four-year-old Ferris Backmeyer has been waiting for the new organ almost all her life, having been diagnosed with Mainzer-Saldino syndrome — a rare disorder involving kidney failure — just days following her birth. This weekend — April 23 to April 25 — organizers will hold a silent auction via Facebook to raise money for the family. The Backmeyer family silent auction will take place on Facebook from 8:30 p.m. on Friday, April 23, to 8:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 25, and is open to the public. “With COVID, right now we’re unable to do anything in person, so we figured this was probably our best bet to be able to raise

some money for them while keeping it safe with COVID,” said co-organizer Kelsi Manson, noting she felt compelled to help out after learning of Ferris’ story. “I’ve got four kids myself,” Manson said. “We’ve been very lucky. We have four healthy kids, so I just couldn’t even imagine being in that situation.” More than 50 items and/or services have been donated for the auction, but donations are still being accepted. All funds will be given to the family, with organizers noting their lodging costs when at BC Children’s Hospital in Vancouver. Those costs have been a hindrance for the family, which has opted to keep parents Lindsey and Pat, Ferris and siblings Tavia, 9, and Ksenia together on trips for Ferris’ appointments and dialysis treatment. The older kids are homeschooled in the process. See SILENT, A21

Dividends are Expected to Deliver in 2021 One year ago, Globally, stock markets were down approximately 35% from their highs in February 2020. The decline had been the fastest market drop in history. Consequently, many investors were questioning their strategy. Fear and economic uncertainty because of the COIVD-19 pandemic hit markets hard; including quality dividend-paying companies. As a quick recap, a dividend is the portion of corporate earnings that a company distributes to its shareholders. We feel this is a great time reflect upon the last year and focus on four key benefits of dividend stocks:

Dividend-paying stocks have outperformed Compound annual total returns (1986-2020)

1) Dividend Companies Can Provide Higher Returns According to RBC Capital Markets Quantitative Research, companies that pay and grow their dividends had the best overall returns between 1986 and 2020:

Dividend paying stocks generally provide a steady income stream which helps reduce the volatility of a portfolio when markets decline. In fact, as stock prices decline, their effective yield increases, making shares potentially more attractive to prospective investors. This feature can provide stability as buyers step in providing share price support. We have included a number of companies we featured one year ago:

Source: RBC Capital Markets

2) Dividends Can Account for Significant Returns Many investors are aware that Canadian Banks have historically been a good investment. In 1995, TD paid dividends of $0.22 a year and today pays $3.16. At time of writing, TD share price was near $83.70 for an annual yield of 3.8%. Through all the good and bad years, dividends grew in excess of 10.8%. Assuming a more conservative 8% dividend growth rate over the next 10 years, shareholders could receive a dividend near $6.82 generating a yield of 8.2% based on todays’ share price. 3) Dividends Outpace Inflation The “silent killer” or forgotten risk is inflation which erodes purchasing power. Using the Bank of Canada inflation calculator, inflation averaged 1.9% over the past 30 years (1990-2020). A $100 basket of goods in 1990 would now cost $178! It is a challenge to find Canadian dividend data; however, using the same time frame for the S&P 500 Index, constituents grew their dividends by an average of 6% keeping well ahead of inflation. 4) Canadian Dividends are Tax Friendly Investments can generate interest, dividends, or capital gains which are all taxed differently. Because Canadian public companies have already paid corporate taxes, dividends are taxed more favorably than interest income in the hands of investors. Currently, British Columbians pay virtually no tax on dividends provided their income is below $49,020 a year. Those with income between $49,020 - $84,369 only pay 1.6% tax on dividends! 5) Interests Rate Equivalent Factor A common guideline is to gross up the dividend by 1.3 times to arrive at an approximate interest equivalent factor. For example: a 4.0% dividend is similar to receiving a 5.2% interest from a Bond. While there are more risks in dividends, the current low interest rate environment favours the higher expected cash flow from dividends. We believe dividend investing continues to be compelling and can be a key contributor to one’s portfolio. As always, please consult with an investment professional before investing. Written by Eric Until next time… Invest Well. Live Well.

Eric Davis

Vice President & Portfolio Manager eric.davis@td.com 250-314-5120

Keith Davis

Associate Investment Advisor keith.davis@td.com 250-314-5124

TD Wealth Private Investment Advice

daviswealth.ca

This document was prepared by Eric Davis, Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor, and Keith Davis, Associate Investment Advisor, for informational purposes only and is subject to change. The contents of this document are not endorsed by TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. which is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. For more information: 250-314-5124 or Keith.davis@td.com. Published April 21, 2021.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

LOCAL NEWS

Silent auction from April 23 to April 25 From A20

Mom Lindsey Backmeyer told KTW all the support from the community is appreciated. “I’m just super grateful,” Backmeyer said. Dad Pat is in nursing school and the family hasn’t been able to access Ronald McDonald House in the past year due to pandemic-related restrictions. Financial support helps ease the nearly $4,000 per month in rent the family has faced, having already had two extended stays away from home in the past year. A new kidney would free Ferris from dialysis treatment and constant travels to BC Children’s Hospital. She has been close to receiving a kidney three times in the past three months. In March, she had a transplant, but complications following the surgery meant the kidney had to be removed. Two other potential donor kidneys lined up in December and January fell through at the last second. The Backmeyer family is currently home in Kamloops, having spent most of 2021 to date in the Lower Mainland. More trips are in their future, starting with one to meet with BC Children’s Hospital to discuss what went wrong with Ferris’ transplant. “We just about lost her that night — scariest night of my life,” Backmeyer said of her

youngest daughter. During this latest stay, Ferris also needed a repair to her abdomen, a tear sustained during peritoneal dialysis treatment — a method that involves injecting a fluid that cleans the blood through the abdomen. Such dialysis can be done in the comfort of home, but after fixing the abdominal tear, Ferris had to, while she healed, switch to hemodialysis, in which the blood is cleaned through a machine. That procedure, however, can only be done at BC Children’s Hospital and Lindsey is

concerned if the abdominal issue continues, doctors may switch Ferris to hemodialysis indefinitely, requiring a more permanent relocation to Vancouver — something the family wants to avoid. In the meantime, Lindsey said, the family is happy to be back in Kamloops surrounded by friends, family and well-wishers. Anyone who wants to contribute to the silent auction can contact Manson by phone at 250-574-9505 or via email at hapitreasuresco@gmail.com. While the fundraising will help, the family

continues to look for the ultimate donation of a living kidney donor. Unfortunately, neither of Ferris’ parents are a match for their daughter and, while many people have offered, there is a rigorous screening process as one must be extremely healthy to donate a kidney. To find out more about being a donor, and to learn whether you might be a match, contact the living donor program at St.Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver by by phone at 604806-9027 or 1-877-955-1755 or by email at donornurse@providencehealth.bc.ca.

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A22

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FEATURED LISTING

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

COMMUNITY

In Kamloops, Mo makes mugs marvellous NINE-YEAR-OLD ARTIST MORRIGAN SULLIVAN HAS STARTED A CREATIVE BUSINESS OF HER OWN DAVE EAGLES

STAFF REPORTER

dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

Nine-year-old artist Morrigan Sullivan is building her own business in the present to build savings for the future. “At school, we had a lesson on business stuff and so I got the idea from there,” Morrigan said. “Also, this past Christmas, my older sister made everyone in the family a hand-painted mug.” That gift, Morrigan noted, gave her the idea of a beginning a business of her own, creating and selling her own mugs and coasters. She calls her business Mo’s Mugs & More. Morrigan has been busy crafting practical, hand-painted mugs, keychains and jewelry — all alive with colour. Morrigan said she likes all colours, especially blue and teal.

“There’s a unicorn, horses, paw prints, and I have an app where you can make characters and $140 then you copy it from there onto

page: Mo’s Mugs and More. There, her latest creations for sale can be found. Her use of social media is teaching Morrigan how to market her work. The Grade 4 Arthur Hatton elementary student concedes not a lot of her classmates have seen her growing stock of mugs, due to COVID-19. That may soon change as her business exposure in the community continues to grow. Recently, friends of the family donated a tent and a table for Morrigan to use in her first Morrigan venture, which saw her sell her Sullivan with goods at the opening day of the some of her Kamloops Farmers’ Regional creations. Market this past Saturday. JULI HARLAND PHOTO Morrigan clearly has plenty of support from family and friends. a mug.” “I’m both nervous and excited,” With help from family, Morrigan said in advance of her Morrigan has taken her business first public engagement. million dollar development venture online with a Facebook When asked what she is saving

her earnings for, Morrigan replied that she wants to attend college and to travel. And where might her globetrotting take her? “I want to go to Japan.” she said without missing a beat. “I’ve seen a bunch of cool things there.” When encouraged by her mother, Juli to explain herself further, Morrigan clarifies: “It’s the food. Food is a cool thing.” If you’re visiting the farmers’ market, be sure to stop in at Mo’s Mugs & More and say hello to the almost 10-year-old entrepreneur. Morrigan will likely be the one sitting behind her table of wares, sipping a cup of her favourite Earl Grey tea in one of her brightly designed mugs, perhaps daydreaming of faraway adventures across the Pacific Ocean. Email mosmugsandmore@ gmail.com for more information on Morrigan’s creations.

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A24

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

DRUG PROBLEM? WE CAN HELP!

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Kamloops BC NAPPG Call 778-220-4198 Meets daily at 181 W. Victoria St, 12-1 & 7:30-8:30

FRANCA MURACA NOTARY PUBLIC • Will and Estate Planning • Incapacity Planning • Real Estate Transactions • Notarizing Documents

T: 778-696-4LAW E: info@muracanotary.ca 301-619 Victoria Street muracanotary.ca

Welcome

Paul De Luca Kamloops This Week & KTWDigital would like to welcome Paul De Luca to our team of Print/Digital Marketing Consultants. Paul has chosen to call Kamloops home with an eagerness to learn and grow with the community. “It’s an exciting time, to be able to pass on my knowledge of what I’ve learned and blend it with my experience in Kamloops.” Paul’s formal education in Communications/Marketing and a strong focus on providing clients with quality results in a seamless way, Paul is sure to be able to achieve the solutions you need. Welcome Paul to Kamloops This Week!

Farmer’s market season begins KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The 2021 season of the Kamloops Regional Farmers’ Market has begun. The Saturday markets are running from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on St. Paul Street, between Second and Third avenues, next to the Stuart Wood schoolhouse. The market will run every Saturday until Oct. 30. The Wednesday farmers’ markets will begin on May 5 and will run in the 400-block of Victoria Street from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. until Nov. 3. As was the case in 2020, this year’s market will look different from previous years, due to

pandemic-related gathering restrictions Since farmers’ markets are considered an essential service under the ongoing state of emergency, they will continue to follow safety protocols outlined by the BC Centre of Disease Control. Information on the market’s COVID-19 protocols can be found on the website at kamloopsfarmersmarket.com. A change from last year is that masks this year are mandatory within the outdoor market area. For those who cannot wear a mask or who prefer to not enter the market area, curbside pickup

will be available. Orders must be prearranged and prepaid with the vendors either directly or online at www. localline.com/kamloopsfarmersmarket. Another change this year is the return of nonfood vendors, who were not part of the market in 2020. All products are made, baked or grown by our vendors within B.C., the majority within a 100-kilometre radius of Kamloops. Here is a sample of what can be found: • Potatoes, sunchokes, green garlic, parsnips, carrots, beets, kohlrabi, baby winter greens, onions and cabbage

• Jams, pickles and preserves • Cheese • Local honey • Flowers and hanging baskets • Fresh baking (breads, cookies, and sweets) • Potted plants (strawberry, raspberry, indoor plants, etc.) • A variety of meats (frozen cuts, ground beef, sausages, smokies and jerky) • Bedding plants, starter plants and seeds • Soaps and beauty products - Farm fresh eggs • Handmade quilts and paintings • Fresh herbs • Hand-crafted jewelry.

TRU, Tk’emlups renew deal KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Thompson Rivers University and Tk’emlups te Secwepemc have renewed an agreement that increases access to post-secondary education. The renewed agreement contains nine commitments ranging from event representation to program delivery reflecting the needs and worldview of TteS students. It also includes the placement of a TteS representative on a university senate subcommittee and the university will follow Secwepemc ancestral protocols at

events and ceremonies. The two groups will work together to improve student retention and graduation rates, incorporate TteS knowledge, values and philosophy into programs. “This renewed agreement is not just about public declarations, but also meaningful action to see the success of TteS students,” said TRU president Brett Fairbairn, who called the agreement “another step in our reconciliation journey.” TRU has also promised to align itself and its programs with

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the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 2015 calls for action. Part of that promise is acknowledging TteS students have the “inherent right to education, including post-secondary education.” The university will also work with TteS in the event of archeological discoveries on university land. “We are committed to upholding a mutually respectful relationship that values creating an inclusive environment for all students,” Tk’emlups Chief Rosanne Casimir said.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY [video online]

A25

A Natural Hearing Experience

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At SKSS, they’re playing through the pandemic DAVE EAGLES STAFF REPORTER dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

W

ith the outdoor temperature breaking into the low 20s last week, the courtyard setting was beyond perfect for a noon-hour concert by South Kamloops secondary band students — bringing live music performances back to the school for the first time since the pandemic began. Under the able direction of teacher Michelle McRae, the jazz band and a saxophone quartet brought to life band standards such as Herbie Hancock’s Chameleon, Henry Mancini’s Pink Panther Theme and Weather Report’s Birdland.

For good measure, the jazz band performed the rock classic Shake, Rattle and Roll, made popular by artists like Bill Haley & His Comets. It was a performance that had students and teachers alike clapping along during the instrumental solos. Everyone was wearing masks and social distancing, but you could sense that underneath the cover of each face mask, smiles were spreading wider as band members found their groove and hit all the right notes. The smiles on the faces of bandmates after finishing each song was evidence they, too, had been longing to play live once again. For a musician, that is what it’s all about.

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A26

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

It takes a village — and, at the Kamloops Y, they are building them Three-year-old Charlotte and mom Crystal Murgatroyd are among those taking part in the Kamloops YMCA-YWCA feel-good project called The Village. The Y’s early learning child-care consultant Karyn Heit (left) and family services director Maureen Doll have seen great community response, with villages and postcards being sent to care homes and day cares in a bid to cheer people up. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

DAVE EAGLES STAFF REPORTER dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child,” certainly holds true, as evidenced by the interest in a Kamloops YMCA-YWCA feel-good project called The Village. It was conceived over the Christmas break by Y community staff looking for a project that would encompass families with young children, child-care providers, seniors and community partners. The inter-generational project became the perfect fit, as Interior Savings and the BC Community Response Network joined forces in funding the project. The idea was to distribute small wooden village kits, which could easily be built by both young and old hands alike — creating tiny replicas of a village to signify “we’re all in this pandemic together.” It’s a message YMCA-YWCA family services director Maureen Doll sees as important. Kits were purchased and delivered to seniors’ care homes and also to families with children in local day cares. The children’s kits included a postcard, on which they wrote encouraging messages and drew pictures to send out to local seniors.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A27

COMMUNITY

Celebrate B.C. Wine Month through April

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DAVE EAGLES STAFF REPORTER dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

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.C. Wine Month is well underway and, in Kamloops, that means great opportunities to celebrate and acknowledge not only B.C. wines, but also local wineries. Now in its fourth year, B.C. Wine Month recognizes the efforts of hardworking, local grape growers. April is a month-long celebration and acknowledgement of the individuals who contribute to B.C’s wine industry, from grape growers and winemakers to retailers and those in the tourism industry. Normally, the month of April sees an industry media launch, along with events at wineries and restaurants. With pandemic-related restrictions on gatherings and events, those types of traditional events are not taking place this year. However, the wine industry has pivoted to make the most of B.C. Wine Month in other unique ways. In Kamloops, there are opportunities to experience four wineries: Harper’s Trail Winery, Monte Creek Winery, Privato Vineyard & Winery and Sagewood Winery. All have tasting rooms and outdoor patio areas. HOW TO GET INVOLVED AND CELEBRATE APRIL B.C. WINE MONTH: • A special campaign, A Year in the Life, will celebrate winemakers and farmers and seek to connect consumers to the faces and hard work behind every bottle of B.C. wine. • The campaign is supported by billboards, in-store point-of-sale materials, social media and a consumer contest that features a chance to win an exclusive behind-the-scenes trip for two to one of B.C.’s pristine wine regions once it is safe to do so. • Local retailers are showing support with special displays and point of sale materials in support of B.C. wine. • Many local wineries are offering free delivery to consumers who wish to order their wines online directly from the wineries. “Being unable to welcome consumers from outside our region to visit our wineries, we have focused a lot of our tourism marketing efforts on local consumers,” Trish Morelli, executive director Kamloops Wineries Association, told KTW. “We are very thankful for our Kamloops and surrounding area residents that have been so supportive and so amazing.”

