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OCTOBER 4, 2019 | Volume 32 No. 80

Page A26 is your guide to events in the city and region

FRIDAY

COUNT IS ON FOR DRACULA

Western Canada Theatre’s latest production will take to the stage at re-opened Sagebrush Theatre on Oct. 10 A25

UNESCO NOD

Read all about Sa-Hali secondary’s exclusive designation A3

BIG GIFT FOR RIH Kelson Group gives $1.5 million for mental health unit A10

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CLIMATE CHANGE #elxn43

Federal Election Climate change is the first in a series of topics tackled by local candidates in the Oct. 21 federal election. Their response to KTW’s questions begins on Page A14. Watch for forestry woes, cost of living and more topics in future editions of Kamloops This Week. DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE

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DID YOU KNOW? Halston used to be known as Mytton, who was manager of B.C. Fruitlands. It later became Halston, apparently for Mytton’s English home. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

Sa-Hali secondary students Erik Sdoutz (left) and Amanda To raise the UNESCO flag on Tuesday to mark the school’s status as a UNESCO member. “It’s amazing because I’ve been part of this since Grade 8,” said To, a Grade 12 member of Sa-Hali’s Global Citizens Club. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 Global Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A21 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A25 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A31 Comics/Crossword . . . . . . . . . .A36 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A41

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Sa-Hali is B.C.’s first UNESCO high school THE UNESCO ASSOCIATED SCHOOLS NETWORK SPANS MORE THAN 180 COUNTRIES MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

What started as a small, four-person extracurricular group has grown to a 20-person club that has earned Sa-Hali secondary international status as an UNESCO-designated school. “It’s amazing because I’ve been part of this since Grade 8,” said Grade 12 student Amanda To, a member of Sa-Hali’s Global Citizens Club. The extracurricular group’s projects and initiatives over the last six years has made Sa-Hali secondary a full-time member of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) associated schools network (ASPnet) — the only high school in B.C. with the designation and one of just 87 schools across Canada to claim such status. Global Citizens’ work in earning the designation included collaborating with other schools across Canada to produce two white papers on the future of water and single-use plastics, which were sent to the Canadian Senate. The group has also sent letters to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau regarding environ-

mental initiatives and conducts an annual carbon challenge in which students try to find more sustainable ways to travel to and from school. About 100 people gathered on the front lawn in front of the high school on Tuesday afternoon to celebrate the designation by raising the UNESCO flag. Sa-Hali secondary teacher librarian and Global Citizens Club co-ordinator Cecile McVittie told KTW the journey toward full membership began five years ago when she completed an application to have Sa-Hali secondary become a UNESCO candidate school. After several years of building a body of work similar to what other member schools were doing, McVittie said, the high school was eligible to apply for full membership in the network. She said full membership gives the club more opportunities to participate in UNESCO youth activities and partner with international schools, rather than collaborating solely at the provincial or national level. “An example of this would be our recent Amsterdam exchange with an UNESCO ASPnet school in Amsterdam,” McVittie said. Members of the group recently returned

from a week-long trip to the capital of the Netherlands, where representatives from each school made presentations on how their respective countries deal with water issues or how they build peaceful, sustainable societies. Sa-Hali hosted the Dutch school in April. The Global Citizens Club is now planning to focus on the United Nations’ 17 sustainable development goals by hosting an exposition at some point during the school year, setting up pavilions in classrooms to showcase its work on each goal. The UNESCO Associated Schools Network has 11,500 members in more than 180 countries. Membership is open to public or private educational institutions that provide pre-primary, primary, secondary, technical or vocational education, or teacher training, in formal or non-formal settings. ASPnet links schools around the world with the goal of contributing to peace and security in the world. Membership in ASPnet based on a firm commitment by the school leadership and community to promote the ideals and values of UNESCO by reinforcing the humanistic, ethical, cultural and international dimensions of education.

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

FIRE PREVENTION WEEK

Council Calendar October 22, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing (cancelled) Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

October 6 to 12 is Fire Prevention Week. Kamloops Fire Rescue (KFR) is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association—the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years—to promote this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!”

October 24, 2019 (cancelled) 2:00 pm - Community Services Committee

In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes from the time the smoke alarm sounds to escape safely. Planning and practising your family’s escape can help you make the most of the time you have, which will give everyone enough time to get out. Make an escape plan and practice it with your family today.

October 28, 2019 2:00 pm - Development and Sustainability Committee (new time) Executive Boardroom, 7 Victoria Street West October 29, 2019 9:00 am - Committee of the Whole (new time) 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

There are four simple steps when making an escape plan:

October 30, 2019 2:00 pm - Finance Committee Executive Boardroom, 7 Victoria Street West

3. choose a family meeting place

1. install working smoke alarms 2. draw a floor plan of your home 4. schedule a home fire drill and practise with your family Follow @KamFire on social media for more fire prevention tips, and for more information, visit:

Want a recap of Council Meetings?

Kamloops.ca/KFR

Sign up for the Council Highlights e-newsletter at: Kamloops.ca/Subscribe

Neighbourhood Meetings Drop-in information sessions, 6:00–8:00 pm Dallas Neighbourhood Wednesday, October 9 Dallas Elementary, 296 Harper Road Heffley Creek Neighbourhood Thursday, October 17 Heffley Creek Elementary, 7020 Old Highway 5 Kamloops.ca/Neighbourhoods

SOCIAL PLANNING GRANTS

HELP US CELEBRATE WASTE REDUCTION WEEK

The application process for the 2020 Social Planning Grants is now open for interested non-profit organizations.

October 21–27 is Waste Reduction Week. This national campaign encourages everyone to think about the social, economic, and environmental impacts of consumption and waste.

Each year, the City allocates approximately $90,000 for local community initiatives through Social Planning Grants. These grants are allocated at the beginning of every year after a thorough evaluation process facilitated by staff, with final determination of award made by the Social Planning Engagement Group (Social Planning Council).

Give a City employee a shout out! “Last year, I contacted the Bylaw Department to complain about the overgrown weeds in the parking lot next door to my apartment complex. The weeds were impairing people with mobility aids from using the sidewalk . . . the Bylaw Officer went above and beyond his job to help the people with disabilities by coming and actually removing the weeds from the sidewalk.” - Laura Carroll, Resident

This year, applications are being accepted to cover operational costs, special projects, or special capital expenditures. The 2020 Social Planning Grant application deadline is Monday, November 1, 2019, at 8:00 am. The Social Planning Grant application process is completely electronic. To access the required 2020 Social Planning Grant application materials, please visit: Kamloops.ca/Grants

As Waste Reduction Week approaches, we hope that residents will join us in taking actions that create meaningful impacts, including: • learning more about the circular economy concept, which encourages people to reuse materials • reducing textile waste by buying used and donating or repurposing clothing • nominating a waste reduction innovator or advocate • swapping out plastics (especially single-use plastics) for “bring-your-own” items • reducing food waste • swapping, sharing, or repairing equipment, electronics, or clothing • donating or recycling e-waste To learn more, visit: Kamloops.ca/WasteReduction

DOWNTOWN TRANSPORTATION CHOICES STRATEGY The City has identified initiatives as part of the Downtown Transportation Choices Strategy by engaging with stakeholder and the public. The strategy includes ambitious but realistic programming and education, and it will promote actions to assist residents with adapting to a lifestyle of more transportation choices and less reliance on the private automobile for their travel to and within the Downtown. You’re invited to review and provide feedback on the draft short-, medium-, and long-term initiatives identified for the Downtown Transportation Choices Strategy. Your support and feedback will be helpful as we continue to move towards developing the final draft of the Downtown Transportation Choices Strategy to present to Council.

PARTICIPATE ONLINE Provide feedback on the recommended strategy online at: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/TransportationChoices

Share your kudos and read others’ comments of recognition at:

LET'S TALK KAMLOOPS

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Staff-Shout-Outs

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. We know you have ideas about our city, and we are committed to working more closely with you to improve engagement and better guide our planning and decision making.

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 Emergency after hours: 250-372-1710

ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Sign up and speak up at

• Recreation Master Plan - Open for feedback on the draft plan • Downtown Transportation Choices - Survey on draft initiatives

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

TRU’s economic impact regionally pegged at $705 in 2018-2019 MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Thompson Rivers University contributed $705 million to the regional economy last year and $1.5 billion provincially, according to a report developed for the postsecondary institution. TRU has released the results of its latest economic impact study, which indicates 9,670 jobs (one in nine) in the Thompson, Nicola and Cariboo region and 17,437 across the province (one in 150) are supported by the activities of the university and its students. TRU contracted Economic Modelling Specialist Intl. (Emsi), a labour market analytics firm, to assess its economic impact on the region, using data from the 20182019 fiscal year. Emsi consultant Susan Hackett presented its findings to a group gathered at the Campus Activity Centre on Wednesday. The economic impact analysis takes into account three main impacts — operational spending, student spending and the impact of alumni working in the region. Hackett Hackett described Emsi’s methodology as using a Canadian regional input-output proprietary model that measures how industries interact with each other and how multiplier effects are created. Hacket described the ripple, or multiplier, effects to those attending the presentation. “TRU pays its employees and the employees then have their paycheques to go out and

buy groceries,” she said. “And grocery stores now have more money to restock their shelves, pay their workers and then their suppliers and their workers spend that money, so it keeps rippling throughout — and that’s a major contributor to the economic impact.” The university is one of Kamloops’ largest employers, with 1,263 full-time employees on a payroll of $129.1 million, according to the report. The university also spent $72.8 million on day-to-day expenses related to facilities, supplies and professional services. The net impact of the university’s operations spending was calculated as adding $169.7 million in income to the region — $160.7 million provincially. “You’ll notice that the regional impact is actually larger than the provincial impact in this case — and that’s because there is more outside money coming to the region than to the province,” Hackett said. “A lot of TRU spending is provincial, so that adds a lot of value locally.” The study calculated student spending in 2018-2019 as adding $45.9 million in income to the regional economy — about half of which is attributable to international students specifically. The university had an international student population of 5,615 that fiscal year. Hackett said the study looked at two types of students — those from outside the region who relocated to attend TRU and those who were retained in the area because TRU exists.

“We didn’t consider the spending of all TRU students because we can’t attribute the spending of every single student to TRU,” Hackett said, noting non-locals students bring with them spending on things such as groceries, rent and transportation, helping the regional economy. Provincially, the student spending impact was calculated as $99.7 million in income to the B.C. economy. The net impact of TRU’s former students employed in the regional workforce amounted to $489.7 million in added income in the region — nearly 70 per cent of the $705 million figure. “We estimate the number of alumni that are actively working using various measures of attrition. We use location data from the B.C. Student Outcomes Survey and then we quantify the value of each student’s education,” Hackett said. “It’s a very intricate calculation, but it gets us to these very significant results.” Provincially, the alumni impact is calculated as $1.2 billion. The study is the first TRU has commissioned since 2013. TRU vice-president of finance and administration Matt Milovick said when the last economic impact study was conducted six years ago, TRU’s revenues were about $163 million, but today that number is approaching $230 million. “Clearly, the impacts that this institution has on this community is significant, even if only measured in those terms,” Milovick said.

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The riverbank in Valleyview — extending in both directions from the public boat launch — is home to loads of garbage, stolen goods and personal possesssions of the area’s homeless.

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While the city has crews cleaning up assorted debris along a swath of riverbank in Valleyview, a resident who came forward with his concerns said the patchwork approach will not solve the problem. Mike Williams said the situation on what is known as K-Mart Beach along the South Thompson River and to the areas east and west has never been worse. “I started seeing it along the river a couple of years ago, starting in Valleyview along the river,” Williams said, noting he is an avid boater who has long

enjoyed the stretch of the river alongside Valleyview. The beach, he said, is used by many families, “It’s beautiful down there and it’s really sad what has happened,” he said, citing needles, trash, clothing, stolen items — all dumped throughout the area. “I understand people have addictions and they’re homeless, but it’s still not acceptable for the city to let it get like this. “They’re stealing stuff and they’re going down there and they’re dumping it. “And, obviously, no one wants to address it.” Williams wants to see a concerted effort, with the city, the federal fisheries department, the provincial environment ministry, the police and the

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businesses in Valleyview working together to clean up the area and devise a plan to prevent it from happening again. “If I walked down to Riverside Park and I started dumping a whole bunch of crap down there, I’d be arrested so quickly,” Williams said. “Yet why is this acceptable? It’s disgusting. I get it. I get it. These people have their addictions and they’re homeless. “Still, it’s not right that it’s allowed to get this bad. The city has a responsibility because a good portion of that is zoned as parkland.” Crime is obvious to the naked eye when walking the area, Williams said.

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A7

LOCAL NEWS THE SITUATION ALONG THE RIVERBANK HAS LED TO A ROBUST ONLINE DISCUSSION, INCLUDING THIS COMMENT:

“The whole community is fed up with the criminality. People are sick of watching the same people ride up and down our neighbourhood on stolen bicycles knowing they are casing and will be back in the night; tired of finding their RV door and vehicle doors jimmied and broken. So we clean up, bylaws and RCMP will be happy to receive less calls. It will look like that again in no time, mark my words. Instead, let’s blow up the pictures, gather our police reports and lists of stolen property and march outside city hall in shifts until something actually is done.”

ABOVE: Discarded syringes are among the debris that litters the riverbank in Valleyview. RIGHT: A man appears to be in the midst of chopping up bikes in the secluded area along the South Thompson River. MIKE WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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An ‘ugly,’ challenging situation From A6

“Down there, I don’t know how many empty purses, suitcases with clothes spilling out — you know, they go through them and get what they want and dump the rest. I found people’s ID down there,” Williams said. “I got down, almost to Kal Tire, I guess, and there was a guy with quite a camp there and he was actually, literally, chopping a bike with a hatchet. “He said, ‘I wouldn’t go any further.” He was nice about it. He wasn’t threatening. It was almost like a warning that it’s not safe.”

Beyond the eyesore that is the area, Williams argues leaving the debris along the river shore constitutes a hazard as, once the river rises in the spring, the needles and discarded bike parts and emptied purses and wallets may be swept downstream. Calling it an “ugly situation,” Kamloops Coun. Dale Bass said she contacted the city’s community and protective services director. She is pleased with quick action by the city in response to concerns raised by residents, with bylaws officers and CP Police scoping out the scene this

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week and a contractor working on cleaning up the area. Bass said it is a challenging situation, one that is not limited to Valleyview. “The reality is, that as soon as it’s all cleared up and the RCMP, the police, the bylaw people go away, there’s nothing to stop people from going right back,” she said. Bass noted a Supreme Court ruling that established the right to set up camp, a city bylaw limiting camping to overnight and the fact those who frequent the riverbanks are dealing with homelessness, mental illness and drug addiction.

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A8

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

HOMELESS HAVE A COLD WINTER AHEAD

T

he clean-up this week of the riverbank in Valleyview, where so much garbage, stolen possessions and belongings of homeless are scattered, brings to mind the fact those without a home are living there and in many other outdoors areas in Kamloops. And, with winter closing in, what options do the homeless have when the temperatures drop dangerously low? There is the Emerald Centre downtown on West Victoria Street and The Branch on Tranquille Road in North Kamloops opened last winter. But the longstanding Out of the Cold shelter (popular among a certain segment of the homeless population who considered it a second home on Sundays and Wednesdays) may not open this year. And there is, thus far, no word on plans by the city or agencies to create a temporary emergency shelter, such as occurred in the winter of 2017-2018, when the former Stuart Wood elementary downtown was used for such a purpose. Valleyview residents (and those in other areas of the city) have a right to be concerned about activities occurring in areas of their community. And the city and CP Rail should be commended for reacting quickly this week to tackle the problem. But the larger issue remains — the need to find help and housing for those truly in need. The riverbanks can be cleaned up and the piles of debris can be tossed out, but the people who need a home still need a home — or at least a warm place to spend the night once the cold winds of November arrive. There should still be a few weeks between now and the arrival of snow and temperatures that test the hardiness of those who live outdoors all the time. Here’s hoping ideas sprout into action to ensure more shelter space is open to those in need.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey

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Rural B.C. takes a big hit

T

he annual Union of B.C. Municipalities convention is usually a non-event for cosmopolitan Vancouver. A little more downtown congestion added to the cruise ship traffic, an extra bump in already high hotel prices and more demand for taxis. It’s usually a yawner for the city media, too, as it features plenty of rural problems and dry financial discussions. That changed briefly last week as a convoy of hundreds of logging trucks descended on the downtown convention centre, from as far north as Prince George and down through the Cariboo and OkanaganSimilkameen. They honked and rolled for hours, getting brief attention from TV cameras. The industry doesn’t seem very organized, one urban observer said. I replied that “the industry” in this case is out-ofwork independent contractors spending hundreds of dollars they need for their next truck payment on fuel to stage the demonstration. With Premier John Horgan and his entire cabinet in town, they went for it. The forest industry crisis was the talk of the convention, as small-town mayors and councillors arrived knowing the province had suspended a $25-million rural dividend grant program to fund relief for Interior communities that have lost their mills. The money is to bridge older

TOM FLETCHER Our Man In

VICTORIA workers to retirement and retrain others, as well as give grants to Quesnel, Chasm, Vavenby and Fort St. James to offer assistance. Government’s response to a wave of sawmill and logging layoffs has been slow and clumsy, capped by Horgan’s comments to reporters after his conventionclosing speech. He compared community leaders wanting the rural fund reinstated to kids who “want everything right now.” The $25 million was for small grants to diversify rural economies, many in towns that lost their forest employment a while ago. No example is more poignant than Port McNeill and its neighbouring villages. You don’t have to explain to Winter Harbour and other North Island communities what it’s like to lose a once-vibrant economy. Port McNeill Mayor Gaby Wickstrom said her town’s grant application was a mere $10,000 to spruce up the downtown. She also serves on the board of Mount Waddington Regional

District, which had one of the hundreds of rural dividend applications awaiting approval. Theirs was about $200,000 for a non-profit society to run its fundamentals of forestry project. That would pay for a staffer to recruit people to move to the North Island. “Not just workers, bringing people to our region, the quality of life, why to live here, why to invest here, that kind of thing,” Wickstrom told me. “Port Alice had an application in, as well, for some signage. They’re trying to reinvent themselves after the mill closure.” The long-dormant pulp mill there was officially shuttered in February, its small maintenance crew laid off. The NDP government has looked desperate on the forest crisis, suspending its caribou protection plan, appointing an apologist MLA to go on yet another listening tour — then this horribly short-sighted cancellation of a modest diversification program. While $25 million provides a hand up for some little towns, it’s a drop in the bucket for Finance Minister Carole James. She just moved $300 million from contingency funds, basically an unused wildfire budget that came in handy to keep the province out of red ink this year. There’s still more than $400 million in contingency this year, but Horgan confirmed all ministries are looking for cuts. Their big inherited surplus has been spent. tfletcher@blackpress.ca


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

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OPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RAVE TO RESCUERS Editor: A big thank you to the people who came to our rescue on Kamloops Lake last weekend. Our boat’s electric motor was not powerful enough to get us out of the current. We thought we would start the sixhorsepower gas motor, only to have the starter cord beak. We found ourselves drifting farther and farther away, which could have led to disaster. How relieved and grateful we were for the help of Good Samaritans, who towed us to safety. May their act of kindness be returned to them in a time of need. David Teichroeb Kamloops

Correction An Oct. 2 letter from Tom Rankin (‘Follow the youth and vote as they will’) contained an error. The sentence should read: “We teach our children how to walk, drive, cook, budget, play sports and so on. Why do we direct them how to vote?”

CITY SHOULD EXPLORE PAY PER COLLECTION Editor: Re: Brian Husband’s letter of Sept. 27 (‘Change garbage collection to every 10 days’): I read with considerable interest Husband’s suggestion to change the frequency of garbage collection in Kamloops to once every 10 days. It seems to me the major issue is the quantity of waste destined for the landfill, not the frequency of collection. It is difficult to see how merely reducing the number of times per year that waste is collected from each residence will reduce the quantity of waste delivered to the landfill. It has been my experience that additional incentives will be required to pique the interest of homeowners in this issue. One program that has proven successful was

GO EVERY TWO WEEKS Editor: Here’s a thought: pick up garbage every second week, with recycling and (a new) garden waste collection every week. Lower mainland communities do it that way. Ann Peterson Kamloops implemented in Beaconsfield, Que. In the simplest of terms, the municipality fitted each waste container and each waste-collection vehicle with devices that would detect and

record each time a waste container was transferred to the truck. The resident paid only for the number of times waste was collected. That provides an incentive to the resident to reduce the quantity of waste destined for the landfill. Beaconsfield was able to reduce the amount of landfill-destined waste by 51 per cent and reduce the cost by 42 per cent. In addition, 78 per cent of residents realized a savings in waste-management payment to the municipality. Perhaps the City of Kamloops should consider a similar program. Allister Brown Kamloops

WE ALL NEED TO BE BEAR AWARE

TEAR DOWN ICBC WALLS Editor: Let’s tear down the walls and open up the floodgates for private auto insurance in B.C. There would be a tidal wave of established private insurance company’s from across Canada rushing in to gain the market share. That would give B.C. residents a choice and competition would be a healthy thing. ICBC has had its protectionist walls up firmly and in place since 1972, preventing auto insurance choice for B.C. residents. Auto insurance in B.C. is increasing to all-time highs. What is wrong with allowing competition? B.C. drivers deserve competitive pricing and a number of insurance companies from which to choose. I double dare the provincial government to tear down ICBC’s wall wall, open up the floodgates and see where the chips fall. Les Evens Kamloops

Editor: On Sept. 27, my wife and I were looking out our window at Rivers Trail east of downtown and saw a black bear walking on the path. We called the conservation office and spoke to a person in Victoria, who said they would contact someone in Kamloops. We did not hear back from anyone. A lot of people use

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

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A local property-management group has donated $1.5 million to support Royal Inland Hospital’s new patientcare tower project now under construction. Kelson Group will dole out the dollars over a six-year timeline, earmarking the funds specifically to outfit the mental health and substance use (MHSU) department of the hospital that will move from the Alumnae Tower to the patient-care tower when it opens in 2022. The new 30-bed floor will have private patient rooms — whereas the current 30-bed space has rooms housing multiple patients — lounges, outdoor courtyards and an ample amount of natural light. “The patient-care tower project is going to modernize the MHSU department at Royal Inland Hospital,” said IH health service administrator, Debi Morris. “Our inpatient unit, built in 1962, needs updating. The new department will be an inviting, calm and therapeutic environment where patients can be cared for in the spaces they deserve.”

