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KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2021 | Volume 34 No. 7

YKASTRONG

SPENDING SPREE AT THE TNRD?

A year ago this month, longtime ThompsonNicola Regional District CAO Sukh Gill suddenly left the organization. In a single day, on Feb. 14, 2020, the TNRD said Gill was on paid leave, then said he was on vacation, then said he had resigned, then said he had retired. When the regional district refused to divulge details of his “retirement,” KTW worked for weeks on obtaining documents that showed Gill left the TNRD with a $500,000-plus payout and that his “retirement” was a term agreed upon in legal documents between himself and the regional district. More documents obtained by KTW during the past year show spending at the TNRD under Gill was high, with current chair Ken Gillis conceding it was “somewhat distressing” and “excessive.” From dining at the finest steakhouses to booking an $8,000 champagne room at a high-end hotel in Whistler to buying gifts for staffers, taxpayers of the TNRD, including those in Kamloops, funded it all.

Turn to pages A14, A15, A16 and A17 to read more

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE

Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

CURBSIDE ORGANIC WASTE COLLECTION

Council Calendar Public and media attendance via Zoom only until further notice

The City is seeking public input into the design of a residential curbside organic waste collection program to help residents divert more waste from the landfill, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and return organic material to the soil ecosystem. Did you know? Organic waste that ends up in our landfill utilizes valuable landfill space and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions (primarily methane) in our community.

February 22, 2021 2:00 pm - Community Relations Committee Meeting Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street February 23, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street

An information gathering and public consultation phase is now underway. The timing of a future pilot program and full implementation will depend on successful grant funding. Visit our Let’s Talk web page to learn more about what items would be included in organic waste collection, to read FAQs about the program, to take a quick poll, and to subscribe to project updates.

February 24, 2021 2:00 pm - Finance Committee Meeting Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street March 8, 2021 1:30 pm - Civic Operations Committee Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Organics

March 9, 2021 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street March 11, 2021 9:00 am - Community Services Committee Meeting Valley First Lounge, 300 Lorne Street The complete 2021 Council Calendar is available online at: Kamloops.ca/CouncilCalendar

Council Meeting Recap Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. The COVID-19 pandemic may impact the engagement timelines for some projects. Please subscribe to the project of interest to receive updates. Sign up and speak up at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Summit Downtown Connection • Ask a question, discussion forum Curbside Organic Waste Collection • Ask a question, quick Poll,

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 For after-hours emergencies, press 1.

WOOD STOVE REBATE PROGRAMS

CITY OF KAMLOOPS ENGAGEMENT GROUPS

VIRTUAL FAMILY DAY WITH THE KMA

Do you have an older, uncertified wood-burning appliance? You may be eligible for rebates!

CALL FOR COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS

Heritage Explorers is a series of virtual programs that explore different cultures through family-friendly stories and crafts. The online activity will be available on the KMA YouTube channel, Kamloops Museum, on February 12, at 9:30 am.

Wood Stove & Fireplace Exchange Program • rebate of up to $800 (plus a $300 FortisBC rebate for gas appliances) to homeowners who remove and replace an eligible wood-burning appliance with a new lower-emission one from an authorized program retailer

Wood Stove Scrap-It Program • $200 rebate to homeowners who remove an uncertified wood-burning stoves (without replacing it). • pre-registration is required to determine program eligibility For a list of authorized program retailers and to find out if you quality for rebates, visit: Kamloops.ca/WoodStove

The City is seeking applications from Kamloops residents who are interested in serving on a volunteer basis for the following engagement groups, which support the work of the Development and Sustainability Committee.

Agricultural Engagement Group Current openings for two community members for a two-year term (at least four meetings per year).

Development Cost Charges (DCC) Engagement Group Current openings for two community members for a one-year term (at least four meetings per year). For eligibility requirements and application instructions visit: Kamloops.ca/Volunteer

The KMA is committed to accessible recreation and will have limited number of pre-made craft kits available for pickup between 9:30 am and 4:30 pm on February 12 and 13. Supplies are limited; maximum one craft kit per family. A full craft supply list for activities is available on KMA’s social media channels: • YouTube - Kamloops Museum • Facebook - @KamloopsMuseum • Instagram - @KamloopsMuseum The Province of British Columbia has provided the Kamloops Museum and Archives a grant in support of our free virtual Family Day activity.

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL CUSTOM SD73 REPORTS MORE CAR BUILDER ON TV SCHOOL EXPOSURES

CURLER BROWN HEADS TO SCOTTIES

New season of Rust Valley Restorers will feature a Kamloops car shop

A national title is on the line within the Calgary curling bubble

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INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A8-9 Eye on Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A21 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A26 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A28 Obituaries/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A40

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WEATHER ALMANAC One year ago Hi: 4 .7 C Low: -3 .9 C Record High 13 .5 C (1981) Record Low -22 .2 C (1990)

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HOW TO REACH US: Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

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District held virtual town hall last week to address COVID-19 queries

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A28

One dead each week by overdose WITH KAMLOOPS RECORDING 60 OVERDOSE DEATHS LAST YEAR, CALLS FOR CHANGE COME POURING IN

MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

he deadliest year of the opioid crisis claimed the lives of more than one person per week in Kamloops in 2020, and it has local officials calling for more action. According to the 2020 BC Coroners Report, released on Thursday (Feb. 11), Kamloops recorded 60 overdose deaths last year, the most ever in the city and the sixth-most of any community in B.C. The 60 deaths were 35 more than that recorded in 2019 (25 deaths) and 14 more than the previous year with the highest number of overdose deaths, 2018, which had 46 deaths. Across the province, there were 1,716 deaths due to illicit drugs in 2020 in B.C., representing a 74 per cent increase over the number of such deaths recorded in 2019 (984). The number of overdose deaths in 2020 equates to about 4.7 deaths per day, which is two deaths per day higher than in 2019 (2.7 deaths per day). Kamloops Coun. Dale Bass described the numbers as heartbreaking. “It’s awful. It’s still happening and it’s getting worse and I understand COVID probably

had some impact on it, but something has to be done,” she said. Bass said it’s a good sign that the provincial and federal governments are now talking about decriminalizing possession of small amounts of drugs; however, the first-term councillor noted, governments tend to move slowly. She said more treatment and recovery beds are needed, as well as additional shelters, more mental-health services, support for social agencies and higher wages for those working in the field as it’s clear from the overdose numbers that current levels aren’t enough. “We need more, more, more, basically,” Bass said, adding that Interior Health also needs to be more receptive to the initiatives for which city council and the community at large have been advocating. The health authority has refused to add another nurse to the Car 40 program, which pairs a police officer with a mental-health professional to respond to mental healthrelated matters, despite calls from city council. Bass also noted a business case for a sobering centre in Kamloops has been in front of the provincial government for years — dating back to the previous B.C. Liberal government. “Fundamentally, gov-

Let’s move forward together.

ernment needs to get itself together here and start moving forward, quit meeting and do something,” Bass said. ASK Wellness Society executive director Bob Hughes said it was heart-wrenching to hear the level of harm the opioid crisis caused in 2020, noting it is impacting people from all walks of life and not only those in a homeless lifestyle. In 2020, 84 per cent of overdose deaths occurred inside — 56 per cent in private residences and 28 per cent in other residences, including social and supportive housing. Hughes said the current investment in harm reduction and overdose prevention has been vital, pointing out that more funding for treatment facilities and programs is important going forward. “We can only imagine what the impact would be if we didn’t have these services and access to resources like naloxone,” Hughes said, referring to the medication that temporarily reverses the effects of an overdose. Minister of Mental Health and Addictions Sheila Malcolmson said about 6,000 overdose deaths were prevented in 2020 due to the use of medication such as naloxone. No deaths have been reported at supervised drug use or overdose prevention sites. Asked about decriminalization, Hughes said he agrees

people shouldn’t be incarcerated for simple possession, but when addiction leads to criminal behaviour, he said it needs to be addressed from a criminal lens. Social advocate Glenn Hilke, who has been involved in myriad ventures in the city that helps the marginalized, told KTW it’s been frustrating for Kamloops’ Community Action Team — a collection of about 30 local organizations that have tried to reduce overdose deaths — as every initiative they think to do, such as providing harm-reduction supplies, has not resulted in a reduction in the numbers of overdose deaths. “What else is there to do? We’re not sure,” Hilke said, adding he agrees that more treatment and detox beds are needed. Hilke believes what’s needed to bend the curve of this epidemic is twofold — decriminalization and a safe supply to ensure users remain safe from the toxic, fentanyl-laced illicit drug supply. He also agreed with Bass that government needs to be more action-oriented. “And not being afraid of trying pilot projects and not being afraid of failing because you learn from your failures,” Hilke said. Turn to A19 for more stories on the overdose crisis

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS DeSantis the first to declare she will seek Kamloops Conservative nomination

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Beverley DeSantis, the CEO of Tourism Kamloops, is seeking the KamloopsThompson-Cariboo Conservative nomination in the next federal election. The nomination will be up for grabs after MP Cathy McLeod announced she will not be seeking a fifth term in Ottawa. DeSantis is the first person to publicly declare interest in the nomination. DeSantis is originally from the Prairies, where she was born in Saskatoon and grew up in Calgary. She has been a member of the Conservative Party of Canada for about six months. DeSantis unsuccess-

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program co-ordinator for the School of Business at Bow Valley College in Calgary, worked in oil and gas and at an organization that helps entrepreneurs start businesses. DeSantis said her experience will aid Canadians coming out of the COVID19 pandemic. “I do think the voice of a powerful woman who has got experience in both business and community, government and not-forprofit, will bring a terrific voice to the conversation,” DeSantis said. The next federal election is not planned until 2023, but speculation has mounted that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, whose Liberals are governing with a minority, will seek an early vote.

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fully sought a nomination in 2015 for the provincial Progressive Conservative Party of Alberta. She described the timing of her decision to seek the nomination locally as one that has been discussed for “quite a while.” DeSantis moved to Kamloops for the position as CEO of Tourism Kamloops in 2016. If she were to become the area’s MP, she would step down from that role. DeSantis brings experience in tourism, business and postsecondary education. She and husband Carl DeSantis, who is the executive director of the Kamloops Central Business Improvement Association, were previously invested in travel agencies. DeSantis was also

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

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LOCAL NEWS

Fulton & Company LLP

Police identify suspect in weekend hotel homicide KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Police say they have identified suspects involved in a shooting death in Kamloops on the weekend, the city’s first homicide of the year and part of what Mounties say is a steady increase in violence among those involved in the low end of drug dealing. Const. Crystal Evelyn said investigators have determined the suspected killer and victim, a man is his 20s, knew each other and were and are known to police. On Saturday, Feb. 13, at 7:50 p.m., officers responded to a call of shots fired at the Howard Johnson Inn at 530 Columbia St. The victim was found in one of the motel’s units. Evelyn said investigators have identified suspects, noting the murder is connected to the low-level drug trade in Kamloops. Police say the murder was targeted and that there is no immediate safety concern to the general public. Evelyn said the murder scene at the Howard Johnson, as well as two rooms at the Star Lodge at 775 West Columbia St., are part of this investigation and were searched by investigators. Police are also conducting interviews and neighbourhood inquiries and collecting any video footage that may be available. “Although the circumstances surrounding this murder are still under investigation, it’s the same type of violence we have experienced in Kamloops before, involving low-end participants of the illegal drug trade who use violence as a business practice,” said Kamloops RCMP Sgt. Nestor Baird, noting the vio-

lence involves low-end drug dealers and debt collectors. “If you are involved in the drug trade at any level, now is the time to rethink the choices you are making and to reach out to other people and agencies that can help you leave that lifestyle behind.” Anybody with information related to the homicide is asked to call Kamloops RCMP at 250-828-3000 and reference file number 2021-4173. The Howard Johnson Inn was the scene in December of a stabbing that police say was also likely connected to the drug trade. On Dec. 2, 2020, police were called to investigate a report of a man being stabbed multiple times. The victim, who is known to police as being involved in the local drug trade, was treated at Royal Inland Hospital for his injuries. The police investigation found video surveillance of a suspect leaving the room and Mounties released the footage video in a bid to identify him. While the Howard Johnson Inn has had a stabbing and now a murder, it was not among the 10 hotels and motels served nuisance property notices last fall by the city due to criminal, bylaws and fire activity. On Oct. 22, 2020, the city declared 10 motels and hotels nuisance properties: the Star Lodge, Desert Inn, Knights Inn, Columbia Motor Lodge, Ramada Inn, Hospitality Inn, Panorama Inn, Best Western Plus, Grandview Hotel, all along West Columbia Street in Lower Sahali, and the Acadian Motor Inn at 1390 Columbia St. downtown.

Dash cam footage sought after fatal Highway 1 crash KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Kamloops Mounties are asking for dash camera footage from drivers who were near a fatal accident on Highway 1 in Valleyview on Monday. The crash claimed the lives of two people and sent two others to hospital. Kamloops RCMP Const. Crystal Evelyn said the crash in the eastbound lanes of the highway near Grand Boulevard occurred just before 10 a.m. and involved a jack-knifed semi-trailer. “When police arrived on scene, they observed a green Toyota 4Runner in the eastbound ditch and a jack-knifed semi-trailer further down the highway,” Evelyn said. “Two of the Toyota’s four

occupants were deceased when police arrived. The other two were taken to hospital with unknown injuries.” All eastbound lanes and one westbound lane of the highway were closed from Grand Boulevard near Holman Road. Evelyn said police are still investigating, but weather is believed to be a factor in the crash, following a light snowfall over the weekend in Kamloops. Anyone with dash camera footage featuring the Toyota 4Runner during or near the time of the crash is asked to contact the Kamloops RCMP at 250-828-3000 and reference file 20214830.

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

THE KTW EDITORIAL

ONE STEP IN FIGHTING OTHER HEALTH CRISIS The news was expected, but it was grim and sad and shocking just the same. Last week, the BC Coroners Service released statistics on overdose deaths in 2020 and a record number of deaths were recorded provincewide (1,716) and in Kamloops (60). Thousands of people across B.C. and Canada have died from overdoses since fentanyl became a common deadly ingredient in the illicit drug supply in 2016. That was also the year the provincial government declared a public health emergency. That declaration remains today, yet the death count continues to rise. There have been calls for decriminalization of simple possession of hard drugs, alongside creation of a governmentcontrolled safe supply of those drugs. There have been calls for more treatment beds, more social services, more social housing — more of everything. It is a daunting challenge, but amid the tragedy there are glimmers of hope. By the end of this month, registered and psychiatric nurses in B.C. will be able to prescribe Suboxone, a prescription opioid substitute. Research from the BC Centre on Substance Use suggests about 83,000 people have opioid dependence in B.C., while only about 23,000 people in the province have access to any form of opioid substitute treatment. Much more needs to be done, but this move to expand the prescription powers will, as nurse Kate Hodgson noted in a recent story, “can really save someone’s life.” Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio SALES STAFF: Linda Skelly Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey Bronwyn Lourens

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen

DIGITAL DESIGNERS Jackson Vander Wal Kazi Ahmed FRONT OFFICE Front office staff: Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery Rosalynn Bartella CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer

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The sounds that soothe

I

f 2020 had a sound, it surely had to be that of nails scraping against a chalkboard as a baby with colic wails and a dog barks and a car alarm sounds and a novice musician positions her trumpet right next to your ear. It was the worst year and it has bled into 2021, carrying with it so much non-verbal noise that we need to find silent refuge. Last spring, while days were longer and warmer, just as the pandemic began to take hold, I stepped outside of my home and heard a most amazing sound, one that jettisoned me back decades, to when I would walk to school and right by a little farm smack in the middle of a growing Abbotsford. Last spring, when I stepped out of my Batchelor Heights home, I heard mooing. I had either stepped into a Far Side cartoon or those were honest-to-goodness cows on the grasslands hill precisely one block from my house. Sure, Kamloops is surrounded by spectacular nature featuring a soundtrack of countless animals’ calls, but for urbanites like me, who do not camp, hunt or otherwise spend a lot of time in the Great Outdoors, those moos were moving. They grounded me and, as I stepped into the grasslands for a short hike and came face to face with these bovines, and heard their chatter up close, it truly was calming. A few months later, I stepped out of my pad and heard different

CHRISTOPHER FOULDS Newsroom

MUSINGS sounds altogether — the beep-beepbeep of a big truck reversing, the ping! ping ! ping! of a metal on metal and the grunts and groans of bulldozers and excavators. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion crews were beginning their work, lining up a path for pipe right where the cows had grazed. From milk to oil, the sights and sounds of my area had changed. The sounds of the pipeline crews are not offensive. They have a lyrical quality of their own, like an industrial music band passing through town. Since Dec. 17, though, when pipeline work was halted due to safety issues, those sounds have been muted. The grasslands today are silent, which is what we need elsewhere, for a noise of another kind continues to hammer our thoughts and raise anxiety levels. From COVID-19 to Donald

Trump to Justin Trudeau to potholes to snow removal to John Horgan to late dog licence fees to conspiracy theories — the letters and words and sentences that consume newspapers, radio programs, TV news broadcasts and great swaths of the internet have become overwhelming. I am in the news business. I live it and breathe it 24/7 and even I recognize the need to shut it off now and then. It seems as though decorum died when social media was born. I’ve seen a Twitter thread discussion about the weather devolve into threats of physical violence. The sounds of social media can be deafening as they bombard our brains with far too many “facts” that do nothing more than disagree with each other. Vaccines for COVID-19 will end the pandemic. Nope, vaccines for the disease will not work. The people who stormed the U.S. Capitol were domestic terrorists. Nope, they were brave patriots risking their lives to defend democracy. City snow-clearing crews are unsung heroes. Nope, they are simply ice wall builders. The noise never ends. Indeed, it only gets louder and louder as it amps up the stress. So, yes, keep up on news from reliable sources, but perhaps put down the paper, close the browser and turn off the TV now and then. Step outside — you may hear some sounds that soothe. editor@kamloopsthisweek.com


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

DOG LICENCE LATE FEE A CASH GRAB STORY GETS STAMP OF APPROVAL Editor: I read with great interest the article about Edith Cavell. Further to this, might I mention that Canada issued a one-dollar stamp (seen above) on Dec. 4, 1930 that depicts Mt. Edith Cavell. Dave Giese Kamloops

Editor: I was unpleasantly surprised when I received a bill from the bylaw department to remind me I owed late fees for my two dog licences. Something that should have cost me $60 was now a bill for $120. I have always paid my licence fee in January and, because I have had dogs for more than 20 years, I did not read

the small print and didn’t see that the deadline for payment had been changed to Jan. 19. What a dirty trick. Unlike many others, I license my two dogs and enjoy the benefit of the money that goes into maintenance of dog parks and more. How hard would it have been to put out a public announcement that the deadline had changed?