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MUG SHOTS OF THE WEEK “Local wineries have adopted several new safety protocols to ensure the health and safety of our guests and staff at all times. They are operating at half — or less — capacity to ensure social distancing can be achieved, incorporating customer contact tracing, following enhanced surface cleaning and mask-wearing, adding Plexiglass barriers and creating unique tasting pod areas.” Morelli said all wineries have adopted a reservation-based tasting system to better control visitors and to ensure improved customer experiences. She said it relates to a more hands-on wine-tasting experience. Making the experience more seamless, Morelli said, is the recent focus on e-commerce. Wineries have upgraded their e-commerce websites, making is easy for customers to enjoy wines from the comfort of their homes. As well, local wineries continue to offer free delivery incentives for online wine purchases. Morelli noted the impact the local wineries have on Kamloops is significant. An average bottle of wine generates $48.17 in business revenue, local wages and taxes. Under normal conditions, Kamloops’ wine industry draws 15,000 visitors annually to the city, generating an estimated $8.5 million in tourism-related economic impact. Locally, that impact is seen in the current major expansion underway at Monte Creek Winery, which is adding a 19,000-square-foot gravity flow production facility, which will expand production capacity to about 50,000 cases. In addition, Tranquille Farms is developing a master plan, which includes significant vineyard plantings and a new winery overlooking Kamloops Lake. The future, Morelli said, appears bright for Kamloops’ wine-lovers.

ANDERSON, James

SCRIVER, Brooke

FEKETE, Suzanne

Height: 173 cm / 5’08” Weight: 77 kg / 170 lbs Race: Caucasian | Age: 37 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Blue

Height: 188 cm / 6’02” Weight: 68 kg / 150 lbs Race: Caucasian | Age: 24 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Brown

Height: 160 cm / 5’03” Weight: 68 kg / 150 lbs Race: Indigenous | Age: 45 Hair: Brown | Eyes: Brown

Wanted for: Assault

Wanted for: (Ashcroft) Fail to Comply with Probation Order x 2 (Kamloops) Break & Enter x 2

Wanted for: Trafficking a Controlled Substance

www.kamloopsCrimeStoppers.ca

If you know where any of these suspects are, call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). You can also submit an anonymous tip online at kamloopscrimestoppers.ca. You never have to give your name or testify in court. If your information is used in an arrest, you may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,000 These suspects are wanted on arrest warrant not vacated as of 3:00pm on Apr 14, 2021

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bighornsecurity.ca Like us on facebook!


A28

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

Lots to do at the library this spring

ALLEN DOUGLAST/KTW FILE

IT’S ROTARY FOOD DRIVE TIME AGAIN

Kamloops Food Bank executive director Bernadette Siracky gives instructions to physically distanced food sorters before food donations arrived at the Wilson Street food bank location during the April 2020 Rotary Food Drive, the first to be held amid the pandemic. Despite concerns about volume to be donated, the spring 2020 event saw a record 70,000 pounds of food collected, enough to fill food bank shelves for six months. The 2021 spring Rotary Food Drive will take place this Saturday, April 24. Look for the familiar yellow bags in today’s edition of KTW. Place food items in that yellow bag (or any bag on hand) and place it at the end of your walkway or driveway for collection on Saturday morning.

The Thompson-Nicola Regional Library’s April to June programming includes regular events like Dungeons & Dragons, Nintendo Switch tournaments and Books & Brews, along with the following: • During the month of April, residents have an opportunity to showcase the beauty of their communities by taking part in the Make Your Own Mobile Library Craft project. Pick up the craft at a library branch or mobile library stop and submit a photo of the completed mobile library to enter to win a prize. • The Kamloops Art Gallery and the TNRL are assisting artist Amy Modahl with an exhibition launching on June 26. Until May 1, Modahl is collecting written responses to the question: “How have you been?”

Responses can be mailed to the KAG (101- 465 Victoria St., Kamloops, V2C 2A9) or emailed to ajmodahl@gmail. com. In addition to artwork developed from responses, the letters will be published as a book (with the authors’ permission) and catalogued by the KAG and the TNRL. For full details, see kag.bc.ca. • Geek Week returns from May 4 to May 8 with a celebration of geek culture. The third annual Geek Week will feature Star Wars Trivia on May 4, Dungeons & Dragons dungeon master training on May 6 and Stranger Things escape rooms on May 8. In addition the library will launch a new collection of Dungeons & Dragons program kits for patrons to use at home with friends and family. See the full guide at tnrl.ca.

SHOW US HOW YOU The 2021 CFJC-TV Boogie the Bridge will be a virtual event, with people running in their own bubbles any time between April 18 and 25.

To celebrate, we're planning a special section in the April 28 edition of Kamloops This Week where we'll run as many pictures of Boogie runners as we can fit!

TO ENTER

Post your photo to social media using the hashtags:

#boogiestrong

#kamloopsboogie

OR go to www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest to upload your pictures to us directly!

GET YOUR PHOTOS IN BY

SUNDAY, APRIL 25!


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A29

COMMUNITY

The History of the Universe as We Know It SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Since October, a Grade 5/6 split class at Summit elementary has been working away at the most colossal of topics — The History of the Universe as We Know It. Last week, the class lined the school’s gymnasium with an abundance of information in the form of posters, elaborate models and even dolls. Students were tasked by their teacher, Terri Anne Wilson, to pursue a topic of their own interest, with many taking on more than one project. Early on, Wilson said, her students had a hard time with interruptions to their learning due to the pandemic. “They weren’t really going very deeply on topics. They were reluctant to write. They were writing a couple sentences and considering that finished,” she said. In an effort to get her students to dive deep, Wilson came up with the idea for her kids to create a virtual museum — in lieu of being able to visit an actual museum themselves. A fiveminute documentary on the project is planned to be published online later this month. Wilson’s students explored Carter Nadeau delved into the history a wide range of of humans — and learned all about Lucy, our most notable ancestor. topics, including the history of weddings, the Titanic, dinosaurs, ancient civilizations and the history of the United Kingdom — something that required last-minute changes with the announcement of Prince Philip’s death. Grade 6 student Carter Nadeau sought to explore the history of humans. The idea came from his mom, but he already knew a bit about it. How? “It was in The Simpsons,” he told Kamloops This Week, referencing the venerable cartoon series. Nadeau perused a pair of books on the subject, learning about various types of human ancestors and how we eventually came to be who we are now. Most surprising to the youngster was the tale of Lucy, a 3.2-million-year old fossilized skeleton of a human

ancestor and a vital part of our understanding of the past today. In his presentation, Lucy appears as a doll — a heavily modified Barbie, in fact. Like many of her fellow students, Alyssa Nickel was hands-on with a number of projects. But her favourite was delving into the mysteries of Ancient Egypt. “I think it’s interesting because there’s so much stuff to cover,” she said. “It was an ancient civilization and they believed in so much stuff.” The pharaohs, the queens and the gods were all subjects of her research and she’s happy with how her work came through. “I think I put a lot of effort into them and it was a lot of fun to put together,” she said, noting she leveraged her love of dogs in the project she put together. “I have a dog named Cooper and I really love him,” she said. “Dogs have been one of my interests for a really long time. I learned a lot about them.” Cartwright said the connection between humans and dogs goes back tens of thousands of years. The question she wanted answered was: How did the dog become a pet? Some of the information Cartwright came across was too grown-up for her to understand, she said, but that didn’t stop her from learning new facts, such as how dogs and wolves still share 99 per cent of their DNA and how early humans used dogs to help them hunt. One of the many topics chosen by the class that proved popular was dinosaurs. Reid Bissell said the idea came to him easily. “I took some time, but then I remembered that I know a lot about dinosaurs,” he said. Bissell capitalized on his knowledge and turned it into a stellar display of his research. He even adorned his poster with dinosaur figurines. “My favourite fact, well, there were a lot of facts. But I like the fact that a Tyrannosaurus rex weighed the same amount as a garbage truck,” he said. And he made friends along the way, too, folding other students into his project. He said he was “very happy” with how it turned out. Wilson said the collaborative part of the project has been important in teaching employable skills, such as organizing and delegating, and noted she began to see her students as research colleagues. The class also collected money for three organizations in the city. This week, students will put their math skills to the test to determine how much the Kamloops SPCA, Kamloops Food Bank and Kamloops Film Society each receive as a result of their fundraising efforts.

ABOVE: Summit elementary student Reid Bissell explains his Dinosaurs From the Past project. LEFT: Summit elementary students Taylor Cartwright (left) Ainsley Sun and Hunter Leonhardt explain projects to younger peers. BELOW: Using the history of Pocahontas, Indigenious cultural representation comes alive for students. DAVE EAGLES PHOTOS/KTW

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A30

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

[share with us]

save-on-foods presents:

EYE ON COMMUNITY

If you have a photo of a charity donation, a grand-opening picture or other uplifting images, email them to

editor@kamloopsthisweek.com,

with “eye on community” in the subject line.

CHARITY CALENDAR

Share It Forward with Save-On ONGOING While the 2021 CFJC-TV Boogie the Bridge event will not be held due to the pandemic, organizers are hoping a sea of runners and walkers can gather for Boogie in 2022. An online fundraising campaign has been launched, despite the postponement for a second year. To donate, go online to gofundme.com and search “Friends of Boogie.” Boogie and RunClub founder Jo Berry is urging participants to continue training on their own as it is more important than ever to pay attention to health, in body and mind. The annual event, which sees participants run and walk various distances, has raised more than $1 million for charity since its inception more than two decades ago. THROUGH MAY 9 The Kamloops Food Bank’s Mother of All Raffles is underway, with the winner eligible to take home a maximum of $100,000. Tickets for the 50/50 draw are available online at https://kamloopsfoodbank.rafflenexus.com/ through May 9. There are 42,500 tickets available for sale — three tickets for $20, 10 tickets for $50 and 25 tickets for $100. The holder of the winning ticket will scoop up half the pot, with the other half going to the Kamloops Food Bank. The draw will be held on May 10.

Welcome to Barb’s Mixed Bag Edition Barb’s Used Book and Music Sale, the perennially popular semi-annual fundraiser for the Kamloops Symphony Orchestra, is being remixed for its return next month. The Mixed Bag Edition will be running from Wednesday, May 12, to Saturday, May 15. Because the traditional two-week format is classified as an event, and therefore not permitted under current pandemic-related public health orders, shoppers will instead be given

the opportunity to pre-order a curated bag of books from one of the following categories: • General Fiction • Science Fiction • Mystery • Young Adult • Romance • Home and Garden Shoppers will be able to pre-order their mixed bag of books online and pick up their order at the former Value Village building, downtown at Seymour Street and Fifth Avenue. Items will be collected

at curbside from May 12 to May 15 between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. A curated bag of eight books is $10 and a bag of 20 books is $20. Donations of gently used books will be accepted at the site from May 12 to May 15 between 10 am and 2 p.m. Pandemic related gathering restrictions prevent volunteers and staff from providing any physical onsite assistance with donations. The following donations

SAHALI 1210 Summit Dr

LANSDOWNE #200-450 Lansdowne St.

WESTSYDE 3435 Westsyde Road

VALLEYVIEW #9 - 2101 E. Trans Canada Hwy

250.374.6685

It’s easy! From April 22 — May 6, Round Up your grocery bill to the nearest dollar and every extra cent will go towards bringing care to BC Kids.

are not being accepted: • Dirty or tattered books • Magazines • Readers’ Digests • Encyclopedias • Textbooks • VHS tapes • Cassettes The sale began in 1997 and was the idea of thenKSO board member Barb Corbishley. After her death, it was renamed Barb’s Used Book & Music Sale in her honour. For more information, contact the KSO office at 250-372-5000.

250.579.5414

BROCKLEHURST #38 - 1800 Tranquille Rd. 250.376.5757

250.374.4187

250.374.4343


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

APRIL 18-24 IS NATIONAL

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

A31

Volunteer Week

Dreger is Ducks Unlimited B.C. volunteer of year What started as a small group looking to form a Ducks Unlimited Canada chapter in Kamloops has blossomed into 37 years of dedication to conservation and unequivocal friendships for Glenn Dreger. Due to that dedication , Ducks Unlimited has named Dreger as its volunteer of the year for British Columbia. “It’s certainly an honour, but we don’t do this for the awards,” said Dreger, who has helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Ducks Unlimited in Kamloops. “Knowing that I have this tight group of friends that I can really count on to work with me to put on events has been a reward in itself.” Dreger, a conservationist and avid photographer, is chair of the Kamloops Ducks Unlimited Canada committee, a position he has held for the past 10 years. He said he shares the award with every member of the committee, pointing to friendships he has fostered over the years with Bev and Barry Corbet, Don Romanin, Kim Hansen and the late Dave Sharpe, all of whom have helped him keep the Kamloops chapter thriving for the past 37 years. Manda Hanson, volunteer fundraising administrator and event fundraising for Ducks Unlimited in B.C., said it was an unprecedented year of dealing with the COVID-19 crisis. She said Dreger understood the organization’s situation and was ready to do whatever it took to motivate his chapter to find a new way of fundraising. “Because of Glenn’s determination and leadership, we are on schedule to raise

Thank you

Kamloops Volunteers for your resilient efforts this past year We can’t wait to properly recognize your contributions to our community. Stay tuned for updates on a fall celebration event.

building a stronger community. “One thing you could always count on is if someone said they were going to do something, you could count on it being done,” Dreger said.

Ducks Unlimited Canada volunteer Glenn Dreger and daughter Heidi are committed to giving back to the natural world by supporting wetland conservation. DUCKS UNLIMITED CANADA PHOTO

$20,000 for a cause that’s close to his heart during a pandemic year,” Hanson said. Dreger said he remains passionate about the cause, especially as increased populations and development have swallowed wetlands around the region. But, he added, the greatest reward continues to be the bonds he has formed with committee members and knowing the work they do means

Our dedicated RIH Auxiliary Members & Hospital Volunteers are what makes the world a brighter place. We’re all in this together, and look forward to when the pandemic is behind us & a brighter safer future is ahead. Your generosity of spirit does not go unnoticed.

Royal Inland Hospital appreciates all that you do. Kamloops.ca

“I have never had to pick up a loose end because someone made a commitment and didn’t follow through. And that’s been very rewarding to work with a group of people like that.”

Interior Community Services, Mount Paul Community Food Centre and Better at Home would like to thank our volunteers for the their time and heart they bring to our programs and services.

765 Tranquille Road, Kamloops • 250.554.3134 www.interiorcommunityservices.bc.ca


A32

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

Get the deck ready for the long haul

Spring Projects

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Adding value outdoors

VINYL DECKS DECK RAILINGS ALUMINUM PATIO COVERS OVER 35 YEARS EXPERIENCE

2180 Ponderosa Ave., Kamloops 250-554-2156 | Toll Free: 1-866-554-2156 abcoduradeck@telus.net

Exterior renovations can enhance the appearance of a property and make it more enjoyable for homeowners. Certain renovations have the potential to add value to a home, while others may do the opposite. Learning which one have the largest return on investment can help homeowners select features that will have the best impact. Curb appeal goes a long way toward attracting potential buyers. Landscaping and external features can do much to influence such impressions. • Lawn care program: Investing in a lawn care program that consists of fertilizer and weed control application and can be transferred over to a subsequent homeowner is an attractive

feature. Such a care program can recover $1,000 in value of the $330 average cost. • Low-maintenance lifestyle: When choosing materials for projects, those that offer low-maintenance benefits can be preferential. These include low-maintenance patio materials, composite decking, vinyl fencing and inorganic mulched beds. • Softscaping: Hardscaping refers to structures

like outdoor kitchens or decks. Softscaping involves the living elements of the landscape. Hiring a landscape designer to install trees, shrubs, natural edging, and rock elements can do wonders toward improving the look and value of a home. • Pool or water feature: In certain markets, particularly hot climates such as summers in Kamloops, a pool or another water feature is a must-have. However, in other areas where outdoor time is limited, a pool or water feature can actually lower the value of a home. Speaking with a real estate professional can give homeowners an idea of how a pool will fare in a given neighbourhood.

The Keep Kamloops campaign aims to provide a boost to culture, recreation and heritage organizations by publicizing their importance and by encouraging people to donate and participate. We want to “Keep Kamloops” active, creative, and engaged by supporting the organizations that do just that. Our vision is to foster a community that is resilient and supported through COVID-19 by residents who value the contributions that arts, culture, and recreation make to their quality of life and the livability of our community. THIS WEEK'S FEATURED ORGANIZATION

Boogie the Bridge Society

#keepkamloopsactive

MOVEMENT IS CHANGE

B

oogie the Bridge is a signature Kamloops event. For over 20 years, each April, thousands of Kamloopsians have gathered to walk, roll and run in the city’s largest “movement” event, Boogie the Bridge.

