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WEDNESDAY

JUNE 26, 2019 | Volume 32 No. 51

SCHEER HERE TODAY’S WEATHER

Chance of showers High 24 C Low 13 C

INQUEST DETAILS

Conservative leader coming to Kamloops on Tuesday, July 2

Missing women commission head speaks at TRU

NEWS/A10

NEWS/A12

Singh won’t call for axing of UBCM/China sponsorship JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

STAIRWAY TO HEADACHES?

This set of stairs behind The Mustard Seed New Life Community Kamloops outreach centre have drawn the ire of area residents. They want the city to remove the staircase due to a number of safety issues involving loitering, drug use and other calls requiring police and bylaws officers to attend. A city committee heard the arguments. For the committee’s decision, turn to page A7.

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The Union of BC Municipalities has come under fire for accepting sponsorship from the Chinese government. Port Coquitlam Mayor Brad West sent a letter to the UBCM executive, opposing the Consulate-General of the People’s Republic of China in Vancouver from hosting a reception at the UBCM convention this fall. Elected officials from across the province, including Kamloops, will attend the convention. The reception — the only one of its kind hosted by a foreign government — has been part of the UBCM convention since 2012 as a way for B.C. communities to explore economic and development opportunities with China. This year’s financial contribution is worth $6,000. A UBCM spokesperson could not tell KTW how much China has given financially over the past seven years. However, assuming a similar amount from this year, the total amount would be more than $40,000. West called it a cash for access situation at a time when ChineseCanadian relations are at an alltime low. “To state it plainly: the Government of China is

ARJUN SINGH

engaged in a number of actions that are hostile to our country’s interests and the interests of every Canadian and are completely at odds with our values, the rule of law and the very principles that we are elected to uphold,” West stated in the letter. Canadian-Chinese relations have taken a hit ever since the RCMP arrested Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at the request of U.S. officials in December, while she was waiting for a flight at Vancouver International Airport. In his letter, West cited detention of Canadian citizens Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor (which immediately followed Wanzhou’s arrest), in addition to the crackdown on Hong Kong protests over a controversial extradition bill and “gross human rights violations” as reasons why China should not be hosting a reception at the UBCM convention. “How could the Union of BC

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Municipalities possibly grant the government responsible for these actions any legitimacy, standing or promotion by facilitating access to B.C.’s locally elected mayors, councillors and area directors in exchange for a financial contribution?” West asked the executive in the letter. Kamloops Coun. Arjun Singh is president of the UBCM. He said he understand’s West’s concerns and has even expressed similar concerns in the past. However, Singh noted UBCM is not of one mind and questioned whether the majority of UBCM members would agree with West. China remains Canada’s second-largest trading partner, Singh said, noting some communities appreciate opportunities to connect. “It’s economic development and it’s trade,” Singh said. “Local communities. This city has sent people to China. People from Sooke. People from the Cariboo. People from all over the province. “Local governments have gone to China to seek out economic development opportunities for their communities. You think about the forestry downturn right now and all these things. There’s a lot of concern around that. That’s one view — very, very strong.” See SINGH, A6

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

MEET YOUR LOCAL REALTORS • KAMLOOPS AND DISTRICT

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, June 29 • 1 - 2:30 PM 2010 High Country Blvd • Rosehill • $760,000

Westwin Realty 800 Seymour St, Kamloops, BC V2C 2H5

Thinking of Selling Your Kamloops Home? Making a Next Move for the Best Results? • More Services: Assisted Home Preparation & Complimentary Staging Consultation • More Marketing: Unparalleled Marketing Reach for Maximized Exposure to Buyers • Best Results: Helping You Maximize the Value You Can Receive for Your Home Sarah devotes 100% of her focus and 100% of her time to your needs, and offers a 100% client satisfaction guarantee.

5 BDRM / 3 FULL BATH LEVEL-ENTRY EXECUTIVE HOME Breathtaking City & River Views Private .46 acres Only 5 min to Downtown

CHELSEA

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My name is Chelsea Mann and I have been a Realtor® in Kamloops for over 12 years. I grew up in this beautiful city, and am proud to call it home! Kamloops has so many amazing things to offer its residents: Great Weather | Outdoor Activities | Central Location

Those are just a few of the things that make Kamloops the perfect place to live, work, and play. It’s such a family oriented community and each neighbourhood has its unique qualities, so everyone can find their perfect place to call home. What I love about real estate is working with people. Whether it be finding them the perfect home, that fits with their unique wants and needs, or helping them sell their home, quickly and for the most money by attracting the perfect buyers! After all,

It’s Not Just A House, It’s Your Home!

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DESERT HILLS REALTY LTD.

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CHRIS CHAN

About Chris: • Kamloops resident for over 30 years • Rugby enthusiast • Community, family and team oriented • Proud supporter of United Way, Grow A Row, Royal LePage Shelter Foundation and Kamloops Pride • Strong believer in supporting local and shopping local

I believe that when it comes to buying and selling your house, choosing a local member of the community is important as well. Choose an agent that is on your team!

250-574-0262

chris@uprealestate.ca

“I prefer names to numbers”

STEVE

HERMAN

Steve has made his home in Kamloops for the past 24 years with his wife and 2 children. From the first time you meet Steve, you will feel at ease with his professional and personable working style and confident in his ability to represent your best interest throughout the real estate transaction.

Steve is more than just a real estate salesperson. His clients consider his background of 24 years experience as a carpenter a valuable asset in serving their needs in buying and selling residential and commercial properties. This guy knows houses. So give Steve a call before you buy, sell, build or renovate and put his experience, trust and knowledge to work for you—because it really does matter who you choose to buy and sell real estate with.

250-319-3322 steveherman @royallepage.ca

Westwin Realty

chelsea@chelseamann.ca

uprealestate.ca

hermanonhomes.ca

NORM

MICHELINE

ANDREW

WOJAK

Born in Kamloops and raising a family here makes me proud to call this beautiful city home. Having lived in most areas of Kamloops, I am familiar with all the different neighborhoods and what they have to offer. As a realtor, my clients are very important to me and I take seriously the level of confidence, professionalism and loyalty they come to expect and deserve. Buying or selling, I will provide you with service above and beyond your expectations, negotiating the best deal possible on your behalf, while making the process as seamless as possible. If you have any real estate related questions, please feel free to contact me anytime. I would love the opportunity to work with you.

STEPHENSON

I LOVE REAL ESTATE! Your home is your most valuable possession. Whether you are buying, selling or just need “HONEST” advice... you need all the facts.

250-682-1617 normwojak @royallepage.ca

Kamloops Realty

www.normwojak.ca

My clients are very important to me. My goal is to make the process easy, enjoyable and rewarding. Let me put my knowledge and experience to work for you. Please call me anytime for your real estate needs.

