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kamthisweek

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 12

#YKASTRONG A man struggles to push carts laden with personal effects along Tranquille Road in North Kamloops in February 2019 as a City of Kamloops bylaws officer looks on. The city’s bylaws department — now referred to as community services — is in the midst of a major restructuring. CUPE Local 900 president Carmen Sullivan said 11 of 30 union members (bylaw officers and custodial guards) affected by the restructuring have been displaced. DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE

SAYING BYE TO THE BYLAWS DEPARTMENT JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

D

on McConnell, 61, said he has a bad taste in his mouth after leaving the city and his 30-year-career in the bylaws sector. McConnell was hoping to retire at age 65. However, amidst restructuring of the bylaws department, McConnell accepted 10 weeks’ severance and no longer works for the city — having departed at the beginning of the year, four years earlier than planned. McConnell said he chose severance among three options offered because the work environment had become, in his view,

“toxic” due to internal conflicts, mismanagement, grievances, arbitration, stress, workload and new physical requirements for the job he believes were brought in to intentionally displace staff. “I have no problem with change,” McConnell told KTW. “You do it the right way.” CUPE Local 900 president Carmen Sullivan said 11 of 30 union members (bylaws officers and custodial guards) affected by the restructuring have been displaced. Staff had the choice of severance, moving departments or applying for the new community service officer role. Four chose severance and seven have been placed elsewhere at the city, Sullivan said.

Of those who chose to apply for the new role, a physical assessment, called the Community Services Officers’ Physical Assessment Test (CSOPAT) is required. Sullivan said five members have so far passed the physical test. The city is allowing three attempts to pass and is providing training for those who again need to take the test. Two of the three fitness test dates have taken place, with the final date, and last chance to pass for those who failed the first two attempts, set for this summer. Sullivan described the number of people who have passed so far as “low,” noting the union has “huge concerns.” Sullivan said that in talking to staff, the

physical benchmark does not match the work. She said at no time would staff need to be able to do a burpee or jump hurdles. Instead, she said skills needed for the job include communication and de-escalation of a tense situation. “When I think of going down the embankment into the transient camp, if there was a log or a fallen tree, at no time would our members be expected to hurdle it,” Sullivan said. “They would walk around it. They would climb over it. They would assess their surroundings and they would maintain their footing. They would not be running down the embankment at full speed. See CITY, UNION, A6

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A4

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE

Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

Council Calendar Public and media attendance via Zoom only until further notice March 30, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing April 7, 2021 2:00 pm - Finance Committee Meeting April 13, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing All meetings are currently being held at Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street. The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Notice To Motorists Please use caution when driving in the vicinity and obey all traffic control personnel, signs, and devices in the following area: • Tranquille Road Singh Street to 12th Street • Dallas Drive Andover Crescent to Peerless Way • McArthur Island Ring Road 12th Street to Kamloops Youth Soccer Association offices • Victoria Street 100 block To stay up to date on road work projects, visit:

STREET SWEEPING Street sweeping is happening in neighbourhoods across Kamloops over the next several weeks. Residents can help City crews by moving their vehicles off of the roadways and not creating sand piles when sweeping personal property into travel lanes. Crews are currently working in the valley bottom and will focus on higher elevations in future weeks. Signs are posted to inform residents when crews are working in their neighbourhood. To see which streets have been swept and the ones that are upcoming, view the City Street Sweeping map at: Maps.Kamloops.ca/StreetSweeping

Did you know? City crews sweep each road, most sidewalks, and every concrete island in Kamloops using a variation of four large sweeping trucks, a skid steer (ATV) sweeper, four sidewalk sweepers, and two water trucks.

ALL YARD WASTE SITES NOW OPEN

SAFELY DISPOSE OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

Spring is here, and as the snow melts, for many people that means yard cleanup! The City would like to remind people of the City’s three yard waste drop-off locations and what is accepted. • Bunker Road Drop-Off Location 1455 Bunker Road 7 days a week, 10:00 am–6:00 pm • Barnhartvale Drop-Off Location 970 Eliza Road Friday–Monday, 8:30 am–4:30 pm • Cinnamon Ridge Compost Facility 4045 Tranquille Road 7 days a week, 10:00 am–4:00 pm (until March 31; 10:00 am–6:00 pm April 1–October 31)

Hazardous waste items do NOT belong in recycling or garbage bins.

Accepted yard waste includes grass clippings, leaves, fallen fruit, garden waste, and tree prunings up to 24" diameter. Please note: New for 2021—compost purchases at the Cinnamon Ridge Compost Facility will be by debit or credit card only. For more details, visit: Kamloops.ca/YardWaste

Are you tossing cell phones, laptops, cordless power tools, or vape pens/ e-cigarettes into your garbage or recycling containers? These items contain lithium-ion batteries, and when they are improperly disposed of, they can have serious consequences—they can explode and ignite during landfill and recycling processes, turning a regular household item into something dangerous. This is not just a Kamloops problem. Across BC in the last year, recycling collectors and processors have seen an increase in fires, almost all of which have been caused by improper recycling and disposal. Hazardous materials should be disposed of safely. Visit our website or download the Waste Wise app to search how to dispose of these items. Kamloops.ca/HazardousWaste

Kamloops.ca/Kammute

DOWNLOAD THESE CITY APPS FOR FREE! MYKAMLOOPS™ APP Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

myKamloops

Report non-emergency issues such as potholes, fallen trees, or broken street lamps. Simply take a picture, confirm the location, add any comments, and submit!

WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WASTE WISE! Sign up for weekly collection reminders and search how to recycle or dispose of hundreds of products and items. Kamloops.ca/WasteWise

FLOWBIRD—PAY FOR PARKING BY PHONE Flowbird is an intuitive and easy-to-use application that allows you to pay for your parking sessions remotely through your mobile phone. Simply select the parking location nearest to your vehicle, select the duration, and confirm payment.

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A5

CAN PAST BE SAVED FROM THE FUTURE?

AFTER THE MURDER CONVICTION

LACE UP THOSE RUNNING SHOES

Century-old homes are in area of downtown redevelopment plans

Kamloops RCMP staff sergeant looks at the impact on the underworld

It is Week 3 of training for the amended Boogie the Bridge event

A12-A13

INSIDE KTW Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A25 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A28 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A36 Art Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A41 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A44

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WEATHER ALMANAC Today Showers Hi: 10 C Low: 2 C One year ago Hi: 10 .3 C Low: -3 .6 C Record High 19 .4 C (1939) Record Low -17 .2 C (1955)

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HOW TO REACH US: Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

A16-A17

A38

Council to decide on trash rate hike JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The City of Kamloops may increase residential garbage collection fees on all but the smallest bin size, as part of several proposed rate changes related to the management of solid waste. Environmental services manager Glen Farrow said the city is taking a close look at its waste-related rates, including collection and disposal for residential and commercial waste at the curb and at the landfill, as part of bylaws revisions. Farrow said the goal is waste reduction and diversion. “We’ve adjusted them [rates] to further incentivize and encourage increased diversion of materials going to our landfill,” Farrow said. The civic operations committee voted to send the proposed rate increases, through bylaw updates, to council, which has final say on whether the rates are changed. The proposed rate increase for residential garbage collection impacts the 180-litre bin (currently $113 per year for rental and collection, proposed increase to $121 per year), 245litre bin ($140/$150) and 360litre bin ($220/$242). It does not impact the smallest bin, which is 120 litres. About half of Kamloops households use the 245-litre bin, the second-largest size, according to a city report. According to the number of containers in use and the proposed rate increases, the change would net the city an additional $216,000 per year.

Auditors check to ensure garbage and recycling bins are filled with the proper material, as per instructions on the containers. The proposed rate increase for residential garbage collection impacts the 180-litre bin (currently $113 per year for rental and collection, proposed increase to $121 per year), 245-litre bin ($140/$150) and 360-litre bin ($220/$242). It does not impact the smallest bin, which is 120 litres. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

Farrow said the additional revenues would cover increased costs of collection, including for repairs, fuel and staff wages. In addition, he said it would help cover the costs of landfill capital projects, including future expansions. The issue was discussed during a recent civic operations committee meeting, where Coun. Kathy Sinclair noted the smallest (120-litre) bin size costs, and would continue to cost, the most per litre under the new rate structure. She questioned whether that incentivizes waste reduction. An alternative rate proposal not recommended by staff suggested decreasing the rate for that smallest,120-litre bin. However, Farrow noted larger bin sizes are often collecting waste for more people, such as families or those in secondary suites. Farrow said the city does not wish to penalize households

that have blended families. In addition, Farrow told KTW, there is a base rate to cover costs for such collection. Farrow said the utility is required to be self-sufficient and not result in tax rate increases. At the committee meeting, Mayor Ken Christian agreed with the user-pay system. “This is waste paying for waste,” he said. Farrow said operating and capital costs are significant. Further, Farrow said a rate increase for residential garbage collection has not occurred since 2012. The city may also increase some landfill rates in order to ensure the public is taking certain products to the right locations for diversion. A proposed increase from $100 to $500 per tonne for yard waste at the Mission Flats landfill and the Kamloops Resource Recovery Centre (former Owl Road dump)

in Valleyview, for example, is aimed at changing behaviour. The city hopes by charging a higher rate at those locations for that product, people will instead take it to the Cinnamon Ridge compost facility, which is free of charge and composts yard scraps. The city received 160 tonnes of yard waste for disposal at Missions Flats landfill in 2019. Conversely, rates for wood and asphalt waste at the Kamloops Resource Recovery Centre are proposed to decrease to encourage people to take it to that location. “We’ve set up these facilities to really have source-separated material,” Farrow said. “What we are trying to reduce and eliminate is construction loads with a variety of, you name it, just throw it all into the site.” A waste-related fine is proposed to rise as part of the bylaw revision. Council will review the committee’s proposal to increase a fine of $125 for multifamily dwellings to $500 for insufficient recycling services. Farrow said the $125 fine currently in place is not a sufficient deterrent. Meanwhile, a curbside organics collection pilot program is in the works to collect food scraps and other materials. The city has said one option, should the pilot become permanent, could be rotating garbage and organics collection on a biweekly basis. Farrow said that discussion is independent of the proposed rate increases. He said several options will be on the table, but noted the conversation is in the early stages.

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A6

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

City, union go to arbitration in summer DRSG IV

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“If there was something urgent and emergent happening down there, the RCMP would be called because our members — following the city’s safe work practices — are not allowed to physically engage,” Sullivan said. “They’re not allowed to put themselves in those positions. They’d be breaching the policies of the city.” Sullivan said the city is anticipating changes to the Police Act, giving bylaws (community services) officers more enforcement abilities, including handcuff training and detention. Community services manager Tammy Blundell said the municipality is focused on the department’s restructuring as a way to make better, wellrounded employees with both physical and mental capabilities. She said the role has changed from issuing parking tickets to one that deals with social issues, graffiti, nuisance properties and more. McConnell, the nowretired bylaws officer, said they were already trained to deal with social issues and other scenarios cited by the city as the reason for restructuring. He said bylaws officers have been dealing with transient camps for 20 years. Blundell said some components of the job were not

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part of the job description, which she said has since been expanded. McConnell, however, argued “other related duties” were always part of bylaw officers’ job description. Both McConnell and Sullivan see the new physical test as a way for the city to circumvent the collective agreement and eliminate staff. Sullivan said the city wants a “new face” of the bylaws department, arguing the fitness test — a timed endeavor in which anything slower than 3:20 is failure — discriminates against employees based on age and pre-existing health conditions. Sullivan said there were employees in their 50s, 60s, and even one in their early 70s, who chose not to apply for the new job. Blundell denies the city is deliberately trying to get rid of staff. “Absolutely not,” Blundell said. “And that’s a hard no. It is about the community … and evolving the role.” There is legal precedence for deeming physical assessments discriminatory. In 1994, Tawney Meiorin lost her job as a forest firefighter in B.C. after running 2.5 kilometres in 11 minutes and 49 seconds, 49 seconds past the 11-minute deadline to finish. Meiorin eventually won a six-year battle when the Supreme Court of Canada concluded she was a victim

of sex discrimination. Meiorin had argued the fitness test was discriminatory because women have less aerobic capacity than men. KTW asked Blundell if the city’s fitness test is discriminatory. “I’m not going to comment on that,” she said. “At the end of the day, if an individual wants to participate in this role, it doesn’t matter what age, sex, gender, whatever race they are. If they want to do it, they will do it and we will help them do it.” Arbitration this summer will not centre around discrimination, but whether the role has changed enough to warrant the fitness test. The two parties differ on that opinion. While Blundell maintains the roles are “substantially” different, Sullivan said the union will submit during arbitration in August that the work has not changed. Blundell said the city has supported staff in the transition, noting enhanced module training has been provided for the expanded role, as well as physical fitness training. She said it is a matter of “opinion” as to whether an officer should need to be able to jump hurdles and do burpees. “The community and the city need officers that are able to perform and be able to deal with those stressful parts of the job and be able to manage that,” she said.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A7

City of Kamloops

CEMETERIES

SCHEDULED TURF MAINTENANCE SEASON Cemetery Bylaw No. 6-27 states all artificial flowers and other tokens of remembrance composed of artificial foliage shall only remain on gravesites from October 1st through to the second Monday in April. We ask family members to remove all items before Monday, April 12, 2021. Items in City-issued flower stands are exempt from this rule. Any items not collected before this date will be placed at the Hillside Cemetery flower storage area and available for pickup no later than April 26 and are not to be placed back on the grave site until after October 1. Commencing Thursday, April 15, 2021, and every Thursday after through to October 1, 2021, flowers placed on gravesites will be removed and placed at the flower storage area for our scheduled turf maintenance. This does not include flowers in City-issued flower stands. It is recommended limiting grave embellishments to fresh cut flowers only during the turf maintenance season and that anyone who wishes to place flowers on graves do so after 3:00 pm Friday of each week. If you have any questions please contact the Hillside Cemetery Office at 250-828-3462. Thank you for your co-operation. RAY JOLICOEUR/KTW

HAWK TO CROW: ‘IT’S TIME YOU GO’

A visit to Lower Sahali by this hawk was not appreciated by area crows, who apparently preferred to have the stunning view to themselves. Despite being dive-bombed by the bellowing black birds, the hawk simply hung out and enjoyed a rest.

Kamloops.ca/Cemeteries Fulton & Company LLP

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A8

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

THE KTW EDITORIAL

FOCUSING ON MISSING MIDDLE A GOOD STEP When glancing at the rising real estate prices in Kamloops, one often hears the refrain that, compared to Vancouver, the prices are reasonable. Most cities in North America, regardless of their housing prices, would seem affordable compared to Vancouver. But looked at in isolation, Kamloops is becoming — and has become, in many instances — a place where it is extremely difficult for a young person just starting out in life to buy a house. When homes in the $500,000 to $700,000 range are subject of multiple bidders and the property sells for $55,000 or more over asking price, the signs point to an unaffordable city for not only those trying to enter the market, but those needing more room as their families grow in size. This is why an idea of Kamloops Coun. Kathy Sinclair is welcome. Sinclair wants the city to address what she calls the “missing middle” of the housing market — bridging the gap between renting and home ownership. She said construction of duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, eightplexes, co-operative housing and subsidized housing could increase the city’s rental housing supply and make home ownership more affordable. Indeed they could — and, as Sinclair noted, such housng can be used as infill so as to minimize changes to a neighbourhood’s character. However, this is not to say any neighbourhood in the city should be considered off-limits for such housing options. We cannot afford (literally and figuratively) to not consider including all manner of housing in all areas of Kamloops if we truly want an affordable market for all. Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey Bronwyn Lourens

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Digital sales: Makayla Peverill PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

DIGITAL DESIGNERS Jackson Vander Wal FRONT OFFICE Front office staff: Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery Rosalynn Bartella CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer

CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com Circulation 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada. Nous reconaissons l’appui financier du gouvernement du Canada.

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We are in serious need of a Canada Football Act II

C

athy McLeod will not seek re-election. Now is the time for the four-term Kamloops Conservative MP to cement her legacy by working to save football as God intended it to be played — with three downs, a 20-second play clock, action on every play and the beloved rouge. McLeod can do her part in at least trying to save the superior form of football from extinction by taking a page out of Marc Lalonde’s playbook. She should introduce a private member’s bill in the House of Commons with the sole aim of ensuring any and all professional football played north of the 49th parallel adheres to Canadian CFL rules — and that means never will we see the excitement of a fair catch or a group of special teamers downing a punt and celebrating as if they had just won the Super Bowl. Nor will we watch as players walk off the field with minutes left in the final quarter, thanks to an NFL play clock as long as War and Peace. Yes, Canadian rules football may be in peril, but McLeod and the Canadian Parliament can save it. Having the House of Commons exercise its political muscle to ensure pro football in Canada retains a 55-yard line and unlimited horizontal and vertical movement behind the line of scrimmage is not without precedent. Consider the aforementioned Marc Lalonde and his proposed Canada Football Act of 1974. The private member’s bill of the then-health minister of the Liberal government of the day included a clause that prohibited any league foreign from the CFL from playing in Canada. The bill was in reaction to interlopers from the World Football League trying to gain a foothold

CHRISTOPHER FOULDS

Newsroom

MUSINGS in Canada, with businessman John Bassett’s proposed Toronto Northmen the focus. The bill never became law — and it didn’t matter because Bassett decided to relocate to Memphis, Tenn., as the Southmen before playing a down in Canada. The proposed bill worked in keeping an inferior form of football from infecting us north of the 49th. We need a similar bill today, one with a focus on preserving Canadian rules football from coast to coast to coast now that the CFL and the twice-bankrupt XFL are “talking about talking,” as CFL commissioner Randy Ambrosie has said. (Ambrosie is one of those guys who talks a lot, but rarely says anything. He is akin to those people you meet who speak in buzzwords, jargon and catchphrases, perhaps as a way of justifying time and money spent obtaining whatever degrees they possess.) The CFL is in trouble, to be sure, but Ambrosie’s reasoning for teaming up with the XFL — “to grow the game of football” — is flawed. The game of football south of the border, the less exciting, fourdown brand played in the NFL, is in no need of growing. It is the most powerful and wealthy league on Earth.

Now, if Ambrosie is meeting with the XFL and its star investor — Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson — to grow the game of Canadian rules football, it would be a different matter altogether. But neither Ambrosie, nor Johnson, nor anybody else involved in the discussions/merger has bothered to expand on what the game would look like if, indeed, the nine established CFL clubs join whatever XFL teams emerge from the circuit’s second implosion last year to form a new CFL/XFL league. If, as many pundits have suggested, a merger would likely see the death of three downs and many other unique CFL rules, then we need to be proactive and have an MP like McLeod create a legacy before she leaves Parliament Hill. A bill that becomes law that mandates professional football in Canada must be played under existing Canadian rules could protect history, culture and a good number of jobs for players born with the Maple Leaf floating through their veins. Arguments have been made that the CFL is bleeding badly financially and may need to hook up with a sordid partner such as the XFL to simply stave off death. If that is the case, if the Canadian Football League can survive only by ceasing to be the Canadian Football League and marrying a twice-failed venture to become a second-tier NFL nobody wants or needs, then let’s hold a funeral for the venerable circuit. I’d rather we bury the grand old lady and remember her as she was meant to be than have an imposter shrink the field, freeze the backfield and line up in Victory formation with enough time left on the clock for a few touchdowns to be scored in the CFL. editor@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @ChrisJFoulds


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CITY SHOULD STAY HEALTHY, DON’T USE PESTICIDES JUMP ON GRANTS FOR CYCLING Editor: Cycling is very popular throughout the Western world — providing inexpensive transportation, reducing city congestion and cutting down on carbon emissions. The key requirement in getting people out of their vehicles and onto bicycles is tthe provision of safe routes across cities. Kamloops has built, and continues to build, significant cycling infrastructure for safe cycling for Sahali and Aberdeen, but the remainder of the city has gone begging. Most of today’s cycling in Kamloops is in or near the valley bottom, despite the road conditions. Some project suggestions include making Schubert Drive a cycle-first, vehicle-second street, widening and resurfacing Rivers Trail from Westmount to the Westsyde dyke, surfacing the dyke and installing lighting, widening street shoulders on Ord Road, Parkcrest Avenueand Tranquille Road and providing an off-highway link between Valleyview and Dallas. The federal government is offering grant money for this very thing; hopefully, the city will demonstrate its skills in this regard. Glen Baber Kamloops

Editor: With the arrival of spring, those of us who have been staying home and abiding by the pandemic orders and recommendations are finally able to go out, into our yards, and enjoy some freedom. Soon we will see little bursts of yellow flowers popping up throughout our city. Please do not use pesticides on them. Pesticides (including fungicides and herbicides) harm our pollinators and other beneficial insects. Dandelions are the first food of the season for our bees. And, as most people are aware, bees are essential for a great many of the foods we eat. Their numbers have been dropping drastically over the years due to their exposure to pesticides.

Pesticides affect our streams and groundwater, our air and our health. Pesticides have been linked to various health issues, including leukemia, other cancers, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and other diseases. People with compromised immune systems or lung problems may also be affected. Applying pesticides to your property is exposing not only you and your family to these toxins, but your neighbours and neighbourhood, as well. The drift from pesticides may travel quite far, affecting several other people. Some people have an immediate reaction — for example, anaphylactic shock — which could cause them to be rushed to

hospital for medical care. Others may show symptoms later. As such, they may not make the connection to pesticides used on or near their property. Many people have backyard hens or are beekeepers. Pesticides should not be used anywhere around them, nor anywhere that children and pets play. Make 2021 the year you go organic if you haven’t already. Research natural, safe ways to garden and check out our local master gardeners for advice on organic gardening (search “Thompson Shuswap Master Gardeners on Facebook). We need healthy bees, healthy foods, a healthy environment and healthy people. Diane Czyzewski Kamloops

VISITING PROTOCOL AT RIH NEEDS TO BE FIXED Editor: I live in Salmon Arm. My brother was brought to Royal Inland Hospital because he was suffering a stroke. His wife of almost 50 years was not allowed to stay with him. I delivered some items to the hospital for my brother. I was not allowed to go in,

of course, and was not even guaranteed he would get the things I brought. While waiting to see if what I brought would get to him, a gentleman arrived and was allowed to visit his wife. When I questioned this, I was told it was because she had delivered a baby.

My sister-in-law, who has been my brother’s right arm for 50 years, is not allowed to visit him and not sure if he is ever going to return home, yet a man who is almost assured of seeing his child in the next couple of days is allowed in? I was told if my brother was palliative, his wife would

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked: Do you think heckling and hurling insults should be banned in the legislature?