Everyone knows Boogie as a fun, uplifting day of activity, music, love and community. But not everyone knows the story of how Boogie came to be. Boogie the Bridge was founded by five women, including Jo Berry -- then a social worker -- in 1998. The event was born from a pivotal and heartbreaking event in Jo’s life: the loss of her mom, who took her own life after

many years of struggling with depression. This painful tragedy created a new mission for Jo: “Movement is Change.” Running, walking, and being active outdoors can create huge changes in people’s mental, emotional, spiritual and physical health, helping to heal, empower and reach potentials they never thought possible. When people of all ages, genders and demographics cross the Boogie finish line, they are changed -- contributing to the health of their own families, coworkers and community. The first Boogie attracted 68 participants. Through the years, Boogie has captured the imagination and hearts of Kamloops, and more recently, close to 3,000 people wearing “Boogie red” descend upon

Kamloops streets each spring. The well-loved event, produced and managed by the Boogie the Bridge Society and dozens of volunteers, has changed hundreds of lives and has raised over $1 million for local charities. When the pandemic hit last year, Boogie the Bridge had to be postponed for the first time in its history. It takes a lot of volunteer time, sponsorship dollars and effort to produce an event like Boogie. Now facing COVID-19 for a second year, Boogie faces financial challenges, impacting its continuation and ability to fundraise for other charities. The grassroots event receives no government funding, relying 100% on registration fees and sponsorships.

Are you an arts, heritage or recreation organization that has made changes in response to COVID-19? We are looking for stories to share about charities and non-profit organizations that make our community special and are implementing new or innovative solutions to navigate this crisis. We also want to direct people to donate to your organization. Go to keepkamloops.ca to learn more.

Keep Kamloops is brought to you by Also sponsored by

While we can’t gather together this year, Boogie the Bridge will go on for 2021 -- virtually! Walk, run, jog, roll, hop or skip your Boogie distance on your own or with your bubble, anytime from April 18 to 25, anywhere you’d like. This year’s Charity of Choice is the Indigenous Youth Theatre Program at Western Canada Theatre. Let’s keep Kamloops active! Register today for Eight Days of (Virtual) Boogie at www. boogiethebridge.com Or make a donation at www.gofundme.com/f/friends-of-boogie.

Follow, share and donate to keep Kamloops active, creative and cultural. Connect with Keep Kamloops online

keepkamloops.ca

facebookcom/keepkamloops

@keepkamloops

BCLC seeks to make a positive impact for players and communities all across the province. We give back to B.C. through our business and through our people. Funds generated by gambling go back to the province to help support arts & culture, healthcare, education and community programs all across B.C. Employee volunteerism and fundraising efforts support organizations that make our community such a great place to live. Thanks to our players, $25 billion in net income has been delivered to the province to support communities, provincial programs and services, charities and major events that have helped shape B.C. since 1985.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A33

KAMLOOPS ART PAGE

W

elcome to the weekly Kamloops Art Page. With the COVID19 pandemic upending society — socially and economically and dominating news for the foreseeable future — we understand pandemic fatigue can set in for even the most ardent followers of current events. While continuing to cover all pandemic and non-pandemic-related news, KTW has also worked hard at featuring positive stories from the crisis, tales that capture the essence of humanity, be it volunteers sewing thousands of masks for health-care workers or musicians offering up weekly free concerts online.

This page is an attempt by KTW to bring some colour into the lives of our readers via artwork created locally. We hope to, on a weekly basis, use this page to showcase works by various Kamloops artists, with between one and three pieces displayed. Thanks for reading Kamloops This Week and we hope this page can help ease the stress of this uncertain era in which we are living. Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have any questions or suggestions relating to this page.

Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have submissions for Kamloops Art Page.

Red Truck, a 20-inchby-20-inch oil painting, was created by Christina Williams and was on display at the recent Art Exposed exhibit at the Old Courthouse Gallery.

This acrylic artwork is called Jack’s in Jack’s Room Come Morning. It was created by Kate Marshall, a Kamloops Arts Council member. Spring Breeze is a 24-inch-by-24-inch acrylic creation by Parm Armstrong. It was among artwork featured in the recent Art Exposed exhibit at the Old Courthouse Gallery.

Thompson River, a 14-inch-by-18-inch painting, was created by Liz Thiessen and was on display at the recent Art Exposed exhibit at the Old Courthouse Gallery.


A34

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FAITH

WOULD YOU GIVE THIS MAN PLACE?

I

n Luke 14:7-11 the Lord Jesus is telling a parable concerning exalting oneself. He used the phrase “give this man place” to illustrate the principle of humility. In the Bible, in Luke 14:1, the Lord was invited to the home of one of the chief religious leaders of the Jews. Jesus was invited to have a meal in the leader’s home. There was a man there who had the dropsy, which is likely a symptom of some condition of the kidneys or heart. It is possible the leader was setting a trap for the Lord in seeing if Jesus would heal the man on the Sabbath. The Lord, knowing the thoughts of the leader, asked him if it was lawful to heal on the Sabbath day. The leader would not answer because the traditions of the Jewish leaders were more important to them than the Law of Moses. So, the Lord healed him and let him go. The attempt to trap the Lord had failed. Then we read that the Lord had noticed that certain ones who came had sought

JOHN EGGERS YOU Gotta Have

FAITH

out seats of prominence and took them. The Lord took the opportunity to speak about humility to the gathering. He spoke about being invited to a wedding and seeking to take a prominent seat when you arrive. Then the one who had invited you would ask you to take a lower place to “give another man place.” The Lord said that it would be better to take the low place and then possibly you would be asked to take a more honourable seat. Then he said, “For whosoever exalts himself shall be abased; and he that humbles himself shall be exalted.”

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Join us online Saturday 6:30 pm & Sunday 9 am & 11 am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call 250-374-7467

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

In these unprecedented times10:00am we are worshiping remotely via our Facebook Sunday Mornings

pageTranquille livestream on 422 Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

Sundays at 10am. All are Welcome

www.northshorecalvary.com www.northshorecalvary.com

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca

We’re going to look at a few of the places where this phrase, “This man” is found in the Bible. In Luke 15:2, the Jewish religious leaders used this phrase in speaking of the Lord Jesus in a derogatory way. They said “this man receives sinners and eats with them”. Though they were opposed to the Lord, what they said was true. The Lord Jesus is called elsewhere a friend of publicans and sinners. He came to seek and to save that which was lost. The rest of Luke chapter 15 is a parable the Lord spoke to illustrate this very truth. In Acts 13:38, Paul is preaching the Gospel to people in Antioch in Pisidia (central Turkey) and he said “through this man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins.” The Bible tells us that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God. We all need to come to grips with the matter of our sins. It is wonderful news that the Lord Jesus provided for our need to have our sins forgiven. God punished his own son while on the cross for the sins

of every person in the world. Acts 13:39 says that “by him all that believe are justified”. Lastly, in Hebrews 10:12 we read, “this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins forever, sat down at the right hand of God.” God has raised his son from the dead and exalted “this man” to be on his heavenly throne. His resurrection is testimony to the satisfaction that God has with the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus for our sins on the cross. O that you would “give this man place” and put your trust in Him as the one who died for your sins. You can know the forgiveness of your sins and the certainty that Heaven is your home, God has promised it.

Which saint is yours?

Some Roman Catholic churches require parishioners hoping to receive the sacrament of confirmation to choose confirmation names. In such instances, prospective confirmands are asked to choose a saint who inspires them or one with whom they identify. Some would-be confirmands may identify with the patron saints of professions they hope to one day pursue. The following is a list of the patron saints of some popular professions: • Accountants: St. Matthew • Artists: St. Luke • Athletes: St. Sebastian • Authors: St. Francis de Sales • Carpenters: St. Joseph • Comedians: St. Vitus • Dietitians: St. Martha • Engineers: St. Ferdinand III • Firemen: St. Florian • Hotel keepers: St. Amand • Lawyers: St. Thomas More, St. Yves • Mountaineers: St. Bernard of Menthon John Eggers is an elder in • Musicians: St. Cecilia, St. Gregory the the assembly that meets in Great Westsyde Gospel Hall in • Nurses: St. Agatha, St. Camillus de Kamloops. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Lellis, St. John of God • Physicians: St. Cosmas & St. Damian, Columns should be between St. Luke 600 and 800 words in length • Preachers: St. Catherine of Alexandria, and can be emailed to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. St. John Chrysostom • Priests: St. John Vianney Please include a very short • Teachers: St. Gregory the Great bio and photo.

COMMUNITY

Plenty to do as Earth Day nears JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The sun is shining and Thompson Rivers University and the City of Kamloops are hoping residents will get out and volunteer some extra time during the pandemic to tidy up their neighbourhoods in advance of Earth Day next week. While the 24th annual Trash Bash event wraps up on April 18, organizers are urging Kamloopsians to get outside, pick up trash where they see it and enjoy nature in the days leading to TRU sustainability programs manager James Gordon said the university has run Trash Bash for 24 years, during which it has

encouraged employees to clean up the university campus on paid time. The springtime event typically wraps up with a barbecue and prizes. It looks different during the pandemic — but has grown community-wide thanks to the partnership with the city. Gordon said animals are impacted negatively by garbage left outdoors, particularly plastics on smaller critters. “We know it can have detrimental effects, certainly, if it [garbage] ends up in our waterways,” Gordon said. City of Kamloops sustainability supervisor Glen Cheetham said the city typically holds a Green Living Expo close to Earth Day but is unable to do so this year,

due to the pandemic. In addition to participating in the community cleanup this weekend, Cheetham suggested Kamloops residents get outdoors during sunny weather and take time to enjoy and appreciate nature. “Maybe do some gardening and plant a pollinator-friendly plant with your family,” he said. “And promote habitat for those pollinators that are really important.” Some pollinator plants include sunflowers, lavender, oregano, Black-eyed Susans and maple trees. Pollinators also need water, so another option is to put out a shallow water dish or bird bath. Pollinator seeds and plants can be picked up at a local garden centre.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

INSIDE: No Kamloops NorthPaws in 2021 | A36

A35

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

Kamloops athletes talk Olympics boycott MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

C

hina’s human rights record is under scrutiny, most notably its participation in the genocide of the Uyghurs, an ethnic Muslim minority. As a result, there has been talk of a possible boycott of the 2022 Olympic Winter Games in Beijing, with Ned Price, a U.S. state department spokesperson, seeming to indicate earlier this month during a press briefing that the U.S. has interest in a joint boycott with its allies, including Canada. “It [a boycott] is something that we certainly wish to discuss ... We understand that a co-ordinated approach will be not only in our interests, but also in the interests of our allies and partners,” Price said. Price and the U.S. State Department later backed away from the comments, saying no discussions have taken place with allies and partners. KTW spoke to several local athletes to get their take on the issue and how it would feel to have their Olympic or Paralympic dreams postponed or dashed if Canadian athletes were pulled from the Games. Of those interviewed, Kamloops resident Matt Dunstone is the only athlete trying to qualify for the Beijing Games, a curler whose team is ranked among the world’s best. “I understand why people would want to boycott the Games. I totally get that,” Dunstone said. “As an athlete on the other side of it, especially knowing how difficult it is to be Team Canada at the Olympics in curling or in any sport, quite frankly, I would have a very difficult time either boycotting them myself or being on board with that decision. The Olympics is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. People work four, eight, 12 years,

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE Greg Stewart launches the implement in February 2020 inside the Tournament Capital Centre.

putting everything they’ve got into it, their life on hold, to go. If the Olympics were tomorrow and I was told we were Team Canada, I would be hopping on that plane instantly.”

On Feb. 22, the House of Commons voted to declare the Chinese treatment of the Uyghurs a genocide, although Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet abstained from the vote.

In addition to the situation with the Uyghurs, two Canadians — Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor — have been in prison in China since December 2018, their detainment widely thought to be retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, who is facing extradition to the U.S. An Angus Reid poll of 5,004 Canadians between Feb. 26 to March 3 found the majority believing there can be no moving forward until the prisoners are released and that Canada should boycott the Beijing Games. Camille Gagné-Raynauld, a spokesperson for Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, told the National Post in February that the decision on whether to participate in the Games lies with the Canadian Olympic and Paralympic committees as they operate independently of the government. Greg Stewart is a great bet to reach the podium this summer at the Tokyo Paralympics, a 7-foot-2 shot putter who since 2017 has dedicated much of his life to reaching the Games. The Tokyo Paralympics are not in jeopardy due to a boycott, but Stewart was asked for his take on boycotts in general. “It’s a great question, a tough question,” Stewart said. “You’re putting your whole life on these specific Games. Everybody’s views and opinions are different. What I might feel is wrong or unfair, others might feel different. Canada has been a leader in terms of making a stand. We stand for rights and freedom. If that’s something another country is not participating in, well maybe there is an area to stand on. But, for me, I don’t know. I honestly don’t know, man. That’s a great question, a tough question, and I honestly don’t know the answer.” Kamloops swimmer Patrick Waters is also a Tokyo Paralympics hopeful. See PENDREL, A36

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

NorthPaws nixed until 2022 Pendrel questions boycott From A35

MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops sports fans thirsty for something to cheer about are not going to like news published in West Coast League and Kamloops NorthPaws’ press releases. The league’s five Canadian teams have withdrawn from the 2021 campaign amid the pandemic, with limitations on gathering sizes and border crossings too much to overcome. “We’re definitely disappointed to not begin play in 2021, but we’re still ecstatic about bringing the NorthPaws and the West Coast League to Kamloops,” NorthPaws’ part-owner Jon Pankuch said in the WCL release. “The pandemic has stalled us from starting, but it hasn’t deterred us.” All five teams are expected to play in 2022, including the expansion NorthPaws, Edmonton Riverhawks and Nanaimo NightOwls. The Victoria HarbourCats and Kelowna Falcons round out the Canadian contingent. Earlier this spring, the league issued a revised schedule that eliminated all cross-border travel. The league’s 10 U.S.-

based teams continue to prepare for the 2021 championship schedule, which begins on June 4 and includes 48 games for each team. The league is working through revised divisional alignments and post-season formats, which will be announced later this spring. “Obviously, the league won’t feel complete without our Canadian members,” WCL Commissioner Rob Neyer said in the WCL press release. “But those five teams will remain foremost in our thoughts this season. We’ll be honouring them in various ways throughout the summer and we look forward to their returns to the field at full strength in 2022.” NorthPaws’ fans who purchased tickets for games in 2021 will be contacted by the team and offered refunds or a rollover to the 2022 campaign.

“It’s really tough. Sport is designed to bring us together,” Waters said. “The Olympics bring us together regardless of what our beliefs are. At the same time, I can appreciate why it [a boycott] happened in the past and why it may happen again. I would really struggle with that one. That would be a tough piece of meat to chew on. I’m hopeful that everyone at the table can come to a resolution before then.” The Kamloops athletes condemn genocide, but it is possible for them to do so and disagree with a boycott, or at least pose questions about the effectiveness of one: Are we just being used as political pawns? Will this boycott exact change? Prolific mountain

biker Catharine Pendrel is aiming to qualify for the Tokyo Games, which would mark her fourth appearance at the Summer Olympics. “I think that unless Canada goes into a boycott with a unified approach with other nations, then the impact on human rights issues of us boycotting would be very small, if any,” Pendrel said. “It would, however, hugely impact the livelihood of the athletes. Historically, Olympic boycotts have not proven effective. If Canada is serious about addressing human rights issues in China, they need to take a

comprehensive approach, rather than a token public political gesture.” The most recent U.S. Olympic boycott came in 1980, when President Jimmy Carter refused to send athletes to the Olympics in Moscow due to the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. A total of 66 countries, including Canada, boycotted the Moscow Games, most citing the invasion of Afghanistan. The Soviet Union countered in 1984 when it and 17 other countries — Warsaw Pact and other allied nations — boycotted the Olympic Summer Games in Los Angeles.

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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

B.C. curling championships still coming to McArthur Island Curl BC will honour its pledge to bring the next B.C. curling championships to Kamloops. The 2022 B.C. Men’s Curling Curling Championship and Scotties B.C. Women’s Curling Championship are scheduled to run from Jan. 4 to Jan. 9 on the Olympic ice surface at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre, according to a Curl BC press release. Kamloops was slated to host the event in 2021, but it was pre-empted by the COVID-19 pandemic. “We already have a fantastic committee in place and we look forward to hitting the ground running for 2022,” event co-chair Linda Bolton said in the press release. “The Kamloops business community was very supportive of the 2021 event, so we want to thank them for their efforts and we look forward to working with them again this next season.” The event is usually held later in January, but in 2022 will take place earlier due to the Olympic Winter Games in Beijing, which get underway on Feb. 4. There will be one open qualification event for the B.C. Scotties, with four berths available. Men’s

Erin Pincott (left) and Dezaray Hawes of Kamloops-based Team Brown talk strategy in February at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in Calgary.