250-571-2678

michelinestephenson @royallepage.ca

Westwin Realty

www.kamloopsproperties.ca

KARPIAK

Born and raised in Kamloops to a long-time, community-supporting medical family, Andrew is a full-time realtor approaching his 13th year serving Kamloops, Tobiano, Shuswap and Sun Peaks. Put my experience into action: • Assisted in hundreds of real estate deals • Top 10 Royal LePage Agent 3 years in a row • Approachable, honest and experienced Check out the new townhouses at Tobiano! andrewkarpiak.com

250-374-1461 andrew@ kamloopsliving.com

Westwin Realty

www.KamloopsLiving.com


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A4

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Retirees Among Those To Benefit From New Hearing Aid

City’s payroll jumped by $1.7 million in 2018

Try newly released hearing aids ideal for the modern lifestyle: full surround sound, plenty of power, & no more feedback! ‡ Just weeks ago, a brand new hearing aid line was released to the public and it’s transforming the hearing experience for its wearers. Most hearing aids deal with background noise using directional microphones that focus only right in front of you--like blinders for your ears. No more! These new hearing aids process signals so exceptionally fast, they handle sound from all directions—greatly improving your ability to hear and comprehend speech, even in noisy environments. Most hearing aids have to reduce gain (amplification strength) to avoid causing feed-

back. Not these! These new hearing aids eliminate obnoxious screeching and whistling before it even starts—while maintaining necessary gain. Connecting to your modern lifestyle is easy! Make hands-free calls from your smartphone, or stream audio from your phone, stereo, TV, or other Bluetooth® enabled devices. These can even be purchased with a rechargeable lithium-ion battery option. Yes, the future of hearing is here and it sounds better than ever. Call now to try these hearing aids for yourself!

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Call or book online: HearingLife.ca/RetireesBenefit

Kamloops Downtown

208-321 Nicola Street | Call toll-free

1-855-764-7033 Free Parking Available

Kamloops North Shore | Northills Centre 700 Tranquille Road | Call toll-free

1-855-774-0399

Formerly No-cost Hearing tests are provided to adults ages 19 and older. A fee will apply for a copy of your audiogram. Child hearing tests are conducted at select locations for a fee, please contact us for more information. Please see clinic for details. Offer not valid in Quebec. ‡https://www.oticon.ca/hearing-aid-users/ hearing-aids/products/opn-s

Promo Code

NSP-RETH-KMLW

REGISTER NOW! KAMLOOPS YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION

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Time change thoughts?

July 22 to 26 - 9 am to 12 pm August 19 to 23 - 9 am to 12 pm Keener Camp = $95 | Goalkeeper & Striker Camp = $125 *A family discount is provided to families with three or more children enrolled in KYSA soccer. The discount is 10% off each child’s registration. NAME: ________________________________________________

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City of Kamloops salaries rose $1.7 million in 2018, compared to 2017, equal to a 3.4 per cent increase. The city paid out $63.3 million in salaries last year, of which $32.8 million went to employees earning more than $75,000, $30 million went to employees making $75,000 or less and $412,000 went to council members. According to a report from administration, most of the increases are a result of one-time payouts relating to retirements and retroactive contract payments. The report notes that, as the city’s workforce ages the number of unionized members retiring increases. Those employees can receive one-time payouts in the form of such items as sick banks and remaining vacation days. The number of city staff members earning more than $75,000 a year increased by 26 — 327 employees in 2018 compared to 301 employees in 2017. Of the 327 city employees making more than $75,000 per year in 2018, 125 were unionized firefighters and Kamloops Fire Rescue management, 111 were city union (Canadian Union of Public Employees) employees and program instructors and 91 were city managers. The number of city staff members earning more than $100,000 a year increased by three — 168 employees in 2018 compared to 165 employees in 2017. Of the 168 city employees making more than $100,000 per year in 2018, 100 were unionized firefighters and Kamloops Fire Rescue management, 65 were city managers and three were city union employees and program instructors. The city’s highest-paid employee was CAO David Trawin, whose total income was $279,109. He was followed by Byron McCorkell, director of community and protec-

tive services, whose total income was $217,397. Director of development Marvin Kwiatkowski was next at $205,312, followed by director of civic operations Jen Fretz at $202,115 and director of corporate services Katherine Humphrey at $197,726. On council in 2018, Mayor Ken Christian earned $107, 200 ($94,900 in salary and $12,300 in taxable benefits and payouts), while councillors Denis Walsh, Arjun Singh, Kathy Sinclair and Dieter Dudy were each paid $37,960. Councillors Pat Wallace, Tina Lange, Ray Dhaliwal and Donovan Cavers (all of whom served from January through October and either failed to get reelected in the October civic election or decided not to seek re-election) each earned $32,984. Councillors Bill Sarai, Mike O’Reilly, Sadie Hunter and Dale Bass (all of whom were elected for the first time in the October civic election) were each paid $5,122. In grants and contributions in 2018, the city allotted $620,979 to Venture Kamloops, $477,302 to the Kamloops Art Gallery, $469,240 to the BC Wildlife Park, $250,500 to Tourism Kamloops, $215,392 to the Kamloops YMCAYWCA, $202,000 to the Kamloops Heritage Railway Society, $182,889 to Western Canada Theatre and $158,640 to Sagebrush Theatre. In 2018, the city paid $120 million to various suppliers, including $21.4 million to the Receiver General of Canada, $8.9 million to BC Transit, $7 million to BC Hydro, $6.5 million to the Pension Corporation, $5.1 million to Acres Enterprises, $3.9 million to Extreme Excavating, $2.5 million to BA Dawson Blacktop and $1.9 million to Dawson Construction. Other expenditures to suppliers included $121,871 to Hockey Canada, $47,261 to the B.C. Lions to have the club host training camp in the city, $134,726 to Kamloops This Week, $50,536 to Newcap Radio and $34,533 to Glacier Media.

The provincial government is surveying the public to find out what residents want to do about time changes. Most areas of B.C. spring forward into daylight saving time during summer months and fall back to standard time in the winter. But, with California, Oregon and Washington either enacting legislation, or in the process of doing so, on ending time changes and staying on daylight time, the British Columbia government wants to hear

from its residents. “As our neighbours in the western United States move toward permanent daylight saving time, it’s a good time to think about what will work best for British Columbia,” Premier John Horgan said. “I invite people to consider our options and take part in an online survey that will help us decide whether to leave things as they are or if it’s time to make a change.” The online survey will be available from June 24 to July 19 at at https://engage. gov.bc.ca/daylight

savingtime/. In addition to the online survey, organizations and individuals are invited to provide written submissions about time observance, which affects many key B.C. industries, such as agriculture and transportation. The push to have B.C. abolish time changes twice a year was started by Tara Holmes, an employee of KTW, and Bob Dieno, owner of Nutech Safety and former president of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce.