Results: Yes: 572 votes No: 121 votes 693 VOTES

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Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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then be permitted to visit — when he would be in a state in which he probably wouldn’t even know she was there. What makes one person’s situation different from those of others? This neeeds to be fixed. Margaret Hill Salmon Arm


A10

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Editor: I visited The Art We Art on Victoria Street for a pot of coffee with cookies. Everyone was socially distanced. I noticed that all the customers who were sitting by themselves were on their cellphones, except for a young lady sitting next to me. A classic song came on the speakers and I asked my neighbour if she knew the artist. She quickly answered correctly: “Donovan.” The song was Donovan’s Mellow Yellow.

I was impressed with the young lady’s knowledge and I also noticed that instead of being on her phone, she was reading an interesting book. It was refreshing to see I wasn’t the only one not attached to their phone. I can’t help but notice that the art of conversation is a dying art. Often when I’m in the elevator in my apartment building, mainly young people immediately go on their phones, eliminating any chance of chatting. On the other hand, we

of the older generation have short, friendly chats and they are so positive at a time when we are all isolated. I guess I’m at that age when I can’t understand the younger generation, but I’m encouraging everyone to take the opportunity to create some social interaction whenever possible. Like many seniors in my building, I live alone and we are aware of how important it is to reach out, even in small ways. Laura Douglas Kamloops

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Editor: After reading KTW’s investigative report about the TNRD and its selfentitled mismanagement of the community’s monies, it came as no surprise to us at Paul Lake. After all, we recall the ramshackle way the TNRD changed the timeline and goal posts to suit its needs, not the community it was hired to serve, regarding our fire department. The TNRD is more concerned with the legalities of us having a fire department and not the potential loss of property and life we experience every year here.

In fact, this bumbling bureaucracy, coupled with the utterly lost B.C. Fire Commissioner’s Office, has placed most B.C. rural volunteer fire departments at risk of being lost. The repugnance of the mismanagement of the utilities in its control is only exceeded by the lack of empathy for the communities the regional district is supposed to be serving. Case in point — how all (managed?) areas were paying for water-treatment facilities when some communities have no watertreatment facilities. This had gone on for years.

According to the TNRD at the time, it was attributed to “an accounting error.” To say the TNRD has run amuck with the latest scandal is an understatement; however, the bureaucrats there believe they were acting within their rights set out — by them — and, therefore, are not responsible. We here at Paul Lake know who exactly is responsible. Unfortunately we are quite sure that they are sleeping well at night on fine Egyptian linen. Rick Allen former Paul Lake volunteer fireman

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It is with great pleasure that we introduce KTW Digitals newest addition to the team, Makayla Peverill, as our Digital Marketing & Advertising Strategist. With a vast background in multiple industries and nearly ten years in Customer Service, Makayla comes to us with an eagerness to learn, and to help her community. Makayla moved to Kamloops five years ago from the small town of Golden BC. She attributes her drive and work ethic to her Grandfather, who is an integral part of Golden’s community, and whose outlook on business is “Do everything within your power to ensure the person who has chosen to come to YOU, is taken care of.” In her early career Makayla spent five years in the Finance Industry. Her most recent endeavor as a Customer Relations Manager taught her many things, doing everything from managing customer issues to IT, Marketing, Process Improvement and Process Implementation. Through this experience she learned that her true passion was in Marketing and Advertising. Makayla has a strong background in design, content creation, and Marketing Strategies and comes to us with a creative mindset and fresh ideas. Coupled with her passion to help her community and to share her knowledge, anyone could benefit from buying her a coffee in exchange for picking her brain. Makayla is excited to further build her contacts within the community. You may recognize her by her brightly colored suit collection. So if you see her out and about, please say hello!


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

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NAME:___________________________________ AGE: _____________________________________ EMAIL: __________________________________ PHONE: _________________________________ Bring your entry to your neighbourhood Save On store or take a photo and email for a chance to win. Submit entries by March 31st. Winners will be announced in the April 7th edition of Kamloops This Week. Prizes to be accepted as awarded, no substitutions. SAHALI WESTSYDE DOWNTOWN BROCKLEHURST VALLEYVIEW 1210 Summit Dr 3435 Westsyde Road #200-450 Lansdowne St. #38 - 1800 Tranquille Rd. #9 - 2101 E.T.C.H. 931sm@saveonfoods.com 2210sm@saveonfoods.com 2211sm@saveonfoods.com 2206sm@saveonfoods.com 2209sm@saveonfoods.com

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A12

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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LOCAL NEWS

JESSICA WALLACE PHOTOS/KTW

435 BATTLE ST.

461 BATTLE ST.

451 BATTLE ST.

Can past be preserved as future is built? JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

he future of the past is being discussed amidst a significant development planned for downtown Kamloops. Local historian Andrew Yarmie met KTW to discuss the fate of a trio of homes built more than a century ago in the 400-block of Battle Street. The homes, located at 435, 451 and 461 Battle St., were built in 1912 and feature Edwardian architecture. They are not quite as old as the eldest homes in Kamloops, which are located in the West End and date back to the 1880s and 1890s. Yarmie explained early area development occurred west of First Avenue, then crept east during a boom and prosperous period for Kamloops in the early 1900s before the Great Depression.

The period during which the Battle Street homes were built was named for British King Edward (on the throne at the time), Yarmie explained, and features modular, boxy construction called “foursquare” houses, complete with front porches, square columns and unique architectural features to offset the boxiness. Edwardian-era homes also often included hardwood and brick fireplaces. The large, light brown home at 461 Battle St. has stained glass windows and a turret, or small tower. Yarmie said the turret is unique to heritage homes in Kamloops and called it a “special feature.” The turret is similar to that of a house on West Seymour Street, built in 1897. A former rancher and city councillor named Thomas Bulman built the house, which continues to stand 110 years later on Battle St., near the downtown YMCAYWCA. “He was a famous rancher and did well that way, and built this house for his

family in 1912,” Yarmie said, noting those who were able to purchase land and build in the area were well-off. “The thing about it is it’s quite well-designed.” Next door, a dark brown house with a large dormer overhead, brick chimney and white porch — at 451 Battle St. — uniquely has a curved verandah. Yarmie said homes from that period almost always had a verandah or porch, offering a place to go outside and cool off. It would be especially needed during Kamloops summers as air conditioning would not arrive until later in the century. John C. Potts and wife Florence built the house. “They owned a very famous clothing store downtown, women’s clothing,” Yarmie said. The store, eponymously named Potts, was located on Victoria Street and operated from 1908 to 1940 — surely not boasting Lululemon tights and grungy ripped-jean fashion trends of today, but

likely more skirts, coats and hats. The third house, at 435 Battle St., was built and owned by Robert Mackay, who was a contractor involved in building interiors of the old Bank of Commerce building (currently home to the Brownstone Restaurant) at 118 Victoria St. and the Plaza Hotel at Victoria Street and Fourth Avenue. “He was around all through the 1900s building places in Kamloops and did a lot of work — and some of his family are still living in town, descendants,” Yarmie said, noting Mackay’s great granddaughter was previously on the Heritage Commission. “She’s really interested to see it preserved, as well.” The homes, which are fairly sizeable, have been converted into apartments and are currently rented out. They are owned by Kelson Group and are part of significant neighbourhood redevelopment plans by the company.

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LOCAL NEWS

Once it’s gone — it’s gone From A12

Yarmie said he hopes the Battle Street homes can be incorporated into development plans. He said Kelson Group’s vision for the area includes a community centre. Yarmie suggested the homes could be utilized for amenities like a gym, barbecue area or coffee shop. Heritage buildings have been retained in communities, including Kamloops, for purposes other than homes. Businesses can be found in old houses on Seymour Street. In Calgary, the Hop In Brew pub was located in an old foursquare. “It’s going to be a very interesting development, but I just feel that it’d be great if their architects could re-examine what they’re planning so that they could incorporate these three houses,” he said. Kelson Group president Jason Fawcett said the company is close to releasing revised plans from those presented for the area last fall. “I can tell you that we have been reviewing comments from the public about all sorts of issues on our proposal and the older homes have been brought up by more than a few people. “And we are working on options and solutions

that we’re hoping will be favourable for the people that are most interested in persevering our heritage,” he said. Fawcett said a website and survey — which so far has garnered about 400 community responses — is available to the public. He said he invites the community to continue completing the survey and providing comments, online at kelsondowntownproject. ca. Kelson Group hopes to apply for a development permit in early April. Similar to the time during which the Battle Street homes were built, Yarmie noted Kamloops is again in a “boom period,” with condos, apartment buildings and other construction popping up throughout the city. Across the street from those homes is perhaps the best example — a modern condominiumstyle building. Yarmie said it is better to restore than to demolish. “It gives people a sense of their community, that this is where Kamloops, how Kamloops existed in the past,” Yarmie said. “I think it’s important that we preserve that. It gives people a sense of identify. This is what our community is. If you take down all of these heritage buildings, then you’re just left with nondescript condos and you can’t really get

a feel for that condo across the street because it’s just a square box, compared to the character and the people who have lived in here [heritage homes]. “They’ve all had quite famous family histories, as well. That gives a sense of community and I think you need that to really feel a part of Kamloops. To take away all that past, it’s really losing a lot of that character.” In addition, he agreed, once it’s gone — it’s gone. RULES TO PROTECT HERITAGE BUILDINGS? Yarmie said rules to protect heritage buildings are only in effect if a building is designated heritage. Designated heritage buildings cannot be demolished and are preserved via city bylaw. Yarmie said 10 public buildings in town, including the Old Cigar Factory and the Old Courthouse, are designated heritage buildings. Others, he said, are recognized as heritage buildings with plaques and a desire by homeowners to recognize the architecture and history. The Battle Street properties are not protected. “To do that, you have to have an interest by the owner,” Yarmie explained. “They have to really want to preserve it and they have to guarantee that the house is not going to be changed.”

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A14

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Local angle to information battle with Ottawa JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Thompson Rivers University law professor and her former students are at the centre of a legal battle with the Canadian government over redacted information detailing its involvement in alleged human rights abuses in Guatemala. After six years — during which time students who worked on the case have since graduated — online

hearings are now underway. TRU law professor Charis Kamphuis explained Indigenous communities in Guatemala filed an international human rights complaint against the Guatemalan government for enabling a Canadian mining company’s operations in that country. Former Vancouver-based company Goldcorp operated the Marlin mine, which has since closed, in Guatemala. The company has since been acquired by Newmont. Kamphuis said consent was not

When?

Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 7:00 pm

Why?

Kamloops City Council will hold a Public Hearing to consider the following proposed amendments to KAMPLAN: City of Kamloops Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 46-1 and City of Kamloops Zoning Bylaw No. 5-1-2001.

Property Location:

Notice for Public Hearing

Page 3

Questions?

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca.

Questions?

The relevant proposedbackground bylaw can be viewedcontact at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. For material the Planning and Development (February 23, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 7.2, Attachment Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. “A”). The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. (February 23, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 7.2, Attachment “A”).

To amend the C-4 7410 Dallas Drive (Service Purpose:Commercial) zone on a site-specific To amend the one C-4 95 basis to allow (Service Commercial) m2 accessory dwelling zone on a site-specific unit within a basis to allow one 95 commercial building. m2 accessory dwelling unit within a commercial building.

To amend KAMPLAN: City of Kamloops Official Community Plan by re-designating the land uses for a portion of the subject property to Urban and Parks and Open Space.

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca.

The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. Page 2 Notice for Public Hearing

(March 9, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.5, Attachment “A”).

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Questions?

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca.

Questions?

The proposedbackground bylaw can be viewedcontact at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. For relevant material the Planning and Development (March 2021, Regular or Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.3, Attachment “A”). Division 9, at 250-828-3561 planning@kamloops.ca.

Property Location:

The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. (March 9, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.3, Attachment “A”).

To amend the C-3 1560 Versatile Drive (Highway Purpose: Commercial) zone on a site-specific To amend the an C-3 basis to allow (Highway Commercial) education/training zone onand a site-specific facility retail trade basis allow an on thetosubject education/training property. facility and retail trade on the subject property.

1830 Qu’Appelle Boulevard Purpose: To rezone a portion of 1830 Qu’Appelle Boulevard from FD (Future Development) to RS-1 (Single Family Residential-1) and OS (Open Space) to facilitate a singlefamily residential subdivision and dedication of open space.

Questions?

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. (March 9, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.5, Attachment “B”).

Property Location:

To amend the C-4 (Service Commercial) zone on a site specific basis to permit the expansion of an existing commercial daycare facility.

Page 3

For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. (February 23, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 7.2, Attachment “A”).

Property Location: 7410 Dallas Drive

Notice for Public Hearing

Page 4

Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. Notice for Public Hearing

Page 4

1 YR.

0.15%

1.02%

2 YR.

3 YR.

1.20%

1.40%

4 YR.

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For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development

The proposed bylaw can be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. Questions? For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development (March 9, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.4, Attachment “A”). Division at 250-828-3561 or planning@kamloops.ca. Questions? For relevant background material contact the Planning and Development The proposed bylaw can be Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, members ofat the public are not able to attend Council Division at 250-828-3561 orviewed planning@kamloops.ca. Meetings or(March Public 9, Hearings in person at this time. Those who wish participate may 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.4,to Attachment “A”). The proposed bylaw canvideoconference be viewed at Kamloops.ca/CouncilAgenda. access the Public Hearing via the link provided below. (March 9, 2021, Regular Council Meeting, Agenda Item 9.4, Attachment “A”). Due We to the pandemic, members the public are not able to attend Council areCOVID-19 also accepting email and mail-inofcorrespondence. Meetings or Public Hearings in person at this time. Those who wish to participate may Have Say: Due to theYour COVID-19 pandemic, of the public are not able to attend Council access Public Hearing via themembers videoconference link provided below. Meetings or Public Hearings in person at thisMail time. Those who wish to participate may Email During the Meeting We are also accepting email and mail-in correspondence. access the Public Hearing via the videoconference link provided below.

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Guatemalan government to not shut down the mine, effectively advocating against an international human rights order. She said the government also appears to have interfered with the body’s independence by trying to insert the company into the process. Kamphuis said the case revolves around government accountability in its support for the private sector. She said the Global Affairs department has a culture of supporting Canadian companies at all costs. “The concerns we have is that Canadian officials continue to support — often very aggressively — the company regardless of or actually sort of working across purposes to the affected communities that are asserting their rights,” Kamphuis said. Kamphuis said amidst alleged human rights violations, Canada should take a step back, facilitate dialogue, hold the Canadian company to certain standards, respect the other country’s sovereignty and abide by international human rights institutions. See HUMAN RIGHTS, A15

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obtained by the Indigenous communities for the mine and consultation was lacking. Environmentalists raised concern about water contamination from the mine and the InterAmerican Commission for Human Rights, of which Canada is a member, issued a statement advising suspension of the mine to have reviewed the water quality impacts. At that time, Canada apparently escalated its involvement. Kamphuis said public servants appeared to have pressured the

Mail 7 Victoria Street West Kamloops Mail BC V2C 1A2

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Written submissions must include your name and address and be received Join via Zoom by visiting legislate@kamloops.ca 7 Victoria Street West no later than 12:00 pm on March 26, 2021. Kamloops BC V2C 1A2 Kamloops.ca/Participate on via Council Zoom legislate@kamloops.ca 7 Victoria Street West March 30, 2021,by atvisiting 7:00and pm.will Written submissions, including your name and address, are includedJoin in the Agenda Kamloops BC V2C 1A2 public Kamloops.ca/Participate onCity be posted onsubmissions the City’s website asinclude part of the permanent record. Please note that the Written must your name and address and be received March 30, 2021, at 7:00 pm.this considers the author’sno address to Council’s of this matter and will disclose later relevant than 12:00 pm on consideration March 26, 2021. personal information. Written submissions must include your name and address and be received Written submissions, including yourthan name and address, are included in the Council Agenda and will no later 12:00 pm on March 26, 2021. be posted on the City’s website as part of the permanent public record. Please note that the City Written submissions, your name and address, are included in the Council and this will considers the author’sincluding address relevant to Council’s consideration of this matter and Agenda will disclose be postedinformation. on the City’s website as part of the permanent public record. Please note that the City personal considers the author’s address relevant to Council’s consideration of this matter and will disclose this personal information.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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A15

LOCAL NEWS What this case is all about

Goldcorp’s now-closed Marlin mine operated in Guatemala. Goldcorp has since been purchased by Newmont. WIKIMEDIA COMMONS PHOTO

This case in a nutshell, as explained by TRU law professor Charis Kamphuis: “This case has broader implications for the public’s ability to scrutinize the extent to which government officials act in accordance with government policies. “In this case, we have a senior government official testifying to a federal parliamentary committee and telling the committee that involved in the case and went on to review more public servants folthan 500 pages of documents — some of which low specific policies were in several different languages — obtained in specific cases. through freedom of information requests from the “Then in the federal government for the case and filed the origi- ATIP [access to nal complaint to the information commissioner information and priabout the redactions. vacy] records, we see She said in looking at the information available government officials and what was missing, it raised “a lot more questaking actions that tions.” completely contra“Especially about the response of employees at dicted the policies both the Canadian embassy and the Canadian gov- they say they follow. ernment in Ottawa,” she said, noting support for “We want to see the Canadian mining company. the redacted inforBall graduated from TRU in 2016 and was called mation to determine to the bar in 2017. She is now an associate lawyer if Canada actuat Paul and Company in Kamloops, practising fam- ally followed its own ily and youth criminal law. policies. She said the experience provided hands-on “If Canadian learning, teaching her patience — both in waitofficials can say one ing for a decision years later, but also in the actual thing, and then do work, analyzing those pages and pages of docuanother, and then ments. hide it from the “Those are really useful skills,” Ball said. “In public using the practice, you can definitely have files that have that ATIP regime, we amount of material in them. Having the ability to think this is a probgo through it all and also having the understandlem for Canadian ing that in legal practice cases don’t happen in democracy and five minutes. It can take years to move something public trust in govforward.” ernment.”

Human rights fight involves TRU prof, students From A14

The alleged pressuring of the international human rights body is focus of the case, outlined in 20 pages of documents with redactions. The government has fought to keep the redacted information from the public, while Kamphuis and her students aim to have the information released. Kamphuis said government is arguing release of the information will affect international relations and the company’s competitive edge. She said those harms, however, are not applicable in this case because of a significant passage of time, the mine’s closure and a change in government over the years. She said documents cannot be hidden to hide “embarrassing conduct.” Kamphuis said Canada has gone to “great lengths” to prevent the Canadian public from knowing what Canadian officials did to support Goldcorp. On the other side of the equation, she said, is an impoverished Indigenous community fighting for its own concerns. “They’ve been doing everything they can,” she said, noting the government resisted for years a complaint on the withholding of information to the information commissioner, delayed judicial review and set itself up with a hearing to privately discuss with the courts its own case. The case is part of the Justice Corporate

Accountability Project, a non-profit experiential learning initiative of which Kamphuis is a founding member. She said the organization works with law students, mostly at TRU and in Canada. Kamphuis said it aligns with a seminar she teaches at the university, Transnational Lawyering: Social Justice, Communities and Resources, which is clinical work providing students with experience. Justice Corporate Accountability Project cases are put together in consultation with civil society organizations and sometimes by working directly with mining-affected communities. The idea is many communities impacted by such projects are impoverished and do not have access to knowledge or resources. Four TRU students were involved in the case (which also included students from four other universities, including Dalhousie and UCLA) currently before the courts. The TRU students were Jeanine Ball, Andrew Dow, Cody Kessler and Tyson Kwasney. Kamphuis said the TRU students contributed research, policy analysis and access to information requests and review. In the fall of 2014, Ball took interest in freedom of information law through Kampuhis’ class. Ball also had interest in social justice issues and Guatemala, after living and volunteering there for six months. At the recommendation of Kamphuis, Ball got

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LOCAL NEWS

What will come after the conviction and guilty plea? MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dr. Preety Desai

Mask Mouth. What is it? We all know that daily mask wearing is going to be a part of our lives for the forseeable future. While they are an effective way to reduce the expulsion of respiratory droplets responsible for the spread of SARS-COV-2, they are not without adverse effects. “Mask mouth” is a collection of oral symptoms which occur as a result of wearing face coverings for extended periods. Masks do disrupt your normal breathing pattern, which is through the nose, both inspiration and expiration. The repercussions are a shallower nasal breathing or the addition of a mouth breathing pattern. This mouth breathing will dry out the saliva in your mouth and this has serious repercussions. Saliva is a critical protective mechanism against cavities, gum disease, bad breath and dehydration. Mask wearing results in less heat loss through the mouth, I know we are not dogs but we do lose some heat through the mouth. It was great during the cold weeks when we could keep our faces warm, but masks will increase in discomfort in warmer temperatures. Healthcare workers wearing N95s for extensive periods are at risk for lower oxygen exchange, but only because we wear masks all day. These symptoms can lead to headaches and a more acidic mouth which make the bad bacteria grow faster in the mouth. Symptoms of mask mouth include bad breath, dry mouth, bleeding gums, cavities, mouth sores and exacerbation of dental abscesses. An increase in body temperature can also occur. How do you mitigate mask mouth? Practice deep breathing before and after wearing your mask for 6 second intervals. This will slow the obvious rapid breathing which can occur after putting your mask on. Train yourself to slow down your breathing through your nose and take full breaths. Take regular breaks from your mask if you are out and about on a number of errands (i.e. take it off as soon as you leave the store). Stay hydrated. Wash your mask EVERY day or wear a new disposable mask every time. Protect your face and lips from abrasion or dehydration with moisturizers and lip balm. Avoid eating snacks while mask wearing. As challenging as that may sound, I have seen it! This will increase your cavity rate because your mouth is more acidic and drier. If you have developed bad breath from mask mouth and it remains, it’s no longer mask mouth. Don’t ignore it. Mask mouth has been the number one reason dentist’s are seeing bigger and more problems since this pandemic started. Remember, we dentists have worn masks right from the beginning of our first year of dental school so we know what we are talking about!