The Kelson Group’s $1.5-million donation to the hospital’s mental-health department is the largest gift RIH Foundation has received from the Kamloops-based property company.

The Royal Inland Hospital foundation is raising $20 million to go toward the $417-million patient-care tower. Having raised $4 million last year, the foundation’s goal for 2019-2020 is to bring in $5 million. Alisa Coquet, campaign director for the RIH Foundation, told KTW the foundation has garnered plenty of support from private donors, but is not releasing how much has been collected until some time in 2020, when it will have hopefully reached 70 to 80 per cent of the goal.

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The Kelson Group’s $1.5-million donation to the hospital’s mental-health department is the largest gift RIH Foundation has received from the company. “We believe mental health is becoming increasingly important to focus on for the overall health of our communities, especially as we strive to help people live better,” Kelson Group vice-president Jason Fawcett said. “We see how declining mental health affects our residents and the people in our communities and we want to help.”

The need for inpatient beds for mental-health patients is expected to increase by 47 per cent over the next 20 years, according to Interior Health’s facility profile from 2016-2017. Established in 1974, the Kelson Group supports RIH both monetarily and through service on its board of directors and has become well known for its philanthropic contribution to various Kamloops causes. The nine-storey patientcare tower at Royal Inland Hospital will include 42 underground parking spaces, 157 surface parking spots and a rooftop heliport. It will also include 14 private ante/postpartum patient rooms, six private labour delivery and recovery rooms, three pediatric psychiatry private rooms and 11 operating rooms. The provincial government is contributing $225 million to the project and the Thompson Regional Hospital District is chipping in with $172 million. Coquet said what will fill the mental health and substance use department’s space in the Alumnae Tower has yet to be determined.

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Did you witness an accident on West Victoria Street on September 12, 2019, at approximately 3:30 pm in front of Spoke N’ Motion involving a BC Transit Bus and an unidentified white car? If so, please contact Michael Sutherland at MJB Lawyers.

Signage at Trans Mountain property on Mission Flats Road warns against obstructing access to the site that has pipeline ready to be used for the expansion project. Opponents of the project will stage a ‘guerrila theatre’ protest outside the yard on Oct. 7. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

250-372-4968

A Red Brigade theatre protest JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Protestors are planning to perform “guerrilla theatre” on Monday, Oct. 7, outside a storage area for the Trans Mountain expansion project. Kamloops author and music teacher Katie Welch said 10 people dressed in crimson outfits and white face makeup will attend the Cando yard on Mission Flats, where pipe has been stored, and walk in a funeral procession on public property as part of an international initiative highlighting areas affected by climate change. “We’re right in the middle of the Trans Mountain pipeline and, if it is twinned, there’s absolutely no way that we’re going to meet our [climate] goals,” Welch told KTW.

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Vintage The Kamloops Red Brigade was formed in the last two weeks, piggybacking the Extinction Rebellion out of the United Kingdom. Welch said she wanted to do something “other than just wave signs” and brought the idea to dance friends. After the theatrical funeral procession, which will travel about 50 metres to a fence warning against trespassing on private property, the group will have a short performance. Welch said the group does not plan to trespass and that the protest will be peaceful. She invited others to attend the noon event, with signs calling for action. A videographer will be in attendance to spread the message on social media. That message? “The Trans Mountain pipeline shouldn’t be twinned,” Welch said. “It will result in gigatons more of carbon dioxide being emitted into

the atmosphere. … It’s basically damning the world to irreversible climate change.” Asked what she would tell Albertans who are out of work as they wait to get their product to market, Welch said the province has relied too heavily on the oil and gas industry. She said those workers should be first in line for jobs in the renewable energy sector. “Our tax dollars go to help subsidize the oil and gas industry,” Welch said. “If that money went to Albertans to create new jobs in clean energy, they could do amazing things. We could be a world leader in alternative energy.” Welch said she is not affiliated with a political party. Local officials have expressed concern about protests, which could arise in Kamloops as a result of the project.

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Suspect in murder of city woman still in custody KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A man arrested last month in connection with the death of a Kamloops woman who vanished nearly 20 years ago will return to court in three weeks. Trent Larsen, 52, is facing one count of second-degree murder in relation to the death of 27-year-old Angel Lyn Fehr. According to court documents, Larsen is accused of murdering Fehr in Kamloops on May 2, 2000. Larsen made a brief first appearance in Kamloops provincial court on Monday. He is slated to make his next

court appearance on Oct. 21. Larsen, who is from Chasm, near Clinton, was arrested on Sept. 15. Police announced the arrest at a press conference in Surrey last week. Mounties said Fehr’s body was located on a rural property near 100 Mile House after Larsen’s arrest. Fehr was last seen on April 23, 2000, when she had Easter dinner with her family, including her two daughters, in Abbotsford. After dinner, Fehr and Larsen left to drive back to Kamloops. The expectant

Indian man faces local sex charges KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A young man from India is in a Kamloops jail cell facing a number of charges, including two counts of sexual assault. A court-ordered ban on publication protects the identity of the 20-year-old and his alleged victim, as well as the details of the offences he is accused of having committed. The man is charged with two counts each of sexual assault and uttering threats, as well

as criminal harassment and intimidation. Each of the offences is alleged to have been committed in Kamloops over a fiveweek period between Aug. 3 and Sept. 8. A Kamloops provincial court judge is waiting to hear more information about a potential electronic monitoring program before deciding whether to grant the accused bail. The man is scheduled to return to court on Oct. 15.

mother was never seen nor heard from again. Investigators deter-

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Kamloops Mounties are reminding the public to hang up on would-be phone scammers, even if the caller ID indicates the call is coming from the police detachment. Kamloops RCMP reports that it has received numerous reports from residents in which a fraudster informs them that there’s a warrant for their arrest. They are instructed to deposit

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Suspect in 2017 shooting will soon be sentenced KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

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Caron is alleged to have barricaded himself in his parents’ home at the G&M Trailer Park on the Yellowhead Highway, across from Sun Rivers. Police said they were initially called to a report of a domestic incident at a North Shore home, where Caron allegedly threatened to shoot police. A man emerged from the home armed with a rifle and fled in a pickup truck.

Caron is accused of opening fire on police on multiple occasions during the subsequent pursuit, which took place on the North Shore and through the Tk’emlups reserve. Court records show Caron is scheduled to be sentenced on Nov. 1, but he has not yet entered guilty pleas. Following his arrest, Caron was facing numerous charges, including four counts of attempted murder.

Flood mitigation work to be done in Riverside Park KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The city will seek funding for flood mitigation work at Riverside Park. On Tuesday, council unanimously approved an application for community emergency preparedness funds, provincial dollars administered via the Union of BC Municipalities to make communities more resilient in responding to emergencies. The city will apply for $750,000 to complete erosion protection and riverbank upgrades in the downtown park. The plan is to raise the riverbank and Rivers Trail through grading, in addition to removing trees and installing rip-rap. City civic operations director Jen Fretz explained the flood risk in the park is equal or greater than what is has been in the past, due to climate change science pointing to more

extremes. In the future, residents could notice the river lower or higher than in the past. The city noted concern for sanitary infrastructure in Riverside Park, in the event of flooding. The city has also applied for about $6 million in grant funding through the federal government’s Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program for a Riverside Park rehabilitation project, including repairs and/ or replacement of the spray park and a new refrigerated ice skating rink. That funding request did not include money for the flood mitigation work. Fretz said the city has not yet heard back on the status of those requests. The city calls the flood protection work a “top priority” and it will be completed with or without the grant funding, paid for otherwise using city stormwater funds.

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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS #elxn43 – Oct. 21, 2019

Federal Election 2019

Kamloops This Week has questioned Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo candidates on a number of topics. First up is CLIMATE CHANGE as we ask those who seek to be MP:

Q:

Canada, B.C. and Kamloops have set myriad emissions targets and have always failed to meet them. Why should voters believe your party’s plan should be the one to embrace? And, is there not an argument for spending energy on adapting to climate change if we cannot avoid the scenarios being presented? Kira Cheeseborough, Animal Protection Party: “One of the biggest things with our party’s platform is that we are looking at a lot of issues that we’re experiencing in the country through a lens of climate KIRA CHEESEBOROUGH change. “One of the big issues is coal and oil industries when you look at greenhouse gases, but there are also issues with deforestation, there’s issues of ocean dead zones, there’s issues of topsoil erosion. “Though oil and coal industries are definitely one of the biggest contributors, there’s nobody else looking at animal agriculture. That’s where we are looking, as well ... “We are looking at every single contributor to climate change. We’re not just looking at the top couple ones and sweeping under the rug, ones that have very powerful lobbying group …. “Dairy is one of the biggest contributors on a global scale to climate change and so is meat production, as well. I do also want to say that even though we are looking at these industries, we also understand that there are families and generations of families that have sustained their livelihood in these industries, so it’s about supporting them and making a transition to something better for the environment, for people’s health and, obviously, better for the animals versus continuing to fund and subsidize these industries ... “If we can still prevent, we should 100 per cent be putting our energy into doing so. Even with the IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] report and the global impacts of 1.5 C degrees increase, there is still irre-

versible damage that is going to come from that and we shouldn’t be taking a reduction stance. “There is science behind the fact that if people try to go for a larger goal, they’re going to be more successful getting there than if they say they’re just trying to minimize something. There’s going to be less effort and energy into a minimizing effort versus a goal to completely prevent. “I do think we should strive for complete prevention based on this knowledge.” Iain Currie, Green Party: “Elizabeth May and the Green party have been relentlessly consistent and we are the Green party. It is based on sustainability. It is based on environmental concerns. “Elizabeth May is the only one who has been talking, IAIN CURRIE again, relentlessly about the science. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has issued reports which we rely on, so it’s the science talking. It’s not the Green party. It’s not Elizabeth May. It’s us repeating the best climate scientists in the world. “We have never sugarcoated — not one bit — the challenge of the undertaking that we are proposing. It is more politically expedient to talk about the climate crisis as if it was a minor thing, this isn’t going to hurt anybody, we can go about business as usual. “That is a much more politically palatable, more digestible message. But that’s not the message we’re going to give to voters because it isn’t true. We’ve been science-based. We’ve based our platform on the truth of the issue. The Green party has taken this position even when it was not popular ...

“It’s not a question of spending versus adaptation. We have to do both. Yes, absolutely, we have to adapt. We have to pay more attention to fighting fires, for example, than we would in the past. “But, we can’t not fight it. Because you can’t adapt to some of the potential consequences of global warming beyond one-anda-half degrees. You can’t successfully adapt as a civilization if you are facing oceans rising to the levels that are possible at higher temperatures. You can’t adapt as a civilization to forest fires raging out of control. This is an existential threat. … “We reach a tipping point where the consequences become massively unpredictable. You don’t adapt to a threat to your survival — you fight against it.” Cynthia Egli, New Democratic Party: “The New Democratic Party believes that climate change is happening and something drastic needs to happen. “A New Democratic government CYNTHIA EGLI will declare a climate emergency and put in place ambitious, science-based greenhouse gas reduction targets. “The aim is to help stabilize the global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees celsius. Our goal is to put targets and legislation and ensure accountability by creating an independent climate accountability office to do regular audits of progress towards our climate goals. “We need to realize that bold, urgent action needs to happen to confront the climate crisis. “I’m not willing to go into this thinking we’re just going to adapt

and continue on with the same status quo that we’ve been doing. “Our kids are asking us to do something and I think it starts with viewing it [the issue] as climate justice and doing justice to the climate. “I went to the climate justice strike last Friday up at TRU and they really believe in reframing it [climate change] to a climate crisis and moving forward looking for climate justice, so it means reframing it to make it an ethical issue not just an issue about actions. Ken Finlayson, People’s Party: “We believe in climate change. Absolutely, no ifs, ands or buts. “We do, however, believe it’s a natural phenomenon. What happens is people confuse climate change with pollution. “There’s lots of polKEN FINLAYSON lution. We’ve got 7.5-billion litres of toxic sewage and chemicals going into the Fraser Delta down in Vancouver and Victoria every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Those are critical problems that need to be acted on right now. It’s kind of like your house is on fire. You need to find a pail of water. Don’t go looking for insurance. “Instead, we find a lot of climate alarmists that don’t want a pipeline and they’re worried about the potential of a hypothetical disaster that may or may not occur at some unknown date in the future. “Meanwhile, we’re polluting our waters. The killer whale population is threatened not because there’s some hypothetical disaster that hasn’t happened yet, but because of the ongoing pol-

lution that we’ve been doing for 100 years. That’s what we need to address.” Finlayson said CO2 is not a pollutant. He called it oxygen for plants, a “perfect symbiotic relationship. “Guess what? If CO2 is not a pollutant, you know what you don’t need? You don’t need to tax it. It’s not a bad thing.” Asked about adaptation versus prevention, he said: “Absolutely. When it gets cold, you better find a sweater. That’s how we’ve survived this long, the last 130,000 years — adapting.” Peter Kerek, Communist Party: “For one thing, we’re not beholden to corporate interests that fund our party and we’re not even beholden to wealthy individuals that fund our party. “We struggle to fund our party, but our PETER KEREK principles are to put people ahead of profits and to meet people’s needs. Those aren’t really the principles of the other parties. Those parties might say something similar, but their record contradicts that … “We should be doing both. We should be preparing for climate change because we are just one country, with a small percentage of the globe’s population, but we have no moral authority to pressure other countries to adopt more climate-friendly policies if we’re not doing them ourselves. “Beyond stopping our own polluting, we can also develop more manufacturing in renewable resource technology. We can do both. We can implement that and be part of a jobs growth program, the retooling of all these closed factories and even sawmills.

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LOCAL NEWS “Those factories can be retooled. “There are factories in the midwestern states where automotive plants were shut down and they’ve been taken over by co-op worker organizations and they’ve turned them into manufacturing of solar panels, for example. “That type of incentive needs to be created in Canada, rather than incentivizing oil corporations to extract more oil by, for example, purchasing bankrupt pipelines off of them so that they can ship their oil through it without risk of devaluing your pipelines.” Terry Lake, Liberal Party: “I think you can do both and we are doing both. As environment minister in British Columbia, there were plans for adaptation as well as mitigation. I think that happens in every TERRY LAKE plan. “You have to protect the coastline. For instance, we know with oceans rising and with more severe weather, that communities like Richmond, for instance, need to harden their coastline to prevent damage. So, yes, I think we should be spending money on adaptation

to make our infrastructure more resilient to the effects of climate change, like more severe weather. “We’ve seen the severe thunderstorms we’ve had here and that can overwhelm the stormwater system, so that’s important. “But, in terms of our party and the plan we’ve put forward, you’ve had environmental economists like Mark Jaccard at Simon Fraser University, like Andrew Leach at the University of Alberta, take a look at all of the parties’ different plans and I would say that the Liberal plan has had good reviews from those experts and I trust their judgment. “There’s always more that can be done, but I think the plan that we have in place at the moment, with the national price on carbon, with the clean fuel standard that the Conservatives want to get rid of, with the single-use plastics ban and phasing out coal-fire plants quicker than before — all of these will get us very close to the Paris target. “Now, do we need to keep reviewing and making sure that that’s still possible? Absolutely. I think no government should be resting on its laurels and I think many of us are looking at net-zero emissions by 2050 as the ultimate target that all governments should be looking at. I would say we have a very robust, comprehensive climate action plan — one that is far better in terms of targets

#elxn43 – Oct. 21

and actions compared to the Conservative plan. “And, compared to the Greens and NDP, it’s more achievable, without causing a dramatic shock to the economy, which would happen under either one of their plans.” Cathy McLeod, Conservative Party: “First of all, we believe in technology, not taxes. We believe that the carbon tax, by what all experts say, is hurting affordability, but it’s not high enough to significantly impact behaviour, so it’s not working. “But we do believe — and there’s many, CATHY MCLEOD many examples out there in terms of the opportunities for technology and whether it’s carbon capture in storage or many others — putting a cap on the major industrial emitters and providing incentives for both the research and the implementation of measures that will reduce our carbon emissions is what is actually going to get us to where we need to go.” Pointing to adaptation as important, McLeod cited diking in places experiencing increased flooding.

Federal Election Election forums set KTW, Radio NL, KamloopsChamber of Commerce forum, Oct. 8 Kamloops This Week, Radio NL and the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce have teamed up to present an all-candidates debate. The event will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. in the Grand Hall at TRU. All candidates have been invited to the forum: Kira Cheeseborough (Animal Protection Party), Iain Currie (Green), Cynthia Egli (NDP), Ken Finlayson (People’s Party), Peter Kerek

(Communist), Terry Lake (Liberal) and Cathy McLeod (Conservative). Sun Peaks forum, Oct. 15 An all-candidates forum will be held in Sun Peaks on Tuesday, Oct. 15. The forum is being organized by Thompson Bayted, sponsored by the Sun Peaks Grand Hotel and Conference Centre and moderated by Brandi Schier of the Sun Peaks Independent News. The event will begin at 6 p.m. at the Sun Peaks Grand, 3240 Village Way.

Free transit on Oct. 21 Kamloops residents can hop aboard the bus for free on election day — Oct. 21. City council has voted unanimously in favour of supporting the initiative, which will allow residents to

ride the bus for free during future civic, provincial and federal elections. The city has offered free transit during events in the past, such as the municipal election and Ribfest,

with the goal of increasing ridership. About $2,700 is collected in fares on a typical day. Free transit will be limited to conventional transit and excludes HandyDart service.

FEDERAL ELECTION FORUM 2019

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 TRU GRAND HALL 7-9 PM (DOORS OPEN AT 6 PM)

Kira Cheeseborough

Brought to you by:

Iain Currie

Cynthia Egli

BROADCAST LIVE ON Come to hear the candidates seeking to represent the voters of Kamloops in Parliament and to ask your questions in this open-mic forum.

Ken Finlayson

Peter Kerek

Terry Lake

Cathy McLeod


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FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Students grill candidates at high school forum South Kamloops secondary Grade 11 student Claire Fortems asks Conservative candidate Cathy McLeod what her party plans to do on meeting the Paris Agreement targets on emissions. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Climate change is on the minds of local youth, as was apparent at a federal election forum on Wednesday at South Kamloops secondary. When NDP candidate Cynthia Egli asked if students agree with teenaged environmental advocate Greta Thunberg, a room full of hands shot up. Meanwhile, People’s Party of Canada candidate Ken Finlayson was asked to defend his party’s position that climate change is real, but is naturally occurring and not caused by CO2 emissions. “Why should youth trust you when, on Facebook, you compared a youth advocate for climate change to Nazi propaganda?” Grade 12 student Ireland Miller asked Finlayson. About 150 high school students were hungry for answers before lunch from candidates running to be MP of the KamloopsThompson-Cariboo riding. They can’t yet officially vote, but will take part in a student vote on election day, Oct. 21. On the issue of climate change,

Terry Lake repeated his Liberal Party’s recent announcement to reach net zero emissions by 2050, while Green Party candidate Iain Currie called for leadership in transitioning to a green economy. “We have to turn this ship around,” Currie said. Incumbent Conservative MP Cathy McLeod was asked how her party would meet the Paris climate agreement targets without a carbon tax.