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS NEWS FLASH? Call 778-471-7525 or email tips@kamloopsthisweek.com

A5

DID YOU KNOW? In Brocklehurst, Young Avenue was once Drevlo Road, Sunnycrest Avenue was Emanuel Road and Fleetwood Avenue used to be known as Sand Road. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

INSIDE KTW

SWINGING INTO SUMMER

Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A15 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A17 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . A18 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A19 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A26 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A28

At the precise moment spring gave way to summer in Kamloops — at 8:54 a.m. on Friday, June 21 — KTW photographer Dave Eagles captured this image: Marlene Baxter and granddaughters Baylee and Orianna enjoying a morning swing in Prince Charles Park in downtown Kamloops. Friday was the longest day of the year, with the sun setting at 9:18 p.m. Enjoy the summer because fall is only 90 days away, when autumn arrives at 12:50 a.m. on Sept. 23.

TODAY’S FLYERS

YIG*, Walmart*, Visions*, The Brick*, The Bay*, Superstore*, Save-On-Foods*, Safeway*, Rona*, Rexall*, Peavey Mart*, M&M Meats*, London Drugs*, Jysk*, Home Depot*, Canadian Tire*, Best Buy* *Selected distribution

WEATHER ALMANAC

One year ago Hi: 24 .8 C Low: 8 .5 C Record High 38 .4 C (2006) Record Low 5 .6 C (1971)

ONLINE

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facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek twitter.com/ KamThisWeek

Riverside Park concession will not open CITY HAS INSTEAD DECIDED TO GO WITH FOOD TRUCKS TO FEED PARK VISITORS

youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

HOW TO REACH US: Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The concession near the pier in Riverside Park will stay closed this summer, with the fate of the building unclear. City of Kamloops business operations and events supervisor Sean Smith said the city is opting for food trucks, rather than have food served from the concession. Last year, the city relaxed its rules to allow food trucks in Riverside Park. It went well, Smith said, offering customers more variety. He said such vendors also have more flexibility during bouts of bad weather, flooding and wildfire smoke, which have impacted park visitors in recent years and have made it more difficult to operate the concession on a consistent basis. The concession is typically open seven days per week during July and August. It is also open on weekends from the Victoria Day long

weekend in May and into the fall. “It was just decided that we wanted to be able to offer the food trucks a little more opportunity to do business,” Smith said. “At the same time, serving the wants and needs of the public.” Papa G’s owner Gerald Thiessen operated the concession in Riverside Park for five years and said he was surprised and disappointed the city did not want him back. He called it a “big hit” to business and noted the summer students he employed will be without work as a result. Thiessen also owns a brick and mortar location at 561 Seymour St. — Papa G’s Cafe — but said he doesn’t want to open a food truck in order to remain in the park. “I’m sure people are going to be upset that we’re not selling ice cream this year,” Thiessen said. “Kids cones we sold for a buck. During Music in the Park, we had a lineup every night for ice cream.” The city charges food trucks $625 per season (March 1 to Oct. 15) to be in Riverside Park,

except during signature events, such as Canada Day. The concession vendor also paid that fee, in addition to an agreement to pay a monthly fee and/or provide the city with a cut of sales from the concession. In 2018, the city designated eight spaces for food trucks in Riverside Park, including three near the concession. Smith said food trucks this year will be able to tuck up onto the pavement, near the concession, which would have previously been problematic. The city approved 14 mobile food vendors in 2018, though not all of them were licensed for Riverside Park. The city has applied for grant funding to upgrade Riverside Park, with plans including a refrigerated outdoor ice rink, trail upgrades, bank stabilization and lighting. It previously considered the concession space as a location for the ice rink, but instead chose the spray park area, which would be home to a rink in the winter and spray park in the summer.

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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Aaron Wiebe (left) with the new Trek Marlin 5 mountain bike he won, then lost to a thief. Dave Eagles/KTW file

SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

As part of Bike to Work Week, Aaron Wiebe won a brand new Trek Marlin 5 mountain bike. Fresh off his win of the Golden Ticket grand prize draw, KTW met Wiebe at City Hall last week to take his photo with the shiny new bicycle. But by Sunday, the bike was gone — stolen from his backyard in Brocklehurst. “I’m usually pretty good at keeping my bikes in a safe place. I’ve never had a bike stolen from my backyard before, so I thought it was safe,” he said. Wiebe, a Kamloops cyclist for six years, said his backyard is enclosed and private and someone was at home at the time, so his bike wasn’t locked up. “It’s completely out of sight, so someone either would have watched me ride into my backyard or gone in there looking for bicycles,” he said. Wiebe called the RCMP as soon as he noticed his bike, valued at $669, had gone missing. Fortunately for him, he had taken photos of the bike and its serial number and registered it on 529 Garage, a bike recovery service used by the RCMP. With the help of Facebook

mends a good lock — especially from companies that offer compensation should their lock be broken or circumvented during a theft, such as Kryptonite’s antitheft protection offer, an optional service.

groups Brock Watch and Stolen Bikes Kamloops, Wiebe said the bike has been spotted around town a couple of times, each time reported to the RCMP, but has not yet been recovered. It wasn’t just his bike stolen, either. The bike he was borrowing was also stolen and Wiebe said the total value of items stolen was about $3,000. As a result, Wiebe said he filed a home insurance claim and will pay the deductible to cover some of the loss. He’s likely not the only one missing a bike. Over a 38-day period beginning in June 2018, the Kamloops RCMP said 64 bicycles worth $98,000 were stolen in the city — and half of them were locked up at the time. Nonetheless, Wiebe recom-

RCMP THEFT-PREVENTION TIPS • Bring your bike inside or lock it inside a garage at night; • Always use a bike lock. While cable locks are easily cut with wire cutters, they have their place alongside a metal U-lock; • Also lock your wheels and saddle, since quick releases and hex bolts are no match for thieves who are after components; • Replace regular screws with security skewers that require a special key because most parts can be removed with a screwdriver or Allen wrench; • When travelling with your bike, ask to bring it inside with you or use secure storage, if available; • Register your bike using the 529 Garage app; • Write down the serial number of your bike and keep a photo of it on file. For more information, go online to project529.com.