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Mounties are not expecting any meaningful disruption in the flow of drugs into Kamloops following convictions in B.C. Supreme Court of two high-ranking participants in the local drug trade. Hugh McIntosh was found guilty last week of the first-degree murder of Jason Glover and the attempted murder of Kelly Callfas, while Gordon Braaten pleaded guilty to manslaughter with a firearm in connection to the Feb. 15, 2019, shootings. “It doesn’t really change anything, frankly. The moment they were in jail, any possible void created by them was immediately filled,” Kamloops RCMP Staff Sgt. Simon Pillay said, noting that is simply the nature of organized crime. While there’s always some group or individual ready to step into another’s place, police, he said, remain focused on violent offenders and thoroughly investigative serious crimes. “It’s very important to get justice in these serious person crimes,” Pillay said. “Whenever I have an opportunity to speak with drug traffickers, I always point out to them police investigate the participants who are engaged in violence and using firearms in our community.” He said he hopes those who are still engaged in the drug trade in Kamloops, which he described as a small number, realize from this court result that using violence will attract the police and land them in jail. Via video conference during

McIntosh’s trial, Callfas testified she has stopped using and selling drugs since being shot. Kamloops RCMP Supt. Syd Lecky described the trial as a “big one” for the Kamloops RCMP. “I have no problem telling you Gordie Braaten was a problem for us in this community and I’m quite pleased to see him in jail,” Lecky said, noting the convictions of both Braaten and McIntosh are good for Kamloops. The McIntosh and Braaten murder case was one of a string of gang violence investigated by police between 2018 and 2019, all involving drug traffickers at the managerial level struggling for control in the wake of the gangland slaying of Red Scorpions co-founder Konaam Shirzad on Sept. 21, 2017. Lecky described the gang violence seen in 2018 and 2019 as some of the worst ever in Kamloops. Asked if there’s a concern newcomers filling the void left by Braaten and McIntosh will lead to more gang violence, Pillay said police thus far haven’t seen another wave of managerial-level conflict. “Those things, they come and go out of nowhere. Often times these major conflicts arise even

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internally,” Pillay said. “We could have a gang war break loose tomorrow and we won’t know until it’s happening.” He added that some of that infighting was responsible for the rash of violence in 2018 and 2019. Since then, Pillay said, police have not seen the high-level conflicts, but rather violence at the lower end of the drug scene. “I’m talking about street level traffickers collecting low-level debts using unnecessary violence,” Pillay said. “We’re always targeting those who are using violence, regardless of their position in the hierarchy, but we have not seen the level of drug line versus drug line violence that we did back then.” Police believe the shooting death of a man in his 20s in a room at the Howard Johnson Inn at 530 Columbia St. on Feb. 13 — the first murder of 2021 in Kamloops — to be connected to low-level drug trade activity. Mounties have identified suspects in that investigation, but have yet to make any arrests. “That is a unit priority for the serious crimes crew and they are working on it actively every day, but these things take time,” Pillay said. He said the January 2019 double homicide of Cody Mathieu and Rex Gill, who were gunned down outside separate hotels, also remains an active investigation and a high priority for the serious crimes unit. The murders were among the high-level wave of violence seen between 2018 and 2019, but Gill, police believe, was killed in a case of mistaken identity.


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Murder conviction in 2019 shootings MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops man will spend at least 25 years in prison after being found guilty of first-degree murder and attempted murder in connection with a drugrelated shooting incident two years ago. On March 18, a jury found Hugh McIntosh, 52, guilty on both counts. A first-degree murder conviction carries with it a minimum sentence of 25 years in prison before parole eligibility is available. McIntosh had been charged alongside Gordie Braaten, who on March 12 pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of manslaughter with a weapon. Braaten had been scheduled to stand trial this week on charges of first-degree murder and attempted murder. The shootings occurred on Feb. 15, 2019, at a residence in Brocklehurst. Jason Glover was killed and Kelly Callfas was left

with gunshot wounds to her face. The jury deliberated for just over three days following a month-long trial that involved more than two-dozen witnesses, including Califas. The Crown’s case hinged largely on her testimony that McIntosh had shot her and Glover, as well as the fact her DNA was recovered from McIntosh’s belt, which was seized when he was arrested in Langley in the days following the shootings. At trial, Crown prosecutors Sarah Firestone and Andrew Duncan laid out their case to the jury, alleging McIntosh fired at least seven shots at both Callfas and her roommate, Glover, at their Tranquille Road townhouse. In his closing arguments, defence lawyer Jordan Watt described Callfas as an unreliable witness with a criminal record who couldn’t be trusted as she was acting in her own interests by making a deal with police. He pointed to inconsistencies and

conflicting statements she had given about the incident, including that she told emergency responders at the time she didn’t see the shooter because she had been asleep at the time. At trial, Callfas, 52, testified that McIntosh and Braaten were waiting for her when she returned home on Feb. 15, 2019, telling her and Glover they needed to talk to them in her basement bedroom. Court heard Callfas, who testified via video conference, had known the two men for years as all three were involved in the drug trade, and that she had sold and used crystal meth and heroin for years. Braaten, she said, accused her of knowing the identity of the person who had broken into her home and stolen $20,000 while she was out of the house earlier that month, an accusation she denied. More that half of the stolen cash was owed to her dealer, who went by the name JD.

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LOCAL NEWS

Interior Health wraps up final first-dose vaccination clinic for city’s marginalized one. He said he doesn’t socialize too much, but michael@kamloopsthisweek.com adopted mask use before it was mandatory and A final vaccination will continue to wear it as clinic for Kamloopsians required. who are homeless or livMary Garman, 70, who ing in social housing was lives at the Crossroads held last Friday at the Inn, was skeptical of Crossroads Inn, downreceiving the vaccine town at Seymour Street at first, but opted to get and Sixth Avenue. one on Friday thanks to Those receiving the some convincing from shots noted feeling more Crossroad support worker protected from the virus. Christine Leicester. “The big thing is Garman has had mulanxiety. It’ll alleviate that a tiple trips to the hospital little bit [and] I think it will recently and is considered do the same for other peo- at high risk of contractple,” said Harry Brennan ing COVID-19, a point after receiving his shot. Leicester stressed. Brennan, 63, who An Indigenous elder, Million lives at $140 a nearby ASK Development Garman told KTW she was Wellness housing projassured she was safer after Panoramic views ect downtown, said he is receiving the vaccine. not a fan of needles, but In order to vaccinate Two towers: 18 & 22 floors noted he barely felt this Kamloops’ homeless and MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

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sites, told KTW about 20 such clinics have been held for this high-risk population, with staff sometimes visiting multiple destinations in one day. She said they have vaccinated about 350 residents and 150 outreach staff — having utilized a strategy of vaccinating both residents and outreach workers at each agency to build trust and convince skeptics the vaccine is safe. Having had her vaccine, ASK Wellness outreach worker Abby Grinberg has been kept busy going to all areas of town to get the word out on the clinics to homeless individuals and educate them about the vaccine. “Lots of folks have

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questions about it and they always ask, ‘Did you get yours?’” Grinberg said, noting those answers and their participation in the clinics can be reassuring for people. ASK Wellness Society executive director Bob Hughes said it’s incredible to see the number of vaccines that have been delivered into the arms of clients, people who can often have a mistrust of the health-care sector. Workers like Grinberg, he noted, have been imperative to the effort. The clinics ensure this high-risk population has expedited access to vaccines as Interior Health has been seeing an increase in the number of the city’s homeless testing positive for COVID-19.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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LOCAL NEWS

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jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

B.C.’s minister responsible for housing says the province recognizes challenges faced by cities grappling with street issues and has provided $100 million in funding to help communities in the short term, with plans for provincially funded complex care facilities to be built throughout the province in the long term. “Obviously, things are very challenging in a lot of cities,” BC Housing Minister David Eby told KTW in an interview, noting recognition of the kinds of issues that led to motions passed recently by Kamloops city council aimed at improvements. Asked what he thinks about council’s motions — which included, among other proposals, requirement in some cases for wraparound services by BC

Housing and for city and provincial counterparts to meet — Eby said context is important, noting Kamloops is not the only community in the province struggling with visible street disorder. “These problems that have been hidden for a long time are much more visible and they’re also worse because of the impacts of the COVID public health measures,” he said. However, Eby also cautioned that problems that have arisen are temporary in nature and those involved are vulnerable. He said it is easy to accidentally swing public opinion against any kind of social housing in a community and to vilify people who are sick and homeless. Eby said the province has committed to working with communities to ensure that doesn’t happen. He noted $100 million in funding via the Stronger Communities Fund, administered by the Union of BC

Municipalities, to help cities with public washrooms, security, policing, outreach and other services. In the long term, Eby said, the province is working with communities on complex care facilities, which he described as housing with health-care supports. Such supports, he said, were expected when the controversial Riverview mental-health hospital in Coquitlam was closed over a number of years, with the last of the patients leaving the facility in 2012. But those supports never materialized. Eby said the BC NDP government is rolling out that work with a “sense of urgency.” No timelines were provided, however, and Eby could not say whether Kamloops will be among locations chosen for such a complex care facility. “We’re still in early discussions about the design of the

facilities and the supports,” he said when asked if Kamloops will be chosen. “We’re relying on pulling together a lot of research that’s been done and some work from the Ministry of Health and different ministries,” Eby said. “Once we have a more concrete proposal of what exactly these will look like and how they’re going to operate, then we’ll be having discussions with cities about where they should be located. These will be regional supports and it may make sense for it to be in Kamloops or it may make sense for it to be in another city.” Eby would not confirm if the province will pick up all of costs for wraparound services, but noted challenges around people who need “intensive supports,” with the costs split — municipalities face higher policing costs, while the province faces greater costs for courts, prisons and emergency rooms.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Focusing on ‘missing middle’ of market JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops councillor hopes the city can help address the “missing middle” in the housing market, bridging the gap between renting and home ownership. During the city’s development and sustainability committee meeting on Monday (Match 22), Coun. Kathy Sinclair noted a “big shortage” of both rental and affordable housing in Kamloops. She said construction of duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, eightplexes,

co-operative housing and subsidized housing could increase the city’s rental housing supply and make home ownership more affordable. Sinclair said unlike apartment buildings erected in neighbourhoods, such housing is a friendly way to increase infill without drastically changing a neighbourhood. She said the city could make changes similar to how it made alterations to accommodate secondary suites. Sinclair put forward a motion requesting a memo back from staff on innovative land-use options

to encourage housing diversity. Sinclair also wants to hear how the city may incentivize such diversity. Incentives were stressed by Coun. Bill Sarai, who said he supports the idea, but noted the decision to build one kind of housing or another ultimately lies with builders. Sarai said a half-duplex in Kamloops is currently selling for between $500,000 and $600,000 and that the real estate market of late is “so high.” The city’s CAO, David Trawin, said one option could be the city putting in place

requirements around rezoning, such as a certain number of affordable housing units being built. Trawin said the timing of such a proposal comes as the city is in the midst of zoning bylaw revisions. Council is due to hear back from staff on that topic during a committee of the whole meeting in mid-June. The development and sustainability committee voted 3-0 — with committee chair Sadie Hunter and Sarai also voting in favour — requesting another committee meeting to discuss the issue, with information from staff.

Festival probed Mounties are trying to track down the organizer or organizers of a potential superspreader gathering in Criss Creek west of Kamloops last Friday, for which a couple of hundred people gathered for a music festival and campout, contrary to health orders. The Tk’emlups RCMP detachment responded to a complaint regarding the large gathering at a campground 13 kilometres up Tranquille-Criss Creek Road, arriving to find about 200 people camping in motorhomes, trailers and tents, with a small stage-like structure set up.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A21

LOCAL NEWS

‘They care for the body, but not the soul’: Families, advocates call for allowing care home visitation JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Darlene Jones’ mother used to constantly ask her adult children to come visit her in long-term care. She kept asking, but her kids couldn’t come, due to restrictions in place to prevent spread of COVID-19. A year into the pandemic, the 88-year-old doesn’t ask anymore and the family says their loved one has rapidly deteriorated and relinquished her will to live. “They care for the body, but not the soul,” Darlene Jones told KTW, citing restrictions in place during the pandemic that have led to deterioration of her mother’s health. With B.C. care home residents and workers vaccinated, the Jones family, of Pritchard, is among those continuing to push for increased visitation at longterm care facilities. Jones’ mother is living at an undis-

closed care home in the Fraser Valley. The senior is waiting to move from apartment-style living into extended care. She neither eats nor talks much anymore and has refused medication. The family thinks she is depressed and doesn’t expect her to make it to her 89th birthday in June. All the while, in the past year, the Jones family has had minimal opportunity to see her. A peek inside the building revealed wide-sweeping isolation amongst seniors, with residents eating alone at tables. More concern — for their elderly mother, but also for the countless other seniors enduring isolation. “I call them inmates because we feel that they are in confinement,” Cliff Jones said, noting he thinks society will reflect later on the treatment of seniors during the pandemic as bordering on “criminal negligence.” BC Care Providers Association CEO Terry Lake said the government keeps

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saying restrictions around long-term care homes will be lifted, but he doesn’t understand why the government is waiting. He said care home residents and staff have been vaccinated and outbreaks are down significantly. Lake is calling for people in long-term care to sit together again when they are eating meals and for the ability to do some recreational activities together, noting seniors have been in isolation for a year. Lake said isolation has been proven to have an impact on seniors’ mental and physical health. “It does beg the question, are we making the right choices for people in care because the quality of life they have is so diminished and I don’t think we’ve done enough to allow for more visitation safely,” he said. The Jones family does not blame the care home — which is the reason why they are choosing not to name the facility — but points to restrictions in place by the province.

The family has sent letters to Dr. Bonnie Henry and the premier’s office, urging action, without response. Henry addressed long-term care home visitation during a press conference last week, noting a provincial order remains in place. Health Minister Adrian Dix, however, said changes around general visitation will occur this month.“You should expect that very soon,” he told the media, though no details were provided. It can’t come soon enough. The Jones family says they have been following public health orders and have not been socializing. Meanwhile, they point to care home staff going home every day to co-mingle with their families, only to return to aid the seniors. Darlene Jones’ mother was vaccinated in late January or earlyFebruary. “What I would like to be able to do is for me and my siblings to have unrestricted access,” she said.


A22

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Thousands vaccinated during clinic’s first week KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

About 3,000 people received their first doses of COVID-19 vaccine from March 15 to March 21 on McArthur Island as Interior Health’s mass vaccination clinics begin to ramp up operations in Kamloops. That facility, which opened in the curling rink on the island, is closed this week while a clinic at the Tournament Capital Centre opened for appointments for the first time this past Monday. The reason for using the two sites separately in the first two weeks, according to Interior Health, is to give staff trial runs to familiarize themselves with the layout and logistics of each site, ensuring they are both

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running smoothly before operating in unison. The McArthur Island clinic will be open again next week, as of Saturday, March 27, operating seven days a week, while the clinic at the TCC operates Mondays to Fridays. People will be given the location of their appointment when they make a booking and the Interior Health website also has updated information. There were about 400 appointments each day at the McArthur Island curling rink, with about 340 per day on the weekend. About 3,000 people were immunized from Monday to Sunday. This week, the TCC is accommodating about 300 appointments a day. Interior Health has 10

immunization stations at the TCC, in addition to 12 on McArthur Island. By mid-April, each site will be utilizing 18 inoculation stations when the health authority enters phase three of its vaccination rollout. Interior Health is hoping everyone who wants a vaccine will have their first doses by June as inoculators move through the age groups. It will take about two to three weeks for immunity from the vaccine to fully take effect and Interior Health is encouraging people to continue taking precautions — wearing masks, maintaining physical distance and engaging in rigorous hand washing even beyond the two week period.

Appointments again by age Seniors in the second half of their 70s and Indigenous people ages 55 and older can begin booking COVID-19 vaccinations this week. Beginning at noon on Monday (March 22), seniors born in 1943 or earlier (ages 78 or older) can call to make an appointment. On Tuesday, those born in 1944 or earlier

(ages 77 and older) can begin booking. On Thursday, those born in 1945 or earlier (ages 76 and older) will be able to book. Those ages 75 (born 1946 or earlier) can book beginning on Saturday. Indigenous people ages 55 and older can book any time this week by calling 1-877-740-7747 between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

LOCAL NEWS

Korean War veterans get COVID care package DAVE EAGLES STAFF REPORTER dave_eagles@kamloopsthisweek.com

Jim Barlow’s face is radiant. The man is a smiler, and so is his wife, Marla. The North Kamloops couple has a lot to be happy about, having been among the first in the city to receive their COVID19 vaccines. For the past year, like so many others, their gracious grins have remained hidden beneath the cover of a coronavirus pandemic. No hugs or kisses for their 13 greatgrandchildren. No taste of sunshine on their faces from visits to destination hotspots. But, the possibility of a return to a new normal is inching closer by the day, as the province advances its rollout of vaccines and people continue to practice maskwearing and social distancing. Recently, Barlow was among Canadian veterans of the Korean War to receive a pandemic care package of high quality KF94 masks from the Korean Consulate in Vancouver. The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when some 75,000 soldiers from

DAVE EAGLES/KTW As a Korean War veteran, Jim Barlow was among the Canadian soldiers honoured by the Korean Consulate in Vancouver with a package of KF94 masks to help protect them against COVID-19 viruses.

the North Korean People’s Army poured across the 38th parallel, the boundary between the Soviet-backed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the north and the pro-Western Republic of Korea to the south. The conflict lasted just over

three years. In an effort to show their gratitude to Korean War veterans across the world, the Korean government, specifically the Ministry of Patriots and Veterans Affairs, shipped two million face masks to coun-

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tries who were members of the UN Allies fighting in the Korean War. Of those distributed, 30,000 were through the Vancouver Consulate. Barlow says he is very impressed with continuing support and recognition from the Korean government for Canadian veterans’ service overseas. Now, at 90 years of age, Barlow remembers fighting as a leading seaman in the Canadian Navy during the Korean War, before retiring (twice) as a lieutenantcommander, spanning a 40-year career. “It was 1952 when I was over there — 69 years ago. Unlike our own government, they haven’t forgotten about the people who volunteered to go over and defend their country, and they keep repaying it in small ways,” Barlow said. “I think it’s a touch of class.” Before the pandemic began, the couple was travelling about every three months. Now, they mask up and head out for groceries every three days. Since the local casinos have closed, Barlow says with a grin, “I’m making nothing but money now.” They hope to be travelling once again, seeing their family and flashing a smile.


A24

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Spring has sprung, but snow still a topic JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops council is mulling improvements to sidewalk snow clearing. During a recent civic operations committee meeting, Coun. Kathy Sinclair said some sidewalks are not getting shovelled following snowfall events, particularly in front of vacant businesses in North Kamloops. Sinclair suggested the possibility of city crews shovelling such sidewalks and billing property owners for the cost. Coun. Bill Sarai also expressed concern for people walking to bus stops to get to work or school. He noted a patchwork of jurisdictions, including BC Transit, multiple city departments and private residents and wants to see a continuum of cleared pathways for those travelling by foot.

For more city council news, go to kamloopsthisweek.com

Speaking to KTW, Sarai pointed to multi-use pathways like the Xget’tem’ Trail in Peterson Creek Park that is cleared by the parks department before some sidewalks are addressed. “I think we should address city sidewalks as soon as possible,” he said. City streets manager Glen Farrow said most sidewalks are not cleared by the city. The city’s bylaw states adjacent property owners are to clear sidewalks.

Farrow said anything done additionally by the city could result in residents stepping back from shovelling snow. Mayor Ken Christian suggested the issue may be one for bylaws and, if people were fined, a company in the private sector could be hired to clear sidewalks and prevent such fines from accruing in the future. The councillors at this point are seeking more information from staff. That request will go to a city council regular meeting through the committee minutes. Increasing service levels often means increasing the cost of service. However, Sarai said one possibility could be clearing sidewalks before side streets off of main arterials. He said sidewalks that are the city’s responsibility should be cleared more quickly, noting additional resources, such as more plows, may need to be added.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A25

COMMUNITY

Free — learn how to be a beekeeper

Kamloops artist Tim Francis’ creation, Before all the Fuss, is subject of an online auction that coincides with an exhibit of his work at The Vic.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most inperson beekeeping classes have been suspended. However, if you have access to the Internet, there are options to learn how to become a beekeeper this spring. The Provincial Apiculture Branch is offering a free second session of the online Introductory was named one of the “Master Painters of the World” by Beekeeping International Artist magazine in 2001. The artist has also put together a book of his paintings, Webinar Series, beginning March released by a local publisher, to coincide with the show. 27. Book signings will take place every weekday morning Registration from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at The Vic for the duration of the is through exhibit. He is asking those looking to have a book signed to first make an appointment by emailing timfrancisart@ the Provincial Apiculture Branch, gmail.com. which can be found To see more of his work, go online to timfrancis.ca.

Francis exhibit on now at The Vic Tim Francis has been painting for 50 years, but he’s never had enough of his paintings on hand for a oneman show — until now. Until April 23, Francis’ work will show at The Vic, downtown at Victoria Street and Fourth Avenue. Part of the show is an online auction for his work, Before all the Fuss, a vibrant portrayal of the Thompson River valleys. Proceeds will go to the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation. Francis has exhibited his works across Canada and

by going online to https://tinyurl. com/ypm7m9fk. This course is offered for free and is open to anyone. It covers a full range of topics related to bee biology, beekeeping management, disease diagnosis and controls. The course involves four webinar sessions on consecutive Saturday mornings, from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.. Prior to each session, registrants will receive an email with suggested reading materials and references. Those wishing to be notified when course details and

registration become available can send an email with their name, email address and location to Paul.vanwestendorp@gov.bc.ca. The Kamloops Beekeepers Club will also organize online events this spring and summer to assist aspiring beekeepers in their endeavours. The club has a successful mentorship program in which novice beekeepers are matched up with mentors. For more information, visit the Kamloops Beekeepers website at kamloopsbeekeepers.com.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

Review: Scott Massey A Marker to Measure Drift Scott Massey’s A Marker to Measure Drift is at the Kamloops Art Gallery through April 3. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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In the modern world, where we regularly look at the face of another person hundreds of miles away through a screen in real time, it is remarkable that something as ancient and regular as the full moon on a clear night in January can be awe-inspiring. The day after such a night, I attended Scott Massey’s solo show A Marker To Measure Drift. Curated by Charo Neville, it is at the Kamloops Art Gallery through April 3. Looking at Massey’s work feels like plucking the moon from the sky in order to examine it under a microscope. However, his ambition is not to rule the cosmos as science tries to do, but rather to understand our place within this larger context. He uses light as a medium in photographic, video, installation and performance works to examine everyday cosmological phenomena and make the invisible visible.