Tournament Capital Sports

BRIEFS

ANDREW KLAVER/CURLING CANADA

teams will qualify through five regional playdowns. The B.C. Curling Tour is also an avenue for qualification for men and women. There are no defending champions in 2022, so no team will qualify based on its status as defending champion. More information on qualifying berths will be released before July 1. NO POST-SEASON The Western Hockey League announced on Monday the 20202021 season will conclude following the completion of the 24-game regular season schedule. Due to current public health conditions and the ongoing challenges with COVID-19, including restrictions on travel across both provincial and international borders, the WHL is not in a position to conduct the playoffs, including the WHL Championship series. The 2021 WHL Awards will rec-

ognize individual award winners from each division, as opposed to the traditional celebration of conference-based award winners. The awards, which will be celebrated digitally following the season, will culminate with honourees in each major category on a leaguewide basis. The WHL will continue to work with government and health authorities on schedule options for the 2021-2022 regular season. ACTION ON ICE The Kamloops Long Blades took part in the 2021 Canadian Youth Challenge, a national virtual speed skating event presented by Intact Insurance. Skaters ages 10 to 15 competed in individual and team races in the short track challenge from Feb. 22 to March 28, with the Long Blades in action on the Olympic ice surface at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre. In the individ-

ual events, Adam Turner placed second in the 222-metre pursuit event. Lienke Raath was fifth in the 100m flying lap and sixth in the 200m pursuit and 400m races. Meena Litt placed sixth in the 100m flying lap and 200m races and seventh in the

400m event. Keidis Corrigan placed ninth in the 400m race and Allison Hill placed 10th in the 100m flying lap. Caleb Van der Merwe finished sixth in the 100m flying lap, fifth in the 200m pursuit and seventh in the 400m. Leah Turner placed 10th in the

111m flying lap, seventh in the 200m pursuit and 10th in the 500m. Sophia Pankratz was ninth in the 200m pursuit and 500m events. In team action, Hill and Van der Merwe placed ninth in the 10-minute, twoperson relay. In the four-lap team sprint, Hill, Litt, Nelson Smith and Corrigan won bronze, while Leah Turner, Adam Turner, Pankratz and Van der Merwe placed fourth.

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A N E W

R I T E

E M I L

E A X H C O A E R L A Y T E L E S A D T S E M M R O U A N T L A C H P O O E T A L E S A L A T I N H E T E R

B U C S

R E H Y D R A T E

A B A C A B L O D O E L S I E A L O N R E E D

A V E R Y R E P E A C H D R S

M O O B S I U P L A N N O S D A M T E R I S O S H O F I L I E I D S P A B R O W I Z E P O L U N L P E S

B E N T

J A B O U O K R I B E S S O T P A T Y I M F A I B D O G I T T O

E V A N S

C E L E S T V E E S T P U E R R M O M I I L L L A E N R O D E

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T S P P I N E A M O R T E R S C E E I R N U I U N D S I C E S T H A N

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A47

City of Kamloops

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS We thank you for your patronage, understanding, and patience as we work together during this unprecedented time. Visit Kamloops.ca/COVID for updates Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

My First Museum

Ages: 2–6

The KMA is pleased to offer My First Museum, a FREE weekly virtual program! Join us Wednesday mornings for stories and caregiverassisted crafts. Ready-made Craft Kits are available for details contact the KMA 250828-3576. Wednesday 10:00 – 10:45 am April 28 Dancing Daisies May 5 Fantastic Frog May 12 Cherry Blossoms May 19 Nifty Noodles May 26 Lantern Art

Spikeball

Ages: 7–12

Spikeball is a sport that combines the teamwork of volleyball, the hand-eye coordination of four square, and the physicality of a cardio workout. The game is played with a small rubber ball and an elastic net stretched tight over a plastic rim. Albert McGowan Park Ages: 6–8 Sun May 1–Jun 5 8:45–9:45 am 6/$60 Ages: 8–12 Sun May 1–Jun 5 10:00–11:00 am 6/$60 Ages: 13–15 Sun May 1–Jun 5 11:15–12:15 pm 6/$60

Tots Soccer

Check our various Tot Soccer programs in your neighbourhood. This program is for children ages 2.5- 6 years starting in May and July. This program focuses basic movement patterns, fun activities, songs, relays and obstacle courses. All programs have a COVID-19 safety plan. Register www.kamloops.ca/perfectmind

Pavement to Roads

Are you a confident bike rider and want to learn how to safety commute through the city? This is the program for you. In partnership with Riding into Life, this course is designed to introduce participants to commuting through Kamloops on a bike. Topics include road riding etiquette, road safety, routes through Kamloops, and hill climbing. Cowan Park Sat May 8–May 22 10:00–12:00 pm 3/$52.50

Kamloops.ca


A38

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Questions? Go online to runclub.ca or send an email to joberry@ boogiethebridge.com.

JAMES MACDONALD Artistic director of Western Canada Theatre

KAYLA PEPPER Emergency manager with the province of British Columbia

KAYLA DERKACH Promotions/on-air at Jim Pattison Broadcast Group

Activity felt great this week. My wife bought me a dollar store knee brace, which has changed my life as tennis and running are virtually pain-free. Can’t say I fulfilled my commitment to yoga, but being active outside in terrific weather was a boost to the spirits. I felt pretty proud of our community, too — the robust support for local businesses and restaurants, the vibrant buzz of responsible activity on the sidewalks of Victoria Street and The Shore and the positive spirit of Kamloopsians is shining through, even as the national news is full of shadows. Has anyone ever been more thankful to not live in downtown Toronto? Can’t say I’ve dropped too much weight in spite of the increased activity. I guess I have to stop using a twice-weekly 10K as an excuse to justify that second (or third) beer or tub of dark chocolate caramel gelato. I am reminded again of the importance of collaboration and ensemble in this week’s RunClub, where runners of all ages and backgrounds jog our 10K Sweet at their own level. Every so often, the cheetahs in the group do a “pick-up” on those who are running at a lower pace. These principles of equity, inclusion and support remind me of how we envision Western Canada Theatre operating on the same principles — access and participation for all. This week is 8 Days of Boogie, so please get out and enjoy the sunshine and support Boogie the Bridge in the process (boogiethebridge.ca).

We ran 8K and then waded into the Thompson River for some cold-water therapy — and it felt amazing. The Boogie spirit was alive and well on the weekend. As our group moseyed from Pioneer Park to Valleyview secondary, folks honked and waved at us. One lady even rolled down her window and shouted, “You inspire me!” We responded with cheering and clapping because, while we were inspiring her, she was also inspiring us to keep moving. That’s community. We are in this together, bumbling along and hopefully spreading some kindness and fun. Those who have Boogied in the past know it’s not just about running and walking — it’s also about dancing. To kickstart our morning, Jo and Tom offered some hand-jiving, fist pumping, warm-up moves. One lady groaned, “It’s too early for this on a Sunday”, but still had a big smile across her face. Because movement, especially when done in community, makes us feel alive. It lights up a part of us that is dormant when we are plugging away at our jobs or staring at our computers or phones. This week, my MA in Leadership thesis was published. While school may be done (yay!), the leadership lessons continue to shine around me. RunClub is packed with leaders who mobilize others to realize healthy, vibrant lives, rich with opportunities for caring, contribution and community.

The 8 Days of Boogie has officially kicked off and I’m excited to be a part of it. The path to this virtual event has been quite a journey, led by the folks from the RunClub spring clinic. I feel like that guy in that movie who was been training to the Eye of the Tiger. I think his name was Rocky. From what I remember of that movie’s montage where Rocky is training, it ends with him standing at the top of some steps. He’s overlooking the city and he’s proud of himself. I feel like I can relate to that, except my “movie montage” experience has been with RunClub and my “standing at the top of some steps” moment is completing my 5K Boogie run. As we’re nearing the end of the spring clinic of RunClub, I like to keep the Boogie philosophy in mind: great community spirit, healthy living (both physical and mental health), fun, passion and a party on the run. There is also love of Kamloops and the “movement” lifestyle. I’ve been asked if I’ll continue with RunClub after this and I can confidently say I will. I’ve found a love for running and a passion for RunClub.

PLAYWORK

COOL DOWN TIPS

MOVEMENT IS CHANGE with Jo Berry, RunClub and Boogie the Bridge founder

Boogie Strong in 2021

Walkers

5K Sweet

10K Sweet

10K Bold

21 Club

5K or 10K Boogie walk

5K Boogie learn to run

10K Boogie run, entry-level

10K Boogie run

Half-marathon distance

Walking warm-up of 5 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

1) Walk easy for 25 minutes, then power walk for for 15. Total 40 minutes.

1) Walk 2.5 minutes, run 3.5 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 48 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 7.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 57 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 80 minutes.

1) 19-kilometre run.

2) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for for 15. Total 35 minutes.

2) Walk 2.5 minutes, run 3.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 36 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 7.5 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 47.5 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 50 minutes (with hills).

3) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for for 15. Total 35 minutes.

3) Walk 2.5 minutes, run 3.5 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 42 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 7.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 57 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

I think the best way to fall in love with a city is through running — connecting with the world as you move from gravel to pavement, trails to neighbourhoods. There’s commitment in that connection. On foot, the relationship with the city becomes deeper. Kamloops is a little city with a big heart, a community of heartcentered souls and a deep desire to come together and help each other out. There’s a lot of optimism here and sometimes that optimism floods over to make even the most challenging days a lot brighter. This past Sunday, we kicked off the 8 Days of Boogie. I fell deeper in love with Kamloops this day, first with a RunClub kickoff and then as we chalked the route between Pioneer and Riverside parks. People of all ages stopped to chat, reading the hopeful messages and reflecting on what Boogie means to them. Runners and walkers Boogied by us with hands in the air, saying, “We are on our Boogie run!” In stressful times, the world needs Boogie more than ever. Movement creates a change in our thinking and when we see each other out running and walking (and getting the chance to connect), we feel it directly in the heart. Our Boogie team loves to create an inclusive environment where everyone can feel cared for and loved. Boogie removes physical and psychological barriers and transforms lives through movement. The pause on Boogie the last two years has been a hardship and has impacted our organization and the charities we support. This past Sunday, while laying down some inspirational messages, we felt the heart of the city and what Boogie is all about: love, community, kindness and connection. Grab your family and chalk the Boogie routes. Your heart will feel happy and you will be paying it forward to others as they walk past your messages.

Walking is just as great as running. Proper walking form includes relax; arms swinging at the hips. Pace yourself and vary your pace.

The time on your feet is now more than five kilometres. Congrats — you got this. Start to strategize your pace going out (2.5km) and coming back (2.5km).

You are now at the 10K mark — congrats. Next week is your longest run of the Boogie program. Then it’s taper time.

In the last six weeks, you have built a fantastic 10K base. This is your distance and you are strong. Goal-setting is part of your practice and Boogie is your spring goal.

The longest run of your program is now complete — congrats! It is time to taper back your running and let the body prepare, build and rest. The goal is to get to the Boogie start line feeling amazing.

HELP KEEP BOOGIE ALIVE A campaign to raise money to help bring Boogie back to the streets in 2022 is online at gofundme.com. If you can help, go to that website and search “Friends of Boogie.”

RUNCLUB PLAYWORK, WEEK 7 GROUP GOAL WARM-UP

WEEK 7

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes. 2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 70 minutes.


A39 THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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D L O S

BROCKLEHURST

ELEGANT CUSTOM ONE OWNER HOME • Cul de sac backs on green space • Vaulted ceilings & great view • 3 or 4 Bedrooms & 4 Baths

PINEVIEW VALLEY RANCHER • 2+2 Bedrooms – 3 Bathrooms • Open Floor Plan & well maintained • Low Maintenance Yard & View

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • Close to Dallas Elementary • 6 Bedrooms / Central Air • 2 Bedroom suite potential

DREAM HOME W/DELUXE 2 BEDROOM SUITE • 2 Double Garages • Extra long RV Parking • All appliances up & down

698 SPRINGFIELD PLACE

1835 LODGEPOLE DRIVE

5569 COSTER PLACE

2676 ROSEWOOD AVENUE

$949,900

$975,000

$1,199,000

LOTS FOR SALE

TOBIANO

JUNIPER HEIGHTS

D L O S

HEFFLEY

TOBIANO GOLF RESORT • Deluxe home w/triple garage • Fully finished & landscaped • 4 Bedrooms & Suite Potential

EXECUTIVE 2-STOREY W/VIEW • 4 Bedroom & Laundry Up • 2 Bedroom Legal Suite • Triple Garage

CUSTOM 3648 SQFT HOME BUILT IN 2016 • Beautiful 3.5 acre property with mountain views • Close proximity to Sun Peaks Ski Resort

228 HOLLOWAY DR

2113 LUPIN COURT

1452 HEFFLEY-LOUIS CREEK RD

VIDEO TOURS

KAMLOOPS LAKE LOT SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


A42

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Mom & Me

LOOKALIKE CONTEST Are you one of those mother-child pairs that’s always told you look alike? Well, here’s your chance to cash in on those shared genes. As Mother’s Day approaches, we’re inviting moms and kids who look exactly alike to enter our annual Mother-Child Look-alike Contest. The winning pair will receive prizes from Safeway and Brock Centre Liquor Store! In addition to the prize, the winner’s picture — as well as those of several runners-up — will appear in the paper on Mother’s Day.

TO ENTER THE CONTEST, GO TO

kamloopsthisweek.com/contests Photo submissions will be accepted until noon Thursday, April 29. As soon as the submission period ends vote for the mother-child pair they think looks the most alike on this page until midnight Monday, May 3.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Make This House YOUR Home… 73 Fundraising Homes for Sale

AND GIVE BACK TO THE SEARCH & RE SCU COMMUNITY E !

F U N D R A I S I N G

F O R

A new 12,000 sq.ft. facility.

5 Styles of Homes • All Entry Level in Brocklehurst Selling at $409,900 - $474,900



Sample Mortgage Calculator G E T I N T O Y O U R N E W H O M E T O D AY !

5%

DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869 + CMHC fee of $15,276 = $443,445

5% down = $21,393 down payment required, $1,765 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

10% DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869 + CMHC fee $12,323 = $440,192

10% down = $42,786 down payment required, $1,661 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

20% DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869

20% down = $85,574 down payment required, $1,431 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

Call Us Now for Your Site Visit

250.819.0502

Community Supporting Community Aaron Krausert

Personal Real Estate Corporation RE/MAX Real Estate Kamloops LTD.

www.yourkamloops.ca/videos/welcome-to-catalpa-community


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A43

Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries

Call today to book a virtual tour!

Dallas

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387 Lower Sahali

Sahali

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

Under Construction

Sun Rivers

SOLD in 2 Days! 6571 Dallas Drive $615,000

10-383 Columbia Street West $399,900

• Large 20,440 sq ft lot with fruit trees, garden and underground irrigation • Lots of natural light and mtn. views • Basement has suite potential

3

3

• City views • Extensive updating • Rentals and pets allowed • Excellent central location

2,428

3

2.5

1,072

Sun Rivers

1584 Golf Ridge Drive $624,900

• Executive townhome with open concept floor plan • Beautiful mountain and city views • Double car garage with room for golf cart • Clubhouse with dipping pool

3

3

2,351

105 Cavesson Way • $1,289,000

1-137 McGill Road $349,900 • Ground level with large patio • Quiet location with city views • New paint, flooring and updates • Stainless steel appliances

2

1

4109 Rio Vista Place $779,000 +GST

• Fully finished walkup floor plan • Appliance allowance included • Take in the views off the spacious sundeck!

1,216

Dufferin

1216 Prairie Rose Dr $1,399,000

• Dream kitchen with high-end Fisher Paykel appliances included • Master ensuite with soaker tub & steam shower! • Fully finished walkout basement • Under Construction – Nearing Completion

5

5.5

1759 Old Ferry Rd • $1,149,000

4,685

4042 Rio Vista Way • $1,250,000

3

3

2,538

Sun Rivers

4112 Rio Vista Place $899,000+GST

395 Monmouth Dr $449,900

• Choose your finishing selections • Completion Fall 2021 • Panoramic Views • Rancher with finished walkout basement • Yard maintenance included

4

3

• Perfect investor or first time Buyer half duplex! • 1 Bed & 1 Bath in-law suite • Fully fenced private yard • 5,295 Sq. Ft. Lot backing green space

3,084

253 Willow Street • $424,900

Sahali

3

1125 Canyon Ridge Dr • $839,900

2

1,606

1554 Griffin Terrace • $649,900

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

PHASE 3

NOW SELLING Call now for more information

• PANORAMIC VISTAS • MODERN STYLING • ADULT ORIENTED • IRRESISTIBLE LIFESTYLE

199,000

$

Lots from

Homes from

779,900 +GST

$

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Denise Bouwmeester MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

Cell 250-319-3876 dbinkamloops@shaw.ca denisebouwmeestersales.com

(Kamloops) Real Estate SENIORS MASTER CERTIFIED REAL ESTATE NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST SPECIALIST

Jessica MATT 250.374.3022

je-matt@hotmail.com GREAT TIME TO BUY OR SELL JessicaMattRealEstate.ca

20 acres nestled in the heart of Barnhartvale Goes from end of Foxwood Lane to Barnhartvale Road

• 122 acres in Eagle Bay area • Preliminary lot layout for 39 lots • 1 hectare each (2.47 acres) • Water at property line • Property adjoins existing sub-division • Zoned RR-1, 2.5 hectors zoned C-5, 2.5 hectares zoned P-1 • Some timber & some properties will have lake view • Priced to sell - Plus GST

138 HOLWAY $409,900

$929,900

• 3 bedrooms 1 bath with updates • Close to River’s Trail and McDonald Park

CALGARY AREA ESTATE ACREAGES

Trade for Kamloops or Shuswap, Okangan Lakefront Property

CALL MARVIN

Working with Denise is always a pleasure. Buying and selling, in such a fast moving market can show its challenges. Denise guided us through calmly and assuringly. Thank you Denise for your hours of hard work.