Singh lauds the diversity of opportunity as beauty of UBCM From A1

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

Residents want stairway gone; SENIORS DAY city will instead look at lighting LAST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH

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The city will explore lighting options for a downtown area known for loitering, after hearing safety concerns from residents. A petition with more than 100 signatures is calling for the removal of a staircase connecting West Seymour Street and McIntosh Street downtown. The staircase is behind The Mustard Seed New Life Community Kamloops outreach centre. On Monday, the city’s development and sustainability committee learned that the city’s bylaws department received 48 calls in connection with that location in 2018. Calls were related to transients and health and safety (including sharps), graffiti and alcohol. Additionally, the RCMP received 15 calls to that location in the past 18 months, calls linked to unwanted persons, loitering and drug use. City engineering manager Deven Matkowski said the incidents have occurred about once per week in the last year. The city received the petition in May, with the majority of signatories appearing to be from the downtown area. The petition notes: “Countless times the presence of the police and or bylaw has been needed due to people setting up tents, using drugs and exhibiting disturbing behaviour in and around the stairwell. There is already a heavily used walking path along West Victoria Street that bypasses the stairs to connect to West Seymour Street, rendering the stairwell useless.” It urges the city to remove the stairwell “to lessen the incidents requiring the need for bylaw and police to respond and upgrade of the walking path to make it fully functional and wheelchair friendly.” However, city staff advised against removing the staircase,

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CITY OF KAMLOOPS PHOTO This stairway connects West Seymour Street to McIntosh Street in downtown Kamloops. A petition signed by more than 100 people asked that the city remove the route.

noting the area’s problems are part of larger social issues that are unlikely to be resolved with its removal. In addition, staff said the sidewalk adds to the pedestrian friendliness of the area, noting that leaving it saves the city money. It would cost $11,000 to remove the sidewalk as part of the West Victoria Street improvement project, which is underway, or $18,000 at a later time. The city is also concerned about setting a precedent amid growing requests to have walkways adjacent to residential homes removed. The city said it sees increasing neighbourhood resistance to projects that add sidewalks, walkways or bus routes to a neighbourhood and it is also receiving more complaints about walkways or bus stops. During discussion over the issue, councillors were mixed in their responses.

Coun. Dieter Dudy agreed with staff, calling it “ridiculous” to shut down the staircase, which he said wouldn’t solve the problem. Coun. Arjun Singh, however, empathized with the safety concerns of those who live in the area and wanted to consider the possibility of removal, despite such a move being contrary to the city’s active transportation plan. Coun. Sadie Hunter suggested staff look into additional lighting to address issues in that area, noting she was concerned about the safety issues presented by residents after speaking to them. In the end, councillors voted to direct staff to return with a report examining the costs of lighting the area to enhance safety. That report is expected to come to the next development and sustainability committee meeting.

Welcome Dr. Aaron Podorieszach We are pleased to announce that Dr Aaron Podorieszach will be joining our team at Riverside Dental!

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

SURVEY SAYS STICK TO CRUCIAL ISSUES

D

o we really need a government-created survey asking residents for their opinions on time change? With mill after mill closing, drought conditions worsening and homelessness, addiction and mental-health issues still at crisis levels, can the government really afford to waste any of its resources on an issue that will solve itself

soon enough? As detailed on page A4 of today’s paper, the provincial NDP government has created an online survey to get feedback on the issue of time change. With the states of California, Oregon and Washington well on their way to abolishing the spring and fall clock movements and remaining on daylight time year-round, Premier John Horgan and his New Democrats felt the time was right to survey the masses about time. The survey is a waste of time and energy, regardless of where you stand on the issue. With the three states definitely moving to yearround daylight time as soon as legislation is enacted in each jurisdiction (Washington has completed its part) and signed off by Congress and U.S. President Donald Trump (who has said he will do so), what is there to ask B.C. residents? Horgan knows full well that, as the three West Coast states go, so goes British Columbia. And it matters not if Alaska and/or Mexico’s Baja California region don’t follow the year-round daylight saving movement because B.C., Washington, Oregon and California form the economic heft of the West Coast. In the summer of 2017, the province’s lieutenant-governor asked the NDP to form government, with the help of three Green MLAs. As government, the NDP needs to make decisions on less important matters — such as time change — and save surveys and government resources that go with them for tackling crucial issues like mill closures. Create a survey and ask for suggestions on fixing what is ailing the forestry sector. There may be some diamond-in-the-rough ideas that could help an industry, and people, truly in need.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Liz Spivey

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Protecting farmland?

T

he NDP government’s overhaul of the Agricultural Land Commission, with new restrictions on secondary homes, is causing grief for B.C. families who are trying to keep family farms going. Agriculture Minister Lana Popham’s drive to protect farmland is based on a couple of longstanding NDP assumptions. One is that there is massive property speculation, with buyers applying to have farmland released from the Agricultural Land Reserve to cash in on its increased value. Actual statistics from the commission didn’t show that, but Popham pushed through legislation that prevents property owners from applying directly for exclusion by declaring that owners are not “persons.” The second assumption is that additional residences are a form of creeping development that has to be reined in. This was accomplished with legislation that passed last November and took effect in February, giving the commission the final say on secondary residences. These changes are filtering through to local governments and there have been some alarming results. The Langley Times reported recently that retirees Cathy and Brian Fichter planned to move their daughter, her husband and six children to an extended family farm as they deal with Brian’s diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. The family’s purchase took

TOM FLETCHER Our Man In

VICTORIA effect on Feb. 26, four days after the new rules took effect. Previously, secondary residences could be justified by the extra work needed to raise livestock. Now, however, local governments have to approve it and the commission can overrule them. As of last week, the Fichters were waiting for a final decision. Dave Strachan of Nakusp is in a similar situation. His wife has been diagnosed with early onset dementia and his daughter and her husband decided to move with them to a small farm to help out. Strachan describes the land as marginal for farm production, as is much of the ALR outside the key food production regions of the Lower Mainland, Okanagan and southern Vancouver Island. Both families went to substantial effort and expense to buy modular homes and arrange servicing to meet the temporary residence rules of the ALR. They didn’t know the rules were changing and it’s likely their

local governments didn’t, either. They await their fate under the new centralized commission that runs the whole province from Burnaby. When this change was debated last November, Popham acknowledged that the commission would have a veto. “We are transferring that approval process to the Agricultural Land Commission because we feel that they are better suited to analyze whether or not an additional dwelling would be required for agricultural activities,” she said. It would be easy to say the above examples are merely “hobby farms,” a few acres with some horses and goats. What else could be done with a remote five-acre parcel, since there is no chance the new regime will allow it to be removed? For larger farms, the residence restriction creates problems even if a second house is allowed. “For instance, if you’re a dairy farm in my area of east Delta, and you have two or three kids who say, ‘I want to continue farming,’ they say, ‘Well, you can’t live on this farm,” B.C. Liberal agriculture critic Ian Paton told the legislature. “We’ve only got one extra house. You’re going to have to rent a house up in North Delta or Richmond or something.” Agriculture ministry staff tell me they are looking at these kinds of cases and considering changes. That’s good to hear. Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press Media. tfletcher@blackpress.ca


