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kamloopsthisweek.com | kamloopsthisweek |

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 13

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Read Kamloops This Week’s Progress 2021 magazine, which has been delivered with this edition of the newspaper. Emerging Stronger is the theme as organizations and businesses discuss how they have met challenges the pandemic has presented.

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VEXED BY VARIANTS

A rise in COVID-19 cases, including more contagious variants, has led to added restrictions until at least April 19, including no indoor dining, no indoor fitness classes and no indoor worship services

STORY, PAGE A5

Frick and Frack Tap House owner Layne Richards posts an updated notice on the window of his downtown business, one of many affected by the latest pandemic-related health orders. Indoor dining is banned until at least April 19, but patio and takeout service is permitted. Richards will be operating his outdoor patio at Victoria and Sixth and will seek city approval for a variance to use a portion of his parking lot space, as well. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

ON SALE NOW! NEW + RETURNING PERKS

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A2

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BIG SAVINGS FOR EVERY BUNNY BC/USA Fresh Russet Potatoes 2.27 kg

JD Farms Fresh Natural Whole Turkeys

8.80/kg • while quantities last

299

Mexico Fresh Asparagus

399

each

4.39/kg weather permitting

lb

199

HOICTE

lb

PR

HROITCE

5 lb bag

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Taste of

Fresh St. Baked Fresh In-store Apple Pie 9”

Bon Appétit! Ocean Wise

Fresh Steelhead Trout Fillets

chemeonsteh

of the Mon Père Double Cream Brie

soft French cow milk cheese

249 /100 g

Little Creek Organic Dressings 750 mL

339

half 550 g 6.79 ea or whole 1.1 kg

1299 each

/100 g

999 each

Ocean Spray Cranberry Sauce

whole or jellied 348 mL

199 each

Alexia Sweet Potato Fries

oven reds 425 g or crispy rosemary fries 450 g

2 $6 FOR

... AND OODLES MORE ON SALE IN-STORE & ONLINE!

PRICES IN EFFECT FRIDAY, APRIL 2 - THURSDAY, APRIL 8

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BIG SLEEPEVENT

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ctive Max ory Foam

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Queen Adjustable Head & Foot Frame

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CUP

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MERRITT

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1976

TERRACE

REVELSTOKE

WILLIAMS LAKE

240 MacKenzie Ave N. (778) 412-9477

SALMON ARM

PULL OUT

MADE I CANAD

SERVING B.C. & ALBERTA

4519 Lakelse Avenue (250) 638-0555

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LOCALLY WAREHOUSED HOLDERS

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KAMLOOPS

1350 Hillside Drive (250) 372-7999

16 2708 Burrard (250) 567-5959

$

HOUSTON

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3459 9th Street (250) 845-2004

*Pay in 24 Months - Interest Free Equal Payments on furniture & mattresses except on cash and carry, clearance NOWand/or damaged items. Administration fees, required deposits, delivery charges, disposable fees, and all taxes payable and due at the time of purchase. On approved credit. A $21 annual membership fee may be charged to your account subject to certain conditions. Financing provided by Fairstone Financial Inc. and is subject to all the terms and conditions in your cardholder agreement and the credit promotional plan disclosure statement (collectively the “Account Agreement”). The purchase price is divided by the number of months in the credit promotional period to determine equal monthly payments to be made during the credit promotional period. Finance Charges will not accrue on the purchase during the credit promotional period of 24 months if the required minimum payment is made each billing cycle during the credit promotional period when due. The terms of the credit promotional plan will terminate if you default under your Account Agreement. On termination or expiry of the credit STORAGE promotional plan (or for purchases that are not part of the credit promotional plan), the standard APR of 31.99% and the terms of the Regular Credit Plan will apply to all outstanding balances owing. This offer is valid up to and including April 4th, 2021, cannot be used for previous purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or special incentive SHOP ONLINE TODAY programs. Certain terms and conditions apply. All prices are shown after discount. Samsung, Kitchenaid, LG, GE, Frigidaire, & Maytag promotions are subject to terms and conditions; see store for details. In-store and online availability may vary. Images of products may not be exactly as shown. Terms & Conditions apply to our Price Beat Guarantee for Appliances & www.cityfurniturecanada.com Most of what you see you can take home today! Electronics. See in store for more details. Due to COVID-19 product availability will vary across advertised items and could be delayed. †Save The Tax promotional prices will be reduced by the equivalent of applicable taxes, Cash & Carry items are not included and this offer cannot be combined with past purchases. Total price will equal the advertised price.

KitchenAid® 24" Stainless Steel Beverage KAMLOOPS 4.8 Talalay Latex 1250Cellar, UltraCold GelActive Max 1350 HillsidePocket Drive Gel FoamFoam Technology Coils Cu. Ft. Memory System Memory Foam

(250) 768-2224

WEST KELOWNA

2341 Bering Rd West (250) 768-2224

362 Reid Street (250) 992-2229

(250) 378-2332

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111 West Victoria Road (250) 837-3373

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Memory Foam

(250) 638-0555

SALMON ARM

1160 10th Avenue SW (250) 832-9770

BlackIce Latex Foam

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Queen Tight Top Pocket Coil Mattress King Available $2339

Carbon Fibre Memory Foam

UltraCold System

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LOCALLY WAREHOUSED

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3459 9th Street

SAVE $

17

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1976 PAYOFF BY 2023!

(250) 845-2004 LOCALLY WAREHOUSED

*Pay in 24 Months - Interest Free Equal Payments on furniture & mattresses except on cash and carry, clearance and/or damaged items. Administration fees, required deposits, delivery charges, disposable fees, and all taxes payable and due at the time of purchase. On approved credit. A $21 annual membership fee may be charged to your account subject to certain conditions. Financing of months in theTODAY credit promotional period to determine equal monthly payments to be made during the credit SHOP ONLINE MADEprovided IN by Fairstone Financial Inc. and is subject to all the terms and conditions in your cardholder agreement and the credit promotional plan disclosure statement (collectively the “Account Agreement”). The purchase price is divided by the number promotional period. Finance Charges will not accrue on the purchase during the credit promotional period of 24 months if the required minimum payment is made each billing cycle during the credit promotional period when due. The terms of thewww.cityfurniturecanada.com credit promotional plan will terminate if you default under your Account Agreement. On termination or expiry of the credit CANADA Most of what you see you can take home today! promotional plan (or for purchases that are not part of the credit promotional plan), the standard APR of 31.99% and the terms of the Regular Credit Plan will apply to all outstanding balances owing. This offer is valid up to and including April 4th, 2021, cannot be used for previous purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or special incentive Apply for Financing Today! programs. Certain terms and conditions apply. All prices are shown after discount. Samsung, Kitchenaid, LG, GE, Frigidaire, & Maytag promotions are subject to terms and conditions; see store for details. In-store and online availability may vary. Images of products may not be exactly as shown. Terms & Conditions apply to our Price Beat Guarantee for Appliances & Electronics. See in store for more details. Due to COVID-19 product availability will vary across advertised items and could be delayed. †Save The Tax promotional prices will be reduced by the equivalent of applicable taxes, Cash & Carry items are not included and this offer cannot be combined with past purchases. Total price will equal the advertised price.

OR

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Shop Local Support Local

$ 1199 2299 $ SAVE $1200 Shop Local Support Local Beautyrest Black $

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799

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$

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valued at $599 MSRP

$

349

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KitchenAid® Low Profile 1.1 Cu. Ft. Microwave Hood

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* Offer valid only at participating Canadian authorized KitchenAid ® appliance dealers. See Sales Associate for details and list of qualifying models.

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NOW

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FREE DELIVERY & SET UP WITH PURCHASE OVER $999

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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SHOP ONLINE TODAY www.cityfurniturecanada.com

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1976

Most of what you see you can take home today!

INTEREST-FREE!

SERVING B.C. ALBERTA Apply for Financing Today! * &Shop OR Local Suppo Shop Local SupportShop Local Local Support Local APPLY CASTLEGAR KELOWNA KAMLOOPSHERE! CASTLEGAR WEST KELOWNA KAMLOOPS MERRITT TERRACE LAKE INTEREST-FREE PAYWILLIAMS IN 24 EQUALWEST PAYMENTS Financing FURNITURE & MATTRESSES CASTLEGAR WEST KELOWNA KAMLOOPS MERRITT TERRACE WILLIAMS LAKEprovided by † Fairstone Financial Inc. Apply for Financing Today!

1919 Columbia Ave (250) 365-5999

1919 Columbia Ave PRINCE(250) GEORGE365-5999 1303 3rd Ave (250) 564-1234

SERVING B.C. & ALBERTA

ON

2341 Bering Rd West (250) 768-2224

VANDERHOOF

16 2708 Burrard (250) 567-5959

1350 Hillside Drive (250) 372-7999

2025 Coutlee Ave (250) 378-2332

2341 Bering Rd West QUESNEL (250) 768-2224 362 Reid Street

1350 Hillside Drive REVELSTOKE (250) 372-7999 111 West Victoria Road

(250) 992-2229

(250) 837-3373

4519 Lakelse Avenue (250) 638-0555

SALMON ARM

240 MacKenzie Ave N. (778) 412-9477

1160 10th Avenue SW (250) 832-9770

2025 Coutlee Ave HOUSTON (250) 378-2332 3459 9th Street

(250) 845-2004

1919 Columbia Ave (250) 365-5999

4519 Lakelse Avenue PRINCE (250) GEORGE 1303 3rd Ave 638-0555 (250) 564-1234

2341 Bering Rd West (250) 768-2224

VANDERHOOF

16 2708 Burrard (250) 567-5959

1350 Hillside Drive (250) 372-7999

240 MacKenzie Ave N. QUESNEL (778) 412-9477 362 Reid Street

(250) 992-2229

2

111

*CASH AND CARRY ITEMS EXEMPT FROM SAVE THE TAX, FREE DELIVERY & SET UP PROMOTION. *12 months no interest, no payments S.A.C. on furniture & mattresses, 6 months no interest, no payments S.A.C. on electronics & appliances except on Cash and Carry, clearance or damaged items. Administr *12 months no interest, no payments S.A.C. on furniture & mattresses, 6 months no interest, no payments S.A.C. on electronics & appliances except on Cash and Carry, clearance or damaged items. Administration fee, any delivery charges and all taxes payable at the time of purchase. On approved credit. A $21 annual membership fee may be charged to your account subject to certain conditions. Financing provided by Fairstone Financial Inc. and is subject to all the terms and conditions in your cardholder agreement and the credit promotional plan discloser statement (collectively to certain conditions. Financing provided by Fairstone Financial Inc. and is subject to all the terms and conditions in your cardholder agreement and the credit promotional plan discloser statement (collectively the “Account Agreement”). Finance Charges will accrue on the purchase from the beginning of the credit promotional period of 12 months on furniture and mattresses and/or 6 months on electronics and appliances but no minimum payments will be due during the credit promotional period. However, if you pay the purchase price in full by the expiration date of the credit pr and/or 6 months on electronics and appliances but no minimum payments will be due during the credit promotional period. However, if you pay the purchase price in full by the expiration date of the credit promotional period, all of the accrued Finance Charges will be waived and no Financial Charges will be assessed on the purchase. Otherwise, all of the accrued Finance Charges will be assessed. On termination of expiry of the credit promotional plan (or for the purchases that are not part of the credit promotional plan), the standard APR of 29.99% and the terms of the regular Charges will be assessed. On termination of expiry of the credit promotional plan (or for the purchases that are not part of the credit promotional plan), the standard APR of 29.99% and the terms of the regular credit plan will apply to all outstanding balances owing. See store and Account Agreement for further information. Sale ends February 28th, 2021. Offers cannot be used for previous purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or special incentive programs. Certain terms and conditions apply. All prices shown after discount. Samsung, Kitchenaid, for previous purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or special incentive programs. Certain terms and conditions apply. All prices shown after discount. Samsung, Kitchenaid, LG, GE Café, Maytag & Whirlpool promotions are subject to terms and conditions so please see store for details. In-store and online availability may vary. Images of productsfee maymay not bebe exactly as shown.to Terms & Conditions to our Price Beat Guarantee for Appliances & Electronics, see store *Pay in 24 Months - Interest Free Equal Payments on may furniture & mattresses on cash carry, and/or damaged tems. fees, required deposits, delivery charges, fees, and all taxes payable and due at the time of purchase. On approved credit. A $21 annual membership charged your accountapply subject to certain conditions. products not be exactly as shown. Termsexcept & Conditions apply toand our Price Beat clearance Guarantee for Appliances & Electronics, isee store Administration or online for details. Due to COVID-19 product availability will vary across advertiseddisposable items.

PRINCE GEORGE

VANDERHOOF

SEE OUR FOR 1303 3rd 2708 Burrard Ave ONLINE FLYERS 16 (250) 564-1234 MORE HOT DEALS (250) 567-5959

QUESNEL

75”

www.cityfurniturecanada.com

362 Reid Street (250) 992-2229

REVELSTOKE

111 West Victoria Road (250) 837-3373

SALMON ARM

1160 10th Avenue SW (250) 832-9770

HOUSTON 2020

3459 9th Street (250) 845-2004

Financing provided by Fairstone Financial Inc. and is subject to all the terms and conditions in your cardholder agreement and the credit promotional plan disclosure statement (collectively the “Account Agreement”). The purchase price is divided by the number of months in the credit promotional period to determine equal monthly payments to be made during the credit promotional period. Finance Charges will not accrue on the purchase during the credit promotional period of 24 months if the required minimum payment is made each billing cycle during the credit promotional period when due. The terms of the credit promotional plan will terminate if you default under your Account Agreement. FOnUtermination or expiry of the credit R N I T U R E S TO R E promotional plan (or for purchases that are not part of the credit promotional plan), the standard APR of 31.99% and the terms of the Regular Credit Plan will apply to all outstanding balances owing. This offer is valid up to and including April 4th, 2021, cannot be used for previous purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers, promotions or special incentive SAVE $1200 Beautyrest programs. Certain terms and conditionsBlack apply. All prices are shown after discount. Samsung, Kitchenaid, LG, GE, Frigidaire, & Maytag promotions are subject to terms and conditions; see store for details. In-store and online availability may vary. Images of products may not be exactly as shown. Terms & Conditions apply to our Price Beat Guarantee for Appliances & Hybrid & price APPLIANCES LTD. Electronics. See in store for Mattress more details. Due to COVID-19 product availability will vary across advertised items and could be delayed. †Save The Tax promotional prices will be reduced by the equivalent of applicable taxes, Cash & Carry items are not included and this offer cannot beCITY combinedFURNITURE with past purchases. Total will equal the advertised price. $

LOCALLY WAREHOUSED

1799

King Available $2339 BlackIce Graphite BlackIce LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1976 Memory Foam Latex Foam

T3 Pocket Coils

SERVING B.C. & ALBERTA LOCALLY WAREHOUSED SHOP ONLINE TODAY Promo Starts March www.cityfurniturecanada.com Most of what you see you can take home today!

11th to LOCALLY March 25thOWNED 2021

SINCE 1976

We don’t sell. We help you buy! 1350 Hillside Drive • 250-372-7999 Across from Aberdeen Mall, Kamloops Now Only PAIR

Monday, Wednesday & Saturday 9-6pm

Thursday & Friday 9-9pm • Sunday 11-5pm


A4

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE

Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

Council Calendar Public and media attendance via Zoom only until further notice April 7, 2021 2:00 pm - Finance Committee Meeting April 13, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing April 20, 2021 9:00 am - Committee of the Whole 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting All meetings are currently being held at Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street. The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Notice To Motorists Please use caution when driving in the vicinity and obey all traffic control personnel, signs, and devices in the following area: • Tranquille Road Singh Street to 12th Street • Dallas Drive Andover Crescent to Peerless Way • McArthur Island Ring Road 12th Street to Kamloops Youth Soccer Association offices • Victoria Street 100 block

WOOD STOVE REBATE PROGRAMS

TREE COUPONS

Do you have an older, uncertified wood-burning appliance? You may be eligible for rebates!

The City of Kamloops’ annual tree coupons will be available to the public April 1 through June 16. The coupons have a $20 or $50 value, depending on the price of the selected tree.

Wood Stove & Fireplace Exchange Program • rebate of up to $800 (plus a $300 FortisBC rebate for gas appliances) for homeowners who remove and replace an eligible wood-burning appliance with a new lower-emission one from an authorized program retailer Electrify It! Get fired up about electric! New for 2021: the rebate amount for electric fireplace inserts has been increased to 50% of the appliance to a maximum of $500.

Wood Stove Scrap-It Program • $200 rebate for homeowners who remove an uncertified wood-burning stove (without replacing it). • pre-registration is required to determine program eligibility For a list of authorized program retailers and to find out if you quality for rebates, visit:

The Tree Coupon Program supports the City’s goal of increasing our community’s tree canopy from the current 12% to 20%, as identified in the Urban Forestry Management Strategy. Urban trees provide many social, health, environmental, and economic benefits, from removing atmospheric carbon dioxide and absorbing air pollutants to reducing energy consumption and increasing property values. A total of 750 coupons will be available on a first-come, first-served basis to residents within Kamloops’ municipal boundaries, with a limit of one per household. Coupons will only be available at the time of purchase of an eligible tree from a participating retailer or nursery. For more information on tree eligibility, restrictions, and participating locations, visit: Kamloops.ca/TreeCoupon

Kamloops.ca/WoodStove

To stay up to date on road work projects, visit: Kamloops.ca/Kammute

DOWNLOAD THESE CITY APPS FOR FREE! MYKAMLOOPS™ APP

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at:

myKamloops

Report non-emergency issues such as potholes, fallen trees, or broken street lamps. Simply take a picture, confirm the location, add any comments, and submit!

WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WASTE WISE! Sign up for weekly collection reminders and search how to recycle or dispose of hundreds of products and items. Kamloops.ca/WasteWise

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

FLOWBIRD—PAY FOR PARKING BY PHONE Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

Flowbird is an intuitive and easy-to-use application that allows you to pay for your parking sessions remotely through your mobile phone. Simply select the parking location nearest to your vehicle, select the duration, and confirm payment.

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A5

SECURITY AND THE CITY STREETS

WHAT IS STATUS OF ARTS CENTRE VOTE?

LACE UP THOSE RUNNING SHOES

After an alleged assault, we speak with Lapper Security, the homeless

April 4 is the anniversary of postponed referendum. We examine its future

It is Week 4 of training for the amended Boogie the Bridge event

A14-A16

A6-A7

A24

Earls Kitchen & Bar in Sahali has set up tables and chairs on the grass between the eatery and Columbia Street, in preparation for the latest pandemicrelated health orders. Until at least April 19, indoor dining is banned in B.C. in a bid to bring down the number of COVID-19 cases. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

INSIDE KTW Art Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A23 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A25 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A30 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A34 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A40

TODAY’S FLYERS

Surplus Herby’s, The Connector, YIG*, Walmart*, The Brick*, Shoppers*, Save-On-Foods*, Safeway*, Rona*, Rexall*, M&M Meats*, London Drugs*, Home Hardware*, HealthyLife Nutrition*, Frescho*, Canadian Tire* *Selected distribution

WEATHER ALMANAC Today Sun clouds Hi: 14 C Low: 3 C One year ago Hi: 6 .9 C Low: -0 .4 C Record High 22 .8 C (1994) Record Low -10 C (1936)

ONLINE

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facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek twitter.com/ KamThisWeek youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

HOW TO REACH US: Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

Health orders target indoor activities KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Restaurants and pubs across Kamloops and B.C. must cease indoor dining for the next three weeks as the provincial government seeks a “circuit breaker” to curb the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. Indoor dining — along with indoor group fitness classes and indoor worshipping — is banned until at least April 19, but patio dining and takeout service is permitted. Establishments that only serve snacks or appetizers must close. The new restriction has given Noble Pig manager Maeghan Summers a case of deja vu. Having been through a three-month closure last year at the onset of the pan-

demic, Summers said this one doesn’t feel as daunting, but nonetheless comes with difficult decisions. “We already have that script pre-written and that makes it a little bit easier, but it doesn’t mean it doesn’t hurt any less or is any less challenging,” Summers said. Summers was busy on Monday afternoon planning how to pivot to the new normal for the restaurant industry in a matter of hours — making myriad changes, from the menu and work schedule to food orders. Temporary layoffs will have to be made and operating hours are being reduced, she said, noting three weeks without dine-in service will still have a “huge impact” on the downtown restaurant. During that time, the Noble Pig will have to make

do with nearly half its current capacity — just 60 patio seats compared to the 100 seats it had been utilizing inside with social-distancing measures. “And the weather isn’t optimum,” Summers said. The restaurant managed as best it could implementing a takeout option last year when eateries were shuttered, but liquor and dine-in sales are what drive revenues, she said. “Thankfully, it’s only a three-week go-around instead of three months,” Summers said, noting public safety is a priority. Summers said she worries about the smaller restaurants and ski resorts that don’t have the same volume the Noble Pig enjoys. There will undoubtably be an impact across the Kamloops restaurant indus-

try as businesses are forced to shrink capacities yet again, hospitality and tourism consultant Bryce Herman told KTW, projecting the impact as “massive.” He said for smaller operators that are not able to offer at least a takeout option, Monday’s announcement will force them to shut their doors — possibly for good. “They’ve been taking it on the chin for over a year,” Herman said, adding there needs to be financial help from government. Herman said the majority of restaurants in the city appeared to have implemented a takeout option in the past year and he expects the number of those that can’t make the shift to be small. See PREMIER, A18

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LOCAL NEWS

This weekend — Sunday, April 4 — marks the one-year-anniversary of a cancelled city referendum on borrowing to build the proposed Kamloops Centre for the Arts. Following months — years, if one goes back to the previously rejected project — of planning, the referendum was swept up among cancellations as the COVID-19 pandemic was declared. At the time, cancellation was considered by some to be postponement. However, it will need to be officially resurrected. In light of the anniversary, KTW checked in with those involved in the project to reflect on what happened and weigh in on the future. Kamloops Centre for the Arts Society president Norm Daley said, despite vaccination ramping up, the world is not back to normal and unknowns remain, such as variants. He said the arts centre society needs to meet and discuss the future of the project. The group met through the fall and sent updates to its 5,000 members. Looking back, he cited “great momentum” heading into the cancelled referendum last year. “I think it’s something that can come back to the forefront, it’s just when is the correct time and when is the political will at all levels of government there?” Daley asked. “Because in our original proposal, we needed the help of every level of government to move something of

this scope forward.” Political will appears to be alive and well in Kamloops. Mayor Ken Christian, who wants to see a referendum on the issue attached to the next municipal election, which will be held in October 2022. Christian said no one was more disappointed than he when the referendum was cancelled last year. He wants community conversation around the arts centre to restart. Christian said lessons can be learned from the pandemic — such as the need to include broadcasting abilities in the facility, due to increased demand for streaming performances online. He also suggested the facility utilize British Columbia lumber and be designed to high environmental standards. Christian said artists have lost audiences and revenue during the pandemic and he hopes grants will come from upper levels of government to support them. In addition, he hopes grants will also help the city construct the Kamloops Centre for the Arts. He wants to engage the community on tweaks, watch for those grant opportunities and take the proposal to add the question to the ballot in 2022 to council for authorization. “That’s what I would like to see and that’s what I will be supporting going forward,” Christian said. Arts centre society director Tyson Andrykew said putting the question on borrowing on the civic election ballot in 2022 would eliminate cost of an additional referendum and give the

society time to plan. “Having it on a municipal election ballot, I think it’s a great opportunity,” Andrykew said. “I think the timeline kind of works, right? A year-and-a-half from now. I think that’s plenty of time to get a glimpse into how the economic recovery is going and for a few things to get ironed out.” Meanwhile, Daley said one issue that could arise, should the question be put on the civic electon ballot, is candidates being asked whether they support or oppose the project. “Sometimes I think that having the standalone question might be better than trying to politicize it in other ways,” he said. Andrykew said the committee put in a lot of work leading up to the cancelled referendum. He said the group completed dozens of presentations and held open houses for community groups, boards of directors and associations. He said most of the work had been done, noting the difficulty was that they were so close to referendum time and feeling confident. “For it to all culminate in a postponement and/or cancellation, it was pretty heartbreaking,” Andrykew said. “It’s really too bad. I don’t reflect on it often because I don’t like to reflect on it. It’s too bad. My heart really aches for the arts groups specifically that were so looking forward to this project. “They’re the real users of it and, for them, to kind of be in limbo and for [proponent] Mr. [Ron] Fawcett as well, who put such an incredible effort behind it himself, it’s tough.” See MAYOR, A7


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A7

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A rendering of what the Kamloops Centre for the Arts was envisioned to look like once developed. The April 4, 2020, referendum was cancelled due to the pandemic.