LOT 5

LOT 6 6.05 acres

• Horse Country • Drilled wells, UG gas & hydro • Close to 3 golf courses • Close to Deerfoot Tr & McLeod Tr

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP

Great photos and video that I use, add to the value of the mls presentation and to the dollars you receive for your home.

– Brendan and Kendra

LOT 7 4.21 acres

6.05 acres

$608,000

4.21 acres

$568,000

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR… • Commercial building South Kamloops • Lakefront lot or house on White Lake • 2 Bedroom apartment Victoria Landing or Riviera Gardens • Newer rancher up to $850,000 - South Kamloops, lower Sahali, Valleyview • Lakefront house on the Shuswap $650,000 - $700,000 Blind Bay, Sunnybrae, Sorrento, Eagle Bay or Mara Lake • House in Blind Bay up to $600,000 • House on 0.5 - 1 acre in Dallas, Juniper, Deloro up to $600,000 • Warehouse/Shop 2500 - 4000 sq.ft. to buy • Daycare to buy or lease, Westsyde or North Kamloops • Lakefront house $650,000 - $950,000 • House in Blind Bay up to $700,000

$1,180,800 • Walk to downtown stores, schools, playgrounds • Custom 1.5 storey 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms • Double garage with lane access - BONUS room above • 8’9” x 11 sitting area extension of Master bedroom; tiled ensuite shower, walk-in closet • Engineered H/W, tile in bathrooms, carpet in bonus room & stairs

D!4 SOLLOT

SOLD!

NEW SOUTH KAMLOOPS - READY SOON!

FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION CALL 250-319-3876

mmatt@shaw.ca

RealEstateKamloops.ca

WITH RECORD LOW INTEREST RATES

DEVELOPERS - INVESTORS CONTRACTORS CALL MARVIN

$625,000

marvin matt 250.319.8784

56 STREET E

A44

• Fenced yard, lawn with irrigation • Award Winning Builder • Prefer main floor living ? Use the main floor bedroom as the Master bedroom, 4 pce bathroom and laundry • Basement will have rec room, bedroom & 4 pce bathroom plus large are for future development • 2-5-10 Warranty • Close to Royal Inland Hospital

QUINN PACHE

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

REAL ESTATE TEAM TRUST | PASSION | KNOWLEDGE

Quinnpacherealestate.ca

250-299-1267 | Quinnpache@royallepage.ca

LINDSAY PITTMAN REALTOR® MBA

250-682-6252 | lindsaypittman@outlook.com

MIKE LATTA REALTOR®

250-320-3091 | mikelatta@royallepage.ca

KAYLEIGH BONTHOUX Office Manager/Unlicensed Assistant

KAMLOOPS REALTY

2277 Balfour Court $623,300

2040 Galore Cres $1,169,000

778-765-5151 | kayleighbonthoux@royallepage.ca

401-1120 Hugh Allan Drive $365,000

255 Calcite Drive $695,000

332 Basalt Drive $98,900

• Beautiful Aberdeen apartment • Top floor, corner unit • Features 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom • Bright, spacious living, kitchen and dining areas • In unit laundry • 2 parking stalls and a sizeable storage unit • Well-maintained building with a community room available • Monthly strata fee includes natural gas, water, sewer, landscaping and garbage • Pets and rentals are allowed with restrictions • Close to all amenities, transit, shopping, and TRU

• Come see the gorgeous view of the city, valley and mountains from this beautiful newer custom built log home with 5 bdrms and 4 bath and 3 decks • The main floor has a mixture of ceramic tile flooring and laminate running throughout • It also features a large kitchen, stainless steel appliances and open living area • Two bdrms are on this floor with a separate entrance to a private deck that includes a private hot tub • Upstairs is incredibly unique with its own living area with one of the two bedrooms having its own loft • The lower level is finished and has 1 more bedroom, family room, gas fireplace and a modified cooking area • Currently owner occupied and operating as a registered bed & breakfast • Generating substantial regular income up to $8,000/mth and after expenses has potential to bring in $88,200 approx annually • Tons of storage available throughout

• Gently sloping residential .20 acre building lot • Beautiful Logan Lake BC • Premium mountain and valley view • Underground services available: hydro, sewer, water, and natural gas • Logan Lake offers plenty of outdoor activities: hunting, fishing, golfing, hiking, and skiing • Kamloops only 35 minutes away • Build your dream home!

SOLD • Unique home on a quiet Cul-de-sac in Aberdeen • Close to bus, school and amenities • Main floor: 1 bedroom, office, 2 bathrooms, large laundry room • Open concept living and dining room with a stone fireplace • 21 foot high ceilings • Updated kitchen includes matching stainless steel appliances, slate flooring and fresh paint • Stunning back yard provides a covered deck • Upper floor: 2 bedrooms,1 bathroom and plenty of storage • Spacious lower level: Generous family room, play area and two bedrooms • Updates include: electrical, laminate flooring, painting and a bathroom • Large driveway allows for ample parking

• Panoramic city, river and mountain view • Located in desirable Juniper West • Open concept design, large view windows, high end finishing’s • Large great room with gas fireplace • Custom kitchen from Excel, Kitchenaid appliances, quartz countertops • Hardwood floors • Stunning master bedroom with custom walk-in closet • Grand 5 piece en-suite with a freestanding tub, spacious shower and double vanity • Large Laundry space (same level as master) • Potential for 1 bedroom in-law suite • Landscaped with underground irrigation systems.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A45

...selling Kamloops every day™ Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

684 Nicola Street - One of the best streets for downtown living. Low maintenance yard, off street parking, dedicated vegetable garden. Previous owner was well known for his prize tomato crop. This one owner home is quaint but does need updating. $500,000

602 - 975 Victoria Street - Outstanding north west views await you at this top floor corner condo in Mission Hill. Conveniently situated on the Summit connector in South Kamloops. This one-owner unit features 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, stainless kitchen appliances & washer/dryer. Pets & rentals allowed with restrictions. Move in ready with quick possession. $409,800

2504 Sunset Drive - Unique opportunity, this ranch style home of 1,703 sf is on a C4 zoned lot in East Valleyview. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, double garage + storage shed and ample parking on the fully fenced yard. $569,900

Sold Sold Sold Sold

2524 Mountain View Dr $848,800

317 Mariposa Court $758,300

2356 Dunrobin Place - 1 owner home with lovely north views, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. A great family home with main floor laundry, nook off kitchen, family and games room down, plus 2 car garage on quiet cul-desac. $689,900

2249 Chief Atahm $132,500

970 Renfrew Avenue $560,000

720 Sequoia Place - Spectacular 180 north, east & west views to be enjoyed from this well-maintained & updated home located in upper South Kamloops. This custom built home has a unique layout and many interesting features. The bright open concept of the main living area along with the generous window package is sure to please. Easy care yard with underground sprinklers, double garage & multiple decks for outdoor enjoyment. $885,000

11-6000 Valley Drive - What a wonderful opportunity to purchase a one-owner townhome in the heart of Sun Peaks Village. Morrisey & Orient Express lifts out your door and village square a 10 minute walk. This 2 storey townhouse has 1,052 sf of living space with 2 bedrooms & 3 bathrooms. Purchase price includes furniture and household items. Strata $476/mth, taxes $2,960/yr. Outdoor recreation right out your door, now that’s living! $799,800

LOOKING FOR A MODULAR HOME At 1030 Ricardo Way (Mountain View Estates) For Qualified Buyer PLEASE CALL PHIL

250-318-0100

301 - 429 St. Paul Street - This is the sweet spot for downtown living. 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom with in unit laundry, north east facing covered balcony, step saver kitchen with 4 appliances & under cabinet lighting, storage locker on same floor, 1 underground secure parking. Building amenities include elevator, intercom, mail room, rooftop terrace with BBQ, amenities room, bike storage, rentals allowed, hot water included in strata of $269.39/mth. $339,800

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL: • Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 • Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. • Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) • Full-time office assistant • Professional representation • Professional Signage • Advertising in Kamloops This Week • Global advertising on the internet • Thinking of Selling and/or Buying?

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


A46

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca REAL ESTATE (KAMLOOPS)

FOR MORE INFO VIEW ALL OUR LISTINGS, UPCOMING LISTINGS, AND KAMLOOPS LISTINGS AT RALPHREALESTATE.CA NG

W

NE

TI LIS

W

NE

G

TIN

LIS

Aberdeen

South Kamloops

Brock

46-1221 HUGH ALLAN DRIVE $339,900 • MLS®161522

602-429 ST PAUL STREET $425,000 • MLS®161187 • 2 bedroom 2 bathroom top floor unit in very central downtown location • Storage locker & parking stall included • Quick possession possible

815 MCGILLIVRAY STREET $549,900 • MLS®161499 • Move in ready 2 bedroom 2 bathroom home in great cul-de-sac location • Lots of parking in both front and back • Quick possession possible

• Very nicely maintained 2 bedroom 1 bathroom townhouse in Aberdeen Ridge • 2 pets allowed with no size restriction, rentals allowed with no resitrictions • Quick possession possible

D L O S

ING

W

NE

T LIS

D L O S

Westsyde

Sahali

Valleyview

616 MCCURRACH PLACE $675,000 • MLS®161362 • Very well maintained 3+2 bedroom 3 bathroom 1 owner home • Great family neighbourhood and location • Large, flat and fenced backyard

252 ARROWSTONE DRIVE $714,000 • MLS®161561

1898 PARKHILL DRIVE $779,000 • MLS®161047

• Great central sahali location with 2+3 bedroom and 3 bathrooms • Large backyard with in-ground pool • Quick possession possible

• Immaculate and well maintained 3+1 bedroom 3 bathroom home • Approximately 25x40 wired and heated detached shop • Great cul-de-sac location on approx. 0.34 acre lot with lots of parking and privacy

ING

W

NE

ING

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W

NE

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Westsyde

Sahali

Aberdeen

3190 WAWN COURT $849,900 • MLS®161516

113 COPPERTREE COURT $899,900 • MLS®161366

2128 SHAUGHNESSY HILL $899,900 • MLS®161549

• Rancher style home with 3+1 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms • Quiet cul-de-sac location walking distance to schools • Over 3000 square feet with full basement and separate entry

• Beautiful home in sought-after Sahali neighbourhood with 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms • Full unfinished basement with separate entry • Totally updated throughout

• 4 bedroom 4 bathroom home in very desirable Shaughnessy Hill • Very well maintained with many updates throughout • In-ground pool with flat & fenced backyard


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Men are pigs (after she’s through with them, anyway!) 6. The ‘‘A’’ of James A. Garfield 11. Naysayers 20. Lower-cost option on a popular rideshare app 21. Egg: Sp. 22. Frontiersman’s headgear 23. Result of a merger between Quaker Oats and Greyhound? 25. Maintaining equilibrium 26. Discourage 27. Soft drink concentrate, e.g. 29. ‘‘Night on Bald Mountain’’ or ‘‘Finlandia’’ 30. With 18-Down, what has four legs and sprints? 32. Musician who was booed in 1965 for playing electric guitar 34. Letters before Gerald R. Ford and Ronald Reagan 35. Luau instrument, for short 37. Zoom 39. Corner 41. Second-longest human bone, after the femur 46. Result of a merger between Kraft and Hershey’s? 51. Result of a merger between Google and Planters? 53. Like the wights on ‘‘Game of Thrones’’ 54. Best of the best 56. Spelling ____ 57. What Santa checks twice 58. R-rated 59. Rulers’ staffs 61. Fire man? 63. On the ____ 64. Poet Lazarus 66. Prefix with thermal 67. Bad sound for an engine 68. Result of a merger between Hasbro and Nikon?

72. Bird like the Canada goose or arctic tern 75. Lummox 76. Cheese offered tableside at Italian restaurants, informally 77. Recipe amt. 80. Eagle constellation 81. Passive acquiescence 84. Voice a view 86. Firm decision maker? 87. Revolutionary Guevara 89. Klum of ‘‘Project Runway’’ 90. ‘‘My love,’’ in Madrid 91. Result of a merger between Procter & Gamble and Jacuzzi? 94. Result of a merger between Hormel and Instagram? 96. Warehouse 97. 10 to 10, say 99. ____ reform, cause for the Marshall Project 100. Middling grade 101. Pub choice 103. Shot across the bow? 106. ____ Waldorf, the so-called ‘‘Queen B’’ on ‘‘Gossip Girl’’ 109. Leaves nothing to the imagination 114. Measured 116. ‘‘Been there, done that’’ feeling 118. Disney’s world 120. Result of a merger between Ralph Lauren and Starbucks? 123. ‘‘Stop your foolishness outside!’’ 124. Not on 125. Chops up finely 126. Was uncomfortably hot 127. Basil-based sauce 128. ____ Allen, one of the founders of Vermont DOWN 1. ____-de-sac 2. Ditto, in scholarly journals 3. Brexit vote, e.g. 4. Home to the Minoan civilization

5. 6. 7. 8.

Shine ‘‘Now I get it!’’ 2021 Super Bowl champs Drink up during a timeout, say 9. Tex who directed the first Bugs Bunny cartoon 10. Iraqi city on the Tigris 11. Kimono accessory 12. Natural talent 13. ____ YoungWhite, comedian/ correspondent for ‘‘The Daily Show’’ 14. Lead-in to an Indiana ‘‘-ville’’ 15. ____ Ng, author of the 2017 best seller ‘‘Little Fires Everywhere’’ 16. Piehole 17. ‘‘Oops!’’ 18. See 30-Across 19. Part of a musical note 24. Held forth 28. ‘‘Two thumbs down’’ review 31. Answer to ‘‘Are you asleep?’’ that can’t be true 33. Drift off to sleep 35. Ordinary 36. ‘‘Eh, not really’’ 38. 1981 hit Genesis album whose name resembles a rhyme scheme 40. Balls in the sky 42. Little sounds 43. Muscular 44. ‘‘Who’s there?’’ response 45. Nancy who served as the first female member of the British Parliament 47. Come together 48. Like some thinking 49. A.O.C., e.g. 50. Meets 52. Evening prayer 55. Come together 59. Raw material? 60. Quintana ____ (Mexican state that’s home to Cancún) 62. Mayhem

65. Land governed by the House of Grimaldi 67. Obedience school command 68. More hackneyed 69. A head 70. A head 71. Best-case scenarios 72. Clipper parts 73. ‘‘You can’t fire me!’’ 74. Italian poet Cavalcanti who influenced Dante 77. Procrastinator’s problem 78. [Bo-o-o-oring!] 79. In essence 81. Where heroes are made 82. Sass 83. Co-founder of the N.A.A.C.P. 85. Word that, when spelled backward, becomes its own synonym 88. Member of the inn crowd? 90. One of the Canterbury pilgrims 92. One doing the lord’s work 93. In which you might do a deep dive 95. Mistruth 98. JAMA contributors 102. Tool in a wood shop 104. Shred 105. ____ hole 107. Battery part 108. Language group related to Yupik 109. Birkin stock? 110. From scratch 111. Quinceañera, e.g. 112. Man’s name that spells a fruit backward 113. Passed-down stories 115. ‘‘Stop stalling!’’ 117. ‘‘The slightest’’ or ‘‘the foggiest’’ thing 119. Oscar-winning lyricist Washington 121. Classic Pontiac 122. Phishing target, for short

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By Dick Shlakman and Will Nediger

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A37

SUDOKU

WORD SCRAMBLE Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to puzzles

FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

ANSWERS

ANSWER: WHEEL

Get Your Mother Mother’’s Day Flowers Here! Custom Floral Arrangements ~ Custom Gift Baskets Delivery and Curb Side Pick Up Available

PROUDLY CANADIAN

safeway.ca

750 Fortune Drive, Kamloops, BC 250.376.4129


A48

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

BABY BLUES

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Some things are entirely out of your control, Aries. You may come up against some such obstacles this week. Focus your energy on the things you can control.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, if you’re seeking new horizons, establish a game plan and then do your homework. This will help determine if it is practical to make a move.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Your expressiveness and affections are drawn out this week, Gemini. It could put you in the mood to push some limits socially or creatively. Chances are things will work out well.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, some focus and harmony enables you to find balance in your personal and professional relationships. You will begin to see eye-to-eye with many people.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 It is a good thing to center yourself emotionally because many decisions are heading your way, Leo. You may find ideas and plans center around domestic issues.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 You are inclined to seek some mental stimulation this week, Virgo. Invest in some puzzles or even a recreational pursuit such as an escape room experience.

Mother’s Day S P E C I A L S

LIBRA

APRIL 21 - APRIL 27, 2021 - Sept 23/Oct 23

Take a break from overthinking, Libra. Involve yourself with pleasurable activities that don’t require a lot of forethought. Others can join the fun.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22

This is a good week to focus attention on your personal needs, Scorpio. Perhaps you are looking for personal fulfillment. Try volunteer work.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Others may be elusive this week, Sagittarius. Don’t take it as a sign of your relationships being in need of mending. Others are just busy, so enjoy the down time.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 People may demand a little more of your time in the days ahead, Capricorn. If you are not sure you can devote extra effort, tell these people as soon as possible.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Disagreements can arise if others are not reading you well, Aquarius. Focus your efforts on effective communication this week to avoid any confusion.