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A9

OPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SHORT-TERM BID WILL RETURN INCOMES ARE NOT KEEPING UP WITH CITY TAX HIKES Editor: The Thompson-Nicola Regional District board should be commended for wisely nixing a request from Thompson Rivers University for $250,000 to establish a student endowment (‘TNRD rejects TRU’s $250,000 funding request,’ June 14). It is not the regional district’s responsibility to help fund post-secondary education. If more such requests pile up, I fear for the well-being of taxpayers in funding their own living and comforts. Over the years, taxpaying seniors have seen their property and other taxes inching up steadily, without any appreciable increasing in pension income. Not too long ago, I bought my house and paid first-year taxes of about $1,600. Council has since kept adding taxes insensibly on amenities — some of which I have never used — and my 2019 tax bill is about $2,100. When will this madness stop? Now we have a non-profit society forming to promote a performing-arts centre. My message to the society is for it to raise as many millions as it needs through corporate and private donations, but to not expect to look to already heavily burdened taxpayers to pay for the centre’s upkeep and operation. This way, one person’s cultural sophistication and fancy need not lead to another person’s financial enslavement and ruin. Narayan Mitra Kamloops

Editor: We recently applied for a temporary use permit so we could acquire legal permission to rent out our cabin at East Barriere Lake for periods of less than 30 days. Under our zoning (RL1), bed and breakfasts are allowed, as are long-term rentals of 30 or more days. Short-term rentals are not permitted, but it is possible to make an adjustment to that zoning restriction through a temporary use permit. We were encouraged by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District to apply for a temporary use permit, which we did, at the cost of $1,500. Our application was reviewed by TNRD staff, which recommended approval to the TNRD board.

Unfortunately, we encountered a strong presence of opposition at the June 13 public hearing (‘Langley couple loses in bid to rent out East Barriere Lake cabin,’ June 14). I was the only one there in favour of my application, but there were about 20 people at the hearing who were opposed. As a result, the board unanimously denied our application, to the surprise of TNRD staff. We are not seeking to have disruptive relationships with others on the lake, nor with our neighbours. In fact, neighbours who rallied others to oppose our application also do not follow zoning bylaws on their property. We accept the ruling of the TNRD elected board, but we will not stand by in silence.

In fact, we plan to apply for a temporary use permit again, when the time is right. Next time, however, we will do so with stronger support from our community. We have now created a public Facebook Group — East Barriere Lake Short Term Rental Coalition. It is not a place to debate whether short-term rentals should be permitted at East Barriere Lake. Rather, it is a place to gather dialogue for those who are in favour of short-term rentals. When there is enough support, we will make a second application for a temporary use permit, with a much stronger case for consideration by the TNRD board. Ryan Dahl Langley

KUDOS TO THOSE BEHIND KBRA KID’S LEAGUE Editor: Another six weeks of kids’ mountain biking races and skills have come and gone. For the past few years, multiple volunteers have made the Kamloops Bike Riders’ Association’s Kid’s League a huge success in getting children out on the trails, instilling confidence in them and letting kids ages seven to 12 know the trails in and around the city are not just for older kids, but also for them to enjoy. The people who show up for hours on Friday nights and do

weekly planning and meetings haven’t been recognized enough. They are all modest people who have never asked parents for anything, other than to be out on the course cheering for the kids because that is what the event is all about. We are fortunate to have this program in Kamloops, run by a group of people that is passionate about biking. Thank you to Dirty Feet for the start/finish line arch. How special do those kids feel when they can see the finish line and push themselves a little harder?

It’s awesome seeing their faces. Thank you to NRI for all the prizes. Thank you to all the local bike shops that were able to help out with bike maintenance and that provided two free bikes. Thank you to Max, who is always game to take a group out on the course, and all the other leads and sweeps. Thank you to the person who runs the KBRA Kids’s League Facebook page. Thank you SaveOn-Foods and the people who cut up the snacks. Thank you to the person who

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Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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makes the medal cookies. They are priceless. And thank you, coach Chris. You are an inspiration to these kids. They will always remember you and your passion for kids and biking. Thanks, also, to his wife and girls for allowing him to dedicate the time he does to the program. Head over to the group’s Facebook page and post a comment so everyone can see how much we appreciate their volunteering. Brad and Ashley Trainer Kamloops

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A10

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

Green to be acclaimed

Andrew Scheer, seen here during a 2016 visit to Kamloops, will return to the Tournament Capital next week. The Conservative leader will join Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo MP Cathy McLeod and others at a July2 barbecue in Riverside Park. DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE

Scheer coming to Kamloops Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer will be in Kamloops next week. He will be the fourth national party leader to visit the city in this election year. Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo MP Cathy McLeod and the Conservative riding association will host Scheer at a Tuesday, July, 2, barbecue in Riverside Park. The public is invited to attend, with a donation to the Lions Club requested. The bar-

becue is scheduled to be held from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP online at www.ktcconservative.ca/rsvp. Scheer’s arrival the day after Canada Day follows two appearances in Kamloops earlier this year by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who is the Liberal leader, and visits by People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier and Green Leader Elizabeth May. Only NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Communist Party of

Canada Leader Elizabeth Rowley have yet to visit Kamloops this year. The federal election will be held on Oct. 21. In Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo, the candidates are: • Conservative: Incumbent MP Cathy McLeod • Liberal: Terry Lake • NDP: Gina Myhill-Jones • Green: Iain Currie • People’s Party: Ken Finlayson • Communist: Peter Kerek.

On Wednesday night, Iain Currie will officially be acclaimed as the Green Party of Canada candidate in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo. The party’s electoral district association will be holding a nomination meeting at The Vic, downtown at Victoria Street and Fourth Avenue, on Wednesday at 8 p.m. Currie is a longtime Kamloops resident and served as a Crown prosecutor for nearly 20 years. He is currently a practising civil lawyer with the Cundari Seibel LLC law office. Organizers are expecting the largest-ever turnout for a Green nomination meeting in the local riding. There are six candidates running in the Oct. 21 election, with all six being acclaimed.

Federal Green candidate Iain Currie.

Crash sends eight to hospital The Coquihalla Highway between Kamloops and Merritt was closed for a few hours on Monday after major accidents sent eight people to hospital. According to DriveBC, several crashes were reported at

11:40 a.m. on a stretch of Highway 5 north of Merritt, near the Lac Le Jeune exit. There were reports of a freak hailstorm and icy roads on the Coquihalla and emergency crews were dispatched to the scene. Eight patients were

transported to hospital, including one in serious condition who was airlifted from the scene. The highway was closed in both directions near Exit 286 for more than two hours. It was re-opened at 2 p.m.