Mayor wants arts centre issue on 2022 election ballot From A6

Arts centre society director and Western Canada Theatre artistic director James MacDonald said the pandemic has provided perspective. He said when the time is right, the community will look to gather together again — through sports, community events, fundraisers, festivals and the arts. “I think we’ll be just raring to go in the next few years as a community,” MacDonald said. He said local artists still need a Kamloops Centre for the Arts and that, as the community continues to grow, demand increases. “The arts infrastructure that we’re missing isn’t just a theatre space where performances happen, it’s all of those other things behind the scenes that are almost non-existent in Kamloops,” MacDonald said. “Our ability to expand our programming and expand our theatre school offerings really hinges on a new space. We cannot continue to exist the way that we do in the Pavilion [Theatre]. It’s too small, it’s too outdated and there’s too much demand on the space. “And the same thing with the Sagebrush [Theatre].” Proponent Ron Fawcett

If the arts centre referendum returns, how will you vote? Take part in our Q of the Week online at kamloopsthis week.com

donated land and money toward the cause. Asked to reflect on the referendum cancellation one year ago, the founder of Kelson Group said: “What happened was COVID. None of us know how to deal with that and it’s a one-in-alifetime thing.” Fawcett said, despite the pandemic, the economy in Kamloops remains “reasonable,” noting he has continued planning a major residential development — the largest in the city’s history, called City Gardens — just down the street from the proposed arts centre location, downtown at Seymour Street and Fourth Avenue. Fawcett remains optimistic and committed to donating the land and funds toward the project. Like Christian, he said minor adjustments could be made to the project, such as more rehearsal halls for smaller groups. While he remains a willing participant, the decision is ultimately up to the city and Fawcett said it is dif-

ficult for politicians right now, without sufficient information during the pandemic. “Without the passage of time, it’s going to be difficult to get that,” he said. Christian said that if borrowing for the project was added to the ballot in 2022 and was approved, Kamloops Centre for the Arts could be built in the next council term, from 2022 to 2026. Asked if tweaks and the passage of time could lead to the centre costing more, Christian said that remains unknown. He knows there will be opposition to the project. “There will always be people that don’t see value in the arts,” he said. “There will always be people that tell you the timing is wrong and it’s the wrong size and location in the wrong time frame, but you know, you just have to kind of go with what the industry and the experts and the community is telling you. “Our community, every time we survey it, they talk about livability and one of the pieces, one of the elements of livability that’s missing in Kamloops, is that support for the arts — and I want that discussion to restart.”

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A8

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

THE KTW EDITORIAL

BUSINESSES IN NEED OF FINANCIAL AID — ASAP A second round of pandemic-related health measures will add more financial pain to owners and employees of restaurants, pubs, fitness firms and others. All indoor dining and group fitness classes (along with indoor worshipping) is prohibited until at least April 19 due to a spike in COVID19 cases and a rise in the more contagious variants of the disease. While deferring to expert health advice is understandable, it is acceptable to question the hows and whys and what nows connected to this latest decision. The BC Liberals are rightly calling on the provincial NDP government to act now to provide financial support for those businesses impacted — businesses that have been struggling since the pandemic was declared a year ago. The decision to ban the aforementioned indoor activities came with a mere 11 hours’ notice to those running restaurants, pubs and fitness classes. Like the last-minute decision to order venues closed early on New Year’s Eve, this latest surprise is a gut punch to a beleaguered industry. COVID-19 cases have been rising steadily for some time; surely the provincial government could have alerted those affected to this announcement last week. We echo the BC Liberals’ call for the government to immediately adjust the small- and medium-sized business recovery grant program by speeding up the application and approvals process and by easing the eligibility criteria. In addition, these businesses need financial help now, not in a few weeks’ time, when it just may be too late for some. Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey Bronwyn Lourens

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Digital sales: Makayla Peverill PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

DIGITAL DESIGNERS Jackson Vander Wal FRONT OFFICE Front office staff: Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery Rosalynn Bartella CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer

CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com Circulation 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

Follow us online at kamloopsthisweek.com

kamthisweek kamloopsthisweek

‘Freedom’ from the facts

A

handful of people in Kamloops and more in Kelowna and Vancouver have had the unfettered freedom to stage those “Freedom” rallies in opposition of pandemicrelated health orders. It is the Mount Everest of the irony range — they are free to complain about perceived freedoms being yanked, yet that fact seems to have escaped them, focused as they are on ignoring Occam’s razor (the simplest explanation is usually the correct explanation) and creating ridiculous theories to out-ridiculous previous theories. If COVID-19 isn’t a hoax, then it is a minor cold we can manage without restrictions. If it is more than a minor cold, then it is a virus created by the UN to expedite the Great Reset. And the Great Reset will be augmented by Evil Bill Gates and his devious plan to depopulate the Earth via sterilizing vaccines for some unspecified gain. And on and on and on it goes. Legitimate concerns abound — the impact of pandemic-related measures on the economy and our collective mental health — but they are too often drowned out by the fever-dream ravings that claim this pandemic is a stealth operation to “control” us for various reasons that make no sense whatsoever. The “freedoms” they claim are being withheld are rather embarrassing, when placed next to actual

CHRISTOPHER FOULDS Newsroom

MUSINGS freedoms that have been, and continue to be, extinguished. In Myanmar on Saturday, security forces killed more than 100 people, including children, who were protesting the Feb. 1 military coup in the country formerly known as Burma. To date, at least 300 people have been killed for protesting their loss of democracy. Meanwhile, the aggrieved in Kamloops protest because they must wear a mask for a few minutes while shopping or while taking a few steps from the restaurant’s front door to their table, where they can remove it. In the Second World War, the Canadian government stripped Canadians of Japanese descent of their homes and businesses and deported them from cities to remote internment camps in the B.C. Interior. Ottawa also censored 340 newspapers, arrested hundreds for speaking out against the war and gave the

RCMP the power to arrest and detain people without charge or trial. Meanwhile, the aggrieved in Kamloops protest because they have been asked — not ordered, but asked — to avoid non-essential travel to other communities. In the U.S. state of Georgia, legislation has been passed that will restrict ballot access to voters, particularly minorities and those in lower-income areas. Meanwhile, the aggrieved in Kamloops protest because they have been asked to work at home, if possible. We are loath to write about these “Freedom” protests in Kamloops because the claims made at the gatherings are about as logical as that of a toddler insisting there is a monster under his bed. No matter how often you prove he is mistaken, the toddler insists that monster is there — even when he can’t see it. This is why we do not preview these tiresome rallies, the latest of which on the weekend was a bust as far as attendance is concerned. I counted and concluded I have more people in my outside bubble. Sometimes, though, it is worth reminding each other what losing one’s liberty is truly all about. Perhaps we can round up some Oxford dictionaries for the next rally and distribute them to the attendees so they can research the actual definition of “freedom.” editor@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @ChrisJFoulds


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Editor: A month ago, I experienced a medical emergency that landed me in hospital — first in Kelowna General, then back to Royal Inland in Kamloops. I must praise all staff involved for their dedicated service toward the high level of care I received in both hospitals. Everyone — including ambulance paramedics, nurses, doctors, techs, lab and support services — present demonstrated such knowledge, compassion and dedication in their lines of work. When something so unexpected and quite frightening comes along, the lasting impact of their actions are never forgotten. I cannot speak for all patients, but my experience was one that makes me very proud and so thankful to the dedicated and hardworking people working in varying fields of health care. I will never forget this event. Thank you to all for your outstanding care and compassion.

BOTHERED BY BYLAWS FITNESS TEST Editor: I feel compelled to write regarding the changes in the city bylaws department, as outlined in the front-page story in the March 24 edition of KTW (‘Saying bye to the bylaws department’). Full-time employees working in the department should be grandfathered and exempt from taking the physical assessment test. Or, at the least, the city should base the requirements on years of service. When they were originally hired, there

were no expectations of passing any such fitness test. Having previously worked for BC Sheriffs Service, I knew that, as part of my employment, I needed to pass the Sheriffs’ Officer Physical Ability Test. Taking the test at 35 years of age was stressful enough. I certainly would not want to take it at 60. I can understand why this would cause added stress to employees and create a “toxic” work environment, as was alleged by a former

AN APPEAL TO BOTH DRIVERS AND CYCLISTS

Editor: With our snow melting, bikes are moving back onto the streets of Kamloops, but spring conditions bring challenges for both cyclists and drivers. It will still be a while before road shoulders are cleaned. Right now, even bike lanes are packed with gravel and leaf litter that is often covering snow, ice, plastic shards, lost bolts and broken glass. This means cyclists are often Shannon Atwater Kamloops much farther out into the street

For more letters, turn to Page A10 and go online to kamloops thisweek.com than is typical in summer. Cyclists know it is safer to cycle in a predictable straight line than move in and out from the curb as debris permits.

They also know that you can’t safely brake when riding on gravel that is sitting atop pavement. This may lead drivers to thinking cyclists are blocking a lane and cause some frustration. Please understand that no cyclist wants to be in front of a moving car. As we start living with each other again (with kudos to those who cycle through the winter), can we ask drivers to pass cyclists slowly, with care

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

Results:

Do you think the City of Kamloops should stop using herbicides to treat weeds and invasive plants?

No: 405 votes Yes: 220votes

What’s your take? 35% YES

65% NO

625 VOTES

This weekend is the one-year anniversary since the arts centre referendum was cancelled. If it returns, how will you vote?

Vote online:

kamloopsthisweek.com

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bylaws employee Don McConnell. Put yourself in the shoes of an employee such as McConnell, with 30-plus years employment. I am appalled that he had to make the decision to retire early, which undoubtedly he has been penalized for in his monthly pension payments. Let’s leave the policing in our city to the people trained to do so — Kamloops Mounties. Kel Ly Kamloops

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and with at least a metre of separation? And can I ask my fellow cyclists to make this the year you halt at every stop sign and red light? Predictability and respect on the part of both drivers and cyclists will get everyone to their destinations safely. Rob Higgins vice-president Kamloops Association for Low-Carbon Transportation kalcat.org

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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A10

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FRANCA MURACA NOTARY PUBLIC • Will and Estate Planning • Incapacity Planning • Real Estate Transactions • Notarizing Documents

T: 778-696-4LAW E: info@muracanotary.ca 301-619 Victoria Street muracanotary.ca

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NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS Kamloops BC NAPPG Call 778-220-4198 Meets daily at 181 W. Victoria St, 12-1 & 7:30-8:30

City of Kamloops

CEMETERIES

SCHEDULED TURF MAINTENANCE SEASON Cemetery Bylaw No. 6-27 states all artificial flowers and other tokens of remembrance composed of artificial foliage shall only remain on gravesites from October 1st through to the second Monday in April. We ask family members to remove all items before Monday, April 12, 2021. Items in City-issued flower stands are exempt from this rule. Any items not collected before this date will be placed at the Hillside Cemetery flower storage area and available for pickup no later than April 26 and are not to be placed back on the grave site until after October 1. Commencing Thursday, April 15, 2021, and every Thursday after through to October 1, 2021, flowers placed on gravesites will be removed and placed at the flower storage area for our scheduled turf maintenance. This does not include flowers in City-issued flower stands. It is recommended limiting grave embellishments to fresh cut flowers only during the turf maintenance season and that anyone who wishes to place flowers on graves do so after 3:00 pm Friday of each week. If you have any questions please contact the Hillside Cemetery Office at 250-828-3462. Thank you for your co-operation.

Kamloops.ca/Cemeteries

NEW ECONOMIC MODELS NEEDED Editor: Because of the purgatory of COVID-19, now is a good time to seriously reflect on our present socio-economic structures, which have compounded the difficulties caused by the virus. Difficulties have included folks not able to afford rent or mortgage payments, many workers and others living paycheque to paycheque and, perhaps the most devastating of all, the terrible death toll of seniors in long-term care homes. For the last 40 years, we have lived under the socio-economic model of neoliberalism. It is an economic order that prioritizes the rights of capital above the rights of the majority of people with its emphasis on global free markets, privatization of government services, low taxation for the rich and corporations, limiting the rights of workers, low wage policies and deregulation limiting

the power of governments. These policies and many others of their ilk have led to the difficulties mentioned above. When a catastrophic pandemic confronts the whole earth, neoliberalism has been found to be impotent. Therefore, the main institutions that can effect a real challenge to the calamities of COVID19 are nation-state governments, by supporting their populations with large monetary payouts. Unfortunately, these governments find themselves with large deficits owing to policies of neoliberalism, but they are the only tool we have unless we are willing to see massive sickness and death. All of the above shows how we must look at new economic models for the future, models that will include: • Supporting individuals and families through a guaranteed

income, especially as future automation will increase unemployment and under employment; • Providing a fair taxation system so the rich and corporations pay their fair share; • Sustaining a well funded health system that includes prescription medication; • Supporting family farms, rather than agribusiness; • Providing a living wage with benefits for long-term care workers. The actions taken by governments show we can take on devastating challenges collectively. Meanwhile, with the same courage and conviction, we can surmount the greatest challenge of our lifetime — climate change — for the earth will not seek favour, but will demand justice. Paul Corcoran Kamloops

TRAIN PURCHASE A WISE DECISION Editor: I was pleasantly surprised to learn that Maj. Jack Fitzwater had, in 1961, convinced the City of Kamloops to buy the 2141 steam engine. What insight. He and his wife were neighbours of our family on West Seymour Street and I used to pick up weeping willow sticks on his back lawn and throw them into his incinerator. He always gave me five cents, but on occasion he must have felt extra generous and gave me a dime for the job. Those are wonderful memories. R. Wells Kamloops

TERRIBLE NEWS OF ROBBERY, DECEPTION Editor: The Thompson-Nicola Regional District could now be the acronym for Terrible News of Robbery and Deception. We are grateful for the brilliant exposé of regional district spending by Jessica Wallace and the team at KTW. It is so disappointing to see the conspiracy of silence among the herd of civic politicians at the

trough of taxpayers’ money. And then there is TNRD board chair Ken Gillis, who from day one denied, dissembled, obfuscated and danced laterally. In a normal corporation, he would be shown the door and expedited with a swift kick to his posterior. George Sennewald Kamloops

WHAT DO THEY SAY TO THEIR LOVED ONES? Editor: I am sure some of the directors and managers at the ThompsonNicola Regional District are married. My question, for those who were with the TNRD during the questionable spending from 2015

to 2020, uncovered by KTW, is this: When you go home and look into the face of your spouse, what do you say? What about your adult children? What do they say? I know what my children would be asking.

The Kamloops This Week stories on TNRD spending, written by Jessica Wallace, were awesome. I cannot imagine the hours of work put into the investigation. The world needs more people like her. Jerry Hamonic Kamloops


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

Another Easter without indoor worshipping SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops church leaders have been through ups and downs in the past week, with respect to health orders and indoor services. Last week saw two variances made to public health orders related to churches. On March 23, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said outdoor worship services could be held with up to 50 people. Churches began planning for upcoming religious holidays, including Easter. A number of restrictions were placed on the outdoor gatherings, including pre-registration, health checks, social distancing, masks and no singing among the congregation. Then, on March 25, another variance to orders came down, allowing indoor gatherings for worship on four days between March 28 and May 13. Guidelines

for the variance stipulated no more than 50 people, or 10 per cent of the worship building’s capacity, could worship together. This past Monday, that permission was revoked with a “heavy heart,” Henry said, as part of new health orders intended to curb transmission of COVID-19 variants of concern and lower daily case counts, which have been nearing 1,000 per day recently. “I’m a little disappointed. I’m trying to get my head around why they didn’t know the numbers are going up,” said Steve Filyk, minister at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Sagebrush. Filyk is one of many church leaders in the city struggling to make heads or tails of the past week. When he heard indoor services could be held once again, the church went all in on that plan. Based on its capacity, St. Andrew’s Presbyterian could have had up to 25

In Kamloops we were able to weather the first wave of COVID in fairly decent shape. Yes, we were locked down for parts of 2020, however, we came through to spring and were blessed to be able to enjoy the nature our beautiful city is nestled in. This second wave has impacted Kamloops and BC far more significantly in terms of socializing, traveling and duration. In spite of these difficulties - I am a proud Kamloopsian! I am proud to be a part of a community that understands what it is to be a community. Living in a smaller city means we are connected and care about each other because we know each other! I have found in spite of the difficulties of our year I have been talking about my gratitude a lot. This last year has encouraged me to be grateful for so much. I am grateful for our community’s spirit; I am grateful for our front line workers; I am grateful to all those who have been committed to keeping our community safe and healthy; and I am grateful we are moving towards sunnier days! One year later, as we move to spring, we are still above water, Kamloops. Take a moment as you see the sun hitting our beautiful mountains and breathe in the fresh air. We are still here, we are strong, and we can keep going forward together! #ykastrong

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congregants for a service. This past Sunday, he put letters in the mail to many who might attend, only to have the permission revoked the following day, before those letters were even received. “The government giveth and the government taketh,” he said. Filyk said he is concerned for those in his congregation, especially seniors, who don’t have opportunities for social engagement at home, and was hoping to allow people to come together. Outdoor gatherings are now being considered, but Filyk is skeptical about the value of holding such events. “What is being proposed for us is that you show up, participate in some sort of transaction and get out. That’s not really worship for us,” he said. Lead minister Michael Caveney at Kamloops United Church downtown said the church didn’t even plan for indoor or outdoor gatherings.

For Easter, a livestream of services is Plan A. “We already have everything planned. And we get double the amount of people watching our services on livestream than we would get in person. Our livestream has gone crazy. We’ve had over 700 people for some services, from all over the world,” he told KTW. Caveney said an Easter service at the church would normally bring in 250 to 300 people. He said he would be hesitant to limit that. “What do you do if you say that only 50 people can come? Is it the first 50 people? It just makes it awkward, so we’ve just decided to err on the side of caution,” Caveney said. At Motion Church in Sagebrush, plans were underway for indoor gatherings before the announcement was made, based on hints from Henry that such services would soon be allowed. But when the announcement

Despite all of the adjustments we have had to make, the Kamloops Arts Council has not let up on efforts to build and strengthen the arts in our community. The KAC has had to adapt a lot of its programming and exhibitions over the past year. Since we cannot have in person events or classes, we have adopted a hybrid format. All of our exhibitions are now showcased online as well as limited attendance in the Old Courthouse. We are also currently working on offering more digital workshops for our Crossing Bridges Outreach program so that participants still have access to the arts. We are so thankful to our sponsors, staff, volunteers and members who have helped us put on these hybrid exhibitions and that we are able to still provide artistic opportunities for those who need them. Artistic expression is a great way to cope with stress and it is very important that people have the opportunities to find and access reprieve. We are looking forward to when we can have in person events again but for now, we are happy to provide art digitally.

7 Seymour St. W Kamloops, BC 250-372-7323 kamloopsarts.ca

didn’t come early last week, lead pastor Jonny Strutt said inperson plans were abandoned, made again late last week and then abandoned again this week. “It’s a challenge to stay positive and to overcome the frustration. It’s also eroded, I think, a lot of trust in the public health officials for people of faith,” he said. Strutt said the current plan is to livestream Easter services and encourage people to gather in groups up to 10 in backyards to tune into the broadcast. “So people are going to gather for Easter Sunday and just invite their friends or neighbours over for Sunday,” Strutt said. The pastor also expressed frustration with the fact that groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, can use the church for their purposes, but it can’t be used for worship. “If that group changed to worship, it’s immediately illegal, even with the same protocols in the same building,” he said.

We are so proud to be a part of our amazing community that is always showing strength and compassion during these difficult times @ykastrong. We have worked hard to create a safe environment while offering the best shopping experience. Thank you to our customers who continue to support us. It is so nice to see familiar and new faces. We also would like to thank you for shopping local and for supporting our beautiful Downtown Kamloops.

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A12

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Report: Bird strike caused Snowbirds crash This RCAF image shows a bird next to the Snowbirds jet piloted by Capt. Richard MacDougall and carrying Capt. Jenn Casey as they took off from Kamloops Airport on May 17, 2020. The jet crashed seconds later, killing Casey and injuring MacDougall.

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The Royal Canadian Air Force has confirmed the crash of a Snowbirds jet in Kamloops last year was due to a bird strike. The CT-114 Tutor aircraft crashed into a house in Brocklehurst shortly after takeoff from Kamloops Airport on May 17, 2002, with Capt. Jenn Casey dying in the crash and pilot Capt. Richard MacDougall suffering injuries. The investigation found that ingestion of a single, small bird into the engine of the aircraft following take-off resulted in a compressor stall and a loss of thrust. Upon loss of power, the pilot initiated a climb straight ahead and then a turn back toward the airport. During this manoeuvre, the aircraft entered into an aerodynamic stall and the pilot gave the order to abandon the aircraft. The report stated MacDougall and Casey ejected from the aircraft at low altitude and in conditions that were outside safe ejection seat

operation parameters. Neither the pilot nor the passenger had the requisite time for their parachutes to function as designed. The report says that, following takeoff, a loud, impact-like sound was heard by MacDougall and Casey and the aircraft then experienced a loss of thrust. MacDougall initiated a climb straight ahead, then elected to carry out a left-hand turn back $140 toward the airport.

a directive be published which outlines the aircrew’s priority where an emergency during the takeoff or landing phase occurs and has the potential to result in an ejection near or over a populated area. The investigation also recommends further training on enginerelated emergencies be practised in The manoeuvre resulted in an the takeoff/low-level environment. aerodynamic stall halfway through It is also recommended that the the turn before he gave the order to practice of storing items between abandon the aircraft. the ejection seat and the airframe DNA evidence collected from wall cease immediately. the engine’s internal components Finally, further research is confirmed the ingestion of a bird recommended into the potential as witnessed from video evidence; options that would stabilize the however, the damage it caused was CT114 ejection seat from any teninsufficient to cause a catastrophic dency to pitch, roll or yaw immefailure. Rather, it resulted in a comdiately following its departure from pressor stall that was never cleared. the ejection seat rails. million dollar development The investigation recommends “Snowbird 11’s power loss could

not have come at a worse time — low altitude, low airspeed, proximity to another aircraft and in the vicinity of a built-up area,” said Col. John Alexander, director of flight safety with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Brigadier-General Denis O’Reilly, Commander 2 Canadian Air Division of the Royal Canadian Air Force, said the air force prides itself on operational flight safety. “However, we recognize the inherent risk with military flying, despite the tireless work of our team of professionals to safely operate and maintain our aircraft. “In emergency situations, pilots must make split-second decisions after quickly processing a lot of information, while at the same time dealing with high levels of stress, g-forces and other challenging environmental factors in the cockpit. We are dedicated to learning from this accident and welcome the flight safety recommendations to minimize the chance of a repeat occurrence.”