Her party will reach those targets, McLeod said, but argued the carbon tax is too low to be effective, instead hurting rural residents who have no choice but to drive without alternative transportation. She said her party would support technological innovation to reach climate targets and cited the Domtar pulp mill’s reduction of particulate as a success story. “The government gave them

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE Application for a Permit Amendment under the Environmental Management Act Westcoast Energy Inc., doing business as Spectra Energy Transmission (Spectra Energy), a subsidiary of Enbridge Inc. intends to amend its existing Permit PA-16322 issued August 18, 2017 by the British Columbia Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy (BC MOECCS). This permit authorizes the discharge of emissions from Spectra Energy’s sweet gas transmission system comprised of 17 compressor stations and associated pipelines. The purpose of the Permit amendment is to accommodate a facility Horsepower Enhancement Project (the Project) at Savona Compressor Station 7 (CS 7). The location of discharge associated with the Project is that part of Lot A, except Plan 8234 and Lot B of District Lot 401, Kamloops Division of Yale District, Plan 7770. This location is in Savona BC, on Highway 1. The Project is required to facilitate operational flexibility at the station and to bring the two existing 18.5 MW turbines up to full power. It is anticipated the timeline for commissioning and operation of the proposed project will begin in the first quarter of 2020. Compressor Station 7 is in operation 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. The existing sources of discharge at CS 7 are two 18.5 MW natural gas turbine driven compressors, one 0.80 MW natural gas turbine driven generator (as backup), one 0.75 MW emergency diesel reciprocating engine driven generator (as backup) and three heat medium boilers (two on standby). The project will include a software upgrade on the two existing 18.5 MW turbines to enhance the horsepower from 18.5 MW to 22.4 MW. This Project involves existing equipment only. No new equipment will be installed. The horsepower enhancement will occur on Spectra Energy owned land. Including the Project, CS 7 authorized discharge limits at full capacity will be: • PM2.5 = 1.2 tonnes/year, increasing by 19% • VOC =4.8 tonnes/year, will increase by 20% • NOX = 206.6 tonnes/year, will increase by 20% • CO = 177.3 tonnes/year, will increase by 20% • SO2 = 6.4 tonnes/year, will increase by 20% An air quality assessment has been conducted. It indicates the Project will result in a small but not significant increase in pollutant concentrations in the immediate vicinity of CS 7. The assessment indicates that there is no meaningful change in air quality regionally. Some small changes may occur in the immediate area of CS 7. Any person who may be affected by the proposed amendment and wishes to provide relevant information may, within 30 days after the last date of posting and publishing, send written comments to the applicant, with a copy to Director, Oil and Gas Authorizations of Ministry of Environment at 325, 1011-4th Avenue, Prince George, B.C. V2L 3H9. The identity of any respondents and the contents of anything submitted in relation to this application will become part of the public record. Contact: Telephone: Address: Email:

Reg Mullett (403) 699-1750 200, 425 – 1st Street SW, Calgary, AB/T2P 3L8 Reg.Mullett@enbridge.com

support,” McLeod said. “There was new research. They have decreased their emissions by 70 per cent. Using those same sorts of thinking, we believe that we will get to where we need to be with the Paris targets.” Finlayson drew the ire of students and other candidates when he outlined his party’s view on climate change. Claiming CO2 emissions are not harmful to the environment, one student asked for proof — to which Finlayson cited climate change skeptic Tim Ball and drew criticism from Lake. “We have these wonderful machines called smartphones,” Lake said. “And you can Google anything. You will quickly discredit Mr. Finlayson’s claims about Dr. Tim Ball. Wikipedia is very precise on how he has been discredited. “All I can tell you is listen to your teachers that are teaching

you science.” Other topics that emerged during the forum included foreign relations with authoritarian regimes and money for retraining employees in light of Interior mill closures and curtailments, to which Communist Party candidate Peter Kerek suggested cutting military spending. Grade 9 student Alexis Cloet said the forum gave her a better understanding of where candidates stood and she planned to go home and talk politics with family. Grade 9 student Matthew House said attending the forum was different from politics depicted in the media. “Sometimes I almost want to get away from it,” House said. “But being here today impressed me, with how well they knew their topics and what they were doing.” Though their votes remain undecided, students KTW spoke with said they were impressed with Kerek and Animal Protection Party candidate Kira Cheeseborough, a self-proclaimed Titan who graduated from South Kam and now has passion to address — you guessed it — climate change.


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On pace for a record permit year JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Through three-quarters of the year, the city’s building permit values are outpacing last year’s numbers. And 2018 as a whole set a record for building permit value, at $285 million. Through the end of September, the city had issued $209.7 million worth of building permits, compared to $186.6 million at the end of September 2018. “In a nutshell, it’s been another really, really strong year,” city building and engineering development manager Jason Dixon said. In September, the city issued $22.4

million worth of permits, with about $10 million attributed to two larger projects: — both housing projects and one each downtown and in North Kamloops. One permit was issued for a 24-unit multi-family housing project on Lorne Street and another was issued for a mixed-use building in the former Super Save gas station location on Tranquille Road. In addition, the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre in Aberdeen was issued a $1.5-million commercial permit for renovations. Last month, a $2.5-million permit was issued for work at the Chevron gas station Eighth Street in North Kamloops, with the

station likely to become a Town Pantry, similarly to the brand’s other stations. It for years had been grandfathered in with service repair bays. As for the final quarter in 2019, Dixon noted a significant amount of permits still in the queue. “We’ve had an exceptionally busy late summer, early fall,” he said. The building department is also introducing an incentive program for the BC Energy Step Code. Dixon said four projects were already lined up in anticipation of the city program, which launched at the beginning of October. “We’ll roll them into it right away now,” he said.

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Out of the Cold is a non-profit organization that provides overnight shelter, food and clothing and a welcoming environment for homeless people in Kamloops. The Executive Director will report to the Board of Directors and will mange shelter operations for the 2019-2020 Winter Season. Duties include recruiting, training and scheduling volunteers and paid staff, management of shelter operations, and fund raising. Employment is from October 2019 to March 2020 (renewable) 25 hours per week, $25 per hour. Some evening and early morning shifts required *Preference is given to applicants with relevant post-secondary education and experience working with the homeless.* Send resume to: mckelvey@shaw.ca

Notice of Intent

Whitecroft, B.C. Road Closure

Notice is given, pursuant to Section 60 of the Transportation Act, that the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has received an application to permanently close an unconstructed, unmaintained portion of Cahility Road between: • Lot 67, Section 11, Township 22, Range 15, West of the 6th Meridian, Kamloops Division Yale District, Plan 26002, and • Lot 1, Section 11, Township 22, Range 15, West of the 6th Meridian, Kamloops Division Yale District, Plan KAP84494, in Whitecroft, B.C. The applicant will then dedicate a new 20 metre wide unconstructed, unmaintained road along the western boundary of Lot 1, Section 11, Township 22, Range 15, West of the 6th Meridian, Kamloops Division Yale District, Plan KAP84494. Anyone with comments of support or objections to this road closure should submit their comments in writing to the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Kamloops office at 127-447 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C., V2C 2T3, or by email to Brandon.Gustafson@gov.bc.ca, no later than October 31, 2019.

UBCM endorses idea of lowering voting age to 16 JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops teacher, whose students in recent years pushed the province to lower the voting age to 16, is calling an endorsement of the idea by municipalities in B.C. a “positive step.” Despite rejecting the idea in previous years, the Union of BC Municipalities last week endorsed a resolution to lobby the province to lower the municipal election voting age to 16. Currently, one must be at least 18 to vote in municipal, provincial and federal elections. Westsyde secondary social studies teacher Jeremy Reid’s students have been lobbying for the lower voting age during the past few years, creating the Vote 16 campaign. Students created a website, advocated through media and wrote to provincial ministers and the premier. Though some

of his students spearheading the initiative have since graduated, Reid said he was pleased to hear the UBCM endorsed the resolution. “I think it would be a positive step and maybe the provincial government will implement that,” he said. Reid said students are engaged. At the municipal level, high school students provide input to city hall via junior council. In addition, an estimated one-million students across Canada are taking part in a student vote for the Oct. 21 federal election. Reid said lowering the voting age would lead to higher voter participation in society, providing a safe, non-partisan place for students to learn. He pointed to Brazilian international students who can vote at age 16 and noted students also drive at that age. Kamloops Coun. Dale

Bass was at the Union of BC Municipalities convention in Vancouver and voted in favour of the resolution. “Look at what all these 16-year-olds are doing right now,” she said. Sixteen-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg has made headlines recently for sailing across the Atlantic Ocean on a zero-emissions sailboat to attend a United Nations climate change conference, where she delivered a powerful speech, calling upon the world’s leaders to act for her generation. She later attended a climate strike march in Montreal that attracted about 500,000 people. The voting age resolution was brought forward by the City of Victoria. It was not recommended for endorsement by the UBCM resolutions committee. UBCM previously rejected lowering the voting age in 2011 and 2006.

Victoria pledges $100,000 for city’s Centre for Seniors Information KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The provincial government has provided $100,000 in funding to the Centre for Seniors Information BC Interior Society. This funding is specifically to

MoTI Ad 1272A NOI Whitecroft Road Closure

further improve access to community-based seniors’ services in Kamloops and to help seniors stay engaged, remain independent and age in place. The funding will give the Centre for Seniors Information

resources it needs to continue providing programs and services such as advocacy, education, support, socialization and outreach services to around 13,000 senior residents in Kamloops and the surrounding area.

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Don’t be fooled: Canada has a gang problem, not a gun problem Kamloops this Week Friday, Oct 4

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A plan showing the proposed road closure may be viewed at the Ministry’s Kamloops office weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. A copy of the plan can be emailed if requested.

For more information, please contact Brandon Gustafson at 250 371-3796 or at Brandon.Gustafson@gov.bc.ca

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LOCAL NEWS

DOCKING FOR THE WINTER

The Kamloops boating community has been busy prepping their vessels for winter storage — and counting the days until they can get back on the water. Wailua Outrigger Canoe Club members Joanne Dobrovolny and Paul Blackett (above) apply protection coating to the canoe, while members of three local dragon boat teams finish tarping their boats for winter storage before settling down for coffee and donuts.

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Honour Ranch to have ceremonial launch Saturday in Ashcroft SAFE HAVEN FOR FIRST RESPONDERS AND MILITARY VETERANS IS 45 MINUTES WEST OF KAMLOOPS KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

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Daniela Basile of SSOL Gardens brought familiar fall colours to the Kamloops Regional Farmers’ Market last weekend. The Saturday morning market continues through Oct. 26.

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Six realtors walked away with hardware at the second annual KADREA Realtor Awards gala, which was held last weekend at the Grand Hall at Thompson Rivers

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a group of partners. “It was last year that we felt the need of having an annual celebration which recognizes those who work hard for the betterment of the real estate sector in Kamloops,” KADREA president Wendy Runge said. “And thus, the idea of having realtor awards was born.” The 2019 award winners: • Realtor of the Year: Linda Turner of Re/Max Real Estate (Kamloops); • Rookie Realtor of the Year: while

Lisa Moonie of Royal LePage Westwin Realty; • Realtor Choice Award: Helen Ralph of Re/Max Real Estate (Kamloops); • Distinguished Service Award: Vince Cavaliere of River City Realty; • Outstanding Affiliate: Cliff Brauner of Pillar to Post; • Non-Member Citizenship: Sarah Park of Mortgage Alliance. The gala saw realtors from more than 20 brokerages nominated in the six award categories.

A new safe haven for first responders and military veterans will soon be open in Ashcroft to provide critical mental health support and services to the community at large. This Saturday at 1 p.m., Honour Ranch will hold a ceremonial launch ahead of its official launch next year. “We’ll start treatment in early 2020,” said honorary colonel Allan De Genova, who is also president and founder of Honour House Society. “The main lodge is ready and we’ll be working toward another 10 cottages.” Until then, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists and various professionals will continue to set up programs for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental illnesses. De Genova said he was inspired to start the ranch by his friend, military veteran Joseph Allina, who completed three tours in Afghanistan, but died by suicide in July 2018. Allina’s partner, a Surrey RCMP officer, will be at Saturday’s Honour Ranch launch. “If I would have had Honour Ranch up and running, I would have saved Joe,” De Genova said. “I feel bad about that and so Joe is truly my

inspiration behind getting this ranch up and running. I think about him every day and I’ve been pushing to get here.” During a recent ceremony, De Genova said a local RCMP officer approached him and described how desperately he needs the facility to open. “He said, ‘I will be there. I couldn’t believe it,” De Genova said, noting he is feeling more inspired than ever to continue his mission to help other veterans and first responders recover and thrive. He said he sympathized with Ashcroft and Cache Creek residents’ recent adversities, including wildfires, floods, mudslides and even losing a fire chief. Honour House opened in 2011 in New Westminster, offering free lodging to first responders and armed forces members who required medical treatment and care. Honour Ranch sits on a 120-acre property south of Ashcroft. Honour Ranch was originally meant to be located in Kamloops, on land in Rayleigh donated by Rick and Donna Wanless. Issues relating to train noise and the floodplain led organizers to seek another location.

Reserve job fair on tap The Canadian Army Reserve Job Fair will be held this Saturday at the JR Vicars Armoury in the McGill industrial area. The public is invit-

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to meet with Army reservists, view interactive displays and participate in activities throughout the day. Interested individuals will also be able to apply on site. The job fair will run from 10 a.m.to 4 p.m. The armoury is at 1221 McGill Rd. YARD SALE The Kamloops CanGo Grannies are hosting their first Fabric, Yarn and More Sale this Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral, downtown at Nicola Street and Fourth Avenue. All proceeds from the sale will go to the Stephen Lewis Foundation for the Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign, which helps African grandmothers who are raising orphaned grandchildren.


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

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GLOBAL VIEWS OPINION

Beijing will use force to halt Hong Kong protests

A

fter the 17th consecutive weekend of increasingly violent protests in Hong Kong, the first protester was wounded by a live bullet this past Tuesday. Eighteen-year-old student Tsang Chi-kin, one of a group of about a dozen students attacking a policeman who had become separated from his comrades, was shot in the chest as he struck the officer with a metal pole. Chi-kin is expected to survive. About 100 other Hong Kongers, civilians and police were treated in hospitals on the same day for injuries incurred during what the Beijing regime calls “riots.” The violence has grown over the months and that is sometimes an accurate description of what is going on in the streets. Even if the protesters are in the right, they are definitely a lot less non-violent than they were at the start. What is remarkable (though rarely remarked upon) is the restraint shown by the police who, although employed by the Hong Kong city government, ultimately serve the repressive dictatorship in Beijing. It’s only relative restraint, of course — we are not talking about the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or kindly British bobbies here — but during months of escalating violence, they have still managed not to kill anybody. Even on Tuesday, when the rest of China was marking the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic, the protests in Hong Kong continued and nobody died. To understand how remarkable this is, ask yourself this: How many protesters would American police have killed by now if equally violent protests had been taking place in the streets of a major American city every weekend for the past four months? This is not proof of how nice China’s rulers are. It’s evidence of how worried they are. They dare not make too many concessions to the protesters, but they want to avoid using major force against them — undertaking another Tiananmen Square massacre, so to speak — because they think the price would be very high. They are right about that. When Britain returned the colony of Hong Kong to China in 1997, it was China’s main financial window on the world. That’s why it was granted a spe-

Teen shot by police charged with rioting ASSOCIATED PRESS

HONG KONG — The teenager who was the first victim of police gunfire in Hong Kong’s months-long pro-democracy protests was charged Thursday with rioting and attacking police, as calls grew for the government to ban the wearing of masks to subdue rising violence in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

GWYNNE DYER World

WATCH cial status in China (one country, two systems) for the next 50 years. It has free speech, the rule of law, all sorts of privileges that do not exist in the rest of China — but, ultimately, it must bow to Beijing. Two decades later, its status as a global financial centre remains a major asset for the regime, but there are red lines that President Xi Jinping will never cross, like letting Hong Kong people choose their own government in a free election. This is now one of the protesters’ demands (although it wasn’t at the start), but it simply is not going to happen. The Communist Party rules through carefully chosen, mostly non-Communist puppets in Hong Kong, but it does rule. As Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, explained in a private meeting with business leaders last month, her freedom of action is “very, very, very limited.” She got into trouble in the first place by putting forward a new extradition law that would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be tried in Chinese courts, where accused people have few rights and the conviction rate is 99 per cent. She probably did it against her own

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The shooting of the 18-yearold Tuesday during widespread clashes marred China’s National Day celebration and marked an alarming escalation in violence in the unrest that has rocked one of the world’s top financial hubs since June. Local media reported that Chief Executive Carrie Lam will hold a special Executive Council meeting on Friday to discuss a ban on masks.

better judgment, but the orders came from above. When the public pushed back, sensing that this could be the beginning of the end for Hong Kong’s relative freedom, Lam probably wanted to drop the matter, but it took her months to persuade Beijing to let her do it. In June, she “shelved” the law, in August she said it was “dead,” but only in early September did she actually get Beijing’s permission to withdraw it. Too little, too late. By then, protests had escalated far beyond the specific law to sweeping demands for democracy in Hong Kong. Most people outside China will sympathize, but it cannot happen. The Communist regime’s first priority is its own survival, so it will not permit such an example to flourish on Chinese soil. The protesters have won what they originally came out for, which is the withdrawal of the extradition law. Their other demands will never be granted because they imperil the ultimate authority of the Communist Party. It’s time to collect their winnings and step away from the table. If they don’t, Beijing will ultimately crush the protests no matter how much economic and reputational damage ensues. In August, it doubled the number of troops it keeps in Hong Kong under the guise of rotating the garrison. The replacements came in, but the others didn’t actually leave. Sooner or later, if matters continue as they are, they will be used. Read more Gwynne Dyer columns online at kamloopsthisweek.com, under the Opinion tab.

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A24

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

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Presented by

It is with much excitement and gratitude that the Pink Ribbon Organizing Committee CREATED HISTORY in Kamloops by raising the greatest amount of money, in one evening, at the 2019 Pink Ribbon Charity Ball. We are pleased to announce we raised $251,172 that will be added to our million dollar commitment to bettering cancer care at Royal Inland Hospital.

Thank you to… Event Sponsors Glaicar Family Foundation The Bilkey Family Team Equipment Dr. Lisa Steele and Iain Currie Gordon and Marcia Ballantyne The Plowe Family

Dr. David Ciriani

Contributors Silver & Gold

TOOLS • TENTS • EVENTS

R E N T A L

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Patrons

• Cundari Family • Glaicar Family Foundation • New Gold Inc. - New Afton • Kamloops Medical Imaging

• Rivershore Ram / Westcan Aircraft • KPMG • Dr. Maureen LeiaStephen • Domtar • Finning

In Celebration of

• Josephine Bruno: 23 year survivor • Mary Fus: 1 year survivor • Kevin Gray: 8 month survivor • Susie Russo: 2 year survivor • Celine Maria Bourchier: 2 year survivor • Larry Heney: 7 year survivor • Robert Biagioni: 18 year survivor

• Elizabeth Biagioni: 4 year survivor • Frankie McBride: 7 year survivor • Linda Robinson: 13 year survivor • Susan Pierce: 1 year survivor • Barrie Hill: 1 year survivor • Juanita Biagioni Ryan: 20 year survivor • Kim Giesbrecht: 1 year survivor

Big Horn Security Hunter Design Kathryn Learie and Dennis Owen – Owen Imaging Silver & Gold CanItal Ladies: Tona Lowie, Luisa Cuzzetto, Modesta Luca and Natalie` Paul

Donors

• Dr. Lisa Steele and Iain Currie • Kamloops Honda • SKIN • Brenda Donaldson - Invis • Brendan Shaw Real Estate • A & T Developments • Dr. Marcia Cirino Ballantyne • Jack Keep Family

• Gerry Bell 1943-2012 • Giuseppe Beltrano 1947-2002 • Anna Beltrano 1960-2002 • Leah Davidson 1974-2013 • Joan Fawcett 1945-2017 • Melissa Greenway 1974-2014 • Jana Deacon 1962-2006 • Mark Biagioni 1969-2005 • Giuseppe Masi 1926-1995 • Ruth Sparrow 1937-2018 • Anne Day 1951-2019

• All North Consultants • Zimmer Auto Group • River City Nissan • Urban Systems • Tenisci Piva Chartered Accountants • Dr. Vitoratos Inc. • BMO Nesbitt Burns

A special thankyou to our 82 silent auction donors that added $30,000 to the grand total In Memory of

• Henry “Harry” Francis Lidster 1923-2016 • Wayne Rusk 1943-2017 • Wendy Shepherd 1954-1998 • Dr. David Hanks 1964-2019 • Anne Day 1951-2019 • Jana Deacon 1962-2006 • Annavon Seidel 1943-2019 • Dallas Randall 1940-2011 • Robert Chappelle 1940-2016 • Hannah Perris 1972-2016

• Abra Lorrensen 1975-2016 • Jana Deacon 1962-2006 • Joan Field 1932-1992 • Marilyn King 1952-2007 • Bonnie Reilly 1951-2018 • Deborah Kitson 1951-2010 • Jana Deacon 1962-2006 • Nella Sirianni 1935-2014 • Auntie Sina 1930-2003 • Luigi Magliocchi 1949-2005 • Cathy Irene Hewitt 1961-2017

• Randine Askin 1968-2006 • Jana Deacon 1962-2006 • Neil Patterson 1945-2019 • Marg Spina 1951-2017 • Wayne Rusk 1943-2017 • Yvonne Schneider 1949-2014 • Rosa Silano 1929-2003 • Rosa Maria Iadarola 1934-2019 • Dave Robinson 1957-2017 • George Carlin 1939-2015 • Josephine Sanesh 1947-2015

• Rose Grandinetti 1947- 2010 • Jan Honey 1949-2019 • Josie Melnychuk 1928-2011 • Edward R. Bilkey 1923-1987 • Betty-June Bilkey 1925-1984 • James G. Whtmore 1934-2002 • Patrick R. Whitmore 1964-2008 • Mary Ailport - 1923-2009 Many contributions were made in celebration of all cancer survivors. We are grateful.