APPLAUSE FOR CITY OF KAMLOOPS STAFF

Editor: City staff deserves a pat on the back for the professionalism, courtesy and level of service provided to us during our lengthy and often challenging Editor: renovation. I want to thank you for the very interesting article The staff in planning, peron Edith Cavell in the Feb.10 edition (‘A Great War mits, building and inspection martyr’s link to Kamloops’). departments were more than It was fascinating to read of the Kamloops conpatient with us and at times nection to this heroine and learn more about Cavell’s provided some real handlife and tragic demise. I will have deepened respect holding while we slugged our for her and the majestic peak in Jasper that bears her way through, up, over and name next time we are lucky enough to travel to that around our money pit. area. In December of 2018, we Patty Klohn purchased a real fixer-upper. Kamloops The extent of the work, the

cost of the renovation and the length of time for completion was something we did not expect. Over the course of the project, we had to change contractors mid-stream. We secured the new contractor in the fall of 2019. Then COVID-19 hit and, with that, unforeseen delays. Our new contractor had planned a long overdue vacation to Hawaii. While out of country, the mandatory self-isolation for returning Canadians was imposed. Then, because of social dis-

tancing practices, subcontractors were not able to work side by side. This resulted in even further delays. This entire time, city staff would forward to us all documents required to get to the next step. Staff would take our phones calls, return our calls in a timely manner and point us in the direction we needed to go. Last month, another obstacle appeared. Our new contractor had to leave town prior to final inspection. We were not sure which way to go or where to turn

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I imagine lots of people with double the licence fee will not bother to renew. At about 3,000 overdue fees, it is a nice money grab for the City of Kamloops. I’ve paid my fine because my dogs work as therapy dogs and it’s required, but I would have thought twice about it otherwise. Esther Leon Kamloops

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because the permits were still open and time was running out. One more time, I turned to city staff, who talked us off the cliff. We had no idea that we, homeowners and not professional contractors, were able to liaise directly with the city and obtain that final inspection. Thank you very much to city staff for all they did for us during a difficult time. Permits were closed on Feb. 5, 2021. Marguerite Dodds Kamloops

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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A10

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

School exposures continue as district responds to questions SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

School exposures in Kamloops have continued, with additional exposures at South Kamloops secondary last week, but at an overall slower pace than prior weeks. Interior Health is report-

ing seven days of exposures at South Kamloops secondary after a member of the school community tested positive for COVID-19. In a letter to students’ families, principal Walt Kirschner said potential exposures were on Feb. 4, Feb. 5 and from

Feb. 8 to Feb. 12. The health authority is conducting contact tracing, determining the person’s close contacts and those who may have been exposed. Interior Health will contact those affected directly and advise them to selfisolate.

Meanwhile, SD73 administrators and a Kamloops-based medical health officer answered parents’ questions at a virtual townhall event, which was held on Thursday, Feb. 11. Questions revolved around how schools report exposures,

Interior Health’s involvement in the process and student health. Figures provided by SD73 superintendent Terry Sullivan show 5.5 per cent of the district’s 14,014 students and 2.2 per cent of 2,097 staff have been required to self-isolate due to

potential exposure to COVID-19 at one point or another. The vast majority of those exposure events — 42 over 69 days in session — occurred after Christmas, compared to the 28 days in session before Christmas, when just five

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

SD73 secretary-treasurer set to retire after 24-year career SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

School District 73 secretarytreasurer Kelvin Stretch is set to retire after a 24-year career with the district. Stretch started his career with the district as an accounting supervisor in 1997, becoming comptroller in 2003 and then CFO and secretarytreasurer in 2008, overseeing

the district’s $205-million budget. District superintendent Terry Sullivan said he accepted Stretch’s resignation due to retirement with “a great deal of regret, but sincere best wishes.” “He’s going to be missed by all of us who have had the privilege of working with him,” Sullivan said during Monday night’s board of education

meeting. Board chair Rhonda Kershaw said Stretch’s leadership has resulted in the district’s “very good” financial position. Stretch also gave thanks for his time with the district. “I equate the work to playing for a Stanley Cup championship team with all-star staff led by incredibly dedicated board members,”

he said. “I have worked with five terrific, yet different boards of education, as well as a tremendous complement of staff in all departments who are dedicated to making SD73 the great school district it is today.” The district will spend the next few weeks putting together a process to choose Stretch’s successor.

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A12

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Court orders Teichrieb to pay Simpson $7 million MICHAEL POTESTIO

LOCAL JOURNALISM INITIATIVE

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

The family of a Kamloops teenager who was savagely beaten with a baseball bat more than four years ago has been awarded nearly $7 million in damages. BC Supreme Court Justice Dev Dley has ordered that Kristopher Teichrieb pay $6.9

million to Simpson, whom Teichrieb beat expectancy of 62 years. into a coma on June 19, 2016. Dley agreed the $50,000 in housekeepThe attack outside Teichrieb’s ing costs was fair based on an estimated Brocklehurst home left Simpson with a allowance of $25 per hour over Jessie’s life. catastrophic brain injury, confined to a The $393,000 is the upper limit for wheelchair and in need of round the clock non-pecuniary damages and was in line care the rest of his life. with what Simpson’s lawyer sought for Dley granted Simpson $393,000 in the severity of the attack, which robbed non-pecuniary damages, $87,000 for Simpson of the ability to lead a normal past income losses, $1.3 million in future life. income losses, $3 million for the cost of Simpson, however, had sought $40,000 his future care, $50,000 for Simpson’s loss each in punitive and aggravated damages, of housekeeping capacity, $75,000 for an which Dley did not award. In his written in trust claim, $42,689 in special expenses, ruling, Dley concluded that the award $432,490 in trust for a crime victim assisfor non-pecuniary damages takes into tance program and $1.4 million in trust account the aggravating features of the for the Ministry of Health. case and to award the separate amount The in trust claim and special damwould be a duplication of an award ages were awarded to Jessie’s mother, Sue, already tabulated. He added the goal of compensating her for her forgone wage punitive damages is already covered by while caring for Jessie — $75,000 — and Teichrieb’s criminal conviction. her out-of-pocket expenses — $42,695 — Teichrieb was convicted for the beating incurred on her son’s behalf. in 2018 and found civilly responsible for Simpson’s lost income was calculated damages by the courts last fall. based on the annual salary for roofers — A two-day trial was held in January to an occupation he had expressed interest determine what that amount would be. in, having worked in that field with his Teichrieb, who remains in jail, was made father prior to the attack. The total was aware of the proceedings, but didn’t participate. based on Simpson working to age 65 and $140 million dollar development The civil action follows Simpson, then reduced to reflect for his now reduced life

18, celebrating high school graduation in June of 2016. He became separated from friends and wound up on Teichrieb’s property, near the corner of Holt Street and Clifford Avenue in Brocklehurst, in the early morning hours.Teichrieb attacked Simpson with his fists and a metal baseball bat. According to witnesses, the bulk of the attack took place in the middle of the street after Simpson tried to run from Teichrieb. Simpson’s injuries were significant. His mom, Sue Simpson, along with friends of the family, continue to organize various fundraising activities. In the weeks leading up to the attack, Teichrieb had threatened vigilante action after calling police to report a number of incidents of theft and trespassing. Police warned him not to take matters into his own hands. Lawyers representing Simpson have accused Teichrieb of hiding assets after the attack in anticipation of a lawsuit. Teichrieb is alleged to have sold his $587,000 Clifford Avenue house to his parents for $1 six months after the assault. That is being dealt with in a separate court proceeding.

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

LOCAL NEWS

B.C.’s police watchdog clears Kamloops Mounties in probe of liquor theft arrest, injury Northbridge Hotel, on the night of Dec. 19, 2020, and was confronted by a worker several minutes later. The worker then locked the front door and called police. Four minutes later, three Mounties arrived — one entering the front door and two covering the back entrance. The suspect — who was not named in the IIOBC decision — grabbed a bottle and fled to the back of the store. He opened the back door and was confronted by the other two officers, finding himself being caught in the middle. MacDonald wrote that the man “smashed the bottle on the ground, raising the broken bottle in his

DAVE CARRIGG

VANCOUVER SUN

A group of Kamloops RCMP officers has been cleared of wrongdoing after a liquor-store shoplifter was Tasered several times as he seriously cut himself with a broken bottle. In a ruling released by the Independent Investigations Office of B.C. (IIOBC) on Wednesday (Feb. 10) chief civilian director Ronald J. MacDonald said the officers did everything they reasonably could in the circumstances. MacDonald said the man entered the Angry Otter liquor store, at 363 Tranquille Rd. in North Kamloops, next to the

hand toward the officers.” One of the officers deployed a Taser against the man, who fell back and started jabbing the broken bottle into his own neck. More officers arrived and, after the man stood up, they deployed their Tasers 13 times against him over the course of several minutes. MacDonald said the Tasers were ineffective because the man was wearing heavy winter clothing. The officers were not armed with less-lethal firearms that could have worked better in this situation, he said. Eventually, the man fell to the ground after continuing to cut him-

self and threaten police. At that point, police and paramedics began treating him. “The course chosen by the officers in this case was the correct one,”

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MacDonald wrote, noting their focus was clearly on minimizing the harm the man was doing to himself. “As soon as they were able, they very promptly gave first-aid, which quite

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

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SPENDING ‘SOMEWHAT DISTRESSING’ In a five-year period of TNRD expenses for meals and accommodations claimed by all employees, 2018 featured the most — $92,706. In 2018, $42,126.25 was charged to TNRD CAO Sukh Gill’s regional district credit card as a result of visits by himself and others to restaurants, coffee shops, wineries, liquor stores and grocery stores. Below is a graphic showing how many visits were made by Gill and others to restaurants, coffee shops, wineries, liquor stores and grocery stores in 2018, how much was charged to the regional district on his credit card and the number of people who were involved in those transactions. There were at least 951 people involved, based on names listed in receipts. Some receipts did not have names listed and many of those 951 people listed appeared numerous times on receipts.

JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A

THE GIFT OF GIVING Other spending of interest during Sukh Gill’s time as Thompson-Nicola Regional District CAO included impressive gifts charged to his TNRD credit card. Retiring staff members in recent years received a $970 iPad from Best Buy (Deborha Merrick), a $707 iPad from Best Buy (Carole Moss), a $595 iPad from Costco (Karen McKay-Smith, who owed $95 back), a $729 HP laptop from Best Buy (Laverne Bernier, who owed $129 back), a $617 laptop from London Drugs (Linda Kelley), a $505 Vitamix blender from Costco (Susan McLure, who owed $155 back) and an unknown $428 gift from Wells Gray Home Hardware (Carol Turner). There was also $1,119.44 spent at Anne Louise Jewellers in Vancouver on Nov. 7, 2018, with no receipt shown. Outgoing TNRD director Pat Wallace received a $997 18-karat white gold necklace with a 14-karat diamond from Karateristics on Victoria Street when she retired in 2018. TNRD policy outlines a maximum amount for gifts depending on tenure — $25 per year served — and Wallace was required to pay for $222 of the $997 necklace, according to documents. A TNRD employee recognition policy, corporate practice No. 7.1, created in October 2013, states retiring employees can be recognized with a gift valued at up to $25 per year of service. In addition, the TNRD will contribute to a retirement event for employees with more than five years of service, with the regional district’s contribution not normally exceeding $300 for staff and $500 for management. And, according to TNRD policy No. 1.1.10, created in April 1994, directors who leave their position on the TNRD board can be recognized with a gift based on the amount of $25 for each year they were a member of the board. The gift policy has not changed, but TNRD board chair Ken Gillis told KTW gifts will be “substantially more modest in the future.”

significant amount of spending of public money occurred at the Thompson-Nicola Regional District prior to the sudden departure of former CAO Sukh Gill, according to multiple sources and years’ worth of financial documents — spending that went unchecked for years on big parties, high-end restaurants, regular coffee shop visits, luxury hotels and expensive gifts. Over the past year, Kamloops This Week has continued to investigate the unexpected departure of Gill, the regional district’s top staffer, who was suddenly dispatched in February 2020 after two decades with the TNRD. In the span of one day, the regional district told KTW Gill was on paid leave, then said he was on vacation. The regional district also said Gill had quit, then said he had retired. Gill left with a half-million-dollar payout and a legal agreement to call his dismissal a “retirement.” KTW has spoken to more than a dozen sources and filed dozens of Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act requests in gathering this information. Spending did not get Gill fired — the reason he was let go remains murky and unexplained officially — but was key to his power at the regional district. As former finance director, the accountant by trade knew budgets and policies inside-out and wrote some of the TNRD rules himself. Gill wined and dined staff and managed with a top-down, hands-on style. The finance department reported to him. Politicians responsible for his employment were presented with balanced budgets, fine dining, luxury hotels and fancy gifts. Creative budgeting split up expenses amongst different line items and utilized “general” accounts. None of it apparently broke policy, though whistleblowers told KTW they felt it was wrong. KTW obtained five years’ worth of Gill’s TNRD credit card expenses, from 2015 to 2020, including receipts that show $174,000 in that time spent at coffee shops and restaurants using public money — on average, once every other day for five years. A total of $165,000 was expensed at restaurants on more than 522 occasions, or about twice per week, and the majority was expensed outside typical nine-to-five, weekday working hours. Much of it was spent with TNRD staff, but it also involved TNRD board directors — those ultimately responsible for Gill’s employment. Board chair Ken Gillis said the board did not know the extent to which spending

SEAN BRADY/KTW

occurred and called the amounts “surprising” and “somewhat distressing.” Changes to policy have since been made. A TNRD corporate policy states credit cards are given to the CAO, directors and managers for travel and business expenses. Documents obtained by KTW show three-dozen staff credit cards existed at the regional district in May of 2020, with a combined limit of $287,500. Gill’s credit card had a limit of $30,000. When Randy Diehl became interim CAO in February 2020, his credit card limit was set at $5,000. The priciest restaurant tab Gill picked up over five years was at the 2018 Union of BC Municipalities convention. On Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, nearly $8,000 was spent at the Bearfoot Bistro in Whistler, a trendy, high-end restaurant in the village that serves Wagyu beef and is best known for its vodka ice room. A receipt shows the regional district reserved a champagne room. “I saw it. I was never in it,” Gillis said of the restaurant’s vodka ice room, which is often featured in photos posted to social media. “I don’t know if anybody from the TNRD group was in it — and I don’t know for sure — but I would hope that if anyone

frequented that, that that would have been done on his own nickel, not on the TNRD dime.” The TNRD hosts UBCM functions independent of the conference, swapping a $100-a-head sanctioned gala dinner in lieu of its own dinner party. Other politicians, including area MLAs, are invited and it is seen as an opportunity to network. Past TNRD UBCM events also included: $5,300 at the Cactus Club Coal Harbour in Vancouver in 2015, $4,300 at Chateau Victoria in B.C.’s capital in 2016, $5,100 at The Keg Dunsmuir in Vancouver in 2017 and $4,900 at Al Porto Ristorante in Vancouver in 2019. The 2020 UBCM convention was held remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Gillis said that since Gill’s departure, the regional district put in place a policy restricting alcoholic drinks at the function to a maximum of two. In emails exchanged in June of 2020 between TNRD board directors about that policy, obtained by KTW, Gillis admitted past venues were pricey and wine had flown freely. He also alluded to Gill’s spending. CONTINUED ON A15


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High-end eateries frequented CONTINUED FROM A14

“It seems that our UBCM dinner might not be such an extravagance as some of the post-dinner drinks offered by our former CAO to those whom he chose to favour and I believe that that practice, together with similar excesses, will now be things of the past,” Gillis wrote to the board. KTW found references to alcoholic drinks purchased among Gill’s expenses. However, next to no restaurant receipts submitted were itemized and instead only included totals. Gillis admitted alcohol was purchased at the Bearfoot Bistro event: “Yes, there would have been wine and so forth served at that meal and probably after-dinner drinks. I don’t know if there were cocktails ahead of time that were picked up by Mr. Gill or not. I can’t remember.” Some liquor store receipts were produced, including a $125 liquor store purchase in Revelstoke in April of 2018 for Gill, Gillis, Ken Christian, Randy Murray, John Ranta, Herb Graham, Steven Rice, William Kershaw and Carolyn Black. In Kamloops, $24,000 was spent on Gill’s TNRD credit card over five years at Nandi’s Flavours of India and Goldie’s Flavours of India and $22,000 was spent at the high-end Terra Restaurant, which has since closed its storefront eatery. In 2018, the regional district spent $3,300 on a board orientation and also hosted a catered-byTerra dinner at Monte Creek Ranch Winery for 24 of its staff and board directors. The guest list included Gill, Gillis, Ken Christian, Carolyn Black, Herb Graham, John Ranta, Rick Berrigan, Peter Hughes, Jack Jeyes, Tina Lange, Jessoa Lightfoot, Willow MacDonald, Randy Murray, Doug Rae, Al Raine, Steven Rice, Mel Rothenburger, Regina Sadilkova, Arjun Singh, Robin Smith, Marg Spina, Ron Storie, Sally Watson and Vicci Weller.

TNRD board chair Ken Gillis said the board did not know the extent to which spending occurred and called the amounts “surprising” and “somewhat distressing.”

The events are examples of spending at the regional district, charged to Gill’s TNRD credit card, but enjoyed by staff, board directors and some of their family members. Gill wrote on the back of his credit card receipts the names of those upon whom he spent taxpayer money. A database of those receipts created by KTW — which has been made available to the public as part of this investigation — provides a peek behind the curtain of bureaucracy in Kamloops and shows Gill also ate and drank with representatives from the City of Kamloops, Interior Health, Ministry of Transportation, Ministry of Forests, Telus, Trans Mountain, Kamloops RCMP, Kamloops Fire Rescue, Kamloops-Thompson school district, Kamloops and District Real Estate Association, Kamloops Central Business Improvement Association, Thompson Rivers University, MLAs, CAOs from other regional districts, staff and politicians in rural communities throughout the region, lawyers, insurers, accountants, realtors and developers. The list of restaurants at which Gill regularly incurred expenses includes high-end eateries, such as The Keg, Cactus Club, Mittz Kitchen,

Brownstone, Earls, Commodore, Cordo, Accolades, Romeos Kitchen and Spirits and Atlas Steak+Fish. During the Federation of Canadian Municipalities convention in Edmonton in 2015, TNRD directors Gillis, Sally Watson and Neil Menard dined with Gill at a steakhouse frequented by NHL players, Ruth’s Chris Steak House, known to be among the finest on the continent. The dinner bill was $450, averaging more than $110 per meal. Meanwhile, Gill’s credit card had one single expense at McDonald’s in five years. Tips added up, with more than $10,000 spent on gratuities among the expenses analyzed by KTW. Gill also appeared to have liked dining at the hotel across the street from the regional district office downtown, with $10,000 spent at the Delta Kamloops (formerly Hotel 540) on 73 occasions over five years. On Thursday, March 10, 2016, TNRD staff members and directors went for lunch at Hotel 540. Later that night, a $1,300 tab was cashed out at 9:17 p.m. at the Brownstone Restaurant four blocks away, with only “Charge: Meals board general,” written on the receipt. Gill frequented local coffee shops, which is where he would often meet community leaders during the work day. Gill met City of Kamloops CAO David Trawin regularly, usually expensing about $10, considerably lower than Gill’s other expenses. Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian was tied to restaurant and coffee shop tabs totalling $11,500 over five years. (Being “tied” to expenses does not necessarily mean that whole amount was spent on that person, but may have included others.) Former Kamloops mayor Peter Milobar was tied to bills worth $4,400.