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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

LOCAL NEWS

RCMP asked to investigate finances at TNRD INFORMATION REGARDING POTENTIAL FINANCIAL IRREGULARITIES FORWARDED TO MOUNTIES JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The Thompson-Nicola Regional District has forwarded to the RCMP information concerning potential financial irregularities at the regional district. In a terse statement issued by the TNRD, the district said the information sent to the Mounties is independent of a financial review and forensic audit of its record it will have a third party conduct through a public request for proposals. The TNRD said any applicable information obtained during the audit will be forwarded to the RCMP. Thompson-Nicola Regional District chair Ken Gillis told KTW the matter is in the hands of the RCMP. “It only means that we

encountered information that we thought might be of interest to the RCMP and we forwarded it to them,” he said. Asked to elaborate on what information was encountered, Gillis said he could not comment. Kamloops RCMP Const. Crystal Evelyn confirmed the detachment was contacted by the regional district. “Last week, the Kamloops RCMP Detachment was contacted by members representing the interest of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District, who presented information they believed may be associated to criminality,” Evelyn said in an emailed response to a KTW query. “Police are assessing that information as part of their investigation. “No further information will be released by the Kamloops

ONLINE NOW @ KAMLOOPS THISWEEK.COM TEMPERANCE

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The regional district wants another 73 cents from your wallet RCMP until a conclusion is determined.” The TNRD statement on the matter reads: “The TNRD remains committed to ensuring full transparency and accountability throughout this process, and will report to the public with the results of

the forensic audit. “However, the TNRD cannot make further comments regarding this RCMP matter or any other criminal investigation.” The TNRD’s decision to send the information to police for a possible criminal investigation comes on the heels of a KTW investigation into spending at the regional district between 2015 and 2020, during which a TNRD-issued credit card showed numerous charges for parties and to coffee shops, high-end restaurants, wineries, luxury hotels and liquor stores. The Kamloops This Week stories followed a KTW article in 2018 that detailed hundreds of thousands of dollars in overtime billed by the regional district to the provincial government in connection to the floods and wildfires of 2017. In total, the TNRD billed

Victoria $582,000 in overtime costs. The declared state of emergency was in place for 10 weeks. On March 11, the TNRD board approved an independent third-party financial review in expenditures over the past halfdecade. It has issued a request for proposals, with a deadline of April 12 to submit. The 33-page document notes the regional district is seeking details and suggestions from the proponents on work and deliverables as part of a proposal. The proponent will carry out a special financial review and provide forensic auditing services for the “purpose of identifying any areas of concern with respect to past expenditures and assessing the TNRD’s past financial administration and approval and control processes.”

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A14

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Brandon Fontaine rests outside the downtown storage facility for the city’s homeless population. The storage facility is run in partnership between the City of Kamloops and the Aboriginal Friendship Society and is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days per week, except on statutory holidays. The building offers laundry service, mail pickup, storage bins, showers, harm-reduction services and client advocacy and supports.

Security and those who live on city streets MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

hose who are part of Kamloops’ homeless population say their interactions with security guards around a city storage facility for the homeless on West Victoria Street are generally cordial — though some in uniform could stand to be more considerate and personable. Kamloops Mounties are investigating after a video surfaced showing a security guard kicking a man who was on the ground in a space next to the storage facility at West Victoria Street and First Avenue. The incident occurred on March 17. The video, which surfaced online and was shown on CFJC-TV’s website, shows about 25 seconds of an altercation between a man in a red jacket and a Lapper security guard, who appeared to be ordering the man out of a no-loitering area. The man is heard swearing at the secuSALES & INSTALLATIONS rity guard.

The security guard then appears to wrestle the man to the ground, stand up and kick him three times while he’s on the ground. Amidst the scuffle, obscenities such as, “You mother f**ker” and “I’ll beat the f**k out of you” can be heard. A bystander then approaches the guard from the rear and the guard tells the bystander to back off. The man on the ground gets up and tells the guard, “You’ve got no right to touch me like that” and the woman filming the video from across the street yells, “That is not OK” before the clip ends. Kamloops RCMP Const. Crystal Evelyn said police initially responded to the assault at about 5:15 p.m. on March 17 and have since gathered more video of the incident. “At the time, police were informed that a security guard had been spat at and pushed by an unknown man, resulting in the guard taking physical action,” Evelyn said, noting that officers attended, spoke to those in the area and patrolled the area. The man involved in the altercation with the security guard was not found, but

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has been identified by police, who are trying to find him. PROBLEMS RARE, BUT COMMUNICATION COULD IMPROVE People can often be found hanging out in that no-loitering area at the side of the storage facility and KTW spoke with five such homeless individuals, asking about their experiences with security patrolling that spot. Michael Roy, 38, who has lived along the Thompson River for the past seven years, said he hangs out in the no-loitering area every day. He said there is generally an understanding between Lapper security guards and the homeless to move along when they come by, but noted guards tend not to bother people unless they’re blocking the sidewalk. He said there can be miscommunication at times, however, with security telling people to move out of that area when, in fact, the reason they are there isn’t to simply loiter, but to charge their cellphones or wait to use the facility’s showers. “It’s supposed to be a safe place where I

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can come and feel safe that I don’t have to leave, because everywhere we go out here in the community, we’re told to hurry up and get out,” Roy said. He feels Lapper security guards tend to lump everyone who hangs out in that spot into the same group of troublemakers, suggesting they should be more considerate of everyone. He said the way people are told to move along is key, too, adding that, at times, vulgar language is used. “If I tell you to get the f**k out of here, that’s not very nice, right?” Roy said. “But, you know what, everybody has a bad day. Same thing with people on the street. Their language gets vulgar more times than not.” He suggested Lapper hire someone who has lived on the street to help improve communication with the homeless. “It’s hard for people to listen to somebody who hasn’t lived that life,” Roy said. While his interactions with Lapper are cordial, Roy said he has had disagreements regarding their jurisdiction along the route outside businesses.

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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

LOCAL NEWS

Outside, ‘there’s good and bad on both sides’ From A14

Marie Leeson, 37, who also frequents the spot next to the storage facility, said she wasn’t surprised to hear about the alleged assault, having seen violent altercations elsewhere in town, but she hasn’t seen people get violent around the storage facility. She said her interactions with security guards keeping people from loitering there have generally been good. “Normally, they just tell us to leave,” she said. Some guards, however, are better than others and males tend to be dealt with more aggressively than women, Leeson said. “It’s the same as anything — there’s good and bad on both sides. There’s some great security guards, there are some that are not so great,” she said. Brandon Fontaine, 33, who could be found sitting on the sidewalk up against the storage facility, said he hasn’t seen or experienced security staff in the area use unnecessary force. “They just tell you to move along,” Fontaine said, adding they could stand to be more personable as people in the area are just hanging out and not committing crimes. Bryan, 65, who did not wish to give his last name, said he hasn’t experienced violence from security guards in the area and feels cooler heads should have prevailed in the March 17 altercation. Jason Jules, 47, who uses the storage facility, but doesn’t usually hang out in the area around the side, told KTW he tends to

“It’s hard for people to listen to somebody who hasn’t lived that life.” — Michael Roy

get along well with most security guards in town, but has heard of friends being dealt with too aggressively by Lapper security guards elsewhere. SECURITY GUARDS FACE CHALLENGES, TOO Ed Lapierre, who owns Lapper Security, said typically one or two guards will patrol West Victoria Street. He said they face constant threats and verbal assaults from a select few individuals. “It’s on a daily basis,” he said. However, Lapierre said, his employees generally have a good rapport with most of the marginalized population in Kamloops, noting his guards hand out food, jackets and blankets over the winter and are there

to help everyone. “No one seems to pull out a camera when they’re doing the things like handing out jackets or hot coffee to people,” Lapierre said. Lapierre, who has spoken with the guard involved in the alleged assault, told KTW it’s unfortunate the video that came out does not show that his employee was assaulted first by being spat on in the face and pushed, leading to an escalation of the incident. He said the company doesn’t condone its staff taking physical actions unless their lives are at risk or they are acting in selfdefence. The incident, Lapierre said, appears to be one in which the guard thought he was acting in

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self-defence, with adrenaline getting the better of him as he attempted to move the person out of the no-loitering area after the storage facility had closed. Lapierre said a memo has since been sent to employees reiterating that physical confrontation isn’t condoned and they should call the authorities or management as needed. “Nothing is worth getting injured over just to have someone leave an area,” Lapierre said. Lapper is contracted to patrol the entirety of West Victoria Street through a multi-organizational contract involving BC Housing and the Canadian Mental Health Association, in partnership with City of Kamloops. The businesses along the route are not involved in the contract, on which the city spent $190,000 in 2020. The security guards monitor for loitering and vandalism around businesses, pick up drug paraphernalia and stop overnight camping in the area. Lapierre said that while area businesses haven’t hired them, his employees do patrol the properties on which they sit. They also patrol areas around bus stops and parks in town and operate a mobile patrol as part of other private contracts. Lapper security guards, he said, undergo basic security training through the Justice Institute of B.C. and, while the guard in question isn’t new to the line of work, Lapierre said he was new to the job in the area. He said the guard, who contacted police after the altercation, has received so many death threats since the video surfaced that he has opted to leave his

position. Police were contacted a week after initially responding to the incident regarding the video taken of the altercation. On March 23, Evelyn said, police found and reviewed more surveillance footage, which led them to identify the man on the ground and others at the scene. Evelyn said officers are now attempting to find and speak with the man as they want to hear his version of what happened. She said speaking with the guard involved would also be part of the investigation. She said it’s premature to discuss any possible charges as police are still collecting information. “If we can proceed with charges, that’s something we always consider, but right now we’re still in that investigative phase,” Evelyn said. Anyone with information regarding the incident is asked to contact Kamloops RCMP at 250-828-3000 and reference file number 2021-8861. CITY OF KAMLOOPS EXPECTED TO DISCUSS THE ISSUE City of Kamloops social development supervisor Ty Helgason, who watched the video that surfaced online, said the municipality is not investigating the incident and is waiting until the RCMP conducts its investigation before taking any steps. “Obviously, we’ll be evaluating our security practices and policies around that. We’re really waiting until we have the full picture before we action anything,” Helgason said. See ASK, A16

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A16

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

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A group of homeless people gather next to the former Value Village building, downtown on Seymour Street. Said Coun. Dale Bass: “Here’s the problem. We roust them out of their tents along the riverbank and we tell them to move along and they go downtown. They hang out there and they cause problems or are just an eyesore and we tell them to move along. And, so, then they go down to that building and then they’re told to move along, but where the hell are they supposed to go?” DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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ASK notes tension in community From A15

Kamloops Coun. Dale Bass said the incident will likely be discussed at the city’s April community services committee meeting, which she chairs. She is also expecting a report from city staff. Having watched the video, Bass said regardless of what prompted the altercation, the guard was wrong in his reaction. “You don’t kick people,” she said, adding she feels bad for the security guard, but noted he should have disengaged and called the RCMP. Bass recently filed a notice of motion to have staff examine the idea of renovating the storage facility so people don’t congregate in that no-loitering area. Staff are currently examining that idea, she said, adding steps need to be

taken to address the issue as the March 17 incident could have escalated. “Here’s the problem,” Bass said. “We roust them [homeless people] out of their tents along the riverbank and we tell them to move along and they go downtown. “They hang out there and they cause problems or are just an eyesore and we tell them to move along. And, so, then they go down to that building and then they’re told to move along, but where the hell are they supposed to go?” She said even having just a few chairs in the storage facility could help the situation. “I want to see more space for them to go to so they’re not on the street,” Bass said. The storage facility is run in partnership between the City of Kamloops and the Aboriginal Friendship Society and is

open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days per week, except on statutory holidays. The building offers laundry service, mail pickup, storage bins, showers, harm-reduction services and client advocacy and supports. ASK Wellness Society executive director Bob Hughes said an incident like that which occurred on March 17 can happen anywhere, noting the video clip can be used to create more conflict. “There’s a lot of tension in the community right now around the issues of the homeless and we need to do everything we can to bridge the divide between the realities of those living without homes and their frustrations with the general public,” Hughes said. He said ways to do that include providing opportunities for people to recover from substance abuse and obtain housing.

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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

LOCAL NEWS

New parkade eyed for hospital JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Planning is in the works for a new parkade to address parking issues at Royal Inland Hospital. The Thompson Regional Hospital District has approved in its annual budget $5 million for an estimated $15-million to $20-million parkade — a third parkade at RIH to join the two existing ones now in use. The $5 million is contingent on later approval of cost sharing by Interior Health. Kamloops Mayor and TRHD chair Ken Christian said the board had communicated from the outset of the patient-care tower project — currently under construction — that planned parking was insufficient. The new parkade would be located above St. Ann’s Academy, in a location once occupied by a day care. “We told them that they first

of all don’t have enough parking for what they’ve already got there and, secondly, once the parkade or the patient-care tower is completed, we were worried the story the week after we do the big ribbon cutting is going to be there is no parking — we’ve been telling them this for quite a while,” Christian said. The parkade would be built in place of an original plan for a 174-stall surface parking lot as part of the patient-care tower project. Plans for that 174-stall surface parking lot have been put on hold. “We’ve temporarily put that on pause as we look at other options for expanded parking,” Interior Health director of business operations Corey Wein said, one of which was consideration of a leased parkade. Wein said Interior Health issued a request for quotes in trying to engage the private

sector to build and operate a parkade, but subsequently cancelled the request because it “turned out not to be a viable option.” The request for quotes was issued on Aug. 17, 2020, and closed on Sept. 16, 2020, and referenced “a new 400-stall parking solution for the Royal Inland Hospital.” The Clinical Services Building parkade, which opened in July 2016, has 350 stalls. RIH also has an older, smaller parkade at the south end of its property, one used by staff. “We are still working actively with the ministry on options for expanded parking,” he said. “Right now, I don’t have a formal request of the board, but we are still working on that and I hope to have an update before the next meeting.” Christian said Interior Health is looking to extend the contract to fund the parkade. Asked for more information

— including location, number of stalls, for whom they would be (staff and/or patients) and timelines — Interior Health provided the following statement: “We know there are parking issues at RIH and, together with our stakeholders, we continue to explore options to add more stalls at the Kamloops hospital. At this point, we remain in the planning stages and we look forward to sharing more information when we can. Included within the approved Patient Care Tower project was the addition of around 100 net new parking stalls.” Christian said the public, hospital employees and BC Nurses’ Union have been sounding the alarm over a lack of parking spaces at the facility for staff — who are forced in some cases to park offsite — and patients. “There’s not even enough parking right now,” Christian said.

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A18

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Premier says financial aid coming to restaurant sector From A5

ROBYN WRIGHT/KTW READER

SPRING WEATHER A GAMBLE IN KAMLOOPS

KTW reader Robin Wright came across these Canada geese and a mallard resting on thin ice on Gamble Pond in Albert McGowan Park in Upper Sahali. If you have photos you would like to share with KTW readers, email them to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com.

Thankfully, he said, the timing of the announcement also comes as patio season begins, but given the current chilly weather, the chances of being able to get those up and running before the three-week closure is reviewed might be limited. Herman said indoor dining “has been the lifeblood” that has kept many restaurants open amidst the pandemic, but noted the government can’t be faulted for having to take measures when COVID-19 cases are increasing. “I think the industry understands it. Do they like it? No, no one does,” Herman said. Asked during a press conference on Monday if financial aid will be given to the restaurant sector, Premier John Horgan said it will, noting provincial officials are examining putting in additions to relief programs already in place and “bridge these next three weeks.” “I don’t want to get into specifics about the next three weeks other than

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EDITORIAL/PAGE A8 Restaurants, pubs need cash help now, not next month to say that the minister’s on it, the government’s on it, and we’ll have more to say once the programs have been developed,” Horgan said. The restriction on dining, among other activities announced, comes as B.C. is experiencing a surge in new COVID-19 cases, with more than 2,500 recorded over the weekend. During Monday’s press conference, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry explained the need to restrict indoor gatherings again comes as a result of the spike cases and hospitalizations and an increase in more contagious COVID-19 variants. She said there are not yet enough people protected by vaccinations, noting gathering indoors presents the greatest risk of transmission. “We need a circuit breaker to stop this virus now,” Henry said.


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

LOCAL NEWS

WestJet adding Kamloops to Edmonton route THE FLIGHTS WILL OPERATE ON THURSDAYS AND SUNDAYS, BEGINNING ON JUNE 24 KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

WestJet is resuming its Kamloops to Edmonton connection, with twice-weekly flights between the two cities, beginning on June 24. The flights will operate on Thursdays and Sundays. The return of the route is one of 11 new domestic routes WestJet has added across Western Canada, including flights between Kelowna and Saskatoon and Kelowna and Regina.

“As we look to the coming months with cautious optimism, we know our restart agenda will be pivotal to Canada’s economic recovery,” Ed Sims, WestJet’s president and CEO said in a release. “Stimulating air travel benefits all Canadians and supports those hardest hit; with one in every 10 Canadian

jobs tied to travel and tourism, the ripple effect benefits our whole country.” The return of the Kamloops-Edmonton route comes after other routes have been started and cancelled locally. On Jan. 23, Air Canada stopped its Kamloops to Vancouver flights. The company said it had continued to operate during the pandemic with less than eight per cent of normal passenger volumes and has reduced its workforce by 20,000 people and fleet by 79 aircraft. That was followed by Pacific Coastal

Airlines’ decision to introduce non-stop service between Kamloops Airport and Vancouver International Airport’s South Terminal on Feb. 9. Those once-daily flights each way operate Sundays through Fridays. It is the only airline to fly between the two cities. In early February, Central Mountain suspended its thrice-weekly flights between Kamloops and Prince George, but will resume the service on April 5. WestJet Airlines continues its daily Kamloops-Calgary connection.

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A20

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

City Gardens presales to begin in the fall JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Questions about construction, parking and green features were fielded on Monday evening (March 29) by those behind a sizeable development project planned for downtown Kamloops. Kelson Group and its architecture firm, Station One, met with the public during a virtual information and question-and-answer session for the proposed City Gardens project, which will rise between Battle and Nicola streets and between Fourth and Fifth avenues. Kelson Group president Jason Fawcett explained the project came to fruition following the purchase of three acres of land in what he called a “growing” and “vibrant” city. The development, consisting of townhomes, apartments and condos for purchase and rent, will be built over six to 10 years, beginning with the largest,

A rendering of what some of City Gardens may look like once built.

22-storey tower. Market conditions will determine whether the next building to rise with be an 18-storey tower or a lower-rise structure. Asked if the project — expected to cost between $160 million and $180 million to complete — is “aspirational” and whether the company can afford to finance the plans, Fawcett said Kelson Group is going to the market in the fall for pre-sales and requiring public

commitment for the project. In addition, the 10-year buildout is a phased out to allow for market absorption and financing. “At this point, we’re going to work very hard to realize this dream,” Fawcett said. Station One Architect partner Justin Dyck said the development design was Kelson Group founder Ron Fawcett’s, inspired by gardens and nature, with visions of

a “lush oasis in the city.” It is expected to be pedestrianfriendly, with amenities, pathways, commercial space and a water feature. It is unclear exactly how much green space has been allotted for the development, but the firm said it will be “higher than a typical apartment development.” Some neighbourhood impacts have already been quelled, including reconsideration of a plan to partially close Nicola Street. Meanwhile, people live in older houses on Battle and Nicola streets that will be demolished. Fawcett said the residents renting the homes are of concern, noting the company has tried to keep renters apprised of plans, with at least four months’ notice to be given, compensation in the works for some of their moving costs and potential relocation help. Some have expressed concern about the cost of the units and whether there will be an affordable housing aspect to the project. The prices have not

yet been determined and will depend on construction costs and market demands, the public heard. In addition, Fawcett said the two high-rise towers will be more expensive to build and will likely cost more, with the wooden frame buildings to cost less. Cost will depend on size of the units — ranging from studio to threebedroom and penthouse suites (one of which in the 22-storey building is earmarked for Ron Fawcett) — and units on higher floors will be more expensive. Affordable/social housing is not part of the City Gardens development. Kelson Group has estimated some 700 residents could live in the development when the 500plus units are built out. All parking will be underground, with access off of Battle Street, Fifth Avenue and Nicola Street. The parking allotted exceeds city requirements by between 30 to 40 stalls, the architecture firm said.


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

LOCAL NEWS

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT: THE WEEK THAT WAS THESE RECENT NEW ITEMS CAN BE READ IN FULL — ONLINE AT KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM HOUSE ARREST SENTENCE FOR LEAVING BODY AT DUMPSTER A Kamloops man who disposed of his deceased roommate next to a dumpster outside his North Kamloops apartment building after hiding it inside for weeks will spend the next David Boltwood died in November of 2019. six months under 24/7 house arrest. Shane Brownlee, 52, was handed a twoyear conditional sentence order and six months’ probation for interference with a dead body. The sentence was delivered by judge Ray Phillips in a Kamloops provincial courtroom on March 26. On Nov. 29, 2019, the body of Brownlee’s roommate, David Boltwood, 65, was found rolled up in a carpet behind 170 Carson Cres. Police initially suspected a homicide, but an autopsy later determined Boltwood died of natural causes. Brownlee had invited Boltwood — who was homeless and had health issues — to stay with him in his apartment unit in October 2019. Brownlee said he returned home one day after Nov. 7 to find Boltwood deceased — and he panicked. He wrapped Boltwood in the rug, which he later placed in a large cardboard box, hiding the body in his apartment unit and in a storage locker before disposing of it outside with the help of a teenager, who was unaware what he was actually moving. Brownlee then fled the province and was arrested in Jasper, Alta. He pleaded guilty to moving the body, but was adamant he didn’t kill his roommate. Boltwood’s autopsy revealed he died of complications from emphysema. Bed sores on his body indicated he was immobile before his death, but there were no other physical signs of injury. OVERDOSE DEATHS IN B.C. CONTINUE AT RECORD PACE The opioid overdose crisis continues in B.C., with 155 suspected overdose deaths recorded in February — the most ever registered in that month. To date, there have been 329 such deaths. Through the same time period in 2020 (January and February), there had been 156 overdose deaths recorded. By the end of last year, B.C. had recorded the most overdose deaths ever — 1,724 — with the surge beginning in March, right as the pandemic arrived.

Last year, January and February were the only months in which overdose deaths were less than 100. Each of the 11 subsequent months included at least 100 deaths. In Kamloops, there was one suspected overdose death last month, with five deaths in total through the first two months of 2021. CHANGES COMING TO LONG-TERM CARE HOME VISITS Those waiting to see their loved ones in long-term care or assisted-living facilities will soon be able to do so, following changes to B.C.’s pandemic-related public health orders. As of April 1, those in long-term care will be able to have “regular, frequent and routine opportunities” for social visits, according to the provincial government. The requirements that residents in these facilities have one designated social visitor have been removed and up to two visitors (plus one child) will be allowed and residents can have visitors in their rooms. Physical touch will also be permitted between visitors and residents. TRU RECORDS SURPLUS IN 2020-2021, EXPECTS SAME IN 2021-2022 The Thompson Rivers University board has approved its 2021-2022 budget worth $238 million. At its March 26 board meeting, the university put forward a budget with $238.6 million in revenue and $238.4 million in expenses — what university vice-president of administration and finance Matt Milovick called “essentially a balanced budget,” with an expected slim surplus of $147,000. What led the university to this point has been a series of ups and downs while weathering the storm of the pandemic. In its year-end for the 2019-2020 fiscal year, TRU ended up with a historically high $20.2-million surplus. A budget with an $8.4-million surplus was recommended for the following year, but after the pandemic hit, that figure sunk to a $6-million deficit, then further to $9 million in the red. But all told, the university now expects to finish the 2020-2021 fiscal year with a surplus of about $3 million. Some of that is due to what Milovick called “extreme financial prudence measures,” but much of it came from higher than expected international student enrolment. The university also sought to save money by slowing down its hiring. CITY REMOVES SOME MOTELS FROM NUISANCE PROPERTY LIST The City of Kamloops says calls for service to the West Columbia Street area have decreased and, as a result, it has removed six hotels and motels from its nuisance

property list. A handful of properties remain on the list. The city has removed the Best Western Plus, Panorama Inn and Suites, Grandview Motel, Ramada by Wyndham, Columbia Motor Inn and Knights Inn from the list. The city’s community services department, Kamloops RCMP and Kamloops Fire Rescue have been working with hotels and motels in the area, following complaints of criminal activity in the area stemming from the properties. Still on the nuisance property list are West Columbia Street’s Star Lodge, Desert

Inn and Hospitality Inn, along with the Acadian Inn downtown. WILDLIFE EXPRESS WILL ROLL DOWN TRACKS THIS WEEKEND The Wildlife Express train at the BC Wildlife Park will be running this Easter long weekend. The train will run from Friday through Monday, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., with tickets $1 (cash only). COVID-19 protocols are in place, which means every passenger over the age of two must wear a mask.