“The sun was born in darkness, to shine for a time, only to return to darkness” introduces the show. As the title suggests, this piece points to the ever-present fact that the sun, the very thing that sustains our existence, is temporary. A video of an unexposed transparency slide being incinerated by a hot point of light is projected

on a large scale. As the thin black plastic burns, it changes to purple, then orange, then blue, until only the charred remains are left. The click of a rotary projector is heard and the process begins again. Creating an unending repetition of birth, life, death and rebirth, the effect is mesmerizing. Massey makes visible the

destruction and formation of the many suns that will replace ours. In the centre of the main gallery, Rememoration Piece (Grass Ring) anchors the space with a large industrial lamp hanging close to the floor. Surrounding it is a circular planter with lawn grass that appears neon green against the pine floor of the gallery. The grass arcs dramatically inward toward the light at the centre. Referring to the centre of the ring, my partner remarks, “I feel like I’ve been in that space.” Indeed, the vivid greenery, confined in the shape of a ring, recalls the familiar manufactured green spaces of urban environments. Everything about the piece is a man-made: the industrial lamp mimics the sun with a full spectrum light bulb and a mechanical

timer that mimics sunrise and sunset, while the grass is grown from genetically modified seed. The goal may be to create an idealized green space, but the final product is made surreal by the grass leaning toward the centre. Rememoration works to remind us that when we try to master nature, we alter it in unnatural ways. Showing works that force contemplation of the cosmos like “The sun was born in dark-ness, to shine for a time, only to return to darkness” along with works that remind us we have influence in our terrestrial existence like Rememoration Piece (Grass Ring) calls attention to humanity as being small and insignificant, but nevertheless influential. A Marker to Measure Drift confronts us with our place in the universe and our responsibility to the celestial body we call home. In the world of ever-advancing personal device technology, Massey reminds us to, every so often, look up.

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You are receiving government assistance. If you or your partner are receiving government benefits such as Guarantee Income Supplement or the Allowance, drawing CPP early could potentially impact your entitlement.

5.

You are a risk-adverse investor. Investments would need to earn 7.2% a year to offset taking CPP earlier than 65. In today's environment, that can be a challenge and could result in taking on more risk than you are comfortable. Drawing down low risk RSPs and leaving CPP for a later date could make sense.

These are just some factors that may impact your decision to draw CPP. As always, please consult your tax advisor to see how this relates to your personal situation. While we can provide the numbers and financial reasoning behind when to draw benefits such as Canada Pension Plan, what is often more important is enjoying retirement and fulfilling bucket lists. Written by Keith Until next time… Invest Well. Live Well.

daviswealth.ca

This document was prepared by Eric Davis, Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor, and Keith Davis, Associate Investment Advisor, for informational purposes only and is subject to change. The contents of this document are not endorsed by TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. which is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. For more information: 250-314-5124 or Keith.davis@td.com. Published March 24, 2021.


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A27

COMMUNITY

KTW a five-time 2021 finalist

BECOME A DUNES PLATINUM MEMBER

NEWSPAPER’S FINALIST QUINTET EQUALS THE NUMBER IN 2020

For the second consecutive year, Kamloops This Week is a finalist in five categories in this year’s Ma Murray Awards. The annual awards, organized by the The BC and Yukon Community NewsMedia Association, invite submissions from newspapers and their digital websites in B.C. and the Yukon. Those submissions are judged by journalism peers elsewhere in Canada, with each category coming down to three finalists. KTW’s newsroom staff are finalists in the following categories: • Christopher Foulds for Best Columnist for columns on memories of those lost (The priceless scraps of those who pass) and

the opioid overdose crisis (The heartache beats on with no end in sight). • Marty Hastings for Best Feature Article for his story on the death of Brady Dalke and its impact on his family (Dalkes lose son, brother to fentanyl). Hastings’ article was the recipient last fall of a

Jack Webster Award. • Former KTW reporter Tim Petruk for Best Historical Writing for his story on how the Spanish Flu impacted Kamloops (A look at the Spanish Flu in Kamloops from 1918 to 1920). • Christopher Foulds, Michael Potestio and Tim Petruk for Best

Multimedia Breaking News for their coverage of the Snowbirds jet crash in Brocklehurst. • Tim Shoults, Ray Jolicoeur, Lee Malbeuf and the team at KTW for Best Community Service Initiative for The Kamloops Kindness Project. Winners will be announced during an April 29 online ceremony. The nominated stories can be read online at kamloopsthisweek. com by using the search function. Kamloops This Week was named community newspaper of the year in British Columbia and the Yukon in 2014 and 2015 and was named community newspaper of the year in Canada in 2014.

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The Keep Kamloops campaign aims to provide a boost to culture, recreation and heritage organizations by publicizing their importance and by encouraging people to donate and participate. We want to “Keep Kamloops” active, creative, and engaged by supporting the organizations that do just that. Our vision is to foster a community that is resilient and supported through COVID-19 by residents who value the contributions that arts, culture, and recreation make to their quality of life and the livability of our community. THIS WEEK'S FEATURED ORGANIZATION

KAMLOOPS HERITAGE RAILWAY

#keepkamloopscultural

WHO SAYS TIME TRAVEL DOESN'T EXIST?

F

ew Kamloops sights are quite as iconic as the 2141 steam engine, the Spirit of Kamloops.

The 2141 is a beautifully restored locomotive consisting of the steam engine, passenger coach, a café lounge, and a caboose. In normal times, the Kamloops Heritage Railway offers dozens of delightful railtours, complete with historical reenactments performed by volunteers, enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. And although the pandemic has tried to derail many things, the KHR is keeping activities on track.

with everyone from visiting Rocky How did the KHR come to be in Kamloops? Mountaineer Railtours passengers In 1961, the CN Railway planned to the young and young-at-heart, to demolish the 2141 steam engine. serving more than 7,000 on-rail Kamloops Mayor Jack passengers each year. When the pandemic hit, Fitzwater convinced “Just did a tour of them that selling it to the the shop area. The it meant the KHR couldn’t City was a better option. knowledge they have run its railtours or welcome The 2141 was a static and the history they contracted US tour groups display in Riverside Park preserve is so valuable for the entire 2020 season. This resulted in a near for 33 years. In 1994, to Kamloops.” a society was formed 100% loss of revenue, to restore and operate the engine. yet bills still needed to be paid. After eight years and 80,000 In response, the KHR began hours of labour, in 2002 the “Spirit looking at an education program of Kamloops” carried its first they’d been planning for grades 2 passengers. It’s been a hit ever since, to 7 and are considering offering a

Are you an arts, heritage or recreation organization that has made changes in response to COVID-19? We are looking for stories to share about charities and non-profit organizations that make our community special and are implementing new or innovative solutions to navigate this crisis. We also want to direct people to donate to your organization. Go to keepkamloops.ca to learn more.

Keep Kamloops is brought to you by Also sponsored by

virtual school tour experience. Thanks to a recent grant from the Province, they’ll also be converting a decommissioned passenger car into an historic replica of a CN school classroom. The KHR hopes to resume railtours later this season, depending on provincial restrictions.

The Kamloops Heritage Railway relies on many volunteers to keep the engine going. More than 35 volunteers put in a collective 5,000 hours every year. Let’s keep Kamloops cultural! Support the Kamloops Heritage Railway by making a donation at www.kamrail.com.

Follow, share and donate to keep Kamloops active, creative and cultural. Connect with Keep Kamloops online

keepkamloops.ca

facebookcom/keepkamloops

@keepkamloops

BCLC seeks to make a positive impact for players and communities all across the province. We give back to B.C. through our business and through our people. Funds generated by gambling go back to the province to help support arts & culture, healthcare, education and community programs all across B.C. Employee volunteerism and fundraising efforts support organizations that make our community such a great place to live. Thanks to our players, $25 billion in net income has been delivered to the province to support communities, provincial programs and services, charities and major events that have helped shape B.C. since 1985.


A28 M C G R A W

C H R O M A

A S C A P

S P I C E

S E A S O N O P E N E R

S P S P U A U T G N U P A L J L O O E B B

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021 S A M B A A L A R M F F I T I P I E S O L R C E T S T H R H I S E E D E C S L L C H E C D E R R A S E L U D T T O P S R H E T T E E D S S D S W A O M A T I C U S E R S E R O N I A F F E E O T S T S A S S T R

L E I C A N N U R O O F B O I L S O C E E B L A A R A L O R R Y K E R H I D L O E F O R K L E E S N O W B T I E S I F B R E D I A S U C H M E A F M A D M R S A A A T M S

A M U S E D B E R G O V A L L A R D

W F I I L D S U E L O E R A E N I S T N C E D E E M T O O A R D I A L L O B R T C I G A Z O N O S

O X I D I Z E R J O B I N T E R V I E W

R M U P N G R T O R M Y O I N A N E

B A D G E

W E I N E R

S O L E L Y

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A43

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

HISTORY The heritage around us

There’s gold in that thar Tranquille KEN FAVRHOLDT

SPECIAL TO KTW

L

ong before Tranquille became famous as a tuberculosis sanatorium beginning in William Fortune’s home in 1907, it was known for gold. ACTIVITY PROGRAMS Placer gold had been discovered at We thank you for your patronage, several locations in the Interior of B.C. understanding, and patience as we work by 1857, including at Pend d’ Oreille and together during this unprecedented time. Tranquille rivers by James Houston, a Visit Kamloops.ca/COVID for updates Scotsman with a sailing background. Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met. It is claimed erroneously that My First Museum Ages: 2–6 Houston was the first to discover gold Introduce your toddler to the museum through on the mainland of B.C., but he was hands-on exploration and artifact handling, involved in the early Pend d’Oreille River stories, songs, and a caregiver-assisted craft. rush of 1855 near the American border. Each socially distanced session is themed Houston later headed to Fort around our current temporary exhibit and Kamloops and, in the spring of 1857, he offers flexibility for young children to engage in the museum world through a variety of found gold at Tranquille River. He sold it to chief trader Donald sensory and play experiences. McLean of the Hudson’s Bay Company Kamloops Museum & Archives (HBC) fort, who forwarded it to his All 8 Sessions superiors. In 1856, Indigenous miners at Wed Apr 7–May 26 Nicoamen on the Thompson River had 10:00–10:45 am 8/$56 already alerted the company to gold in Flower Art the district. Wed Apr 7 New evidence by historian Daniel 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 Marshall suggests that all gold, whethGrass Painting er collected from Houston or from Wed Apr 14 Indigenous and non-Indigenous miners, 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 was sent directly to London by ship from Play with Clay Fort Langley. Wed Apr 21 In December 1857, Gov. James 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 Douglas advised the Colonial Office Dancing Daisies in London of the discovery of gold in Wed Apr 28 the Couteau district of the Fraser and 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 Thompson rivers. Fantastic Frogs At that time, he issued a proclamaWed May 5 tion that made digging for gold illegal 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 without a licence. It was a vain attempt Cherry Blossoms to control what became an influx of Wed May 12 American miners. News of the discov10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 ery resulted in the rush of 1858, which Nifty Noodles attracted great numbers of miners from Wed May 19 California and elsewhere — more than 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 30,000 in that year alone. Lantern Art The fur trade itself was already in Wed May 26 decline in the southern half of the 10:00–10:45 am 1/$8 Interior, forcing the HBC to adapt to the changing commerce. The trade store at Fort Kamloops, located on the Physical Literacy is learning the skills and having the motivation and North Shore until 1862, catered to new consumers and supplied miner’s tents, confidence to enjoy many physical clothing, boots, tools and foodstuffs. activities for life. The ABC’s – Miners flocked to Tranquille until agility, balance and coordination are 1862 and created a flourishing busiskills that support physical literacy. ness. Many of the original miners were Secwépemc who lived at Tranquille, called Pellqweqwile by the incoming miners after the biscuit root there. Jean Baptiste Lolo “St. Paul,” who Kamloops.ca had left employment with the HBC City of Kamloops

Did you know?

778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

PHOTO COURTESY KAMLOOPS MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES The dam and flume of Tranquille River for hydraulic workings, seen here about 1895. This 25-foot high dam and 1,200 feet of flume several miles from the river’s mouth provided water for ground sluicing of the gravel banks.

some years before, quickly established himself at the mouth of the creek, staking off claims with a group of men from the nearby village and setting up a small trade store. It is known that as early as 1859, five men were said to be making $300 a day (when gold was $12 an ounce) using sluice boxes. Individuals with rockers were making $10 to $12 a day. By 1861, it was reported there were as many as 150 miners along the river, including many Chinese, making $3 to $16 a day. One of the Overlanders of 1862 from Canada who did not venture to the Cariboo with the rest of the party, but instead stayed on in Kamloops, was William Fortune. He first worked as a carpenter on the new HBC post, then later settled at Tranquille, taking up farming rather than mining. By the time he pre-empted land there in 1868, after the Secwépemc village had been decimated by the smallpox epidemic of 1862 and 1863, the creek had already been well worked. By 1868, there were only 25 men mining on Tranquille River, making between $2 and $5 per day. The completion of Fortune’s flourmill and later sawmill at the mouth of the river in 1869 meant the necessities of flour and lumber for miners were close at hand. But placer mining was essentially a

transient occupation. Those who persisted, like the Chinese, could make a fair living — 20 Chinese miners yielded $7,000 in 1876 alone. Placer mining on Tranquille River gave way to hydraulic methods in 1892 when a company from the coast headed by James Russell appeared on the scene. Ground sluicing began two years later by erecting a 25-foot high dam across the creek and a flume 1,200 feet long to work the benches along the west side of the creek. It paid about $1,000 in the first year. The new finds led to the formation of a company promoted by MP Hewitt Bostock. The Tranquille Creek Hydraulic and Quartz Mining Company secured Russell’s former lease. By 1896, there was a big mining boom all over again. Even Fortune settled near the mouth of the river and, not being a full-time prospector, boasted he had enough gold in the ground under his house to pay off the national debt of England. Ken Favrholdt is a freelance writer, historical geographer, and former curator/archivist of the Kamloops Museum and Archives. This article is revised from a previous article by Favrholdt in the former Kamloops Daily News.


A29 THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

R E A L

Clifford Brauner Accredited Home Inspector

E S T A T E

License #47212

250-319-5572 photo: Evan Hauk

KAMLOOPS & AREA • EACH EDITION AVAILABLE ONLINE

March 24, 2021 | Volume 35 | Issue 12

kamloops.pillartopost.com

Attention Realtors

GET MORE EXPOSURE FOR YOUR LISTINGS!

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SHOWHOME OPEN SATURDAYS • 1:00-3:00PM • LOT 204


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Jessica MATT 250.374.3022

je-matt@hotmail.com GREAT TIME TO BUY OR SELL JessicaMattRealEstate.ca

CALL MARVIN

$929,900

• 122 acres in Eagle Bay area • Preliminary lot layout for 39 lots • 1 hectare each (2.47 acres) • Water at property line • Property adjoins existing sub-division • Zoned RR-1, 2.5 hectors zoned C-5, 2.5 hectares zoned P-1 • Some timber & some properties will have lake view • Priced to sell - Plus GST

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP NEW SOUTH KAMLOOPS - READY SOON!

$1,180,800 • Walk to downtown stores, schools, playgrounds • Custom 1.5 storey 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms • Double garage with lane access - BONUS room above • 8’9” x 11 sitting area extension of Master bedroom; tiled ensuite shower, walk-in closet • Engineered H/W, tile in bathrooms, carpet in bonus room & stairs

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D!4 SOLLOT

LD! SOLOT 5 LOT 6 6.05 acres

• Horse Country • Drilled wells, UG gas & hydro • Close to 3 golf courses • Close to Deerfoot Tr & McLeod Tr

56 STREET E

A30

LOCAL PHOTOS? We’re looking for your local photos to use in local publications

LOT 7 4.21 acres

6.05 acres

$608,000

4.21 acres

$568,000

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR… • Commercial building South Kamloops • Lakefront lot or house on White Lake • 2 Bedroom apartment Victoria Landing or Riviera Gardens • Newer rancher up to $850,000 - South Kamloops, lower Sahali, Valleyview • Lakefront house on the Shuswap $650,000 $700,000 - Blind Bay, Sunnybrae, Sorrento, Eagle Bay or Mara Lake • House in Blind Bay up to $600,000 • House on 0.5 - 1 acre in Dallas, Juniper, Deloro up to $600,000

To win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos at:

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Mar 26

Follow us on Instagram to vote on the top photos at the end of every month

@Kamloopsthisweek

1 winner selected at the end of each month from majority vote of selected entries. Submitte though www.KamloopsThisWeek.com/photo-contest will be accepted. Physical & emailed copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for more details.

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KAYLEIGH BONTHOUX Office Manager/Unlicensed Assistant

KAMLOOPS REALTY

166 Cavesson Way $234,900

42-1900 Hugh Allan Drive $498,900

401-1120 Hugh Allan Drive $369,900

2308 Omineca Drive $649,999

• Beautiful Aberdeen apartment • Top floor, corner unit • Features 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom • Bright, spacious living, kitchen and dining areas • In unit laundry • 2 parking stalls and a sizeable storage unit • Well-maintained building with a community room available • Monthly strata fee includes natural gas, water, sewer, landscaping and garbage • Pets and rentals are allowed with restrictions • Close to all amenities, transit, shopping, and TRU

• Great family home with 5 bed, 3 baths • Large deck with amazing views of the city (stunning sunsets) • Quartz countertops, new appliances, and mountain views from Kitchen • Updates throughout: Paint inside and out, new high efficiency furnace (2020), Roof (2013) • Home is ready to go and could easily contain a two bedroom suite with a separate entrance already in place. Showings will begin Saturday March 27th.

G N I D N E P

G PENDIN • Convenient and well-positioned lot • Design and build your dream home • Stunning and peaceful ranch lands at Tobiano • Unique topography • Unobstructed and breathtaking views off the main floor and upper deck(s) of your eventual home, along with a walk out basement • View of the pristine waters of Kamloops Lake • Watch the sun set on the magnificent rolling hills of the Tranquille Ecological Reserve • Conveniently located close to recreation and amenities • Award-winning golf course, premiere dining, access to Bruker Marina for lake-time fun • Plenty of biking, hiking and horseback riding opportunities • Your dream home build awaits!

2537 Qu’Appelle BLVD $998,000

778-765-5151 | kayleighbonthoux@royallepage.ca

• Move in ready • 3 level town home • Northgate complex in Pineview Valley • Close to Pineview Valley park, bus routes, hiking and biking trails and all amenities • Main floor: Unique open concept living area with a large kitchen, dining and living room, covered patio, powder room and a cozy fireplace • Upstairs: 3 spacious bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Master bedroom featuring a 4pc ensuite • Entry level basement is fully finished with rec room and laundry room • Additional designated parking spot is available

• Beautiful custom 5 bdrm 4 bath • Sought-after neighbourhood of Juniper Ridge • 0.38-acre private lot - provides plenty of parking, a green space and mature garden area • 4000sqft home has been completely remodelled • Open concept kitchen, dining area features a farmhouse style sink, stainless steel appliances • Spacious sundeck and garden area • Living room features exposed beams, large gas fireplace and a second deck with stunning views of the entire valley • Modern master bdrm is complete with a walk-in closet and ensuite • Entry level offers a large family room with a wood burning fireplace • Unique basement provides a games room accented with a wood burning stove, sauna, bathroom and storage • 2 car garage & extra bonus wrap around shop area


LindaTurner

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

A31

www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • LindaTurnerPREC@gmail.com

250-374-3331 REALTOR® of the Year

$239,900

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Real Estate (Kamloops)

$335,000

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$424,900

SAHALI

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Adam Popien REALTOR®

$489,900

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GREAT CENTRAL LOCATION • 2 Bedrooms -4pc update bath • New carpet & flooring • Ground floor for easy access

2 BEDROOM 2 BATH FRONT FACING • 55+ Ashley Court- No Pets or Rentals • C/Air - All Appliances & 1 parking stall • Walking distance to downtown & Riverside park

55+ LARGER 2 BEDROOM UNIT • Custom design for wheel chair bath • Vacant w/Sundeck & mountain view • All appliances & Air Conditioner

SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM-2 BATH UNIT • South corner unit with private deck • Open floor plan-Granite kitchen • Rentals allowed -Walk to all Amenities

TOP FLOOR, 2 BEDROOM + DEN • 1700 sq ft with 2 levels • Open plan w/Island kitchen on main • Upper floor has 2nd bedroom & bath

32-1595 SUMMIT DRIVE

208-338 NICOLA ST

309-760 MAYFAIR STREET

308-755 MCGILL ROAD

304-550 LORNE ST

$499,900

$624,900

$629,900

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D L O S

ABERDEEN

JUNIPER

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59-2022 PACIFIC WAY

RANCHER W/ FULL DAYLIGHT BASEMENT • Breathtaking view • 4 beds & 3 baths • Low maintenance living 17-2630 NECHAKO DR

$699,900

$724,900

UPDATED WITH BREATHTAKING VIEW • Level entry with full daylight basement • 3 Bedrooms & 3 Baths • Large Rec Room & Media Room

D L O S

ABERDEEN

ABERDEEN

377 SEYMOUR STREET W.

$724,900

$789,900

STUNNING NORTH RIVER VIEW • Dead end cul de sac location • Updated w/4 Bedrooms & 2 baths • Private fenced yard & S/Garage

DALLAS

SAHALI

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • 5 Bedrooms & 3 Baths • Updated hardwood & new kitchen • Easy to suite if desired

ONE OF A KIND 35FT HEATED SHOP • 2+1 Bedroom home + D/Garage • Great yard w/2 large decks • RV Parking & Suite potential

859 REGENT CRESCENT

1088 GREENOCK COURT

ELEGANT CUSTOM ONE OWNER HOME • Cul de sac backs on green space • Vaulted ceilings & great view • 3 or 4 Bedrooms & 4 Baths 698 SPRINGFIELD PLACE

$885,000

$949,900

$975,000

D L O S

BROCKLEHURST

DREAM HOME W/DELUXE 2 BEDROOM SUITE • 2 Double Garages • Extra long RV Parking • All appliances up & down 2676 ROSEWOOD AVENUE

VIDEO TOURS

TOBIANO

ABERDEEN

BEAUTIFULLY RENOVATED ABERDEEN HOME • 5 bedroom 3 bath • Close to schools, shopping and recreation 2192 SIFTON AVE

JUNIPER HEIGHTS

D L O S

BATCHELOR HEIGHTS

BEAUTIFUL 5 BEDROOM 2.5 BATH BATCH HOME • Kitchen and living room on main • Flat fenced backyard with Pergola 2143 DOUBLETREE CRES

$875,000

D L O S

JUNIPER HEIGHTS

GREAT CUL DE SAC LOCATION • Close to Dallas Elementary • 6 Bedrooms / Central Air • 2 Bedroom suite potential

EXECUTIVE NEW HOME W/VIEW • 4 Bedrooms & Laundry up • 2 Bedroom legal suite • Triple Garage

5569 COSTER PLACE

2129 LUPIN COURT

$1,199,000

LOTS FOR SALE

HEFFLEY

TOBIANO GOLF RESORT • Deluxe home w/triple garage • Fully finished & landscaped • 4 Bedrooms & Suite Potential

EXECUTIVE 2-STOREY W/VIEW • 4 Bedroom & Laundry Up • 2 Bedroom Legal Suite • Triple Garage

CUSTOM 3648 SQFT HOME BUILT IN 2016 • Beautiful 3.5 acre property with mountain views • Close proximity to Sun Peaks Ski Resort

228 HOLLOWAY DR

2113 LUPIN COURT

1452 HEFFLEY-LOUIS CREEK RD

KAMLOOPS LAKE LOT SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


A32

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

THINKING OF SELLING?