On Sept. 13, 2018, TNRD CAO Sukh Gill expensed nearly $8,000 (including a $1,000 deposit not shown on the receipt) at the Bearfoot Bistro in Whistler, a trendy, high-end restaurant in the village that serves Wagyu beef and is best known for its vodka ice room. A receipt shows the regional district reserved a champagne room. The receipt also shows the amount spent was to be split between regional district sub-budgets.

THE FINE ART OF BUDGETING EXPENSES Sukh Gill’s credit card receipts detail not only who he spent taxpayer money on, but also at times allude to where money came from within the TNRD budget. The back of Gill’s receipts include references to “general admin,” “admin meals,” “general legislative,” “legislative meals,” “office supplies” and others, all of which fall under expenditure line items in TNRD budgets. Some were split between different budgets. For example, a $1,400 “employee recognition” dinner at Goldie’s Flavours of India in October of 2016 was split four ways between administrative, library, planning and environmental health services budgets. For hospital district business, the regional district charged the regional hospital district. Emergency operations expenditures went to the province. KTW analyzed accounts that popped up on receipts. Here is a summary of all employee expenses for some

of those accounts, provided by the TNRD’s finance department: General and sundry spent: • 2015: $97,061 • 2016: $116,126 • 2017: $81,261 • 2018: $240,875 • 2019: $108,770 Travel spent: • 2015: $50,972 • 2016: $52,533 • 2017: $52,857 • 2018: $45,018 • 2019: $58,924 Meals and accommodation spent: • 2015: $57,409 • 2016: $59,239 • 2017: $48,933 • 2018: $92,706 • 2019: $86,418 Totals: • 2015: $205,442 • 2016: $227,898 • 2017: $183,051 • 2018: $378,599 • 2019: $254,112

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Review of expenses led to some policy changes CONTINUED FROM A15

Trips by Milobar and Gill to Kelowna to meet Interior Health officials often included a meal at The Keg. On one April night in 2015, Robert Harpens, Erwin Malzer, Milobar and Gill dined, with the bill at $525. Overall, in five years’ worth of Gill’s expenses, about $9,000 worth of coffee shop expenses were charged to his TNRD credit card. One Friday morning, Gill, two TNRD staff members and a board director went to the Valleyview Starbucks and ordered a venti Americano, venti latte, venti soy latte and venti chai tea latte. It cost about $20. About two hours later, the same foursome expensed another $20 on chocolate chip cookies, dark chocolate peanut butter cups and almond chai bars. Board members and area politicians also routinely received Purdy’s chocolates from the regional district at Christmas time. Gill’s credit card statements and receipts

showed $3,000 spent at chocolate shops in five years. In addition, Gill expensed $27,500 on Christmas parties. In an interview before his departure in August 2020, interim TNRD CAO Randy Diehl said throughout his long career in government, different CAOs held different views and philosophies on spending. He noted TNRD expenses were put on Gill’s credit card, with many of the expenditures made by Gill or Gill’s assistants on behalf of directors or for the regional district. For example, hotel rooms — the majority, if not all, of which were luxury hotels — for staff and directors were charged to Gill’s credit card. Both Gillis and Diehl said the spending did not violate TNRD policy. Gillis conceded some of the expenses were “extravagant,” but added nothing that would “constitute impropriety.” Asked what policy would have allowed Gill to spend taxpayer money on restaurants and coffee shops, Diehl said

there was an “absence of policy.” Diehl said Gill encouraged his team to take people and clients out for lunch or dinner, noting the regional district has good relationships. He said spending on restaurants and coffee shops at the TNRD pre-dated Gill’s tenure. However, Diehl said the degree to which it occurred was a matter of choice by the former CAO. Diehl also distanced himself from such expenditures, telling KTW he stayed in modest accommodations during conferences and otherwise when he worked for the City of Kamloops, which included a stint as CAO. Gillis said Gill did not leave the regional district because of the spending and that the regional district did not find anything that would have been actionable had the spending been discovered before Gill left. The regional district will not comment on the reasons why Gill is no longer CAO. Though Gillis maintains the board was not aware of the extent

GIFT CARDS: FROM COFFEE TO LIQUOR Meanwhile, gift cards were increasingly purchased via Suhk Gill’s TNRD credit card before his departure from the regional district in February 2020. Many of them were reloaded onto an unknown card at coffee shops or unattributed and unaccounted for. In expenses analyzed by KTW, it started in 2015, with the purchase of a $100 gift card at Tobiano Golf Course. In the summer of 2017, Gill purchased eight Tim Hortons cards for an annual TNRD golf tournament and also reloaded $20 onto another unknown card. Over time, more and more gift cards were purchased with Gill’s TNRD credit card. Most were from Starbucks and Tim Hortons. On a Friday afternoon in May of 2019, $116 was spent at the Valleyview Starbucks for two lattes, a grilled cheese sandwich and a $100 gift card.

Tim Hortons and Starbucks cards were loaded and reloaded monthly in 2019 in $60 to $100 increments for a total of $970. The weekend before Christmas in 2018, purchases included a $275 BC Liquor Store gift card, a $135 Aberdeen Mall gift certificate and a $75 Tim Hortons card load. The receipts said to charge “general admin.” A small number of the gift card purchases alluded to gifts. A couple of other purchases on Gill’s credit card included a FitBit charger and two backpacks purchased from Bentley, a store in Aberdeen Mall, on Sept. 17, 2018, and Aug. 27, 2019. Asked if Gill was using his TNRD credit card as a personal expense account, Diehl said he did not see that. Thompson-Nicola Regional District credit cards earn one per cent cash back, which is applied to the cards’ outstanding balance.

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of Gill’s spending, board directors’ names were among those listed on the back of Gill’s receipts. Gillis — who became TNRD board chair in 2018 — is tied to $17,000 worth of Gill’s restaurant and coffee shop expenses over the five years, while former chair John Ranta is tied to $6,900 before he failed to secure re-election in 2018. Vice-chairs also partook. Willow MacDonald, 2015 vice-chair, was tied to $12,400 of Gill’s coffee shop and restaurant expenses, followed by 2016 vice-chair Ronaye Elliott ($9,100), 2017 vice-chair Steven Rice ($11,900) and current vicechair William Kershaw ($12,300). Asked if the board turned a blind eye, Gillis said: “I don’t think that would be accurate to say. A lot of this never became evident to the board before the expenses were put under scrutiny. I think you would have seen objection, substantial objection, from a number of board members, but it’s kind of an incremental thing. “OK, so you go and spend money on a UBCM dinner and you

don’t think that much of it, and then it’s three or four months later there may be another event and, you know, nobody’s doing a tally, really, and I think our director of finance is keeping much closer tabs on it now and I know for a fact that our new CAO is keeping very close tabs on that kind of expenditures.” The spending would have gone through not only the board, but also the TNRD’s finance department and auditors. Gillis said the finance department worked beneath and reported to Gill as CAO. One new check and balance brought in by Diehl was to have the CAO’s expenses signed off by the chair and vice-chair. A request for comment from KPMG, which audits the TNRD’s financial statements, was declined. Other policy changes include staff can no longer expense alcohol and are required to provide itemized receipts. Kamloops This Week reached out to Sukh Gill for comment. He has not returned this newspaper’s calls.

ETHICS COURSE CHARGED TO TNRD JUST BEFORE DEPARTURE Sukh Gill’s credit card expenses also reveal a $10 coffee date with the TNRD’s lawyer, Denise McCabe, at 9:06 a.m. on Dec. 10, 2019, at Amplified Cafe, the coffee shop in the TNRD Building. That same morning, at 8:56 a.m., Gill registered for a $240 Ethics for the CFO course through the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. An online description of the course explains it

teaches common ethical issues faced by CFOs, codes of ethics and professional codes of conducts, how to recognize conflicts of interest and the importance of whistleblowing in an organization. “One wrong decision by the CFO can lead to a loss of trust and a damaged reputation among peers, board of directors, employees, customers, suppliers and the general public,” the CPA course

description states. Then, around lunchtime that same day, $100 was loaded onto a Starbucks gift card before dinner was purchased for Gill, Gillis, Linda Brown (Merritt mayor and Gillis’ wife), Ken Christian and eight “nonTNRD folks” for a $357 tab at Nandi’s Flavours of India. Gill left the regional district two months later with more than a half-milliondollar settlement.

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Salary augmented by overtime with the EOC JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

According to the latest financial statements, which encompass 2019, Sukh Gill was paid a salary of $222,000 and claimed nearly $30,000 in expenses as CAO of the Thompson-Nicola Regional District. In 2014, a few years after Gill became CAO, the Thompson Regional Hospital District revised its policy to compensate the regional district CAO.

Minutes from a closeddoor meeting on July 17, 2014, state board chair and thenKamloops mayor Peter Milobar advised the board most hospital districts provided annual compensation for an administrator. “… the chief administrative officer previous has not been compensated for this position in the past, but the CAO has been and will contribute 70 hours or more per year towards the operation of the Thompson Regional Hospital District,” the minutes state.

The recommendation was to provide compensation of $6,000 per year, backdated to Jan. 1, 2014. The additional pay would be funded by the hospital district’s budget, of which Kamloops property owners, on average, contributed about $200 during tax time in 2020. The decision was approved unanimously by the hospital district board of the day. Gill was paid an extra $38,000 in pay, about $230 per paycheque, throughout the remainder of his tenure at the

regional district and continues to be paid that as part of his severance agreement. The TNRD also paid for Gill’s professional fees. A 2019 receipt from the Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia showed renewal fees charged worth $1,000. Meanwhile, Gill also claimed $117,000 in overtime wages over a two-month period — about $1,900 per day, on top of his regular salary — during the floods and fires of 2017. Receipts show he charged

multiple Sunday brunches at Milestones to the Emergency Operations Centre. An itemized receipt from Swiss Pastries charged the EOC for Swiss chocolate macaroons and black forest cake. Documents obtained by KTW reveal Gill was paid a total of $208,400 in EOC overtime throughout the course of his career at the TNRD. He also spent about $3,700 in EOC expenses over five years via his TNRD credit card, including about $600 at coffee shops in 2017 and 2018.

Comparing CAO credit card expenses KTW reached out to some other regional districts for their CAOs’ credit card charges. The number of restaurant/coffee shop/food expenses charged by CAOs in various regional districts in 2019: • Sukh Gill, Thompson-Nicola Regional District: 172 times. • Robert Lapham, Capital Regional District: 17 times. • David Sewell, Regional District of North Okanagan: 6 times. • Carol Mason and Jerry Dobrovolny, Metro Vancouver Regional District: one time.

SEARCH THE KTW DATABASE

Kamloops This Week readers can peruse five years’ worth of Sukh Gill’s TNRD credit card spending via a spreadsheet created by KTW chronicling regional district credit card statements and receipts. The spreadsheet can be sorted in myraid ways, from amounts to type of expense to vendor — and more. To view it, go online to https://tinyurl.com/y4ccrtr9.

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Dubs Kustoms gets Rust Valley treatment MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

James West is swashbuckling into 2021, a metal fabricator who believes his dreams, once razed in fire, are about to rise from the ashes and materialize on national TV. “I honestly feel like this is going to be the biggest opportunity of my life, so I am grasping it wholeheartedly,” said West, who owns Dubs Kustoms, the metalwork, fabrication and welding shop on Salish Road on the Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation. The 42-year-old Kamloops resident will feature prominently in Season 3 of Rust Valley Restorers, the Tappenbased vehicle restoration show that unlocked a

CORUS ENTERTAINMENT PHOTO James West of Kamloops considers his involvement in Rust Valley Restorers the biggest opportunity of his career to date.

worldwide audience when Netflix acquired streaming rights in 2019. Episode 1 of the History channel offering will air at 9 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 18, giving viewers a chance to catch up with Mike Hall, Connor Hall and Avery Shoaf, the stars who carry the series. West, who appeared sparingly in Season 2, will

hit the small screen in most of this season’s 12 episodes, billed as a metal magician and master fabricator fighting to keep his business afloat amid the pandemic. Central to his narrative is a 1952 Mercury pickup truck fused with a Corvette frame, a Frankentruck build that doubles as a money pit. “This truck is the sick-

est truck on the planet,” West told KTW. “And I don’t say that lightly. It’s absolutely amazing and it’s going to blow people away.” West was living in Quesnel in 2009 when his shop burned to the ground. “I ended up running in and saving what I could, but it ended up putting me in the hospital for the day,” West said. “It was literally one of the worst days of my life.” The 1952 Merc was salvaged. “I was able to save that truck and one welder,” West said. “Everything else was a complete loss. It took me another 10 years after my shop burned down to get to the point where I could try to go after my dream again.” That dream — to run a hot rod shop and build

custom cars — began to take shape after a move to Kamloops about seven years ago. “When I rented this building, I started painting signs, putting them on the outside, getting the look I wanted before I even had any customers walking through the door,” West said. “With a five-foot spider crawling down the wall and all that, people take notice. One day a fellow come in the door and he had some involvement in the show.” The fellow is Matt Shewchuk, who runs Burnaby-based Mayhem Entertainment, along with Tyson Hepburn. They are the creators and executive producers of Rust Valley Restorers. Hepburn said the decision to increase the spotlight on Dubs Kustoms in

Season 3 should attract a new audience among car lovers. “James’ creations are totally one-off,” Hepburn said. “You’ll never see another one like it in the world. That was a big draw for us.” Corus Entertainment and History executives will decide whether the show is picked up for a fourth season. Netflix brass will make a similar decision on Season 3. West is confident the Dubs Kustoms builds, including a 1947 custom gasser Willys pick-up truck, will help push the ratings needle in the right direction. “The anticipation is killing me, to be honest with you,” West said. “This season is going to be absolutely epic and I just can’t wait for the world to see it.”

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LOCAL NEWS

2020 was deadliest year for ODs in B.C. KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

As was anticipated, 2020 saw the most people ever die in B.C. due to overdose. The BC Coroners Service said there were 1,716 deaths due to illicit drugs in 2020 in B.C., representing a 74 per cent increase over the number of such deaths recorded in 2019 (984). The number of illicit drug toxicity deaths in 2020 equates to about 4.7 deaths per day, which is two deaths per day higher than in 2019 (2.7 days per day). The toxic illicit drug supply in British Columbia has claimed more lives than motor-vehicle crashes, homicides, suicides and prescription-drug related deaths combined. Kamloops recorded 60 overdose deaths last year, the most ever in the city and the sixth-most of any community in B.C. The 60 deaths were 35 more than that recorded in 2019 (25 deaths) and 14 more than the previous year with the highest number of overdose deaths, 2018, which had 46 deaths. "The impacts of COVID-19 highlighted the immensely precarious situation of those experiencing problematic substance use in our province" chief coroner

Lisa Lapointe said. "Decades of criminalization, an increasingly toxic illicit drug market and the lack of timely access to evidencebased treatment and recovery services have resulted in the loss of thousands of lives in B.C. It's clear that urgent change is needed to prevent future deaths and the resulting grief and loss so many families and communities have experienced across our province." Added Leslie McBain, executive director and co-founder of Moms Stop the Harm: "There is no other disorder or condition besides substance use disorder in which we force people to access the medicine they require on a street corner and manufactured by the minions of organized crime." In April 2016, the provincial government declared a public health emergency due to the sudden spike in the number of overdose deaths, mainly due to the addition of the powerful drug fentanyl to supply of cocaine, heroin and other hard drugs. That public health emergency remains in effect today. Other findings in the year-end report: • In 2020, 69 per cent of those dying were ages 30 to 59 and males accounted for 81 per cent of deaths.

• The communities that experienced the highest number of overdose deaths in 2020 were Vancouver (408), Surrey 2014), Victoria (122), Abbotsford (65), Kelowna (61), Kamloops (60), Prince George (58), Burnaby (56), Nanaimo (39) and Langley (39). • Fentanyl or its analogues continued to be detected in more than 80 per cent of illicit drug toxicity deaths in 2020. Cocaine and methamphetamine were the next most commonly detected drugs. • In 2020, 84 per cent of overdose deaths occurred inside (56 per cent in private residences and 28 per cent in other residences, including social and supportive housing, single-residence occupancies, shelters and hotels and other indoor locations), while 14 per cent occurred outside in vehicles, sidewalks, streets, parks, etc. • Overdose death rates among those ages 19 to 59 has been trending downwards over several months, while rates among those ages 60 and older have been trending upwards. Rates among those 18 years of age and younger remain low. • No deaths have been reported at supervised drug use or overdose prevention sites.

Advocates continue push for safe supply KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The Canadian Association for Safe Supply said the provincial government failed to act and prepare for more overdose deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic, which was declared by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. “The provincial government was caught flat-footed during a pandemic. When we needed physical distancing and safe supply, few could access that supply and it wasn’t exactly safe, although patients were never told that,” association co-founder Jordan Westfall said. He called on the provincial government to act now on creating a safe drug supply, noting regular and recreational users continue to be at risk. “There is literally a non-profit pharma company producing diacetylmorphine in British Columbia and everything needed is right here, but it seems like the province is gridlocked,” Westfall said. “Instead of expanding

pharma coverage, which is a provincial responsibility, they rely on the federal government to fund more pilot projects.” Association co-founder David Mendes noted that while the federal exemption to section 56a of the Canadian Criminal Code was implemented, allowing drug users to take home doses of dilaudid and ritalin as a COVID19 isolation tool. “While this was a positive and groundbreaking initiative, it did not curb the rising death toll,” Mendes said. “The majority of the users receiving these were still having to use street drugs — fentanyl — due to the limited potency and increased tolerances from extended use of fentanyl and benzodiazepine. “For many, a generic form of dilaudid was prescribed instead due to cost, which does not have the desired and needed effect or their local doctor or pharmacy would not prescribe anything at all due to their personal beliefs, limited knowledge of addiction and lack of tested safe supply

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options such as diacetylmorphine (heroin) and hydromorphone.” Minister of Mental Health and Addictions Sheila Malcolmson said during a press conference on Thursday (Feb. 11) that about 6,000 overdose deaths were prevented due to the use of medication such as naloxone and suboxone. She said much more needs to be done, noting measures such as de facto decriminalization of simple amounts of hard drugs — via the police not bothering to make such arrests — is not enough. Malcomson pointed to her government’s pledge to increase treatment beds for youth as one of the steps being taken. She said she has pressed the federal government on the need to decriminalize and create a safe supply, in response to her mandate letter from Premier John Horgan that directs her to discuss the issue with Ottawa and, failing movement there, look for a made-in-B.C. solution.