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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A11

LOCAL NEWS

Jessup acquitted on murder charge ACCUSED HAD BEEN CHARGED WITH KILLING CELLMATE AT CITY PRISON

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STAFF REPORTER

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In what the B.C. Supreme Court justice called a “difficult case,” Nathaniel Jessup has been acquitted of second-degree murder in connection with the death of his cellmate nearly five years ago in Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre. In handing down her verdict in B.C. Supreme Court in Kamloops on Friday morning, Justice Sheri Donegan explained circumstantial evidence presented by the Crown did not rule out the possibility that Dylan Judd, 20, died by suicide when he was found dead in his cell on Nov. 10, 2014. “The law requires that I find Mr. Jessup not guilty,” Donegan said. Judd’s death was initially ruled a suicide before Jessup was

Dylan Judd was found dead in his cell at KRCC on Nov. 10, 2014.

charged last year. During the trial, the defence maintained Judd’s death was a suicide, with the burden of proof on the Crown to prove murder. Donegan leaned on experts who weighed in on Judd’s cause of death and body positioning, along with the absence of markings on both Jessup and Judd, which did not suggest a struggle. The court heard Judd died by asphyxiation. He was found in a bed in his cell covered in a blanket with a KRCC sweater tied in a tight

knot around his neck. His arm positioning was apparently consistent with that of gravity. Donegan said Judd had demonstrated suicidal behaviour on at least three previous occasions and noted the absence of a motive, with no identified issues between the two cellmates. Dongen said that absence of a suicide note, a conversation Judd had with his mother two days prior to his death and video footage of Jessup’s movements in the common area at KRCC were not enough to rule out suicide. In addition, Donegan disagreed with the Crown’s suggestion that Judd could not have reasonably killed himself by tying the sweater around his neck. Donegan said that, on the contrary, an incarcerated person intent on taking their own life might consider

it among limited options that would not bring attention to them. “Mr. Judd shared a cramped, somewhat, jail cell under supervision, subject to regular checks,” Donegan said. “These circumstances provided him with very few options if he was intent on taking his own life.” Judd’s family was visibly distraught after the decision, but declined to speak with KTW. Nor did Crown prosecutor Neil Wiberg comment after the decision. Defence lawyer Jeremy Jensen, however, agreed with Donegan’s characterization of the case as difficult. “I think the fact that it initially all pointed to suicide and then police received some information that led them to believe that it wasn’t a suicide,” Jensen said after the decision.

“Unfortunately, that information doesn’t necessarily transfer into evidence that can be used in court.” Meanwhile, the decision does not mean freedom for Jessup, who remains in custody in KRCC on two other matters, including charges of assault and murder. Jessup was charged with an unrelated murder on the eve of his trial. He is charged with second-degree murder and offering an indignity to a human body in connection with the August 2015 death of 58-year-old Katherine McAdam in Creston. Jessup was arrested for Judd’s murder at the conclusion of a 3.5-year sentence he served for a string of choking incidents involving children, as well as attacks on prison officials. Jessup has been in custody since September 2015.

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TRU impact: meet our donors The legacy of Chinese-Canadian soldier Frederick Lee will be memorialized through a scholarship at TRU in recognition of his life and character. TRU extends its

gratitude to the Jack and Sylvia Gin Foundation, which has pledged $20,000 to create the Private Frederick Lee Scholarship in honour of Lee, a Kamloopsian who was killed in action as one of 300 Chinese Canadians who served in the First World War. Vancouver-based philanthropist Jack Gin, founder of the Finding Freddy Lee Project, hopes the scholarship gives bright youth a chance at an education Frederick Lee never had. The Private Frederick Lee Scholarship is an endowed award that will be awarded for the first time this fall. TRU thanks the Jack and Sylvia Gin Foundation for this incredibly meaningful gift that will benefit students for years to come.

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A12

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

Chief commissioner: Read report and act on it MICHAEL POTESTIO

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The chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) said governments and private-sector organizations can now begin strategizing how to address the report’s 231 recommendations. Marion Buller was at Thompson Rivers University on Monday, speaking to a packed crowd in the Brown Family House of Learning about the report, which cited the significant, persistent and deliberate pattern of systemic human rights and Indigenous-rights violations and abuses as the cause of the disappearances, murders and violence experienced by Indigenous women and girls. The report said the violence constituted genocide by the state against Indigenous people. Buller described the report’s recommendations as “legal imperatives” rather than mere recommendations, given Canada’s commitment to international declarations and treaties recognizing Indigenous, human and civil rights. She said the inquiry found “breach upon breach,” arguing the federal government cannot continue to promote an image of Canada upholding those rights while that not being the case domestically. The report calls on all forms of government to ensure those rights are recognized and protected. That includes Indigenous governments, which Buller said were found to not have the full trust of Indigenous women. The recommendations also extended to facets of society such as the media, hospitality and transportation industries and education and legal systems. Buller told KTW both the public and private sectors should read the report and start to strategize how they can address its recommendations. She said the cities of Saskatoon and Winnipeg are already doing this and noted Kamloops can do the same. “I suggest the mayor here call the mayors of Winnipeg and Saskatoon and find out precisely what they’re doing,” she said.

MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls: “What’s happened through the process of colonization is that Indigenous women have lost their power and lost their place in their own societies. We want to come back full circle.”

Buller also suggested the Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation also read the report and develop priorities, strategies and partnerships needed in order to move forward. Provinces and territories could begin to work on education, child care and the justice system independent of the federal government, given their jurisdictions in these areas, she said. “Provincial and territorial governments, you have no excuse for not moving forward,” Buller said during her presentation. Taking questions from the crowd, Buller was asked how a national action plan can be implemented when baseline data is incomplete and a federal election is on the horizon. She said such a plan won’t be easy, but added it will need to be implemented through a partnership with Indigenous peoples at all levels of government. “Not by government doing to us, yet again, but us doing it with government,” Buller said. The inquiry heard from 1,434 family members and survivors of violence, gathered testimony from 83 experts and knowledge keepers and held 15 community hearings and more than 50 statement-gathering events across Canada. Buller said a research team also analyzed more than 900 studies for the report.

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She pointed to a number of disturbing trends that stood out to her over the course of compiling the report. One was that women didn’t feel safe in their own communities or homes, particularly in Northern Canada. “There are no safe houses. There may be only one road out and that is an ice road,” Buller said. “So many women do not have a choice that women in urban centres have.” Buller also heard that violence was a normal part of women’s lives — a normalized occurrence passed down from multiple generations stemming from the residential school system. Disillusionment with police was also a common theme, Buller said, noting she also heard numerous stories in which police officers went “above and beyond the call of duty to keep women safe, but those stories were few and far between.” The mandate of the report was to inquire and report on systemic underlying and historical causes of violence against Indigenous women, girls and LGBTQ people and make recommendations to stop that violence. “What’s happened through the process of colonization is that Indigenous women have lost their power and lost their place in their own societies, “ Buller said. “We want to come back full circle.”

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

LOCAL NEWS

Miller lands $85,000 scholarship

15 THINGS YOUR TEETH CAN SAY ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

VALLEYVIEW GRAD, GOLF PHENOM OFF TO SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Georgia Miller can see her future as well as she can read a putt. The 18-year-old Valleyview secondary graduate sees herself making the Ladies Professional Golf Tour (LPGA) or using her wealth of experience on the links and a business degree to become a golf teacher. She’s already on her way, having earned an $85,000 scholarship to Southwestern Oklahoma State University, where she will play Division 2 NCAA golf beginning this fall. Speaking to KTW over the phone between holes at Rivershore Estates and Golf Links, Miller said she’s excited, but also bit nervous, to be heading south of the border. “I’m going to be leaving everybody and starting over and real far away from anyone I know, but I’m more excited than anything,” she said. Miller had been hoping to snare a scholarship from an American university, landing on the Sooner State after sending out hundreds of emails and speaking with many schools. “The only way I was going to go to America was if it was a full-ride,” she said. The soon-to-be Southwestern Oklahoma State Bulldog hopes to make the travelling team that will take her to tournaments across the U.S.