Brent Miller

Rie TakahashiZhou

Now is the time. Call Rie or Brent for your

Personal Real Estate Corporation

Cell 250.319.7376 brentmiller@shaw.ca

Personal Real Estate Corporation

Cell 250.851.2000 riezhou@gmail.com

FREE MARKET EVALUATION

VIEW OUR LISTINGS AT

www.KamloopsProperties.com

Cell 250-319-3876 dbinkamloops@shaw.ca denisebouwmeestersales.com

Photo: Babette Degregorio

Denise Bouwmeester MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

250-371-7992

(Kamloops) Real Estate SENIORS MASTER CERTIFIED REAL ESTATE NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST SPECIALIST

7130 SAVONA ACCESS RD • $405,000

FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION CALL 250-319-3876 Great photos and video that I use, add to the value of the mls presentation and to the dollars you receive for your home.

nced Experie

Great central North Kamloops location with a spacious home rented up (3 bedrooms) and a one bedroom suite rented down REDUCED $489,000

SOLD

THE MARKETPLACE IS HOT AND NEW LISTINGS ARE MUCH NEEDED

JEANNE VOS

SOLD dwightvos@gmail.com • 250-554-4511

2123 MARTIN PRAIRIE RD • $789,000

SOLD

Re/Max Real Estate (Kamloops)

READY TO SELL YOUR HOME? GIVE US A CALL! "Andy and I have used a few realtors over the years and some were better than others. However Denise Bouwmeester has been outstanding. She is personable, professional, knowledgeable, efficient, hard-working, always on time either with appointments or email/call replies. She has warm, friendly personality and really works for you, with you. We thought it would take 6 months to a year to sell our farm but we were wrong. It took only 17 days and we could not be happier! Just when we were losing hope of finding what we were looking for, and let me say, we were very particular on what we were looking for, we found just the one. The process was fast, clear and efficient! She reminded us of things we didn’t know, we wanted or could have. Thank you Denise Andy and I could not be happier. You will forever be a friend and be part of our family." – Cecilia Guerrero

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Bobby Iio

REALTOR®/TEAM LEADER

Jeremy Bates REALTOR®

Kim Fells REALTOR®

Michael Jodoin REALTOR®

Team110remax

team110 - remax


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries

Call today to book a virtual tour! F E ATU RE L ISTI N G

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

Tobiano

105 Cavesson Way $1,289,000

• Custom designed home at Tobiano! • 1,000 sq. ft. garage (suitable for 4 vehicles) • Legal 2 bedroom self contained secondary suite • Master bedroom retreat - with soaker tub and full tile “open” shower • Entertainers dream, outdoor kitchen, covered gazebo, immense patio, hot tub and heated inground pool!

5

3

2,979

1125 Canyon Ridge Dr • $839,900

253 Willow Street • $424,900

Campbell Creek

1759 Old Ferry Rd $1,149,000

• Waterfront living just 15 minutes from Kamloops • Gourmet kitchen with granite counters • Panoramic views of the river valley • Huge garage with heated storage / workshop • Bonus: Guesthouse, garden shed, waterfront storage shed and more

3

Dufferin

1216 Prairie Rose Dr $1,399,000

• Located in exclusive Hidden Trails • Dream kitchen with high-end Fisher Paykel appliances included • Master ensuite with soaker tub & steam shower! • Fully finished walkout basement • Inquire now for information package • Under Construction – Nearing Completion

5

5.5

4,685

3

3,798

1554 Griffin Terrace • $649,900

2024 Sifton Ave • $619,900

Sun Rivers

4042 Rio Vista Way $1,250,000

• ONE OF A KIND location • Panoramic views of the city and river valley • Totally private end of cul-de-sac • TWO double garages • High end finishing selections • Under Construction.

3

3

4,250

4000 Rio Vista Way • $799,900

1572 Golf Ridge • $599,000

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

PHASE 2

SOLD OUT Call now for more information on phase 3

• Panoramic vistas • Adult oriented • Modern styling • Irresistible lifestyle

Homes from

588,900 +GST

$

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

...selling Kamloops every day™ Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

11-6000 Valley Drive - What a wonderful opportunity to purchase a one-owner townhome in the heart of Sun Peaks Village. Morrisey & Orient Express lifts out your door and village square a 10 minute walk. This 2 storey townhouse has 1,052 sf of living space with 2 bedrooms & 3 bathrooms. Purchase price includes furniture and household items. Strata $476/mth, taxes $2,960/yr. Outdoor recreation right out your door, now that’s living! $799,800

970 Renfrew Avenue - Conveniently located on the North Shore within close proximity to amenities. This well-cared for one owner home is available for quick possession. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, good sized fenced yard. Lots of potential. $560,000

1295 Harrison Place - Located on a quiet no thru street in lower Aberdeen with a lovely fenced back yard. Within close proximity to major shopping, schools, university and highway access. This 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom home has benefited from updates done in 2016. $498,800

2249 Chief Atahm, ADAMS LAKE - Sweet, rustic cabin located on the pebble beach shore of beautiful and pristine Adams Lake. This property is accessed by vehicle ferry, a quick 6-minute ride, or boat. Beautiful mountain views, fun filled days and peaceful starry nights are waiting for you. This is leased land with the Adams Lake Indian Band. $132,500

317 Mariposa Court - Located on a quiet cul-de-sac in Sun Rivers this one owner home is in immaculate condition. Outstanding features include geothermal heating & cooling, engineered wood flooring, open concept main floor, generous window package for maximum natural light, mature easy-care landscaping with u/g sprinklers, double garage + additional parking. $758,300

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL:

2504 Sunset Drive - Unique opportunity, this ranch style home of 1,703 sf is on a C4 zoned lot in East Valleyview. 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, double garage + storage shed and ample parking on the fully fenced yard. $569,900

2524 Mountain View Drive - Located in the beautiful village of Sun Peaks where life is good. This home has been started and is almost at lock up. You can complete it and make this your dream home. The views of the Burfield and Sundance are outstanding and if that’s not enough you will also be able to enjoy fantastic evening sunsets from the covered deck. Some stipulations apply, please call listing Realtor for further details. $848,800

• Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 • Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. • Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) • Full-time office assistant • Professional representation • Professional Signage • Advertising in Kamloops This Week • Global advertising on the internet • Thinking of Selling and/or Buying?

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca Real Estate (Kamloops)

For more info view all our listings, upcoming listings, and Kamloops listings at ralphrealestate.ca

75-1605 SUMMIT DRIVE $279,900 • MLS®160854

90-7545 DALLAS DRIVE $287,500 • MLS®159953

1305-1000 TALASA WAY $339,900 • MLS®160676

D L O S SAHALI • Great 2 bedroom 1 bathroom townhouse in Riverview Village • Private yard with large sundeck and backing onto South Sahali Elementary School • Pets and rentals allowed with restrictions

DALLAS • 2 bedroom 1 bathroom modular home built in 2005 • Low bareland strata fee of $95/month • 2 pets allowed with no size restriction. No rentals allowed

405-950 LORNE STREET $389,900 • MLS®159127

SUN RIVERS • 2 bedroom 2 bathroom apartment in the Navarro building • Pets & rentals allowed with restrictions • Quick possession possible

1131 WINDBREAK STREET $575,000 • MLS®160769

D L O S SOUTH KAMLOOPS

• Great location in this 1 bedroom + den & 2 bathroom unit in Park Place • Top floor unit with river views • Walking distance to all downtown amenities

BROCK • Great family home and area with 3 bedroom and 2 bathrooms • Lots of updates including kitchen, windows, flooring and more • Quick possession possible

292 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD $750,000 • MLS®159641

1898 PARKHILL DRIVE $779,000 • MLS®161047 NG

W

NE

MCLURE • Very private 1+2 bedroom 3 bathroom log home • Mountain and river views

• Approximately 16.77 acres • Built in 2009

TI LIS

VALLEYVIEW • Immaculate and well maintained • Great cul-de-sac location on 3+1 bedroom 3 bathroom home approx. 0.34 acre lot with lots • Approximately 25x40 wired of parking and privacy and heated detached shop


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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

SPORTS kamloopsthisweek.com | Marty Hastings: 778-471-7536

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BERGER ON VERGE OF OLYMPICS

RBC OLYMPIANS PHOTO Matt Berger, who has seen almost no competitive skateboarding action since the pandemic shut down the sports world last March, received his Olympic qualifying schedule earlier this month. MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

M

att Berger is in qualifying position for the Olympic Summer Games this

year in Tokyo. The 27-year-old skateboarder from Kamloops said a top-three performance at an upcoming event in Des Moines, Iowa, should lock up his spot on Team Canada for the 2020 Games, which were originally slated for 2020, but had to be

rescheduled to this July and August due to the pandemic. “I feel the best I’ve ever skated in years,” said Berger, who has overcome multiple knee surgeries in his career. “Between just getting older and becoming more confident with what I do and, I guess, getting a little bit more wise, I’ve been able to do things skateboarding in the last year that I really didn’t know I’d be capable of doing.” Find the evidence on Instagram — @mattberger_. The account has more than 138,000 followers.

Five years ago, the International Olympic Committee determined skateboarding will make its debut at the Tokyo Games. Berger is the top-ranked Canadian in the street discipline in Olympic World Skateboarding rankings, sitting 17th overall. Skaters must be inside the top 20 when the qualifying period ends to reach the Games. There are two events remaining in the qualifying period, information that was released to anxious athletes earlier this month — a Dew

Tour competition, which runs from May 20 to May 23 in Des Moines, and the Street World Championships, which run from May 31 to June 6 in Rome, Italy. Berger, who will skate at both events, has competed only once since winning gold at the Canada Skateboard National Championships in March 2020 in Toronto. “It was a letdown, of course, when our whole year got flipped upside down and it sucks when you kind of feel like you’re in limbo, but I’m always trying to be the best

skateboarder I can be,” said Berger, who lives in Huntington Beach, Calif. “So nothing really changed in that regard.” Berger has been preparing as if the Olympics will take place this year and has put in ample time training off of the board. “We’re going to see which people have grown from corona and taken the opportunity to get better and which ones have gotten lazy, I guess,” Berger said with a laugh. “These days, I’m just excited to go out and skate, just knowing my mind, body and spirit are all kind of aligning well.”

Masters of Golf

The 2021 Masters is coming up April 8-11 at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. In the lead-up to the 85th Masters, vote for your all-time favourite Master of Golf in this knockout voting bracket for your chance to win a Dunes 2021 Season Pass!

Second Round voting ends Friday, March 26 Go to www.kamloopsthisweek.com/contests to cast your vote!w

Brought to you by


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL SPORTS REASON TO CELEBRATE

For the first time in more than a year, Orrin Centazzo and the Kamloops Blazers will take to the ice for a Western Hockey League contest. The shortened schedule begins on Friday, with the Blazers squaring off against the Vancouver Giants at Sandman Centre. Game time is 7 p.m. Read more about the season in a special Blazers’ section, which begins on page B1.

MANURE SALE!

The Kamloops Track And Field Club

28TH ANNUAL

MANURE SALE Aged

Mushroom Manure

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

1200 per bag

$

Atkinson talks WolfPack staffing MARTY HASTINGS sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Five layoff notices were issued last year to staff (no coaches) in the TRU WolfPack athletics and recreation department amid the pandemic. WolfPack athletics and recreation director Curtis Atkinson spoke to KTW about the prospect of increasing staffing levels this year, with Canada West competition expected to return in time for the 2021-2022 campaign. “I don’t think we’ll be at pre-COVID staffing levels right away, but over time we may build back up there again,” Atkinson said. “We’re really starting to look at that now, this spring. What’s that going to look like as we rebuild?” Part of the conundrum facing Canada West schools is the uncertainty surrounding what competition will

West,” he said. “It will probably look a little bit different. I can’t say definitively at this time what all the roles will look like.” The WolfPack have seven varsity teams — men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and soccer, along with swimming. Competitive seasons did not take place in 20202021. Key fundraisers were wiped out, along with moneymaking sports camps. There are ideas in motion to pull off fundraisers in 2021 and some sport-specific, performance-related camps will go ahead. TRU’s recreational sports camps are likely to remain sidelined this summer, Atkinson said. “We’ve faced some huge challenges this year,” he said. “We learned about our group, the need to be adaptable and flexible. We’ve always said that. This year, we had to live it. The biggest thing for us is the resiliency of our group.”

Thompson Rivers University athletics and recreation director Curtis Atkinson said his program is entering a rebuilding phase.

STAFF REPORTER

ANDREW SNUCINS/TRU WOLFPACK

look like next season. League schedules, which are usually ratified by this time of the year, may not be finalized until later this spring or early this summer. Atkinson seems confident a return to traditional schedules and formats is not going to occur in 2021-2022, with less travel and other costsaving measures expected to be in place. “That will be important

for us because there has certainly been a hit financially,” Atkinson said. “We’ll rebuild, but it’s been a tough year.” Atkinson said he expects an efficient staffing model to be in place by this summer, one that meets league requirements for pulling off an altered season. “We might have to modify how we do certain jobs, but we have requirements we have to meet to be in Canada

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A38

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Questions? Go online to runclub.ca or send an email to joberry@ boogiethebridge.com.

JAMES MACDONALD Artistic director of Western Canada Theatre

KAYLA PEPPER Emergency manager with the province of British Columbia

KAYLA DERKACH Promotions/on-air at Jim Pattison Broadcast Group

“I’d never belong to any club that would have me as a member” — Groucho Marx Never more true than when I registered (late) for our weekend RunClub. Our fearless coach Rick told me my usual choice, the 10K Sweet, was full and that he was shifting me to the forebodingly named 100K Bold. He also noted we’d be running 12 kilometers at 8 a.m. on Sunday morning (!). Never having run 12K in my life, it sounded like a great plan. I drove out to Mac Isle at 7:30 a.m., gazing enviously at leisurely walkers with their steaming to-go cups of coffee and cavorting dogs. It was a wonderful run — crisp spring in the air and a supportive group of people at an excellent pace, alternating eight minutes of running with two minutes of walking. Turns out 12K takes you on a beautiful path from NorBrock Stadium to Colombo Lodge — who knew? As for the aches and pains? Nothing that a two-hour bath couldn’t fix. Good thing I like to read. I also spent the past week on a detox plan, with no alcohol, wheat or sugar. I’m tremendously disappointed to discover that it feels great — better sleep, better all-day energy, better mood. I’ve never been one for cleanses and deprivation, preferring moderation, but it really does make a difference. Now that I’m running a bit more, I’ve renewed my search for a great playlist. I discovered the perfect song for our time — Here Comes the Sun by the Beatles. Do yourself a favour and crank it every morning. It’s been a long cold lonely winter, but the smiles are returning to our faces.

I’m curious about runners who run for the sake of running. Because they enjoy it? Because it’s what they do for fun? I run because I know it’s good for me, but it still takes a “pre-game” self-coaching chat to coax me to the sidewalk. When I started running again (all of three months ago), I turned to Spotify to distract from the actual “running” part of running. My mind wandered to projects at work, what I was going to eat after my run or how to avoid as many steep hills as possible in Juniper. I was far from enjoying the present moment. So, this week, as a bit of an experiment, I tried being more present. Present to my breath. Present to dodging doggydoo on the sidewalk. Present to pulling my tights back over my jiggly, belly bits. Present to the crisp, sunny weather signaling a return to spring. Present to practising compassion when I compared myself to other runners with flawless form who were carrying out conversations — in full sentences! Then, on the Rivers Trail, the darndest thing happened. For more than a few fleeting moments, my thinking mind melted away. I was just going with it. Foot landing after foot, shoulders and hands relaxed and I noticed a slight smile across my face. I wasn’t running to lose weight or get fitter, but because it felt good. Perhaps a turning point for my journey? Cheers to week 3. We’re almost halfway to Boogie.

As I enter week 3 of RunClub, I can’t believe how quickly this is going and how much I’m enjoying it. Before RunClub, the only running I did was from my problems and the consequences of my actions. Now I actually enjoy running for fun. Who knew? This past week, I discovered RunClub is more than just a running group. I’ve learned a variety of things, like how important it is that your shoes fit your feet and, if they don’t, how they can cause you all sorts of problems, from common sports injuries all the way to bunions. And that you should be changing your runners every 6 months. My current runners are three years old, so I foresee a shoe-shopping spree in my future. RunClub has also taught me a little bit about yoga. We do yoga after our sessions to stretch and help prevent injury and I’ve actually started to include these yoga stretches into my everyday life. For example, if I am in my kitchen and need a pot from the bottom shelf, excuse me while I do the downward dog to get it. One thing I didn’t expect from joining RunClub is how much of the city I’m exploring. It’s incredible how much Kamloops has to offer in its parks, trails and other places. I had never had the opportunity to check out a lot of these things. The latest run was at McArthur Island and we took a trail I didn’t even known existed, one that was surrounded by wildlife and incredible views. I look forward to experiencing more of Kamloops and soaking up the scenery as I continue my journey with RunClub.

RUNCLUB PLAYWORK, WEEK 3 GROUP GOAL WARM-UP PLAYWORK

COOL DOWN TIPS

Walkers

5K Sweet

10K Sweet

10K Bold

21 Club

5K or 10K Boogie walk

5K Boogie Learn To Run

10K Boogie run, entry-level

10K Boogie Run

Half-marathon distance

Walking warm-up of 5 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

1) Walk easy for 15 minutes, then power walk for 30. Total 45 minutes.

1) Walk 3.5 minutes, run 2.5 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 48 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 51 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 70 minutes.

1) 17-kilometre run.

2) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 25. Total 45 minutes.

2) Walk 3.5 minutes, run for 2.5 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 36 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 42.5 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 50 minutes (with hills).

3) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 20. Total 40 minutes.

3) Walk 3.5 minutes, run 2.5 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 42 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 6.5 minutes. Repeat six times. Total 51 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

The best complement to your run is yoga. Yoga packs serious perks for runners, including flexibility, easing aches and pains and recovery.

You’re doing fantastic. The long run is your anchor. By increasing your long, steady distance safely, you are increasing your endurance, fitness and distance.

Remember to hydrate before, during and after your runs. Hydrating is energy-giving and reduces inflammation, injury and fatigue.

Half-marathon training is lifechanging. Start visualizing and plan out pacing for Boogie. By putting a plan in your mind, the Boogie half-marathon is already a picture of success.

We all need to get outside more. Many people are vitamin D-deficient, affecting important things like bone health and immune systems.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes. 2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times with some hills. Total 70 minutes.

WEEK 3 MOVEMENT IS CHANGE with Jo Berry, RunClub and Boogie the Bridge founder

Boogie Strong in 2021

M

y first ever “run” was roughly 30 years ago. It was a slog around my block on a hot day in July. Back then, I lived close to McArthur Park and this first-ever run is still ingrained in my memory. That day, I ran as best I could. It hurt bad. I was gasping for air and my legs felt like rocks. Everything hurt the next day and I never went out again for another couple of years. The next attempt at running was not running. I walked. I fell in love with walking everywhere. I walked to work (Valleyview Overwaitea). I walked downtown. I walked back home. I walked here, I walked there, I walked everywhere. One day I decided, what the heck, let’s try to run again. To my utter shock and disbelief, I managed to run (with walking) for about an hour. It wasn’t easy, but it was a run. Six months later, I ran my first half -marathon and, a year after that, I ran a full marathon. Another epic running mistake (too much, too soon) and I was off again with every injury imaginable. The next few years, I learned how to run properly and how to be gentle with myself. Running is an amazing sport and I could never imagine my life without it. But it can be intimidating and there are plenty of pitfalls and land mines to be avoided when first getting started. Amid the pandemic, running (and walking) has been a gift to all of us. Outdoors is not cancelled. If you have been walking for some time and are wondering how to start running safely, we are here for you (and excited for you). Follow the program here in KTW and let’s knock off the weeks together. Make sure you put a ton of walking in your workouts. Be kind to yourself, be calm and be safe. Boogie is our heart project and you are part of “movement is change.” You will do it! HELP KEEP BOOGIE ALIVE A campaign to raise money to help bring Boogie back to the streets in 2022 is online at gofundme.com. If you can help, go to that website and search “Friends of Boogie.”


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A39

If you’re thinking of buying owr selling, give me a call to discuss how I can help you!

317-765 MCGILL ROAD SAHALI • $359,900

250-682-1617

normwojak@royallepage.ca

normwojak.ca

Kamloops Realty 322 Seymour Street

CHRIS

CHAN ABOUT CHRIS:

• Kamloops resident for over 30 years • Rugby enthusiast • Community, family & team oriented • Proud supporter of United Way, Grow A Row, Royal LePage Shelter Foundation and Kamloops Pride • Strong believer in supporting local and shopping local I believe that when it comes to buying and selling your house, choosing a local member of the community is important as well. Choose an agent that is on your team!

250-574-0262 chris@uprealestate.ca

“I prefer names to numbers”

Immaculate 1 bedroom plus Den unit in Landmark Place. Unit features granite countertops with spacious island, stainless steel appliances and tile backsplash. Enjoy sitting on your covered patio overlooking the courtyard. Large Master bedroom with a passthrough to the 4 piece bathroom. Nice size Den currently set up as a bedroom could also be used as an office. Separate laundry room w/ additional storage space. Gym in building. Convenient location. Walking distance to TRU, restaurants, shopping and bus stops. Storage unit also included. Buyer to verify all details if deemed important.

LINDA

I

TURNER

have lived in Kamloops for 27 years and I plan to make this city our retirement home. With years of direct sales experience I know how to market properties to achieve the most effective results. I have earned several top RE/MAX sales awards and was honored by our Kamloops Real Estate Association with the Realtor of the Year award. On a personal note, I enjoy travel, gardening and making stained-glass windows which I donate to raise money for charities. I also make a contribution from every sale to help the BC Children’s Hospital.

My daughter, Kristy Janota and Adam Popien are members of my team and we would love to hear from you, to help make your buying or selling experience a pleasant one.

SARAH

LEE

Thinking of Selling Your Kamloops Home? Making a Next Move for the Best Results?