NOTARY PUBLIC • Will and Estate Planning • Incapacity Planning • Real Estate Transactions • Notarizing Documents

T: 778-696-4LAW E: info@muracanotary.ca 301-619 Victoria Street muracanotary.ca

Dr. Preety Desai

Is it safe to go back to the Dentist? Absolutely! The dentist’s office is the safest place to be outside of your home. Before COVID, what you never saw as a patient, were the behind the scenes protocols which every dental office was obligated and mandated for: sterilizing ALL their instruments, wiping and disinfecting all surfaces and cleaning everything in site, allowing ample time in between patient rooms, disposable gloves and masks and wrapping and disinfecting all dental touch points. Dentistry implemented gloves and masks in the 1980s because of the AIDS-HIV epidemic. Have you heard of a single cross infection from the dental office? Medical offices had not implemented the changes we had. What has occurred since the Covid pandemic is that we not only have continued with the same efficient protocols, but we now have implemented physical distancing like everyone else. We do this by controlling patient crowding and flow in our reception areas and also in the dental treatment rooms. More importantly we have started to take care of ourselves and our staff by using N95s, air purifiers and gowns—remember we are front line workers dealing with aerosolized saliva and blood from the dental drills, cavitron cleaners and air/water syringes which rinse your mouths. We are the closest to your mouths, so in fact, if you are an unknown COVID carrier, science has now shown that the virus particles will live longer in your dental plaque and periodontal pockets putting us dental professionals at risk. Despite what the BC Ministry of Health says, we are more at risk in contracting COVID during a procedure than is the patient. What my colleagues and I see is the amount of stress and disease from the lack of care absolutely explode due to the shutdown last year and it is critical to treat things in dentistry sooner rather than later. When you get a call from your dentist for “just a check up” or “just a cleaning,” please don’t worry about getting COVID from us. We would rather put out the fire in your mouth so to speak than deal with extracting your teeth later on!

t. 778.471.6001

a. 101-775 McGill Rd, Kamloops

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A20

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

So far, an average year for snowpack depth in Kamloops region and province KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Snowpacks in the North Thompson and South Thompson basins are right about historical norms as of Feb. 1, while snowpacks across B.C. are at

or slightly above normal depths. Those measurements are vastly different from one year ago, when much deeper snowpacks led to warnings of significant flooding in the spring, though such events did

not occur. The Feb. 1 snow survey from the River Forecast Centre includes information from 100 manual snow courses and 88 automated snow weather stations around the province.

NOTICE OF INTENT TO TREAT The Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, Thompson Okanagan Region, is planning to aerially treat up to 29,200 hectares of Douglas-fir and western hemlock forest to reduce the populations of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura freemani) and western hemlock looper (Lambdina fiscellaria lugubrosa). Depending on weather conditions, the biological insecticide Foray 48B (Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki) will be applied by rotary-wing aircraft (315B Lama and Hiller UH12ET helicopters) once on each site between June 15 to July 30, 2021. The proposed treatment sites are located within the Thompson Rivers (Kamloops Timber Supply Area) and Okanagan Shuswap Districts (Okanagan Timber Supply Area). TSA Location Kamloops TSA Deadman Creek Criss Creek Greenstone Mtn. Beaton Creek Indian Garden Creek Barnes Creek Okanagan TSA Perry River Mt. Griffin Crazy Creek Pukeashun South Pukeashun North Josh Mtn. North Total

Target insect Hectares western spruce budworm 313 western spruce budworm 3,828 western hemlock looper 3,146 western hemlock looper 5,208 western hemlock looper 1,936 western hemlock looper 1,668 western hemlock looper 1,262 western hemlock looper 1,324 western hemlock looper 3,997 western hemlock looper 2,105 western hemlock looper 2,096 western hemlock looper 2,278 29,159

All sites proposed for treatment are coved by the Southern Interior Area Forest Health Program Pest Management Plan (PMP) #2017-2021-4, confirmation #402-0672-17/22. The PMP and maps of the treatment areas may be viewed at: Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Thompson Okanagan Region – Forest Health Program 441 Columbia Street Kamloops, B.C., V2C 2T3 250 828-4179 Anyone wishing to contribute information about the proposed treatment sites may send comments to the address above until April 30, 2021. Notice for Public Hearing

Page 4

Written submissions, including your name and address, are included in the Council Agenda and will be posted on the City’s website as part of the permanent public record. Please note that the City considers the author’s address relevant to Council’s consideration of this matter and will disclose this personal information.

Snow levels range from a low of 79 per cent of normal in Skagit (along the B.C./ Washington state border, east of Hope) to a high of 126 per cent of normal in the South Coast. While Skagit now has the lowest snowpack in B.C., it had the highest exactly one year ago, at 136 per cent of normal. In the Kamloops region, the two basins are in the normal snowpack territory (90 per cent to 110 per cent of historical averages). The North Thompson snowpack depth is at 100 per cent of normal measurements, while the South Thompson is at 105 per cent. Both are down from Jan. 1 data, which had the North Thompson at 101 per cent and the South Thompson at 113 per cent. A year ago, the South Thompson basin’s snowpack was second-greatest in the province, relative to normal amounts, at 130 per cent. The North Thompson was at 119 per cent of normal. Provincewide, the snowpack is 111 per cent of normal, almost identical to the 110 per cent mark a year ago. The River Forecast Centre noted the snow-

pack has been built up by a stormy and snowy first half of January, though conditions have been relatively dry since. January also saw temperatures above normal, from 0.5 C to 5 C above normal, depending on locations in B.C. By early January, nearly two-thirds of the annual B.C. snowpack has typically accumulated. Interestingly, warmer than normal readings in January were recorded in northern B.C., while Vancouver Island experienced lowest temperatures, compared to normal data. Seasonal weather forecasts from January 31, 2021 by Environment and Climate Change Canada indicate an increased likelihood of colder than normal temperatures from February through April for the northern half of the province, and near normal temperatures for the southern portion of B.C. There is an increased likelihood of higher than normal precipitation for the entire province from February through April. These forecasts hint at continued snow accumulation into the start of spring, and thus the possibility of delayed snowmelt.


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

save-on-foods presents:

EYE ON COMMUNITY

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

A21

[share with us]

If you have a photo of a charity donation, a grand-opening picture or other uplifting images, email them to

editor@kamloopsthisweek.com,

with “eye on community” in the subject line.

CHARITY CALENDAR

Share It Forward with Save-On The Kamloops Hospice Association launched its Bucket List Raffle — Live Your Best Life in November as a fundraiser for the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice House. The online raffle is still open until Feb. 21 at 5 p.m. There are five experiences to win, each with a value ranging from $4,000 to $6,000. Kamloopsians are encouraged to capture the spirit of living their best life, by contributing to the hospice’s care of its patients in a very unique way. The five Bucket List experiences are: • An interactive cooking experience with chef Ryan Clark; • Painting with artist Trish Selmer in her studio; • A VIP tour and experience for two with the Rust Brothers TV show crew; • Gift certificates from local businesses to spruce up your outdoor living space; • Seventeen rounds of golf around Kamloops. Learn more about each bucket and to purchase tickets, go online to hospicebucketlist.com. Ticket prices range from $10 to $100 value packages. Purchasers can decide into which bucket their tickets will go. Tickets will be sold until Feb. 21 at 5 p.m. with the draw on Feb. 25 at noon.

PROUD TO SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY OF KAMLOOPS

DRIVING FORWARD WITH FOOD BANK DONATION: Kamloops Ford Lincoln donated $4,300 to the Kamloops Food Bank as part of Kamloops Ford Lincoln’s Paying it Forward campaign. The money donated was raised through donating a portion of sales from the month of January to the initiative. In the photo: Kamloops Ford Lincoln general manager Craig Brown presents the cheque to Kamloops Food Bank director of resource development Corra Gassner.

STOLLERY, BC INTERIOR COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OFFER BIG HELP TO BIG BEAR In partnership with The Stollery Charitable Foundation, the BC Interior Community Foundation presented a grant of $7,995 to Tara Ettinger of the Big Bear Child & Youth Advocacy Centre. The funding will support essential improvements to the agency’s new location, including a lobby renovation. In the photo, from left: Spencer and Janet Bryson of The Stollery Charitable Foundation, Tara Ettinger of the Child & Youth Advocacy Centre and Darlene Iadarola of the BC Interior Community Foundation.

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

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LINDA LOVE

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CHAN ABOUT CHRIS:

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I

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have lived in Kamloops for 27 years and I plan to make this city our retirement home. With years of direct sales experience I know how to market properties to achieve the most effective results. I have earned several top RE/MAX sales awards and was honored by our Kamloops Real Estate Association with the Realtor of the Year award. On a personal note, I enjoy travel, gardening and making stained-glass windows which I donate to raise money for charities. I also make a contribution from every sale to help the BC Children’s Hospital.

My daughter, Kristy Janota and Adam Popien are members of my team and we would love to hear from you, to help make your buying or selling experience a pleasant one.

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

MASTERS OF

A23

FINANCE

Think you may need to repay CERB?

Sandwich generation caring for children, aging parents at same time

CANADIAN PRESS

When Catherine IkedaBlazys moved next door to her aging parents eight years ago, it was the perfect spot for her to care for repay CERB. them in their golden years. “But if you did receive Yet the Toronto-based that uncomfortable letexecutive assistant also ter, you probably need to had her own children, think about immediately and as her parents’ health filing your taxes to figure out what your obligations deteriorated over time, she felt the demands of caring are to the government.’’ for two generations grow. McDonald said filing Then after years of taxes now will help clear worsening dementia and up whether you owe the government money, if you glaucoma, her father died accidentally received both in December. “It’s overwhelming tryemployment insurance and CERB, and if you can ing to manage it all,’’ she make a retirement savings said. “I’m maintaining two households.’’ plan contribution before Ikeda-Blazys is part of the tax deadline to lower the so-called sandwich your amount owing for generation, a cohort of regular income taxes. middle-aged adults carIf you still end up ing for both children and owing the Canada aging parents. Revenue Agency money It’s a group that’s long for emergency benefits grappled with the conflictyou weren’t eligible for, ing demands of caring for McDonald said people children and seniors, a sitwho earned less than uation that can put a stag$75,000 will be given an gering emotional, physical extra year of interest-free and financial pressure on forgiveness until 2022. For people who are still caregivers. And with the additional without work and aren’t strain of a pandemic, in a financial position to repay benefits, McDonald experts say professional said he hopes the govern- advice on financial, ment will provide some retirement and estate leniency to the debts on a planning strategies can case-by-case basis. help ease the burden on

BEST TO START PLANNING NOW, EXPERTS SAY SALMAAN FAROOQUI

CANADIAN PRESS

When 20-year-old Alex Coucopoulos got a letter from the government in December telling him he’d have to pay back $12,000 of pandemic aid, the stress was immediate. “It was a really bad situation,’’ Coucopoulos said, who lives at home and immediately took $5,000 out of his savings to re-pay the Canada Emergency Response Benefit “It was very stressful. Pretty much my entire income from my (new job) would have gone to paying the rest back.’’ The Ottawa resident said he applied last year after discussing his eligibility with a Canada Revenue Agency representative on the phone, who told him that he was eligible for CERB because his gross income in 2020 was over $5,000. But he was one of many Canadians who were caught out when the government agency said applicants were actually

required to have a net income over $5,000. Coucopoulos was relieved when the Canadian government changed course last week and said people who applied thinking they were eligible because of their gross income would no longer have to repay CERB. He said he can now continue with saving his income to pay the rest of his university costs, rather than setting aside all of his income to repay the benefit. The Ottawa student’s situation is exactly why D’Arcy McDonald, Senior Vice President of Deposits, Investments & Payments at Scotiabank, advises people who’ve been asked to repay CERB to take their time and explore their options moving forward. “Watch the government communications closely, because I think those sands are still shifting,’’ McDonald said, saying that the government still could change course on who is required to

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Private Wealth. “The pandemic has exacerbated issues that probably were there in the past but are now even more pronounced.’’ For Ikeda-Blazys, her parents saved and invested wisely, leaving no financial burden for their children, she said. Statistics Canada said employment in January fell by 213,000 jobs, its lowest level since August. Those losses were entirely in part-time work and were concentrated in the Quebec and Ontario retail sectors, the federal agency said earlier this month. The result could lead to higher financial needs among older children as aging parents require more assistance. But financial, retirement and estate planning strategies can help relieve some of the pressure on the sandwich generation, Henderson said. “People need to look at their overall financial plan and their retirement goals and see if they are setting aside enough for retirement and how a change in circumstances like additional expenses for caring for elderly parents impacts those goals.’’

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the sandwich generation. As life expectancy increases and people have children later in life, the number of people pulled between caring for two generations is expected to increase. In 2018, Statistics Canada reported that 700,000 Canadians were caring for their kids and parents, with the majority of those making up the sandwich generation women. But observers say COVID-19 lockdowns and the rise of working from home has in some cases amplified the pressure. And while sheltering in place with both children and elderly parents can be emotionally taxing, experts warn it can also take a financial toll. Financial planners say the extra burden could even put retirement goals at risk. “The stay-at-home order means children that normally would have been at school or away at university are home and now many elderly parents are moving in as an alternative to longterm care or require other financial support,’’ said Sandra Henderson, regional president in the Toronto-area with BMO

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HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dig It: Playing hide and seek with history This “let’s find as many sites as we can” focus also left little time to conduct subsurface work, such as shovel testing to find buried archaeological deposits, so these sites tend to only be recorded from what could be seen on the surface. The result? A rich legacy of very interesting archaeological sites recorded across the landscape, with only an approximate idea of their actual size, shape and location. Following the early inventory period, the drivers of archaeology shifted so that more and more of the work was development-driven. Archaeologists were now going out into the field with maps provided by their clients, armed with an increased awareness that knowing the size, shape and locations of sites was now of heightened importance so the client could manage the impacts to those sites. Much of the work during this era was conducted before the Global Positioning System (GPS) was available. Sites were quite accurately plotted in relation to the development plan maps, but often were only approximately located on the smaller scale maps that the B.C. Archaeology Branch was using at the time. After this middle period of archaeology, from about the 2000s to the present, widespread avail-

CLINTON COATES

REPUBLICOFARCHAEOLOGY.CA

I

f only I could have a dollar for every time I am asked why there is no easy way for a non-archaeologist to determine if there is a recorded archaeological site on a property. It should be easy, right? After all, every property is precisely surveyed and displayed in online mapping applications and there is also an online repository that shows the location of all recorded archaeological sites. It would be a trivial exercise to automatically merge these and let every landowner know if there is a recorded site on their property. Alas, it is not this simple. Until the late 1970s, the primary mindset for B.C. archaeologists was to increase the overall knowledge of archaeological sites across the landscape. This was achieved through a rapid expansion of the known site inventory by completing largescale surveys of specific geographical areas, such as the banks of the South Thompson River. At that time, there was little thought given to the potential consequences of having an archaeological site on one’s property and sites were not mapped to legal survey standards.

ability of GPS technology allowed ever more accurate maps to be created. It was during the transition into this era that the B.C. Archaeology Branch moved from paper-based to digital maps. This was a huge undertaking that took many years to complete as there was a backlog of more than 20,000 recorded sites to contend with, along with an everincreasing tide of newly recorded sites that continued to flow in year after year. In the end, it was realized that there was just not enough time or resources to accurately relocate every one of these old sites. In many cases, there was simply not enough information. Finally, it was decided that the only workable process would be to locate these sites as best as possible in the new online map catalogue. A system was then created to involve professional archaeologists whenever a development

referral was found to overlap, or be close to, a recorded archaeological site. Following is a case study to illustrate a typical example of this process. The brown polygon to the southwest in the inset map shows the shape, orientation and location plotted in the B.C. Archaeology Branch database for an archaeology site recorded in 1992. In 2015, I was asked by a client to assess this site in relation to a proposed development. The development map showed the site located approximately 200 metres to the northeast, as shown by the cyan blue polygon on the inset map. Obviously, something was amiss. While doing the background research, I discovered another archaeologist had visited the site in 1997. I took the location map from the 1997 report and overlayed it onto Google Earth and found that it showed the site to be very close to where the development plan indicated, as shown by the red triangle on the inset map. There was also a detailed handdrawn site map in the report that indicated the location of the site in relation to nearby roads and landforms. Armed with this information, I visited the project area.

First, I confirmed the site location, size and orientation plotted in the B.C. Archaeology Branch database was indeed incorrect. Then, I took the 1997 site map and matched it to roads and terrace edges, confirming the development plan and 1997 report map generally agreed. Finally, I remapped the site with an accurate GPS. The red polygon shows this refined site location. Unfortunately, this experience is more common than we would wish when dealing with archaeological sites that were recorded well into 1990s. Often, an hour or two of background research is all it takes for an archaeologist to determine how well plotted an archaeological site is, in relation to a property. The widespread availability of GPS technology and applications such as Google Earth are important tools for archaeologists to determine the accuracy of a plotted archaeological site. Tens of thousands of archaeological sites are distributed across B.C. and accurate mapping is an essential aspect of managing this important and non-renewable resource. Clinton Coates is a Kamloopsbased archaeologist. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca.