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

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A25

KTW’s Arts and Entertainment section is published on Fridays. A&E co-ordinator: Sean Brady Call 778-471-7521 or email sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

arts&entertainment

FRIDAY | OCT. 4, 2019

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WCT to present a comedy you can really sink your teeth into SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

W

estern Canada Theatre will make its triumphant return to Sagebrush Theatre with a spoof of a classic monster tale. Dracula: The Bloody Truth depicts Professor Abraham van Helsing’s attempts to convince his audience that Bram Stoker’s Dracula was no work of fiction. In fact, the professor himself knows the titular bloody truth and has staged a production for all to see. Van Helsing, portrayed by actor Christopher Hunt, leads the audience through his version of events, taking them on a journey from the Transylvanian mountains to the English coast, often becoming frustrated with his cast and the numerous characters he has them play. “I’m angry and cranky and pissed off and not having a lot of fun — and I don’t want the audience to have fun. I want it to be serious. It’s not theatre, it’s not entertainment. They’re there to be educated,” Hunt told KTW. “It’s fun because the more serious I am, the more things go wrong. It’s a good thing to butt up against,” he said. Officially, the play has just four roles — Van Helsing and his three actors. But within the professor’s production, each actor brings a number of characters to the table. In one scene, actor Kirk Smith even accompanies himself in a scene, portraying “man and boy on a cliff,” jokingly calling himself “the worst scene partner I’ve ever hard.“ Smith also takes on the titular

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Natascha Girgis (left), Kirk Smith and Christy Bruce are actors playing actors in Dracula: The Bloody Truth, a classic monster tale spoof set to be staged by Western Canada Theatre beginning Oct. 10.

role of Dracula and about a halfdozen others, and Kamloops audiences might remember as Buddy in WCT’s production of Elf – The

LAST SHOW FOR LOCAL PROMOTER FACTOTUM Factotum/A27

presentS

Musical, staged in 2018. If keeping that many characters in his head wasn’t already a daunting task, Smith and fellow

LOCAL EVENTS THIS WEEKEND AND BEYOND

Local events/A26

SAVE THE DATE!

cast member Christy Bruce are also playing catch-up, joining the production after its first run by Calgary’s Vertigo Theatre nearly

FILM REVIEW:

DON’T PLAN TO SEE UNPLANNED Unplanned/A27

one year ago, with Hunt and fellow actor Natascha Girgis a part of that production.

See Dracula, A27

A NIGHT AT THE SYMPHONY, REVIEWED

Saturday, October 26th - NOON - 1pm

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PASSION FOR FASHIONSHOW FEATURING SOME CELEBRITY MODELS!


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KAMLOOPS ART GALLERY Until Oct. 26 and from Oct. 5 to Dec. 31, Kamloops Art Gallery, 465 Victoria St.

New exhibits are coming to the Kamloops Art Gallery. Until Oct. 26, see the work of four recent TRU graduates presented in The Cube gallery in the exhibition Upon Further Discussion. From Oct. 5 to Dec. 31, the main gallery will feature Hexsa’am: To Be Here Always.

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On Oct. 26, young author Finn Newcomen, 13, will sign his book The Hard Life of Jackson, about the salmon run. On Nov. 2, Ian Ferguson will be signing his latest book, The Survival Guide to British Columbia. On Nov. 16, Kamloops author Lorna Carleton will sign her latest, the second book in a seven-book teen fantasy series.

KAMCOMEDYFEST Until Oct. 5, The Rex, 417 Victoria St.

Headliners Dave Merheje and James Mullinger will be joined by more than a dozen other acts, including some from Kamloops. Tickets are available online at kamtix.ca.

CHAMBER MUSIC Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m., Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St.

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The Chamber Musicians of Kamloops will present the second concert of their season called On an Overgrown Path. It will feature cellist Martin Kratky and mother Alena Kratka, performing Czech works for cello and piano. Tickets are $25 and free for children ages 12 and younger, available online at cmk.eventbrite.ca or at the door.

WILDLIFE PARK FREE ADMISSION Oct. 14, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., BC Wildlife Park, 9077 Dallas Dr.

A day of free admission is on offer at the BC Wildlife Park, featuring a day of animal encounters (schedule to be announced), the second annual pie baking contest and a barbecue special featuring hot dogs and hot chocolate.

JIMMY RANKIN Oct. 18, 7 p.m., The Rex, 417 Victoria St.

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Canadian singer-songwriter Jimmy Rankin will stop by Kamloops for a show in support of his latest album, Moving East, released last fall. Tickets will be available online at jimmyrankin.com/tour.

OKTOBERFEST EVENT Oct. 19 to Oct. 20, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., The Dunes, 652 Dunes Dr.

The Dunes is hosting a family-friendly Oktoberfest event featuring vendors and shopping. Admission is free.

THE WILD Oct. 25, On The Rocks Pub and Grill, 1265 Rogers Way

Kelowna band The Wild will stop in Kamloops as part of their cross-Canada tour. In the past, the band has supported fellow hard rockers like Korn, Buckcherry, Rise Against and Godsmack. MINIMUM

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ZACH KLEISINGER Oct. 25, 7 p.m., RareBirds Housing Co-operative, 772 West Battle St.

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Vancouver folk singer Zach Kleisinger and his trio will perform at the RareBirds house. Small snacks will be provided, but concertgoers should bring their own beverages. Tickets are $20, available online at eventbrite.ca.

ROCKY HORROR Oct. 26, 7 p.m., Paramount Theatre, 503 Victoria St.

Kamloops Film Society and the crew from the Drunk in a Graveyard podcast are hosting a screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, with the audience encouraged to bring traditional props and dress in costume for what is traditionally a very

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FROM OCT. 4 audience-involved screening. Tickets are $11 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for students, available online at eventbrite.ca.

HOLLERADO Oct. 29, 7 p.m., Cactus Jack’s Nightclub, 130 Fifth Ave.

Hollerado will return to Kamloops for the last time in October as part of its One Last Time tour. The Ottawa-based indie rock band announced in February they were calling it quits after 12 years together. Tickets are $20, available online at kamtix.ca.

KAMCON Nov. 2 to Nov. 3, Thompson Rivers University, Campus Activity Centre, 805 TRU Way

The KamCon tabletop gaming convention will return to Kamloops, featuring Dungeons and Dragons and other board games and all things video game and fantasy related. General admission is $5 and gaming passes start at $35. For tickets and more information, go online to kamloopsconvention.ca.

ALEX CUBA Nov. 7, 7 p.m., Cactus Jack’s Nightclub, 130 Fifth Ave.

Latin Grammy and Juno Award winner Alex Cuba will play a show in Kamloops. The Cuban-Canadian singer-songwriter sings Afro-Cuban jazz and pop. Tickets are $15, available online at kamtix.ca.

TRANQUILLE ESCAPE ROOM Until Nov. 7, Tranquille Farm Fresh, 4600 Tranquille Rd.

The Enigma Women escape room continues until Nov. 7 and features a Second World War and Enigma machine theme, challenging participants to break the code. Tickets are $35, available online at tranquillefarmfresh.com/events.

CALEB HART Nov. 8, 9 p.m., The Blue Grotto Nightclub, 319 Victoria St.

Reggae musicians Caleb Hart and The Royal Youths will perform soulful, funky tunes at the Grotto. For ticket information, go online to thebluegrotto.ca.

PIFF THE MAGIC DRAGON Nov. 8, 8 p.m., Sagebrush Theatre, 821 Munro St.

Piff the Magic Dragon will perform. Funnyman magician John van der Put is known for his appearance on shows like Penn and Teller: Fool Us and America’s Got Talent, and as a resident magician at The Flamingo hotel and casino in Las Vegas.

NORTHERN SINGER-SONGWRITERS Nov. 9, 7 p.m., The Art We Are, 246 Victoria St.

The Art We Are will feature two solo acts. First up will be Ryan McNally, an acoustic traditional blues, jazz and old-time artist from Whitehorse. Following up will be folk artist Evrytt Willow from Dawson. The door fee is $5 to $10.

SPICE GIRLS TRIBUTE Nov. 9, 7 p.m., Cactus Jack’s Nightclub, 130 Fifth Ave.

Wannabe, a Spice Girls tribute show, will be at Cactus Jack’s on Saturday, Nov. 9. Tickets are $15, available online at kamtix. ca.

ILLUSIONISTS Dec. 5, 4 p.m. and 7 p.m., The Rex, 417 Victoria St.

Victoria illusionists Murray Hatfield and Teresa will headline the Kamloops Shriners Variety Show. The duo, as seen on the Penn and Teller: Fool Us TV show, will perform magic, comedy and illusions. They will be joined by guest comedian and chainsaw juggler Aaron Gregg and bubble artist Geoff Akins-Hannah. Tickets are $25, available online at bcshrinersshow.com/buytickets.


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REVIEW

Don’t make plans to see Unplanned TODD SULLIVAN STAFF REPORTER todd@kamloopsthisweek.com

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DAVE EAGLES/KTW Christopher Hunt plays Professor Abraham van Helsing, who leads the audience through a theatrical production based on his notes, letters and diary entries that warns of the dangers of Dracula.

Dracula lives on in WCT’s latest From A25

It’s been really quick,” Smith said. “Last week was our first week and it was just a breakneck speed right out of the gate.” The play is the product of Exeter, U.K.-based theatre company Le Navet Bete and John Nicholson. The company specializes in physical comedy and turning the sentimental or serious to silly. “Some of the plays we do are dramatic and seemingly important and feature modern social issues, and some are more on the silly and fun end of things — and this

is definitely that,” Hunt told KTW. The play within the play, Hunt said, is remarkably true to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, the source of the famous Count — a character that has lived on in various iterations, such as Bruce’s favourite, the horrific Nosferatu, or Smith’s, the educational and silly Count von Count of Sesame Street. The farcical haunt will run from Oct. 10 to Oct. 19 at Sagebrush Theatre, 1300 Ninth St. Tickets are available at the Kamloops Live box office, 250-374-5483, 1025 Lorne St. or online at kamloopslive.ca.

THE BLOODY TRUTH CAST Christy Bruce’s last WCT production was in Blind Date in 2014. Along with her theatre work and regular improv performances, her career also includes TV appearances on shows like Schitt’s Creek, The Handmaid’s Tale, New Eden, Suits, Orphan Black and more. Natascha Girgis is making her WCT debut, but has a long work history in theatre, including with Calgary’s The Shakespeare Company, Vertigo Theatre, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Company and about a dozen others across Western Canada. Christopher Hunt has a long history with WCT, performing in Still Desire You (2007), Cornflower Blue (1993), The Idler (1988) and Village of Idiots (1985). He has also performed with Berkeley Street Theatre in Toronto and The Shakespeare Company in Calgary and also works as a director, adjudicator and writer. Kirk Smith’s most recent WCT appearance was as Buddy in last season’s Elf – The Musical, but his past work also includes A Christmas Carol, Don’t Dress for Dinner, The 39 Steps, Boeing Boeing, Les Miserables, Fiddler on the Roof and more.

Last show for Factotum on Oct. 10 KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A Kamloops concert promoter is calling it quits, with a final show featuring a trio of bands from Vancouver and Kamloops to be played on Oct. 10.

Factotum CO has been promoting local shows for nearly three years, with 40 shows under its belt, but owner JP Lancaster said the next one will be its last. The final show will feature Bridal Party

(Vancouver), Tim the Mute (Vancouver) and local band Phosphenes. In a Facebook post, Lancaster, who recently put together a host of acts for Brewloops, said he will continue to work behind the scenes to put band

lineups together for some events in town, noting Factotum will continue to release music periodically as a record label. The show at The Blue Grotto, 319 Victoria St., begins at 8 p.m. Entry is $5 at the door.

hen it comes to looking at a film like Unplanned, the controversial antiabortion film that screened last weekend at Paramount Theatre, there are two metrics that need to be considered. The first is its artistry, or how well it works as a piece of filmmaking. The second is its accuracy, as it’s a film supposedly based on a true story. Unplanned fails in both of these metrics. Let’s talk about the filmmaking first. Unplanned tells the story of Abby Johnson, a woman who worked as the clinic director of a Planned Parenthood in Texas for eight years before quitting her job and becoming an anti-abortion activist. She’s played in the film by Ashley Bratcher, who delivers a perfectly fine performance alongside other generally adequate actors, which is to say no one is really spectacular. At the bottom end, though, would be Brooks Ryan, who plays her husband Doug, a character that only seems to exist to be right about everything. Honestly, there’s a truly bizarre scene in which Doug, entirely out of the blue and for no apparent reason, asks his wife Abby, “Are you sure you’re not pregnant?” Of course she thinks this is weird, and assures him she is not, but the next day she goes to work and gets a pregnancy test kit and, holy cow, she’s pregnant! That’s it! That’s the scene! I don’t know why it was there, except that they had to come up with some way to tell the story that Abby gets pregnant at that point in time. Apparently having a woman realize that for herself would just be too weird, I guess. Anyway, I digress. The storytelling bounces around in time in an utterly confusing fashion. It opens on the moment that Abby claims sparked her decision to leave Planned Parenthood: her assisting in an ultrasound guided abor-

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tion. It then jumps into the past eight years to show how she first became involved with the organization. After some time in the past, it jumps ahead four years, at which point I had no idea what the date was anymore, until the story caught up with the opening moments again. Planned Parenthood employees are depicted as everything from carelessly glib to actively cruel to, in the case of Robia Scott’s Cheryl, Abby’s boss at Planned Parenthood, cartoonishly evil. The only other characters that are depicted in a negative light are Abby’s parents, who treat their daughter terribly over and over again because of her work at Planned Parenthood. Except I’m pretty sure their attitude is meant to be seen as entirely defensible. So, yeah, it’s not a good movie, but even worse, it’s of questionable accuracy. That scene at the start of the movie, where Abby participates in an ultrasound-led abortion? Well, the reason it inspires her to leave is because, as she’s running the ultrasound, she watches as the fetus reacts to attempted abortion, struggling and fighting to remain alive. It’s a legitimately horrifying scene and you might understand why it might make someone change their mind about their work. There’s just two problems with this. First, the abortion may not have ever happened in the first place. There were no ultrasoundled abortions scheduled for the day Abby said it happened, and doctors at the clinic said Abby had never assisted during an abortion procedure. But even if the abortion had taken place, doctors have explained that the fetus couldn’t have reacted that way. At 13-weeks, not only could it not have felt pain, it would have been unable to make purposeful movements. Unplanned is a weird piece of propaganda. It’s a film that’s preaching to the choir. The antiabortion message of the film isn’t going to change too many minds because the only people watching it are the ones already on its side.

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Casting call for Kamloops Players Two men between the ages of 45 and 55 and one woman between 30 and 50, are required for The Love List. The show will run from Feb. 14 to Feb. 16 and Feb. 21 to Feb. 23. Murder at Shady Moss Rest Home is a murder mystery set at a rest home. The Players are looking for a keyboard player and anyone interested in helping with organizing, including set décor, stage managing or narrating. The play will run from March 27 to March 29 in 2020. Later in the spring, the Players will stage Gas Light by Patrick Hamilton, a British thriller. Sought for this cast-of-

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Ever wanted to try your hand at theatre? The Kamloops Players Society is holding open auditions this weekend. The community theatre group is looking for actors for three upcoming productions. The Love List, a comedy set to debut on Feb. 14, is about two friends who put together a list of attributes of the ideal woman companion. But after a matchmaking gypsy intervenes, the two realize they should have been careful what they wished for.

five play are men between 40 and 55 and women between 30 and 50, as well as anyone interested in doing stage management, sound and lights or front-of-house. The play runs May 7 to May 9 and May 15 to May 17 in 2020. Auditions will take place on Sunday, Oct. 6, and Tuesday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. at the Stage House Theatre, 422 Tranquille Rd. No acting experience is necessary for any roles. For questions, contact Sharon Huuha at the Kamloops Players, 250-554-2388 or email sharonhuuha@gmail.com.

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REVIEW

Symphony makes good on Romantic Promises LESLIE HALL SPECIAL TO KTW

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t was another night at the symphony, but not just any night and not just any symphony. The opening night of conductor Dina Gilbert’s third season with the Kamloops Symphony Orchestra delivered on Romantic Elements, as promised. From the tuning up of sounds to the sweetness of guest soloist Timothy Chooi’s encore, the large audience was in thrall. From its beginnings in a school gym in Westsyde 43 years ago, the musical ensemble has been an enduring made-in-Kamloops orchestra. To prove the point, two original members of that fledgling orchestra still participate in every concert. Musicians are volunteer or are paid and come from Kamloops and beyond. Past conductors include: James Verity, Robert Ryker, Gordon Walter, Juliet Proudman, Czerslaw Gladyszewski James Verity and Bruce Dunn. Last weekend’s opening event was a masterful program. First, a lovely imagining by Jean Ethridge of Salmon Arm of four elements: earth, air, fire and water. The audience was told it grew from a casual conversation between composer and conductor via a summer of doubtlessly intense work and onto the music stands of conductor and 41 orchestra members.

Warmed by the gravity, lightness, joy and calmness of the above, the audience was immediately plunged into the bursting energy of Felix Mendelsohn’s First Symphony, followed by a thoroughly captivating performance of Pyotr Tchaikovsky’s only violin concerto. From the moment Chooi shot his bow in the air, seemingly lifting his whole body from his feet, attendees were on a grand ride. His standing ovation was well-deserved. A NOTE ON VENUES

The symphony’s next concert, The Music of Chicago, will be staged at Sagebrush Theatre, which has been closed much of the year due to roof truss issues. Looking back, the Oasis Church in Aberdeen has been a superb home since the first March concert. One can only imagine the changes to scheduling needed or the accommodation that allowed for creating a larger stage in the worship space. Pastor Marco Bessa and his congregation have been friends in need, indeed. The Music of Chicago takes place Oct. 25 and Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Sagebrush Theatre, 1300 Ninth Ave. Tickets are $48, or $10 for youth under 19, available at the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483 or online at kamloopslive.ca.

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REVIEW

Author of The Shuswap the focus of new biography JIM COOPERMAN SPECIAL TO KTW

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t is an exceptional book about a remarkable man who never received the recognition he deserved for his major input to what was then the new science of anthropology. Written by University of Victoria professor emeritus Wendy Wickwire, At the Bridge not only describes James Teit’s extraordinary life and achievements, but it also explains how his employers took advantage of him and why the academic community discounted his vast contributions. Wickwire begins the book with her own story about how she became fascinated with Teit and describes her many decades of research and writing about both Teit and Indigenous songs and storytelling. In some ways, Wickwire’s work with Indigenous elders carried on from what Teit began, as many of her books are collections of stories that have been passed down from generation to generation. Teit immigrated to Canada from the Shetland Islands in 1884 at the age of 19 to work for his uncle at his store in Spences Bridge. He was part of a mass exodus of the islands, once ruled by Denmark, that was due to deteriorating economic conditions caused in part by the collapse of the fishery and an unfair political and economic system controlled by the wealthy few. Before he left, James was influenced by the Islands’ “freethinkers” who challenged the establishment, explored their Scandinavian roots and pursued socialist ideals.

When the railway pulled its construction camp out of Spences Bridge after the railway was completed in 1886, his uncle’s store had to close and Teit was forced to find other work. The backcountry skills he developed in the Shetland Islands helped him as he turned to hunting and trapping as a source of income. Within a few years, Teit became a foremost hunting guide and one of his loyal wealthy clients became a benefactor for some of his anthropological studies. As Wickwire explains, Teit’s connections to Shetland’s Indigenous peoples helped him develop a deep respect for his adopted homeland’s Indigenous peoples that resulted in intense collaboration with them over his lifetime. Although most settlers scorned such unions, Teit’s marriage to Lucy Antko in 1892 further deepened his closeness to the local Nlaka’pamux people and likely helped him become fluent in their language. When the young anthropologist Franz Boas stopped in Spences Bridge in 1894 as part of his ongoing studies of the province’s Indigenous peoples, he met Teit who then helped take cranial measurements. He soon realized that Teit, who had already begun studying Nlaka’pamux culture and history, was the ideal candidate to research and write a complete ethnographic report of the Nlaka’pamux. Over the following 28 years until his death in 1922, Teit completed 11 monographs, collected hundreds of artifacts, made many wax-cylinder recordings of songs and stories, and produced thousands of pages of unpub-

lished notes and drawings. Only a few of Teit’s ethnographies were published under his name, as much of his work was undercredited and, in fact, plagiarized. Although Boas was both his mentor and major employer, Teit’s research technique and style described as “participantbased” was in sharp contrast to Boas, who remained an aloof observer. While Boas worked to document what he considered to be a dying primitive culture, Teit studied those who he lived with and befriended. Wickwire describes Teit’s work as “an anthropology of belonging,” which is also the sub-title for her book. As a result of his closeness to the people he studied and his own socialist background, Teit became intricately involved in the Indian Rights movement by actively campaigning for provincial and national organizations, often at his own expense. One of his most significant efforts was assisting the Interior Chiefs prepare the Memorial presented to Prime Minister Laurier in 1910 about the need for justice and fairness so that “wrongs may at last be righted.” Given that much of what is known today about the history of the Secwepemc stems from The Shuswap, Teit’s seminal monograph, At the Bridge should be of interest to all those who want to learn more about this early ethnographer and B.C.’s Indigenous people. Thanks to Wickwire’s book, more people will become aware of Teit’s many significant achievements, and hopefully his reputation will gain the recognition it deserves.

Artwork on display Contenders show will ahead of Timeraiser return to Kamloops Artwork soon to be auctioned off is now on display at the Old Courthouse Cultural Centre. The Kamloops This Week Timeraiser is part volunteer fair and part silent auction, as participants gather one evening to bid on artwork using volunteer hours as their currency. Artwork for this year’s event — 18 pieces in all — is now on display in the vault space of the Old Courthouse gallery at 7 West Seymour St. It features artists like Timeraiser favourites Shelley Penner and Sheila Dunn but also newcomers like Kaylee Hulbert, who is just eight years old. The show will run until Nov. 14. Entry is by donation to the Kamloops Arts Council. The gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., or to 4 p.m. on Saturday. KTW Timeraiser will take place Friday, Nov. 15. The event will feature local volunteer organizations making their pitches accompanied by appetizers and live music by Kelly Spencer. Tickets are $10, available online at ktwtimeraiser.com.