Your Household Name in Real Estate

250-374-3331

LindaTurnerPREC@gmail.com

Real Estate (Kamloops)

Linda Turner Personal Real Estate Corporation

• More Services: Assisted Home Preparation & Complimentary Staging Consultation • More Marketing: Unparalleled Marketing Reach for Maximized Exposure to Buyers • Best Results: Helping You Maximize the Value You Can Receive for Your Home Sarah devotes 100% of her focus and 100% of her time to your needs, and offers a 100% client satisfaction guarantee. Kamloops Real Estate Services with More Services & More Marketing

250-572-5893 sarah.lee @royallepage.ca

Westwin Realty

uprealestate.ca

www.LindaTurner.bc.ca

KamloopsRealEstateServices.com

ANDREW

MICHELINE

PLACE YOUR

KARPIAK Born and raised in Kamloops to a long-time, communitysupporting medical family, Andrew is a full-time realtor approaching his 13th year serving Kamloops, Tobiano, Shuswap and Sun Peaks. Put my experience into action: • Assisted in hundreds of real estate deals • Top 10 Royal LePage Agent 3 years in a row • Approachable, honest and experienced Check out the new townhouses at Tobiano! summerslanding.ca

STEPHENSON NAME HERE I LOVE REAL ESTATE! Your home is your most valuable possession.

Whether you are buying, selling or just need “HONEST” advice… you need all the facts.

250-374-1461 andrew@ kamloopsliving.com

Westwin Realty

www.KamloopsLiving.com

My clients are very important to me. My goal is to make the process easy, enjoyable and rewarding. Let me put my knowledge and experience to work for you. Please call me anytime for your real estate needs.

250-571-2678 michelinestephenson @royallepage.ca

Westwin Realty

www.kamloopsproperties.ca

TO BOOK YOUR AD CONTACT

BRONWYN LOURENS 250-374-7467 realestate@kamloopsthisweek.com


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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KAMLOOPS ART PAGE

W

elcome to the weekly Kamloops Art Page. With the COVID19 pandemic upending society — socially and economically and dominating news for the foreseeable future — we understand pandemic fatigue can set in for even the most ardent followers of current events. While continuing to cover all pandemic and non-pandemic-related news, KTW has also worked hard at featuring positive stories from the crisis, tales that capture the essence of humanity, be it volunteers sewing thousands of masks for health-care workers or musicians offering up weekly free concerts online. This page is an attempt by KTW to

bring some colour into the lives of our readers via artwork created locally. We hope to, on a weekly basis, use this page to showcase works by various Kamloops artists, with between one and three pieces displayed. Thanks for reading Kamloops This Week and we hope this page can help ease the stress of this uncertain era in which we are living. Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have any questions or suggestions relating to this page.

Email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com if you have submissions for Kamloops Art Page.

Alexa Penrod-Virdi, a Grade 4 student at Aberdeen elementary, created this piece she calls Happy Saint Patty’s Day, in honour of the day of celebration that arrives each March 17.

Six-year-old Angelo Anastasio is an avid reader of the KTW Art Page and created this collection of superheroes to be considered for the page.

MEMORIES MEMORIES & & MILESTONES MILESTONES Happy 40th Wedding Anniversary

Bruce & Lynn Buchanan March 21st

She was a rough and tumble “Queen of Cool” kind of gal from Westsyde. He was a sporty, smart aleck “Prince of Gasoline” from Valleyview. One night in a bar he saw her from across the room. He sat down next to her, put his arm around her and said: “Hi, my names Bruce. How do you like me so far?” And she laughed. Three kids, one grand-daughter, countless adventures and they are both still laughing. Happy 40th Wedding Anniversary to these two supportive, funny and genuinely weird people. Love Stacey, Patrick, Jessica and Nova.

Happy Birthday

Mom

May this special day be as wonderful and perfect as you are.

We Love You Always

Tons of hugs and kisses from the whole family


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A41

FAITH

SAYING: ‘THIS JESUS HAS GOD RAISED UP’ On the day of Pentecost, disciple Peter spoke these very words in his message, found in Acts 2:32

T

he first coming of the Lord Jesus Christ nearly 2,000 years ago was met with different expectations than actually happened. The people were expecting Jesus of Nazareth to release Israel from Roman occupation and establish his glorious kingdom. He was accepted by many to be the Messiah, foretold throughout the Old Testament. The closest followers of the Lord were confident he came to deliver them from Roman rule. The many miracles of Jesus only confirmed the faith of the followers that this one held the future in their expectation of his kingdom soon to be established. The Lord spoke at different times concerning his death, burial and resurrection, but the disciples did not really understand what he was saying. They had different expectations about their coming Messiah.

JOHN EGGERS You Gotta Have

FAITH

In the Bible, the Gospel writers make it clear they did not expect their Messiah to die and certainly not on a cross. Jesus said to the disciples in Luke 9:44-45: “Let these sayings sink down into your ears: for the Son of man shall be delivered into the hands of men. But they understood not this saying, and it was hidden from them, that they perceived it not: and they feared to ask him of that saying.” Matthew 16:21-23 tells us Jesus made it clear he was

going to be killed and raised again the third day. Even so, Peter sought to rebuke the Lord for this and was not willing for it to happen. The Lord spoke very directly to Peter and said Peter was not valuing the things of God, but rather the things of men. There are many scriptures written about the suffering, death and resurrection of the Messiah. The disciples were feeling the weight of the rule of Rome and were expecting the prophecies concerning the Lord’s earthly kingdom to be fulfilled at that time. Isaiah 53:5-6 is very clear about the suffering one called “a man of sorrows.” Isaiah wrote in verses 5 and 6: “But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his

own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.” At this point, we need to turn to John, chapter three, where Nicodemus came to the Lord by night to talk to him. Nicodemus was one of the top teachers of the scriptures in Israel. He did not want to be seen talking with Jesus. Nicodemus said they knew he was a teacher who came from God on account of the miracles he had done. The Lord spoke to Nicodemus about his need to be born again. In the conversation, the Lord spoke about the necessity for him to be lifted up or crucified. The Lord said in verses 14-15: “And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life.” Nicodemus must have trusted in the message from the Lord to him as he helped

in the burial of the Lord’s body after he died. But that is not the end of the story. To the disciples who were looking for deliverance from Rome, the work done by the Lord on the cross was far more important when they realized he was raised from the dead. They became faithful messengers of the Gospel and many of them laid down their lives for their Lord. On the day of Pentecost, Peter included the words of the title of this article in his message. At this time of year, we think of the resurrection of the Lord from the dead and can rejoice with Peter, who said: “This Jesus has God raised up!” Acts 2:32. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@kamloopsthisweek. com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.

KAMLOOPS Easter symbolism complements Places of Worship the holiday traditions Tradition plays an important role in Easter celebrations for many families. Cherished traditions and symbols of Easter may include anything from egg hunts to lilies to lambs. Understanding the importance behind these symbols can make sharing the miracle of Easter that much more special. EGGS Eggs are one of the more recognizable symbols of Easter. For Easter egg hunts, eggs are hard-boiled and decorated in bright hues. It’s believed the origins of Easter eggs are both secular and religious. From the secular (once pagan) perspective, the egg is an ancient symbol of new life, according to The History Channel, and has been associated with pagan festivals that celebrate spring. Some Christians feel that Easter eggs represent Christ’s emergence from the tomb and his subsequent resurrection. Eggs were once a food not consumed during Lent, therefore painting and decorating them to mark the end of fasting and penance became a way to celebrate Easter.

CRUCIFIX The crucifix is one of the central symbols of Easter and Christianity. The cross is a symbol of Christ’s crucifixion and sacrifice. The crucifix highlights the ability of God to give new life to people after death. RABBIT The Easter bunny is very much a secular symbol of the holiday, but one that has become so ingrained with the season that many people ascribe to it a Christian meaning. Pagan celebrations of spring often linked rabbits or hares with the season because of their fertility and ability to bring forth new life. According to the Christian living resource Crosswalk, believers associate the rabbit coming out of its underground home as a symbol of Christ emerging from the tomb. LILIES The American Bible Society says lilies grow in the spring around the time when Easter is typically celebrated. Also, because they look like trumpets, they can be a symbol that heralds Christ’s resurrection.

Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Join us online Saturday 6:30 pm & Sunday 9 am & 11 am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call 250-374-7467

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

In these unprecedented times10:00am we are worshiping remotely via our Facebook Sunday Mornings

pageTranquille livestream on 422 Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

Sundays at 10am. All are Welcome

www.northshorecalvary.com www.northshorecalvary.com

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca


A42

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

BABY BLUES

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Don’t shy away from the issues that keep cropping up this week, Aries. They may cause a few headaches, but they also are making the days much more exciting.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, many people like to live by the mantra “don’t judge a book by its cover,” but many times appearances matter. Don’t regret picking out a nice outfit or a trendy restaurant.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Change may take you in unexpected directions this week, Gemini. The good news is that things are finally turning around for you. Enjoy this exciting time.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, you may be drawn to people who appeal to your analytical side this week. You could be interested in some intellectual debate and need a worthy sparring partner.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, if you see a chance to get ahead this week, jump on it. No matter what is involved or how inconvenient, you do not want to let this opportunity pass you by.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 There is much more clarity in your life this week, Virgo. It’s almost as if a veil has been lifted or if your eyeglasses prescription has been fine-tuned.

LIBRA

MARCH 24 - MARCH 30, 2021 - Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, there might be a lot of activity going around you over the course of the week. Whether it’s good or bad, you won’t be directly involved in any of it.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22

Exercise caution when sharing your secrets, Scorpio. Make sure others can be tight-lipped, as some people cannot resist passing on a little gossip here and there.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 There is great harmony in your life right now and it’s due mostly to the fact that you are working together with people both at home and at work. Keep up the collaborations.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Listen to people around you to get a fresh perspective on various components of life that you share. People may have good ideas and be willing to share their advice.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, if you have been trying to become better acquainted with someone in your personal life or even at the office, pay attention to their body language. It can say a lot.

PISCES

- Feb 19/Mar 20

Pisces, trust your heart this week and be honest with how you feel about situations. Not every decision has to be based on analysis. Trust your gut.

DO YOU HAVE AMAZING LOCAL PHOTOS?

WE’RE LOOKING FOR YOUR LOCAL PHOTOS TO USE IN LOCAL PUBLICATIONS To win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos at:

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Mar 26

@Kamloopsthisweek Follow us on Instagram to vote on the top photos at the end of every month

1 winner selected at the end of each month from majority vote of selected entries. Only entries submitted though www.KamloopsThisWeek.com/photo-contest will be accepted. Physical and emailed copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for more details.


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Some rappers 4. Music genre for Carmen Miranda 9. Pioneer in 35mm. cameras 14. Bit of bait 18. His face overlooks Havana’s Plaza de la Revolución 19. Fire ____ 20. See 67-Across 21. Refurbish 22. Architectural innovation jokingly predicted by 101-Across in 1982 26. Actress Perez 27. Performer’s showcase 28. Gave out 29. God of love 30. Goofy images, perhaps? 32. Kitchen brand whose name becomes an animal after adding a T 33. Old N.Y.C. subway inits. 36. Wish-list items 38. Grooming tool jokingly predicted by 101-Across in 1979 41. ‘‘Gotcha’’ 43. ____ Sea, whose eastern basin has become a desert 44. Either spy to the other in ‘‘Spy vs. Spy’’ 45. Prop in a Shakespeare tragedy 47. Abbr. at the end of a planner 48. Classic board game derived from pachisi 50. Place to order a cassoulet 52. Writing aid jokingly predicted by 101-Across in 1967 55. Therefore 56. ____ block 57. Midnight trip to the fridge, say 58. ‘‘Yellow Flicker Beat’’ singer, 2014 59. Type of headsail 62. Super-duper 63. Shake off 65. Hammer out, say

66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 72. 73.

‘‘____ Lisa’’ With 20-Across, yearly Some sports car options Painter Paul ‘‘Them’s the breaks!’’ Butler played by Gable Winter sport jokingly predicted by 101-Across in 1965 75. Treadmill settings 77. They’re not known for neatness 78. Word connecting two place names 79. Word connecting two last names 80. Taters 81. Ragamuffin 82. Nominee’s place 84. Telephone feature jokingly predicted by 101-Across in 1961 89. Porters, e.g. 92. Stampede member in ‘‘The Lion King’’ 93. Manual readers 94. ‘‘____ fun!’’ 95. Early smartphone model 96. Italian lager 98. Square thing 100. Like some rights and engineers 101. Satirical cartoonist, born 3/13/1921, known for dreaming up ridiculous inventions .?.?. or are they? 107. Ransacks 108. Peter the Great and others 109. Eponym of an M.L.B. hitting award 110. Jellied British delicacy 111. Goes down 112. Fender product, for short 113. Windows forerunner 114. Droll DOWN 1. Phil of ‘‘Dr. Phil’’ 2. Intensity of color 3. When the president may make a pitch

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Ump’s call Comedian Wong Gym array Sweet bread Not as scarce Language not traditionally written with spaces between words 10. Ambient musician Brian 11. Like Bach’s first two ‘‘Brandenburg’’ Concertos 12. Like dice, shapewise 13. Finding it funny 14. Off the mark 15. Substance that helps a spaceship’s fuel burn 16. Direct 17. It’s greener the higher it is, for short 21. Glow, in a way 23. Narrow inlet 24. Part 25. ____ of Man 31. Exposed to high heat, in a way 32. Cosmetics brand with ‘‘Face Anything’’ ads 34. Ex-QB football analyst Tony 35. Word repeated before ‘‘again’’ 37. Move stealthily 38. Big part of the S&P 500 39. ‘‘It’s co-o-old!’’ 40. Toss in a chip, maybe 42. Hid 45. Org. concerned with performance rights 46. Mace, for one 48. Oodles 49. ‘‘____ From Muskogee’’ (Merle Haggard hit) 50. Cartoonist Dave famous for ‘‘The Lighter Side of .?.?. ’’ 51. How anatomy charts are drawn 53. Mormon church, for short 54. Blow

55. ‘‘Mountain of God,’’ in Exodus 58. Longtime name in cinemas 59. Hire calling? 60. Like slapstick comedies 61. Feature of a Care Bear’s belly 64. Oodles 65. Hazard on an Arctic voyage 66. 1960s style 68. Blues ensemble? 69. Slices easily (through) 71. Brush brand 72. Command+Y, on a Mac 73. Swizzle 74. Cartoon speech bubble, often 75. Whirled around 76. Sting, e.g. 77. Egg holders 80. Droop 81. Most sinewy 82. Its coat of arms features a marlin and flamingo, with ‘‘the’’ 83. Baseball’s ‘‘Big Papi’’ 85. Since 86. Principles 87. Russian assembly 88. Gutter nuisance in cold climates 90. Apt surname for a ho-dog vendor? 91. Alone 97. Gobbles up 99. Suet alternative 100. Survivalist’s stockpile 101. It might come in a yard glass 102. High toss 103. Crew’s control? 104. ____ diavolo (in a peppery tomato sauce) 105. Year-round Phoenix hrs. 106. Sticky stuff

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A28

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

WORD SCRAMBLE Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to puzzles

ANSWERS

ANSWER: VEHICLES

Hero Heart of the

2021 CAMPAIGN

Raising money to improve “ICCHA/WISH Cardiac Care Unit” at RIH To find out more or to donate please visit iwishfund.com


A44

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Tax not included

Coming Events

For Sale - Misc

Pets

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

Eagle coffee tables $100, JVC 3 piece stereo set $300 & speakers, sewing machine $50, beige rugs $100, recliner $75. 250374-8285.

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

EASTER DEADLINE CHANGE Kamloops This Week

will be closed on Friday, April 2nd, 2021 for the Good Friday Statutory Holiday.

Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000/obo 250-3766607. Pressure washer $175. Battery charger $150. 48” table saw. $200. Angle grinder $125. 250-3748285. Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Furniture 8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933. Solid oval oak table w/6side chairs, 2 arms chairs, buffet. $5,000. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100. Treadmill $450, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-851-7687.

Antiques Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

Art & Collectibles “Power of One” Magnificent creation by John Banovich 43”hx50”wide brown wooden frame. $500 Firm 250-578-7776

Plants / Shrubs / Trees Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $15 each obo 250376-6607

Garage Sales BROCK Saturday, March 27th. 8am-1pm. 2385 Bossert Ave. Covid Protocol. Hshld items, home decor, purses, small appliances etc.

Apartments / Condos for Rent LOGAN LAKE, BC RENTAL AVAILABLE APRIL 1ST 2 Bedroom Condo, Alder Apartments $575/mo. Call Michael 604-837-3728 michael_kwasnica @hotmail.com

Commercial

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 COMMERCIAL SPACE for Lease Approximately 900 Sq. Ft., on High Traffic North Kamloops road. Premises are bright and attractive with good On-Street parking. Call 250-3769152 for more information.

Houses For Rent Furn Home WestEnd Corporate/Crew 4bd, den nsp near RIH $3700. 250214-0909.

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca

VALLEYVIEW Sunday, March 28th. 9am-1pm. 1866 Orchard Drive. Rain or Shine. Antiques, collectables, hshld items, records +more.

“DOZING LYNX” Robert Bateman 30 3/4”h x 43 1/2W Forest Green mat & dark green frame $250. 250-578-7776

Sports Equipment

ONLY $35.00 (plus Tax)

Golf Clubs 3-wheel pull cart, w/bag Nancy Lopez woods,Dunlop irons 2-putters $325 250-3728932

(250) 371-4949

kamloopsthisweek.com

DOWNTOWN 1411 Columbia St Sat Mar 27th & Sun Mar 28th 10-3pm Antiques, collectibles odds & ends

Wanted to Rent Seeking small 3bdrm home w/bsmnt downtown. 1.5baths, W/D, 2 parking spaces. 236-425-2525.

RUN UNTIL SOLD

*some restrictions apply call for details

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

Fax: 250-374-1033

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500 Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Recreational

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Recreational

RESORT FOR SALE 2.6 ac. 1/2 hr. to Kamloops 42 Long Term Suites. 130 Seat Bar & Grill Food Truck. 4000 sq. ft. Owners Suite. 2 blocks to town centre. High School next door. Doctor, Golf Course, Ice Arena. Price & Options on Web.

www.getoutadodge.info

250-523-9432

Farm Services

Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

Blinds & Draperies

ULTRASONIC BLIND CLEANING OFFERING TWICE A MONTH SERVICE TO KAMLOOPS TAKEDOWN, CLEAN & REHANG. ADVANCED BLIND CLEANING

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916

778-999-4158

2006 Dodge 2500 4x4 HD. w/1994 11ft. camper. $14,500/both. 778-2207372.

Lawn & Garden Reliable Gardener. 30 yrs experience. Cleanups & pruning. Call 250312-3986.

To advertise call

250-371-4949

HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. April 24th and 25th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L April 11th. Sunday. Pr o f e s s i o n a l outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970 kamloopsthisweek.com

Vans 1997 Ext GMC Savana 3500. Work ready service van and tools avail. $9,500. 250-573-9337.

Rims 1990 Jaguar Red. leather, 4-door, A/C, Power everything. 142,597kms, $2200.00 250-851-0209.

Trucks / Heavy, Commercial

4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

Legal / Public Notices

2012 Fuso Canter FE160. 6spd auto. Diesel. Big box 8x18 extra high with skylight. 2000lb power tailgate, S&M tires, A/C and CD. 189,000kms. $29,750/obo. 250-376-6607.

Utility Trailers All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

To advertise call

BigSteelBox Corp at 37400 North Parallel Rd, Abbotsford, BC and 10 Burnt Valley Ave, Red Deer, AB. claims a PPSA Lien Against THE MANE EVENT of Kamloops, BC for arrears of container rent amounting to $2,940.00 plus any additional costs of storage that accrue. If not paid in full, the contents of the storage container, filled with furniture, horse equipment and other miscellaneous items. Will be sold online auction via Ibid4Storage. com on March 29, 2021.

250-371-4949

Legal & Public Notices Con’t on next page

Auctions

Auctions

AUCTION

HUGE ON-SITE ON-LINE RVs / Campers / Trailers 2000 Adventurer Camper 8ft. New HWT, pump, battery, solar panel, skylight. $12,500. 250-299-9076.

Classes & Courses

Sports & Imports

s

Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more

Handyman for hire. One call for all your handyman needs. Carpentry, drywall, painting, renovations and more Free Estimates. Blaine 250-8516055.

Tax not included

Dodd

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

www.danshandymanservices.net

Tax not included

Security

Handyperson

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

250-540-2401

250-838-0111 Handyperson

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

Automotive Tires

RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread . 285/30R20 $1700.00 Call 250 319-8784

Bob and Alice Sebastian

ESTATE AUCTION BIDS START CLOSING Sat March 27th 9:00 AM SORRENTO, BC

Oil & Gas Collectables, Tools, Furniture, Gretzky Collection & Rookie Card, 1980 Camaro (Full Restoration), 2017 Lincoln Navigator, Large Coin Collection, Visable Gas Pump, Ride-On Mower, Die Cast Cars, Collectables & Much More. ON SITE VIEWING 1350 TRANS CANADA HWY, SORRENTO, BC WED/THURS/FRI (MARCH 24, 25, 26) 9:00AM-5:00PM Bid Online or Absentee Bids Accepted 3311 - 28 Avenue • Subject to additions & deletions

Photos & link to sales @ doddsauction.com www.doddsauction.com

DODDS AUCTION 250-545-3259


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices RESIDENTIAL TENANCY ACT Notice is hereby given to Ryan Friesen, last known address #305240 Royal Ave., Kamloops, BC, that to recover charges under the provisions of the Residential Tenancy Act, all belongings, consisting of living room furniture, kitchen furniture, bedroom furniture, freezer, TV, miscellaneous kitchen supplies and miscellaneous personal items, that were left behind and have been in storage since March 1, 2021, will be sold and discarded April 30, 2021 by Columbia Property Management Ltd. #101-388 First Ave. Kamloops, BC to partially recover outstanding rent of $665.00.

kamloopsthisweek.com

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

POWER SWEEPER OPERATORS McRae’s Power Sweeping Ltd. is hiring full-time Power Sweeper Truck Operators. Apply today to join our team. Requirements • Class 5 License with Air Brake Endorsement at a minimum. Clean driver’s abstract. • Able to understand, speak, read, write and communicate in English and follow instructions. Benefits • Wages are competitive and full time employees receive medical & dental benefits after 3 months. • Flexible shifts are available working in the Kamloops area. Please send resumes to sab@mcraetank.com DOWNTOWN Rte 310 – 651-695 2nd Ave, 660-690 3rd Ave, 110-292 Columbia St, 106-321 Nicola St. – 43 p. Rte 317 – 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(Even Side), 702-799 Nicola St. – 39 p. Rte 318 – 463 6th Ave, 446490 7th Ave, 409-585 8th Ave, 604-794 Battle St. – 27 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave, 763-804 7th Ave, 744-764 8th Ave, 603-783 Columbia St(Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. 50 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 327 - 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. - 38 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. – 56 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35-377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 371 – 125-207 Connaught Rd, 451-475 Lee Rd, 7-376 W. St Paul St. – 73 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p. LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 402 – 14-94 Bestwick Dr, Mahood Pl. – 28 p. Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, Bestwick Crt E & W, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Morrisey Pl. – 47 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p.

Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 467 – 1605-1625 Summit Dr. – 30 p. Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p. Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Crt, Dr, & Pl. – 67 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 486 – Garibaldi Dr. – 40 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p. ABERDEEN Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 509 – 459-551 Laurier Dr, Shaughnessy Hill – 47 p. Rte 512 – Ainslie Pl, Balfour Crt, Braemar Dr, MacIntyre Pl. – 69 p. Rte 513 – Braemar Way, 556-696 Laurier Dr, 2214-2296 Van Horne Dr. – 39 p. Rte 522 – 604-747 Dunrobin Dr. & Dunrobin Pl.-64 p. Rte 526 - 2015-2069 Van Horne Dr.-68 p Rte 528 - 1115-1180 Howe Rd, & 1115-1185 Hugh Allen Dr.-47 p. Rte 532 - 1221 Hugh Allan Dr.-26 p. Rte 537- 1201-1295 Harrison Pl, Harrison Way & 11811291 Howe Rd.-33 p.

LITIGATION ASSOCIATE Bilkey Law Corp. is looking for a litigation associate to join our KAMLOOPS office. The ideal candidate will have 3+ years civil trial experience and be capable of handling a complex file load independently. Competitive compensation offered. Please submit resumes to Jen Ford (Senior Administrator) by email only to jford@bilkeylaw.ca. PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p. Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p. VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648, 1652-1764 Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 19092003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 618 – Big Nickel Pl, Chapman Pl, Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd, 2440-2605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p. Rte 619 – 2710-2797 Sunset Dr, Sunset Lane, 115-159 Tanager Dr, 2583-2799 Valleyview Dr. - 54 p. Rte 652 – 1616-1890, 1955-2212 Coldwater Dr, Coldwater Crt, 19211999 Skeena Dr.(Odd Side) – 50 p. Rte 660 – 1689-1692 Adams Ave, Babine Ave, 23912881(Odd Side), 2472-2578 (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 60 p. Rte 666 – 1603-1665 Cheakamus Dr, Cheakamus Pl. – 26 p. Rte 667 – Birkenhead Dr, & Pl, 1674-1791 Cheakamus Dr, Similkameen Pl. – 61 p. Rte 670 – Galore Cres, Crt, & Pl. – 105 p. DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. 87 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 718 – Bel Air Dr. – 24 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p.

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462

Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p. RAYLEIGH Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p. BROCKLEHURST/ NORTH SHORE Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St, 2412-2741 Tranquille Rd. – 71 p. Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 806999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 17091862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Rte 137-144-244 Briar Ave, 106-330 Clapperton Rd, Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100-204 Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p. Rte 142 -Alder Ave, Cypress Ave, 300-348+430 Fortune Dr(Even Side), Juniper Ave, 325-439 Schubert Dr, Spruce Ave.-70p. BATCHELOR/WESTSYDE: Rte 206 –Dickenson Rd, Walkem Rd, 1835-1995 Westsyde Rd(Odd Side), Yates Rd. – 53 p. Rte 216 - 701-795 Franklin Rd, 705-799 Huntington Dr. & 2675-2715 Westsyde Rd.-56 p. Rte 249 – 3085-3132 Bank Rd, 600-655 Bissette Rd, Cooper Pl, Hayward Pl, Norbury Rd. – 55 p. Rte 259 - 715-790 Kyle Dr, 731-791 Morven Dr, 2721-2871 Westsyde Dr(odd side)-54 p.

Employment

Employment

Employment

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Employment

Full Time Payroll/Tax Clerk The Payroll/Tax Clerk performs a wide range of senior level accounting functions. The Payroll/Tax Clerk is responsible for complex payroll and benefit processing, all aspects of municipal property taxes, financial software administration, and provides reception coverage as required. Minimum job qualifications include: Completion of Grade12, Certified Canadian Payroll Designation, minimum of 2 years in a professional accounting program, minimum of 3 years related experience (preferably in a municipal setting), ability to produce proficient and accurate work, working knowledge and skill in the use of office equipment. This full-time position is 35 hours per week (Monday to Friday 8:30am – 4:00pm). The 2021 wage rate for this position as per CUPE Local 900 Collective Agreement is $34.76 per hour. Applications will be received by the undersigned until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 for the position of Payroll/Tax Clerk. For further details on this position, please visit http://www.loganlake.ca/career-opportunities While we thank all applicants in advance for their interest, only those being considered for an interview will be contacted. _____________________________ Colin Forsyth, Director of Finance District of Logan Lake PO Box 190 Logan Lake, BC V0K 1W0 1W) Fax: 250.523.6678 Email: cforsyth@loganlake.ca

Business Oportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Career Opportunities

Front Desk Clerk Chambermaid Laundry Person 250-572-0763 or 250-372-3386 LAMPLIGHTER MOTEL

Employment

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

250-374-3853

VINYL DECK INSTALLER

Required immediately experience preferred but will train. Must be physically fit, hold a valid drivers licence, experience in flooring and use of power tools an asset. Contact Don after 1pm 250-554-2156 or email abcoduradeck@ telus.net

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

kamloopsthisweek.com

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

The Aberdeen Publishing has an immediate opening for an Office Administrator position in Kamloops. MAIN JOB TASKS AND RESPONSIBILITIES • Accounts Receivable & Billing • Enter daily payments in DTI • Perform all necessary account reconciliations • Reconcile the physical paper/supplements each publication • A/R Collections • Entering all EFT’s, e-transfers, cheques, Paypal • Credit card processing monthly • Assist in month end reporting procedures • Accounts payable entry into Great Plains • Perform filing and general administrative tasks • Liaise with other departments/customers/vendors EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE • High School Diploma or equivalent • POS experience • 2 years with Microsoft Office, Excel Spreadsheet • Knowledge of Great Plains, DTI, and Naviga would be an asset. • Previous bookkeeping experience is an asset • Training will be provided THE IDEAL CANDIDATE SHOULD EXCEL IN AND POSSESS THE FOLLOWING SKILLS: • Planning and organizing • Ability to multi-task • Prioritizing • Attention to detail • Problem-solving • Teamwork • Customer service orientation • Communication skills • Work in fast paced environment If you are interested in this position, please email your cover letter and resume to dfolk@ aberdeenpublishing.com

Kamloops This Week is part of the Aberdeen Publishing Group

CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

for Tsideldel First Nation. Full job description at www.tsideldel.org and application instructions. Application deadline is April 5, 2021. Resume and covering letter to katrina.elliot@4cmc.ca.


A46

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

www.kamloopsthisweek.com In Memoriams

In Memoriams

Obituaries

BROTHERS - SONS

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

In Loving Memory of Verna Lucille Porrier

December 13, 1924 - March 3, 2021 It is with deep sadness we announce the passing of our mother Verna. Mom was predeceased by her parents Alfred and Catherine Lutze, her three brothers Almond, Melvin and Wilfred and her husband Fred.

In Loving Memory Of Denise E. L. Fortier May 5, 1968 – March 26, 2017

Jesse Morgan Banfield April 14, 1978 March 22, 2011

Verna was born in Lucky Lake, Sk. in 1924. At the age of nine her family moved west to BC when the depression and the locusts impacted their farm. They settled in Falkland, BC and she lived there till she came to Kamloops and shortly after married her husband Fred who was also from Falkland.

Shane Kitson Banfield

She is survived by her sons Donald (Nonie), David (Barbara), her grandchildren Darrell (Kerri), Leanne, David (Desiree), Cody (Kaitlyn), Cathy, Nancy and numerous great-grandchildren.

September 15, 1980 - March 28, 2011

Our family are longtime Kamloops residents. Father was a owner operator in the logging industry and mom was a stay at home mom. Upon dad’s passing, mother became interested in volunteer work at Desert Gardens Community Centre which was located in the building where she lived for 23 years, 2 years with her husband and 21 years on her own.

“To live in hearts we leave behind - is not to die.” Forever Remembered, Forever Loved.

“She asked so little of so few, yet gave so much to so many”

Mom and Dad

She always put the feelings and needs of others ahead of her own. Denise, and her warming and endearing smile, are still sorely missed.

She was a tireless volunteer with the centre and was honoured several times by them for her dedication and service, and we are sure she will be greatly missed by all who knew her there. The family would like to thank her close friends at Desert Gardens, Seiko and Penny, Margaret, Barbara and Flo for looking out for her in her last years there and will always be in your debt for being there for her. We would also like to thank the staff at Ponderosa Lodge who went above and beyond caring for her in her last 2 months of life. In December of this year her health took a turn for the worse and was hospitalized and then sent to Ponderosa to recover but unfortunately that did not happen. There will be no service for her due to Covid. Thank you to Drake Cremation for their help with Mom’s passing. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

In Loving Memory of

Kathleen P Bucher

In Loving Memory of Angelo Munegatto May 16, 1936 - March 25, 2020

1946 - 2020

We will never be able to forget that heartfelt laugh of hers. She was always positive, loving, and caring for family, relatives, friends and strangers. We sure miss her and she will live with us all forever. Husband Martin, Sister Joan, and all members of our family miss their wife, sister, mother, grandmother and great grandmother for whom she leaves treasures of memories of a life well lived. My Härz RIP

I feel a warmth around me, like your presence is so near. And I close my eyes to visualize your face when you where here. I endure the times we spent together, and they are locked inside my heart. As long as I have those memories, we will never be apart. Even though we cannot speak anymore, my voice is always there, because every night before I sleep, I have you in my prayer. Your Loving Wife Lina, Nadia, John, Diana, Catia and Families

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

Ship The

I am stan standing tandin tan dingg upon din upon the th seashore. A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue ocean. She is on object of beauty & strength & I stand & watch her, until at length, she is only a speck of white cloud just wheret he seas & sky meet and mingle with each other. Then someone at my side exclaims, “There, she’s gone!” Gone where? Gone from my sight, that is all. She is just as large as she was when she left my side & just as able to bear her load of living freight to the place of her destination. Her diminished size is in me, not her.

And just at the moment when someone at my side says she is gone, there are other eyes watching for her coming and other voices ready to take up the glad shout “There she comes!”. by Henry Van Dyke

Douglas Kieth Piggott

September 2, 1978 - March 8, 2021 “Gone too soon.” It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of Douglas Piggott. Left to mourn is his grief-stricken family: his mom Maureen (Terry), dad Bill (Cindy), sisters Monica (Ewald), Cora, Pam (Dan) and Cheara, step-brother Steven, grandpa Jim Piggott as well as many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and friends. Doug will be remembered for his love of hunting, fishing, biking, and camping. Doug also enjoyed his time at Sun Peaks, where he worked on the ski hill and volunteered on the Fire Department. He was also employed at Mica Dam as a custodian where he was regarded for his work. For those that remember, Doug was a “neat freak.” Most people will remember Doug for his chatty personality; he was a social butterfly and had a great love for his friends and family. Doug was the type of person who was always willing to help. It didn’t matter if it was moving furniture or working on a friend’s vehicle, he always liked to be a part of things. This being said, he would look for where the action was going on, he was a thrill seeker, always seeking out the next adventure! Doug had a great love of animals. In lieu of flowers a donation to the SPCA or Wildlife Federation in Doug’s memory would be a great way to honour him. Our families will never be the same as Doug’s passing has left a huge void in our lives. Part of us went with you ~ we love you Doug. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Share condolences and memories of Doug through his obituary at www.fischersfuneralservices.com


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Myrtle May (Robbi) Lovlin

Cirilo Antonio Ancheta

August 22, 1928 - March 21, 2021

February 9, 1923 - March 13, 2021 With great sadness we announce the passing of our father, Cirilo A. Ancheta on March 13, 2021 at the age of 98. Strong in spirit to the end. He was a loving and devoted husband, father, brother, uncle, grandfather and a friend. He’s gone to join his loving wife Adriana and son Gerry. He leaves behind his ten children, Minda Rudakewich, Fely (Willy Ulanday+) Frank (Rina), Alma (Efren Poca) Cristy (Sechai Chua), Shirley (Ed Jones), Angie (Philip Baisa), Evelyn (Francis Lam) Gerry+( Elma) and Ruel Ancheta, 29 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. He was a self made man. At a young age, him and his four other siblings were orphaned. He was a working student, and finished his teaching career in the Philippines. He was a school teacher and became Principal and Administrator. He was a farmer and land owner. He was a Philippines Boy Scout Master and was at 10th World Jamboree at Mt. Makiling, Laguna, Philippines. He was once a ghost writer for the mayor and other political leaders in his home country, Philippines. Dad also worked at the U.S. Clark Air Force Base, Logistic Army Veterans. He emigrated to Canada in 1977 with his daughter Shirley to join the other two daughters Minda and Fely and son Frank, and the rest of the family followed after. He worked for the City of Kamloops for 10 years and retired from there. He was an active member of the Filipino/Canadian Association and was a President for many years. He loved to garden (flowers and vegetables) and won a few awards for his gardening skills. Our Dad was a very hardworking man. He was very kind and helpful to others. He was loved by many for his kindness and generosity. He was always positive and could always see the good in everyone who is around him. He is a strong believer that God has a plan for everyone. The family would like to send our sincere gratitude and thanks for the excellent care he has received from all his caregivers, especially to his loving daughter Cristy and husband Sechai, who cared for him for years until his passing. Thank you for the incredible love, care and attention you gave to our father. Due to Covid-19 restrictions a celebration of Dad’s life will be held in the future when we can gather all together again. The Funeral Mass was celebrated on Friday, March 19, 2021 at Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church in Kamloops, BC. Father Vijay Martin OCD, Celebrant. Prayers were recited on Thursday, March 18, 2021 in the church. Following the Mass, Cirilo was laid to rest at Hillside Cemetery with his beloved wife Adriana. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

On Sunday we said goodbye to Robbi. During her 92+ years she was a wife, a mother, a great-greatgrandmother, and many roles in between. Robbi grew up sharing a log cabin with five siblings, in Northern Alberta and made her home in more than thirty houses thereafter. Living across Canada and the western USA, she raised six children, honed many skills and navigated through births, conflicts and family adventures. Until recently, the smell of fresh buns and coffee greeted all who visited. Early in her marriage she learned to play bridge and pursued that pleasure through her life. She curled and golfed through several decades. Needle-sharp sewing skills provided clothing for her children and theirs for decades and produced artistic creations in her later years. Many years as a realtor brought deep satisfaction seeing clients’ eyes light up when they purchased a new home. Robbi was well-travelled. She lived in four provinces and the NWT and travelled to most of the rest of Canada. She lived in several states in the USA and visited Europe, Scandinavia, Hawaii, and Mexico with her husband Ralph. After their divorce, she sought out more exotic places like Turkey, Thailand, England and even Newfoundland. A chance meeting with Kathleen in Thailand sparked a long friendship, exchange visits and transformed Robbi into a SCRABBLE fanatic. Her children have the scars to prove her spelling acumen and strategic abilities in the game. A prolific letter writer, Robbi often said her biggest thrill in life was arriving in Saskatoon in 1963 and finding she had mail delivery EVERY DAY. Her thoughtfully penned letters reflected her schooling when penmanship was taught and practiced. Her writing passion created a two-part autobiography, finished as her 65th and 70th birthday gifts to her children and their children. Living in BC piqued an interest in making wine. For the twenty years in Kamloops there was always wine, and cheese, to greet her visitors. Donations of cryptic plaques, some winesoaked, memorabilia and humorous insights got displayed on her “wine wall,” that grew in size and myth. You always knew where you stood with Robbi. She spoke her mind and offered an unvarnished, often humorous, perspective on anything being discussed. As with her life, she chose to die on her own terms, through the Medical Assistance in Dying program. Mom became a Lutheran church member at Redeemer Lutheran in Saskatoon and being an active member in several congregations thereafter brought her comfort and pleasure. Robbi’s world was filled with the many friends she cultivated, especially in her twenty years in Kamloops. We, the forty plus members of her direct family, her sisters, in-laws and her cherished friends, will miss her. We hope the conversations she has with her God continue as she moves on from our lives.

Obituaries

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Obituaries

Robert E. A. Lewis Bob, loving husband, father, papa and friend left this world suddenly on March 14, 2021 at the age of 73. Growing up in Jasper, Bob developed a deep love for the outdoors and nature which stayed with him throughout his life. This was shown in his many hobbies; photography, skiing, biking, fishing, camping and more. Bob could make or fix most anything and often heard “do you think you can help figure out how to fix this”, which he loved to hear. The only thing that might have made him happier was imparting his knowledge in a good story to anyone who would listen. His entire working career from the age of 14 was spent in many capacities with CN Rail. He is survived by his wife Jean, son Robert (Marla), daughter Cyndi, grandsons Graeme, Connor and Jake and his granddaughter Sadie, who were the love and joy of his life. He also left behind his sister Marjorie, sister-inlaw Shirley and many nieces and nephews. There will requested.

be

no

service

as

he

In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Kamloops SPCA. Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

DO NOT STAND AT MY GRAVE & WEEP BY MARY FRYE (1932) Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there, I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow. I am the diamond glint on snow. I am the sunlight on ripened grain. I am the gentle autumn rain.

Celebrate Celebrate the the lives lives of loved ones with of loved ones with your your stories, photographs stories, photographs and and tributes on tributes on

legacy.com/obituaries/nsnews

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.

#4-665 Tranquille Rd Kamloops

250-554-2324

www.myalternatives.ca

When you wake in the morning hush,                      Do not stand at my grave and weep. I am not there, I do not sleep. Do not stand at my grave and cry. I am not there, I did not die!

We offer assistance and guidance for pre-planning your final arrangements.


A48

WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

Obituaries

Obituaries

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Joan Marlene Johnson

Joan is survived by her children Casey (Cheryl) Johnson of Winnipeg, MB, Bonny (Cam) Thomson of Lusaka, Zambia, Sheila (Joe) Zaik of Spruce Grove, AB, Laura (Jeff) Gorham of Surrey, BC, Cameron (Dana) Johnson of Kamloops, BC, Nicole (Kevin) Cundari of Kamloops, BC, and Rebecca (Jeff) Turner of Kamloops, BC. Also left to cherish Joan’s memory are her grandchildren Clinton (Emily) Zaik, Jordan (Paige) Zaik, Matthew (Christen) Zaik, Brooke (Colby) Sanelli, Jorja Gorham, Sophia Cundari, Ava Cundari and Jackson Turner, as well as great-grandchild Piper Zaik, Joan’s brother Kenny (Lynn) Slamp, sister Marilyn (Bruce) Bannerman, and brother Rick Slamp. Joan was predeceased by her parents Albert and Anne Slamp, husband Harold Johnson, and baby brother Mark Slamp. Joan was a loving and generous person who gave tirelessly to her family and community. She was a strong and beautiful woman who always encouraged others. She loved the Bible and was proud to be one of Jehovah’s Witnesses. Joan actively shared Bible truths with others about Jehovah God and his Kingdom as the solution to mankind’s problems, including sickness and death. She will be greatly missed by her family, friends and congregation, but we are comforted by the Bible’s promise of a resurrection to perfect life, and health on a paradise earth. (Revelation 21:4), (Isaiah 25:8). A Zoom Memorial Service for Joan will take place at 1:00pm PST on Friday, April 2, 2021. If you wish to attend the Zoom memorial, please email bthomson0001@yahoo.com to request zoom codes. The family wishes to extend a special thank you to Dr. Amanda Bosman, the staff of the Royal Inland Hospital, Home Support Nurses, and the staff at Marjorie Willougby Hospice Association for their dedicated service and heartfelt care. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

250-371-4949

Jackie Onufreychuk Jackie Onufreychuk of Kamloops passed away on March 16, 2021 at 74 years of age. She is survived by her loving children Tony Onufreychuk of Calgary and Mary Onufreychuk of Kamloops, her grandchildren Ashton, Rohan, Evin, Julie, Taylor, Jorie, Iyla, and her brothers Fred and Norman Downs. She was predeceased by husband Jack Onufreychuk.

her

Jackie was born in Calgary, AB on July 23, 1946. After completing her nursing, she moved to Kamloops and worked at RIH before gaining a position at Overlander Extended Care hospital. Jackie met her husband Jack in Kamloops and it was there that they raised their two children Mary and Tony. She enjoyed time with all her grandchildren. Mom was devoted to many different organizations and volunteered countless hours outside of working fulltime as a nurse and being a mother and wife. Her biggest involvement and passion belonged to the Girl Guides of Canada. She wore many hats within this organization, and she was proud of every moment she spent within it and greatly cherished all her sisters in guiding. There will be no formal service by request. Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Obituaries

Joseph T. (Joe) Mychaluk

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Joan Marlene Johnson (née Slamp) of Kamloops, BC, on March 11, 2021, at 79 years of age.

To advertise in Classifieds call:

Obituaries

March 31, 1931 - March 14, 2021

With saddened hearts we grieve the loss of our Husband, Father, Grandpa and Great-Grandpa. Survived by his wife of 63 years, Elsie, daughters Suzanne (Augie) and Donna, grandchildren Angela (Ryan), Lisa (Abbey), Ellen, Paul (Melanie) and Julie, greatgrandsons Jacob, Isaac and Samuel, brother Walt (Elsie), sisterin-law Irene (John) and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents, brother Steven, granddaughter Jocelyne and niece Jo-Ann. Dad was born in Edmonton, his early life spent along the CN railway tracks in small communities from Kamloops to Jasper. His teenage years were spent in Vancouver where he graduated in 1949 from Kitsilano High School. After graduation Dad went to work for CN in Northern BC but after an accident that broke his ankle he returned to Vancouver to recuperate. He returned to work in Vancouver as an Operator with CN, then a Dispatcher, and finished his career in Kamloops as the Chief Train Dispatcher in 1988 after almost 40 years. His retirement was spent travelling, snowbirding in Texas, golfing and curling. Dad was a wonderful cook and he was not shy to try something new and test it on the rest of the family. Due to COVID-19, a private family service was held on March 20, 2021 with interment at Hillside Cemetery. Flowers gratefully declined but if desired donations to Kamloops Hospice Association or Royal Inland Hospital Foundation are appreciated.