PISCES

- Feb 19/Mar 20

You don’t need to know every detail of an issue to be able to take a side or a stance, Pisces. Your ability to make choices will improve.

Large selection of Local & Import Wines & Specialty Items

Selected Pink Wines on sale for the month of May. Select Bubbles on sale for Mother’s Day Weekend

#1-1800 Tranquille Rd 250-554-3317 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 9AM-11PM

brockcentreliquorstore.com


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A49

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Art & Collectibles

Furniture

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca

8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541.

“Power of One” Magnificent creation by John Banovich 43”hx50”wide brown wooden frame. $500 Firm 250-578-7776

For Sale - Misc Apple iPhone 4 like new. $600. 250-318-0170.

If you have an upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com

and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details! 250-371-4949 Eagle coffee tables $100, JVC 3 piece stereo set $300 & speakers, sewing machine $50, beige rugs $100, recliner $75. 250374-8285.

Personals

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Antiques Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

Art & Collectibles “DOZING LYNX” Robert Bateman 30 3/4”h x 43 1/2W Forest Green mat & dark green frame $250. 250-578-7776

Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-8517687.

Plants / Shrubs / Trees Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $15 each obo 250376-6607

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

Health WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 1 issue a week!

Call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

FIND HELP FOR YOUR PROJECTS

Apartments / Condos for Rent

1 Day Per Week Call 250-374-0462

Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933.

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000/obo 250-3766607. Pressure washer $175. Battery charger $150. 48” table saw. $200. Angle grinder $125. 250-3748285. Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Logan Lake bachelor suites 30mins to hospital. $600/mo. includes internet, hydro, partially furnished. Gord 250-5239433.

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500 Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Tax not included

Coming Events

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

Commercial COMMERCIAL SPACE for Lease Approximately 900 Sq. Ft., on High Traffic North Kamloops road. Premises are bright and attractive with good On-Street parking. Call 250-3769152 for more information.

FOR SALE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY C-IT BETWEEN 2 CAR LOTS. OPPORTUNITY NOW! HARVEY'S AUCTION 250-319-2101

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Houses For Rent

Furn Home WestEnd Corporate/Crew 4bd, den nsp near RIH $3700. 250214-0909.

Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone!

GarageSale DIRECTORY SOUTH KAMLOOPS Sat, April 24th. 9:00amnoon. Corner of River Street and 14th Avenue. Hshld items, Xmas stuff, MC Helmets WESTSYDE Kamloops Ruff Start rescue garage sale again. Sunday, April 25th. 9am1pm. 3261 Westsyde Rd. All proceeds to save more dogs. Covid rules apply. BROCK ANNUAL STREET SALE. Young Avenue. Saturday, April 24th. 9am-1pm.

Fax: 250-374-1033

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

RESORT FOR SALE 2.6 ac. 1/2 hr. to Kamloops 42 Long Term Suites. 130 Seat Bar & Grill Food Truck. 4000 sq. ft. Owners Suite. 2 blocks to town centre. High School next door. Doctor, Golf Course, Ice Arena. Price & Options on Web.

250-371-4949

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

Garage Sale deadline is Tuesday 10 am for Wednesday Paper

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

Tax not included

Tax not included

Handyperson

Boats

Handyman for hire. One call for all your handyman needs. Carpentry, drywall, painting, renovations, sheds, decks and fences and more Free Estimates. Blaine 250851-6055.

Elec boat loader by Dovetail. $1900. 10ft. fiberglass 2-man fly fisher c/w oars, elec motor, loading wheels. $1200. 250-679-3565.

Landscaping PETER’S YARD SERVICE Time to trim Cedar Hedges Tree pruning or removal Yard clean-up, Landscaping

www.getoutadodge.info

250-523-9432

Concrete Services

SMALL

Lawn & Garden Gardens Rototilled. Tractor mounted tiller. Seniors discount. 250-376-4163. Reliable Gardener. 30 yrs experience. Cleanups & pruning. Call 250312-3986.

CONCRETE JO

BRICKS, BLOCKS, PAVERS SIDEWALKS + PRUNING

Security

CHOOSE LOCAL

Family Protecting F R E E E S T I M AT E S !“Our Your Family”

PRESTIGE 250.851.5079 • 250.554.1018

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

Farm Services

Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

250-374-0916

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

Renos & Home Improvement

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111 Handyperson

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more 778-999-4158

www.danshandymanservices.net

RVs / Campers / Trailers 2000 Adventurer Camper 8ft. New HWT, pump, battery, solar panel, skylight. $12,500. 250-299-9076. 2006 Dodge 2500 4x4 HD. w/1994 11ft. camper. $14,500/both. 778-2207372.

Licensed & Certified 250-572-0753

Concrete Services

Luigi s Luigi’s

Handyperson IT’S GARAGE SALE TIME Call & ask us about our GARAGE SALE SPECIAL ONLY $12.50 FOR 3 LINES (Plus Tax) ($1 per extra line)

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

Run until sold New Price $56.00+tax Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, motorcycle, ATV or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) $35.00 (reg. 3 line ad)

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Automotive Tires

kamloopsthisweek.com

Renovations on construction, complete interior and exterior projects. Free estimates. 250-2626337.

Classes & Courses HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. May 8th and 9th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L May 2nd Sunday. P r o f e s s i o n a l outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread $1388.00 Call 250 319-8784

Motorcycles

2002 Harley Davidson Dyna Low Rider. Dual Exhaust, windshield, backrest. 86,500kms. $7,500. 250-318-2428.


A50

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

Motorcycles

Legal & Public Notices

Legal & Public Notices

Legal & Public Notices

Sports & Imports

1990 Jaguar Red. leather, 4-door, A/C, Power everything. 142,597kms, $2200.00 250-851-0209.

Sports Utilities & 4x4’s 1986 Bronco 2 4x4. 5spd, lots of repairs done. Project on-going. $2,400. 250-679-3565.

Legal & Public Notices

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Notice of Woodlot License Plan

PUBLIC NOTICE 2006 HD Blue Dyna Low Rider. 23000kms. Mint condition. $10,000.00. Call 250-851-1193

Legal & Public Notices

PROPOSED TELUS TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITY 48.1-METER TALL SELF-SUPPORT TOWER STRUCTURE PROPOSED STRUCTURE: As part of the public consultation process required by Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) and the Thompson Nicola Regional District (TNRD), TELUS is inviting the public to comment on a proposed telecommunications facility consisting of a 48.1-meter tall self-support tower and ancillary radio equipment situated on private land at 4597 Harrison Road, Pritchard, BC. COORDINATES: 50.668697, -119.789631 ANY PERSON may comment by close of business day on May 24th, 2021 with respect to this matter. TELUS CONTACT: Further information can be obtained by contacting: Brian Gregg, SitePath Consulting Ltd. 2528 Alberta Street, Vancouver, BC V5Y 3L1 Email: briangregg@sitepathconsulting.com

Take notice that a Woodlot License Plan (WLP) has been prepared for Woodlot 1603, located north of Pinantan Lake. This Woodlot Licence Plan is a replacement of a previously approved plan. This plan outlines the results and strategies the Woodlot Licensee will follow to meet objectives set by Government. A draft of this plan is available for public review and written comment. A review can be arranged by making appointment with Wes Bieber, R.P.F. at the office of Longfellows Natural Resource Management Solutions Inc. in Salmon Arm, B.C. Written comments should be submitted no later than June 4, 2021 to Longfellows Inc., 4840 16th St. NE, Salmon Arm, B.C., V1E 1E1. Wes can be contacted at 250-674-1199 or wes.bieber@longfellows.ca.

Business Oportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

2011 Hyundai Santa Fe AWD. Fully loaded. 5 passenger 2 row seating. C/W winters on rims, trailer hitch. 249,000kms. $9,500.00 250-319-5911

Employment BAMBOO INN Cook wanted. Willing to train the right person. Apply in person after 4pm. No phone calls please.

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information

Home Support Worker Required for unique in-home care. Must have Drivers License. F/T - $285.00 per shift Falkland: 250-3069445 Training provided. Covid 19 free environment.

Children’s Circle Daycare Society has an opening for a full time Early Childhood Educator. We are a Non-Profit Society striving for excellence in the care of our children and families. We are a play based centre that also uses emergent curriculum. We are a union centre and our wages and benefits are per the current BCGEU collective agreement. After 3 months, you would qualify for extended medical and dental benefits at no cost to you. We also offer matched RSP’s up to a certain percentage. Our daycare also subscribes to the new Wage Enhancement program, and you would also qualify for paid holidays after 3 months. Applications must hold a valid Early Childhood Educator License to practice and a current first aid certificate. The right candidate must enjoy working with children from Infants -5 years of age, have strong communication abilities, reliable, dependable, be able to work as part of a team and be creative. This position is open to both male and female applicants. Please apply with cover letter and resume to childrenscircle@ccdaycare.ca or stpauls@ccdaycare.ca

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

250-374-3853

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

kamploopsthisweek.com

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE DOWNTOWN

2018 Hyundai Tucson AWD. Fully loaded. Back up camera, BMS, heated seats etc. 15,000kms. Warranty. $25,000/obo. 250-571-9594

Trucks / Heavy, Commercial

Sun Peaks Mountain Resort Municipality

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Monday, May 3, 2021 2:00 P.M. 2012 Fuso Canter FE160. 6spd auto. Diesel. Big box 8x18 extra high with skylight. 2000lb power tailgate, S&M tires, A/C and CD. 189,000kms. $29,750/obo. 250-376-6607.

Vans 1997 Ext GMC Savana 3500. Work ready service van and tools avail. $9,500. 236-565-4767.

Rims

4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

Utility Trailers All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

Sun Peaks Mountain Resort Municipal Council gives notice that it will hold a Public meeting via Zoom and livestreamed on the municipal Facebook page to review the 2021 5 Year Financial Plan. Zoom Meeting ID: 827 3548 7269 Passcode: 103013 Questions, comments and feedback can be forwarded to Cheryl Taylor-Gale at dof@sunpeaksmunicipality.ca.

www.sunpeaksmunicipality.ca

WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT

WHEREAS DUKE GROS IS INDEBTED TO SUNVALLEY CONTAINERS FOR FEES WHICH OUGHT TO HAVE BEEN PAID, ARE STILL UNPAID, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE PROPERTIES CONTAINED WILL BE SOLD TO PAY FOR THE OUTSTANDING DEBT, PLUS COSTS ON THE FOLLOWING CONTAINERS:

NYKU4553030 SKSU6334958 FSCU6736699

In the amount of $9731.60, two weeks from the date of this notice on April 28, 2021 at 1021 Ricardo Road, Kamloops, BC 250-374-5555

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at 250-374-0462

kamloopsthisweek .com

Rte 310 – 651-695 2nd Ave, 660-690 3rd Ave, 110-292 Columbia St, 106-321 Nicola St. – 43 p. Rte 317 – 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(Even Side), 702-799 Nicola St. – 39 p. Rte 318 – 463 6th Ave, 446-490 7th Ave, 409-585 8th Ave, 604-794 Battle St. – 27 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave, 763-804 7th Ave, 744-764 8th Ave, 603-783 Columbia St(Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. - 50 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 327 - 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. - 38 p. Rte 328 – 935 13th Ave, Cloverleaf Cres, Dominion Cres, Pine Cres, Park Cres. – 52 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. – 56 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 371 – 125-207 Connaught Rd, 451-475 Lee Rd, 7-376 W. St Paul St. – 73 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI

Rte 400 – 383 W. Columbia St. – 21 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p. Rte 451 – Odin Crt, Whiteshield Cres, Whiteshield Pl. – 39 p. Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 459 – Monarch Crt, & Pl. – 39 p.

Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p. Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Crt, Dr, & Pl. – 67 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 511 – Drummond Crt. – 50 p. Rte 527 – Hunter Pl, Huntleigh Cres. – 27 p. Rte 528 - 1115-1180 Howe Rd, & 1115-1185 Hugh Allen Dr.-47 p. Rte 542 – Coal Hill Pl, Crosshill Dr, Dunbar Dr. – 58 p.

MT. DUFFERIN

Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p. Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p.

VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER

Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648, 1652-1764 Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p.

Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 19092003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 618 – Big Nickel Pl, Chapman Pl, Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd, 24402605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p. Rte 660 – 1689-1692 Adams Ave, Babine Ave, 2391-2881(Odd Side), 2472-2578 (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 60 p. Rte 666 – 1603-1665 Cheakamus Dr, Cheakamus Pl. – 26 p. Rte 667 – Birkenhead Dr, & Pl, 1674-1791 Cheakamus Dr, Similkameen Pl. – 61 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. - 87 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Mo-Lin Pl. - 29 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p. Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p. Rte 760 – 149-167, 6303-6697 Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 62 p.

BROCKLEHURST/ NORTH SHORE

Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St, 24122741 Tranquille Rd. – 71 p. Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 806999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 1709-1862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Rte 107 – 1117 8th St, 1109-1139 10th St, 1110-1140 11th St, 1138 12th St, 809-1175 Pembroke Ave. – 71 p. Rte 137-144-244 Briar Ave, 106-330 Clapperton Rd, Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100204 Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p.

WESTMOUNT

Rte 206 – Dickenson Rd, Walkem Rd, 1835-1995 Westsyde Rd(Odd Side), Yates Rd. – 53 p.

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

In Memoriams

WEBBER LAW

In Loving Memory Of

Lawfirm requires

Legal Assistant

Marie Williams

Experience preferred but not essential. Excellent Salary & Benefits for qualified applicants. Send Resume to: Roger Webber Webber Law #209 – 1211 Summit Drive Kamloops, BC V2C 5R9 roger@webberlaw.ca tel: (250) 851-0100 fax: (250) 851-0104

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

Obituaries

Ask DRAKE

August 12, 1929 - October 4, 2015

Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW!

Hugh Leroy Turner

Audrey Ruth Turner

Q. What do you recommend most strongly?

Mom and Dad Mother, Grandmother and Great-Grandmother Passed away April 9, 1997. You are missed very much, But your memory’s so dear, That deep in our hearts You will always be near.

PAPER ROUTES

AVAILABLE GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

Lovingly remembered Your Family,

Jan, Janice, Carole, Jon, Taylor & Logan Cook

For as long I can remember... You were always by my side, To give me support, confidence and help. For as long as I can remember... You were always the people I looked up to, So strong, so sensitive, so wonderful. For as long as I can remember... You always provided stability within our family, Full of laughter, full of tears, full of love. For as long I can remember... And still today, You are everything a parent should be. Whatever I have become is because of you... ...And I thank you forever.

       

In Memoriams

In Loving Memory of

In Remembrance 5 Years of our Daughter Abra Lael Lorensen Passing.

Donna Faye Klekta (McLeod) August 30, 1952 - April 18, 2008

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes kamloopsthisweek.com

A. Two things: 1. Get your Will done. Some people can do it themselves (we have a free guide book). 2. Take 5 minutes to fill out ‘Drake’s Easy as 1-2-3 Planning Sheet’. It will save your family a ton of stress.

Drake Cremation & Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne • 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 • DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

Fly Me He understands every mode of force He knows what’s true of the elements He is subtle but genuine at lift off and landing He is an airplane ride blowing through the clouds He is an airplane window that reveals a whole dimension He is a propeller to delve farther deep into the universe like fractals He is an airplane grounded in the sky mighty with fuel He is an airplane engine efficient, sustaining and swift He is a wing of a plane that stabilizes my lift He has an open storage to keep the baggage balanced on flight He has a trap door that releases the body of pain He has a water tank to keep the peace

October 7, 1975 to April 23, 2016

Here is a safe place to crash

Do you know how infectious her laugh was? If you knew her, you do. Did she tell you what an amazing person you were and complimented you each time you were with her? If you knew her, she did.

Shared to our family by her dear friend.

Did she make you feel like she genuinely cared how you were when she asked? Have you asked someone how they are, only to realize you didn’t actually listen to their answer?

Abra, we miss you and are comforted by our Faith to be together again.

Do you know she heard your answer every time?

Love, Dad and Mom Psalm 62:6

Did she talk to you about her family and how grateful she was every day for them?

A ride in the sky at night reveals a bright shiny movement You, my plane, are visible to the naked eye in each spectrum

You knew that didn’t you, because she told you. Do you know a day without Abra is like learning to breathe again? If you knew her, you do.

We feel your and Hannah’s presence in our hearts each day.

Obituaries

In Loving Memory of

March 2, 1933 - January 17, 2020

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER

In Memoriams

Obituaries

A51

With heavy hearts but unforgettable beautiful memories of the love and life we shared together, we remember that heartbreaking day when God called his angel home to live with him in peace and end the pain and suffering you were enduring here on earth. We know that you are in a better place, shining gloriously, looking down, watching over us, our special one of a kind angel, waiting for that glorious day when we shall hold you in our arms once again.