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A27

FAITH

Decision today on injunction bid AMY SMART

CANADIAN PRESS

The chief justice of the British Columbia Supreme Court said the provincial government is putting the court in an “impossible position’’ by asking for an injunction ordering three churches to stop in-person services before their challenge of public health orders is heard. Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson said health orders already prohibit such gatherings and it is within the power of Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and the government to escalate enforcement without a court order. “There are alternate remedies,‘’ Hinkson told Gareth Morley, legal counsel with the legal services branch of the Attorney General ministry, during a Feb. 12 hearing. “I shouldn’t be doing Dr. Henry’s job. If she wants police to have the ability to arrest people, the order can be amended, can’t it?‘’ The court is “rather ill equipped’’ to second-guess health decisions by people who actually have the exper-

tise to make them, Hinkson said. The injunction request by the provincial health officer and attorney general comes after the churches filed a petition that challenges COVID-19 restrictions on in-person religious services, arguing the ban violates people’s rights and freedoms. The Riverside Calvary Chapel in Langley, the Immanuel Covenant Reformed Church in Abbotsford and Free Reformed Church of Chilliwack were among more than a dozen individuals or churches that filed the petition last month, with the challenge set to be heard in March. They allege several charter violations, including freedom of religion, belief, expression, peaceful assembly and association. Lawyer Paul Jaffe, who represents the churches, told the court his clients have adopted safety protocols similar to those approved by Henry in places like schools that remain open. It doesn’t make sense that some people should be allowed to gather to do yoga or to study history, but not talk about God, he said. “It’s so arbitrary, it’s so irrational.

Viruses don’t become activated because of the subject of discussion,” Jaffe said. The health orders allow exemptions for support groups for people challenged with grief, substance use and other conditions. Jaffe said churches play a similar role. The churches applied for an exemption in December and have not received a response, he said. Jaffe described the application for an injunction as a “punitive’’ and “vindictive’’ move, when the court hearing is less than three weeks away. However, Morley said existing restrictions on worshippers aren’t working without compliance and a court order could add weight and protect the public. Hinkson said applicants for court injunctions are typically non-governmental organizations or companies that don’t have any other option. Governments do, he said. Hinkson said he will deliver a decision on Wednesday, (Feb. 17), adding he does not condone breaching orders.

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Join us online Saturday 6:30 pm & Sunday 10 am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call 250-374-7467

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

In these unprecedented times10:00am we are worshiping remotely via our Facebook Sunday Mornings

pageTranquille livestream on 422 Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

Sundays at 10am. All are Welcome

www.northshorecalvary.com www.northshorecalvary.com

Christian Science Society, 1152 Nicola Street, Kamloops Sunday Church Services 10:30 - 11:30 am All are welcome www.christianscience.bc.ca csskamsoc@yahoo.ca


A28

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS kamloopsthisweek.com | Marty Hastings: 778-471-7536

Skip Corryn Brown and her Kamloops Curling Club rink will begin play on Saturday at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in Calgary. ANDREW KLAVER PHOTOGRAPHY/CURLING CANADA

Brown eyes national title in curling bubble MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

E

ight seasons and 105 episodes of Below Deck will be at Corryn Brown’s fingertips in the Calgary curling bubble, along with another shot at the women’s national title.

“I’ll probably watch all the Netflix that my partner [Matt Whiteford] doesn’t want to watch when we’re together, binge some trashy TV,” Brown said with a laugh, noting it might be time to rewatch Suits. Scouting opponents and studying ice conditions are, of course, atop the to-do list for skip Brown, whose Kamloops Curling Club rink, which

includes third Erin Pincott, second Dezaray Hawes and lead Sam Fisher, will represent B.C. at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts, which will get underway this Friday at the Markin MacPhail Centre at WinSport’s Canada Olympic Park. But there will be down time — lots of it. Pincott, Brown, Fisher and coach Allison MacInnes, each

of whom has been in total lockdown mode at their respective homes since Valentine’s Day, will leave Kamloops on Wednesday morning, linking up to convoy with Peachland resident Hawes in Sicamous before continuing on to Calgary. Day Zero testing for COVID19 will be conducted upon arrival. Team members will then proceed to their individual

hotel rooms in the Four Points by Sheraton Hotel, which is less than two kilometres from the rink. They will be holed up in their rooms for most of Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, allowed to meet for practices, but barred from team gatherings away from the ice. See QUEBEC, A29


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Quebec up first for Team B.C. From A28

“Sitting around your room all day isn’t going to be great for being ready to play, so I think we’ll try to do as much as we can to stay somewhat active, so we’re not just in this kind of lackadaisical attitude,” Brown said, noting online yoga sessions may pencil into the team agenda. A sense of normalcy is expected to return on Saturday, when teams will be permitted to gather away from the ice after receiving a second negative test. The team’s first action is slated for Saturday, a 5:30 p.m. clash with Quebec, the beginning of B.C.’s light early-tournament schedule, with only three games in the first four days of action. “We’ll be paying attention to the ice because the team we’ll be playing will already have a game under their belt,” Brown said. “You can learn tendencies of the team, but it’s mostly seeing what the ice is doing, seeing if anything has changed from our pre-event practising. There is lots of scouting that can be done.” Brown fifth Stephanie Jackson-Baier will provide an extra set of eyes. The Victoria resident will also be competing in the Home Hardware Canadian Mixed Doubles

Brunswick), Lori Eddy (Nunavut) and Sarah Hill (Newfounland/ Labrador). In Pool A are Kerri Einarson (Team Canada), Rachel Homan (Ontario), Laura Walker (Alberta), Mackenzie Zacharias (Wild Card No. 2), Beth Peterson (Wild Card No. 3), Kerry Galusha (Northwest Territories), Jill Brothers (Nova Scotia), Krysta Burns (Northern Ontario) and Laura Eby (Yukon). Four teams from each pool will move on to the Championship Pool, from which three playoff teams will emerge. The No. 1 seed will advance to the final (a 5:30 p.m. start on Feb. 28),

ANDREW KLAVER PHOTOGRAPHY/CURLING CANADA Team Brown third Erin Pincott delivers at the 2020 Scotties Tournament of Hearts in Moose Jaw. Brown placed sixth at the tournament.

Championship, which gets underway on March 18 in the Calgary bubble. “A big reason why we picked Steph is her previous Scotties experience,” Brown said. “That’s really huge to have. She brings a wealth of knowledge and I think it’ll be a really great fit.” Fisher is the only team member who has not seen action at the Canadian championship. The Kamloops Curling Club rink made its debut at women’s nationals last year in Moose Jaw, finishing sixth with the help of standout play from lead Ashley Klymchuk, who stepped away from Team Brown after the tournament and gave birth to twins in September. Fisher will miss out on much of the pageantry that traditionally accompanies the Scotties. “You’re not going to be as awestruck with different things, like getting your Scotties necklace and doing the

banquet and the up close and personals,” Brown said. “All of those extra bits that kind of take up your time are gone. That makes it a bit easier. You can only go from the hotel to the rink and back. But it’s too bad that Sam won’t the able to experience that.” Team Brown earned its way to the 2020 national championship by winning its first provincial women’s crown last February in Cranbrook. This year, Curl BC chose to send the Kamloops rink on the back of its standing as defending B.C. titleists, as the 2021 provincial championships were pre-empted by the pandemic. No spectators will be allowed into the Markin MacPhail Centre. Brown wishes family could be in Calgary for this career highlight, but said it may prove advantageous that Alberta representatives will not be able to feed off of a home crowd. Joining B.C.

in Pool A are Wild Card No. 1 Tracy Fleury (who will not be participating, replaced by skip Chelsea Carey of Calgary), Jennifer Jones (Manitoba), Suzanne Birt (Prince Edward Island), Sherry Anderson (Saskatchewan), Laurie St-Georges (Quebec), Melissa Adams (New

with the second and third seeds to square off in semifinal action. TSN will provide coverage of every draw. “People will be itching to watch on TV,” said Brown, whose team’s most recent competitive action was on Nov. 12. “I’m sure the ratings will be the best they’ve ever been because people have been deprived of curling for a long time.” Netflix will provide coverage of Below Deck. “I’m really into some of those trashy Slice shows,” Brown said. “I might continue with that. It will be nice when we can congregate as a team, meet after games and maybe play some board games.”

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ACTIVITY PROGRAMS We thank you for your patronage, understanding, and patience as we work together during this unprecedented time. Visit Kamloops.ca/COVID for updates Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

My First Museum

The KMA is pleased to offer My First Museum, a FREE weekly virtual program! Join us Wednesday mornings for stories, songs, and caregiver-assisted crafts. Lovely Ladybugs February 24 10:00 – 10:45 AM Racing Rattlesnakes March 3 10:00 – 10:45 AM Brilliant Badgers March 10 10:00 – 10:45 AM

Culture Kids

The KMA is pleased to offer Culture Kids, a FREE weekly virtual program! Join us Friday mornings and learn about different cultures through stories and caregiver-assisted crafts. Japanese February 19 9:45 – 10:45 AM Chinese February 26 9:45 – 10:45 AM Indian March 5 9:45 – 10:45 AM Italian March 10 9:45 – 10:45 AM

FAST Tennis

Fun Adult Starter Tennis (FAST). In this program you will learn tennis fundamentals, including basic tactics and techniques, rules, and scoring. In partnership with the Kamloops Tennis Centre. Kamloops Tennis Centre Sun

Mar 3–Mar 23

Drop-In Pickleball

Singles Play. Visit www.kamloops.ca/TCC for more information

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A30

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

McEvoy talks B.C. Lions, camp in Kamloops MARTY HASTINGS

Neil McEvoy, co-general manager and director of football operations for the B.C. Lions, said Kamloops is the ideal location for the CFL club’s training camp.

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Neil McEvoy, co-general manager and director of football operations for the B.C. Lions, addressed a number of topics during an interview with KTW. Here is the questionand-answer session, which has been edited for length. KTW: What is the latest on the Lions’ hopes for hosting training camp in Kamloops this spring? Neil McEvoy: We’re supposed to start camp May 15 and we’re planning to do so, but we are waiting for health officials to give us the OK. KTW: If camp can’t be held in Kamloops, what are the alternative plans?

B.C. LIONS PHOTO

NM: We have the ability to host it here at our facility in Surrey, but that’s not what our angle is. Best-case scenario, we need to have a training camp where we have the ability to bring all our players in and Kamloops is the best option for that for many reasons, whether it’s the field availability or the infrastructure

that is up there. KTW: The deal between the Lions and the City of Kamloops is in its last year. Is the plan to keep camp in Kamloops in the future or are there plans to look elsewhere? NM: That’s a question for our president [Rick LeLacheur], but for me, personally, I think

Kamloops is an amazing place for us to go. Hence the reason we’ve been there for over 10 years. I understand in the past we’ve wanted to move it throughout the province because we are the B.C. Lions, but just from a football perspective, Kamloops gives us everything and more to build a team, which is what

the ultimate goal is.

official broadcaster. Now, they’re not there. What’s next for the Lions from a rights-holder standpoint? NM: We just have to bunker down. This is such an early start of the process. We’re all shocked it happened. But I don’t necessarily know what the fine print is for the rights holders. TSN 1040 was a Bell Media corporation and, of course, Bell is still in existence.

KTW: Feb. 9 was a terrible day for Vancouver sports radio. TSN 1040 was, essentially, wiped out by Bell. What are your thoughts on what happened? NM: To be quite honest, it’s a sad day. I have a lot of colleagues and people I’ve spoken to throughout the years, friends of mine on and off the field, that you always feel hurt for when someone loses their job, their passion and their career. That station was certainly complimentary to the B.C. Lions, three-down football and the CFL. It was a sad day and it has ramifications for all of us.

KTW: Would Sportsnet 650 be an option for the club if nothing works out with Bell? NM: Again, I’m not sure. That’s a question for once we get closer to the starting date and a little bit further away from what happened yesterday. We don’t have the answers yet. That’s the easy answer, but we simply don’t.

KTW: Among those ramifications for the Lions, is you had a deal with them through 2022, to be the

February Feast

Join us in spirit from the comfort of your own home on Saturday, February 27th, with a delicious baked ham meal, with roasted carrots and potatoes (cranberry sauce is optional!) and a sweet treat for dessert. There will also be a silent auction that will be available online from 4:00pm on Friday, February 26th to 12:00pm on Sunday, February 28th.

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per plate Dinner tickets must be purchased in advanced by February 24th Pick up times between 5-7pm. Call us to inquire about larger group orders. Call (250)376-6494 or e-mail crtca@chrisrosecentre.org Proceeds go to the Chris Rose Therapy Centre for Autism

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A31 THE HOME OF THE HOME INSPECTION TEAM

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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A32

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Denise Bouwmeester MASTER CERTIFIED NEGOTIATION SPECIALIST

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• Country living close to town • 5 minutes to shopping and schools • Located on the scenic North Thompson River • 0.89 of an acre • Warm and cozy home is over 2100 sq ft • Features 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Plenty of space to add more bedrooms • Spacious living room withlarge windows that capture the breathtaking views • Lower level has in-law suite potential • Updated cabinetry throughout, a wrap around deck, two driveways, plenty of parking, a great shop space and even a chicken coop!

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• 4 bedroom 3 bath • Family-oriented neighborhood • Functional layout • Bright kitchen with potential 2nd dining option or second family room • Covered back deck with very private backyard oasis • Gas BBQ line • Ample parking for cars and toys • UV protection on window off kitchen • 30amp RV Plug • blackout blinds • Jet pump for irrigation • Upgraded Furnace and roof 2004, HWT 2017, AC 2017


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A33

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CUSTOM 3648 SQFT HOME BUILT IN 2016 • Beautiful 3.5 acre property with mountain views • Close proximity to Sun Peaks Ski Resort

228 HOLLOWAY DR

1452 HEFFLEY-LOUIS CREEK RD

KAMLOOPS LAKE LOT SABISTON CREEK RD • $469,000 • Rare 12.3 Acre waterfront lot on Kamloops Lake • 1800 Feet of shoreline • 15 Min boat ride from Savona

$949,900

TOBIANO

HEFFLEY

VIDEO TOURS

In helping you navigate through the changes brought on by Covid-19 please see updated video tours of all our listings on our Easy To Use website www.LindaTurner.bc.ca • Please call for more information 250-374-3331


A34

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Photo: Babette Degregorio

CONGRATULATIONS- ANNOUNCEMENT

250-371-7992

JEANNE VOS

SOLD dwightvos@gmail.com • 250-554-4511

nced Experie

KEVIN CARSWELL RECEIVES THE 2020 PRESIDENT'S DIAMOND AWARD Kevin Carswell receives the 2020 President's Diamond Award for being in the top 3% in sales/service in the region. Kevin was also recognized for being in the top 25 percent Canada- wide for donations to the Women’s Shelter Fund.

Great central North Kamloops location with a spacious home rented up (3 bedrooms) and a one bedroom suite rented down REDUCED $489,000

Mr. Carswell

(KEVIN)

TEAM

Cell:778-220-5432 Office: 250-374-3022 mrcarswell@royallepage.ca

READY TO SELL YOUR HOME? GIVE US A CALL!

110 B.PE./Ed.

KAMLOOPS REALTY

RECEIVE A FREE NO OBLIGATION WE’VE GONE ONLINE! MARKET EVALUATION See all listings & much more at team110.com CALL 250-851-3110 OR 250-571-6686 TODAY! Proud Sponsor

110

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Bobby Iio

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A new 12,000 sq.ft. facility.

5 Styles of Homes • All Entry Level in Brocklehurst Selling at $409,900 - $474,900



Sample Mortgage Calculator G E T I N T O Y O U R N E W H O M E T O D AY !

5%

DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869 + CMHC fee of $15,276 = $443,445

5% down = $21,393 down payment required, $1,765 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

10% DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869 + CMHC fee $12,323 = $440,192

10% down = $42,786 down payment required, $1,661 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

20% DOWN

with purchase price of $409,900 + GST = $427,869

20% down = $85,574 down payment required, $1,431 monthly payment on 60 month term, 300 month amortization.

Call Us Now for Your Site Visit

250.819.0502

Community Supporting Community Aaron Krausert

Personal Real Estate Corporation RE/MAX Real Estate Kamloops LTD.

www.yourkamloops.ca/videos/welcome-to-catalpa-community


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

Call today for your FREE home market evaluation! 250.377.7722 www.cbkamloops.com www.sunrivers.com 3,100 Offices Worldwide In 49 Countries under construction

Call today to book a virtual tour!

BOB GIESELMAN 250.851.6387

Sun Rivers

4000 Rio Vista Way $799,900 • Designed for lifestyle and wellness • Panoramic view of river and valley • Luxury Kitchen with waterfall island • Maintenance free – Lock and go living

• Outdoor gas fireplace • Heated ensuite floors • 1,480 sq ft unfinished basement • Still time to pick finishes – summer 2021 completion

NEW LISTING

3

1,480

Coming soon

3

3,084

CALL US TODAY

• Private Cul-de-sac • Panoramic views of the city and river valley • Mediterranean Villa style home • Amazing opportunity for a makeover 2

3

1518 Golf Ridge Dr. • $549,900

Want to sell your home in 2021?

Batchelor Heights

3

LISA RUSSELL 250.377.1801

Sun Rivers

4031 Rio Vista Way $638,900

3

MIKE GRANT 250.574.6453

2,596

What Our Clients Say “Amazing Place! Lisa Russell is very caring about her clients and the public. She is professional and knowledgeable about all things Real Estate. Such a powerful team! Keep up the great work you all do here! Beautiful Development! Highly Recommend!” - Ashley

FOR A FREE EVALUATION Serving the entire Kamloops region What Our Clients Say “Mike was professional, efficient and trustworthy. He was incredibly patient with us and always went the extra mile. We never had any worries as he was always extremely thorough and always worked in our best favour. He was especially reliable during the uncertain times of COVID. We will be working with Mike again in the future when it’s time to move again.” – S.W.

4027 Rio Vista Way • $629,900

524 Stone Ridge Dr • $729,000

2016 Galore Crescent • $849,900

NEIGHBOURHOOD TOURS BY APPOINTMENT - CALL TODAY!

PHASE TWO ALMOST SOLD OUT CALL NOW TO REGISTER FOR PHASE 3

• Panoramic vistas • Adult oriented • Modern styling • Irresistible lifestyle

Homes from

588,900 +GST

$

KAMLOOPS@COLDWELLBANKER.CA • 250-377-7722


A36

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

...selling Kamloops every day™ Phil.Dabner@evrealestate.com | phildabner@telus.net | phildabner.evrealestate.com

1-250-318-0100

©2019 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act. • Serving Kamloops since 1991

1729 Cheakamus Drive - Simply Stunning! This custom built contemporary-designed home offers 180-degree panoramic views from Kamloops Lake through to the South Thompson from it’s location on ‘The Bluff at the Benchlands’ in East Juniper. Completely saturated with light throughout, capturing both the daylight and moonlight, in addition to the beauty of the changing colours of the seasons. This is a spacious home with an intimate feel that functions well. Multiple outdoor decks and spaces to relax and entertain with easy care landscaping. This is the type of home that is like being on a luxury vacation every day. $1,400,000

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE COMPARATIVE MARKET EVALUATION KEY BENEFITS OF LISTING YOUR HOME WITH PHIL:

714 - 9th Street - Don’t miss this opportunity to purchase an affordable investment property - a 3 level split floor plan with non-conforming one bedroom self contained suite with separate entry. This home is situated on a pie-shaped property of 11,594 sf with good sized back yard & single attached garage & additional parking. Updates in the last few years include roof, furnace & hot water tank. $448,500

2524 Mountain View Drive - Located in the beautiful village of Sun Peaks where life is good. This home has been started and is almost at lock up. You can complete it and make this your dream home. The views of the Burfield and Sundance are outstanding and if that’s not enough you will also be able to enjoy fantastic evening sunsets from the covered deck. Some stipulations apply, please call listing Realtor for further details. $848,800

• Full-time licensed Realtor® since 1991 • Regular contact re: marketing, feedback, etc. • Listing on Multiple Listing Service (MLS) • Full-time office assistant • Professional representation • Professional Signage • Advertising in Kamloops This Week • Global advertising on the internet • Thinking of Selling and/or Buying?