The Contenders, a duo made up of Valdy and Gary Fjellgaard, will soon return for their 18th annual tour of the Thompson-Okanagan. The two Juno Award winners came together to release the first Contenders album in 1999 and followed up with a second volume in 2007. The two are long-celebrated Canadian folk musicians and each has also earned a spot in the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame. Playing a western, roots and folk style of music, Fjellgaard said the music “champions the vanishing values and frontier spirit” of the genre. Their tour is a string of five dates, including a Friday, Nov. 1, performance in Kamloops at Sagebrush Theatre, 1300 Ninth Ave., beginning at 7:30 p.m. Other dates include Oct. 30 in Lake Country, Oct. 31 in Tappen, Nov. 2 in Summerland and Nov. 3 in Oliver. Tickets for the duo’s Kamloops performance are available at the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483 and online at kamloopslive.ca.

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Sink your teeth into a comedy that will have you down for the Count. Professor Van Helsing leaps off the pages of Dracula to set the record straight. Four actors playing 40 characters take you on a hilarious, breakneck journey to tell the true story of the legendary vampire. A rollicking farce for ages 12 to the undead, Monty Python meets the macabre in this WCT Hallowe’en treat.

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Lots of hot spots for golfing in New Zealand RAY CHATELIN

SPECIAL TO KTW

travelwriterstales.com

E

very country has its own way to say hello. The Hawaiians place a wreath of leis around your neck; the French kiss you on the cheek; the Germans like to shake hands. New Zealanders, on the other hand, want to know your golf handicap. For the country is a golfer’s paradise — a birdie in a world of par golf, having more golf courses (397) per capita than anywhere in the world, except for Scotland, with its 543 courses. Many are unattended and have honour boxes for payment. Drop your cash in the box, pick up your score card and head for the first tee. Besides, the real adventure in golfing in New Zealand is when I tell my friends the courses I played. With courses named Muriwai, Huapai, Titirangi, Pukekohe and Arikikapakapa you almost need elocution lessons. Off-shore golfers asking directions are a constant source of amusement for locals. It’s also, without doubt, the most affordable place in the world in which to play a round, with prices ranging from $5 NZ for a pasture course, to $50 NZ for a championship track. Yes, there are more high-end courses scattered around the country where you’ll pay more, such as the luxurious Cape Kidnappers golf course near Te Awanga at Hawkes Bay. Here, a green fee for a walk-on is $330 NZ — about $293 CN. For the most part, golf in New Zealand is its national recreational sport. Pick a style. There are courses where hazards include wandering sheep and cattle (and their

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leftovers), as well as the finest layouts in the country, such as Jack’s Point at Lake Wakitapu, a 20-minute drive from Queenstown; or Kauri Cliffs — 30 minutes north of Kerikeri. Some 482,000 adults over the age of 18, golf each year on private and public golf courses and it is the number one sport for men and number two sport for women, behind basketball-like netball. There are 138,000 registered golf club members and seven mil-

lion rounds of golf played each year, as practically every small town has its own course or links. Down under, golf is a walker’s game. Many championship courses have power carts, but don’t expect them at every course. Distances are usually in metres. Just add 10 per cent to the metric distance for an approximate distance in yards. Start north of Auckland and then work your way down to Christchurch on the South Island. Each night check the map and

LEFT: Champagne Pool at Wai-o-Tapu, a geothermal area in Rotorua, North Island. TOP: Art from Maori Arts and Crafts Institute, where young carvers train in the ways of their elders. Enjoying a round of golf at Rotorua Golf Club.

pick out the courses you want. Unless it’s a Sunday or a designated club tournament, chances are good you’ll get on. If not, try the one that’s always down the road. But golf isn’t the only pleasure to be found here. It’s a nation filled with art and history and Maori culture, sweeping beaches, tropical vegetation and volcanic springs. No matter where you play, you’re always near a unique cultural experience. The Arikikapakapa course

at the Rotorua Golf Club is an 18-hole, par 70 course with many holes played over and around both dormant and active thermal areas. The club is also near the Maori Institute, one of the most visited places in New Zealand — a living museum in which visitors can experience traditional Maori life. When you play the 6,548 yard Napier Golf Club at Hawkes Bay in the central region of the north Island, you have access to superb Chardonnay’s and Pinot brands not available in Canada, from nearby vineyards. At the 6,418 yards Waitangi course, north of Auckland, you wander along the ocean, overlooking the spectacular Bay of Islands. The 10th to 14th holes demand concentration as you shoot toward the shoreline and lush greens set along the water. Nearby, is the site of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi where, a century and-a-half ago, Maori chiefs signed over the right for the British to settle the islands. Still, the most unforgettable experiences in New Zealand may not come from the biggest and the best courses, but from the smallest places — villages and towns with their own 18-hole courses. For anyone with limited time to hit the links, my must-stop spot is the Coromandel Peninsula, due east of Auckland along the coast. Here, 18-hole courses such as The Dunes Golf Resort Matarangi, The Lakes Resort Golf Course at Pauanui, Mercury Bay Golf and Country Club at Whitianga and the public course at Whangamata — offer a variety of styles with local character and amazing vistas on and off the course. Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent newspaper syndicate. For more information, go online to travelwriterstales.com.

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O.C. IS A-OK — AND SO ARE THE BLAZERS

The Kamloops Blazers dropped their first three games of the WHL season, defeats that slowed the hype train after a 7-0 pre-season. Three consecutive victories, including an 8-1 drubbing of the Seattle Thunderbirds on Wednesday at Sandman Centre, have the Blazers rolling into a home game on Saturday against Everett. Orrin Centazzo, who leads Kamloops with 10 points after six games, is part of an offence that has juggernaut potential. Read about Wednesday’s offensive explosion on A32. For live updates on game night, follow @KTWonBlazers on Twitter. Game stories and photos are posted online at kamloopsthisweek.com.

Titans’ quest for playoffs runs through Maroons STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Mike MacDonald and Sheldon Gerlib did not make it complicated. “That’s what we like to do — hit kids,” said MacDonald, the South Kamloops Titans’ star running back and linebacker. Added Gerlib, an offensive lineman and linebacker: “Our team is just kind of fearless and likes to use a bit of the intimidation factor, hit guys in the mouth, for sure.” The Titans and Clarence Fulton Maroons of Vernon will square off in smash-mouth football under the lights on Friday at Hillside Stadium, a game that may decide which of the two opponents qualifies for the post-season. Kickoff is slated for 7:30 p.m. It is only Game 1 of the B.C. Secondary Schools Football

Association regular season for both teams, but the stakes are that high. The Vernon Panthers are the powerhouse of the Interior AA Varsity Division, defending provincial champions who are favoured to go 4-0 in a division that also features Salmon Arm and Okanagan Mission of Kelowna. Only the top two teams in the division are guaranteed postseason berths. Salmon Arm is a bit of a mystery, dropping down to AA from AAA this season. Okanagan Mission is making the jump to AA Varsity for the first time in a long time and is expected to take some hard knocks. “It really comes down to beating Fulton,” said JP Lancaster, the Titans’ third-year head coach. “They are the perennial two seed. We’ve got to go through them.” The Titans have never chalked

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See WE’RE, A33

UP TO

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ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE South Kamloops Titans’ quarterback Eric Crawford prepares to deliver against the Westsyde Blue Wave in 2018 action. The Titans and Clarence Fulton Maroons of Vernon will square off in a pivotal Week 1 B.C. Secondary Schools Football Association matchup on Friday at Hillside Stadium. Game time is 7:30 p.m.

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up a W over the Maroons under Lancaster, whose charges fell 14-3 to hometown Clarence Fulton in Week 1 last season. South Kam finished the season 2-2 and missed the playoffs. In a surprise turn, the Titans were handed a post-season berth in 2018, when the Samuel Roberts Technical Titans of Maple Ridge declined to travel to Prince George to play the Polars in a Round 1 matchup. Prince George cruised to a 42-14 victory over South Kamloops. Lancaster’s team, which was 1-3 in 2017, has improved each year since he took the helm. The Titans enjoyed a 3-1 pre-season in September that included victories against a pair of AAA teams from Kelowna — 27-6 over Mount Boucherie and 28-25 over Rutland.

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A32

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BLAZERS GAMEDAY

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SPORTS

Ten minutes of fury MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

And there it was, the explosive potential of the Kamloops Blazers on full display, an allout blitzkrieg that left dazed and defeated the Seattle Thunderbirds, 10 minutes of killer instinct that ended a hockey game. The Blazers wrung the necks of the Thunderbirds in the second period of a WHL contest on Wednesday at Sandman Centre, scoring five consecutive goals that led to the eventual 8-1 demise of the visitors from down south. “I thought it was really great to see,” Blazers’ head coach Shaun Clouston said. “There have been times where we haven’t done that. I know it’s early in the season, but I thought it was a much better mindset. You think back to the home opener. You get close and you give one back. In different games, we got the lead and we give one back. “Tonight, we kept going.” Brodi Stuart, Kyrell Sopotyk, his second of the game, Connor Zary, Sean Strange and Martin Lang tallied goals in a span of nine minutes and 49 seconds in the second stanza.

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Kamloops Blazers’ captain Zane Franklin has three goals and eight points in six games.

The flurry of offence followed a Blazers’ penalty kill championed by goaltender Dylan Garand, who, with the game knotted at 1-1, made difficult saves look easy on shots by Henrik Rybinski and Simon Kubicek. “It could be a lot different if they get one there,” Clouston said. “Great job by the PK and by our goalie.” But Garand, who allowed one goal on 26 shots, was not the story on Wednesday. The message that should resonate with those paying attention across the league is the Blazers, now 3-3 after starting the campaign with three consecutive losses, have what it

takes to force submission in a matter of minutes. “There have been glimpses of it, but today I think all 12 forwards, everyone was buzzing,” Sopotyk said. “Everyone will be taking quicker shifts. It keeps everyone fresh. They want to get back out there.” Any wind beneath the T-Birds’ wings was repurposed and ridden by Orrin Centazzo, who scored 11 seconds into the third period to ensure Seattle’s tailspin continued. The nose dive was reaching its terminus when Centazzo plucked another feather for his cap, his fourth goal and sixth point in

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his last two games. “We just never let off the gas pedal,” said Centazzo, who has a team-leading 10 points after six games. Conner Roulette opened his WHL goalscoring account, his first-period tip-in being the T-Birds’ only marker of the night. Roddy Ross, who made 50 saves in a 4-1 win over visiting Kamloops on Sept. 21, started between the pipes for Seattle (1-2) on Wednesday and lasted two periods, allowing six goals on 33 shots. Blake Lyda replaced Ross to start the third period and made eight saves on 10 shots. “If we play like that, we can really do something here,” Stuart said. “Everybody is enjoying it. Once you have that feeling, you don’t let up. The energy keeps coming and it’s a lot of fun.” Kamloops will play host to the Everett Silvertips (1-2) on Saturday at Sandman Centre. Game time is 7 p.m. Blazers’ brass will be hoping for a better crowd than the 3,371 (there were not that many butts in seats) that was announced on Wednesday. Those who stayed home to watch the Canucks missed out on a culling on Mark Recchi Way, a diabolical stretch of Blazers barbarism, an interestpiquing peek at a forward group’s potential.


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A33

SPORTS

KAMLOOPS PADDLERS WIN BIG MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kierra Willis sounded like an old soul, the 15-year-old speaking eloquently about the sport she loves and its ties to her roots. “It has to do with my heritage, with me being Métis,” said Kierra, who had just broken from class at NorKam senior secondary on Wednesday afternoon. “For me to go do something that represents Indigenous youth in sport and their excellence in it, it just helps me kind of connect to my heritage and show people what we can do.” She showed them, all right. So did fellow Kamloops Canoe and Kayak Club member Emma Guertin. The duo returned home from the B.C. Aboriginal Provincial Canoe/Kayak Championships last month in Agassiz toting six medals, three apiece earned in one-person kayak races. Emma, competing in the under-18 division, won gold in the 200-metre, 1,000m and 3,000m. Willis, paddling in the under-15 division, finished atop the podium in the 200m and 3,000m events and claimed silver in the 1,000m. “There was a couple

How to Cook a

Turkey Hey kids, how do you think you cook a turkey?

Kierra Willis (left) and Emma Guertin are provincial champion paddlers.

of girls who were fairly close to them, but they definitely did dominate,” said Shaunda Willis, Kierra’s mother. “Our girls can train five days a week all summer.” Head coach Stan Marek has long been sending KCKC athletes to national and international events, running a program at Shumway Lake that rivals the best in the province. Emma and Kierra are expected to crack the Team B.C. development squad, from which athletes will be chosen to compete at the 2020 North American Indigenous

Games, which will run from July 12 to July 19 in Halifax. “Canoe/kayak is already such a tradition in many Aboriginal and Indigenous cultures,” Kierra said. “Being able to go and represent for Team B.C., for my culture, would be a huge way to bring that heritage into the spotlight for some people, especially the people around me.” Kierra trains five days a week, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., during the summer. “I train for kayaking the same as I do for school,” she said. The dedicated paddler usually practises

between four to six days a week, for about two to three hours each day, in the spring, fall and winter. “It’s kind of what I do,” Kierra said. Training paid off for Kierra and Emma earlier this year with a trip to the Canoe Kayak Canada Sprint National Championships in Regina. Both reached finals in team-boat competition. They seem likely to get more international experience next year in Halifax. “It’s another stepping stone in my kayaking career to go to a major competition like that,” Kierra said.

SHOW US HOW TO DO IT IN YOUR OWN DRAWING OR STORY!

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Deadline for entries: October 7 Draw date: October 8 • 10:00 am Entries will be published October 9

PRESENTS

Great for families with young kids!

‘We’re the only team left now’ From A31

Those wins landed South Kam fifth in AA provincial rankings, a spot it relinquished to Robert Bateman after the Timberwolves downed the Titans 49-20 last weekend in Abbotsford. “Our pre-season went pretty good and it went to our heads a little bit,” Gerlib said. Added Lancaster: “You’re never happy to lose a game, but it was kind of good to get humbled a little bit. That’s a playoffcalibre team. We felt we were right there with them.” Former NCAA Division 2 offensive lineman Jacob Bigham has joined the South Kamloops coaching staff this season, an acquisition that has led to notable improvement among the hogs. Lancaster said quarterback

Eric Crawford is expected to play more of a game-manager role while his team employs a runfirst attack. But don’t underestimate Crawford, who championed an effective air assault last season — 19-of-30 for 354 yards and three touchdowns — in his club’s 35-18 triumph over Westsyde, the win securing a city title. Neither the Valleyview Vikings nor the Westsyde Blue Wave were able to field a team this year. “When I was in Grade 10 and 11, we played those games and the atmosphere at our school, it’s just something you don’t see every day,” Gerlib said. “People know you’re playing. It’s the biggest crowds of your high school career. It’s like playing a playoff game, but almost better.” Added MacDonald: “It’s kind of sad. We’re the only team now.”

KTW will next week look into the high school football scene, along with Kamloops Community Football’s and the Kamloops Broncos’ potential plans for bantam- and midgetage programs. For now, the stage belongs to the Titans, who boast about 65 players combined at the junior varsity and varsity levels and feel they are on the cusp of something big. A second-place finish in the division would secure a wildcard playoff tilt, with the winner advancing to a provincial quarter-final matchup in BC Place Stadium. “We’ve been putting in a lot of work, doing the winter practices and, finally, we feel we’re at the point of breaking through and being competitive provincially,” Lancaster said. “That’s pretty rewarding.”

Compliments of

Baba Yaga & the Black Flower

Produced and performed by professional puppeteer Viktor Barkar (Vancouver Puppet Theatre) and directed by Karen Petersen, our new interactive marionette show is a unique opportunity to introduce your children to the magic of the puppet theatre.

Oct. 26 & 27 | 2 Shows per Day 1:30 pm & 4 pm $20 per person (tax included) Includes Chicken Fingers or Pizza plus drink.

Tickets at 250.579.3300 ext. 2 or at The Dunes Restaurant


A34

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

D R O P A C R E B A S E K T S O I O N I S B E N E P U R P E L T E S C A T E T O R N A L E S H I G H U N O M E T O P A R R R I Z P O

C A T A R A C T S R A M S

A G A P E H U E

E L C H A S P N O O O T Z O E T

P B E B E N R E P E A R A L I G L I S A T E R D E D R R E E V E N V E R S I T O L S L B E A P E I E E D D T S O S T R A I M P N E S G R O

A M M A N S U S S E D O U T S N O T S

L O I N

S A N C T K I E R A I N C P H R O E S S S M P I A S S F S E E D S

A N D E R S O N

S O S A

V R E O N N E E G R E S H S O O R S E D

www.kamloopsthisweek.com I G G Y C O L A E W A S I M M L L I E D A N T W E R K O I O L E D O P E L E M E N D A S I E F P G I R E A V O N S M E R A R A L N E M I I S P E

S T A N D S T O R A H

SPORTS E D A M S W A T

L S E S I N E E E S L S

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A37

City of Kamloops DISCOVER BATS! $15

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

Bats are misunderstood and underappreciated. They’re also in trouble from white nose syndrome. Join Guide is out. communityFall bat Activity coordinator Vanessa Robinson on a IS NOW OPEN.creatures. journey toREGISTRATION learn more about these fascinating Walk upare Tranquille to view numbers them leaving Programs cancelledcreek if the minimum are nottheir met. roosts. Use a bat detector to ‘hear’ them. There’s so much to discover bats. 18th of September. 7 pm to 9 pm. Youth about Sport Night Ages: 13–17 in Pine parking lot, Tranquille. Join Meet us for this Park drop-in sport program. For

members of Kamloops Immigrant Services or those new to Kamloops. Please register with Amy 778-470-6101 In partnership with the City of Kamloops and Kamloops Immigrant Services Beattie Elementary School Thu Oct 3–Nov 7 7:00–8:00 pm 6/FREE

A Hauntingly Good Time Ages: 5–12

Wear your Halloween costumes, and join the KMA in a spirited scavenger hunt fraught with games and crafts as you explore all three floors of the museum. Learn about some of our more scream-worthy artifacts as you and your children dare to explore our spellbinding galleries together! Kamloops Museum & Archives Sat Oct 26 1:00–2:00 pm 1/$5

Fencing

Ages: 10+

Not too late to register! Fees are pro-rated based on start date. Participants will be introduced to the sport of Olympic Fencing, both in Foil and Epee. This program is for participants ages 10+. This program is in partnership with the Kamloops Fencing Club. Kamloops Fencing Club Thu Sep 26–Nov 28 6:30–7:30 pm Begginer $60 Thu Sep 26–Nov 28 6:30–8:30 pm Advanced $80

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE Batsman Simranjit Singh of the Kamloops Cricket Club connects during B.C. Mainland Cricket League action in Rayleigh in August.

Kamloops Cricket Club earns B.C. Mainland Cricket League promotion MARTY HASTINGS STAFF REPORTER sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Rising like an errant yorker, the Kamloops Cricket Club is moving on up again, beaming as it goes. The squad from the Tournament Capital waited until the final weekend of the B.C. Mainland Cricket League Division 3 season to secure promotion to Division 2 for 2020, downing Richmond on Sept. 7 to nail down the top-two finish in league standings required to make the jump. “We were in a very comfortable spot, but we wanted to make sure because there were a couple of other teams playing the same day,” said player/manager Simranjit Singh, who joined the club in 2017. “If we lost the game, it would have been a difficult situation, depending on the run rate. “We wanted to get the win and know that we were going to be promoted. It was a very close game. It went down to the last over. We had one wicket in hand. The boys definitely gave us a good season.”

The victory set up a rematch against Richmond the next day in the league final, a contest Kamloops lost on a rainy day in West Vancouver. “It’s been quite an exciting journey,” Singh said. “Kamloops, of all surprises, has got a decent amount of cricket lovers.” Kamloops finished the 2019 campaign with a record of 12 wins and three losses. Three matches were abandoned. Richmond (14-4) claimed the regularseason title and league championship trophy. The River City club was forced to begin play in the BCMCL’s lowest tier in 2014, the eighth division, which is actually Division 10, as the Elite and Premier Divisions precede divisions one through eight. Thompson Rivers University students have been the backbone of the team in years past, an integral part of the club’s rise up the league’s ranks, but the formula has changed of late. “We thought we should promote it more from the community level, which is our focus moving forward,”

said Singh, whose club plays its home matches at Rae-More Park in Rayleigh. “We had RCMP, a couple of dentists, people who work in real estate, the IT section. “It’s a mixed balance of students and working professionals who have an interest in the game.” Countries that have been represented at the club include Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Australia, England, South Africa and Canada. Singh has also been approached by U.S. study-abroad students who are interested in signing up. “It’s nice to see how people are trying to get engaged,” Singh said. “But it’s not just Kamloops getting good players. It’s the Lower Mainland, too.” The competition will stiffen next season in Division 2. “Oh, definitely,” Singh said. “It will be even more tough.” Anyone interested in helping the Kamloops club chase another promotion can email kamloopscricketclub@gmail.com or find it online on Facebook.

FAST Tennis

FAST stands for Fun Adult Starter Tennis. In this program, you will learn tennis fundamentals, including basic tactics and techniques, rules, and scoring. In partnership with the Kamloops Tennis Centre. Kamloops Tennis Centre Sat Oct 5–Nov 2 10:30–12:00 pm 4/$75

Join PLAYKamloops and the TNRD Library in launching our new Physical Literacy Kits during Storytime & Craft at the Kamloops Branch, October 17th, 10:30am!