Loved Forever - Never Forgotten Always missed by Wayne, your children Julie, Nancy, Nathan, Michael and all their families.

by Kathy Ruth Manongdo

Written on Father’s Day 2010

Am I your passenger? Am I your wingman? Am I your baggage? Am I your well oiled engine? Am I your wing? Am I your lift in the air? Am I your propeller that thrusts you to a new dimension? I am all that you shape me to be You have a windshield view exposing the picture beyond Only you fit the pilot’s seat As your hands and feet heart and eyes are trained to work the plane You know every part and how to fix it You are navigating by the spirit You belong to a solid tender heart and so accepted as firm to soar You’re worth the shiniest mint coins and bills in circulation and so loved Your competence as an airplane secures my place For more experiences with you Will you invite me onboard?

Psalms 91:4 says, “He shall cover you with His feathers, And under his wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler”

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.


A52

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

Obituaries

Obituaries

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

1931 - 2021

It is with great heartfelt sadness that the family of Hatsue Yoshida announce her passing on April 17, 2021. She will be deeply missed by her sons, grandchildren, Don of Virginia, granddaughter and grandson-in-law Shena and Ryan of Brooklyn, NY, Ken of Kamloops, BC, and Gary (Suzanne), granddaughter Lyric and grandson Rohan of Whistler, BC, and many nieces and nephews. Surviving Mom is her brother Jenji (Joanne) of North Saanich, BC, niece Sandi of Sooke, BC, nephew Jason of Victoria, BC and niece Laura of Portland, OR, sister-in-law Anna (Barry) of Kamloops, brothers-in-law Tetsuo of Calgary, AB and Hidewo (Setsuko) of Winnipeg, MB and nephews Blair, Kent, and niece Erin, nephews of Vancouver Rick (Diane), Abe (Pamela), nieces Evelyn and Linda (Mike) of Kamloops, BC. Haddie was predeceased by husband Yoshio, sons Stanley and Patrick, parents Kumajiro and Chiyoko Konishi, sister Setsuko Iwasaki (Yataro), brother Fiko Konishi, brother-in-law Suyeki Yoshida (Lorna), sisters-in-law Jean Yoshida, Midori Yoshida, and Haruka Yokome (Mitsuo). Haddie was the eldest of four children to Kumajiro and Chiyoko Konishi. She was born on Mayne Island, British Columbia on March 26, 1929. Haddie and her family were relocated to the Skimikin/Turtle Valley area in April 1942 during World War II. She cherished the 11 families that lived alongside her own in Skimikin/Turtle Valley area. She possessed an encyclopedic knowledge of their many histories. After the war, Haddie’s family rebuilt and settled in Tappen, BC to farm strawberries and tomatoes. In November 1954, she married the love of her life, Yoshio. She would go on to be blessed with five sons and prosper in the City of Kamloops. Haddie was extremely resourceful, wise and endearing. She was blessed with a green thumb and maintained a luscious garden year after year. She had delicate hands that allowed her to create dresses that could be worn to celebrate any occasion. Her dedication to her family and friends knew no bounds. She would often have friends stay overnight, and she would take great joy and pride in cooking them carefully crafted Japanese meals and making sure they went home with plenty of her fresh vegetables. She had so much love to give. We are deeply saddened by our loss. Funeral for Hatsue is scheduled for May 1, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. at Kamloops Funeral Home, 285 Fortune Drive, Kamloops BC. For attendance please RVSP with Kamloops Funeral Home at: home@kamloopsfuneralhome.com or (250) 5542577. In lieu of flowers for Haddie and family please donate to the Kamloops Jodo Shinshu Buddhist Temple or a charity of your choice.

As you share the stories and the memories of how they lived their lives and how very much they meant, may you find comfort...

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Ruth Edith Branchflower

Hatsue Yoshida

March 26, 1929 - April 17, 2021

Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

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Ruth Edith Branchflower passed from mortality at the age of 89 on Friday, April 16, 2021 after battling with Alzheimer’s for several years. Ruth was born September 22, 1931 at Evansburg, Alberta. She was the only child of Walter and Liesel Smillie. Her father worked in the coal mines.

Each Loss Each loss is very different, The pain is so severe. Will I ever stop missing This one I loved so dear? Good times we had together, The moments that we shared We didn’t have to tell each other How much we really cared. I never dreamed you’d go away, Never thought of sorrow. So sure you’d always be here Took for granted each tomorrow. Now my life is all confused Since you went away. You took a part of me And for help I daily pray. But when God sent you to me He never said that you were mine, That I could keep you always – Only borrowed for a time. Now, He’s called you home, I’m sad and I shed tears. Yet I’m glad He loaned you to me And we had these many years.

One Final

Gift

Scatter me not to restless winds, Nor toss my ashes to the sea. Remember now those years gone by When loving gifts I gave to thee. Remember now the happy times The family ties we shared. Don’t leave my resting place unmarked As though you never cared. Deny me not one final gift For all who come to see A single lasting proof that says I loved... & you loved me.

After completing elementary school education in various towns in Alberta she graduated from Jasper Place High School in Edmonton. She then completed two years of teacher training at the University of Alberta and then obtained a teaching job in Edson, Alberta. After teaching for four years, and going on a two-month tour of Germany and Scotland with her cousin Lore Graham, Ruth married Cliff Branchflower on October 23, 1955. Shortly thereafter the couple moved to Kitimat, BC, where Ruth taught until June of 1956. The couple then moved to Kamloops, arriving on the July 1st weekend. In Kamloops, Ruth taught at North Kamloops Elementary School for four years. In the ensuing years, the couple built a home in Brocklehurst. Ruth, a life-long lover of music, worked on obtaining a degree as a piano teacher from the Toronto Royal Conservatory of Music. Later in life, Ruth completed studies through the University College of the Cariboo and received a Bachelor of Education degree from UBC, though she never returned to teaching in the public school system. As a piano teacher, she prepared many young people for taking the Conservatory exams, with most of her students passing their exams without difficulty. Her grandchildren fondly remember the cookie that always accompanied each piano lesson and every visit. She also accompanied the singing of hymns for worship services at church, as well as the church choir. For many years, she also accompanied the German language Liederkreis choir as they performed at seniors’ facilities around the city Ruth’s lifelong focus and passion was on family, music and on selfless service to others which included an 18-month mission with Cliff in Thailand for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. She also had a great love for flowers, and for animals, including her “tuxedo” cat Lucky. Though small in stature (under 5 feet tall) Ruth was something of a human dynamo who worked tirelessly night and day to bring to conclusion whatever project she had taken in hand. Some of these projects included: chocolate making for fundraisers, making cinnamon buns for high school graduates, providing music for multiple choirs and helping to organize the Nativity displays at the church. Ruth is survived by her husband of 65 years, her daughter Alison (Rick) Steffler and their two sons, Ty and Cole of Kamloops, by her son Wally (Shaunna) of Kamloops, their daughter Melissa of Lethbridge; daughter Kelsey (Brock) Olsen of Kamloops; son Ben (Brooke) of Boston, Mass.; daughter Riley of Kamloops; daughter Denae of Rexburg, Idaho; daughter Kara of Provo, Utah and daughter Hayley of Kamloops. She is also survived by great-grandchildren Olivia Branchflower of Boston and Isaac Olsen of Kamloops.

While words cannot express how much she will be missed by her loved ones, we take comfort in knowing that she is reunited with her heavenly family and that we will see her again. Ruth’s family wishes to express their appreciation to the caring staff of Ridgeview Lodge for their compassionate and loving care of Ruth during her final six weeks in mortality at that facility. In memory of Ruth Branchflower, in lieu of flowers, if you wish a donation to the Alzheimer’s Society of BC could be made. (www.alzheimer.ca)

by DJ Kramer

#4-665 Tranquille Rd Kamloops

250-554-2324

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Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of despair With the unique challenges brought by COVID-19, we remain committed to helping families. We now offer online arrangement services.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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Lee John Demmans Lee John Demmans was born in Dawson Creek, BC on July 7, 1970 and passed away in RIH on Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at the age of 50 after a hard fought battle with pneumonia and staphylococcal infection. Lee John is survived by his mother Bev, sister Christine Baker, nieces Brittany and Hailey, nephew Shae. Also, many aunts, uncles, and cousins. Lee was predeceased by his father Roger (1983) brother Garth (1994) grandparents and special Aunt and Uncle, Gail, and Ted Farnsworth. He lived in Chetwynd for the first seven years of his life and then the family moved to Kamloops, BC. Lee John loved sports and learned to skate at a very early age on a rink that his dad used to make in the backyard. He started playing hockey at age 5 although small he was a fast skater. His dad was his coach the first few years he played. After moving to Kamloops, he attended Arthur Hatton Elementary, McArthur Park Junior High then NorKam Senior Secondary. He was on the wrestling team where he excelled to a very high level. Brian Dick coached the team to Provincial Championships on more than one occasion. Mr. Dick took members of the team to Montreal for Canadian Junior Championship where Lee won silver in Greco. Lee has many trophies from his wrestling days and fitness challenges. Lee was male athlete of year in grade 12 and he earned a special award in grade 12 for earning all athletic awards available by grade 11. He also played on NorKam Saints rugby team. Playing on the Saints team must be where rugby became his passion. He played rugby until well into his forties. He signed his text with his beloved #11. He loved the game, and he loved his teammates. He loved his teammates children as well and lots of them called him Uncle which made him beam. For some reason, his favourite team was France in the World Cup Rugby (he liked that rooster) and Toulouse Club Rugby Club. He had some passion for anything Irish as well. The family always had a ski pass for Tod Mountain and spent a lot of weekends on the hill. When Lee John was younger, he was usually skiing beside the runs in the bush finding logs or whatever to jump over. As he got older Lee John had competitions with his brother and sister to see who was the fastest down the hill. Especially on black diamond runs. In the summers, the family spent a lot of time camping and being on the water in the boat. Water skiing on Kamloops Lake and Shuswap Lakes. That too could become a competition to see who could get the biggest rooster tail on a slalom ski! Always a competition with Lee but I think he came by it honestly. Family games of Uno could get pretty intense. Lee knew and retained a vast amount of knowledge on sports. He knew players from all teams, be it football, hockey, baseball, rugby, soccer, skiing, tennis, and any other sport. He knew the stats on players of all eras. He also got tired of explaining what 2 1/2 games in hand meant! I would promise not to ask again but every year in the run up to baseball playoffs I would have to ask the question again! Lee worked in the construction industry mostly with concrete. He worked in Fort McMurray off and on for several years and here in Kamloops. If there was concrete to be poured, he was there and involved. The family wish to thank Kamloops Rugby Club for the gathering last Wednesday for Lee. Having his #11 on signs between the goal posts. Also, all the support they gave Lee. You were all family to him. Thank you to all the friends and relatives that have phoned, texted, emailed and Facebook messenger the family. Also sent delicious meals that were greatly appreciated at this time. Due to Covid, a graveside service was held on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 where he was interred at Hillside Cemetery next to his brother Garth.

“You either loved him, or hated him, but you never forgot him” Lee will be missed by his family and many friends. Rest In Peace, ONE IN, ALL IN #11. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

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Charles James Smith It is with great sadness that we report the passing of our brother, Charles James Smith, on Saturday, April 17, 2021 at the age of 63. He had been suffering with heart disease for many years and succumbed peacefully at home in Logan Lake. Fondly referred to as “Butch” his entire life, he was born at Victoria, BC on November 26, 1957. Butch’s love of the outdoors took him on many hunting and fishing trips. Foremost of all were the fishing trips taken aboard mom and dad’s boat “Daruma”, which they sailed out of Kitimat. Indeed he was the captain and chief navigator and was happiest when he was at the helm. He loved the fishing but also enjoyed time spent capturing the white Kermode bears in photographs and video. Left to mourn Butch is his brother George (Joanne) Smith, his sister Shirley “Nan” (Bernard) Wesselingh and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by our parents Jim and Peg Smith. At his request there will be no service. We would like to thank Dr. Frederick Kruger for the care he gave to both Dad and Butch over the years. Memorial donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation at 729 Victoria St, Kamloops, BC V2C 2B5. Condolences may be expressed at: www.firstmemorialkamloops.com

Dr. Hanna Ritenburg On April 11, 2021, Dr. Hanna Ritenburg passed away peacefully in her home in Kamloops, BC at the age of 73 years. She is survived by her loving spouse Terry Shewchuk, her sister Isabella Pater, her children Christine, Andrew (Lindsey), Katherine (Patrick), and Matthew (Emily), as well as her grand children Jimmy, Cedric, Daniel, Maggie, Isabel, Ivy, Thomas, Samson, Benjamin and Evelyn. Additionally, she leaves behind her step-children Kris, Tod, and Erin and her grand-stepchildren Myah, and Lauren. She is predeceased by her parents Alfred and Zenta Pater. Hanna was born in Gratz, Austria, but moved as a young child to Regina, Saskatchewan. It was there that she gained a love of winter sports, swimming, golfing, and spending time at her family’s lake cabin. Hanna settled in Kamloops after medical school and grew her practice and family. She was a dedicated family physician and sincerely appreciated the relationships she had built with her patients and colleagues. She was devoted to her spouse, family, friends and patients, and she will be missed. Should friends desire, in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. On-line condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Fond memories linger every day, Remembrance keeps them near.

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As you share the stories and the memories of how they lived their lives and how very much they meant, may you find comfort...


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WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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Stanley Mitchelmore

Kenneth Albert Johnson

December 27, 1940 - April 11, 2021

1929 - 2021

It is with sadness we announce Stan Mitchelmore has fallen asleep in death.

Ken passed away in the evening of April 2, 2021 shortly after his 92nd birthday. He is survived by son Rodney and grandson Clayton of Kamloops, brother Roy of Nanaimo, and numerous nieces and nephews in BC and Alberta. Ken was pre-deceased by wife Betty, siblings Gladys, Lester, Gordon, Harvey, and Doris.

Stan was born in Green Island Cove, NL, the third of nine children born to Theophilus and Augustina Mitchelmore. He married Judy Squire, on July 2, 1966 and together they raised three children.

Ken was born at his parent’s farmhouse in the Ardmore District of Alberta. He hired onto CN in early 1949, working in Smithers. He married Betty Jonasen there in 1957, moving to Kamloops in 1966 to continue his CN career until retirement in 1988. The family enjoyed many happy times at their summer cabin on East Barriere Lake.

In 1977 the Mitchelmore family moved to British Columbia and eventually settled in Kamloops. Stan worked as a welder at Highland Valley Copper for over 22 years. After his retirement he became busy in his faith, teaching others Bible truths and helping in his congregation. He was especially committed to his work with the Patient Visitation Group, spending countless hours visiting his spiritual brothers and sisters who were hospitalized at RIH.

After retirement, Ken and Betty spent many winters in Arizona and summers touring Canada and the USA. In recent years, Ken and Rodney have continued to visit family and friends and enjoy their trips in their motorhome.

Stan is survived by his wife of 54 years, Judy, his children Karen Tallen (Mark), Kelly Hales (Jared) and Mark Mitchelmore (Miranda), his grandson Ryan Watson, brothers Ray (Cicely), Garry (Joanne), sisters Annie Bushey, Edna Parrill, nieces, and nephews, and his many close friends among various Jehovah’s Witness congregations.

Ken has left a hole in the heart of many and will always be remembered as a kind, patient and sharp minded soul. There will be no service at his request. Condolences may be sent via www.everdenrust.com

A memorial talk will be held via Zoom on Saturday, April 24, 2021 at 2:00 pm. Please contact the family for details.

Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone!

Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of despair

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Mary White (Nelson)

September 6, 1926 - April 13, 2021 We wish to let family and dear friends know of the gentle passing of our mom in Kamloops, BC. She will be lovingly remembered by her three children Judy Rogers (Grant Close), Debbie Topolnisky (Ewen), Barry Graham (Adrienne), two step-sons Murray White (Joan) and Allen White (Donna) as well as grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. She is also survived by two siblings June Blennerhassett and George Nelson.

THE TIME IS NOW If you are ever going to love me, Love me now, while I can know The sweet and tender feelings Which from true   Love me now         I’m gone

Mom was predeceased by two loving husbands David White (2015) and her first husband Bill Graham (1978) and two brothers and two sisters.

And then have it chiseled in marble,

As the matriarch of an extended circle of family and friends, she was adored and treasured by all of the people whose life she touched. Her beautiful smile and generous heart brought happiness to everyone.