QUALIFIED BUYERS LOOKING FOR…

2249 Chief Atahm, ADAMS LAKE Sweet, rustic cabin located on the pebble beach shore of beautiful and pristine Adams Lake. This property is accessed by vehicle ferry, a quick 6-minute ride, or boat. Beautiful mountain views, fun filled days and peaceful starry nights are waiting for you. This is leased land with the Adams Lake Indian Band. $132,500

900 Meadow Lake Road - One of a kind rural property nestled amongst the trees! Located just outside of Clinton on 160 sprawling acres is an exquisite Douglas fir log home featuring white pine interior, beautiful kitchen with high-end appliances, 3 generous bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, & an oversized attached 2 car garage. The 2nd building is a 40’ x70’ detached shop with 16’ & 14’ doors & tons of storage space. The third building is a 24’ x24’ pump house that can be used for additional storage. Each building is on own well systems. House & shop on own septic systems. $1,350,000

509 Walterdale Road - This unique log home located in the McLure/Vinsula area is situated on just under 4 acres! Enjoy rural living while knowing the comforts of the downtown core are just 30 minutes away. Included is a 40x40 detached shop with tons of power, perfect for a craftsman or handyman, plus two chicken coops. $589,900

1. Sun Peaks - townhouse in McGillvary, Trappers or Woodhaven, $900,000 2. Sun Peaks - house with suite, $1,200,000 3. South Kamloops - house, $900,000 4. Sun Rivers - Sagewood Community 5. Kamloops - Townhouse, under $500,000 6. Kamloops - Apartment - South Kamloops/ Sahali, $350,000, pets & rentals allowed

CALL PHIL 250-318-0100

FOLLOW YOUR DREAM, HOME.


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

250-374-3331 www.ralphrealestate.ca Real Estate (Kamloops)

For more info view all our listings, upcoming listings, and Kamloops listings at ralphrealestate.ca

1624 SPARTAN PLACE $299,900 • MLS®160300

90-7545 DALLAS DRIVE $287,500 • MLS®159953

135 HOLWAY STREET $349,900 • MLS®159478

ING

W

NE

DALLAS • 2 bedroom 1 bathroom modular home built in 2005 • Low bareland strata fee of $95/month • 2 pets allowed with no size restriction. No rentals allowed

T LIS

BROCK

NORTH KAMLOOPS

• Great starter or investment property in this 2+2 bedroom 2 bathroom half-duplex • Updated hot water tank 2018 and roof 2019 • Nice cul-de-sac location

405-950 LORNE STREET $399,900 • MLS®159127

• Very well maintained 2 bedroom 1 bathroom home in central location • Beautiful flat and fenced backyard with large carport • Unfinished half-basement

13-791 JENSEN ROAD $425,000 • MLS®160042

SOUTH KAMLOOPS

• Great location in this 1 bedroom 1 bathroom unit in Park Place • Top floor unit with river views • Walking distance to all downtown amenities

698 BATTLE STREET W $499,900 • MLS®160179

WESTSYDE • 1 owner modular home in Jensen Place with 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Immaculately kept with approx. 1120 square feet and 4’ crawl space

292 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD $750,000 • MLS®159641

SOUTH KAMLOOPS • Corner lot home with 3+3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Great investment property with close proximity to Thompson Rivers University • Quick possession possible

• Low bareland strata fee of $120/month • 2 pets allowed with no size restriction, no rentals allowed • Beautiful private back garden

• Very private 1+2 bedroom 3 bathroom log home • Mountain and river views

MCLURE • Approximately 16.77 acres • Built in 2009


A38

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

BABY BLUES

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

by Chris Browne

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, you are feeling ambitious this week, so it might be time to try a new hobby or other interest. Write down your goals and see if any align with potential hobbies.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, some nice surprises are likely to come your way, especially in your private life. Enjoy every moment as it unfolds and express your appreciation when applicable.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you are likely to upstage everyone else this week because people simply cannot get enough of your magnetic personality. If you grow weary of the limelight, take a break.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, clear your social schedule in favor of some quiet time at home. Such a respite can provide a great opportunity to reflect and make a new plan.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you have a goal to meet someone new and there’s a good chance you will discover that person in the days to come. Accept the possibility that hopes and dreams can come true.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, friends often end up filling familial roles. Even though a person may not be related by blood, certain friends can be relied upon through thick and thin.

LIBRA

FEBRUARY 17 - FEBRUARY 23, 2021 - Sept 23/Oct 23

Even though the holidays are over you may still want to continue the celebration, Libra. Find a way to socialize with friends or family in a responsible manner.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22

Scorpio, you may be finished with the business that made last month hectic. Now you are ready to start a new chapter. A calm period is ahead.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, a potentially lucrative opportunity may present itself in the days to come. Consider all of your options and give equal though to all of them.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Capricorn, even if you don’t say much, there is a lot of chatter going on in your head. Take some time to find a quiet place and meditate for a while.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Sometimes you just have to take a risk without vetting all of the possible outcomes, Aquarius. If it feels like it’s a good time to make a change, embrace the opportunity.

PISCES

- Feb 19/Mar 20

This week is the ideal opportunity to show strength and exhibit your organizational skills, Pisces. Don’t be afraid to think big.

DO YOU HAVE AMAZING LOCAL PHOTOS?

WE’RE LOOKING FOR YOUR LOCAL PHOTOS TO USE IN LOCAL PUBLICATIONS To win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos at:

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/photo-contest Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Feb 24

@Kamloopsthisweek Follow us on Instagram to vote on the top photos at the end of every month

1 winner selected at the end of each month from majority vote of selected entries. Only entries submitted though www.KamloopsThisWeek.com/photo-contest will be accepted. Physical and emailed copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for more details.


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ACROSS 1. Unloading point 5. Trait for a ballerina 10. ‘‘Wanna hear a secret?’’ preceder 14. Not much 18. The ‘‘O’’ of OWN 20. Portrayer of Captain Davies in ‘‘Roots’’ 21. Bind with rope 22. Abacus column 23. Helpful 24. Accept payment from Batman? 27. Eponymous Irish city 29. ____ pickle 30. Counterparts of faunas 31. Cause for celebration at a pachyderm sanctuary? 36. ____ lecithin (chocolate additive) 37. What most pens can’t do 38. Jane portrayer in 1981’s ‘‘Tarzan, the Ape Man’’ 41. Worry about, informally 45. Flip (out) 46. Rock band that you might think would always be an opening act, with ‘‘the’’? 48. Ex-Giants QB Manning 49. Finish scooping out a big stir-fry? 54. Signal approval 55. Inexplicably missing, say 56. Brontë who wrote ‘‘Agnes Grey’’ 57. Target of permethrin cream 58. Not very convincing 60. Highly skilled 61. Rare race outcome 63. Unimaginative birthday gift 64. Is stertorous 65. Puritan’s goal in 17th-century Salem? 69. Changes topics in a debate, perhaps 73. Scrapes (out) 74. The Rose Bowl, e.g. 79. Czar who co-ruled with Peter I 80. Goes head to head

81. Indiana athlete 83. Sunburn soother 84. Specialist publication, for short 85. Monopolize 86. Something a Parmesan vendor might offer? 89. Unflappable state of mind 90. Baron Cohen of film 92. One of all fours? 93. Container words 94. 2019 film whose title means ‘‘to the stars’’ 96. A dance and a dip 98. Cartoondom’s Olive ____ 100. What a stoner actor smoked during rehearsal? 107. Beginning and end of ‘‘America’’ 109. ‘‘Ha-ha!’’ 110. Noise heard during the London Blitz 111. Domain for Jameson and Maker’s Mark? 116. Curl target, informally 117. Manual alternative 118. Soul singer Bridges 119. Bank investment? 120. Spanish dagger or Adam’s needle is a variety of it 121. New York football team, informally 122. Apt rhyme for ‘‘crude’’ and ‘‘rude’’ 123. It may need to be broken to move 124. Lucretia ____, abolitionist and women’s rights advocate DOWN 1. Childbirth assistant 2. Choose to participate 3. Concern for Superman 4. Superman’s birth name 5. Like many a teenage boy’s facial hair 6. First Asian tennis player to be ranked No. 1 in singles 7. Press

8. Bishop’s jurisdiction 9. Long period 10. Like some evidence and bulbs 11. Doctor’s order 12. I.R.S. ID 13. Live broadcast no-no 14. In 15. One creating draft after draft? 16. Andean empire member 17. Some clicks of the tongue 19. Slice of toast? 25. Comes out ahead 26. Dolts 28. Market launch, for short 32. Amphibians that may have toxic skin 33. Clichéd 34. Shakespeare villain with more lines than the title character 35. Kindle download 39. Skip the big ceremony, say 40. They’re found around Scots 41. Bony fish with prized eggs 42. ‘‘Bottled poetry,’’ according to Robert Louis Stevenson 43. Active Sicilian volcano 44. Filled with wonder 47. Without concrete evidence 50. ‘‘Ad Parnassum’’ and ‘‘Fish Magic,’’ for two 51. Metaphor for a shared experience 52. Be more important than 53. Exaggerated kiss sound 55. Fuss 59. Legal title: Abbr. 60. He wrote lyrics to ‘‘My Way’’ for Sinatra 62. Channel with a lot of house renovation shows 63. Keeps in the loop, in a way

64. Give a start 66. Prez with a rhyming campaign slogan 67. Lab work 68. Cause of some brain freeze 69. It comes in California and New York styles 70. Covered in vines 71. Celebrity who holds the Guinness world record for ‘‘Most Frequent Clapper’’ 72. Half and half? 75. Gallivants 76. On the safe side 77. Ancient kingdom in modern-day Jordan 78. Elusive, in a way 80. Words to learn, briefly 81. In itself: Lat. 82. ‘‘Oh, come on!’’ 85. Aggressive pitch 87. Physically fit 88. Rock song? 90. Big cut of tuna 91. Fill with wonder 95. Attaches, as a button 97. Some shop tools 98. ‘‘Now it makes sense!’’ 99. ‘‘____ So Bad’’ (Tom Petty song) 101. Flying ____ drop (pro wrestling move) 102. Shocks, in a way 103. Hip bone 104. Classic brand of wafers 105. Upright 106. The Apostle of Ireland, familiarly 107. It might come in a branded tote bag 108. Buddy 112. ‘‘____-haw!’’ 113. Laid up 114. Formerly called 115. Perón of politicsIt is Katie’s debut. — W.S.

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By Katie Hale and Christina Iverson

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TODDLER TALK

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A29

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

WORD SCRAMBLE Rearrange the letters to spell something pertaining to puzzles

ANSWERS

Row for the Heart with Tara

For every $1 donated, Tara Sales, heart warrior and Head Trainer at OrangeTheory Fitness will row one metre to help fundraise for a 3D Echocardiogram at the ICCHA / Wish Coronary Care Unit at Royal Inland Hospital. ANSWER: SLICK

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 20

ROW FOR20th, THE Saturday, February 2021 HEART WITH TARA

For every $1 donated, Tara Sales, heart warrior and Head Trainer at OrangeTheory Fitness will row one metre to Fundraising $20,000 help fundraise forGoal: a 3D Echocardiogram at the ICCHA / Wish Coronary Care Unit at Royal Inland Hospital. For event details or to donate, visit www.iwishfund.com

FUNDRAISING GOAL: $20,000

For event details or to donate visit www.iwishfund.com Presented by Orangetheory Fitness Kamloops Presented by Orangetheory Fitness Kamloops


A40

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

www.kamloopsthisweek.com p

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Phone: 250-371-4949

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

Announcements . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . 100-165 Service Guide. . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm. . . . . . . . 450-499 For Sale/Wanted . 500-599 Real Estate. . . . . . . 600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive. . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . .920-1000

Wednesday Issues

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue . . . . . . . . . . . $1300 Add colour. . . . . . . $2500 to your classified add

• 10:00 am Tuesday

All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

| RUN UNTIL SOLD

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. $ 3500 Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Tax not included

Coming Events

Art & Collectibles

Free

Commercial

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca

Free: Firewood cut to 1ft lengths dried poplar wood. 250-573-4060.

CHOOSE LOCAL

If you have an upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com

and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

1 Day Per Week Call 250-374-0462

Personals

For Sale - Misc 3000 watt generator. $250. 778-220-7372. All shop tools compressor $600, light plant & welder $800 250-3748285 Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details! 250-371-4949

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Fuel tanks - 1-300 gal and 2-100gal on stands. $300. 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000/obo 250-3766607.

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Hay-Bales for Sale Hay for Sale. Alfalfa and Grass. $600/bale. 250374-8285.

Antiques Wrought iron beds $300/each. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-3728177.

JVC 14” TV and VCR combo c/w remote. $50.

For Sale - Misc Logan Mat cutter with additional cutters with it. $65/obo. 778-471-7687. Moving Sale. Kitchenware, furniture, lamps, rifles, hunting and fishing gear. 778-220-7372. Pressure washer $175. Battery charger $150. 48” table saw. $200. Angel grinder $125. 250-3748285. Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

Furniture 2 bar stools black metal frame wood back. $400. 250-579-7555. 8ft Antique Couch $900. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $800. 250-374-8933. Solid oval oak table w/6side chairs, 2 arms chairs, buffet. $5,000. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100. Treadmill $450, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-851-7687.

Plants / Shrubs / Trees Scotch Pine trees smaller ponderosa in pots 2ft (50) $15 each obo 250376-6607

“Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Houses For Rent

Furn Home WestEnd Corporate/Crew 4bd, den nsp near RIH $3700. 250214-0909.

For Sale by Owner

Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 1 issue a week!

Call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

Apartments / Condos for Rent Bachelor you need a car 30 mins to hospital. $600 inclds hydro. Partly furn. Gord 250-523-9433. North Shore new apt unit 2bdrm, 2bath 3rd fl. S/S appl’s. $1850/mo. 250819-2099.

Commercial COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE Comprising approximately 1,000 sq. ft., Attractive Professional or Retail location, on High Traffic North Kamloops route. On street parking is available... call 250-3769152 for further information.

kamloopsthisweek.com • kamloopsthisweek.com

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Farm Services

Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111 Handyperson

Handyperson

No Job Too Small. Friendly Service. 15 years exp. Guaranteed. References.

DAN’S HANDYMAN SERVICES Renovations, Painting, Flooring, Drywall, Bathrooms, Electrical (Red Seal) & more www.danshandymanservices.net

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

WE will pay you to exercise!

| Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com EMPLOYMENT RUN UNTIL RENTED GARAGE SALE

778-999-4158

Pets

Health

Fax: 250-374-1033

RICKS’S SMALL HAUL For Sale by Owner $55.00 Special The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run in (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops and area every Wednesday. Call or email us for more info: 250-374-7467 classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!! 250-682-1802

kamloopsthisweek.com Mobile/Manufactured Homes for Sale Oakdale Mobile Home Park 3bdrms, porch, wired shed, garden area, fenced yard, shower only. $89,500. 778-220-7372.

2 Homes For Sale Logan Lake 2500 sq ft each with monthly income of $25,000+ Call Gordon: 250-523-9432 www.getoutadodge.info

Handyman for hire. One call for all your handyman needs. Carpentry, drywall, painting. Free Estimates. Blaine 250-8516055

Misc Home Service JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal Cleaning Service Nails removed from boards etc. Sandwich Board Advertising Digging with shovels only 2 Kings 5:15 778-257-4943/250-6820698

Security

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family”

PRESTIGE

LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916

$1250 - 3 lines or less BONUS (pick up only): • 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . . $1638

Tax not included

Tax not included

Blinds & Draperies

Automotive Tires

ULTRASONIC BLIND CLEANING

4- 5 stud 20” rims with sensors for Dodge 1/2T. $350. 250-573-5635.

OFFERING TWICE A MONTH SERVICE TO KAMLOOPS TAKEDOWN, CLEAN & REHANG. ADVANCED BLIND CLEANING

250-540-2401 Classes & Courses HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. March 6th and 7th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L February 21st, Sunday. Professional outdoorsman and Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

Boats 14ft. Runabout boat. 40hp Johnson motor on trailer. $1000/obo. 778469-5434.

RS5 Audi winter studded snow tires and wheels over 90% tread . 285/30R20 $1700.00 Call 250 319-8784

Domestic Cars 2000 Jaguar XK8 Convertible 4L, V-8, fully loaded. Exec shape. $12,500/obo. 250-3764163.

RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00 (plus Tax) (250) 371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Sports & Imports

RVs / Campers / Trailers 1990 Jaguar Red. leather, 4-door, A/C, Power everything. 142,597kms, $2200.00 250-851-0209.

Run until sold New Price $56.00+tax

Trucks - 4WD

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, motorcycle, ATV or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* $56.00(boxed ad w/photo) $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

2011 Nissan Frontier 4x4 SV 4.0 L Auto, white,188,000kms $12,500 250-682-2264

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Call to advertise at: 250-371-4949

Vans 1997 Ext GMC Savana 3500. Work ready service van and tools avail. $9,500. 250-573-9337.


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Rims

Business Oportunities

4 - BMW X5, X3 wheels like new. $590 Call 250-319-8784.

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Utility Trailers All aluminum cargo trailer 7ftx14ft. $12,000/firm. Like new. 250-719-3539.

kamloopsthisweek.com

Legal / Public Notices

Legal / Public Notices

WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT

WHEREAS GARRY MARVIN BURRELL OWES BERNADETTE WILLIS STORAGE FOR THE FOLLOWING ITEMS:

1974 Kit Companion trailer CGDC2050SC4S32 1998 CHEV 1500 2GCEK19R8W1245780 2002 Ford Service Truck 1FDXF47S42EA89519 1994 Ubilt trailer NIL VIN 2009 Ubilt trailer NIL VIN 2009 GMC 1500 1GTEK19C192139484 in the amount of $29,565.00, these items will be offered for sale after February 17, 2021 by bid. Contact Tannis at 250-961-2714 or centralinteriorbailiffs@shaw.ca in order to make an appointment to view or place a bid.