There’s always “room for improvement with this sport.

— GEORGIA MILLER

“I want to be the top athlete at Oklahoma because I’m competitive that way and golf is my dream,” she said. Miller said she received the scholarship thanks to her good grades, SAT scores and a golf handicap that has dropped significantly in the last few years — to a three from eight. “My dad and I made a graph so that they would notice it more,” Miller said with a laugh. Asked how her parents felt about the news, Miller quipped: “Pretty sure they want me out. I wouldn’t have been where I am today if it wasn’t for my parents because they sacrificed more than anyone I know.” The youngest of two children, Miller said she followed her brother — who is attending

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the University of Toronto on a football scholarship — into the game of golf. “My brother was into it and I just followed everything he did and copied him,” she said. “He went on to liking football more than golf and I just stuck with golf because I was in love with it.” Miller, who has been golfing for 15 years — since she was three years old — said she enjoys the game because it’s always a challenge. “There’s always room for improvement with this sport,” she said. Working on a business degree while at Southwestern Oklahoma State, Miller said she may use her education to one day start her own coaching business in Kamloops.

HOMESTAY FAMILIES NEEDED for international summer camp students studying at TRU!

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August 4 to September 8, 2019 International Islamic Education Council Overseas Program • Students from Indonesia, ages 12–17 years old • $29/night, no driving required to and from TRU • 2–4 students per family

When I examine a patient, I am looking for so many things to help me diagnose problems, not just “the gums.” Sure, I can tell if your teeth are clean or not, but do you know about the underlying secrets those pearly whites and pink gums can tell me about your underlying health issues? In the following 3 columns, I will take a look at 15 things your teeth can say about your health: 1. Stress Everyone has heard about the flight/fight response that man has been designed for in order to deal with stress in prehistoric times. But that is an “acute” stress, while today’s society keeps us under constant “chronic” stress. This depletes our immune system (more to come in column 3!) but can lead to the clenching of your jaw and subsequent “grinding” of your teeth. If the edges of your teeth are flatter or smoother than they used to be then you are abrading your protective enamel coating. Clenching vs grinding makes no sounds while you sleep. This can lead to serious and expensive dental work in the future. 2. Eating Disorders Not only can anorexia or bulimia cause serious nutritional deficiencies but they can affect the health of your teeth. Bulimia is especially hard on your enamel as regular vomiting and stomach acid can cause your tooth enamel to disintegrate in a very distinctive pattern as well as trigger acidity in the rest of the gastrointestinal system playing a role in gastric reflux. 3. Osteoporosis Gum disease is a sign of systematic inflammation, and not a typical “infectious disease.” Having unhealthy gums leads to inflammation in the rest of the body, including all your other bones. Women with osteoporosis are three times more likely to lose their teeth. 4. Allergies Spaces between your teeth due to extractions or poor alignment, can indicate a tongue thrust habit. This can be caused by excessive mouth-breathing — due to nasal congestion, sleep apnea or allergies. This is a bad sign if anything affects your sleep as you will have less oxygen intake during the night! 5. Sleep disorder Small or large gaps between your teeth can also be a sign you have a sleep disorder. Excessive tongue muscle pressure up against your upper teeth while you sleep leads to a multitude of problems. People with narrow jaws are more likely to have sleep apnea and thus less oxygen intake during the night time. To be continued in August 2019...

August 6 to 23, 2019 August 4 to September 8, 2019 3 Week Open Language & Culture International Islamic Education Council Overseas Program • Students from various countries, high school age and up • Students from Indonesia, ages 12–17 years old • $29/night, no driving required to and from TRU • $29/night, no driving required to and from TRU • 1–2 students per family • 2–4 students per family 6 to 23, 2019 CompleteAugust Summer Camp Information 3 Week Open Language CultureTerm Availability Please visit truhostfamily.ca and click on&“Short •Form” Students from countries, high school age and up for the fullvarious list of short term hosting opportunities. • $29/night, no driving required to and from TRU • 1–2 students per family For more details, please visit truhostfamily.ca Complete Summer Camp Information | 250.828.5365 or contact us at homestay@tru.ca

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A14

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

TRU preference for most SD73 students Of the graduates this year who plan on attending college or university, most will be staying home and taking classes at Thompson Rivers University. School District 73 conducts an annual survey of graduates, asking them for their future plans. Sixty-five per cent of surveys were returned. Of those who returned their surveys, 75 per

SD73

BRIEFS cent indicated they will be pursuing a post-secondary education. TRU is the No. 1 choice, with 46 per cent response rate among those attending postsecondary schools. Just less than 29 per cent said they will be attend-

ing school outside of Kamloops or B.C. Because the declining number of completed surveys being returned by grads, the school district will be looking at ways to counter the trend. FOUR INCIDENTS OF ANAPHYLAXIS School District 73 has about 15,000 students attending 46 schools. Of those 15,000

students, 299 are anaphylactic, meaning they have severe allergies. The 1.9 per cent of the student population with severe allergies is down from last year. In the 2018-2019 school year, there were four reported incidents of anaphylaxis. Two led to administrations of epinephrine in secondary schools and one resulted in the administration of epinephrine

at an elementary school. In the fourth incident, emergency services was called to treat the student. All school district staff who supervise children receive annual anaphylaxis training. ORDERING THEM OUT OF SCHOOLS An annual report on maintenance orders in the school district — orders that prohibit

a person from being on school property — reveals that 21 such orders were issued during the past school year. Of those, 16 involved students at secondary schools, three dealt with parents/adults at elementary sites and two were focused on parents/adults in secondary schools. The maintenance orders issued to students who presented a threat to other students, while the maintenance orders issued to adults involved those people being verbally abusive or exhibiting intimidating behaviour toward staff. ELECTRONIC EYES IN SCHOOL DISTRICT A review of use of video surveillance in the

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Kam High reunion The 1979 grad class from Kamloops senior secondary is planning its 40-year reunion, and organizers are on the lookout for classmates. The details are still being finalized, but the event is slated to take place in late summer or September. If you are a member of KSS’ class of 1979, email ksss79reunion@gmail.com for information. A Facebook page has also been set up, which can be found by searching for “Kam High Class of 1979 Reunion” on the social-media app.