If you have tender thoughts of me,

Cremation with no service at this time. The family will hold a Celebration of Mom’s life at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the BC Children’s Hospital, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC.V5Z 4H4 or by email at patientexperience@cw.bc.ca Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Sweet words on    

         am sleeping, Never to awaken, There will be death between us, And I won’t hear   So, if you love me,      Let me know it while I am living       

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Georgina Pearl Salle It is with deep sadness we announce the passing of Georgina Pearl (née Clyne, formerly Bradford). She is survived by her only remaining sister Gladys (Clyne) Chester, her sisters-in-law Lil (Bradford) Mattenley, Ethier and Marion (Vic) Bradford, brother-in-law Stanley Bradford and Bill Guy, her children, Diane (Gary) Bloomfield, Dodie (John) Lysak, Leslie (Jody) Kennedy. Grandchildren, Valoree (Nolan) Bloomfield, Craig Lysak, Amber Lysak, Jayson (Cherina) Kennedy, Trevor (Tessa) Kennedy, Ali (Travis) Giddens. Great-Grandchildren Sophia and Avery Leach, Michael, Matthew and Markus Lysak, Nash and Nixon Kennedy, Emerson and Mackenzie Kennedy, Mason and Ella Giddens. Foster Children Heather (Dave) Wiebe and family, Lawrence (Doris) Power and family, Doug (Bonnie) Hutton, Bobby (Lynne) Hill, Ron Eland, Dallas Jones. She is predeceased by her husbands Bob Bradford (1970) and Manne Salle (2016), daughter Patsy and Len Jenkins and foster son Phillip Power. Shortly after her 80th birthday Geordie sat down and composed some of her life accomplishments written in her own words with a few added details by family. Georgina Pearl Clyne Bradford Salle was born on August 1st, 1922 in the farm home on 4-2-19 Morton Township, Manitoba. She was the first of seven children of Alex Clyne; a Scottish newcomer and his wife Clara Violet Mabel (Scott). Georgina received her education at Wood Lake and West Lake Schools Manitoba, and her R.N. Diploma from Brandon General Hospital, Manitoba in 1944. After she graduated, Georgina and her nursing friend travelled to B.C. and immediately began nursing on the staff of Shaughnessy Hospital; just when the returned men were coming back from war. It was there she met and fell in love with Robert John Bradford; a double leg amputee and they were married; moved to his home at Bridge Lake for a couple of years where she was accepted as a very close member of the Bradford family. In 1946 and 47 they all moved to Chinook Cove area of the North Thompson Valley; buying a farm and building their home. Very shortly after their arrival, a Diphtheria outbreak developed in Rayleigh (a small community just outside of Kamloops). Georgina volunteered inoculating over 300 persons in the Barriere area with help of her husband and a friend who kept five little needles boiled up to use in the one little glass 2 cc syringe that she owned. After that, she voluntarily assisted and helped her neighbours with whatever illness and accident they brought to her door. People started coming to Nurse Bradford’s house whenever they needed medical attention or advice. She came to be known as the community nurse and did all of her work voluntarily. For 23 years she treated everything from the flu, bee stings, ticks, burns, croup, pneumonia, strep throat, polio and broken bones. Her daughters fondly remember neighbours knocking at the door day or night. Geordie would get her blue medical suitcase ready for any emergency. She delivered many babies at the farm. Geordie always had a home remedy for most ailments, including bread and milk poultices that she swore by. The voluntary medical services nurse Bradford provided to the local residence was invaluable because there was no local doctor. The road to Kamloops was a treacherous windy dirt road. Bob and Geordie bought a red station wagon and were loaned a stretcher from the mill. This became the first volunteer ambulance service so they could take people with more serious illnesses and injuries into Kamloops. They continued to do so until 1969 when the community ambulance service was established in Barriere. Geordie took time out of her volunteer services to work at the Irving Clinic and both Kamloops and Clearwater hospitals. Georgina and Bob raised four daughters; Patsy, Diane, Dodie, and Leslie as well as many foster children who were loved and nurtured as their own. Geordie remained in close contact with many of her foster children and their families. Geordie was very active in many organizations. First secretary of the North Thompson Fall Fair and first Boy Scout Group. Georgina participated in the forming of the Barriere United Church. Georgina was active in the Chinook Cove Hall Association, the Chamber of Commerce, Barriere Woman’s Institute, Barriere Seniors and O.A.P.O, the Yellowhead Pioneer Residence Association, volunteered for the One-to-one reading program at the elementary school, Barriere Hospice, delivered Meals on Wheels, Barriere Cancer Society including teaching selfexams for Breast Cancer, Barriere Curling Rink include the Jam-Can and …. (Georgina didn’t finish this sentence as we think she didn’t believe she was done volunteering and making a difference in the community that she loved). Georgina received the Queens Diamond Jubilee award for her commitments to her community and was the first to receive the Citizen of the Year award for Barriere. In 1970 her loving husband Bob passed away and in 1972 she married her second love Wolfgang A. Salle “Manne”. Geordie sold her Chinook Cove farm and moved to Barriere. She carried on with her nursing career for many years and when she retired she took up quilting. She made well over 100 quilts for family, friends, raffles etc and also winning prizes for special ones at the fair. Geordie and Manne bought a beautiful camp lot on East Barriere Lake in 1978 and every summer enjoyed endless time with family and friends at this wonderful site. This cabin became the most beloved spot of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren; with many family and friends coming to stay for a vacation. Georgina always had activities for the grandkids including plaster molds for painting, scavenger/treasure hunts, swimming lessons, fishing, campfires and so much more. There was no time to be bored! Georgina taught all her grandchildren how to play crib and phase ten. Geordie spent many hours playing Oh Shit! with her good friend Jean. Geordie and Manne enjoyed travelling and took trips to Europe, British Isles, U.S.A., across Canada and B.C., Australia, New Zealand, Disneyland, Hawaii and often took her family and friends. Geordie decided to ‘move South’ for the winter, making the long trek into Kamloops at Ridgepoint to be closer with family. After a stroke finally slowed her down, Georgina spent her last four years in Pine Grove Care Home. Georgina enjoyed the entertainment and activities offered and became a favourite of the care staff. The family wishes to thank Dr. Montalbetti and Pine Grove Care Home. In lieu of flowers, family ask that donations be made in Georgina/Geordie’s name to the North Thompson Fall Fair and Rodeo, Barriere Curling Club, or the Barriere Hospice Association.


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

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Margaret Ruth Jones

August 1, 1928 - April 9, 2021

This past Thursday Margie died following a stroke. At her side were her husband Jack and daughter Chrissie. Margie’s last hours were in the Marjorie Willoughby Hospice. Prior to this last day she spent most of a month in Royal Inland Hospital. Thanks are extended to the staff at both the hospital and the hospice for the loving care, as well as to Dr.’s Newmarch and Hollman. Margie was a second child of Dr. Ron Bradbury and Una Bradbury and she was born in the town of Eltham, Victoria, Australia. She was pre-deceased by her parents, her elder sister Dorothy and younger brother Pete. Educated at Presbyterian Ladies College, Melbourne, Margie completed a 5-year Dietetics degree. Early on she worked at the Royal Melbourne and the Geelong hospitals and later in Canada at Overlander Extended Care Hospital and as an itinerant dietician throughout the Interior. Margie was a talented Aussie - everything from prize-winning cake decoration, directing “Marjacks” the “Tranquille trainees” at Mt. Paul United in Rev. Dick Hall’s time, playing the piano as an accompanist, painting (all media), gardening, even acting in festival plays for Seniors...and winning! But perhaps her forte was singing where her skill at sight-reading was impressive, but, then she had been in the Royal Melbourne Philharmonic Choir of 130 voices...she was a true contralto. In Kamloops she sang with The A Cappella Singers for 30 years, also Kamloops Choristers, Happy Choristers, and in Anglican Church choirs. Margie Jones’ family (the Joneses are hard to keep up with!) is far-flung: in Australia, England, Florence, Japan, Canada, and New York. Margie is survived by her husband of almost 65 years, Jack, children Jenny (Alex), Chrissie (Steve), Suzy (Leigh), Paul (Kerryn), brother Ed, grandchildren Hannah, Naomi (Phil), Katie, Jane, Hamish, and great-grandson Nathan, and many nieces and nephews. Margie was an active Christian volunteering in Senior’s lunches, teaching Sunday school and attending Cursillo retreats. She will be missed by her St. George’s Anglican Church community. She was a kind, caring and loving person. In spite of being diminished in her latter years by Alzheimer’s disease she was a gentle invalid. “Margaret/Margie, we are proud of you, Wife, Mother, Granny, Grandnana, Auntie, and Friend” We will meet again. . . that is our faith.

Vivian passed away after a short illness, she is missed and lovingly remembered by her son Bill Affleck (Val Perkins), granddaughter Wendy Chalmers (Kemper Klyne), greatgrandchildren Abby and Joel Klyne, niece Janice Fisher (David) and great nephews Shawn and Michael (Fisher), as well as many friends and family. Vivian was predeceased by her daughters Lorna Chalmers and Wendy Burns and son-in-law Ian Chalmers, second husband John (Patrick) Keen, as well as, her parents Robert and Margaret Gordon, brothers James (Buster) Gordon, Johnny Gordon and Bob Gordon and sisters Roberta Cook and Edna Wismer. Vivian was born in Kamloops and in her early years she worked at Tranquille and a tomato cannery that was located near the Overlander Bridge. She later moved to Victoria and then Quesnel before settling back to Kamloops. She was a vibrant, active woman always spending hours in her garden in the spring and summer tending to her tomatoes, strawberries, flowers, and the lawn. Autumn was for raking leaves.... all the leaves-sometimes even her neighbour’s leaves and in the winter, she would shovel the snow from her own driveway and reserve time to bake the best pies, cookies, and muffins. She always had something to do and would say “you need to justify your existence” or “you need to have a purpose” she was never one to sit still for too long. She had a great love for her family, caring for her greatgrandchildren and great nephews when they were young, she also never missed an opportunity to visit her son Bill and daughter-in-law Val in Surrey. Her care and compassion for her family continued through the years. Although she went through hardships in her life, she tried to maintain a positive attitude and instill this to others, she could be heard saying “...now, you need to think positively”. She had a way of offering advice without you really knowing that was what she was doing, love you Gram and I will miss the “pep talks” and our daily chats. She had a sly sense of humour and some great “one-liners”. She was fiercely independent and did things her own way. Left to cherish her memory, along with her family and friends, are special long-time friends Verne and Audrey Hauge and family (Victoria), Olga Rhoades (Mill Bay), Lynn MortensenOudoire (Le Thor, France) and Isobel Nemitz (Prince George).

~ I am going to miss you Mom, Love Bill ~~ We Miss You - Love Always ~ XOXO Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Marjorie Willoughby Hospice, or the Alzheimer’s Society.

Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW!

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Fredrick Lewis

January 25, 1936 - March 1, 2021 Fred, loving husband, father, grandfather and friend left this world on March 1, 2021 with his family by his side. Fred is lovingly remembered by Rae, his wife of 59 years and his three children Sandra Ann (Mike), Terrence (Tracy) and Trevor (Sandra Lynn). Also to cherish his memory his beloved grandchildren Kaitlin (Alex), Ava, Sawyer, Kennan, Ethan, Erica and David and one little greatgranddaughter Sena. He also leaves his sister Jean (George) and many cousins, nieces and nephews. Fred was predeceased by his older brother Bill. Fred was born in Matsqui, BC and spent his childhood in Vancouver, Alert Bay and Courtenay. He then moved to the interior and worked 40 years for Dept. of Highways, Survey and Design branch. Enjoying his work, making many friends and moving all over BC. He retired to Shuswap Lake, built a beautiful log house and spent many happy hours boating, fishing, swimming and sitting at the campfire with family, friends and neighbours. Fred’s fishing and bear stories were told and enjoyed. Fred is dearly loved, sadly missed and forever in our hearts. Special thanks to Dr. Cribb and the caregivers and staff of the ponderosa lodge for their excellent and compassionate care. Condolences may be expressed at: www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

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Martin David Lee

No service by request.

A post-COVID memorial service will be held at St. George’s Anglican Church.

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Vivian Beatrice Keen (née Gordon)

8 July, 1932 - 15 April, 2021

Condolences may be sent to the family at: DrakeCremation.com

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A55

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.

We tragically lost Martin on the morning of April 5th, 2021. He leaves behind his mother Helen W. Lee, his partner of nine years Tracey Isaak, and her four children and six grandchildren. He was predeceased by his father Roger Duncan Lee, and his sister Tiona. Our entire family is devastated by Martin’s unexpected passing at the young age of 49. Martin was loved by many and will always be remembered for his humour, his love of music - especially playing his guitar - and his love of fishing. He enjoyed anything outdoors; some of our favourite memories will be the times we spent together camping or hiking. All the kids adored him as much as he did them, and they will greatly miss their “Farty Marty.” Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca


A56

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Get up $ to 7,500 to build your eCommerce website today Now is the time to upgrade to an eCommerce website with help from the Launch Online Grant Program. The BC Provincial Government is currently offering a financial grant of up to $7,500 for small and medium sized businesses to build or improve their eCommerce presence online. This includes building a brand-new website from scratch, or updating an existing online shopping website. As a Kamloops-based Web Development agency, KTWDigital is eligible to build you an eCommerce website with help from this grant. Don't wait! This first-come, first-serve offer only lasts until the funding has been invested. Take advantage of this opportunity by starting or upgrading your eCommerce website today.

Mobile-friendly and intuitive shopping experience.

We can help you through the grant application process! Read more at ktwdigital.com/LaunchOnline

YOUR DIGITAL SALES Manager

Chris Wilson

chris@ktwdigital.com Tel: 250.374.7467 Cell: 250.572.2443

@ktwdigital www.ktwdigital.com


WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A57

IT’S OUR 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY en Thank you Kamloops! e d r e b A all LOCALLY OWNED

M

NO CONTRACTS • NO CREDIT CHECKS • NO SURPRISE BILLS

Bring or buy a Hwy. new or pre-owned phone from us. Monthly Financing available on pre-owned. Trans Canada W., Kamloops, BC V1S 1J2 Choose a plan and start saving on Canada’s largest mobile network

101-1320 outside Aberdeen Mall lower level between Chatters and The Gap) CANADA WIDE AFFORDABLE PLANS ON SALE NOW!* (Located

43 Fortune Drive, Kamloops, BC V2B 2K4

ILE ULD PLAN 15

$

25

35

$ (Located $next to McDonald’s)

*LIMITED TIME OFFER

outside A

40 4-643 50 For

$

$

00 | kamloopscellrepair.com | info@kamloopscellrepair.com 100 minutes Canada-wide +BONUS 250 MB with AutoPay Unlimited Incoming calls Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging Call Display & Voicemail

Trans

500MB Data

2.5GB Data

4.5GB Data

10GB Data

+BONUS 500 MB with AutoPay Unlimited Talk Canada-wide Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging Call Display & Voicemail

+BONUS 500 MB with AutoPay Unlimited Talk Canada-wide Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging Call Display & Voicemail

+BONUS 500 MB with AutoPay Unlimited Talk Canada-wide Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging Call Display & Voicemail

+BONUS 500 MB with AutoPay Unlimited Talk to USA & Canada-wide Unlimited Text & Picture Messaging Call Display & Voicemail

250.299.5700 | kam

FAST & EFFICIENT REPAIRS • Physical & Liquid Damage Repairs On Cell Phones, iPods, iPads & Tablets • Unlock Phones • Accessories • Replacement Batteries • Pre-Owned Phones THANK YOU FOR VOTING FOR US

DELIVER & PICK UP FOR NEW WEBOTH SALES & SERVICE STAY SAFE & AVOID LINE-UPS

ABERDEEN MALL 101-1320 Trans Canada Hwy W

250.299.5700

ONE OF THE BEST

info@kamloopscellrepair.com

kamloopscellrepair.com

2 YEARS IN A ROW!

2020

LOCALLY OWNED


A58

WEDNESDAY, April 21, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRESH. HEALTHY. LOCAL.

weekly flyer LARGEST SELECTION OF KAMLOOPS GROWN PRODUCE!

Thursday, April 22nd - Wednesday, April 28th 2021 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

#2 - 740 Fortune Drive, Kamloops

BC GROWN TOMATOES ON THE VINE

BC GROWN RHUBARB

$1.98

$1.98

/LB

/LB

MANDARINS

ROMA TOMATOES

CELERY

78¢ /LB

98¢/EACH

CORN

BUTTERNUT SQUASH

LONG ENGLISH CUCUMBER

PINK LADY APPLES

NAVEL ORANGES

$5.98 /EACH

98¢/COB

BOSA FOODS

ASSORTED LASAGNA

$18.98

/907G

$1.28/EACH

RUSSET POTATOES

BANANAS

58¢ /LB

$1.98

/5LB BAG

TREE ISLAND

GAY LEA

ASSORTED YOGURT

$4.98

COCONUT WHIP TOPPING

/325G

NEW SPRING/SUMMER STORE HOURS

$1.28

$4.48

/225G

MONDAY 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM

/LB

88¢

/LB

CANTALOUPE MELONS

POMEGRANATES

ELMHURST

SAPUTO MOZZARELLISSIMA

$2.98/EACH

MATCHA OAT LATTE

$3.98

/355ML

$1.98 /EACH

PIZZA MOZZARELLA

$12.98

/690G

TUESDAY - SATURDAY

SUNDAY

8:00 AM - 7:00 PM

10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

REVEN & RETTELSWEN LIAME RUO ROF PU NGIS

98¢/LB

98¢/LB

98¢/LB

!NOITOMORP ro ETADPU ,REYLF A NO TUO SSIM

AMBROSIA APPLES

$1.28/LB

ICEBERG

moc . T EK RAM ECUDO R P FA E LUN

WATERMELON

Profile for KamloopsThisWeek

Kamloops This Week April 21, 2021  

Kamloops This Week April 21, 2021

Kamloops This Week April 21, 2021  

Kamloops This Week April 21, 2021

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