Sweet Dreams Dad Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Fly Me He understands every mode of force He knows what’s true of the elements He is subtle but genuine at lift off and landing He is an airplane ride blowing through the clouds He is an airplane window that reveals a whole dimension He is a propeller to delve farther deep into the universe like fractals He is an airplane grounded in the sky mighty with fuel He is an airplane engine efficient, sustaining and swift He is a wing of a plane that stabilizes my lift He has an open storage to keep the baggage balanced on flight He has a trap door that releases the body of pain He has a water tank to keep the peace Here is a safe place to crash A ride in the sky at night reveals a bright shiny movement You, my plane, are visible to the naked eye in each spectrum

by Kathy Ruth Manongdo Written on Father’s Day 2010

Am I your passenger? Am I your wingman? Am I your baggage? Am I your well oiled engine? Am I your wing? Am I your lift in the air? Am I your propeller that thrusts you to a new dimension? I am all that you shape me to be You have a windshield view exposing the picture beyond Only you fit the pilot’s seat As your hands and feet heart and eyes are trained to work the plane

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Ask DRAKE Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW!

Q. Should I scatter the ashes on a windy day? A. No. Please call/download Drake’s Guide to scattering. It tells you all about the law, as well as the wind.

Drake Cremation & Funeral Services

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“Mikey” Pete

April 26, 1982 - March 16, 2021 With a heavy heart. The Pete family would like to announce the passing of our beloved “Mikey” Pete. He was a cook, cabinet maker, ginseng worker, ranch and farm hand, apple windfall picker before going to work on building bike trails. He finally decided to work for John Favell Painting as an apprentice. “Mikey” was a hard worker like his dad Peter K. Dixon and mother Thelma Pete. He leaves behind his pride and joy his son Damian “Moon”, sisters Angela (Serge) Valliers, Melanie Kirkland and family. Numerous grand aunts, grand uncles, aunties and uncles which were all his favourites. He considered his cousins his brothers and sisters. A special thanks to everyone for their kindness especially the Vilac’s, Dixon’s and Favel families. Thank you to family members from Simpcw First Nations, Canim Lake, Esket; also, George Pete and great grand aunt Felicity Nelson. If we missed anyone we are very sorry it was unintentional. Heartfelt thank you from the Pete Family, Jenny Joseph and Philip Families. Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

You know every part and how to fix it You are navigating by the spirit You belong to a solid tender heart and so accepted as firm to soar You’re worth the shiniest mint coins and bills in circulation and so loved Your competence as an airplane secures my place For more experiences with you Will you invite me onboard?

Psalms 91:4 says, “He shall cover you with His feathers, And under his wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler”

             


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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Manfred Konrad Straka It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Manfred Konrad Straka, who was born on August 3, 1925 in Graz, Austria and died on March 17, 2021 in Kamloops, BC. Preceded in death by Nelda, his beloved wife of 66 years, he is lovingly remembered by his daughters Silvia (Mary), Claudia (Bill) and Isabel (Greg); grandchildren Matthew (Erin), Alison, Samantha, Cameron and Timothy; and relatives in Europe. Manfred lived a rich, long, and remarkable life, filled with many accomplishments and experiences. After surviving war and earning his PhD (Math and Physics), he met Nelda and they emigrated to Canada in 1952. Living in Toronto and Kirkland Lake, they moved to Kamloops, BC in 2016. They often travelled back to Europe and spent many pre- and post-retirement years in Oliva, Spain. A vibrant couple, they were admired by many for embracing life with every fibre of their being. Manfred was a teacher to his core, touching the lives of generations of students, even after retirement. An inspired and impassioned educator, he made significant contributions to the building of new educational institutions (Ryerson, Northern College) and the founding of the Ontario community colleges system. Manfred also had a deep commitment to service, everything from tutoring neighbourhood children to co-founding a regional Northern History Museum to advancing Austrian-Canadian relations, for which he received Austria’s highest national honour, the Decoration of Merit in Gold. An intelligent, cultured, hospitable man, Manfred was genuinely interested in the lives of others, listening carefully and responding thoughtfully. He was also a skilled and engaging raconteur, with a quick wit and sense of humour, appreciated by many. His chivalrous “old world” manners were among his hallmarks. But perhaps more than for his many accomplishments, Manfred will be best remembered for his gentle, kind, and gracious spirit, which will live on in all our hearts. We are especially grateful for the excellent care, kindness and compassion provided to Manfred at Berwick on the Park and at Brocklehurst Gemstone Care Centre. A Celebration of Life ceremony will be held over Zoom on May 1, 2021 at 10:00AM PST, 1:00PM EST and 7:00PM CEST. If you wish to attend, please email celebrateMKS@gmail.com Should you desire, in lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to SCWIST (a scholarship fund supporting Canadian women in Science and Technology) in Manfred’s name. Condolences may be expressed at www.firstmemorialkamloops.com

Wesley Stephens

April 23, 1932 - March 3, 2021 Wesley passed away peacefully with family by his side on early Wednesday, March 3, 2021 after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was survived by wife Phyllis, sister Jean Bowie, sons Dale and Douglas Stephens, grandchildren Rylee, Carley, Alexander and Maximilian and great-granddaughter Isla. Wesley was born on April 23, 1932 in a cabin on the Bell Ranch in Big Creek, BC. He later completed high school, met and married Phyllis Camp on August 16, 1955 in Bralorne, BC. After they were married Wes and Phyllis raised their family in Kamloops, Prince George and William’s Lake. Wes lived a full life. In his younger years he competed in alpine skiing, softball, hockey and curling. Wes and Phyl were very social and grew to have a fishing, hiking and skiing groups of friends. Their house was often full of friends and laughter. They were actively involved in the community, Wes spent over 40 years as a member of the Rotary Club participating in and helping to organize many fundraising events. He was able to continue skiing into his 80s with the “Sun Peaks Antiques,” and successfully fundraised and completed the BC Lung Association’s Bicycle Trek for Life and Breath 16 times. The most important thing to Wes was family. Wes and Phyllis were married for 65 years. Together they taught their sons and then grandchildren how to ski. They built a cabin and spent many wonderful summers at Shuswap Lake. They enjoyed travelling and visited many places around the world or wherever their grandchildren were. He was the grandpa who always gave the best bear hugs, who was always ready to go for an ice cream and who actually “walked on water” for his grandchildren. Recently, he became a great-grandfather and while he was not sure about the title, he was very fond of Isla.

He will be missed dearly and remembered fondly. A celebration of life will be held later this year, when it is safe to do so. Donations can be made to the Parkinson’s Society of BC, 600 - 890 West Pender Street, Vancouver, BC or to your charity of choice.

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Barbara Jane Stankiewicz July 3, 1934 - March 11, 2021

Barbara Jane Stankiewicz was born on July 3, 1934 in Revelstoke, BC and passed away in her sleep on March 11, 2021 at Gemstone Care Centre in Kamloops, BC. Barbara grew up in Vernon, BC during the Second World War and her parents Milton and Kate Haner (with brother William “Bill”) helped the war effort by billeting a number of army soldiers. Barbara fondly remembers the evening debates that she was able to participate in for entertainment. After graduating from Fulton High School Barbara moved to Victoria to get her teaching certificate from Victoria Normal School. In later years she completed her degree in Education by attending UBC in the summer. Her first teaching job was in a very small school in Celista, BC on the Shuswap Lake where she met her husband Henry Stankiewicz (Hank). The two were married and built their forever home on the Thompson River in Kamloops, BC. Barbara kept up her career that lasted more than 35 years, mostly split between Marion Schilling School in the early years and then later at Dallas Elementary School. She would often recall teaching students and later teaching the children of those past students, as the generations slipped by. Once Barbara and Hank were established, they brought two sons into the world, Stewart and David. They taught strong family values of community, worship, volunteering and above all “love” as they both taught Sunday School at the United Church. The Stankiewicz family tree grew through the years with Stewart marrying Valerie Carins with their granddaughter for Barbara named Serria. David married Laura Marshall and brought five more grandchildren into the picture, Riley, Fraser, Calvin (wife Andrea), Oliver, and Miranda (husband David). Most recently Miranda and David gave Barbara two great-grandchildren, Oscar and new baby Anja. After Barbara’s husband passed away in 2001, she moved to Sun Rivers Golf course where she bought a home and started new endeavours such as belonging to Retired Teachers and volunteering at the Sagebrush Theater. Our Mom has gone to be with her Hank, along with all the family and friends that passed before her. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

GIVE LAVISHLY LIVE ABUNDANTLY By Helen Steiner Rice

The more you give, The more you get, The more you laugh, The less you fret,      The more you live abundantly, The more of everything you share, The more you’ll always have to spare, The more you love,     That life is good, And friends are kind, For only what we give away, Enriches us from day to day.


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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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“FLIP” Philip Winston Evans

September 30, 1929 - March 17, 2021 After 91 years of good living, Phil, our Husband, Father, Grandfather, Great Grandfather passed away at home with his wife of 45 years, Beverley, and his youngest daughter, Tammy by his side. Phil is survived by his wife Bev, one sister Betty, his seven children, Donna Smith (Harry), Brent Evans, Sandy Vollo (Bob), Greg Johnson (Hope), Jeff Johnson (Linda), Michelle Evans (Kent) and Tammy Franzman. He also leaves a huge legacy in his seventeen grandchildren and twenty-five great-grandchildren, and was always happy to spend time with them. Phil was the youngest in a large family of ten children, eight of whom predeceased him; Sid, Bert, Ada, Gladys, Marjorie, Gwen, Muriel, Laura. Being the youngest, you can imagine that he was fairly well looked after, especially by his sisters. Even as a grown man, he could somehow persuade one of them to do things for him, such as washing his vehicle. Phil and Bev met at a Legion dance where he made every effort to persuade her to the dance floor, and when she finally agreed, the rest is history. They successfully blended their two families together and many great memories were made. He was an amazing dancer and the girls of the family always took pride in having a spin around the dance floor with him. Just one of his many claim to fames, in 1950, Phil earned the title of KAA Boxing Club’s Featherweight Boxing Champion. When Phil retired as a Conductor with the CPR in 1986 after a 37 year career, it enabled them to enjoy so many activities, such as travel, hunting, dancing, camping, cards. He was also an accomplished waterskier, curler, pool player, joke teller, and most importantly, golfer. Bev knew that if she wanted to spend time with him, she had better learn the game. He was one of the longest standing members of the Kamloops Golf and Country Club, having joined in 1954, and he golfed well into his 80s. He was so proud that even then, he could “shoot his age.” You could always count on him to tell a great joke and wear a smile. Phil had a plethora of great friends, and maintained those friendships for decades. Our family would like to specially thank their wonderful neighbours, Melodie and Steve Vickers, for their friendship and assistance over the past few years. Also a special thanks to Dr. J. Wiltshire for his care of Phil.

“As you walk down the fairway of life, you must stop and smell the roses, for you only get to play one round” He leaves a big hole in all of our hearts, and will be deeply missed. A Celebration will be held at a later date when COVID restrictions have been lifted. Bring your best jokes!

Pauline Margaret MacNaughton Pauline was born in Port Coquitlam, BC, on June 18, 1927. Pauline passed away in the afternoon of the first day of spring, March 20, 2021. Pauline lived a long and happy life and leaves to cherish her memory her only child Gary (Vicki), her siblings Ron (Betty), Phyllis (Cam), and Art (Louise). She also leaves four grandchildren Lisa (Will), Paul, Shelly, Reece (Heather), seven great-grandchildren Brandin (Cyarra), Billy, Alexander, Hugh, Sydney, John, and Tess, and one great-greatgrandchild Aubree. Pauline also had many nieces and nephews, who were also in her thoughts. Pauline was a very optimistic person, and her favourite saying was “April showers bring May flowers,” anytime it rained. The family would like to give special thanks to Dr. Sven Kipp and the staff at Overlander Residential Care, SouthPark Unit for their outstanding care and compassion. At Pauline’s request, there will be no service. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Anyone wishing to make a memorial donation in Pauline’s name please consider Overlander Residential Care. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

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James Albert Smith It is with heavy hearts that we report the passing of our dad, James Albert Smith, on Thursday, March 18, 2021 at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice in Kamloops, two days short of his 93rd birthday. Jim was born on March 20, 1928 at Hardisty, Alberta, the youngest of four kids. He grew up on a homestead along the Battle River. His parents were Edward King Smith and Elizabeth Marie Barber. After his dad passed when Jim was eleven, his mother remarried and they moved out to Victoria, BC, where Jim graduated high school. After finishing school, he worked around the province, finally ending up being employed by the BC Power Commission where he apprenticed and became a journeyman lineman at Kamloops. It was while working out of Kamloops that he met the love of his life Margaret (Peggy) Riddell at Chase, BC. They were married on 30 December, 1954. Peg had two small children from a previous marriage that Jim adopted and raised as his own. After completing his apprenticeship in 1956, Jim and Peg moved the family to Victoria. It was there that their son Charles was born in 1957. In 1965 they moved the family to Armstrong in the Okanagan. It was a time of huge transmission power line construction in the province of BC and Jim was good at his job. As a supervisor he worked for numerous contractors around the province and as far away as Dawson City in the Yukon. He was away from home a lot and it was hard on family. Finally in 1969 Jim settled down to work for BC Hydro Force Construction out of Vernon and eventually he and Peg fulfilled their lifelong dream of raising cattle. They purchased a small farm at Grindrod, BC and established Grandview Limousin in 1972, raising purebred Limousin cattle. Wishing to expand their herd, Jim and Peg bought a larger farm at Darfield, BC in 1980. The years they spent there were not only filled with hard work but also with fond memories made with family and friends. Jim retired from BC Hydro in 1988, sold the farm in 1990 and they retired to Logan Lake, BC. Their favourite pastime after retirement was deep sea fishing. Numerous trips with friends and family were made on their boat which they kept moored at Kitimat, BC. Jim will be lovingly remembered by his children George (Joanne) Smith, Shirley “Nan” (Bernard) Wesselingh and Charles “Butch” Smith; grandchildren Ken (Diane) Hughes, Teresa (Jesse) Welsh, Wayne (Amanda) Smith and Kristy Zanella; as well as eleven great-grandchildren. He is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. Jim was predeceased by his wife of 58 years, Margaret Lillian Riddell, (who passed on 4 April 2013); his parents Edward King Smith and Elizabeth Marie Barber, his step-father Thomas “Tippy” O’Neill; his sister Edna (Bob) Selover and brothers George (Pat) Smith and Lawrence “Pete” (Ellen) Smith. It was Jim’s desire that no service be held. He will be laid to rest with Peg at the Chase Cemetery at a later date. The family would like to thank the staff at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice for taking such good care of dad in his last days. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in his name can be made to the Kamloops Hospice Association at 72 Whiteshield Crescent S., Kamloops, BC V2E 2S9 or the Heart and Stroke Foundation at 729 Victoria St, Kamloops, BC V2C 2B5. Condolences may be expressed at: www.firstmemorialkamloops.com

Arlana Winifred Dau

Ralph A. H. Maltman

Arlana Winifred Dau passed away January 29, 2021 in Delta, BC. Arlana was born in Kamloops to Nora and Alex Bulman. She is survived by her daughter Brigitta Dau, and son-in-law Doug Warhit. Arlana was happily married to Hans Dau for 42 years until his passing in 2012. They enjoyed numerous trips to Hawaii, Los Angeles, and New York.

It is with great sadness that we have to announce the passing of a wonderful man. Mom didn’t want an obituary but she did want to thank the nurses and doctors at RIH on 6th North and in the ICU, for everything they did to help dad.

In her youth, Arlana was a local talent in musicals in both Kamloops and Vancouver. She was also known for her love of fashion, (particularly anything in pink or purple), artistic home decor and her passion for animals. She was the proud owner of the Petite Clothing Store “Tiffany’s” in Ladner for many years. Due to COVID restrictions there will be no celebration of life until it is safe to do so.

Go in peace dad. You are missed. Love Jodi, Garry, Erika, Blake, Kirsten, Helen and Denis and your beautiful wife Patricia. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.drakecremation.com

Fond memories linger every day, Remembrance keeps them near.


WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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Max (Muhammad) Zahir

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Mary Zagorski (née Yakubowich) October 11, 1932 - March 8, 2021

Born in Ludhiana, Punjab, India on November 27, 1936 Passed in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada on March 20, 2021 Max left us at the week’s end on the first day of spring. Symbolically, the finality of his passing was met with the dawning of rebirth. This was so in keeping with Max’s steadfast quest to give meaning to every moment and to never trivialize life. To those who encountered him during his lifetime, there would be no argument offered that few men have graced this blessed earth with the determination, grace, intellect and compassion as Max so aptly did. He had an uncanny ability to listen when others would perhaps deem it futile. Eternally ungrudging and clement, he embodied the attributes of a true gentleman. All he encountered received the gift of his self-effacing disposition. No thing or no one was too insignificant, nor too prodigious, for his time and effort. Max was a lover of all things intellectual. His desire for learning was insatiable. He was a self-professed logophile and keen admirer of the English language. During his retirement one of his projects focused on reading all of Shakespeare’s works. The quote from Hamlet: “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy,” speaks to the sudden passing of our beloved Max. Even the most learned of men, for which he was one, could not explain why he was taken with such celerity, and why we lost him when we did will remain inexplicable. Truly, even science, for which Max dedicated much of his life as a physician and scholar, is not limitless. As a Rhodes Scholar, Max achieved the highest of academic recognitions. Medical school classmates could only marvel at the fertility of his mind. Perhaps most importantly, Max fully engulfed the intellectual capacity he possessed in the most selfless manner possible: working steadfastly to improve the lives of others and transferring his vast knowledge for the betterment of society. A further retirement master plan was to write his memoir, focusing on the consequential events of the Partition of India and Pakistan in 1947. To remain silent on this tumultuous time in history offered no purpose for him. Many applauded him for taking on such an arduous and difficult task. It was not a text intended to entertain but rather to educate. Education, according to Max, was what held answers when questions abounded. Max sought answers to life’s most imposing queries, regardless of the effort required. Having lived in India, Pakistan, England, the United States and, finally, Canada, led to a life of cosmopolitan camaraderie. Maintaining these friendships brought him much joy and delight. Retirement allowed him greater ease in doing so for which he was most appreciative. While an intellectual at heart, Max firmly believed in the importance of a well-rounded approach to life. From playing many a bridge hand at Heritage House, engaging in heated matches at the Kamloops Tennis Club, to serving the community near and afar as an active Rotarian. Max experienced many career highlights as a pathologist/hematologist, including his involvements with the British Columbia Medical Association (Doctors of BC), British Columbia Ministry of Health committees, as well as his time spent as Chief of the Royal Inland Hospital Laboratory, to name only a selected few. Broadening the scope of his profession to encapsulate all its facets gave him due recognition as a master in his field. One of his most recent explorations was an exhaustive study of the impending impacts of the burgeoning climate crisis, and he presented his harrowing findings via an online presentation to the public last summer. Even a pandemic was not able to silence his voice. Once again, it was a difficult topic to address but one he deemed necessary to investigate and bring to the fore. Perhaps this was his way of reminding others to tread wisely on this earth and allow generations beyond to enjoy the fruits of all our labours in our future pursuits with modesty and grace. Max would only want his own grandchildren; Alyssa, Kathryn, Nicholas, Max and Dante, to inherit an earth which would be viable for years to come. His own children; Sara (Joseph), David and Kate (Pierre), would be wished a life of health, and his devoted wife Maureen of fifty-six years, to be comforted by family and friends in perpetuity. Despite his numerous accomplishments and accolades, his family was his greatest treasure and source of inspiration. Animated discussions with children and grandchildren were memorable and held most dear. Adventures afar in his earlier years and closer to home in the latter part of his life, accompanied by his dear Maureen, were instrumental to his well-being. Summer eves spent with the family at the cottage on Shuswap Lake and winter morns at the condo at Tod Mountain breathed life into his beautiful soul. As his family grew, so did his heart. His unfailing support of his grandchildren did not go unrecognized. Max and Maureen took solace in simple pleasures. In the last year, weekly sojourns to Riverside Park, to simply sit and watch the water ebb and flow, provided much joy and comfort.

It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of Mary Zagorski (née Yakubowich), on March 8, 2021 at the age of 88. Mary, the middle child of five, was born in Koczan Gorodok, Poland in 1932 to Peter and Maria Yakubowich. After the war, Mary and her family immigrated to Canada and settled in the prairies. In 1952, she married Mike Zagorski in Flin Flon, Manitoba and together they went on to have five children. In 1967, the family decided to move to British Columbia where Mary fell in love with Kamloops and made it her permanent home. Mary worked as a care aide at Thrupp Manor Seniors Retirement home, then went on to work at Kamloops Home Support Services until she retired. Mary had many interests. In her younger years, she was a proud member of the Ladies Auxiliary at the Anavets. She was an avid crib player and won several tournaments and trophies throughout the years. She loved music, singing, and looked forward to occasional evenings of dancing with her friends. Mary loved to cook and bake, and you were often treated with something delicious upon visits. She gifted many beautiful sweaters, scarves and slippers which she hand knitted/crocheted. When Mary wasn’t tending to her home or visitors, she would often call and say “Let’s go to Bingo!”. Mary was a wonderful and loving mother who gave her all to her family. Her home was always open to everyone, no matter the occasion. She always made sure everyone was fed and was fondly known as “Mom” by all who knew and loved her. Mary was predeceased by her parents Peter and Mary Yakubowich, her husband Mike Zagorski, her sisters Eva, Nadia and Kathy, her nieces Anne and Tanya, and her son Micheal Zagorski. Mary is survived by her four children, Chester, Terry, Rita and John of Kamloops; her grandchildren Thea and Jonathan of Kamloops, Billy of Kelowna and Mitch of Vancouver. She is also survived by her brother Adam Yakubowich of Kamloops; her nieces Lydia, Ruth and Mary of Winnipeg, and her nephews Nick of Winnipeg, Tom of Edmonton, Tim and Terry of Kamloops, and numerous great nieces and nephews. Nothing will be able to replace the emptiness in our hearts from Mary’s passing. She was one of the kindest, most selfless women to ever walk this earth and our family was blessed to have her in our lives. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory can be made to the Alzheimer’s Society of BC. A private graveside service will be held at Hillside Cemetery for the family and a memorial service/celebration of life will be held at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family fromwww.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

May tranquility be so deservedly yours, dear Max. Generations will forever be in your indebtedness. Inshallah The family expresses much gratitude to those who played such an important role at his end of life. As Max spent the majority of his career on the medical staff of Royal Inland Hospital, we think it would be most fitting to request, in lieu of flowers, a donation to the RIH Foundation in his honour.

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance.

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WEDNESDAY, March 24, 2021

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