Kamloops.ca

VIBE OFF TO PERFECT START WITH THREE WINS ON ROAD The Kamloops Vibe are off to a flying start in South Coast Women’s Hockey League play. Kamloops earned three victories on the Lower Mainland last weekend — 5-2 over the South Fraser TNT, 5-1 over the Richmond Devils and 2-1 over the defending league champions, the Fraser Valley Jets. Rochelle Smith scored four goals against South Fraser and finished the weekend with a team-lead-

Tournament Capital Sports

BRIEFS ing seven points. Also reaching the scoresheet on the weekend for the Vibe were Melinda Smith (3G, 3A), Marjorie Boisvert (2G, 2A), Chantelle BeadmanRolph (1G, 2A), Sarah Botter (1G) and Jenna Ormondy (1A). Beadman-Rolph

netted the gamewinner against the Jets with about three minutes remaining in the third period. Ashley Fisher was between the pipes for Kamloops, which does not play again until Oct. 26, when the North Shore Rebels come to town. Game time is 7 p.m. at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre. COMMUNITY SCENE Two Kamloops Community Football

nine-man tackle teams were in Southern Interior Football Conference action last weekend. The junior bantam Kamloops Broncos (3-0) rumbled to a 64-0 victory over the hometown Salmon Arm Chargers (1-3). Colby Johnson scored multiple touchdowns for the visitors. In atom action, the Broncos (2-1-1) and Kelowna Junior Sun Green (1-2-1) tied at 12-12 in the Little Apple.

The peewee, atom and junior bantam Broncos will be in action this weekend in Vernon. ON THE DIAMOND The TRU WolfPack baseball team will host a pair of doubleheaders this weekend at Norbrock Stadium. TRU and the UBC Thunderbirds will square off at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Saturday. The Pack (3-3-2) and T-Birds will clash at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Sunday.


PG35

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

FAITH

They are coming and going through city churches

K

amloops churches and ministries have seen a few changes in staffing this year. Of special note among these is the hiring of a new lead pastor at Southwest Community Church in Aberdeen. After an almost two-year search, the church welcomed Andrea Tisher as its pastor, succeeding Larry Boss. Tisher recently served as minister of worship at the First Baptist Church in downtown Vancouver. Both churches are under the banner of the Canadian Baptist of Western Canada. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University (music, European studies), Tisher obtained a master’s degree in arts and theology from Regent College in Vancouver. First Baptist in Vancouver ordained her to ministry in 2017. Having been born in a church-centred home, it would have been natural for Tisher to welcome a personal conversion experience with its attendant growth in Christian life. But reflecting backward, she now gives credit to the experience as an ongoing process “that started when I was very young and will continue until my old age.” Creating and leading in worship accompanied her studies through school and university days. With gifting in music, this came naturally. She spent almost five years as the chapel co-ordinator at Regent College (a graduate school in theology) in Vancouver, where much of her talents went into creating liturgies and making use of the variety of talents and traditions that were part of the Regent community. A longer role of 8.5 years in worship ministry followed at the First Baptist Church in downtown Vancouver. Along with worship ministry, her time was also shared in mentoring and pastoral care ministries to the 100-plus people involved in the church’s worship ministry. But sensing the time for moving into a more generalist position, Tisher saw the opening for a lead pastor at Southwest Community Church and its job description of “empowering men and women to leadership roles, and their desire to connect with God, with people and with a cause.” As a first-time lead pastor, Tisher hopes three of her chief values would govern her vision for Southwest Community

NARYAN MITRA

You Gotta Have

FAITH

Church in particular and the Kamloops community in general: • the story of God and God’s people; • the church as an intergenerational community; • having Jesus at the centre. As for filling a lead pastoral role as a woman, Tisher is confident of using her gifts to teach, preach and lead as a pastor. Unlike her earlier upbringing, when she could not vouchsafe God’s gifts to women in senior levels of ministry, she said she is now “able to accept that God seems entirely comfortable to use people and methods of which I disapprove to further His kingdom, and hope that others can do the same.” Tisher is married to Gordon and they have two children: Emily and Brendan. Southwest Community Church is at 700 Hugh Allan Drive in Aberdeen. Sunday service starts at 10.15 a.m. It can be reached by phone at 250-828-1114. NEW CAPTAINS AT SALVATION ARMY The 105-year-old Kamloops Salvation Army welcomed captains Cory and Kelly Fifield in mid-August. Hailing from NewfoundlandLabrador, Cory is not new to B.C., having lived in Vancouver. As with many Salvation Army officers, he was trained in the Army school in Winnipeg Following training, Cory was first posted in High River, Alta., serving seven years there. New to Kamloops, the Fifields are busy supervising a team of 16 full-time staff. This number evidently goes up during the busy Christmas season and with the Kettle Campaign in full swing. Not many are aware that the Salvation Army runs a full church program, with Sunday service and Sunday school starting at 11 a.m.

There is also a weekday program for youth and a weekly women’s Bible study. As co-captains, Cory and Kelly take turns preaching on Sundays. As parents of two girls, Sophie, 6, and Olivia, 3, the Fifields say they find family life and work difficult to balance. But they are quite willing to meet more volunteers and to fellowship with churches in Kamloops. “There are plenty of opportunities to fill human needs in Kamloops,” Cory said. “We are learning to be patient, discover where the gaps are and how fill in there. Just give us a call, come and say hello.” The Salvation Army Service Centre and Church is at 344 Poplar St. in North Kamloops. Sunday service and Sunday school is at 11 a.m. It can be reached by phone at 250-554-1611. The Salvation Army Thrift Store is at 533 Tranquille Rd. in North Kamloops. It can be reached by phone at 250-376-1110. NEW ASSOCIATE PASTOR AT CHRIST COMMUNITY CHURCH Christ Community Church (formerly Kamloops Evangelical Free Church) recently welcomed Warren Trenholm as its associate pastor. The former pastor at First Baptist Church in downtown Kamloops will minister about two days a week at Christ Community Church’s North Shore location, assisting lead pastor Mike De Jong, especially in developing discipleship programme, working with some youth activities and preaching once a month. Christ Community Church has seen steady growth, especially in its Sunday school and youth ministries. The church operates a Wednesday evening snack stall for the needy in the community. Christ Community Church is at 1132 Eighth St. in North Kamloops. Sunday service starts at 10 a.m. It can be reached by phone at 250-376-9365. Narayan Mitra is a volunteer chaplain at Thompson Rivers University. His email is ryanmitra225@gmail.com. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.

Follow us @KamThisWeek

Inner Ideals & Creativity:

Which more shapes our world views? Presented by Guest Minister

Rev. Linda Horton

Sunday, October 6, 10:00 am. Valleyview Community Hall 2288 Park Drive Brought to you by the Kamloops Unitarian Fellowship. For more information and upcoming schedule, please visit www.uukamloops.ca

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

Weekend Gathering Times Sat: 6:30pm Sun: 9:00 & 11:00am Online live at 11am 200 Leigh Rd | 250-376-6268 kamloopsalliance.com @kamloopsalliance

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

10:00am

Sunday Mornings

422 Tranquille Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

All are Welcome www.northshorecalvary.com

UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS 1044- 8TH STREET ~ 250.376.9209

SATURDAY October 5, 2019 Vespers @ 5:30 pm SUNDAY October 6, 2019 Divine Liturgy @ 10:00 am MONDAY October 14, 2019 Divine Liturgy, Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos @ 10:00 am The Parish Priest is Rev. Fr. Chad Pawlyshyn SERVICES ARE IN ENGLISH

COMMUNITY CHURCH 344 POPLAR A Place To Belong A Place To Worship A Place To Serve

Sunday Service - 11a.m. Children’s Church - 11:45 a.m.

250-554-1611

Visit us at www.kamsa.ca

You and your family are invited to a series of

Gospel Meetings

each Sunday 3:30 - 4:30 pm at Desert Gardens Community Centre 540 Seymour St., Kamloops Dwayne Powell

250-682-3259 Reid Goodkey

To advertise your service in the Worship Directory, please call Kate at

778-471-7541


A36

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

THE BORN LOSER

BABY BLUES

BIG NATE

by Art & Chip Samsom

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

by Lincoln Peirce

by Chris Browne

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

GUESS WHO?

HERMAN

by Jim Unger

KIT ’N’ CARLYLE

by Larry Wright

FAMILY CIRCUS

by Bil & Jeff Keane

I am a singer/songwriter born in Pennsylvania on October 11, 1946. My parents both had musical backgrounds, so music was a natural choice for me. I met my future bandmate in college. We were a successful duo with many hits in the 70s and 80s. ANSWERS

Daryl Hall

FRIDAY, NOV 15 | 7 - 11 pm The Rex Hall | 417 Seymour St. • Local art show • Live music • Cash bar • Appies • Community inspiration IOSECURE

Tickets: www.ktwtimeraiser.ca


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ON THE UP AND UP

A37

By Tracy Gray

ACROSS 1. Large decorative letter at the start of a chapter 8. Wood for crafts and rafts 13. Rapper Azalea with the 2014 hit “Fancy” 17. Farm stat 18. Weep for 19. Competitors in a classic advertising “war” 21. Salon bed acquisition, perhaps 22. Give a nudge 23. Discarded computers and such 25. Maintain the impression of well-being 28. [Grrr!] 29. General on Chinese menus 32. Put in order, in a way 33. Online instigator 35. “____ minute” (“Be patient”) 36. Ancient region of Asia Minor 38. Lopes of R&B’s TLC 39. Reconciled, as a couple 41. Ab-targeting exercise equipment 43. To the point 45. ____ Chex (old breakfast cereal) 46. With 12-Down, “Isle of Dogs” director 47. Work at a music school 49. When doubled, band with the 1984 No. 1 hit “The Reflex” 51. MGM rival of the ’30s 53. Money handler on a ship 55. Amber, originally 56. Miniature spring bouquet 60. Pummel with snowballs, say 61. Roulette choice 63. “I believe,” in Latin 65. Something that comes with a sock 66. Screen-minimizing key 67. Method for identifying mystery callers 70. M.L.B. stat 71. Downed

1

DOWN 72. O’Connor’s Supreme Court successor 73. Futuristic deliverer of packages 74. Flank or shank 75. Athlete’s knee injury, familiarly 77. Bitter fruits 79. – 82. Material for classic hockey sticks 83. Bouquet offerers, maybe 84. Deep distress 85. Article in Paris Match 87. Animal mimic? 89. Response to “Who’s there?” 91. Some cheesecake photos 95. Accelerated alternative to broadband 98. “Poppycock!” 100. Rainwater diverters 101. Diez menos nueve 102. “Au contraire!” 103. Hairstyling icon Vidal 105. What it is to kill a mockingbird, in “To Kill a Mockingbird” 106. “I feel the same way!” 108. Voltage-increasing electrical device 111. Animal mimic? 113. Ask too much 114. Brand in the dessert aisle 118. Character in “Grease” who sings “There Are Worse Things I Could Do” 119. Like many measuring cups and spoons 120. Doctor Doom and Galactus, to the Fantastic Four 121. Homer, for one 122. “Yecch!” 123. Puts to rest, as rumors

1. 2010s dance move involving dipping the head to the elbow 2. Inits. on 30 Rockefeller Plaza until 1988 3. Surgery sites, for short 4. Christmas Eve no-no 5. Large waterfalls 6. Slack-jawed 7. Distant correspondent 8. Oktoberfest locales 9. Mideast capital once known as Philadelphia 10. Tender ender? 11. Holy, in Latin phrases 12. See 46-Across 13. Treat to reduce swelling 14. Run amok 15. Flamboyant rock genre 16. Woman’s name that’s one letter off from a fragrant flower 18. Prepare, as pot roast 20. Roadside produce sellers 24. Cheese with a red covering 26. Top-drawer 27. Sammy with 609 career home runs 29. Bard’s contraction 30. Cry a river 31. A quarter to four? 34. Ignore for the time being 37. Like xenon or neon 39. Popular moisturizing lotion 40. Subj. of Article 86 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice 42. Paint choice 44. Solved 48. Foe of Austin Powers 50. Dried chile peppers 52. ____-Aid 53. Tagliatelle topper 54. Reason for some bellyaching? 55. Got up again 56. Outer layer 57. Weapons that are about 3 1/2 feet long

58. Five books of Moses 59. Whack 60. Fuel common in Scotland 62. Doc at a clinic 64. Red-headed friend of Harry Potter 67. Losing Super Bowl LIII team 68. Former leader of the Sinaloa drug cartel 69. Door openers for journalists 74. Family name? 76. “A bit of talcum/Is always walcum” writer 78. Set (down) 80. Chill in the air 81. Host of the Oscars, Grammys and Emmys 83. Apiarist’s hazard 84. Oil painter’s primer 85. One-dimensional 86. Act of selfaggrandizement 88. They might get collared 90. Like a jammed printer 92. KOA visitors 93. Waipahu wreath 94. Form 1099 fig. 95. Distinctive part of a zebu 96. Kind of button 97. Feature of many a Cape Cod house 99. Played (around) 103. Little brats 104. Muscat citizen 107. Pasta also called risoni 109. Lhasa ____ (dog) 110. Aid for getting a boat in the water 112. Little ’un 115. Many an alibi 116. This may shock you 117. It’s twice twisted

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A34

WORD SEARCH

ANTIQUE WORD SEARCH

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

ANSWERS

Do you have

AMAZING LOCAL

PHOTOS? We’re looking for your local photos to use in local publications

Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle ABATTANT AMBROTYPE ARCADE ARMCHAIR ARMOIRE ART DECO BALUSTER BANDING BAROQUE BEVEL BIEDERMEIER BRONZE

CAMEO CERAMIC CHIPPENDALE CLASSICAL CUPBOARD DECORATIVE DESK NOUVEAU PANELLING POTTERY SIDEBOARD WARDROBE

ANSWERS

WIN A PRIZE VALUED AT $50 Submit your photos to

www.kamloopsthisweek.com/contests Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Oct 28

Photos must as high quality as possible. One winner selected at the end of each month from all acceptable entries. Physical copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for details.


A38

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Dean Andre Martin With sadness in our hearts and tremendous loss we announce the passing of our beloved brother Dean Andre Martin on September 12, 2019. Deano, to all who knew and loved him, referred to him as a gentle soul, hardworking, kind, quiet and thoughtful. He was an avid guitarist who loved music of all genres but especially Metallica, the Beatles, Joe Satriani and Oasis. Deano was predeceased by his mother Barbara Peggy Martin (Darwin) in 2017 and father Lucien Guy Martin in 2019. Left to mourn are his sister Linda (Gary), brother Claude (Shawn), nephew Aaron (Val), nieces Nicole (Travis) and Eden (Kieran). Deano had many friends over the years who thought fondly of him and we are thankful that they were a part of his life. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Florence (Nadeau) Knull Florence (Nadeau) Knull passed away peacefully at the age of 95 on Saturday, September 28, 2019. Mom spent her final days at the McKenney Creek Hospice Residence, where she received loving and compassionate care. Mom was predeceased by her husband Harold and her son Brian. She came to Maple Ridge in 2011 from Kamloops where her and dad had a successful business. Mom will be remembered by her two children Linda and Robert (Albertina), her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Our family would like to thank the hospice and her good friends from Home Instead and Maple Ridge Seniors Village. The care and compassion shown to mom was most welcomed and appreciated. There will be a Funeral Mass at St Patrick’s Catholic Church in Maple Ridge on Wednesday, October 9, 2019 at 1:30 pm. Expressions of sympathy can be made at www.gardenhill.ca

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Joseph Klemens Perszon Joseph passed away on September 27, 2019 at Royal Inland Hospital. He is survived by his brother Pawel, his sisters Marta and Monica and many nieces and nephews in Poland. Left to cherish his memory are his four children Richard (Gayle) Perszon, Edward (Joanne) Perszon, Ella (Don) Brown and Frances Perszon (Hardy Spitman). He is survived by ten grandchildren Martin Brown, Matthew Brown (Veronika), Steven Brown, (Jordin), Kurtis Brown, Jeanine (Clayton) Traudt, Christa Pattie (Neil) and Brynn Perszon (Matt), Sean (Elysha) Perszon, Josef Perszon and Michael Perszon. Joseph is also survived by nine great-grandchildren Tayior, Summer, Sophie, Jamie, Benton, Jacob, Mya, Noah and Haydn. Joseph cherished his relationship with Stephan, Arlene and Christine Marshall. Born on January 4, 1926, as Jozef Klemens Perszon near Poblocie, Poland, he was the third of five children to Pawel and Paulina Perszon (Wohs). Joseph is predeceased by his wife Caroline in 2018, by his parents, his brother Francisek, his sister Helena, and his grandson Richard Brown. Joseph grew up on the family farm and he attended school until grade 10, when Germany invaded Poland in 1940. He worked on a state farm under German occupation. At age 18, he was sent to Stutthof concentration camp and later to Neckzrgrech concentration camp. He endured much hardship. He was freed by American forces in April 1945, and treated in the Displace Persons Hospital in Heppenheim until February 1946. Joseph first trained as a Guard. He then became a Military Police Officer with the United States Army for four years. Joseph met Caroline Rubicz in Schweinfort, Germany, while waiting for passage to Canada. Upon arriving in Canada on May 6, 1949, he was assigned to the Cleavely Ranch in Little Fort, BC and she to a tuberculosis sanatorium in Brandon, Manitoba. Caroline and Joseph married in Kamloops on January 19, 1952.

Edward James (Jim) Allen December 31, 1952 - September 30, 2019

Jim passed away peacefully at Kamloops Hospice after a short battle with cancer. He is predeceased by his parents Robert and Marlene Allen, and sister Kimberly Veitch. Survived by his daughter Chelsea Allen (Bill Shelley), sister Karen Chamberlain (Dale), nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephew. Jim loved his family. He was an avid outdoorsman who enjoyed fishing, hunting and having a cold beer. At Jim’s request a Celebration of Life will be held at the Westsyder Pub on Saturday October 5, 2019 from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm. Come join us for a drink in his memory. Donations to the Kamloops Hospice Association are greatly appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577 Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Joseph was an honest, humble, kind and hard -working man who was totally devoted to his family. He loved gardening and flowers, his milk cow Bossy and market garden. Joseph enjoyed fishing at Roche, Bleeker, and Jocko Lakes. He was a founding member of the Yellowhead Lions Club. Upon retirement, Joseph dove into making wood crafts. He enjoyed meeting people at the Northills flea market and at Christmas craft fairs. Joseph loved playing strategic games of crib. Our family is grateful for the loving care provided to Joseph at Active Living Care and by the care aides in Logan Lake. We wish to thank Dr. Paul Dickinson for his care. Vigil Prayers will be offered on October 10, 2019 at St. John Vianney Roman Catholic Church at 7:00 pm, 2826 Bank Road in Westsyde, Kamloops. Funeral Mass will be celebrated by on October 11, 2019 at St. John Vianney at 10:30 am. On-line condolences may be expressed at www.shoeningfuneralservice.com

It is with great sadness that the family of Doreene Alice Malo announce her passing in Edmonton, Alberta on the morning of September 28, 2019. She was born on October 28, 1938 in St. Boniface, Manitoba. She raised her kids in Kamloops and Edmonton. Doreen will be lovingly remembered by sons Kurt and Kevin, grandchildren Jason (Michelle), Jeffrey and Tyler (Tara) and great-grandchildren Linden, Cohen and Lily. A private family gathering will be held in Kamloops. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her honour to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

250-554-2577

While the price difference for a cremation with NO Service is similar at most funeral homes in Kamloops, First Memorial is proud to have facilities to accommodate all of your needs, whether you choose a Celebration of Life or a full Traditional service. We can do it all at First Memorial. Come talk to us and have a look around. You will be pleasantly surprised. They lived at Trapp Lake (near Roche Lake) where Joseph was a faller for Frolek Lumber Co. for 7 years. In 1958, they purchased a farm in Rayleigh. Joseph worked as a lumber grader for Balco, then as a custodian for Rayleigh Elementary for 25 years. Caroline and Joseph faithfully attended Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Heffley Creek until 2015 and later at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Logan Lake. They lived with Ella and Don Brown until 2018. After Caroline’s passing, Joseph resided at Kamloops Senior Active Care in Brocklehurst.