Welcome

Makayla Peverill It is with great pleasure that we introduce KTW Digitals newest addition to the team, Makayla Peverill, as our Digital Marketing & Advertising Strategist. With a vast background in multiple industries and nearly ten years in Customer Service, Makayla comes to us with an eagerness to learn, and to help her community. Makayla moved to Kamloops five years ago from the small town of Golden BC. She attributes her drive and work ethic to her Grandfather, who is an integral part of Golden’s community, and whose outlook on business is “Do everything within your power to ensure the person who has chosen to come to YOU, is taken care of.” In her early career Makayla spent five years in the Finance Industry. Her most recent endeavor as a Customer Relations Manager taught her many things, doing everything from managing customer issues to IT, Marketing, Process Improvement and Process Implementation. Through this experience she learned that her true passion was in Marketing and Advertising. Makayla has a strong background in design, content creation, and Marketing Strategies and comes to us with a creative mindset and fresh ideas. Coupled with her passion to help her community and to share her knowledge, anyone could benefit from buying her a coffee in exchange for picking her brain. Makayla is excited to further build her contacts within the community. You may recognize her by her brightly colored suit collection. So if you see her out and about, please say hello!

MOBILE PATROLS GUARD SERVICE ALARM RESPONSE Ronik Security Ltd. has been serving Kamloops since 1972 and is 100% Canadian. We wish to thank our current and future loyal customers during this pandemic season! Our employees are proud to serve for your safety and security.

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A22

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WHAT IS ROTARY?

Made up of over 34,000 Rotary clubs around the world, Rotary International forms a global network of business, professional, and community leaders who volunteer their time and talents to serve communities locally and around the world – and form strong, lasting friendships in the process.

IN KAMLOOPS Rotary Club of Kamloops Aurora Centennial

The little club that can (and does)

A

little over 18 years ago, a small group of Kamloops Rotarians asked a few more Kamloopsians, to join with them to form another Rotary Club. At the stroke of midnight, July 1, 2004, the 100th anniversary of Rotary International, the 5th Rotary club of Kamloops was officially chartered as the Rotary club of Kamloops Aurora Centennial. Since then, Aurora has grown as a club, accomplished so many things and hopefully positively affected many, many lives. The Rotary year starts in July and ends in June and it has been some year with all the challenges that it had. Our club of 20 members has been very busy adapting to the challenges. We have been meeting virtually, but making the best of it by connecting with speakers from the Ivory Coast, India, Europe and across our region. We miss the fellowship of in person meetings but we realize we will meet again, likely sooner than later. Our club has managed to adapt some fundraisers to help support the causes we normally do. It was through these activities that we reaffirm our sense of purpose and fellowship in Rotary. The Rotary Food drives brought out the best of our community and we, as Rotarians, were able to adapt to make it happen is a big way. Records for food

collected were set last April and last September. We are currently supporting 4 international Rotary projects and working on another. We did a couple of music and food nights last September, plus our regular spaghetti western take-out dinner, and our April 9th take out dinner will support the Rotary commitment to a Mental Health space in the new RIH building. We also managed trail cleanup in Kenna Cartwright was also done. We partnered with the SD #73, and furthered our commitment to youth, education and the environment, by planning some activities at the McQueen Lake centre. Planned boardwalk construction, assisting with roofing, funding a traditional indigenous pit house, to name but a few. We recently supported the purchase of Chrome books for the Dufferin PAC, some Laptops for Community Inclusion BC, and an online educational course for The Centre for Epilepsy and Seizures BC. We also supported the TRU Nursing and Public Health Building. Many members camped out again in support of the A Way Home organization, a group we have long supported in many ways. In keeping with the youth, we have continued to sponsor our young Rotary members in Interact and hopefully Rota-

Our motto, Service Above Self, exemplifies the humanitarian spirit of the 1.2 million Rotarians worldwide.

KAMLOOPS’ ROTARY CLUBS:

ROTARY CLUB OF KAMLOOPS • Mondays at 12 noon • IN PERSON (alternating Mondays) at Delta Hotel by Marriott (540 Victoria Street) • www.KamloopsRotary.org • VIA ZOOM weekly - email tshoults@aberdeenpublishing.com for link

ROTARY CLUB OF KAMLOOPS AURORA CENTENNIAL ract. These young people 1230 years of age are our future and we recognize they too can and are changing our world too. Rotarians from a number of Clubs, have assisted and mentored these great young people and we are grateful for their support. As they say, you can’t change what happens to you but you can change how you react to what happens to you! Rotarians are reacting and making the best of the situation. The Rotary club of Kamloops Aurora Centennial as a little club that can and does. We just keep on doing. Do you think that you have what it takes to make a difference in the world? Check us out on Facebook, Instagram or through our Website, we are always looking for people wanting to make a difference. Stay well, stay safe, and stay the course! – Dr. Stephen Karpuk, President 2020-21

• Meets Tuesdays at 7 am • Nandi’s Flavours of India Restaurant — 610 West Columbia St. • www.AuroraRotary.ca

ROTARY CLUB OF KAMLOOPS WEST • Meets Thursdays at 11:55 am • The Coast Hotel & Conference Centre — 1250 Rogers Way • Portal.ClubRunner.ca/821 • https://zoom.us/j/93985031352

ROTARY CLUB OF KAMLOOPS DAYBREAK • Meets Fridays at 6:45 am • Delta Hotel by Marriott — 540 Victoria St. • Deep Pannu, membership chair — gpannu2015@gmail.com • Portal.ClubRunner.ca/819

KAMLOOPS HYBRID INTERACT CLUB:

• Youth Rotary club focused on community and global involvement. • Instagram: kamloops_interact • Facebook: @KamloopsHybridInteract • Meetings are Tuesdays at 7pm on Zoom — email hybridinteract@gmail.com for link

Only a land surveyor knows your boundaries I have been a Charter Member of the Aurora Centennial Club for 17 year and am currently the club president.

Dr. Stephen Karpuk, B.Sc., DC, Owner #4-1390 Hillside Dr. Kamloops

250-372-8835

250-372-2002

or visit www.acckamloops.ca for more info

I own Aberdeen Chiropractic Clinic and have 18 years of service behind me now as a Chiropractor. Like Rotary, I work with my RMT colleagues Matt and Haley, to improve the lives of others. Proud to serve!


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

KAMLOOPS ART PAGE

W

elcome to the weekly Kamloops Art Page. With the COVID-19 pandemic upending society — socially and economically and dominating news for the foreseeable future — we understand pandemic fatigue can set in for even the most ardent followers of current events. While continuing to cover all pandemic and non-pandemic-related news, KTW has also worked hard at featuring positive stories from the crisis, tales that capture the essence of humanity, be it volunteers sewing thousands of masks for healthcare workers or musicians offering up weekly free concerts online. This page is an attempt by KTW to bring

some colour into the lives of our readers via artwork created locally. We hope to, on a weekly basis, use this page to showcase works by various Kamloops artists, with between one and three pieces displayed. Thanks for reading Kamloops This Week and we hope this page can help ease the stress of this uncertain era in which we are living. Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have any questions or suggestions relating to this page.

Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have submissions for Kamloops Art Page.

Susan Cullum created this acrylic piece, which was painted based on a photograph she took during a sunset in Costa Rica, as she looked at the Arenal volcano.

Madison Baillie loves to hike, camp, ski and explore British Columbia. She has been painting for most of her life and enjoys capturing through art places she has visited. This artwork is called Alpine Glow Vol. 1.

Linda Davidson created this 16-inch-by-20-inch watercolour painting of a cowboy herding cows on Douglas Lake Ranch. It is called Cowboy and Dog.

MEMORIES & MILESTONES MEMORIES & MILESTONES Happy 60th Anniversary

to the best parents in the world

Dick & Diane Forde April 3rd

Love Tania

Happy 10th Birthday

William!

We are so proud of the amazing, compassionate, sweet kid you are. We hope all your dreams come true this year! Love you to the moon and back. Mom, Dad, Mia & Mason


A24

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Questions? Go online to runclub.ca or send an email to joberry@ boogiethebridge.com.

JAMES MACDONALD Artistic director of Western Canada Theatre Last week was Week 2 of my detox, with continued high energy, excellent sleep and vigorous exercise. I “celebrated” the end of the cleanse on Friday with a couple of nice cold beers — and promptly had a terrible sleep and felt sluggish all day Saturday. Hmmm. For the first time this year, I was able to play tennis outside, a spirited match in which my tennis partner, Alan, took it a little easy on me, allowing me to take a few games while running me ragged. I am happy that my running and tennis seem to have had a very positive effect on my cardio. The fresh air rejuvenates the spirit and, in these cautious times, allows us to breathe deeply and freely. his year, we’re all itching to get outside of our four walls, with the approach of spring bringing hope and optimism to our souls. Unfortunately, post-match my body went to war with my positive mindset, with my knees, back and hips all rising in rebellion against my youthful spirit, with cramps and twinges lasting several days. I’ve always been a bit of a weekend warrior, choosing to lie on the couch for five days, then climb the proverbial Everest on Saturday, whether it’s hiking, biking, skiing or softball. There was a time when aches and pains survived my lack of training (and the lazy post-workout stretching), but no more. My body is telling me that if I want to put a few miles on the old chassis, I’d better check the engine regularly, put in the proper fluids and keep up the maintenance. A paint job wouldn’t hurt, either.

KAYLA PEPPER Emergency manager with the province of British Columbia

KAYLA DERKACH Promotions/on-air at Jim Pattison Broadcast Group

On a windy, sunny, Sunday morning in Dufferin, RunClubbers gathered for another round of walk/run intervals (four minutes of running and two minutes of walking). Coaches Arjun and Rawya spoke to us about running form. While they shared some wise practices (relaxed shoulders, hands like you’re holding potato chips, avoid side-to-side arm swinging), they also emphasized that your stride and form should fit what works for your body. Last week, I wrote about comparing myself to folks with flawless form. This week, I learned there are as many expressions of flawless form as there are people out there moving their bodies. One of the best running hacks I’ve picked up since joining RunClub was Arjun encouraging me to shorten my stride. He pointed to our radiant leader, Jo Berry, as an excellent example. I seem to be surrounded by long-legged folks when out for walks or runs — Arjun included — and whether consciously or not, I was trying to mirror their strides, only to find myself getting tired and sore because my stride wasn’t natural for my body. Part of running is finding what feels good in my own body (a.k.a the safest, most energy efficient way to move). My stubby legs holding up my five feet and five inches can still keep pace with my towering friends, but the number of steps I take (also called “turnover”) might be a bit quicker. Whether a 5K takes 6,000 steps or 8,000 steps, the finish line is there waiting for us all.

I can’t believe in how being involved in RunClub for such a short time could already have such huge positive impacts on my life. I’ve started to rearrange my schedule and habits around my runs and I’m loving it. We run Tuesday evenings and Sunday mornings. Before RunClub, a typical COVID-19 Saturday night for me was staying up late, having some drinks while Zooming with friends and playing games into the wee hours of Sunday morning — and basically making the rest of my Sunday useless. I was recovering from my Saturday night shenanigans all day Sunday and really wasn’t productive. I now look forward to an early night on Saturdays so I can tackle that 8 a.m. RunClub. And I now get so much done on Sundays. I’ve noticed a huge increase in my energy levels, I feel more focused and there’s more positivity in my life. It feels good. I’ve been struggling with quitting smoking and with the increased amount of physical activity I’ve been doing, RunClub has given me a kick in the butt to help me kick this habit, even though it’s still a work in progress. Right now, we’re only jogging for two minutes at a time and two minutes does not sound long until you’re jogging uphill in the Dufferin area, sweat in places where sweat shouldn’t be, counting down the seconds until that two minutes is up. Having a goal of being able to do that for 5K is incredible and, even though I sometimes struggle, I’m feeling my stamina increase and, overall, my well-being is benefiting from this whole experience.

RUNCLUB PLAYWORK, WEEK 4 GROUP GOAL WARM-UP

Walkers

5K Sweet

10K Sweet

10K Bold

21 Club

5K or 10K Boogie walk

5K Boogie Learn To Run

10K Boogie run, entry-level

10K Boogie Run

Half-marathon distance

Walking warm-up of 5 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

1) Walk easy for 15 minutes, then power walk for 30. Total 45 minutes.

1) Walk 3.5 minutes, run 2.5 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 48 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 51 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 70 minutes.

1) 17-kilometre run.

2) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 25. Total 45 minutes.

2) Walk 3.5 minutes, run for 2.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 36 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 42.5 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 50 minutes (with hills).

3) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 20. Total 40 minutes.

3) Walk 3.5 minutes, run 2.5 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 42 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat six times. Total 51 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes.

COOL DOWN

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

TIPS

We all need to get outside more. Many people are vitamin D-deficient, affecting important things like bone health and immune systems.

The best complement to your run is yoga. Yoga packs serious perks for runners, including flexibility, easing aches and pains and recovery.

You’re doing fantastic. The long run is your anchor. By increasing your long, steady distance safely, you are increasing your endurance, fitness and distance.

Remember to hydrate before, during and after your runs. Hydrating is energy-giving and reduces inflammation, injury and fatigue.

Half-marathon training is lifechanging. Start visualizing and plan out pacing for Boogie. By putting a plan in your mind, the Boogie half-marathon is already a picture of success.

PLAYWORK

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes. 2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times with some hills. Total 70 minutes.

WEEK 4 MOVEMENT IS CHANGE with Jo Berry, RunClub and Boogie the Bridge founder

Boogie Strong in 2021

I

n both my professional and personal worlds, I’m seeing a theme emerge. We are having to redefine and reinvent our sense of connection and community. The pandemic has done a huge number on us. The previous “automatic” ways we were able to engage (or disengage) with others has been cracked wide open. Before, we could hide in our everyday lives and tolerate behaviours. Things just didn’t seem so potent. This past year, everything has been exposed. Relationships are changing and our own sense of health and well-being is much more important. We have all been forced to slow down and look at the very things inside ourselves that make us healthy (mentally and physically). Many of us have deepened and evolved in our health. Along with this is the awareness that our connections and our community have to deepen and evolve with us. RunClub has evolved to a very heartcentered group of individuals, seeking more health — physically , mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Their humanness is open to all the possibilities and learning to live a healthy life. Relationships are deeper and there is a reciprocal energy where people give and receive. There is a massive capacity to show up and love big and true. Is this not what healthy living is all about? Movement in all modalities? To look deeper than just the physical? Yes, people are busting some very impressive running goals, but they are also busting into new ways of being, thinking and sharing. As we get through this year, we are all realizing we have an opportunity to truly be healthier. Things we tolerated before are no longer serving us. This makes sense. What does this have to do with Boogie? I know we have always felt this energy on Boogie day — an authentic connection. HELP KEEP BOOGIE ALIVE A campaign to raise money to help bring Boogie back to the streets in 2022 is online at gofundme.com. If you can help, go to that website and search “Friends of Boogie.”


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

INSIDE: COVID-19 halts Blazers-Rockets game | A26

A25

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

As season begins, Sopotyk looks at different future A snowboarding accident on Jan. 22 near North Battleford, Sask., changed the course of Kyrell Sopotyk’s life. Doctors told the 19-year-old his T5 vertebrae is fractured and he will never walk again. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

KAMLOOPS BLAZER TALKS ABOUT HEARTBREAKING PARALYSIS, AMAZING SUPPORT AND THE LONG ROAD AHEAD MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kyrell Sopotyk is 1,200 kilometres away. He’s never been so close to hearts in Kamloops. “I know I’ll be watching and cheering them on proudly from here,” said Sopotyk of his Kamloops Blazers. “That’s as much as I can do.” Sopotyk spoke to KTW on Friday, March 26, from Saskatoon City Hospital. He should be entering his 19-year-old season and should have been bursting out of the tunnel on Friday with his Blazer teammates, who played host to the Vancouver Giants to start this most unusual of WHL seasons, a

truncated 24-game campaign, A devastating snowboarding accident on Jan. 22 near North Battleford, Sask., changed the course of his life. Doctors told Sopotyk his T5 vertebrae is fractured and he will never walk again. “Hearing that, it breaks your heart,” said Sopotyk, whose stall, complete with name plate, remains untouched in the Blazers’ dressing room. “My plan was to come back to Kamloops and play hockey. I’m not going to lie. I was in tears hearing that.” Kyrell’s mom, Lori Sopotyk, added: “That was the first thing out of his mouth, his hockey, that he would never skate again. And he felt like he had let everyone down.” Ask his teammates. He’s not a

former Blazer. He’s a Kamloops Blazer. Sopotyk should have been there last Friday on Mark Recchi Way, embracing opening night and striking a blow against the pandemic with the rest of his club. “You create great relationships with the guys and the city, so it feels like a part of your life is missing now, right?” said Sopotyk, the Aberdeen, Sask., product who had 27 points in 43 games last season. “It brought me joy throughout my life. It’s all I wanted to do. Moving forward, I know I can’t change the past. I’m OK with it. I know, through talking to people, there is lots of opportunity outside of the hospital in sports. I’m looking forward to trying that

stuff and, hopefully, pursuing something in that field.” The snowboarding wipeout seemed innocent enough. “I was just cruising down and it was a complete freak accident, just a weird fall,” Sopotyk said. “I must have scorpioned or something and fell awkwardly on the board or hit something on my back. Just a super-freak accident and pretty unlucky, but you can’t change it now.” He was briefly unconscious and came to knowing something was terribly wrong, unable to move his legs or feel anything throughout his lower body. A few hours later, Sopotyk was told his hockey dreams will never be realized. Now nearly two months into his hospital stay, focus has shift-

ed to the therapy that will enable Sopotyk to craft a new purpose. Occupational therapy, physical therapy and recreational therapy take place Mondays to Fridays. Time is spent in the gym working out, cooking, learning movements and wheelchair skills and playing sports. “I’m kind of stubborn,” Sopotyk said with a laugh. “I want to be able to figure out stuff on my own. Getting in and out of bed, getting dressed, having showers, I’m independent with all that. The athletic background probably helped a little bit with the strength training. I’m able to have good upperbody strength to move myself around.” See SOPOTYK, A26

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FINAL ROUND OF VOTING BEGINS SATURDAY! Go to www.kamloopsthisweek.com/contests to cast your vote!w

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A26

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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SPORTS

COVID-19 case nixes Blazers-Rockets game

Kyrell Sopotyk scored a hat trick during this game, a 7-6 Kamloops win over visiting Victoria on Feb. 17, 2020. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

Sopotyk trying to stay positive From A25

Sopotyk was asked about hopes for walking again. “Science and research is a crazy thing, so maybe one day there will be, but right now it’s just learn how to manage life in the chair,” Sopotyk said. Down days are inevitable, but support is unceasing — from family, friends, teammates, Blazer Nation and the entire hockey world, including the people who pitched in to raise nearly $200,000 through a GoFundMe account. “It’s been crazy,” said Sopotyk, who may be released from

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

hospital this Thursday. “I’m overwhelmed, honestly, just knowing everyone is behind me. Everyone wants to hear about my journey and how I’m doing. “The support and just talking to people has really helped me through this and to be able to move on and stay positive.” The GoFundMe account was started by family friend Kathleen Zary, whose son, Connor, Kyrell’s best pal, was this week named captain of the Blazers. “He’s in my thoughts all the time,” Connor said. “Everyone is thinking about him. You always know when he’s

out there. He brings a lot of energy and he’s always having fun. He puts a smile on your face every day. “That’s a guy we miss having out on the ice, but especially in the dressing room. It’s tough not having him here, but he’s always in our thoughts.” He should be here. Some day, he’ll be back. Kamloops will be ready with open arms. “I wish I could be in Kamloops watching in person, but this will have to do for now,” Sopotyk said. “I’ll be in a wheelchair moving forward, a paraplegic, but that’s not stopping me from anything.”

Tuesday night’s (March 30) game in the Okanagan between the Kamloops Blazers and the Kelowna Rockets was postponed after a staff member of the Rockets tested positive for COVID-19. No players have tested positive, according to the Western Hockey League. As a result of the positive test in the team cohort, the Rockets have suspended all team activities. The WHL said it is working in consultation with B.C. health authorities. Pending determination of close contacts and further test results, the WHL will provide more information. On March 19, another member of the Rockets’ team cohort tested positive for COVID-19. At that time, the league said the positive test was discovered during the initial return-to-play

testing phase. The individual was required to self-isolate for 14 days, as was one other individual within the cohort deemed a close contact of the person who tested positive. The Blazers are 2-0 in this truncated, 24-game season. Kamloops opened the season on the weekend with two wins at Sandman Centre, one of two hubs hosting B.C. Division teams of the Western Hockey League. Kamloops, Vancouver and Prince George are based in the Tournament Capital, while Kelowna and Victoria are home in the Okanagan city. On Friday night, Kamloops defeated Vancouver 7-3 before recording a come-from-behind 5-4 victory over Prince George on Saturday night. The Blazers are scheduled to play Victoria in Kelowna this Thursday before facing Vancouver at home on Saturday.

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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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SPORTS

O’Brien the first inductee in new TRU Athletics Hall of Fame KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Thompson Rivers University has unveiled its TRU Athletics Hall of Fame, with the first class of inductees in the university’s 55 years in post-secondary sports to include people from the categories of builder, coach and athlete. The official Hall of Fame wall is now located near the WolfPack office inside the Tournament Capital Centre and will also be hosted online at gowolfpack.ca, with biographies and videos of each inductee. The first inductee was announced on Monday (March 29) —Pat O’Brien, in the builder category. Hall of fame inductee announcements are also scheduled for April 5 and April 12. O’Brien was our the school’s first director of athletics and recreation, having started in the 1970-1971 season (when TRU was known as Cariboo College) and retiring after 24 years, in 1994. During that time, O’Brien was coach or manager of many of the sports programs,

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including men’s soccer, men’s hockey and any other team needing his leadership. He also helped create the Sports Task Force, which has raised significant funds for TRU Athletics, and he remained involved in retirement. O’Brien established the sports programs at Cariboo College, starting with the soccer and hockey programs in 1970. In 1971, he co-ordinated the admission of Cariboo College hockey into the newly established PIHL, the first organized league in which the school became a member. In 1972, O’Brien co-ordinated the transition of Cariboo College from the PIHL into the Totem Conference. The Totem Conference would eventually become the BCCAA, then PACWEST, which included league competition for all of sports, including badminton, basketball, volleyball, cross-country, golf, ice hockey, rugby, soccer and curling. O’Brien was inducted into the Kamloops Sports Hall of Fame in 1997.

Pat O’Brien was the school’s first director of athletics and recreation, having started in the 1970-1971 season, when TRU was Cariboo College.

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Painting, Singing, Acting, Dancing

Ages: 7–12

Painting, Singing, Acting, Dancing

Ages: 3–5

This weekly program is a great opportunity for children who are interested in trying out new areas of the arts or who already love multiple disciplines. Kamloops Performance Company Sat Apr 10–Jun 19 11:00–12:00 pm 10/$125

This weekly program is a great opportunity for children who are interested in trying out new areas of the arts or who already love multiple disciplines. Kamloops Performance Company Sat Apr 10–Jun 19 10:00–11:00 am 10/$125

Culture Kids Across Canada Ages: 2–6

The KMA is pleased to offer Culture Kids, a FREE weekly virtual program! Join us Friday mornings and learn about different cultures through stories and caregiverassisted crafts. Ready-made Craft Kits are available for details contact the KMA 250828-3576. FREE VIRTUAL PROGRAM Fridays Apr 16–Jun 4 9:45–11:00 am April 16 – Prince Edward Island April 23 - Nunavut April 30- Quebec May 7 – Alberta May 14 – Newfoundland and Labrador May 21 – Saskatchewan May 28 – British Columbia June 4 - Yukon

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Open 7 days a Week • 250-765-5641 1605 Garner Road (Corner of Garner and Hwy 33) Kelowna www.okanagankoi.com

Kamloops.ca


A28

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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FAITH

HOLY WEEK EXPLAINED Easter is a significant holiday for Christians across the globe. Though Easter Sunday is when faithful Christians gather to celebrate their faith, the week preceding Easter Sunday is also full of significant events.Known as Holy Week, the week preceding Easter begins with Palm Sunday and ends with Holy Saturday, the day preceding Easter Sunday. Holy Week commemorates different events that unfolded over the final days of Jesus Christ’s life. • Palm Sunday: This day celebrates the entry of Jesus Christ into Jerusalem. On the day of Christ’s entry into Jerusalem, residents laid palms before him, which is why palms are distributed to the Christian faithful each year during Palm Sunday Mass (in non-pandemic years, of course). Palms are blessed at mass and many Christians turn their palms into crosses upon arriving home. The palms are eventually returned to the church, where they are burned, and the ashes of the palms are then used during the following year’s Ash Wednesday services. • Holy Thursday: This day

commemorates the Last Supper, when Jesus celebrated the Passover feast with his disciples. In the story of Jesus Christ, the night of the Last Supper was the same night Jesus was betrayed by his disciple, Judas. • Good Friday: This day commemorates the trial, punishment and crucifixion of Christ. Though the official presiding over the trial of Jesus, Pontius Pilate, found no evidence of Jesus’s guilt in relation to the charges filed against him, he nevertheless ultimately agreed to Christ’s crucifixion in an effort to appease the crowd and avoid a riot. As a result, Christ was stripped, flogged and crowned with thorns before being made to carry his cross through the streets to the place where he was ultimately crucified. On Good Friday, the tabernacle inside Catholic churches is left empty to symbolize that Christ is departed. • Holy Saturday: The final day of Holy Week is a day to remember that Christ descended into hell, where he preached the gospel and opened the way to heaven for all those who were worthy.