NOTICE OF DISPOSAL SALE TAKE NOTICE that Storage Vault Canada doing business as Storage For Your Life, intends to sell the following vehicles: 1979 Ford Pickup, Vin: 526SCEG3916, Owner: SarahTenveen/Graeme Baker, Amount of debt: $580.95. 1952 Chevrolet Car no VIN Owner: Rick Smith Amount of debt $1848.30. The sale will be held on or after March 18, 2021 at 1021 Ricardo Road, Kamloops BC.

NOTICE OF SALE WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT By the virtue of the Warehouse’s Lien Act, contents left belonging to: Sandra McKenna, 878 Puhallo Dr., Kamloops, BC. The goods will be sold on or after March 3, 2021. Central Storage Ltd., 1236 Salish Rd, Kamloops, BC, V2H 1K1. 250-314-9522. FIND HELP FOR YOUR PROJECTS

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Director of Marketing & Communications Deadline for Submissions: Friday, March 5, 2021 To apply, visit wctlive.ca

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

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In Memoriams

In Memoriams

HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call! Steve 250-3207774.

In Loving Memory of

PAPER

Nee: Tereposky

Candy Johnson

ROUTES

AVAILABLE

250-374-7467

 

PAPER ROUTES AVAILABLE DOWNTOWN Rte 310 – 651-695 2nd Ave, 660-690 3rd Ave, 110-292 Columbia St, 106-321 Nicola St. – 43 p. Rte 317 – 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(Even Side), 702-799 Nicola St. – 39 p. Rte 318 – 463 6th Ave, 446490 7th Ave, 409-585 8th Ave, 604-794 Battle St. – 27 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave, 763-804 7th Ave, 744-764 8th Ave, 603-783 Columbia St(Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. – 52 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805979 Columbia St, 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 64 p. Rte 327 - 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. - 38 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. - 34 p. Rte 335 - 1175-1460 6th Ave, 1165-1185 7th Ave, Cowan St, 550-792 Munro St. – 56 p. Rte 370 – Nicola Wagon Rd, 35-377 W. Seymour St. – 36 p. Rte 371 – 125-207 Connaught Rd, 451-475 Lee Rd, 7-376 W. St Paul St. – 73 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 – Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 69 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 42 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 23 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W.Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 42 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W.Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 29 p. LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 402 – 14-94 Bestwick Dr, Mahood Pl. – 28 p. Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, Bestwick Crt E & W, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Morrisey Pl. – 47 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p.

Rte 452 – 1430-1469 Springhill Dr. – 64 p. Rte 453 – 1575-1580 Springhill Dr. – 73 p. Rte 456 – Springhaven Pl, Springridge Pl, 1730-1799 Springview Pl. – 47 p. Rte 457 – 990 Gleneagles Dr, 662-698 Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. – 50 p. Rte 461 – Glen Gary Dr & Pl, Glencoe Pl, 700-799 Gleneagles Dr. – 49 p. Rte 467 – 1605-1625 Summit Dr. – 30 p. Rte 468 – 320-397 Monmouth Dr, Selwyn Rd, 303-430 Waddington Dr. – 57 p. Rte 471 - 100-293 Monmouth Dr. – 38 p. Rte 474 – Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 21 p. Rte 475 – Castle Towers Dr, Sedgewick Crt & Dr. – 47 p. Rte 476 – Tantalus Crt, Tinniswood Crt, 2018-2095 Tremerton Dr. – 50 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Crt, Dr, & Pl. – 67 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, 409-594 Robson Dr. – 59 p. Rte 486 – Garibaldi Dr. – 40 p. Rte 487 – 201-475,485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 35 p. ABERDEEN Rte 503 – Fleming Circ. Hampshire Dr, & Pl, Hector Dr. – 49 p. Rte 508 – 700-810 Hugh Allan Dr. - 49 p. Rte 509 – 459-551 Laurier Dr, Shaughnessy Hill – 47 p. Rte 512 – Ainslie Pl, Balfour Crt, Braemar Dr, MacIntyre Pl. – 69 p. Rte 513 – Braemar Way, 556-696 Laurier Dr, 2214-2296 Van Horne Dr. – 39 p.

PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN Rte 580 – 1300-1466 Pacific Way, Prairie Rose Dr, Rockcress Dr. – 83 p. Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 587 – Sunshine Crt, & Pl. – 51 p. Rte 588 – Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, & Pl, Monterey Pl, Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 71 p. RAYLEIGH Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 832 - Bolean Dr & Pl, Chilco Ave, Kathleen Pl. – 58 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 838 – 4556-4797 Cammeray Dr, Strawberry Lane. – 62 p.

VALLEYVIEW/ JUNIPER Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648, 1652-1764 Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 19092003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 618 – Big Nickel Pl, Chapman Pl, Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd, 2440-2605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p. Rte 619 – 2710-2797 Sunset Dr, Sunset Lane, 115-159 Tanager Dr, 2583-2799 Valleyview Dr. - 54 p. Rte 652 – 1616-1890, 1955-2212 Coldwater Dr, Coldwater Crt, 19211999 Skeena Dr.(Odd Side) – 50 p. Rte 660 – 1689-1692 Adams Ave, Babine Ave, 23912881(Odd Side), 2472-2578 (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 60 p. Rte 666 – 1603-1665 Cheakamus Dr, Cheakamus Pl. – 26 p. Rte 667 – Birkenhead Dr, & Pl, 1674-1791 Cheakamus Dr, Similkameen Pl. – 61 p. Rte 670 – Galore Cres, Crt, & Pl. – 105 p.

BROCKLEHURST/ NORTH SHORE Rte 4 – 727-795 Crestline St, 2412-2741 Tranquille Rd. – 71 p. Rte 20 – Barbara Ave, Pala Mesa Pl, Strauss St, Townsend Pl, 2105-2288 Tranquille Rd. – 48 p. Rte 24 – Dale Pl, Lisa Pl, 806999 Windbreak St. – 50 p. Rte 27 – Bentley Pl, Kamwood Pl, 1866-1944 Parkcrest Ave, - 62 p. Rte 32 – Laroque St, 17091862 Parkcrest Ave, - 65 p. Rte 137 – 144-244 Briar Ave, 106-330 Clapperton Rd, Larkspur St, Leigh Rd, 100-204 Tranquille Rd, Wilson St, - 55 p. Rte 142 – Alder Ave, Cypress Ave, 300-348+430 Fortune Dr(Even Side), Juniper Ave, 325-439 Schubert Dr, Spruce Ave. – 70 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. 87 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd. - 43 p, Rte 715 – Country Pl, Meadowland Cres. N. & S. -73 p. Rte 718 – Bel Air Dr. – 24 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p.

BATCHELOR/WESTSYDE: Rte 175 – Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 201 – Montrose Cres, Wedgewood Cres, Westlynn Dr, Westmount Dr. – 78 p. Rte 206 –Dickenson Rd, Walkem Rd, 1835-1995 Westsyde Rd(Odd Side), Yates Rd. – 53 p. Rte 249 – 3085-3132 Bank Rd, 600-655 Bissette Rd, Cooper Pl, Hayward Pl, Norbury Rd. – 55 p

It was 30 years ago today when you left us... The world changes from year to year... Our lives from day to day... but the love and memory of you shall never pass away. Love: Vern, Lee & Dean. Sandy, Brandy, Andy, Trudy & Judy

In Loving Memory of Luke Robert Ward

October 8, 1979 – February 17, 2016

INTERESTED? CALL 250-374-0462

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

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Of all the special gifts in life However great or small To have you as our Son Was the greatest gift of all.

Forever loved and never forgotten Love Mom, Dad, Mat, Erin, Tyler, Mason, Diana, Lee, Eric and Heidi


A42

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

In Memoriams

In Memoriams

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

1953 - 2021

Stanley Hilton Moore

The Best Husband, Dad and Grandpa ever

A million times we needed you, A million times we cried, If love alone would have saved you, You would have never died. It broke our hearts to lose you, But you did not go alone, A part of us went with you, The day God called you home. Your memory is our keepsake, With which we’ll never part, God has you in His keeping, We have you in our hearts.

He was a member of the IBEW Local 993 for 40 years. He was involved with KYSA and spent many years coaching his sons’ soccer teams. He enjoyed, curling, fishing, golfing, and camping with family and friends. Dave loved a good party, good scotch, good conversation and always had a joke to tell. Dave is survived by his wife of 41 years, his high school sweetheart - affectionately known as Luscious Linda (Lestage), sons Adam (Jessica), Jordan, his special daughter Arlean Galbraith, grandchildren Maddi and Austin, his four legged buddies Luca and Tucker (AKA little shit), sister Lynda (Bill) McLevin and family, brother Wayne (Karen) Rabidoux and family, brother-in-law and sister-in-law Wayne (Shelley) Lestage and family, sister-in-law and brother-in-law Rhonda (Murray) Leonew and family, father-in-law Raymond Lestage, his best buddies Jim, Lorne and Mike as well as many more friends and family. Dave was predeceased by his mother Lois Zart, father Aldedge Rabidoux, step-father Dennis Dawson, sister and brother in-law Marilyn and Brian Ens, mother-in-law Dorothy Lestage and sister-in-law Donna Meeley (Lestage). Much gratitude to all the doctors and nurses on 7-North and Emergency who cared for Dave during his final weeks. Dave’s wishes were to be cremated. A celebration of Dave’s life will take place at a later time when friends and family can gather safely. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

kamloopsthisweek.com

In Loving Memory of

Margaret Morisette

Returned to Angels February 16, 2018

THE ANGEL ON YOUR SHOULDER

Ed Davidson

September 10, 1950 January 25, 2021

By Jackie Huston Lena, Wisconsin There’s an angel on your shoulder Though you may not know she’s there,

December 17, 1960 - January 23, 2021

It is with great sorrow that we say goodbye to a son, brother, father, mentor, leader and friend. Holly Anderson, Deputy Fire Chief passed away on January 23, 2021.

Keeping you safe from danger And nurturing your soul. She’ll be there through your triumphs She’ll dance on clouds with pride,

He is survived by his children Mackenzie and Amanda, mother Fern, and father John. Holly will be missed by his brothers Dean, Doug and Dorian. He will also be remembered by many nieces, nephews, grand nieces and nephews. Right out of high school he went directly to work as a diesel technician. Holly had his own business Thompson Valley Diesel for 32 years. Holly was a valued and highly respected member of the fire department. He treated everyone like family and would help out whenever he could. Holly enjoyed hanging out with his friends around a campfire having a good time and also taking time to listen. Holly had an amazing talent for resurrecting older vehicles to their former glory. We will mourn his celebrate his life at when we can safely again. Private family have been made.

loss and will a future date come together arrangements

Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Ask DRAKE Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director Every Wednesday in KTW!

Q. I pre-paid somewhere else but I want you to take care of me. Now what?

& Funeral Services

Watching you learn and grow

Ed is survived by Helen and his son, Sam.

210 Lansdowne • 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 • DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

Forever in our hearts.

She’ll hold your hand through disappointments and fears, Standing faithfully by your side.          And stood up for what was right. In your life you’ll be faced with decisions and trials And she’ll shine down her guiding light. Life holds so much in store for you, So remember as you grow older,

Bereavement Publishing Inc. 5125 N. Union Blvd, Suite 4 Colorado Springs, CO 80918

Love’s greatest gift is remembrance. Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone!

Each Loss Each loss is very different, The pain is so severe. Will I ever stop missing This one I loved so dear? Good times we had together, The moments that we shared We didn’t have to tell each other How much we really cared. I never dreamed you’d go away, Never thought of sorrow. So sure you’d always be here Took for granted each tomorrow. Now my life is all confused Since you went away. You took a part of me And for help I daily pray. But when God sent you to me He never said that you were mine, That I could keep you always – Only borrowed for a time. Now, He’s called you home, I’m sad and I shed tears. Yet I’m glad He loaned you to me And we had these many years.

THERE’S MORE ONLINE

There are no heights you cannot reach ‘Cause there’s an angel on your shoulder.

Obituaries

In Loving Memory of Gavin Holly Anderson

Drake Cremation

And keeps you in her care. There’s an angel on your shoulder

Love James, Kevin, Candace & Desiree

Obituaries

A. We get that question a lot. In most cases it’s quick and easy to help. Call/visit and we’ll help you.

She watches over you day and night

How we miss you Mama! Every day you are in our thoughts and in our hearts!

Obituaries

It is with sad hearts that we announce the passing of Dave on February 10, 2021 after a brief battle with cancer. He was born on March 6, 1953 in North Bay, Ontario. Dave moved to Kamloops with his family in 1967, where he has resided since.

February 5, 1929 – February 19, 2004

In life we loved you dearly, In death we love you still, In our hearts you hold a place, No one can ever fill.

Obituaries

David Craig Rabidoux

In Loving Memory of

Lovingly remembered by Muriel, Mark, Cindy, Matthew and Nicole, Cori, Wes, Justin, Julia and Alicia

Obituaries

             

KamloopsThisWeek.com


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

Arlene Lois Gascon

December 27, 1938 - January 24, 2021 Our hearts are filled with sorrow as we say goodbye to our loved one. Arlene was born in Edmonton, AB and raised in Tiger Lily, Camp Creek and Barrhead, AB. She is survived by her children Linda (Dave) Maartman, Allen Gascon, Donna Gascon (Mike Malm), grandchildren Tana (Colton) Hunt, Jerrid (Kelsey) Robinson, Taylor (Kylie) Robinson, Rochelle Gascon, Janel Maartman (Brant Philcox) and Bryce Maartman, great-grandchildren Adria Hunt, Ezra and Nora Robinson and her sisters Janice (Bruce) Lee and Geri (Ray) Talma. Arlene was predeceased by her grandson Jesse Gordon Gerald Gascon (1994), her husband of 55 years Gerald Gascon (2015), her son Gordon Gascon (2017), her sister Marie (Jim) Slator and her parents Bill and Lena Mitton. Mom met dad in Edmonton through mutual friends, and it was love at first sight. Arlene and Gerry were married July 9, 1960, and moved Lac La Biche, AB. Ten years and 4 kids later, Arlene and Gerry left Lac La Biche, making the move to Sherwood Park in 1970, and Edmonton in 1971. A decision was made, and in February 1973, they packed up the family and headed to Kamloops, BC. Kamloops was still home to mom when she passed, Mom was, for the most part, a stayat-home mom. Family was very important to Mom, and she always made sure her husband and children were taken care of. Mom worked at K-mart in the late 70s to the mid 80s. Mom and dad provided the family with many fun-packed summers at the lake, horseback riding, snowmobiling, boating and many family road trips. Arlene and Gerry enjoyed extensive travelling throughout parts of BC, AB and the States; there was always another great casino just around the corner! Mom was still very active up until her passing. She loved meeting her friends at Bingo on Tuesday nights; weekly wine night with Vi Maartman, and lunch dates with her long-time friend of 80 years Darlene Spychka. She especially enjoyed bus trips to the casinos in Washington and the Lower Mainland, travelling to Alberta to visit with family and friends, and did so right up until Covid closed everything down. She also enjoyed spending time out at Shuswap Lake with the Maartman family; playing board games with family, reading, and putting together puzzles. Arlene was incredibly patient, kind-hearted and caring; she loved dancing and did so whenever and where ever possible. Mom was lovingly referred to as “The Dancing Grandma.” Mom brought so much love, joy and happiness to our family which will live on forever. The beautiful memories she has left us with will always be cherished. A graveside service will be held with family in late spring, 2021. In lieu of flowers please make a donation to a charity of your choice. Mom’s favourite song was ‘Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag and Smile, Smile, Smile’, take a listen to it, we know she’ll be dancing in the sky. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Fond memories linger every day, Remembrance keeps them near.

Obituaries

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Obituaries

Debra Lyne Peters On January 26, 2021, Debra “Debi” Lyne Peters (née Wilflingsider) AKA The Crazy Cat Lady, overcame her struggle with ongoing pain and suffering. Even in her final hours, she was able to draw those that loved her dearly closer. She was surrounded by a “Sea of Love.” She is survived by her husband Doug, her sisters Susan (Bob), Wendy (David), and Shelly; her brothers Gary and Tim (Krista); her mother-in-law Betty; brothers-in-law Garry (Victoria) and Rodney (Cory); step-sons Grant (Jen, Kassity, Jaxon, Alexander) and Scott (Erin, baby on the way); numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, grand-nieces and grand-nephews; and special friends Deborah and Shauna (Camdyn, Jordyn). Those that knew Debi knew that Doug was her true human love, and every animal she encountered had a special spot in her heart. She gave a home and love to many critters, including her current cat Dolly. She also spent many hours walking around McArthur Island Park, enjoying the wildlife that live there. She was predeceased by her mother Lisa, her father Steven, her father-in-law Louis, and special pets Danny, Tia, Scrounger, Squinchy, Ginger, Malachi, Karley, Little Bit, and numerous others. Special thanks to all the medical professionals who aided in her care. We know she’s with the angels now, painless and happy. Remember me in your heart: Your thoughts, and your memories, Of the times we loved, The times we cried, The times we fought, The times we laughed. For if you always think of me, I will never have gone. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Joseph William Kristmanson It is with a heavy heart that I announce the passing of my dear Uncle, Joseph William Kristmanson who passed away on January 31, 2021 at the age of 75 in his home in Kamloops, BC. Born in Vancouver, Joe grew up in North Burnaby, however at an early age, went to work with his father, Christmas Joe (Sr), on his Dispatch boat, the “Limited”. Joe loved the ocean and he soon started a career in fishing, leaving for Alaska to fish halibut on the Milbanke Sound. Joe pursued his career in fishing and eventually became a Marine Engineer. He worked on the Leader Fish, Viking Prince, Pacific Viking & Viking Tide and was a valued and very well liked Shipmate with his kind heart and great sense of humour. Sadly in 2008, Joe had an accident while commercial fishing and then retired to Kamloops, where he had moved some years earlier. When not fishing, Joe was very social and loved meeting up with friends and past fishing buddies for beers and sharing stories. Joe had a very easy going personality and always had a good story to tell. Joe will be sadly missed by his niece Jacquie (Dave), nephews Roy, Dale (Shelley) and Clark, and many dear friends. He was predeceased by his sister Evelyn (Roy) and brother Don (Una).