Doreene A. Malo

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

schoeningfuneralservice.com

Donald George Campbell February 15, 1958 - September 28, 2019

It is with immense sadness that the family of Donald George Campbell announces his tragic passing on Saturday, September 28, 2019 at the age of 61 years. Don will be lovingly remembered by his wife Sandy, daughters Kirstin (Zac), Jailene (Nathan), Chianne (Mike) and his six grandchildren Alexander, Isabella, Sofia, Maximus, Elizabeth and Abigail. He will also be deeply missed by his mother-in-law Marie (Bill), brother Rob (Wendy), nieces Stephanie (Johnny) and Katie, brothers-inlaw John and Bill (Delaine) as well as many nieces and nephews. Don is predeceased by his parents Douglas and Marjorie Campbell. He was born with a zest for life on February 15, 1958 on a Canadian Airforce base in Zweibrucken, Germany. Don built a life full of love and adventure based on his values of unwavering integrity, compassion, generosity, sharing, humour, empathy, tenacity and his passion of justice for all. He was a voice for those that could not speak for themselves. His accomplishments were numerous. He represented Canada on National Ski and Skydiving Teams and was a successful, esteemed lawyer. His greatest and most important achievement was being an incredible husband, father and grandfather. He was happiest when spending time with his cherished “pretty lady”, Sandy and their family. His strength of character was only challenged by his grandchildren whom he could never say no to. He will be greatly missed by family, friends and colleagues. “To infinity and beyond” A Church Service will be held at 10:30 am on Saturday, October 5, 2019 at Our Lady of Perpetual Help, 635 Tranquille Rd, Kamloops, BC with a reception to follow in the Parish Centre. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Kamloops Mustard Seed in memory of Don Campbell, https://canadahelps.org/en/charities/the-mustard-seed/, 181 Victoria St. W., Kamloops, BC V2C 5L7. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

(250) 377-8225


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A39

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Francis Louise Douglas (née Braaten) 1937 - 2019

It is with great sadness we announce the sudden passing of Fran, beloved wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend to many. Fran passed away peacefully on September 26, 2019 surrounded by family. Fran is survived by her husband of 62 years Gordon (Gordie), two sons Scott (Shannon) and Bruce (Susan), and daughter Diane (Alan), thirteen grandchildren who all loved her tremendously Nicole, Jacquilyn, Taylor, McKenzie, Connor, Karrington, Finlay, Oliver, Liam, Cameron, Nick, Felix and Eliot, her brother Gordon (Margaret) Braaten and sisters Inger Worthen, Norma Howatt and Diane Braaten. Fran was predeceased by her parents Gunvar and Arne Braaten, brothers Jacobb Braaten and Ingvar Braaten. Fran was born on March 29, 1937 in Nanton, Alberta to immigrant parents from Norway. Fran was one of seven children raised in Turner Valley, Alberta. She would later meet her future husband in the local school in grade 4, recalling he had indoor plumbing. One of Fran’s first summer jobs was in Jasper, AB, she would often share memories of what a fun experience it was and how excited she was when her granddaughter McKenzie took a summer job there. Fran went on to work and get married in Calgary on September 7, 1957. Fran and Gordie started their own family in Calgary and shortly thereafter moved to Prince Rupert, BC. They settled in Kamloops in 1970 and welcomed Diane into their lives in 1977. Fran enjoyed going to their Shuswap Lake cabin with family, welcoming all the children’s friends that came too. Many friends and family share memories of drawing

straws for either dish washing duties or picking rocks off the beach! Fran was always one for having fun and participated fully in the summer parties and campfire sing-a-longs. One time after joining a good “yukaflux” party and not understanding her inebriation, she was heard saying, “But I only ate the fruit”! Fran and Gordie built a successful business together in Kamloops that allowed them to retire early and hit the road in their 5th wheel trailer. Retirement included golfing, fishing and travelling to Arizona, California and camping throughout BC, making many new friends along the way. Fran was an accomplished marbles player - she would “kill” her immediate opponent with surprising regularity but always with a smile! In recent years, Fran and Gordie spent many evenings playing cribbage trying to “skunk” each other. A fantastic cook, Fran loved baking cookies and she baked a mean key-lime pie. The family wishes to thank the doctors and staff at RIH – ICU for their assistance, continuous support and for keeping Fran comfortable during this difficult time. A Celebration of her Life will be held in the North Shore Community Centre, 730 Cottonwood Ave., Kamloops, Dogwood Room, on Saturday November 9, 2019 at 2:00 pm. We invite all those who were touched by Fran to join us to share memories with each other. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Kamloops Royal Inland Hospital, ICU Family Fund.

Diane (Johnson) Vigna It is on September 27, 2019 that our dear Diane (Johnson) Vigna, a very gentle soul, passed away with her loving husband Michel Vigna at her side. She was a nurse for many years at the Sherbrooke Hospital in Quebec, then at the Kamloops Royal Inland Hospital in BC.

In Loving Memory of Isabelle Kiesman

March 25, 1941 – October 7, 2018

Alfred ‘Alf’ De Frane

December 4, 1965 - August 13, 2019

It is with tears in our eyes and broken hearts that we; Sandee (wife), Shayla (daughter) and Mckenzie (son) announce that Barry, our Barry, passed away suddenly and accidentally after an ATV adventure.

In lieu of flowers, we would appreciate a donation at Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice in Diane’s name. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Celebration of Life Dorothy Atwater

Barry, it’s always been you. Dad, you will be forever missed everyday.

While she lies in peaceful sleep Her memory we shall always keep.

The Day God Took You Home

A million times I’ve needed you A million times I’ve cried, If love alone could have saved, you you never would have died. In life I loved you dearly, in death I love you still. In my heart you hold a place, no one else can ever fill. It broke my heart to lose you, but you didn’t go alone Part of me went with you, The day God took you home.

Your Loving Husband Paul Kiesman and Family

We would like to send appreciation, care, compassion and gratitude to family, friends we have chosen as family, friends, colleagues, neighbours, Reiki practitioners and Intuitives, to the random strangers who offered condolences as well as hugs. Thank you to the first responders, EMS ground and flight crew, doctors and nurses in ER, OR, PAR, ICU, the transplant team and the team at our general practitioner’s office. A Barry-type gathering will be held at the Knutsford Hall, in Kamloops on Saturday, October 26, 2019 at 1:00 pm. Dress casually. A light lunch and snacks will be available. We look forward to this opportunity to remember our Barry with you.

A. I think couriers stopped shipping them some time ago. It’s understandable that Greyhound Bus won’t accept acids, ammunition, compressed gases... and corpses! But they also forbid shipping “cremated remains!” So, a relative can take Murray from Kamloops by car, plane or train. Or use Canada Post.

We would like to thank the personnel at Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice for their excellent care.

My Grandfather started in funeral service after WWII. Later my dad also taught me the value of funeral service, now even my own children are fully involved. Four generations of our family helping your family with caring compassionate support every step of the way. Tradition. Trust. Affordable.

Barry Joseph Lawrence Povoas

Q. How do I get Murray’s ashes to Toronto?

She leaves to mourn her two sisters-in-law Jeanne St-Laurent (wife of the late Donald) and Roxane Gagnon (wife of late Wayne) as well as her nieces and nephews Patricia (Steve Patrick), Ann, David, Jill (John Labree), Kim, Wendy (Steve Rowe), James (Geneviève Avril), cousins and friends.

Celebrating the life of Dorothy Atwater, 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm on Saturday, October 5, 2019 at Desert Gardens, 540 Seymour St., Kamloops, BC. Join us to share stories and remember a life lived to the fullest.

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She was the daughter of Homer and Edith (Edkins) Johnson.

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73 Taren Drive, Clearwater, BC, V0E 1N2 Toll free: 1-877-674-3030

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Lawrence Schrader

Mrs. Penny March Mrs. Penny March passed away peacefully in Kamloops on September 22, 2019 at the age of 67 years. She will be lovingly remembered by her sons Daniel Steinke (Candice) and Micheal Steinke (Danelle Johnston). She will be sadly missed by her five grandchildren Mayson, Taya, Stephanie, Zoe and Maddison. She is survived by Eugene March, brother Rick and sisters Susan, Jane and Michelle and many nieces and nephews. No formal service by request. Online condolences may be expressed at iamalbundy@telus.net

Celebration of Life Denny Pearson May 11, 1945 – July 21, 2019

Please join us to share stories and remember a life lived to the fullest. The Celebration of Life will be held in the home of Bill and Mary Pearson. Open House on Saturday, October 5, 2019. Between 1:00 and 4:00 pm. Casual attire. Refreshments will be served. For location, please e-mail DennyRemembered@gmail.com


A40

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Terrance John Millar

June 27, 1932 - September 20, 2019 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our dad Terry Millar. Dad slipped away peacefully and is finally reunited with the love of his life, mom. He was predeceased by his wife Esther Millar in 2018, his baby son Grant in 1956 and his four-legged friends that he loved so much: Lily in 2019, Puds,Tiger and Irish. He leaves behind his children Gwen (Rob) of Edmonton, Kevin (Deb) of Kamloops and Lala (Carlo) also of Kamloops, grandchildren Robbie (Stacy), Anthony, Lauren (Kai), Taylor, Connor and Leah, Erika, Jiles, great-grandchildren Lily and Bryson, Jack and Annika, Ava, Paisley and Nixon, and our Jacob will miss their Grandad. Numerous nieces and nephews will too. Dad was born in Flin Flon, Manitoba. He married mom on December 16, 1953 in Choiceland, Saskatchewan and they were together for almost 65 years until her passing last year. Dad and Mom were best friends and loved doing everything together. Many nights were spent in the kitchen having cocktails and dancing the night away, just the two of them laughing, telling stories and planning as to what they were going to do next. In the early years, there was “Millar’s Cave” in the basement outfitted with a special bar, pool table, stereo system... the perfect place to invite family and friends to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries, St. Patty’s Day, Grey Cup’s and so on. They had a huge circle of friends which they all curled together going to many fun bonspiels, they played horseshoes, both were great pool players, back in the day dad played hockey with the Lynn Lake Miners, he was the hot shot right winger. Dad even got in the ring and boxed competitively for awhile, and because of that boxer instinct if you came up behind him he would automatically “put up his dukes”, he would startle the heck out of you, then the laughing would start, funny guy! Over the years dad and mom went on many gambling trips to Reno, Vegas, Seattle, Utah and finally here in BC and Edmonton when it became legal. They went on a cruise to Alaska and found sunny Hawaii too, awww those were the good old days for sure.

Wm. Gordon Bacon

Ph.D, P.Eng. FCAE Emeritus

December 28, 1944 - September 27, 2019

In 1963, Dad became an ironworker and joined the Local 97 Ironworkers Union, throughout his career, dad also went to BCIT in Burnaby to get his welding ticket from there he worked on almost every bridge, dam and highrise in BC and then even going across Canada to work. After 29 years of being a name requested ironworker, Dad finally hung up his belt June 27, 1992. Even though Dad was retired he would get up every morning at the crack of dawn and be out in the yard puttering about, he would manicure his lawn and yard (nothing out of place) then he would go to the neighbours “Rita May” where he would do the same to her yard. Painting would start either at the request of mom, Rita or Lala or some other household fix, Dad could fix anything and truly was a “handyman” in every sense of the word, he was a perfectionist. He kept us all happy, especially Mom of course, he would do everything and all things for her. Dad belonged to the Elk’s Club, he volunteered hundreds of hours over the years to specific charities he also belonged to the Moose Lodge, Eagles and always supported the Legion. All was good, till as gradual as it was, it wasn’t, something was wrong with Dad? almost 15 years ago our Dad was diagnosed with the dreaded Alzheimer’s disease. Slowly Dad was drifting but he never lost his keen sense of humour and he never forgot his children’s names. When Mom passed on, dear Dad was placed in Overlander Extended Care Facility where he never wanted to bother anybody and was always the gentleman. If dad was resting in bed and we came to visit almost on a daily basis, he would throw the covers back, get his slippers on and was raring to go. Dad loved music, any kind of music, but the golden oldies reminded him of all the good times. One of his favourites “Tie a yellow ribbon round the old oak tree” he said was his and Momma’s song. So a cup of tea or an ice capp and any kind of pastry (he had a sweet tooth), sitting with him for a while enjoying the music and having a few laughs is all he needed to be happy. In closing, Dad always said he had a wonderful life, “How sweet it is” he used to say, for us children this verse pretty much sums it up.

as Vice President of Engineering and Technology at Inco. During this time Gord was also an active member in many professional societies, and mining organizations. He also served as an adjunct professor at UBC and on advisory boards for Queen’s University and UBC. Not one to rest upon retiring, Gord provided expert consultation to numerous major global mining companies.

Born the son of a professional geologist, Gord spent his formative years in Langley, Malartic, Sydney (Australia), Victoria, West Vancouver and Calgary. This early experience of moving from place to place was to become a continuing theme in Gord’s life. There weren’t many places on a map one could point to which Gord hadn’t visited. After earning a degree in Mathematics at UBC, Gord continued on at the same institution to earn a Bachelor of Mineral Engineering and a Doctorate in Metallurgical Engineering. Gord earned $1000 scholarships to pursue his studies from both Kennecott and Stelco. A very substantial amount at the time and a testament to his brilliance. Gord also financed his education by working at the Pine Point Mine, NWT and for Kennecott in Ely, Nevada. Upon graduating, Gord worked for the International Minerals and Chemical Corp, earning two promotions during his two year stint. In 1972, Gord capitalized his expertise in metallurgy to found Bacon Donaldson Associates, a company he grew from a partnership to an employer of seventy five. Upon selling this business he moved on to become the Vice President of Technology for Sherritt International. Gord then went on to serve

Gord was also an enthusiastic and highly accomplished fly fisherman. He was a longstanding member and captain of the Canadian Fly Fishing team, competing for his country in countless international competitions. For many years, Gord held the distinction of holding the highest individual ranking for a Canadian fly fisherman in world competition. When this standing was eclipsed, he couldn’t have been more proud and excited for the former team-mate who took over this distinction. Remarkable as Gord’s career and personal pursuits were, his greatest achievement was the number of enduring friendships he formed and maintained during his life. Gord will be lovingly remembered by his wife Marion Bacon, his step-children from a previous marriage Jennifer (Reg), Ryan and Toby (Shelley) West and grandchildren, Mitchell, Steven, Jake and Ryan. Also by his sister Barbara (Craig) Peters, niece Lindsey (Scott) Hunter, and in-laws Doug and Anne Stuart. Gord’s celebration of life will be held in Kamloops, BC at a future date. Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

He never looked for praises, he was never one to boast, he just went on quietly working, for the ones he loved the most.

In Loving Memory of

His dreams were seldom spoken, his wants were very few, and most of the time his worries, went unspoken too. He was there.... A firm foundation, through all our storms of life, a sturdy hand to hold on to, in times of stress and strife.

Michael Anthony October 8, 1999

A true friend we could turn to, when times were good or bad, one of our greatest blessings, the man that we called Dad. Our entire family would like to express our sincere gratitude to Dr. Mavis Hollman, her help and attention were invaluable, especially in the past few months of dad’s care. Dad thought so highly of you Mavis and was very appreciative of your care. Special Thank you, go to all the nurses and care aids at Overlander. Their care, concern and compassion was beyond our expectations and we will be forever grateful. No Service will be held at this time at dad’s request. Should friends desire, donations to the Alzheimer’s Foundation or to Overlander Extended Care Facility in memory of dad’s name would be greatly appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Drake Cremation and Funeral Services

”Rest Easy”

www.Drakecremation.com

Don, Ray, Desiree and Dyan

(250) 377-8225

Michael Glen Cain

September 23, 1949 – September 28, 2019 It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Michael Cain on September 28, 2019 at the age of 70 after a short stay at hospice. Michael is survived by his beloved wife of 50 years Patricia, his sons Jason (Chris), Jeremy (Michelle), his adopted son Dan, his grandchildren Courtney, Brandon, Logan and his little dog Rosie. Michael is also survived by his sister Dorothy-Ann (Art), brothers Keith (Sharon), Steven (Barb) and many nieces and nephews. Michael was born in Brantford, Ontario and grew up in Revelstoke, BC where he enjoyed an active and mischievous childhood. After marrying his wife Patricia in 1969, they relocated to Kamloops in 1973. Michael Immediately began working for the city upon his arrival in Kamloops and enjoyed a 30-year career which saw him begin as an equipment operator, and later moving into management with public works. Michael was an avid reader and always had several books on the go, he was particularly interested in history which he studied throughout his life. He loved to spend time in his back yard working in his garden. He was also a very talented artist who enjoyed drawing and woodwork. Michael always had a great sense of humor, getting particular enjoyment from British comedy and reading his favourite comic strips. Above everything else, Michael was a dedicated family man, who showed great loyalty and devotion to his wife, children and grandchildren. He had a unique strength which helped to protect and guide the people he loved most, in the end he wished only that he had more time to spend with them. His family will miss him dearly. At Michael’s request there will be no service. There will be a gathering at the family home on Sunday, October 6, 2019 between 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm, if more information is needed, please contact Jason at (780) 821-0353 or Jeremy at (250) 574-2678.


FRIDAY, October y 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A41

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949

|

Fax: 250-374-1033

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Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

RUN UNTIL SOLD

RUN UNTIL RENTED

GARAGE SALE

EMPLOYMENT

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

Based on 3 lines

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

$

1250 Friday - 3 lines or less $ 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue.. . . . . . $1638 1 Week. . . . . . $3150 1 Month . . . $10460

INDEX

LISTINGS

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classiďŹ ed ads.

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300 1 Week. . . . . . . . . $2500 1 Month . . . . . . . . $8000 ADD COLOUR. . $2500 to your classiďŹ ed add

35

$

00

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Tax not included

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

Coming Events

Furniture

For Sale by Owner

Misc Home Service

Classes & Courses

THANKSGIVING

1-4ft long horn one of a kind. $900. New pedestal round drop leaf table 40� w/2 chairs leather seats. $750. 250-3776920.

SNOWBIRDS GOING SOUTH FOR SALE Park Model, Indio California, Over 55 Park, serious enquiries. Betty 250-3141005.

JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943

6 drawer Walnut dresser w/ mirror & matching double bed exc cond $225. 250-374-7514.

Property For Sale

Scrap Car Removal

HUNTER & FIREARMS Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. October 28th to October 31st evenings. P.A.L. October 7th & 8th evenings. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor: Bill 250-376-7970

Kamloops This Week will be closed on Monday, October 14, 2019 for the Thanksgiving Holiday

8ft Antique Couch Couch & matching $200. 250-374-1541.

$900. chairs

Chesterfield off-white, made by Sears. 3 1/2 yrs old. $1,000/obo. 236-425-0077.

Farm Equipment Case Collector Tractor only 1950s. $600. 1958 Case (utility) 350 Tractor w/blade, chains, front-end loader. $1,000. 250-819-9712, 250672-9712.

Antiques Wrought iron $300/each. Floor lamp High chair $30. Cedar Chest $400. Rocking $150. Oak dresser with $475. 250-372-8177.

beds $50. Hope chair mirror

For Sale - Misc 1948 Ferguson rebuilt motor & extra parts has a util. snow blade & chains mostly original $3000.’ 20’utility trailer with a 10lbs electric winch has 12lbs axles & new deck like new $3500. 250-374-828

Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933. Solid oval oak table w/6side chairs, 2 arms chairs, buffet. $5,000. Exec desk dark finish $200. Teak corner cabinet $100. Treadmill $450, Custom oak cabinet $200. 250-8517687.

Sports Equipment Hockey Gear fits 5’4� 120 lbs, brand new + skates 6.5 size. Serious inquires only $650/obo. for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992. La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 10. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. Savage AX19 223 Remington caliber 40X Vortex scope 80 rounds of amo, $725 Henry 22 mag lever action $550. both like new (250) 554-4467

Commercial

CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family�

PRESTIGE LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

2018 Yamaha Vino 50cc Scooter. 413 kms. $2200/obo. 250-371-1392 5th wheel hitch $250. 250374-8285. 6hp Evinrude O/B motor. $600. 70 CFM air compressor. $750. 250-574-3794. Butcher-Boy commercial meat grinder 3-hp. 220 volt. c/w attachments. $1500. 250318-2030. Craftsman LT11 Riding Mower. Chains and garden trailer. Deck needs minor work. $500. 250-819-9712, 250-672-9712.

KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

250-374-7467

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

Luigi’s SMALL

F R E E E S T I M AT E S !

   Time to Trim Your Hedges Tree Pruning or Removal Yard clean-up, Landscaping Licensed & CertiďŹ ed 250-572-0753

Lawn & Garden Reliable Gardener. 30 yrs experience. Clean-ups & pruning. Call 236-421-4448.

Houses For Rent

RICKS’S SMALL HAUL

Brock, carriage house 2bdrms, priv entr, parking, all appl’s. $1800/mo. Nov 1st. 250-319-0891/250-319-7379.

Fuel tank w/pump $950. Electric boat loader. $950. 250579-9550. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000 (250) 376-6607

House-sitting Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 250-374-6007.

Makita Jig Saw, like new. $40. 250-319-7003.

Shared Accommodation

Satellite phone Model Iridium 9505A handset w/attachments. $1300. 250-374-0650.

For quiet N/S male, in downtown apartment. TRU student OK $600/mo. 236-425-1499.

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CONCRETE JOBS

PETER’S YARD SERVICE

For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!! 250-377-3457

courses mid-week & weekends. NEW - Intro to Reloading & Bear Aware courses on demand. For schedules see www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

10.5ft Timberline truck camper exc cond,w/all the extras, must see, $8500 250-572-7890

1972 Triple E motor home 25’ 77,000miles 402 Chev lots of extras $7,000 250-523-9495 2004 Cougar 5th wheel. 12ft slide. Excellent cond. $14,000/obo. 250-554-1744.

2006 Dodge 2500 4x4 HD. w/1994 11ft. camper. $15,500/both. 778-220-7372. 2014 Adventurer Camper 89RB solar 13’ awning + extras $22,000 (250) 523-9495.

CHOOSE LOCAL

2016 24ft. Jay Feather 23 RBM. Fully loaded. 1500kms. $22,000/obo. 250-377-1932.

PRESTIGE LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION KAMLOOPS ONLY ULC CERTIFIED MONITORING STATION

FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

250-374-0916 Renos & Home Improvement

Tax not included

Motorcycles

2006 HD blue Dyna Low Rider. 23000kms. Mint condition. $13,900.00. Call 250-851-1193

4 Arctic Claw winter tires 225/75R15. $350. 250-3761360. 4 Michelin X Ice 3. 215/70R15. $200. 250-573-3289.

Brand New Yamaha R3 Motorcycle with only 6kms. 320CC, liquid cooled, ABS brakes. Still has 1 year Factory Warranty. $4,700. 250-578-7274.