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Join us online Saturday 6:30 pm & Sunday 9 am & 11 am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call 250-374-7467

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

In these unprecedented times10:00am we are worshiping remotely via our Facebook Sunday Mornings

pageTranquille livestream on 422 Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

Sundays at 10am. All are Welcome

www.northshorecalvary.com www.northshorecalvary.com

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca

Holy Week exposes holy dualism THE CENTRAL ISSUE OF HISTORY IS THIS STRUGGLE BETWEEN SAVIOURHOOD AND SIN — AND THE CROSS OF CHRIST IS THE CLIMACTIC EXHIBITION OF BOTH

D

uring the last week of Jesus’ life on Earth, two symbols stand out — palm branches and the

cross. The palm branches represent the acclaim of crowds greeting a messiah coming to his own. The cross represents tragedy. Why did the Christian church not take the palm branch as its symbol, a joyful token to be happy ever after, with its recollections of hosannas to the conquering Christ? We know the Christian church would never have survived the centuries with only a palm branch over its high altar. The cross goes deeper, much deeper than anything else into the heart of man’s experience, need and deliverance. There is sin and saviourhood on Calvary, locked in desperate encounter, with the fate of the world depending on which of those two will win in the end. The central issue of history is this struggle between sin and saviourhood — and the cross of Christ is the climactic exhibition of both. There, on Calvary, one also sees sacrificial saviourhood at its best, the supreme rescue story in man’s history, one who did not need to do it voluntarily, taking on himself the burden of the world’s iniquity that he might deliver men and women blaze the trail for a kingdom of righteousness on earth. One of the first things this struggle between sin and saviourhood says to us is, “Don’t oversimplify your philosophy of life.” We are all tempted to do that, to seek some neat formula that will smooth out, at least in theory, life’s disharmonies and conflicts and help us to forget them. This philosophy goes on to say that evil is not real, but only the shadow cast by good. As the rising sun is real, so is goodness, they say, but all the evil of the world is but the passive, transient shade some temporary obstacle casts as the sun rises. That is a childish philosophy. Sin is no mere shadow cast by

NARAYAN MITRA You Gotta Have

FAITH

good, but a demonic devastating power. It can incarnate itself in a moral maniac who plunges the whole world into such collective agony as mankind has never before endured. Such oversimplified philosophies will no longer do in the 21st century. The devil is real. I do not mean, of course, he is an individual with horns and a tail. He is much worse than that. He is the symbol of a devastating force in history that can destroy every human hope. But the Holy Week we are about to enter, brings us another message. The central fact of history is no easygoing harmony, but the fierce conflict on which the whole outcome of our human adventure depends — saviourhood against sin. Let us say to ourselves that, on the Palm Sunday, as we see Jesus enter Jerusalem amid the crowd’s hosannas, saviourhood is still present in this world. There are dreadful diseases like COVID19, but there is also the quest for billions of doses of vaccine. Frontline workers are giving up their days off and leisure in order to save precious lives of seniors. There is the devil and all his representatives, but there is Christ, too. Lowly and riding on a donkey’s foal, he came to the great city, a saviour, and there he did face sin as all saviours do — the sin of religious fakes who did not wish their orthodox establishment disturbed, of businessmen wanting no money changers’ tables overturned to their profit’s hurt, of politicians like Caiaphas

playing their clever, selfish games, of cowards like Pilate washing his hands off his responsibility, of Roman soldiers doing whatever cruelty they were commanded to do, of the crowd persuaded by the skilful propaganda to cry, “Crucify Him!” So, as always, saviourhood faced sin. But today, after 2,000 years, it’s not the sin we are celebrating on Good Friday and Easter 2021, but the saviourhood. Now, because the central fact of history is this struggle between sin and saviourhood, never expect Christianity to pipe down on the reality and terribleness of sin. So long as Christianity is here at all, it will be insisting on sin’s reality, its power and its catastrophe. Where, for example, is intellectual dishonesty most clearly seen as an evil and most insistently hated? We had better go to a scientific lab for that, for in that lab the eyes of men are centred on a great good, indispensable to the progress of the truth — intellectual honesty, objective, disinterested, uncompromising. But, sadly, it is also there that the relative curse of intellectual dishonesty would be most strongly felt and hated. So, not in the dens and moral slums of life is sin best understood and its diabolical reality most powerfully felt, but in the gospel of Christ. For there the central struggle of human life stands out, no oversimplified Pollyanna philosophy, but the real truth — a great conflict, sin against saviourhood and saviourhood against sin. The Holy Week celebrates that exciting truth at the heart of the Christian faith. There is saviourhood in this world and in it is a quality which, really seen, lays hold on us as nothing else ever does. Narayan Mitra is the pastor of Merritt Baptist Church. His email is mitraryan902@gmail.com. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Easter Worship 2021

HE IS RISEN

Kamloops United Church Centre for Community & Spiritual Discovery

ALL ARE WELCOME April 1 Maundy Thursday Service April 2 Good Friday Service April 4 Easter Sunday Service

Easter Sunday April 4 at 10:00 am

HOLY WEEK SERVICES ON ZOOM

MAUNDY THURSDAY April 1 • 7:00 pm

standrewskamloops.com/live

Good Friday April 2 at 10:00 am

KAMLOOPS ROMAN CATHOLIC PARISHES Streaming of the Palm Sunday Mass (11:30 am) Chrism Mass (Tues 10 am) Holy Thursday (7 pm) Good Friday (3 pm) Easter Vigil (8 pm) Easter Sunday Mass (11:30 am) celebrated by Bishop Joseph Nguyen may be viewed at https://youtube.com/ channel/ UC4LMk5KyHYfXY PcEhehgPDQ/

All services online at Kamloops United Church YouTube As an Affirming church, every part of Kamloops United Church life is available to LGBTQ2S+ persons.

GOOD FRIDAY April 2 • 10:00 am EASTER SUNDAY April 4 • 10:00 am Zoom link can be found on our website www.hillsofpeace.com 695 Robson Dr, Kamloops • 250-828-2221 (off Summit, one block from Hillside)

kamloopsunited.ca 250-372-3020

KAMLOOPS ALLIANCE CHURCH presents

GOOD FRIDAY April 2 at 9:00am & 11:00am

April 3 at 6:30pm April 4 at 9:00am & 11:00am

We invite you to join us online at KAMLOOPSALLIANCE.COM/EASTER

“Jesus proved by his resurrection that Life, Spirit, is eternal.” The members of Christian Science Society, Kamloops wish you a happy Easter.

Visit our website to find the links to live and recorded church services: www.christianscience.bc.ca

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops For more info: csskamsoc@yahoo.ca

A29


A30

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dig It: Animal stories from beneath the soil TODD PAQUIN

SPECIAL TO KTW

republicorarchaeology.ca

T

he study of how people used and interacted with animals in the past is called zooarchaeology. Animal remains in the form of bones, teeth, antler and horn, and shell can tell us a great deal about people’s adaptions relating to subsistence activities and how they changed through time. The first step is identifying what elements and animals are represented within a site. Very rarely are complete items recovered, as most are found as small pieces due to cultural and/or natural factors. Archaeologists must determine if the fragments can be assigned to certain elements, such as a femur or molar. From there, efforts are made to classify the animal to the most specific level possible (e.g., mule deer, freshwater mussel, salmon, waterfowl, turtle, etc.). The result is an inventory of the various animals harvested, processed and/ or consumed by the site inhabitants. The presence and distribution of animal remains with characteristics relating to skinning, butchering and cooking allows archaeologists to interpret the kinds of animal processing

TODD PAQUIN PHOTOS Archaeologist Todd Paquin examines animal remains collected from an archaeological site to identify how people adapted relating to subsistence activities and how they changed through time.

taking place, how people organized their subsistence activities, (e.g., butchering and cooking in separate site areas or separate sites) and the intensity of the activities. For instance, skinning and disarticulating a carcass often left cut marks from stone knives near the ends of limb bones or smashing marks from choppers on rib bones. Roasting over a fire often resulted in bone burning. Calorie-rich marrow was harvested by breaking bones with stone hammers, leaving impact marks and curving fractures. Grease rendering involving bone boiling is often represented by concentrations of highly fragmented bone.

The archaeologist may note that certain elements are present or absent in a site. One interpretation of this situation is that hunters engaged in selective butchering and transport activities when large animals were killed a distance from camp, or many animals were harvested without enough time to process all the meat before spoilage. Those portions removed and taken to the camp are interpreted to have high subsistence value, such as those containing the ribs and the limb bones, while those left behind at the kill site are interpreted to be lowervalue. Archaeologists also attempt to ascertain how

many of each animal is present at a site. This is done by selecting the most highly represented element of each animal. For instance, there may be 11 femurs from elk in a site occupation, of which seven are right side femurs and four are left side femurs. The basic interpretation would be that a minimum of seven elk are represented because the four left femurs would be considered partners to four of the right femurs. Further, this amount would represent an intensive hunting and processing activity providing the site inhabitants with significant amounts of calories and manufacturing materials.

Let’s move forward together.

By conducting such an analysis, it is possible to make interpretations about the relative importance of animals to inhabitants or availability of certain animals in an area, and the levels of effort spent on pursuing the identified animals. The seasonal variability in animal availability or anatomy can be used to interpret the time of year for site occupation. Sockeye salmon are seasonally migratory so the recovery of large numbers of their bones point to a fall harvesting period. The presence of an adult male deer skull lacking antlers indicates it was harvested between January and April, the period in which antlers were shed and before they

grew back. While radiocarbon dating may reveal a site is 4,270 years old, analysis of animal remains may determine that people lived there between September and November. Oh, the stories those old bones can tell. Todd Paquin is a Kamloops-area archaeologist. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca. Dig It is KTW’s regularly published column on the history beneath our feet in the Kamloops region. A group of archaeologists working in the area contribute columns to KTW’s print edition and online at kamloopsthisweek.com. Eric Davis, BBA, CIWM, PFP© Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor Keith Davis, BBA, CFP®, CIM© Associate Investment Advisor

Let’s build a financial plan that you can be proud of. TD Wealth Private Investment Advice T: 250 314 5124 | 1 866 377 1511 eric.davis@td.com | keith.davis@td.com | daviswealth.ca Davis Wealth Management Team is part of TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. which is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ®The TD logo and other trademarks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or its subsidiaries. 17022873MC


A31 THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

R E A L

Clifford Brauner Accredited Home Inspector

E S T A T E

License #47212

250-319-5572 photo: Evan Hauk

KAMLOOPS & AREA • EACH EDITION AVAILABLE ONLINE

March 31, 2021 | Volume 35 | Issue 13

kamloops.pillartopost.com

Attention Realtors

GET MORE EXPOSURE FOR YOUR LISTINGS!

250.319.7008 jerri@jerrivan.com

2152 GARYMEDE DR. • $649,900

REACH OVER 30,500 HOMES EVERY WEEK

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To learn more contact

Bronwyn Lourens realestate@kamloopsthisweek.com 250-374-7467 1365B Dalhousie Drive

RANCH STYLE HOMES STARTING AT $649,900!

ADULT ORIENTED GATED COMMUNITY WITH ON SITE SECURED RV PARKING, MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN KAMLOOPS & NO GST!

Contact us for more info www.SiennaRidgeKamloops.com KIRSTEN MASON Personal Real Estate Corp P: 250-571-7037 E: Kmason@kadrea.com

SHOWHOME OPEN SATURDAYS • 1:00-3:00PM • LOT 204


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Denise Bouwmeester MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

Cell 250-319-3876 dbinkamloops@shaw.ca denisebouwmeestersales.com

Photo: Babette Degregorio

A32

250-371-7992

(Kamloops) Real Estate SENIORS MASTER CERTIFIED REAL ESTATE NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST SPECIALIST

SOLD

READY TO SELL YOUR HOME? GIVE US A CALL!

7130 SAVONA ACCESS RD • $405,000

THE MARKETPLACE IS HOT AND NEW LISTINGS ARE MUCH NEEDED FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION CALL 250-319-3876

nced Experie

Great central North Kamloops location with a spacious home rented up (3 bedrooms) and a one bedroom suite rented down REDUCED $489,000

2123 MARTIN PRAIRIE RD • $789,000

SOLD

JEANNE VOS

SOLD dwightvos@gmail.com • 250-554-4511

"Andy and I have used a few realtors over the years and some were better than others. However Denise Bouwmeester has been outstanding. She is personable, professional, knowledgeable, efficient, hard-working, always on time either with appointments or email/call replies. She has warm, friendly personality and really works for you, with you. We thought it would take 6 months to a year to sell our farm but we were wrong. It took only 17 days and we could not be happier! Just when we were losing hope of finding what we were looking for, and let me say, we were very particular on what we were looking for, we found just the one. The process was fast, clear and efficient! She reminded us of things we didn’t know, we wanted or could have. Thank you Denise Andy and I could not be happier. You will forever be a friend and be part of our family." – Cecilia Guerrero

NORTH KAM $549,000 1089 BELMONT CRES Ne w Listing

RICK WATERS

250-851-1013 call or text anytime

rickwaters@royallepage.ca

SELLING?

CALL ME FOR A FREE MARKET EVALUATION with no obligation!

• Great family home with 3+1 bdrm 2 baths • Updated furnace, c/air & hot water tank • Park across street & close to elementary • RV parking & room for garage

HERE TO HELP!

NORTH KAM $529,900 1002 MONCTON AVE Ne w Listing

27 YEARS

EXPERIENCE! Buying or Selling? I will save you time and money!

Great photos and video that I use, add to the value of the mls presentation and to the dollars you receive for your home.

BUYING?

Did you know almost all listings are multiple listings.This means I can show you anything on the market.

• Sold corner lot house in good area • 3+2 bedrooms 3 bathrooms • 2 bedroom in-law suite if needed • Great family home with quick possession

MORE PICTURES & INFO AT: WWW.ROYALLEPAGE.CA/RICKWATERS

QUINN PACHE

PERSONAL REAL ESTATE CORPORATION

REAL ESTATE TEAM TRUST | PASSION | KNOWLEDGE

Quinnpacherealestate.ca

250-299-1267 | Quinnpache@royallepage.ca

LINDSAY PITTMAN REALTOR® MBA

250-682-6252 | lindsaypittman@outlook.com

MIKE LATTA REALTOR®

250-320-3091 | mikelatta@royallepage.ca

KAYLEIGH BONTHOUX Office Manager/Unlicensed Assistant

KAMLOOPS REALTY

166 Cavesson Way $234,900

42-1900 Hugh Allan Drive $498,900

SOLD • Convenient and well-positioned lot • Design and build your dream home • Stunning and peaceful ranch lands at Tobiano • Unique topography • Unobstructed and breathtaking views off the main floor and upper deck(s) of your eventual home, along with a walk out basement • View of the pristine waters of Kamloops Lake • Watch the sun set on the magnificent rolling hills of the Tranquille Ecological Reserve • Conveniently located close to recreation and amenities • Award-winning golf course, premiere dining, access to Bruker Marina for lake-time fun • Plenty of biking, hiking and horseback riding opportunities • Your dream home build awaits!

2537 Qu’Appelle BLVD $998,000

778-765-5151 | kayleighbonthoux@royallepage.ca

401-1120 Hugh Allan Drive $369,900

G N I D N E P • Move in ready • 3 level town home • Northgate complex in Pineview Valley • Close to Pineview Valley park, bus routes, hiking and biking trails and all amenities • Main floor: Unique open concept living area with a large kitchen, dining and living room, covered patio, powder room and a cozy fireplace • Upstairs: 3 spacious bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Master bedroom featuring a 4pc ensuite • Entry level basement is fully finished with rec room and laundry room • Additional designated parking spot is available

• Beautiful custom 5 bdrm 4 bath • Sought-after neighbourhood of Juniper Ridge • 0.38-acre private lot - provides plenty of parking, a green space and mature garden area • 4000sqft home has been completely remodelled • Open concept kitchen, dining area features a farmhouse style sink, stainless steel appliances • Spacious sundeck and garden area • Living room features exposed beams, large gas fireplace and a second deck with stunning views of the entire valley • Modern master bdrm is complete with a walk-in closet and ensuite • Entry level offers a large family room with a wood burning fireplace • Unique basement provides a games room accented with a wood burning stove, sauna, bathroom and storage • 2 car garage & extra bonus wrap around shop area

2308 Omineca Drive $649,999

G N I D N E P • Beautiful Aberdeen apartment • Top floor, corner unit • Features 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom • Bright, spacious living, kitchen and dining areas • In unit laundry • 2 parking stalls and a sizeable storage unit • Well-maintained building with a community room available • Monthly strata fee includes natural gas, water, sewer, landscaping and garbage • Pets and rentals are allowed with restrictions • Close to all amenities, transit, shopping, and TRU

• Great family home with 5 bed, 3 baths • Large deck with amazing views of the city (stunning sunsets) • Quartz countertops, new appliances, and mountain views from Kitchen • Updates throughout: Paint inside and out, new high efficiency furnace (2020), Roof (2013) • Home is ready to go and could easily contain a two bedroom suite with a separate entrance already in place. Showings will begin Saturday March 27th.


LindaTurner

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

A33

www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • LindaTurnerPREC@gmail.com

250-374-3331 REALTOR® of the Year

$239,900

D L O S

SAHALI

Kristy Janota Proud Supporter of Children’s Miracle Network

$319,000

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

Real Estate (Kamloops)

$335,000

BROCKLEHURST

$424,900

SAHALI

REALTOR®

Adam Popien REALTOR®

$489,900

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

GREAT CENTRAL LOCATION • 2 Bedrooms -4pc update bath • New carpet & flooring • Ground floor for easy access

2 BEDROOM 2 BATH FRONT FACING • 55+ Ashley Court- No Pets or Rentals • C/Air - All Appliances & 1 parking stall • Walking distance to downtown & Riverside park

55+ LARGER 2 BEDROOM UNIT • Custom design for wheel chair bath • Vacant w/Sundeck & mountain view • All appliances & Air Conditioner

SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM-2 BATH UNIT • South corner unit with private deck • Open floor plan-Granite kitchen • Rentals allowed -Walk to all Amenities

TOP FLOOR, 2 BEDROOM + DEN • 1700 sq ft with 2 levels • Open plan w/Island kitchen on main • Upper floor has 2nd bedroom & bath

32-1595 SUMMIT DRIVE

208-338 NICOLA ST

309-760 MAYFAIR STREET

308-755 MCGILL ROAD

304-550 LORNE ST

$499,900

$619,900

$624,900

$639,000

$669,900

D L O S

ABERDEEN

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

D L O S

JUNIPER

UPDATED WITH BREATHTAKING VIEW • Level entry with full daylight basement • 3 Bedrooms & 3 Baths • Large Rec Room & Media Room

STUNNING NORTH RIVER VIEW • Dead end cul de sac location • Updated w/4 Bedrooms & 2 baths • Private fenced yard & S/Garage

59-2022 PACIFIC WAY

377 SEYMOUR STREET W.

RANCHER W/ FULL DAYLIGHT BASEMENT • Breathtaking view • 4 beds & 3 baths • Low maintenance living 17-2630 NECHAKO DR

$699,900

$724,900

$724,900

D L O S

ABERDEEN

ABERDEEN

D L O S

SAHALI

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • 5 Bedrooms & 3 Baths • Updated hardwood & new kitchen • Easy to suite if desired

ONE OF A KIND 35FT HEATED SHOP • 2+1 Bedroom home + D/Garage • Great yard w/2 large decks • RV Parking & Suite potential

859 REGENT CRESCENT

1088 GREENOCK COURT

ELEGANT CUSTOM ONE OWNER HOME • Cul de sac backs on green space • Vaulted ceilings & great view • 3 or 4 Bedrooms & 4 Baths 698 SPRINGFIELD PLACE

$885,000

$949,900

$975,000

D L O S

BROCKLEHURST

DREAM HOME W/DELUXE 2 BEDROOM SUITE • 2 Double Garages • Extra long RV Parking • All appliances up & down 2676 ROSEWOOD AVENUE

VIDEO TOURS

TOBIANO

JUNIPER HEIGHTS

ABERDEEN

BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED ABERDEEN HOME • 5 bedroom 3 bath • Close to schools, shopping and recreation 2192 SIFTON AVE

$789,900

D L O S

DALLAS

D L O S

BATCHELOR HEIGHTS

BEAUTIFUL 5 BEDROOM 2.5 BATH BATCH HOME • Kitchen and living room on main • Flat fenced backyard with Pergola 2143 DOUBLETREE CRES

$875,000

D L O S

JUNIPER HEIGHTS

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • Close to Dallas Elementary • 6 Bedrooms / Central Air • 2 Bedroom suite potential

EXECUTIVE NEW HOME W/VIEW • 4 Bedrooms & Laundry up • 2 Bedroom legal suite • Triple Garage

5569 COSTER PLACE

2129 LUPIN COURT

$1,199,000

LOTS FOR SALE

HEFFLEY

TOBIANO GOLF RESORT • Deluxe home w/triple garage • Fully finished & landscaped • 4 Bedrooms & Suite Potential

EXECUTIVE 2-STOREY W/VIEW • 4 Bedroom & Laundry Up • 2 Bedroom Legal Suite • Triple Garage

CUSTOM 3648 SQFT HOME BUILT IN 2016 • Beautiful 3.5 acre property with mountain views • Close proximity to Sun Peaks Ski Resort

228 HOLLOWAY DR

2113 LUPIN COURT

1452 HEFFLEY-LOUIS CREEK RD

KAMLOOPS LAKE LOT SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


A34

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries

Call today to book a virtual tour! F E ATU RE L ISTI N G

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

Dufferin

1216 Prairie Rose Dr $1,399,000

• Located in exclusive Hidden Trails • Dream kitchen with high-end Fisher Paykel appliances included • Master ensuite with soaker tub & steam shower! • Fully finished walkout basement • Inquire now for information package • Under Construction – Nearing Completion

5

5.5

4,685

1125 Canyon Ridge Dr • $839,900

253 Willow Street • $424,900

Tobiano

105 Cavesson Way $1,289,000

• Custom designed home at Tobiano! • 1,000 sq. ft. garage (suitable for 4 vehicles) • Legal 2 bedroom self contained secondary suite • Master bedroom retreat - with soaker tub and full tile “open” shower • Entertainers dream, outdoor kitchen, covered gazebo, immense patio, hot tub and heated inground pool!

5

Campbell Creek

• Waterfront living just 15 minutes from Kamloops • Gourmet kitchen with granite counters • Panoramic views of the river valley • Huge garage with heated storage / workshop • Bonus: Guesthouse, garden shed, waterfront storage shed and more

3

2,979

2024 Sifton Ave • $619,900

Sun Rivers

1759 Old Ferry Rd $1,149,000

3

3

1554 Griffin Terrace • $649,900

3,798

4042 Rio Vista Way $1,250,000

• ONE OF A KIND location • Panoramic views of the city and river valley • Totally private end of cul-de-sac • TWO double garages • High end finishing selections • Under Construction.