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Obituaries

Richard Kivari

October 9, 1984 - February 17, 2020 Richard Kivari, beloved son, brother and uncle, passed away February 17, 2020 with his family by his side. At 35 years old, 4 years after his first benign brain tumor and after only 16 months battling stage 4 Glioblastoma, Richard’s fight is over. Richard was a great lover of all things nerdy. He played many video games with his favourite being the Legend of Zelda series. He loved playing D&D with his friends. He collected figures from anime, movies, games and comics. He was an avid movie goer and binge watcher. If it was considered geeky, Richard probably liked it. He leaves behind father Rick, mother Denise, sister Beth, brother-in-law Chris, niece River, nephew Bob and cherished cat Samus. The family would like to thank Dr. Omahen, Dr. MacDonald, Dr. Howie, the staff at Royal Inland Hospital, the staff at both the Kamloops and Kelowna branches of the BC Cancer Agency and the staff of the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice Home. As per Richard’s wishes there will be no service. His ashes will be spread by the family in Prince Rupert at a later date. While condolences are appreciated the family requests no flowers be sent due to allergies. Instead a donation in Richard’s name can be made to the Kamloops Hospice Association or the Brain Tumor Foundation of Canada.

Maureen Winnifred Grayston

September 29, 1926 - February 7, 2021 With great sadness the family of Maureen announces her peaceful passing, at the age of 94 in Kamloops, BC. She was born in Kelowna to her parents William and Dorothy Marshall. Maureen is remembered by her two sons Kim (Gale) and Todd; her six grandchildren Corey, Carrie, Marshall, Courtney, Quinlan, Rhyan and three greatgrandchildren Lauren, Danica and Flynn. She is also survived by her sister Doris Ward and family, her brother Donnie (Dodie) and family and many cousins, nieces, nephew and friends. No funeral services by request. Maureen’s cremated remains will be laid to rest with her parents in Lakeview Cemetery, Kelowna. Condolences may be expressed at:

www.firstmemorialkamloops.com

Thanks for wearing a mask, for everyone!


A44

WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

Obituaries

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

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Desiree “Anne” Denbigh (née Bennett) This is to inform one and all of the passing of a most extraordinary woman, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother Desiree Anne Denbigh, Anne to most that knew her, Denbigh to a select few. She was born on August 19, 1924 in Shanghai, China and died on her own terms in Kamloops, BC, on February 1, 2021. She is predeceased by her husband Ian, her eldest son David and her granddaughter Rachel and many in-laws and friends. She leaves behind, to cherish her memory, one son Tony (Gerri), daughter-in-law Libby, grandchildren Ian (Gina), Sarah (Brian), grandson-in-law Aaron Chan, Charles (Courtenay) and MaryAnne and great-grandchildren Yuma, Cesar, Olyn and Sumiko and a very special friend and caregiver Phaedra Stuart. Anne met the love of her life, Ian in a Japanese P.O.W. camp (Ash Camp) in China, where Ian was the camp interpreter. They married October 8, 1945 in Shanghai. They came to Canada by steamer shortly thereafter, on the toss of a coin (heads; Australia, tails; Canada), David came in January of 1947 and Anthony (Tony) in May of 1951. Anne was very well travelled, as indicated by a world map stuck with push pins, I think when done, there were more countries with pins than without. She was an artist (watercolour), a golfer (a hole-in-one at Kamloops Golf Club), a bridge player, drafts person, house designer, lighting consultant (B.C. Hydro), doctor’s receptionist, singer (Kamloops Choristers) an expert crossword solver and awesome Trivial Pursuit player. She was also a great mother, grandmother and great-grand mother. Anne lead a long and fruitful life and its almost impossible to sum up 96 years in a couple of short paragraphs. There will be a celebration of life when COVID 19 restrictions are lifted. Donations in Anne’s memory can be made to World Neighbours Canada or a charity of your choice.

Suzanne Mary Dussome

February 24, 1952 - February 6, 2021 Suzanne Mary Dussome left us on February 6, 2021 at Kamloops Hospice House with her soulmate by her side. After some difficult medical setbacks from cancer she could no longer fight the battle. Suzanne was born in Victoria, BC, her life was spread from Vancouver Island to Kamloops then to the Yukon and finally settling back in Kamloops and Anglemont for the last thirty some years with the love of her life Ian Wilson. She not only raised her own daughters Jennifer (Tod) and Dawn (Mike) but spread her love to her step-daughters Penny and Valerie (Mike). Throughout the past thirty years with Ian and all the girls she was blessed to be able to love all of her grandkids Chelsea, Wyatt, Dayton, Rayne, Isaac, Miya, Sydney, Ryan and Chloe. She was a devoted mother, wife, grandmother and friend to all that crossed her path. Suzanne was pre-deceased by both of her parents so her relationship with her brother Brian Craig was a close bond. She will be missed by her extended family just as much. Suzanne will be remembered by her community, friends and church in Anglemont where her and Ian lived their life by the lake. Her passion was for gardening, flowers, succulents, herbal remedies, essential oils, she seemed to have something to offer anyone and never a shortage of lavender. She was appreciated by all those who had a chance to meet her, and her friends always had good things to say about her. The sorrow of losing a loved one is overwhelming. In that time of heartache, it’s important to remember to laugh, she would want that. While we mourn the loss of someone near and dear, we should also remember to celebrate a life well lived even though cut short. We should gather to appreciate a person whose mission on earth although not completed was successful. A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date, please keep Suzanne in your heart and plant something in her memory to forever visit and cherish. We would like to thank all the staff and volunteers at Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice House who made her last weeks comfortable and peaceful not only for her but her family, Dr. Mavis Hollman, Dr. Ewert and everyone who helped her and her family during this trying time. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Charlene Elizabeth Seymour (née Burak) It is with a heavy heart and great sorrow that we announce the passing of Charlene Seymour (née Burak) on January 30, 2021, at the age of 42. Our dearest Charlene will always be remembered for her caring demeanor, contagious smile, and kind heart. Her devotion to loved ones and generous ways will always be missed and cherished. Charlene was born on September 10, 1978 in Bonnyville, Alberta. She is survived by her husband Mark, children Kayla Burak, Brett Burak, Daneille Seymour, step-children Randy and Celeste Seymour. Also, her proud parents Nancy and Al Graham, father Alan Burak, brother Cody Graham and the joy of her life, grandson Liam along with numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and her furry kid, Myla. Charlene attended St. Patrick Elementary School in Red Deer, Alberta until she relocated to Kamloops, BC with her mom, where she proudly accepted her grade 12 diploma. She was successful in following her dream as a Health Care Aide by completing her postsecondary education at the Red Deer College. Charlene and Mark were married in 2002 and began extending their family and following their careers while settling into their family home in Eckville, Alberta. Char treated everyone she came across with no judgement and took great pride in making people feel accepted and wanted. She loved her residents at the Eckville Manor from 2007 until her passing. She cared for the residents like they were her own grandparents. Friends, family, and neighbourhood children loved the Seymour household because of the way Charlene welcomed them, made them feel comfortable, and most of all like family. Being raised in Kamloops, BC, Charlene loved spending time outdoors. Kayaking, rollerblading and spending time with friends around the campfire brought her peace and joy. Vacationing with her mom and close friends from Kamloops during the summer was an annual highlight and something she always looked forward to.

Frank Thomas Schell The family of Frank Thomas Schell are saddened to announce his passing on Saturday, February 6, 2021 in Kamloops, BC at the age of 85. Frank was born on July 30, 1935 in Tisdale, Saskatchewan and was the youngest of seven children born to Russell and Juanita Schell. Frank left Tisdale in his late teens to work and live in various places in BC. He married Beverley Johnson and they lived in Vancouver where their four sons were born: Dale, Darryl, Dean and Dennis. After their divorce, Frank moved to Clearwater, BC, married Sylvia Gervais and adopted her young son Darren. Although Frank worked in many different jobs, his main career was always carpentry. Frank owned his own construction company where he gained much respect in the industry and community while building many homes and office buildings over the years. It was common knowledge that a well-built home was a “Schell-built home” and it even appeared in a newspaper as a selling feature of a home! After he and Sylvia split up, Frank lived in Kamloops, BC where he continued to build homes and projects and prove that he was a master carpenter! He moved to Westlock, AB for a few years, but returned to Kamloops for the last number of years. Frank was a character who had a wonderful, mischievous sense of humour, which will make us smile for many, many years to come. May we all enjoy telling stories of Frank’s antics and relive those memories. Frank was predeceased by his parents and all of his siblings (five brothers: Ken, Bruce, Maurice, Alvin, Bill and one sister Doris).

The greatest pleasure in Charlene’s life was to watch her children grow, succeed, and become responsible, caring adults. She was proud of who they have become and who they thrive to be.

Left to cherish his memory are his five sons: Dale (Kelly), Darryl (Sharon), Dean, Dennis (Jane) and Darren (Shantel) and his grandchildren: Leanne, Loni, Colin, Brittany, Justin, Russell, Janelle, Sean and Ashlynn. He also leaves greatgrandchildren: Alexa, Mathew, McGary, Dallas, Dana, Lee, Nathan, Taylor, Alexis and Reagan. He also leaves his many nieces, nephews, friends and sister-in-law Orlah.

I’m jealous of the angels seeing your smile each day. Love & Huggs Char!

No formal service will be held at this time. Interment of Frank’s cremated remains will take place in the family plot in Tisdale, SK.

A private family gathering was held for Charlene.

Condolences may be expressed at: www.firstmemorialkamloops.com


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Obituaries

Obituaries

Obituaries

ALAN PERRETT Larger than life and dramatically unforgettable, Al Perrett left this life on February 1, 2021, from Royal Inland Hospital, at the age of 82, for the great hereafter which, we expect, will continue to include many loyal friendships, positivity, enthusiasm, exuberance, generosity and, of course, skiing and motorcycles! Related to skiing, Al, in the mid 1950's, without having had any training in racing, competed on Mount Seymour in the Vancouver high school skiing championships. Al was the only entrant from his school, King Edward. Although he didn't have much in the way of equipment or ski clothing, his enthusiasm and determination attracted the attention of other racers. He was invited to join their ski racing club. His saying "yes" marked a turning point in his life and in the lives of the club members. Al had a new focus, and the club members gained a life-long friend, someone with boundless enthusiasm and a generosity, friendliness and openness that few had encountered. Al became a fixture in the group, a good friend to all and a constant source of inspiration. After just a few years of racing, although having had no formal coaching, Al caught the attention of the Canadian National Ski Team, which sent him to Europe to race against the world's best alpine skiers. Unfortunately, after only two weeks, he suffered an ankle injury and was released from training. Al was not about to give up on this great European opportunity and just go home. Being Al, he turned this into a great new adventure. He somehow picked up a motorcycle and went travelling. Along the way, he came across a multi-day cross-country motorcycle race which he entered, sore ankle and all. This may have been the beginning of one of his favourite sayings, "Pain is my friend". He would tell us, if he was feeling pain, he knew he was still alive. Quite by chance, Al bumped into a member of his regular ski group who was off on his own European experience. Together, they went to Pamplona, had a wonderful time and, of course, ran with the bulls! The friend unfortunately became ill and went to England for treatment. Al followed, made regular hospital visits all the while the friend was recovering from hepatitis

Fly Me He understands every mode of force He knows what’s true of the elements He is subtle but genuine at lift off and landing He is an airplane ride blowing through the clouds He is an airplane window that reveals a whole dimension He is a propeller to delve farther deep into the universe like fractals He is an airplane grounded in the sky mighty with fuel He is an airplane engine efficient, sustaining and swift He is a wing of a plane that stabilizes my lift He has an open storage to keep the baggage balanced on flight He has a trap door that releases the body of pain He has a water tank to keep the peace Here is a safe place to crash A ride in the sky at night reveals a bright shiny movement You, my plane, are visible to the naked eye in each spectrum

Obituaries

and then helped him get back on his feet. Al never lacked compassion, generosity and possessed an innate willingness to help. In the 1960s, a number of Al's ski group went to spend a ski season at Queenstown, New Zealand. On landing in NZ, they found themselves (burdened with a huge mound of luggage and skis) outside the quay on a very busy street. They knew where they wanted to go but had no idea as to how to get there. Al spotted a small panel van coming down the street, walked out into the traffic, waved down the van and talked the driver into taking the group to its destination, gear and all. Al could “connect” with people in an instant. In addition to many more wonderful stories, Al taught for a season in Davos, Switzerland, was coach of the Alberta junior ski team for a season and, in the late 1960's, was coach of the Whistler Mountain junior ski team. And, throughout his skiing years, Al always had a grand time skiing with his children and grandchildren. Al's other love, motorcycles, began when he was age fourteen. After having been given a ride on a 250 BSA, he was hooked. He thought motorcycles were awesome. Al had worked as an iron worker and had some "near-misses". Think, Second Narrows Bridge. Looking for a less perilous line of endeavour, he went to work with his brother, Jon, as a plumber. Al and Jon always had a very close relationship but, after eight or nine months, he let Jon know, "I don't think this is going to work out for me." Jon kindly suggested, because of Al's adeptness at such, he go into repairing motorcycles. So, in 1966, Al borrowed $4000 from the bank, bought five Suzukis from Trev Deeley, and opened a small shop in Richmond. It didn’t take long before he moved to larger quarters selling Yamahas. Money was tight but Al bought out Tyne Side Repairs, a longtime established dealership. This purchase was a great move as he had truck loads of parts for sale and was soon able to pay off the bank as well as Deeley's for the purchase of motorcycles. He was even able to move to a larger location. In 1972, Al sold his Yamaha shop and moved to Kamloops, starting Kamloops Honda. One of Al’s best business decisions was taking on a Harley-Davidson franchise in 1977. He developed a very successful business in spite of a devastating

Obituaries

Obituaries

fire in 1986. Their HOG chapter raised huge funds for Muscular Dystrophy and donated many gifts and cash to charities in the community. Al's "do business on a handshake" reputation was such that, people would travel from far away just to do business with him. Through it all, Al took out time to race motorcycles. Dan Amor talked Al into going to the Six Days Trials in Italy in 1974 and over the next decade he won several medals. In 1990, Al rode in his first Baja 1000, "the Most Dangerous Race in North America", and finished! He was hooked! He competed in 17 Baja races with different teammates over the years, winning class age 50 and 60 numerous times. As for being the most dangerous race in North America, during one race, Al was riding the night-time leg. Suddenly, in the dark, loomed a cow. Al survived the crash; the cow did not. Al did see the inside of a hospital in more than one country. Related to Al's racing in Bahia de los Angeles, Baja Mexico, Al so loved the people and the location, he bought property there in 2005 and built a house. Over the years, he met many wonderful friends and developed beautiful relationships in the community. Al made annual trips there to ride, fish and enjoy the life. Al's motorcycle racing took him to varied destinations, from the ultra-dangerous Isle of Man TT, to our local Westwood. He won four National Cross Country Championships in the 1980's and 90's. Al was inducted into the Canadian Motorcycle Hall of Fame on November 17, 2018 at its 13th Annual Banquet and Reunion at the Delta Hotels Burnaby Conference Centre. There is no end to anecdotes which feature Al Perrett as the main character. Everyone who knew him has a different “favourite story”. Or three! Al Perrett, it has been a great honour and an endless pleasure to call you “friend”! Al is survived by the mother of his children and lifelong friend Shirley Perrett, four children and eight grandchildren. Guy Perrett (Barb), Magnus, Xavier; Renee Bucknell, Elizabeth, Ella; Jane Perrett, Travis, David; Andrea Perrett (James Huser), Pierce, Roko. He also leaves behind his beloved brother Jon

by Kathy Ruth Manongdo Written on Father’s Day 2010

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(Eva) Perrett, sisters Gail Robb and Linda Sysoloff and their families. As well as many, many friends all over the globe. Al is predeceased by his father Emery Perrett, his mother Helen Blythe (Perrett), and his sister Rosemary Bryan. Our family would like to thank the Royal Inland Hospital Cancer Clinic, Dialysis Clinic, and the Community Dialysis Center for their outstanding and compassionate service. Al frequently praised the quality of care he received. If you would like to pay tribute to Al’s life please consider a donation to the BC Cancer Foundation, the Canadian Kidney Foundation or the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation. A celebration of life will be held when it is safe to do so. Please stay tuned… A special note: Al, many times, gave loving thanks for his mother's positive and supportive attitude. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

DO NOT GO GENTLE GIVE LAVISHLY THAT GOOD NIGHT LIVEINTO ABUNDANTLY

Bynot Helen Steiner Do go gentle intoRice that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. The Though wisemore men atyou theirgive, end know dark is right, BecauseThe theirmore words had youforked get, no lightening they Do not go gentle into that good night. The more you laugh, Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright The less you fret, Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, TheRage, more you do the unselfishly, rage against dying of the light. more         The you live  abundantly, And learn, late, they grieved it on its way, The more of too everything you share, Do not go gentle into that good night. The Grave moremen, you’ll always have to spare, near death, who see with blinding sight moreblaze youlike love, BlindThe eyes could meteors and be gay, Rage, against the find, dying of the light. The rage more you’ll And you, my father, there on the sad height, That life is good,                And friends are kind, Do not go gentle into that good night. For Rage, onlyrage what wethe give away, against dying of the light.

Am I your passenger? Am I your wingman? Am I your baggage? Am I your well oiled engine? Am I your wing? Am I your lift in the air? Am I your propeller that thrusts you to a new dimension? I am all that you shape me to be You have a windshield view exposing the picture beyond Only you fit the pilot’s seat As your hands and feet heart and eyes are trained to work the plane You know every part and how to fix it You are navigating by the spirit You belong to a solid tender heart and so accepted as firm to soar You’re worth the shiniest mint coins and bills in circulation and so loved Your competence as an airplane secures my place For more experiences with you Will you invite me onboard?

Enriches us from day to day. by Dylan Thomas

Psalms 91:4 says, “He shall cover you with His feathers, And under his

#4-665 Tranquille Rd Kamloops

250-554-2324

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With the unique challenges brought by COVID-19, we remain committed to helping families. We now offer online arrangement services.


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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Get up $ to 7,500 to build your eCommerce website today Now is the time to upgrade to an eCommerce website with help from the Launch Online Grant Program. The BC Provincial Government is currently offering a financial grant of up to $7,500 for small and medium sized businesses to build or improve their eCommerce presence online. This includes building a brand-new website from scratch, or updating an existing online shopping website. As a Kamloops-based Web Development agency, KTWDigital is eligible to build you an eCommerce website with help from this grant. Don't wait! This first-come, first-serve offer only lasts until the funding has been invested. Take advantage of this opportunity by starting or upgrading your eCommerce website today.

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@ktwdigital www.ktwdigital.com


WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

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WEDNESDAY, February 17, 2021

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FRESH. HEALTHY. LOCAL.

weekly flyer LARGEST SELECTION OF KAMLOOPS GROWN PRODUCE!

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