Collectibles & Classic Cars

2006 Buick Allure CXS. 1owner. Fully loaded. Excellent condition. 207,000kms. $4,900/obo. 250-701-1557, 778-471-7694.

Trucks & Vans 1977 Ford Custom, auto, body needs some panel repair. $700. 250-819-9712, 250-6729712. 1996 GMC Suburban 4x4 good shape runs great $2750obo Call (250) 571-2107

2003 Ford Ranger 4x4. Needs engine, everything else is new. $2,000/obo. 250-372-2096. 1939 Chevy Coupe. Needs to be restored. Price $ 6000 Call 604-250-0345 in Merritt, BC

Trucks - 4WD 1995 Chev 2500, 4x4, 5std Canopy, w/tires on rims $2000obo 250-579-8675

Trucks/Heavy, Commercial

1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794

Cummings Gen Set Ford 6cyl 300 cu/in single and 3 phase pwr $5000 (250) 376-6607

Rims

Domestic Cars

4 - BMW X5 wheels 18 inch, like new. $1,100. Call 250-319-8784.

ATVs / Dirt Bikes

Motorcycles

2014 Lincoln MKS, AWD, 4dr Sedan. 3.5 Ecoboost twin turbo like new, black in & out. 80,000kms, $22,300.00. 250-319-8784.

2001 Dodge Caravan exc cond 295,000km well maintained worth seeing and driving $3500 obo 250-318-4648

4 - Nokian Hakkapelitta winters on rims. 215/70R16 studded. $400. Text 250-8197541.

Yamaha Grizzly ATV. KMS 011031 $4,000 250-579-3252

Domestic Cars

2002 Ford Escape, auto. Exec body. Mechanic special. $900. 250-819-9712, 250-672-9712.

Automotive Tires 2-Cooper Weather Master studded winter tires. 215/65/R17. $150. 376-4163.

Tax not included

Sports Utilities & 4X4s

2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $16,900. 236-421-2251

Security

“Our Family Protecting Your Family�

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6� Sub compliments of

RVs/Campers/Trailers

17’ Aerolite Trailer like new, slide out, stabilizer bars. $10,900 (250) 372-5033

BRICKS, BLOCKS, PAVERS, SIDEWALKS + PRUNING

Handyperson

250-374-0916

To advertise call

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

Furnished5BdDen nrRIH, nsp, $3300. Call for shorttermrates 604-802-5649pg250-314-0909

Karcher Pressure Washer K3000, 1800psi; never used. $200/obo. 250-579-5880.

AAA - Pal & Core

CHECK US OUT ONLINE

BONUS (pick p up p only):

1998 Subaru Legacy Runs well 250,000kms. A/C, body fair, good tires, some mech work required. $1,300 250-554-2016 2000 Jaguar XK8 Convertible 4L, V-8, fully loaded. Exec shape. $17,500/obo. 250-3764163.

Parts & Accessories Brake Buddy. Good $170.00. 250-319-7003.

shape.

Utility Trailers 10ftx6.6ft heavy duty utility trailer. $600. 250-578-7776.

Legal/Public Notices

Misc Home Service

1957 Triumph Tiger 110 matching serial numbers. $7,800 Firm. 778-257-1072.

To advertise call

250-374-7467

2009 Honda Silverwing. $1500. Low mileage. Nice shape. (250) 376-2253

2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Must see to appreciate. $14,900. 250-374-1541.

Looking for a witness to a motor vehicle hitting a pedestrian in the parking lot of the Fortune Drive Safeway on September 9/2019 @ 2:05pm. Please contact 250-412-9620

2010 Harley Davidson Softail. Lugg carrier, cover, lift-jack. $11,000/obo. 250-374-4723.

2013 White Chevy Cruze LT. Auto, fully loaded. $6,000/obo. 250-554-4731.

kamloops thisweek.com


A42

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

Employment

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Career Opportunities

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

Indigenous Cultural Heritage Planner FPCC Cultural Heritage Program One (1) year full-time contract position Sept. 2019 – Sept. 2020 - Located in Kamloops, B.C. In an Indigenous context, cultural heritage refers to ideas, experiences, objects, artistic expressions, practices, knowledge and places that are valued because they are culturally meaningful, connected to shared memory, or linked to collective identity. This is an excellent senior opportunity for a dedicated professional who will report to the Manager of the Cultural Heritage Program at First Peoples’ Cultural Council, this position has responsibilities throughout the province and focuses on: WHAT YOU’LL BE DOING: This is an excellent senior opportunity for a dedicated professional who will report to the Manager of the Cultural Heritage Program at First Peoples’ Cultural Council, this position has responsibilities throughout the province and focuses on: • Assist in the preparation and implementation of special planning studies and research projects pertaining to Indigenous heritage matters such as best practices in conservation, funding mechanisms, heritage conservation and management, infrastructure development, and revitalization; • Carry out data collection and maintenance analysis including the maintenance of the FPCC’s planned Heritage Properties Register; • Provide planning information and advice to members of the public and assist in general with Indigenous heritage planning; • Support the FPCC Heritage grant program at its various stages which can include drafting guidelines, report templates, criteria, jury materials. • Guide grant applicants through the approval process and navigating FPCC’s grant application system; • Perform a variety of duties related to sites, landscapes and cultural materials of heritage significance, review proposals for alteration and provide technical and research support and advice on heritage planning policies, guidelines and objectives to the Indigenous communities and members; • Review, create and maintain content and activities for FPCC’s proposed Heritage Resource Centre; • Assist in drafting and presenting reports and recommendations to First Peoples Cultural Council’s foundation, staff, advisory groups and partners;

MANAGER KAMLOOPS

TCS is seeking a skilled, experienced and selfdirected individual for a full-time management position to assist in the development and monitoring of a Community Based Program for individuals with developmental disabilities. Applicants must demonstrate extensive experience as a Community Service Worker in a residential and/or community setting. Supervisory experience, mediation and advocacy skills are an asset. You must have sincere commitment to providing quality services to individuals with developmental disabilities. We offer a competitive salary with an excellent benefit package. Start date will be determined. This position is based in Kamloops. Please reply in writing by September 27, 2019. Thompson Community Services Attn: Chantel MacMillan, Director of Services cmacmillan@tcsinfo.ca

TRU invites applications for the following positions:

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: A competitive compensation package is offered. To be considered, please submit your cover letter and resume outlining how you meet the requirements of this position to HR@fpcc.ca with Indigenous Cultural Heritage Planner in the subject line by 3:30 pm on October 4, 2019.

FACULTY Instrumentation & Control Technician Construction Trades

Submissions from applicants with Indigenous ancestry are strongly encouraged to apply. We thank all who submit; however, only short-listed candidates will be contacted. All applications will be treated with strict confidentiality.

SUPPORT Culinary Assistant Culinary Arts Program Auxiliary/On-Call For further information, please visit:

Thompson Rivers Family Optometry NORTHILLS CENTRE

The Mount Paul Community Food Centre is expanding our team and looking to hire: Food Access Coordinator (35 hours/week) • Increases access to healthy, dignified food • Delivers food access programs • Food procurement and purchasing • Volunteer management, community engagement and support of onsite garden. Community Gardens Coordinator (18 hours/week) • Oversees the operations of community gardens • Coordinates gardener registration and volunteers • Promotes public awareness of gardens • Liaises with community services providers Please submit resumes by October 16th 4:30 pm careers@interiorcommunityservices.bc.ca Please visit our website for more details www.interiorcommunityservices.bc.ca/career

We are adding to our team! Are you a positive detail oriented, devoted team player, who multi tasks easily and enjoys working in a fast paced progressive office? Are you eager to learn a variety of duties and responsibilities? We are willing to train the right person. If this is you please apply in person during regular office hours. We are open Monday to Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (closed lunches). Thompson Rivers Family Optometry 60-700 Tranquille Road, Kamloops

THERE’S MORE ONLINE Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

KamloopsThisWeek.com

Considering a Career in Real Estate?

Century21 Desert Hills Realty. We provide training & tutoring. Talk to Karl Neff 250 377 250-377-3030 SStart your new career today!

General Employment Activation Laboratories We are looking to fill positions for Sample Prep Technician. No experience necessary. Email resumes to: nolangoddard@actlabs.com or apply in person at 9989 Dallas Drive. Competitive wages and benefits. Brock Auto is looking for a 1 -2yr Apprentice Technician. Must be eager to learn and have some mechanical attributes. Mon - Fri. Send resume to: ian@brockautocentre.com I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679 Looking for nursery and ginseng workers Mon-Sat 8-10hr per day transportation provided Call 250-319-7263 or fax 250-554-2604

ADMINISTRATIVE Administrative Assistant to the Dean Faculty of Arts

Visit our website for more information: www.fpcc.ca

250-374-3853

tru.ca/careers

We wish to thank all applicants; however, only those under consideration will be contacted.

WEBBER LAW Expanding Law Firm requires:

Mario’s Towing Is Expanding! Kamloops or any of our 9 locations are hiring. Light Duty Tow operators & Heavy Tow operator. Must Pass Criminal Records Check. Experience an asset but will train the successful Candidate. Must be available for all shifts. Please forward Resumes & Current Drivers Abstract to: kamloops@marios-towing.com or in Person 726 Carrier St. No Phone Calls Please! VINEYARD FARM SUPERVISOR Permanent full-time Vineyard Farm Supervisor is required by Sidhu & Sons Nursery Ltd at 2420 Miners Bluff Rd, Monte Creek, BC. Must have ability to perform and supervise all duties of vineyard workers related to production of grapes. - 3+ years of experience in growing of grapes is essential. - Wages are $20 per hour - Minimum high school diploma required. Email resume to info@sidhunursery.com or fax 604-820-1361. Head office: 9623 Sylvester Road, Mission BC.

Work Wanted

1. Conveyancing Legal Assistant, 2. Legal Assistant for a Solicitor’s Practice.

HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774.

Experience required for both positions.

Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. gene@shaw.ca

Excellent Salary & Benefits for qualified applicants. Send Resume to: Roger Webber Webber Law #209 – 1211 Summit Drive Kamloops, BC V2C 5R9 roger@webberlaw.ca tel: (250) 851-0100 fax: (250) 851-0104

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GarageSale DIRECTORY ABERDEEN Estate Sale: Saturday, Oct 5th. Noon to 3pm. #39-2080 Pacific Way Sierra Vista Estates.

DALLAS Sat, Oct 5th. 8am-Noon. 394 Wing Place. bottom of Barnhartvale Rd. Something for everyone, free stuff too.

DOWNTOWN Sat, Oct 5th. 9-2pm. 432 St. Paul St. inside at the back in bsmt. Folding tables, grills, lamps, tools, lots of hshld + more. Lots of items 50% off.

LOWER SAHALI Sat & Sun, Oct 5th & 6th. 9am-4pm. 198 Arrowstone Drive. General hshld, yard & garden items, misc. No early birds!

VALLEYVIEW Sat, Oct 5th. 9am-5pm. #7-1651 Valleyview Dr. Garage shelving, work bench, hshld, sump pump, tiger torch, carpet hoover, 2-lrg Xmas trees, misc Xmas item, 8 QT presto canner & jars +more.

kamloopsthisweek.com


FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Auctions

s Dodd

KIDS & ADULTS NEEDED!

Rte 317 - 535-649 7th Ave, 702-794 Columbia St(even side), 702-799 Nicola St. - 46 p. Rte 319 - 545 6th Ave, 604-690 Columbia St(even side), 604-692 Nicola St. - 16 p. Rte 320 – 483-587 9th Ave, 801-991 Battle St, 804-992 Columbia St (even side), 803-995 Nicola St. 51 p. Rte 322 - 694 11th Ave, 575-694 13th Ave, 10031091 Battle St, 1008-1286 Columbia St, 1004-1314 Nicola St. - 61 p. Rte 324 - 606-795 Pine St. – 30 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St(odd side), 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St. - 65 p. Rte 327 – 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. – 38 p. Rte 331 - 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806990 Pleasant St. – 38 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11179 W. Nicola St. – 50 p. Rte 380 - Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 71 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 24 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 46 p.

LOWER SAHALI/ SAHALI

Rte 403 - 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 27 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, Bestwick Crt. E & W., 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Morrisey Pl. – 47 p.

Rte 410 - 56-203 Arrowstone Dr, Silverthrone Cres. – 47 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p. Rte 457 - 990 Gleneagles Dr, Monarch Dr, 1810-1896 Springhill Dr, Tolima Crt. - 50 p. Rte 459 - Monarch Crt, & Pl. – 38 p. Rte 474 - Coppertree Crt, Trophy Crt. – 22 p. Rte 475 - Castle Towers, Sedgewick Crt, & Dr. – 44 p. Rte 478 - 191-299 Chancellor Dr, Sentry Pl, Sovereign Crt, The Pinnacles. – 42 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Dr, Crt, & Pl. – 68 p. Rte 482 - 101-403 Robson Dr. – 55 p. Rte 483 - Breakenridge Crt, Cathedral Crt, Grenville Pl, & 409-594 Robson Dr.-59 p. Rte 484 – 1923-2069 Gladstone Dr, Gladstone Pl, & 611-680 & 695 Robson Dr.-52 p. Rte 487 - 201-475, 485-495 Hollyburn Dr, Panorama Crt. – 75 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 503 - Fleming Circ, Hampshire Dr. & Pl. & Hector Dr. – 48 p. Rte 509 - 459-551 Laurier Dr. & 2101-2197 Shaunessy Hill – 47 p.

PINEVIEW VALLEY/ MT. DUFFERIN

Rte 581 - Cannel Dr, Cascade St, 15081539 Hillside Dr. & Mellors Pl.-47 p. Rte 582 - 1540-1670 Hillside Dr, 1500-1625 Mt. Dufferin Ave. & Windward Pl.-37 p.

Rte 584 - 1752–1855 Hillside Dr. – 26 p. Rte 586 - 1505-1584 Mt.Dufferin Cres, 1575 Park Way & 1537-1569 Plateau Pl-27 p. Rte 588 - Davies Pl, 16801754 Hillaisw Pl, Monrwewy Pl. & Scott Pl. – 46 p. Rte 589 - 1200 – 1385 Copperhead Dr. – 52 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr. & Saskatoon Pl. – 36 p.

VALLEYVIEW

Rte 602 - Apple Lane, Knollwood Cres, Parkhill Dr, 1783 Valleyview Dr. - 47 p. Rte 603 - Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648, 1652-1764 Valleyview Dr. - 40 p. Rte 605 - 1770-1919 Glenwood Dr, Knollwood Dr, Vicars Rd. – 61 p. Rte 606 - Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815–1899 Valleyview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 607 - Cardinal Dr, 1909-2003 Valleyview Dr. – 33 p. Rte 608 - Curlew Pl, & Rd, 1925-1980 Glenwood Dr. – 70 p. Rte 618 - Big Nickel Pl, Chapman Pl, 2509-2552 Marsh Rd, Paul Rd, Peter Rd. & 2440-2605 Thompson Dr. – 58 p.

JUNIPER

Rte 667 – Birkenhead Dr, & Pl, 1674-1791 Cheakamus Dr, Similkameen Pl. – 64 p.

BROCKLEHURST

Rte 4 - 727-795 Crestline St. & 2412 – 2741 Tranquille Rd.-70 p. Rte 14 - 2399-2305 Briarwood Ave, McInnes Pl, Richards Pl. & Wallace Pl. – 37 p.

Rte 15 - Bossert Ave, 2195 Parkcrest Ave. & 1054-1094 Schreiner St.-55 p. Rte 19 – Downie Pl & St, Moody Ave & Pl. 23072391 Tranquille Rd. – 49 p. Rte 21 - 2300-2397 Fleetwood Ave, Fleetwood Crt & Pl, 1003-1033 Schreiner St, 1020-1050 Westgate St. – 53 p. Rte 61 - Popp St, Stratford Pl, 1371-1413 Tranquille Rd, Waterloo Pl, Woodstock Pl. – 39 p.

NORTH SHORE

Rte 106 -1239-1289 10th St, Cranbrook Pl, Creston Pl, 949-1033 & 1035-1045 Halston Ave, Kimberley Cres. - 73 p. Rte 112 - 701-779 10th St, 702-717 9th St, Kirkland Pl, 806-870 Renfrew Ave, 865-925 Tranquille Rd, & 1063 Tranquille Rd. – 78 p. Rte 153 - Kemano St. & Seton Pl. – 36 p. Rte154 - Belmont Cres, Cumberland Ave, Patricia Ave & Qualicum Pl. – 70 p.

BATCHELOR

Rte 175 – Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p.

WESTMOUNT/ WESTSYDE

Rte 253 - Irving Pl, 2401-2477 Parkview Dr, Rhonmore Cres, 2380 & 2416 Westsyde Rd. - 54 p. Rte 257 - Alpine Terr, Community Pl, 2192-2207 Grasslands Blvd, Grasslands Pl, 881-936 McQueen Dr, Woodhaven Dr. – 53 p. Rte 258 - 806-879 McQueen Dr, Perryville Pl. – 36 p. Rte 260 2040–2185Westsyde Rd. – 24 p.

DALLAS/ BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 - Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. – 92 p. Rte 706 - 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Mo-Lin Pl. - 29 p. Rte 710 - 1350-1399 Crestwood Dr, Ronde Lane, 1300-1399 Todd Rd.-43 p, Rte 718 - 1207-1390 Belair Dr. – 23 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl. – 31 p. Rte 751 - 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 752 - 5600-5998 Dallas Dr, Harper Pl. & 190-298 Harper Rd.-62 p. Rte 754 - Hillview Dr, & Mountview Dr. – 40 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley Pl, Melrose Pl, Yarrow Pl. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p. Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 55 p. Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr, & Pl. – 61 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 836- Cahilty Cres, Hyas Pl, 4551-4648 Spurraway Rd. – 36 p. Rte 837 - Helmcken Dr, 4654-4802 Spurraway Rd. – 24 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE?

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 250-374-0462

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250�371�4949

aUCtion

Driver Wanted

SAT. OCT. 5 11:00 AM

1941 ROSEDALE RD E ARMSTRONG BC

Applications will be reviewed as they arethey received with an with anticipated start as are received an date of September 27, 2019. immediate start date. Kamloops This Week is looking for an energetic individual to join our team of Contract Drivers. Reporting directly to the Circulation Manager, you will be responsible for the timely delivery of newspapers to our valued carriers, business and apartments. The applicant must have a suitable vehicle (van or covered pickup) with all necessary insurance and a valid driver’s license. The successful candidate will be paid in accordance to the Kamloops This Week/Unifor Collective Agreement. This posting is open to internal and external candidates concurrently. Internal applicants will be first in accordance with the Collective considered first Agreement. New applicants must submit a resume, current driver’s abstract and description of their vehicle to be considered. Internal applicants may just submit their expression of interest to the Circulation Department directly. In addition to the posted opening, Kamloops This Week is establishing a list of substitute drivers to fill fill routes on a temporary basis or as routes come open. This is a part-time, 2 night per week contract with delivery typically starting between midnight and 2am.

Acting On Behalf of The Owners, Dodds Will Auction A 1956 Ford Pick-Up Restored (Very Nice), Komatsu WA40 Loader, John Deere Riding Mower (Only 238 Hours), 2013 Kawasaki 450 Quad - 266 Km, 1990 5th Wheel Trailer 16’ Flatdeck Totally Restored, Lincoln Welder, Mechanic Tool Boxes & Tools, Elec. & Air Tools, 5th Wheel Hitch, HD Ramps, Snap-On Compressor, Karcher Gas Pressure Washer, Stihl Chainsaw & Gas Trimmer, Come-a-Longs, Battery Chargers, Ladders, Garden Tools, Fence Gates & More. Antiques & Furniture: Toys, Crocks, Wash Tub & Stand, Chairs, Roll Top Desk, L-shaped Desk & Chair, Humpback Trunk, Rosewood Carved Coffee Table, Dressers, China Cabinet, Flat Screen TV’s, Torchier Shade Floor Lamp, Safe, Theatre Chairs (3), Hide A Bed, Sofa & Chair, Wooden Bench, Collectable Smalls Plus Much More. DATE: SAT, OCT 5TH TIME: 11AM VIEWING: FRI. OCT. 4TH • 9AM-5PM SAT. 8AM-11AM

www.doddsauction.com Subject to additions and deletions

DODDS AUCTION 250-545-3259

Farm Services

Kamloops This Week 1365 Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC. V2C 5P6 Fax 250-374-1033 Or email c/o Sherrie Manholt, HR Manager sherrie@kamloopsthisweek.com

Farm Services

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

Circulation Manager

LIZ SPIVEY 2503747467

1365 DALHOUSIE DR

EstatE • moving

Please send your expression of interest to the attention of:

CWC

Auctions

AUCTION

Looking for Carriers DOWNTOWN

A43

- Regular & Screened Sizes KTW Digital is part of the Aberdeen Publishing Group

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111

HowFollow us to @KamThisWeek Cook a

Turkey

Share your Hey kids, how do you event with the think you cook a turkey? community SHOW US HOW TO DO IT IN YOUR OWN DRAWING OR STORY!

KamloopsThisWeek.com/events

Each submission will be entered into a draw for a free Turkey. Winners will be notified by phone, so please include a name and contact phone number with your submission. There will be a total of four prizes drawn! Deliver entries to 1365B Dalhousie Dr. or email scans to ktw@kamloopsthisweek.com

Deadline for entries: October 7 Draw date: October 8 • 10:00 am Entries will be published October 9

Compliments of


A44

FRIDAY, October 4, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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Kamloops This Week October 4, 2019  

Kamloops This Week October 4, 2019

Kamloops This Week October 4, 2019  

Kamloops This Week October 4, 2019