3

3

4,250

4000 Rio Vista Way • $799,900

1572 Golf Ridge • $599,000

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

PHASE 3

NOW SELLING Call now for more information

• PANORAMIC VISTAS • MODERN STYLING • ADULT ORIENTED • IRRESISTIBLE LIFESTYLE

Lots from

199,000 +GST

$

Homes from

779,900 +GST

$

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

...selling Kamloops every day™

A35

HAPPY EASTER

Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

11-6000 Valley Drive - What a wonderful opportunity to purchase a one-owner townhome in the heart of Sun Peaks Village. Morrisey & Orient Express lifts out your door and village square a 10 minute walk. This 2 storey townhouse has 1,052 sf of living space with 2 bedrooms & 3 bathrooms. Purchase price includes furniture and household items. Strata $476/mth, taxes $2,960/yr. Outdoor recreation right out your door, now that’s living! $799,800

970 Renfrew Avenue - Conveniently located on the North Shore within close proximity to amenities. This well-cared for one owner home is available for quick possession. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, good sized fenced yard. Lots of potential. $560,000

317 Mariposa Court - Located on a quiet cul-de-sac in Sun Rivers this one owner home is in immaculate condition. Outstanding features include geothermal heating & cooling, engineered wood flooring, open concept main floor, generous window package for maximum natural light, mature easy-care landscaping with u/g sprinklers, double garage + additional parking. $758,300

2249 Chief Atahm, ADAMS LAKE - Sweet, rustic cabin located on the pebble beach shore of beautiful and pristine Adams Lake. This property is accessed by vehicle ferry, a quick 6-minute ride, or boat. Beautiful mountain views, fun filled days and peaceful starry nights are waiting for you. This is leased land with the Adams Lake Indian Band. $132,500

2524 Mountain View Drive - Located in the beautiful village of Sun Peaks where life is good. This home has been started and is almost at lock up. You can complete it and make this your dream home. The views of the Burfield and Sundance are outstanding and if that’s not enough you will also be able to enjoy fantastic evening sunsets from the covered deck. Some stipulations apply, please call listing Realtor for further details. $848,800

2504 Sunset Drive - Unique opportunity, this ranch style home of 1,703 sf is on a C4 zoned lot in East Valleyview. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, double garage + storage shed and ample parking on the fully fenced yard. $569,900

d l o S

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL: • Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 • Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. • Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) • Full-time office assistant • Professional representation • Professional Signage • Advertising in Kamloops This Week • Global advertising on the internet • Thinking of Selling and/or Buying?

1295 Harrison Place - $498,800

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


A36

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca Real Estate (Kamloops)

For more info view all our listings, upcoming listings, and Kamloops listings at ralphrealestate.ca

75-1605 SUMMIT DRIVE $279,900 • MLS®160854

602-429 ST PAUL STREET $425,000 • MLS®161187 ING

W

NE

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

• Great 2 bedroom 1 bathroom townhouse in Riverview Village • Private yard with large sundeck and backing onto South Sahali Elementary School • Pets and rentals allowed with restrictions

• 2 bedroom 2 bathroom top floor unit in very central downtown location • Storage locker & parking stall included • Quick possession possible

2270 GREENFIELD AVENUE $575,000 • MLS®161186 ING

W

NE

D L O S

T LIS

SAHALI

T LIS

1305-1000 TALASA WAY $339,900 • MLS®160676

SUN RIVERS • 2 bedroom 2 bathroom apartment in the Navarro building • Pets & rentals allowed with restrictions • Quick possession possible

1131 WINDBREAK STREET $575,000 • MLS®160769

D L O S BROCK

• Great family home with 3+1 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Large 0.23 corner lot • Currently rented for $2800/month

292 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD $750,000 • MLS®159641

BROCK • Great family home and area with 3 bedroom and 2 bathrooms • Lots of updates including kitchen, windows, flooring and more • Quick possession possible

1898 PARKHILL DRIVE $779,000 • MLS®161047

D L O S MCLURE • Very private 1+2 bedroom 3 bathroom log home • Mountain and river views

• Approximately 16.77 acres • Built in 2009

VALLEYVIEW • Immaculate and well maintained • Great cul-de-sac location on 3+1 bedroom 3 bathroom home approx. 0.34 acre lot with lots • Approximately 25x40 wired of parking and privacy and heated detached shop


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

COMMUNITY

Art auction benefits Chris Rose Centre KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The inaugural Chris Rose Online Art Auction benefitting the Chris Rose Therapy Centre for Autism is right around the corner. Due to pandemic-related gathering limits, the centre is going online with this fundraiser, with the auction taking place from April 9 at 4 p.m. to April 11 at noon. April is World Autism Awareness Month. A number of pieces have already been donated, but artists who wish to add to the donated artwork to be auctioned off is asked to call 250-376-6494 or email email us at crtca@chrisrosecentre.org. The Chris Rose Therapy Centre for Autism has been in operation since September 1989 and, during the past three decades, has helped hundreds of families in the Kamloops area supporting children with autism

spectrum disorder. Thus far, works donated include creations by local artists such as David Langevin, Tricia Sellmer, Lynne Woodruff, Vaughn Butland, Lance Weisser, Susan Knox, Bonnie Kavanaugh, Jackie Ziehe, Penny Heaslip, Deb Fong, Sheila Macdonald, Valerie Deacon, Sarah Rose, Kathie Gray, Ken Gray, Gine Rose, Lee Walton, Dr. Allen Frissell, Parm Armstrong, Maureen Hove, Ila Crawford, Karl Willms, Sandra Sugden and Wendy Madsen. In addition, there are works from outside of the Kamloops area: Aina Elina Rønningen (Norway), Amy Ballett (St. Catharine’s, Ont.) and Debbee Skinner (New Hampshire). Mediums explored include watercolours, acrylics, oils, sketches, linotypes, quilting, felting and metalwork. For more information and to view the auction, go online to chrisrosecentre.org/Art

City student wins national 4-H award KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Recently, 4-H Canada members celebrated the 4-H Canada Leadership Awards in a first-ever virtual event to recognize outstanding contributions of 4-H youth, leader and alumni. Sa-Hali secondary student Amanda McGillivray was among four young people recognized for their leadership in creating positive change in the world, earning the 4-H Canada Leadership Excellence Award of Distinction within one of 4-H’s leadership development pillars — Environment and Healthy Living. The value of the scholarship awarded to Amanda will go a long way, providing $20,000 over four years for her post-secondary education. Amanda grew up on her family’s cattle ranch, raising purebred and commercial Angus herds. For the past nine years, she has been part of the Tod

AMANDA MCGILLIVRAY Mountain 4-H Club. She has spent time at 4-H events, competed in public speaking events across the province and in judging and beef projects. Outside of 4-H, Amanda has engaged within her community and school, getting involved in leadership and peer tutoring groups. Her volunteer efforts at Royal Inland Hospital have helped to make patients’ stays more comfortable.

Amanda has also been active in competitive dance for the past 10 years and loves being part of a dance team. Looking ahead, she said she is focused on dedicating her efforts to studying psychology — a subject she about which she is passionate. Amanda plans to earn a psychology degree at the University of Victoria before aiming for a master’s degree in clinical psychology. Through 4-H, she has become aware of the challenges within the agricultural community, including the increased risk of anxiety and depression for ranchers and farmers. Amanda said she is committed to using her experiences and upbringing to pursue a career as an industry speaker and counsellor, specializing in the agriculture community. To learn more about 4-H Canada, go online to 4-h-canada.ca or search their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages.

Kamloops mentors recognized by AimCanada The AimCanada Mentorship Society’s Student-Business Mentorship Awards were handed out via an online gala event on March 26, produced by Mastermind Studios and hosted by Tara Holmes. Winners were chosen from nominations in categories of Lifetime, Individual, Corporate, Student, Environment and Corporate Sustainability. The AIMCanada Mentorship Society’s purpose is to engage more students during their undergraduate and graduate years and create an awareness in the student body on the benefits of career mentorship and mentoring others.

The society also seeks to increase, support and recognize corporate/business mentorship programs and individual mentors within the Thompson-Nicola-Cariboo region. Video from the gala can be viewed online at https://youtu.be/IlC3SX5nmtM. Donations to the AIMCanada Mentorship Society can be made online at https://portal. aimfoundationofcanada.ca/fundraising-anddonations/. Recipients of the 2021 AIMCanada Student-Business Mentorship Awards: • Kira Cheeseborough received the Student Peer Mentorship Award, nominated by Leann Kopytko;

• Anneke Spice received the Student Mentorship for Social Justice Advocacy Award, nominated by Dr. George M. Johnson; • Sid Kandola and City Furniture received the Corporate Mentor Award, nominated by Mahesh Mohan; • Kamloops Coun. Arjun Singh received one of two Environmental Mentor Awards, nominated by Amit Goel; • Ross Styles received the second Environmental Mentor Award, nominated by Dr. George M. Johnson; • General Grants received the Outstanding Community Sustainability Mentorship Award, nominated by Cam Thomson;

TEAM

• Former Kamloops councillor Patricia Wallace received the Lifetime Mentorship of Leaders Award, nominated by Arjun Singh; • The late Katherine McParland was awarded the Lifetime Mentorship for Youth Homelessness Advocacy Award, which was accepted by Daniel Galbraith, nominated by Leann Kopytko. Sponsors included Mastermind Studios, Adarsh Chawla of World Financial Group, Amit Goel of EXP Realty, Maurya’s Restaurant Bar and Banquet, Tara Holmes of Holmes is Where the Heart is Matchmaking, General Grants, Kamloops Chamber of Commerce, NSBIA, Leann Kopytko and George Adregal.

110

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110

Robert J. Iio Personal Real Estate Corporation

Bobby Iio

REALTOR®/TEAM LEADER

Jeremy Bates REALTOR®

Kim Fells REALTOR®

Michael Jodoin REALTOR®

Team110remax

team110 - remax


A38

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. SAT section eliminated by the College Board in 2021 6. Firth person? 10. Best-selling book of all time 15. Get the attention of 19. Sister-in-law of Prince William 20. Lead-in to pilot 21. Stick on 22. ‘‘Goodness gracious!’’ 23. Nod off at a selfserve restaurant? 26. Jupiter, exempli gratia 27. [Turn the page] 28. Sooner, informally 29. Diamond stat 30. Get down and dirty, in dialect 32. Bovine disease 34. Fancy flooring for an R.V.? 38. Home of Etihad Airways: Abbr. 39. Eyeball creepily 40. Requirement 41. Hoops grp. 44. Like universal blood recipients 48. One layer of a seven-layer dip 50. What the prestigious ice sculptor had? 55. Unable to think clearly 59. Goes nowhere, say 60. Word with holy or heating 61. Grammy-winning singer Cash 63. Certain elite school 64. Appear 65. Back in the U.S.S.? 66. Org. to which Taft was elected president after serving as U.S. president 67. ‘‘Yes, that’s clear’’ 69. ‘‘Let everyone else get some steak before taking seconds!’’ 74. Mooches 76. Mate 77. Grand Central info 78. Surreptitious bit of communication

81. ‘‘What have we here!’’ 82. Like many characters in Alison Bechdel cartoons 84. Nintendo release of 2006 85. Show runner 86. 2013 Tony winner for Best Revival of a Musical 88. ‘‘We should stall!’’ 91. Long-stemmed mushroom 93. Egyptian god of the afterlife 94. Llama’s head? 95. Button clicked to see the rest of an article 97. Not out, say 101. Target of the heckle ‘‘What game are you watching?!’’ 103. Why no one hangs out in actors’ dressing rooms these days? 107. Played obnoxiously loudly 111. At 10 or 11 p.m., say 112. Part of lifeguard training 113. Navigation app 115. Lucky charm 116. American ____ (century plant) 117. Bathroom fixture that one never asked for? 122. Their heads get dirty 123. Dirt 124. Typos for exclamation marks if you fail to hit Shift 125. Opposite of neat 126. ____ strategy 127. Fills to the max 128. Set (on) 129. Bathroom-door sign DOWN 1. ____ salt (magnesium sulfate) 2. Mixed-martial-arts great Anderson 3. What a hiree should be brought up to 4. Brief summary 5. Gab 6. Knocked in a pocket, in pool

7. Handle a job satisfactorily 8. Additional 9. ____ the line 10. Trinket 11. Less certain 12. Many a maid of honor, informally 13. Create an account? 14. Not included 15. Marvel group led by Hercules 16. ____ monkey 17. Lucky charm 18. Plague 24. ‘‘My treat next time!’’ 25. Cheese sometimes paired with fig jam 31. Subject of the Iran-contra affair 33. Requirements for witnesses 35. Jessica of ‘‘L.A.’s Finest’’ 36. Believer in Jah 37. Book-fair organizer, maybe, in brief 41. Longtime procedural set in Washington, D.C. 42. Foreshadow 43. Pass up? 45. Declare 46. ‘‘All in the Family’’ mother 47. Tissue that’s prone to tearing, for short 49. Italian car since 1907 51. Enemy in the game Doom 52. Sticks in a box? 53. Style of women’s leather handbags 54. Isaac and Rebekah’s firstborn 56. Piece with a title like ‘‘10 Best Places to .?.?. ’’ 57. First mate? 58. Recolor 62. Comparatively neat 65. Johnson & Johnson skin-care brand 68. Moniker after a lifestyle change 70. Initial problem for a storied duckling

71. Man’s nickname that sounds like consecutive letters of the alphabet 72. ‘‘Phooey!’’ 73. Japanese ‘‘energy healing’’ 74. Bread for dipping 75. Golden ratio symbol 79. Actress Patricia of ‘‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’’ 80. Phone, wallet, ____ (traveler’s mental checklist) 83. Gaudy jewelry 84. Word in obituaries 85. Eponymous member of the Ford family 87. Most cheerful 89. Fictional establishment selling Duff Beer 90. Option for an overnight guest 92. Campsite org. 95. Antacid brand 96. Forms of some mythological sea creatures 98. Turn into 99. Bob hopes? 100. Garment worn with a choli 102. Something Pharaoh’s dream foretold in Genesis 103. Make a goat 104. Heavies 105. ‘‘Pearls Before ____’’ (comic strip) 106. Put away 108. Sculptor with a dedicated museum in Philadelphia 109. Throw out 110. Showers attention (on) 114. Lemon-bar ingredient 118. Food-service-industry lobby, for short 119. Command to a dog 120. Male swan 121. Slow (down)

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A27

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

WORD SCRAMBLE Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to puzzles

ANSWERS

ANSWER: RISEN

Hero Heart of the

2021 CAMPAIGN

Raising money to improve “ICCHA/WISH Cardiac Care Unit” at RIH To find out more or to donate please visit iwishfund.com


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A39

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Tax not included

Coming Events

Art & Collectibles

Furniture

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca

8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541.

EASTER DEADLINE CHANGE Kamloops This Week

will be closed on Friday, April 2nd, 2021 for the Good Friday Statutory Holiday.

“DOZING LYNX” Robert Bateman 30 3/4”h x 43 1/2W Forest Green mat & dark green frame $250. 250-578-7776 “Power of One” Magnificent creation by John Banovich 43”hx50”wide brown wooden frame. $500 Firm 250-578-7776

For Sale - Misc 23” Blonde doll holding a candle that plugs in. $40. 250-376-4473. Coleman BBQ with cover, tank, temp gauge like new. $100. 250-5713484. Diningroom table w/4 chairs and lrg china cabinet. $500/obo.571-4008. Dual compound/table saw light and portable. $500. 236-565-4767.

Personals

Eagle coffee tables $100, JVC 3 piece stereo set $300 & speakers, sewing machine $50, beige rugs $100, recliner $75. 250374-8285. Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712.

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details. Male would like to meet male for fun evenings. Please reply to Box 1474, Kamloops This Week, 1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC V2C 5P6

Antiques Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

kamloopsthisweek.com

Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000/obo 250-3766607. Pressure washer $175. Battery charger $150. 48” table saw. $200. Angle grinder $125. 250-3748285. Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Furniture Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933. Solid oval oak table w/6side chairs, 2 arms chairs, buffet. $5,000. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100. Treadmill $450, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-851-7687.

Plants / Shrubs / Trees Major Tress Colorado Blue & Green Spruce Digging 1st wk of April. Trees are in 42” - B&B 12’ + wide bottom branch spread. 12-16’ + height. $250-$550. To view call 250-819-9712 or McLure Nursery 250-672-9712. Will hold until June. Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $15 each obo 250376-6607

TV’s-Stereo-Video Haier 2017 38” TV. Hardly used. $100. 250-5714918 or 250-573-2599.

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

Garage Sales LOGAN LAKE Spring Yard Sale. Sat & Sun April 3rd/4th. 9am-3pm. Copper Valley Resort. #19 Apex Drive. 2wheel Trike, camping gear, tools, garden stuff, quality 3x clothes, much more. COVID rules apply. NORTH SHORE 664 Seton Place. Fri Apr 2nd 3-6 and Sat Apr 3rd 9-3. Wide asst of stuff and Early Birds welcome.

Commercial

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500 Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Fax: 250-374-1033

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

Tax not included

Tax not included

Commercial COMMERCIAL SPACE for Lease Approximately 900 Sq. Ft., on High Traffic North Kamloops road. Premises are bright and attractive with good On-Street parking. Call 250-3769152 for more information.

Grazing / Pasture for Lease 100+ acres fenced and cross-fenced on the river at McLure. Will support 30 cows/calf pairs. July 1st to November 1st. Call Bob 250-819-9712 or 250-672-9712.

Houses For Rent Furn Home WestEnd Corporate/Crew 4bd, den nsp near RIH $3700. 250214-0909.

Apartments / Condos - For Sale 1bdrm apt 55+ in a secure bldg close to Northills Mall, second floor with storage on same floor. 5appl’s. 250-3769378 or 250-554-0033.

Recreational Property WANTED: Freehold lakefront cabin on local lake <$1M. Call 250-307-8375 champigny@gmail.com

is prouudcteo introd

Duraguard Fencing NOW AVAILABLE IN BC Commercial | Residential | Industrial

Home Builders | Agriculture | Safety & Protection

Protecting Commercial Facilities, Residential & Industrial Sites

CONTRACTORS • RETAIL • PARTS & SERVICE • DIY OR WE INSTALL

CALL NOW

778-471-7103

tsaarm.ca/fencing • Info@tsaarm.ca

RESORT FOR SALE 2.6 ac. 1/2 hr. to Kamloops 42 Long Term Suites. 130 Seat Bar & Grill Food Truck.               School next door. Doctor, Golf Course, Ice Arena.       

www.getoutadodge.info

250-523-9432

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER

Farm Services

Farm Services

Handyperson

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

Handyman for hire. One call for all your handyman needs. Carpentry, drywall, painting, renovations and more Free Estimates. Blaine 250-8516055.

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

Reliable Gardener. 30 yrs experience. Cleanups & pruning. Call 250312-3986.

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

Security

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

250-838-0111 Handyperson

Handyperson

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more 778-999-4158

www.danshandymanservices.net

Lawn & Garden

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916


A40

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

Classes & Courses HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. April 24th and 25th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L April 11th. Sunday. Pr o f e s s i o n a l outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

RVs / Campers / Trailers 2000 Adventurer Camper 8ft. New HWT, pump, battery, solar panel, skylight. $12,500. 250-299-9076. 2006 Dodge 2500 4x4 HD. w/1994 11ft. camper. $14,500/both. 778-2207372.

Trucks / Heavy, Commercial

2012 Fuso Canter FE160. 6spd auto. Diesel. Big box 8x18 extra high with skylight. 2000lb power tailgate, S&M tires, A/C and CD. 189,000kms. $29,750/obo. 250-376-6607.

Vans 1997 Ext GMC Savana 3500. Work ready service van and tools avail. $9,500. 236-565-4767.

Rims

Automotive Tires

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Legal / Public Notices RESIDENTIAL TENANCY ACT Notice is hereby given to Ryan Friesen, last known address #305240 Royal Ave., Kamloops, BC, that to recover charges under the provisions of the Residential Tenancy Act, all belongings, consisting of living room furniture, kitchen furniture, bedroom furniture, freezer, TV, miscellaneous kitchen supplies and miscellaneous personal items, that were left behind and have been in storage since March 1, 2021, will be sold and discarded April 30, 2021 by Columbia Property Management Ltd. #101-388 First Ave. Kamloops, BC to partially recover outstanding rent of $665.00.

PAPER 4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

ROUTES

AVAILABLE

Utility Trailers RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread . 285/30R20 $1700.00 Call 250 319-8784

Motorcycles

All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

 

Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices

250-374-7467

Assignees Declaration of Acceptance of a Crown Grant made Patent Crown Grant number 384/574, issued on 24 day of March in the year of our Lord, one thousand, nine hundred and Thirty, by King George the Fifth, Monarch of the Dominion of Canada.

2002 Harley Davidson Dyna Low Rider. Dual Exhaust, windshield, backrest. 86,500kms. $7,500. 250-318-2428.

Sports & Imports

1990 Jaguar Red. leather, 4-door, A/C, Power everything. 142,597kms, $2200.00 250-851-0209. 2007 Nissan Versa S. 4dr hatchback, auto. Runs well. 257,000kms. $2,350. 250-819-5526.

Sports Utilities & 4x4’s

Know all men by these present: That we, Philippe of the family Voisard and Divina Gracia-Zoleta of the family Maano do jointly certify and declare that we bring up this Crown Grant made patent in our name. Land so sought to be patented, and legally described and referenced under patent number 384/574 listed above, in Lot 4968, in the District of Lillooet, Province of British Columbia. The claim is made herein that the assignees have been assigned the entire tract of 160 acres of land described in the original patent. This assignment is inclusive of the 160 acres of Lot 4968. We, Philippe of the family Voisard and Divina Gracia-Zoleta of the family Maano, do swear and state that the above is true, or believed by us to be true and correct to the best of our ability and knowledge. Assignees: Philippe of the family Voisard Divina Gracia-Zoleta of the family Maano

2018 Hyundai Tucson AWD. Fully loaded. Back up camera, BMS, heated seats etc. 15,000kms. Warranty. $25,000/obo. 250-571-9594

EARN EXTRA $$$ KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462

Gateway Storage of 231 Andover Crescent, Kamloops BC is taking lean action against PHIL MCLENNAN. If the sum of $940.00 is not paid in full as of April 30, 2021 the stored item will be sold to recover the debt. Don Buller - Buller Trailer Sales 231 Andover Crescent, Kamloops BC. 250-573-3222 kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

POWER SWEEPER OPERATORS McRae’s Power Sweeping Ltd. is hiring full-time Power Sweeper Truck Operators. Apply today to join our team.

Term Equipment Operator II Position Applications will be received by the undersigned until Monday, April 19, 2021 for the position of Temporary Equipment Operator II. This position will be for a 5month period. The temporary Equipment Operator II is required to operate all Class II Equipment which includes all light duty vehicles (without air brakes) and riding lawnmowers. This position will also be involved in all facets of Public Works Department duties including parks maintenance, road and sidewalk maintenance, fence line repairs, water and sewer system maintenance, general facility and equipment cleanup, and other duties as from time to time assigned. Job Qualifications: Grade XII or equivalent, Class 5 BC Driver’s License, ability to work productively with minimal supervision, good mechanical aptitude. This temporary position is 40 hours per week (Monday to Friday 7:00am – 3:30pm). The 2021 wage rate for this position as per CUPE Local 900 Collective Agreement is $32.13 per hour. Anticipated start date is May 3, 2021. For further details on this position and qualifications, please contact the undersigned below (email preferred). A job description is available on our website at: http://www.loganlake.ca/career-opportunities

Wade Archambault, Director of Public Works and Recreation, District of Logan Lake, PO Box 190 | Logan Lake BC, V0K1W0 warchambault@loganlake.ca P: 250-523-2755

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR MULTI MEDIA The Aberdeen Publishing has an immediate opening for an Office Administrator position in Kamloops.

ADVERTISING CONSULTANT

MAIN JOB TASKS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Award-winning media company Kamloops This Week has an • Accounts Receivable & Billing opening for an Advertising Sales Consultant for our suite of • Enter daily payments in DTI print and digital products. The successful candidate will be a • Perform all necessary account reconciliations self-starter, organized and able to work inpublication a fast-paced • Reconcilehighly the physical paper/supplements each environment. The candidate will lead KTW to great success in • A/R Collections this dynamicallposition and have cheques, a strong drive • Entering EFT’s, e-transfers, Paypalfor networking. The candidate will also work creatively with a diverse team to • Credit card processing monthly provide appropriate marketing opportunities and solutions • Assistthe in month end reporting procedures • Accounts payable entry into Great Plains for our clients. Marketing and/or advertising background is an • Perform filing and general administrative tasks asset, but not required.

Requirements • Class 5 License with Air Brake Endorsement at a minimum. Clean driver’s abstract. • Able to understand, speak, read, write and communicate in English and follow instructions. Benefits • Wages are competitive and full time employees receive medical & dental benefits after 3 months. • Flexible shifts are available working in the Kamloops area. Please send resumes to sab@mcraetank.com

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

for Tsideldel First Nation. Full job description at www.tsideldel.org and application instructions. Application deadline is April 5, 2021. Resume and covering letter to katrina.elliot@4cmc.ca.

Business Oportunities

Trades Help

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Required immediately Journeyman Plumber and apprentice plumber for full-time. Competitive wages. 250-371-4661.

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

Employment

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

250-374-3853

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at 250-374-0462

RUN TILL

RENTED

• Liaise with other departments/customers/vendors

YOU HAVE: EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE • Strong understanding of goal-oriented sales • High School Diploma or equivalent • Passion for digital marketing • POS experience • Passion to be creative • 2 years with Microsoft Office, Excel Spreadsheet Strong, genuine skillswould be an asset. ••Knowledge of Greatcustomer Plains, DTI,service and Naviga Buildingbookkeeping strategic marketing ••Previous experiencecampaigns is an asset Brand will awareness ••Training be provided • Be able to adapt to different types of clients THE IDEAL CANDIDATE SHOULD • Passion to drive business andEXCEL create long-term IN AND POSSESS THE FOLLOWING SKILLS: relationships • Planning and organizing

• Ability to WHAT’S INmulti-task IT FOR YOU: ••Prioritizing Company benefits • Attention to detail • Professional print & digital training • Problem-solving • Competitive compensation based on previous experience • Teamwork

5300

$

Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10

Must be pre-paid. Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time private parties only. No businesses. Some Restrictions Apply

• Customer service orientation • Communication skills Interested applicants should send or email resume to: • Work in fast paced environment

Ray Jolicoeur, Sales Manager Kamloops This Weekin this If you are interested 1365-B Drive position,Dalhousie please email your cover letter and B.C. resume to dfolk@ Kamloops V2C 5P6 aberdeenpublishing.com ray@kamloopsthisweek.com

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

Kamloops This Week is part of the Kamloops This Week is part of Aberdeen Publishing Group the Aberdeen Publishing Group

250�371�4949


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Employment

Bylaw Enforcement/Animal Control Officer (Exempt)

Job Posting The District of Logan Lake, situated 60 kilometers south of Kamloops, is accepting applications for the position of Bylaw Enforcement/Animal Control Officer. Under the direction of the Director of Corporate Affairs, the Bylaw Enforcement/Animal Control Officer fulfills the District’s responsibilities related to bylaw enforcement and animal control, including dealing with bylaw enforcement issues, issuance of tickets, legal representation on the District’s behalf, patrols and pickup of stray animals, animal care, and operation of the impoundment facility. Deliverables include coordination of all functions related to bylaw enforcement and animal control; Respond to call outs and public inquiries, both by telephone and in person; Receive, attend to, and investigate complaints of alleged municipal bylaw infractions and act accordingly; Liaise with other District Departments, the RCMP, Court Registry, and Crown Counsel on matters involving District bylaws and enforcement, including Provincial and Federal legislation; Issue tickets for infractions of any bylaws under the District’s Ticketing Bylaw; Prepare any necessary Court documents, files, prosecutes, and/or give evidence of bylaw infractions in Court on behalf of the District; and Liaise with the Finance Department and Corporate Administration Department to ensure effective and accurate billing, collection, and reporting of tickets, licenses, and fees. This position is responsible for the operation of the District of Logan Lake Impoundment Facility, and enforcement of the Animal Control Bylaw and dog licensing regulations; investigates complaints, patrols, catches, and transports stray or vicious animals to the Impoundment Facility, and feeds, waters, and cares for animals while in custody. Responsible for ensuring the Impoundment Facility is clean and maintained to appropriate level of sanitation. Qualified Applicants should possess Bylaw Compliance, Enforcement & Investigative Skills Level 1, and have a proven history work with animals and livestock; Demonstrated computer experience, preferably in a Windows environment and with Word and Excel; Ability to work independently and to complete tasks and assignments; Ability to interact effectively and tactfully with District employees and the public; Strong written and oral communication skills; and a valid Class 5 B.C. Drivers License. This is a part-time position with an approximate 15-hour work week, with the ability to be called out during evening and weekend hours as required. Interested individuals are encouraged to submit their resume and cover letter to Melisa Miles, Director of Corporate Affairs, at mmiles@loganlake.ca no later than 4:00 pm on April 15, 2021. Melisa Miles Director of Corporate Affairs District of Logan Lake P: 250-523-6225 ext. 230 F: 250-523-6678 Email: mmiles@loganlake.ca

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

In Loving Memory of James Murdoch Milner James Murdoch Milner came into this world on January 26, 1985. He brought with him a kind heart that always knew how to compromise during life’s journey. His gentle soul and yearn for peace were noticed at a very young age. He drew on his talents and work ethic to become an incredible musician, writer, and observer of societal injustices. As a young boy he always had one or two paper routes, worked at the town down curling club, or organized his friends to perform in one of his videos. His mind was never idle when it came to creativity. This wonderful young man with so much potential started his journey with a life altering illness at age 18. He never gave up on us or himself, continuing through great adversity, with his ability to compromise. In February 2019, James wrote. “We have never said goodbye here. We have never said goodbye. Does it feel that you are taking back the love that made us real? In a lifetime, time will always take its toll, and I will lay unshielded from the pain.” In some ways this is the way we feel, but we are sure he felt it every day. We never got to say good-bye when he passed March 21 2019, only wanting to say goodnight. His desire to live and make the world a better place, despite

A41

Each Loss Each loss is very different, The pain is so severe. Will I ever stop missing This one I loved so dear? Good times we had together, The moments that we shared We didn’t have to tell each other How much we really cared. I never dreamed you’d go away, Never thought of sorrow. So sure you’d always be here Took for granted each tomorrow.

the cruelty of his illness, will never be forgotten. The star that James created will always be remembered. James has joined his mother Judy Louise Collins and brother Karl Nickolas Milner in the ultrareality of heaven. He has found true peace and love. His father Charles Thomas Milner, sister Lisa Ann Milner, and nephew Christian James Milner miss him, but know his journey is not over. We will meet again in the land of love. As James always would say when leaving, “good-bye for now”.

Obituaries

Now my life is all confused Since you went away. You took a part of me And for help I daily pray. But when God sent you to me He never said that you were mine, That I could keep you always – Only borrowed for a time. Now, He’s called you home, I’m sad and I shed tears. Yet I’m glad He loaned you to me And we had these many years.

Obituaries

Obituaries

James Richard Olver

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE DOWNTOWN Rte 310 – 651-695 2nd Ave, 660-690 3rd Ave, 110-292 Columbia St, 106-321 Nicola St. – 43 p. Rte 317 – 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(Even Side), 702-799 Nicola St. – 39 p. Rte 318 – 463 6th Ave, 446490 7th Ave, 409-585 8th Ave, 604-794 Battle St. – 27 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave, 763-804 7th Ave, 744-764 8th Ave, 603-783 Columbia St(Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. 50 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 327 - 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. - 38 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. – 56 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35-377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 371 – 125-207 Connaught Rd, 451-475 Lee Rd, 7-376 W. St Paul St. – 73 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p. LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 402 – 14-94 Bestwick Dr, Mahood Pl. – 28 p. Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, Bestwick Crt E & W, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Morrisey Pl. – 47 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p.

Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 467 – 1605-1625 Summit Dr. – 30 p. Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p. Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Crt, Dr, & Pl. – 67 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 486 – Garibaldi Dr. – 40 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p. ABERDEEN Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 509 – 459-551 Laurier Dr, Shaughnessy Hill – 47 p. Rte 512 – Ainslie Pl, Balfour Crt, Braemar Dr, MacIntyre Pl. – 69 p. Rte 513 – Braemar Way, 556-696 Laurier Dr, 2214-2296 Van Horne Dr. – 39 p. Rte 522 – 604-747 Dunrobin Dr. & Dunrobin Pl.-64 p. Rte 526 - 2015-2069 Van Horne Dr.-68 p Rte 528 - 1115-1180 Howe Rd, & 1115-1185 Hugh Allen Dr.-47 p. Rte 532 - 1221 Hugh Allan Dr.-26 p. Rte 537- 1201-1295 Harrison Pl, Harrison Way & 11811291 Howe Rd.-33 p.

PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p. Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p.

RAYLEIGH Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, 1625-1648, 1652-1764 Davie Rd. – 44 p. Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p. 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. BROCKLEHURST/ Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 1909NORTH SHORE 2003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St, Rte 618 – Big Nickel Pl, Chapman 2412-2741 Tranquille Rd. – 71 p. Pl, Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd, Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala 2440-2605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p. Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, Rte 619 – 2710-2797 Sunset Dr, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Sunset Lane, 115-159 Tanager Dr, Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 8062583-2799 Valleyview Dr. - 54 p. 999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 652 – 1616-1890, 1955-2212 Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, Coldwater Dr, Coldwater Crt, 1921- 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. 1999 Skeena Dr.(Odd Side) – 50 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 1709Rte 660 – 1689-1692 Adams 1862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Ave, Babine Ave, 2391Rte 137-144-244 Briar Ave, 2881(Odd Side), 2472-2578 106-330 Clapperton Rd, (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 60 p. Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100-204 Rte 666 – 1603-1665 Cheakamus Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p. Dr, Cheakamus Pl. – 26 p. Rte 142 -Alder Ave, Cypress Ave, 300-348+430 Fortune Dr(Even Rte 667 – Birkenhead Dr, & Side), Juniper Ave, 325-439 Pl, 1674-1791 Cheakamus Schubert Dr, Spruce Ave.-70p. Dr, Similkameen Pl. – 61 p. Rte 670 – Galore Cres, Crt, & Pl. – 105 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. 87 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 718 – Bel Air Dr. – 24 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p.

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462

BATCHELOR/WESTSYDE: Rte 206 –Dickenson Rd, Walkem Rd, 1835-1995 Westsyde Rd(Odd Side), Yates Rd. – 53 p. Rte 216 - 701-795 Franklin Rd, 705-799 Huntington Dr. & 2675-2715 Westsyde Rd.-56 p. Rte 249 – 3085-3132 Bank Rd, 600-655 Bissette Rd, Cooper Pl, Hayward Pl, Norbury Rd. – 55 p. Rte 259 - 715-790 Kyle Dr, 731-791 Morven Dr, 2721-2871 Westsyde Dr(odd side)-54 p.

April 27, 1988 - March 20, 2021

In Loving Memory Of Denise E. L. Fortier May 5, 1968 – March 26, 2017

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of our son James Richard “Mini” Olver of Terrace, BC, at age 32, on March 20, 2021. James went to school in Terrace, BC graduating from Caledonia High School. He then took a welding program at North West Community College and following Boilermaker Training at BCIT. He joined the Boilermakers Lodge 359 which took him to work locations throughout the province, later achieving his Red Seal in both Welding and Boilermaking. James leaves behind his parents Colleen and Glen Olver, his sister Angela (Aden), his grandfather Jim Olver, aunts, uncles and cousins. He also leaves behind the love of his life Darcie Petuh.

“She asked so little of so few, yet gave so much to so many” She always put the feelings and needs of others ahead of her own. Denise, and her warming and endearing smile, are still sorely missed.

Not only a very kind and caring person, James would give you the shirt off his back even if he didn’t have one. In his short life, James touched the lives of many people. He will be sorely missed by his family, friends and Union brothers.

Rest in Peace Son. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to BC Children’s Hospital (Special Care Nursery) at 4500 Oak St, Vancouver, BC V6H 3N1 or online at www.bcchildrens.ca or to a charity of your choice. You are invited to leave a personal message of condolence at the family’s online register at www.myalternatives.ca


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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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Roy Noble Dixon

Roy had a humble start in life with nine brothers and sisters, half-brothers and half-sisters -- the kind of convoluted family tree that no one could quite keep straight. He left school at a young age and found work in Vancouver delivering coal to people’s homes. He returned home to Lavington where he worked in the bush as a faller for several years. He met the love of his life, Dorothy, when he was 26 and never looked back. They were married for nearly 60 years and raised three wonderful children. With Dorothy’s help, Roy was known as “the host with the most” -- their door (and Roy’s bar) was always open. Roy never missed an opportunity to practice his stated religion, which was - quite simply - to be good-humoured, helpful and unfailingly generous to all. He joined the Dept. of Highways as a drilling foreman in 1964 where he spent over 30 years travelling the province of BC. He had a strong old-fashioned work ethic and believed that anything worth doing was worth doing well. He was proud of the work he contributed to, even though it kept him away from home and family for weeks at a time. Summer holidays were all about family camping trips and lake-time. In retirement, Roy’s skill as a heavy equipment operator meant he could get their fifth wheel into all kinds of secret fishing spots - no site too tight, and no fish too wily! He and Dorothy loved to dance, and Roy was a formidable crib player. He was a self-taught handyman - there was nothing Roy couldn’t construct, rehabilitate or invent from scratch. He always had a project on the go. He was also known for the dozens of hand-crafted crib boards that he gave away throughout the Interior, and for his beautifully intricate wooden puzzles, 10-wheeler trucks, and countless wooden toys that he gave away freely. Next to his family, Roy loved nothing more than a bargain. He acquired a treasure trove of equipment and hand tools - going into his workshop to borrow tools was more fun than shopping at Home Depot for free! Roy’s memory will be held and cherished by his wife Dorothy; their children: Shelley Battistella (Dan), Les Dixon (Arlene) and Brian Dixon; their five grandchildren: Tyson, Jarret, Brendan, Nolan and Rachel; their two-great-grandchildren Rylee and Beau and his brother Richard Dixon and sister Ginny Vaillancourt, as well as his extended family and many friends who loved him.

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Sheila Jacqueline Mitchell

June 26, 1935 - March 19, 2021 Kamloops bid farewell to one of its kindest, most generous souls on Friday, March 19, 2021. Roy Dixon was the kind of guy who would give you the shirt off his back, tools from his workshop or the last dollar in his pocket, and never expect to get anything back. He was one of those hardworking, salt-of-the-Earth, honest-as-the-day-is-long kind of guys.

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July 22, 1937 - January 27, 2021

With deep sadness we announce the passing of Sheila Jacqueline Mitchell, age 83, at the Brocklehurst Gemstone Care Center, Kamloops, BC. Sheila was predeceased by her loving husband Jack Eldon Mitchell, in 2016, as well as her sister Deanna M. Winters in 2001. She is survived by her three siblings, William J. Vaughn (Lynne) of Auburn, CA; Terry Arnold Vaughn (Lynn) of White Rock, BC; and Sonia Laverne Martin (Kess) of Calgary, AB. Sheila is also survived by three nephews (Dirk & Kurt Winters) of Delta BC, and Jerret Vaughn of White Rock, BC; and three nieces (Nancy & Michelle Martin) of Calgary, AB, and Tracey Marritt of Kelowna, BC; as well as her four stepchildren Doug Mitchell (Lee) of Pagoda Springs, CO; Lee Mitchell of Lillooet, BC; Jill Koop of Armstrong, BC; and Dave Mitchell (Lea) of Kamloops, BC; as well, seven stepgrandkids and seven great step-grandkids. Sheila was born in Blairmore, AB but lived all of her school years in Creston, BC. Sheila and Jack lived in Westwold, BC most of their married life on their seed potato farm and though they endeavored in various other crops such as hay, cattle and ginseng when it became the popular rage, it was the seed potatoes they were most renowned for. Together with her husband “Mitch”, they worked long, hard days from sun up to sun down sowing, planting, tending to, harvesting, storing, selling and shipping their crop across the USA each year. Sheila was talented with numbers and did all of the accounting for their business ventures on top of all the physical work the farm demanded of her. She was a sturdy “farm girl” who loved to be outside and who especially loved her garden. She was proud of the “bumper” crops of tomatoes, corn, carrots, beets and greens she grew and was always happy to share the fruits of her labours with any and all who were interested. She worked tirelessly and selflessly alongside her husband Jack, “Mitch”, but always made time to take care of herself. Her hair was always permed and coiffed, her make up “just so”, and when not out in the fields, she was dressed primly in anticipation of visitors to the farm or just to look good for Mitch! It is with admiration and love that I say Sheila was a terrible cook! However, she never once hesitated to host large family gatherings for potluck dinners with a hardy game of pickleball in the potato storage barn to work up an appetite and then skeet shooting after dinner with dessert and coffee in hand. Those days will long be remembered by any and all who had the good fortune to be invited to the “party”!! Jack and Sheila enjoyed winter breaks in Gold Canyon, Arizona. It was there she learned and became very good at sketching, drawing and painting. One of her original paintings now hangs in her honour at the Gemstone Care Home.

The family would like to thank Pinegrove Extended Care Home and Dr. Andrew Wynne for all the care and loving support.

Sheila will be dearly missed by her family and friends but fond memories of good times, terrible food, hearty laughter and competitive, but friendly, pickleball tournaments will long be remembered.

A Celebration of Life is planned for later this year, to reminisce and celebrate Roy’s life.

Gone from this place and time but now Heaven has another angel to welcome home!

Pauline was born in Port Coquitlam, BC, on June 18, 1927. Pauline passed away in the afternoon of the first day of spring, March 20, 2021.

The family would like to give special thanks to Dr. Sven Kipp and the staff at Overlander Residential Care, SouthPark Unit for their outstanding care and compassion. At Pauline’s request, there will be no service. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Anyone wishing to make a memorial donation in Pauline’s name please consider Overlander Residential Care. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

By Helen Steiner Rice

Pauline was a very optimistic person, and her favourite saying was “April showers bring May flowers,” anytime it rained.

The more you give, The more you get, The more you laugh, The less you fret,      The more you live abundantly, The more of everything you share, The more you’ll always have to spare, The more you love,     That life is good, And friends are kind, For only what we give away, Enriches us from day to day.

GIVE LAVISHLY LIVE ABUNDANTLY

Pauline lived a long and happy life and leaves to cherish her memory her only child Gary (Vicki), her siblings Ron (Betty), Phyllis (Cam), and Art (Louise). She also leaves four grandchildren Lisa (Will), Paul, Shelly, Reece (Heather), nine great-grandchildren Brandin (Cyarra), Billy, Alexander, Hugh, Sydney, Keelan, Declan, John, and Tess, and one greatgreat-grandchild Aubree. Pauline also had many nieces and nephews, who were also in her thoughts.

We would like to express our most sincere and heartfelt gratitude to all the staff at Gemstone Care Home who were exceptional in making Sheila’s last days comfortable. Thank you for the “above and beyond” care she received, for facilitating video visits after work hours with family members, for sitting with her when we could not, and for keeping us informed often about her state of health and the progression of her illness. We cannot thank you all enough.

GIVE LAVISHLY LIVE ABUNDANTLY

Pauline Margaret MacNaughton


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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October 30, 1941- March 24, 2021

Velma leaves to cherish her memory a large extended family: brother George Brown (Marianne), daughters: Ashly Davy (Jim), Tammy deBruijn, Susan Loewen (Jeffrey), sons: Terry deBruijn (Martine), Karl deBruijn (Lynn), Scott deBruijn (Susan), Mark deBruijn (Lois), Mark Schrader (Carmi), Floyd Duncan, as well as twenty grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Velma was predeceased by her two husbands Scotty deBruijn and Myrle Schrader, her parents Bus and Rosemary Brown, her sister Norma Jean Pratt, her daughter Scottina deBruijn, and her grandson Kristopher deBruijn.

Susie leaves behind her daughters Leah (Rod) Erichuk, Thea Holden (Bill Hender), her cherished grandchildren Taylor, Breckin, Conlin, and Hailie and her sister Shirley Bishop. She is predeceased by her parents William and Edna Normand, and her brother William (Bill) Normand.

Susie was also an accomplished piano player and played the flute in her high school band. She also loved spending time at Lac Des Roches in the summertime with her childhood friend Mary Ellen. Susie loved horses. Growing up on Nicola Street, didn’t allow for horses however she never stopped wishing. Fortunately, her dream came true when she acquired a horse named Kitten. It wasn’t long before it became clear that owning more horses would soon follow. As her family grew, they moved to an acreage in Knutsford where they bred and raised Quarter Horses. Many weekends were spent travelling to horse shows to watch their stallion compete on the AQHA circuit, and then later on to watch and support the girls as they showed their horses all over BC. Susie was a member of the Kamloops and District Light Horse Club, 4-H Senior Council, and Leader of the Top Rail 4-H Horse Club. Mom also loved cats. Her house with never without one or two and the barn was often a refuge for rescues or strays. Her beloved cat Zoe was her constant companion. Susie was a proud member of PEO - Chapter AT for almost 57 years. The generosity, kindness, and commitment this group has not only to each other, but to the women of this community, is unwavering and my mom loved spending time working, learning, and laughing with her PEO “sisters”. Mom was a Social Butterfly. Dinners out, Saturday morning coffee, October Birthday Club, PEO or 4-H events, Knutsford Stitch group, Grad Reunions, or volunteering somewhere, Susie was never still for long. She loved to help others and treasured all the many friends she made along the way. Susie was also a Kamloops Blazers Season Ticket Holder for over 30 years. She rarely missed a game and enjoyed going to the rink with her hockey crew. Susie was also an amazing Nana to her grandkids. Her love for them was endless and she could usually be found cheering them on at a sporting event or taking them on an adventure somewhere. The family wishes to extend a heartfelt thanks to Dr. Dickinson for his dedication and kindness, Sandi for being there whenever we needed you, Stella and Heather for your regular visits, the nurses at Hospice House who made her final days comfortable, and to all her friends who loved, supported and cared for her. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her memory to Parkinson Society BC. A private graveside service will be held at Hillside Cemetery for the family and a celebration of life will be held at a later date.

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It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of Velma Mae Schrader (formerly deBruijn), (née Brown), on Sunday, March 21, 2021 at the age of 88 years.

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Elspeth Anne “Susie” Haughton on March 24, 2021, at the age of 79, with her family by her side.

Growing up, Mom enjoyed figure skating and participated in many productions with her skating club over the years. This love of figure skating carried on for her entire life. She loved watching the sport and was always very biased towards the Canadian performances. A highlight for her was attending the World Figure Skating Championships in Vancouver in 2001.

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Velma Schrader

Elspeth Anne “Susie” Haughton (née Normand)

Susie was born and raised in Kamloops. She attended Kam High and graduated in 1959. She then went on to Secretarial School at Mount Royal College in 1960-61. Her career included positions at Marion Hilliard House, the Burris Clinic, and from 1980 to 2002, School District #73. Susie worked as a steno at the School Board Office, Valleyview Secondary, and to end her 22-year career, at Sahali Secondary.

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Velma was born at the Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, BC. During her early life, her father worked for the CNR and during WW2 he joined the Canadian army and worked as a payroll clerk. As a junior employee with the railway he was stationed at many small communities and stations along the rail line. The living accommodations were often remote and very basic so Velma grew up playing among the forest and wilderness along the tracks. With the military, her dad was stationed at military bases throughout western Canada. The nature of her father’s employment meant that the family had to move and relocate frequently. Home was never the same place for very long. Velma was fortunate to be able to spend a lot of time with her maternal grandparents (Williams) at their small home on the corner of McKenzie Avenue and Williams Street in North Kamloops. At an early age, she became a veteran of rail travel as she was “shunted” between her parent’s home and the Kamloops CNR junction with caring conductors to watch over her. Velma often referred to herself as a “railway brat and an army brat”. Although she lived with her family in many different communities, she grew to consider Kamloops as her home base and would return later in her life to raise her many children. Velma married Scotty deBruijn from Edmonton in 1952 and as fate would have it, he was in the RCAF. She was to continue her transient life and together they moved may times as Scotty was transferred to bases around the country. Several times he was posted to isolated radar bases where there were no accommodations for families. When this happened, Velma was expected to stay back and raise the family on her own. In 1963, Scotty received such a transfer. He was transferred from CFB Centralia, Ontario to the isolated CFB Puntzi Mountain in BC. Velma had had enough. She refused to be left on her own in Ontario while her husband worked in BC. After giving the military a piece of her mind and without their approval, she pulled up stakes and moved her family to Kamloops. There she had family and friends and her husband was close enough to visit more regularly. Fortunately, Scottie’s next posting was to CFB Kamloops so the family did not have to move again. There was some debate about whether the RCAF made this decision for sound economic reasons or whether they simply did not want to face the “wrath of Velma”, again. Sadly, Scottie passed away in 1974. In 1976 Velma met the second love of her life, Myrle Schrader. They were married in 1979 their two families were blended. Myrle and Velma moved to the Shuswap and spent many happy years living on the “Little Lake” where they were able to spend many wonderful summers with their children and grandchildren. They spent many years wintering in Yuma, Arizona where they enjoyed the sun and avoided the winter. Once “snowbirding” became impractical for them, they moved to the Florentine retirement community and then to Gillis House in Merritt.

Velma lived a very full and rewarding life and she will live on in our hearts forever. The family would like to thank the staff of Gillis House, Merritt, BC for the loving care that they provided Velma and the help they gave her family in keeping contact during these very difficult times. Regardless of how busy they were, they would make time to get Velma ready for a window visit: to make sure her hair and nails were done and the jewelry matched! Due to COVID safety measures, there will be no service at this time. If so inclined, a donation to a local charity of your choice in Velma’s memory would be appreciated.

Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Condolences may be sent to www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone! #4-665 Tranquille Rd Kamloops

250-554-2324

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May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of despair kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

With the unique challenges brought by COVID-19, we remain committed to helping families. We now offer online arrangement services.


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WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

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Mavis Deanna Anderson (née Howlett)

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May Connon

It is with sad hearts announce the passing (Maisie) Connon.

It is with heavy hearts that the family of Mavis Anderson announces her peaceful passing on February 27, 2021 at her home, after a brief illness. Her children were privileged to be with her in her final weeks and at the time of her death.

Born in Killam, Alberta, Mavis grew up in Galahad, Alberta, gained a nursing diploma from Royal Alexandra Hospital and married Ronald Anderson (1959-1978) in 1959. In addition to nursing, homemaking and raising her three children, Mavis enthusiastically participated in the numerous communities in which she lived (Aklavik, Hay River, Yellowknife, Quesnel, and Kamloops) making longtime friends in all of these places. Mavis nursed briefly at Tranquille Psychiatric Hospital, and then at Overlander Extended Care Hospital. Here she rose through the ranks retiring as Director of Nursing in 1999. She was respected by all; loved by many, and her compassionate pragmatism was deeply appreciated by residents and their families. Social and competitive, Mavis loved playing golf, curling, Scrabble and bridge. After her retirement, she taught English in China then began to travel in earnest. She was convivial, curious about people and a natural storyteller with a dry sense of humour. She had a natural elegance and always looked sharp. Our mother was a force to be reckoned with, and had a finely tuned BS meter. She was a staunch and loyal friend, generous, often to a fault and constantly put others before herself. We are grateful for her broad community of friends, and their strong network of support, especially evident in this isolating time. Heartfelt thanks also go to Dr. Hollman, her physician, colleague and friend; the surgeons at Royal Inland Hospital; and her palliative team’s support and attention despite COVID 19 restrictions. Flowers are gratefully declined but, if wished, donations can be made in her name to Mustard Seed, (giving.theseed.ca) Find photos and expanded obituary at www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com A virtual celebration of life is planned for April 10, 2021. Request an invitation, if not already invited, by emailing us at maviscelebrationoflife@gmail.com

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Dwight Rodney Leng

December 23, 1924 - March 21, 2021

1937 - 2021

Mavis will be forever remembered by her sister and best friend Judy (Graeme); her children Olivia, Kathryn (Nicholas), and Jeff (Eri); six grandchildren, three greatgrandchildren, and many beloved nieces and nephews.

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that we of May

Born in Winnipeg, May was one of six children to Jack and Mary Cromb. Her family moved to Vancouver when she was 14 years. During WW2 May did her part by working for Boeing helping to assemble planes. In November 1943 May enlisted with the Canadian Women’s Army Corp. It would be in 1945, that May met the love of her life Jim Connon whom she affectionately always referred to as Connie. May and Jim were married on November 5, 1949. In 1968 the couple along with their two children moved to Kamloops where they would make many friends and entertain at their home on Desmond Street especially around the pool in the summertime. May is survived by her daughter Shannon of Vancouver, son Tim of Surrey, sister Pearl Dombrosky of Burnaby as well as many nieces, nephews and friends including her dear friend Anne Tjader of Kamloops. May was predeceased by her husband Jim, parents, brothers and one sister. A big thank you to the wonderful staff at Ridgeview Lodge for making sure that May’s remaining years were as comfortable as possible.

It is with deep sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Dwight Rodney Leng in Kamloops, BC at the age of 52 on March 12, 2021. Dwight was predeceased by his mother Sharron and father Rodney. He leaves behind to mourn girlfriend Tracy, sister Desirea, three brothers Daniel, Mitch and Peter John, cousins Bradden and Tina, uncles Robert and Wayne and other relatives in Canada and the U.S. There will be no memorial service. However if friends so desire, a donation may be made in memory of Dwight to a charity of your choice. Cremation to follow. Drake Cremation and Funeral Service in charge of arrangements.

Ask DRAKE Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW! Q. What if we all want some of Murray’s ashes?

No service by request.

Alice Mary McGuckin It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Alice “Issy” McGuckin on March 21, 2021, at the age of 76. She was predeceased by her parents, John and Alice McGuckin. She is survived by her brother James McGuckin (Isis) of Edmonton, her niece Patricia Wells (Keith) of Victoria and nephew Alexander McGuckin (Colette) of Edmonton. Alice will also be lovingly remembered by her grandnieces and grandnephews, Elizabeth, Victoria, Alexander, James and Eliana. Alice loved to go and see her community of friends at Bingo where she was known by one and all. She was an excellent cook and loved to dance and listen to music. She will be missed for her great sense of humour and her contagious laugh. The family would like to thank her good friends, Sherry and Albert Fedun, Diane and Reg Schindelka, Fern Carifelle and Jean Poznikoff for their friendship and support over the years. At Alice’s behest, there will be no funeral.

A. Unless Murray made his wishes perfectly clear, it’s up to the Executor/ next of kin. Murray, have this discussion with your family while you’re still alive! Let them know how you feel about sharing yourself.

Drake Cremation & Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne • 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 • DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

SHOULDER

By Jackie Huston Lena, Wisconsin By Jackie Huston Lena, Wisconsin There’s an angel on your shoulder Though you may not know she’s there, She watches over you day and night And keeps you in her care. There’s an angel on your shoulder Watching you learn and grow Keeping you safe from danger And nurturing your soul. She’ll be there through your triumphs She’ll dance on clouds with pride, She’ll hold your hand through disappointments and fears, Standing faithfully by your side.

         And stood up for what was right. In your life you’ll be faced with decisions and trials And she’ll shine down her guiding light.

             

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of Despair

Life holds so much in store for you, So remember as you grow older, There are no heights you cannot reach ‘Cause there’s an angel on your shoulder.


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Lori Davies

April 9, 1956 – March 15, 2021

It is with great sadness that the family and friends of Lori Davies announce her passing on March 15, 2021 at Vancouver General Hospital. Lori is survived by her mother Fay Davies, her sisters Nancy Stewart and Carolyn Gavriel, her nephew Alexei Gavriel, her nieces Allison and Lindsay Stewart, and her loving partner David Gow Cooper. She was predeceased by her father Dr. Gordon Davies in 2002. Lori was born Lorene Catherine Davies on April 9, 1956 in Vancouver, B.C. Her parents moved around for several years while Gordon completed his medical internship and training as a general surgeon and then established a medical practice, moving from Vancouver to Saskatoon and then to Kamloops. Lori was a bright light everywhere she went, beloved by all who knew her. Throughout her school years at JP and KSS Lori was an intelligent and talented student, a gifted actress in drama productions, and was popular with her teachers and fellow students as a person who was unfailingly polite, kind and generous to everyone, fun-loving and energetic, spirited and courageous, and ready to try almost anything. During her late teens and early twenties she worked for approx. six summers as a lifeguard and swimming instructor for the City of Kamloops. In 1979 Lori graduated from the University of Alberta with a BSc in Psychology, and in 1981 graduated from Western Washington University with a Master’s Degree in SpeechLanguage Pathology and Audiology. In 1981 she moved to Calgary, working at Alberta Children’s Hospital and the Dr. Gordon Townsend School’s Communication Class until 1986. She also worked in Kelowna and eventually ended up in Vancouver in about 1987 at the Vancouver Neurological Centre, now called the Centre for Ability. Lori’s former CFA colleagues report that in addition to being a truly gifted speechlanguage pathologist she was also a devoted clinical supervisor, guiding and supporting many UBC MSc students in their clinical placements. In 1995 Lori battled two very serious cancers, taking a year off work while she underwent two surgeries, radiation treatments, recovery and rehabilitation. Lori wasalways ready to use humor to help herself and others cope with the worst circumstances, and with

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of despair

Obituaries

Obituaries

many the loving friends visiting her post-surgery with worst circumstances, and with at VGH, a nurse remarked to Lori that she many loving friends visiting her post-surgery had nevera before heard so much in at VGH, nurse remarked to Lorilaughter that she the ward. heard so much laughter in hadcancer never before the cancer ward. Not one to malinger, as soon as she felt able, Lori joined a cancer as survivors’ boat Not one to malinger, soon as dragon she felt able, team and over the next few years worked Lori joined a cancer survivors’ dragon boat her to the being member Team teamway andup over nexta few years of worked Port way of Vancouver, competing at theofDragon her up to being a member Team Boat as one of only eightteams in Port ofFestival Vancouver, competing at the Dragon the Cascadia Division, outeightteams of hundreds Boatelite Festival as one of only in of teams. Always to the competing elite Cascadia Division, out of happy hundreds include children, she allowed young of competing teams. Always her happy to nieces participate warm-upher exercises includetochildren, sheinallowed young with thetoteam. nieces participate in warm-up exercises with the team. In 2003 Lori returned to Kamloops, working at 2003 the Lori Children’s and working Family In returned Therapy to Kamloops, Resource Centre as both a therapist the at the Children’s Therapy and and Family supervisor of a multi-disciplinary team. Resource Centre as both a therapist and She the also coordinated the Autism Assessment supervisor of a multi-disciplinary team. She Teamcoordinated and mentored students aswell also themany Autism Assessment as other therapists. According to her former Team and mentored many students aswell colleagues, Lori was absolutely as other therapists. According to dedicated her former to the children and absolutely families she served; colleagues, Lori was dedicated in she and was families intelligent, to her the work children she intuitive, served; extremely resourceful, she cared for her in her work she was and intelligent, intuitive, clients from the bottom of she her cared soul. for her extremely resourceful, and clients from the bottom of her soul. Among her many areas of expertise, Lori was interested andof researchedpreAmong her manyinareas expertise, Lori literacyinterested and literacy children with was in skills and inresearchedpreDowns hadinmany resources literacy Syndrome, and literacyand skills children with that sheSyndrome, shared. and had many resources Downs that she shared. Families remember her infectious laughter her ability toherbe gentle and Families andremember infectious nurturingwhile for laughter and herfiercely ability toadvocating be gentle and children and families. a supervisor nurturingwhile fiercely As advocating for she was and a leader but always ‘led from children families. As a supervisor behind’ was but positive, she was and a leader always supportive ‘led from and encouraging her coworkers, behind’ and wastoward positive, supportive with whom she formed lasting and encouraging towarddeep her and coworkers, friendships. with whom she formed deep and lasting friendships. Travel, adventure and love of nature were key components of Lori’s life. of Upon graduating Travel, adventure and love nature were key from high school in 1974, andgraduating Candace components of Lori’s life. Lori Upon Cates hopped intoina1974, Honda Civic drove from high school Lori andand Candace across Canada to Quebec, then in drove 1976Cates hopped into a Hondaand Civic and 77 backpacked around Europe the across Canada to Quebec, and thenand in 1976USSR, the beginnings of many 77 backpacked around Europeadventures and the Lori have throughout life with USSR,would the beginnings of manyheradventures many wonderful Because of Lori’s Lori would have friends. throughout her life with experiences with friends. cancers Because and subsequent many wonderful of Lori’s battles with autoimmune she was experiences with cancersdiseases, and subsequent always aware of the possibility she battles with autoimmune diseases, that she was may notaware live a long life,possibility so she made always of the thata very she conscious anddetermined not toa wait may not live a long life, so effort she made very to live her anddetermined best life, but to effort live her life conscious notbest to wait in to the livepresent. her best life, but to live her best life in the present. In that goal she was aided by lots of amazing friends who herlots toofcamping, In that goal sheintroduced was aided by amazing fishing, on a motorcycle, kayaking, friends travelling who introduced her to camping, snowshoeing, cross skiing, hiking fishing, travelling on a country motorcycle, kayaking, and biking. They through snowshoeing, crossbiked country skiing,France, hiking hikedbiking. throughThey the Andes in Peru and the and biked through France, Annapurnas Nepal, and kayaked hiked throughin the Andes in Peru and and the camped their Belize and Annapurnas in way Nepal,through and kayaked islands the way Pacific Coast. Belize Lori loved campedofftheir through and the outdoors felt that timeLori in nature islands off theand Pacific Coast. loved replenished soul.felt In later fell in the outdoorsherand that years time she in nature love with bird and years photography. replenished herwatching soul. In later she fell in

Obituaries

Obituaries

Lori unfortunate tendency to injure love had withan bird watching and photography. herself but she was never to a quitter Lori hadonantrips, unfortunate tendency injure and sheon did not but want towas let her herself trips, she never a quitter and she did not want to let her injuries ruin injuriespeople’s ruin other people’s enjoyment of other enjoyment of the adventures the adventures (she calledgene”). it “the She hostess (she called it “the hostess had gene”). Shestamina had incredible stamina and incredible and determination in determination in the of cause thingsother that the face of things that face would would cause givebroken up – people to giveother up –people brokentoribs, brokeninribs, broken bones in and her more. foot, bones her foot, broken wrists, broken wrists, andillness more. and Instead of letting Instead of letting injuries beat illness and injuries beat herwas down, Lori’s her down, Lori’s response to come response was to come backlive stronger, back stronger, fight harder, better fight and harder, live better and achieve evenchildren more. achieve even more. Lori loved Lori loved children and seemed connect and seemed to connect withtothem so with themsosointuitively, naturally,that so intuitively, that naturally, they invariably they invariably adored It was a true adored her. It was a true her. gift that enhanced gift enhanced asa her effectiveness asa her that effectiveness speech-language speech-language therapist and made aunt her therapist and made her a much-loved atomuch-loved to her nephew, nieces, her nephew,aunt nieces, and all her friends’ and all her friends’ children. children. Lori’s family is grateful to her partner Dave, who brought so much love into her life and cared for her during her illness when the pandemic prevented others from getting close to her and giving her the care they so badly wanted to provide. We also want to acknowledge and thank Ruth Lidster, Lori’s lifelong friend and partner in crime, for more than 50 years of friendship, support, adventures, and countless moments of absolute silliness. They loved to go on bird watching walks and trips, and while Lori was in a coma during her final final days at VGH, Ruth played bird songs at her bedside. Many thanks to the medical staff at Royal Inland Hospital and the ICU at Vancouver General Hospital, for their diligence and care. According to Lori’s wishes, she has been cremated and her ashes will be scattered over a body of water. We have not yet determined where that will be, but friends and family are encouraged to provide suggestions, and everyone will be kept informed when a decision is made. Because of pandemic rules against large gatherings, a celebration of Lori’s life will be held at some time in the future when itis safe for all her many friends to come together, hold each other, and cry and laughtogether. flowers, please consider making In lieu of flowers, a donation to the Children’s Therapy and Family Resource Centre, and/or to Ducks Unlimited. A longer and more detailed story of Lori’s life can be found online at www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com People are encouraged to leave messages, tell stories about Lori, express their feelings and read the messages left by others. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577

Obituaries

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Obituaries

Michelle Marie Foreman

April 30,1979 - March 9, 2021 With deepest sorrow, we share the sudden loss of our beloved Michelle. Michelle is survived by her daughter Emily, mother Judy, brother Ryan, Barb and Jim Grahn and numerous other relations. Predeceased by her father Tony, aunty Patti, uncle Cam and grandparents Mike Frey and Madge and Reg Foreman. A friend to many who struggled valiantly to standup to life’s challenges. Known for her gifts of flowers and a ready smile. She will be greatly missed by many. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in her name, can be made to The Tree a non-profit society at 250-377-6890 in Kamloops, BC. A private gravesite service to follow with inurnment to a family plot in Manitoba. A special thanks to the Turning Point outreach nurses and staff.

Laurie Kathryn Horne It is with great sorrow that we announce the passing of Laurie Kathryn Horne on March 15, 2021 in Kamloops, BC, at the all-too-young age of 66. Survived by husband Jim, son Andrew (May) and two grandchildren of Burnaby, brother Ron (Nan) of Victoria, and numerous uncles, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews, and friends. Predeceased by brother Bob and son Robert. As a beloved wife, mother, sister, and more, Laurie will be missed by all those who had the privilege of knowing her through the years. We are grateful to Royal Inland Hospital and Community Care Clinic staff for her care over the past few months. No service by request.

Donald (DOC) Halliday It comes with great sadness to announce the sudden passing of Donald Valiant Halliday. Born in Burnaby April 6, 1946. Don worked in several professions including logging, corrections and lastly as a school bus driver in Clearwater and Chase until his retirement in 2017. He moved to Kamloops shortly after. DOC had many friends and always had a story and a laugh to share at his regular hangouts sipping on a cup of Joe. He will be missed by all who knew him.


A46

WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

Employment

Employment

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Colleen Marie Koch My little sister, Colleen Marie Koch died on March 25, 2021 at the age of 52 in Royal Columbian Hospital where she was being treated for Calciphylaxis since October 2020. Colleen had been waiting for a kidney donor since 2016. Colleen is predeceased by her parents Peggy (d. 2006) and David Koch (d. 2013), and is survived by me, Dana Koch (Reg Maidment).

GORDON TANSLEY On March 18, 2021, Gordon Tansley, a resident of White Rock, BC passed away at the age of 83. He was surrounded by his loved ones as we all sadly said our goodbyes. Gordon is survived by his wife Diane, his three daughters Lisa, Lana (Tim), Julie (Harvey), his nine grandchildren Brittani (Everett), Brooke (Kyle), Brandon, Jordan (Taylor), Riley (Devan), Madison (Jordan), Dawson, Liam, Jack and great-granddaughter Trixie. He is also survived by his brother Marvin Tansley, and his sister Sheran (Marvin) Munro along with nieces and nephews. Gordon was born on January 10, 1938 in Provost, Alberta to Doug and Sylvia Tansley. After a few relocations, the family settled in Kamloops in 1948. His love for hockey began at the age of ten where he spent endless hours at the Memorial Arena. He then quit high school to play junior hockey in Melville, Saskatchewan, and attended Montreal Canadians training camp in 1958. He returned to BC where he played in the Western Hockey League and went back to school. At this time, he met Diane Veness, the love of his life. He then played for Seattle Totems in 1960/61 before being drafted by the Boston Bruins. Feeling unsettled, he returned home to pursue his education, he married Diane in 1964, graduated with a Bachelor of Education at UBC in 1966. Following his graduation, he started a teaching career in Richmond, BC and then moved to Kamloops with his wife and daughters where he continued his teaching career and also completed his Master’s degree before retiring in 2000. Gordon and Diane shared a love that most people long for, through thick and thin. He absolutely adored Diane and he never held back making that known to us all. They loved to pack a lunch and get in their car and drive with no destination in mind until they arrived wherever. This was their 'means of therapy' some days to work through life's challenges. Together they created so many happy memories for their three daughters. The family grew with grandchildren and even more memories. Gordon's love for life included his trips to Hawaii, his road trips to Saskatchewan (in the beloved 1987 motorhome "Franklin") with whichever grandchild was up for it, and his camping trips to Golden Ears Provincial Park. He made us all laugh along the way and each day was an unpredictable adventure. Gordon's faith in God was prevalent through his day to day living. His days started with devotions and prayer time. He brought an abundance of peace and strength to each of us no matter what was going on in our world. He was a lover of all things sweet. There would often be chocolate bar wrappers under the seat of his car. He had his own candy/twinkie cupboard that we all liked to raid upon visiting. His love for books, the Mary Tyler Moore Show, Two and a Half Men, wall to wall pictures of family members are just a few things that come to mind when thinking about him. He loved to surprise Diane with random dinner guests when he would pick up hitchhikers between Kamloops and Rayleigh. He would share his love for God with them, feed them dinner and send them on their way. He would amuse us all with his mis-pronunciation of people’s names or mis-use of words which would sometimes land him in trouble. He managed to redeem himself through his charm. He believed that Gorilla Glue was the fixer of all things including the frame of his 1987 motorhome which raised a few eyebrows. He was not a fan of line-ups or traffic jams and would reroute no matter how much time was added to the journey. If someone passed him in traffic and ended up at the same stop light, it was guaranteed that he would honk and wave. As a Principal and teacher, he deeply cared for his students. He was known for his walks past the student’s smoke pit to stop and chat, chasing the occasional unwanted guest off the school grounds and of course the “no drug/ alcohol speech” at the start of every school dance. Gordon was loved beyond measure, well respected and admired by his family, friends and his former students. He will be greatly missed by all. Thank you for all the memories. His immediate family will be celebrating his life on Easter Sunday, April 4th.

Coll was born in Trail, BC in 1969 and we relocated to Kamloops, BC before she was a year old. She attended North Kamloops Elementary, MacArthur Park, and graduated in 1987 from NorKam. Colleen earned her degree in psychology/criminology from Simon Fraser University in 1992. Her career as a public servant started as a welfare case worker before she moved to the Public Guardian and Trustee where she worked for more than 20 years. As a manager for the PGT, Colleen was much loved and respected for her leadership, fairness, and the fun she brought to her workplace. Could our girl laugh?!? She could only get part way through a joke before making herself laugh to tears. Colleen had a huge, boisterous personality that was truly magnetic and magical. She was a joy to be around and her infectious laugh could not be resisted. She was quick to let you know she’d been wronged, and even faster to forgive. Coll knew just how to push your buttons but never too far. Her friends are too numerous to count and all are as devoted to her as she was to each of them. We were all bees swarming around our queen. Colleen’s outlook was always sunny and positive. This was challenged greatly over the last 5 years as she struggled with kidney disease and failing health. Her determination to come through each setback was a marvel to family, friends, and her healthcare team. Even when faced with her final crisis, she steadfastly declared she would beat the odds, recover, and go back to the life she loved. Her final gift to us was a glorious week where she spoke at length to me and friends - sharing dreams, stories, and love.

Pennies

From

Heaven

by Charles L. Mashburn

I found a penny today, Just laying on the ground But it’s not just a penny,                      He said angels           He said when an    They toss a penny down               of your frown So don’t pass by that penny, When you’re feeling blue         That an angel   

Although Coll lived in the Lower Mainland, Kamloops was always home. She always longed to return home and spent most of her vacations there with family and friends. She was a trusted confident, provider of wisdom, cherished friend, and precious sister. Because Colleen was loved by so many, we will be waiting until we can all meet to joyfully remember her greatness.

Love you, Babes. Oh, my heart, I miss you so. Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes

May the Sunshine of Comfort Dispel the Clouds of Despair


WEDNESDAY, March 31, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Support your local restaurants!

With the new public health orders announced this week, there’s never been a more important time to support our local restaurants and enjoy fresh, high-quality food from here at home.

Order take-out, drive thru or use food delivery services

Purchase a restaurant gift card for a friend, or to use later

Choose local products whenever you can

Support Kamloops restaurants and businesses

Go to infinitekamloops.com

for an up-to-date list of local restaurants offering delivery and take-out options!

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