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Kamloops-Thompson school district in the 2018-2019 school year reveals that all 78 district buses use the technology daily. In addition, the Twin Rivers Education Centre in Brocklehurst has five surveillance cameras outside, recording to catch acts of vandalism. There are two cameras outside the school district’s maintenance office on Notre Dame Drive, used to deter theft. There is one camera in the medical room of South Kamloops secondary, with a live feed activated when a student is in the room. Westwold elementary, which did not open this school year due to no students enrolling, has one camera outside to deter theft of diesel.

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

COMMUNITY 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Nicolani Drive’s little library thrives BRIGHT RED BOOK BOX REMAINS POPULAR IN THIS DIGITAL AGE TODD SULLIVAN STAFF REPORTER todd@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

here’s an old joke: What’s black and white and read all over? The classic punchline answer is “a newspaper.” But the answer could just as easily be “books from Brandie Merkosky’s neighbourhood book box.” Sitting in the 800-block of Nicolani Drive in Brocklehurst, its bright red colouring and chunky construction draws your eye immediately. Merkosky admits she’s not a great carpenter. “It’s not very square,” she says. “But you know what? It does the trick.” Built with scrap wood and having an old coat rack as its base, the book box started as a way for Merkosky to recycle her kids’ books, allowing neighbours to grab her old tomes from the box while recycling their own reading materials. Soon books for all ages started to appear. Wander by today and you will find an eclectic mix of words. On a recent day, there was a good selection of children’s books, including a manga, a number of books in the Divergent series and even the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Road, by Cormac McCarthy. In spite of its rough construction, the book box has stood for almost two years, weathering a couple of winters along the way. Though traffic might slow during the colder months, Merkosky is certain book lovers use it year-round. And she continues to check it herself on a regular basis, grabbing new books for her children and, on occasion, for herself. Even in this digital age, Merkosky makes time for old-school, print-onpaper books. “It’s just nice that we don’t have to go very far to go get a book to read every night,” she says. “If they want to read a new book, they just run out there and go grab a book. “And I like to keep that alive.” This book box isn’t an entirely new idea. Similar book-swapping loca-

Kamloops Community

BRIEFS

SENIORS’ PICNIC AT RIVERSIDE PARK The city’s annual Seniors’ Picnic will be held on Friday, July 5, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Riverside Park. The Kamloops Rube Band and Brown Eyed Molly will be entertaining the crowd while a picnic-style lunch is served. There will also be activities, including Rhythm ‘n’ Moves, chair Zumba, face painting and a photo booth. While tables and chairs will be set up in the shade, participants are encouraged to bring a water bottle, hat and sunscreen. The event is free for residents who are 55 years of age and older, but registration is required. Call 250828-3500 or go online to kamloops.ca/perfect mind to register. Limited free parking is available in the west parking lot at Riverside Park. The Seniors’ Picnic is sponsored by the City of Kamloops, The Residence at Orchards Walk and Kamloops Seniors Village. STUDY ON AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER Okanagan Clinical Trials, a medical research company in Kelowna, is conducting a study to determine the effectiveness of an investigational medication for autism spectrum disorder in adults. Eligible volunteers for the study will be men and women 19 years of age or older and diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Volunteers must have a partner available to participate in the study along with them. This would be someone who has regular and sufficient periods of contact (including regular conversations and face-to-face interactions) with the participant to be able to report on their status on relevant study assessments. A total of 350 patients worldwide will participate in the clinical study. Effects of the study medication will be measured initially over 24, weeks followed by a two-year open label extension study. Participation will not affect provincial medical coverage and all study-related costs will be paid for by the sponsor. Participants are free to leave the study at any time. For more information, call 250-862-8141.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Brandie Merkosky reads to her children: five-year-old Reese (left) eight-year-old Ryan and threeyear-old Kate. The Brocklehurst family maintains a book exchange outside its Nicolani Street home for neighbours of all ages who love a good book.

tions have been popping up around Kamloops, and in other communities, and are known as Little Free Libraries. You can find locations for some of them, including a few in Kamloops, online at littlefreelibrary.org.

The little library on Nicolani Drive isn’t listed yet, but Merkosky says it will be soon. Not that her location needs the publicity. It’s doing just fine on its own, via words of mouth.

STUDENTS JUMP IN WITH $140,000-PLUS The Heart and Stroke Foundation’s Jump Rope for Heart Campaign ends this week, with more than 40 schools in the Thompson-Nicola -Shuswap-Cariboo having taken part in the program. Collectively, students in the schools raised more than $140,000 for research, awareness and advocacy campaigns for those affected by heart disease and stroke. The top fundraising school in the KamloopsThompson school district was McGowan elementary, where the students raised $9,269. The No. 1 fundraising student in the district was Cheyenne Stacey of Haldane elementary in Chase, who raised $1,876.

THE PERFECT SUMMER JOB! Kamloops This Week has openings for temporary route coverage in all areas of the city this summer, for as little as a week or up to the whole summer! • Two days per week (Wednesdays & Fridays) • Most routes take one hour or less - take multiple routes to earn more money • Earn spending money to enjoy the rest of your summer!

For information on routes in your area, call 250-374-0462 or email circulation@kamloopsthisweek.com


A16

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

WALK TO END ALS BEGINS WITH DOVE LOVE

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Participants in Saturday’s 10th annual Walk to End ALS released doves in Riverside Park to mark the start of the event. About $23,000 was raised locally, with the money going to the ALS Society of BC to provide patient services programs for people living with ALS in B.C. and to the ALS Canada Research Program.

B.C. reduces clean-energy vehicle rebate amounts Drivers considering buying an electric or hybrid vehicle will now receive less in rebates from the provincial government. The government announced on Saturday that rebates will be reduced, despite the fact Victoria is adding $26.5 million to its CEVforBC rebate program to meet ongoing demand. The provincial program previously offered rebates up to $5,000 for qualifying new battery electric, fuel-cell electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. It also offered rebates up to $6,000 for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The new rebate structure is $3,000 for battery, fuel-cell, and longer-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and to $1,500 for shorter-range plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Rebates have also been eliminates from any clean-energy vehicle with a price tag of more than $55,000. The federal government’s $5,000 rebate remains in effect. In a news release, Minister of Energy Michelle Mungall said the changes are being made to allow more people to access rebates and switch to electric vehicles. The BC Scrap-It program also provides a $6,000 incentive for those buying a qualifying new electric vehicle when the old vehicle is brought in. It offers a $3,000 incentive when a used EV is purchased. In total, a driver in B.C. could receive up to $14,000 in provincial and federal rebates if they purchase a brand new EV and return their old vehicle.

Visitors to Sunday’s electric vehicle show at Thompson Rivers University admired the Tesla, among other vehicles, both with four wheels and two wheels. To see more photos from the event, go online to kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the Community tab. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW


PG17

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

DIG IT: ARCHEOLOGY OF ANCIENT LIVING SPACES when they moved into summer tents at the end of winter. In some cases, tools and other seasonal items were stored within the pithouse until the following year. Inevitably, a few items were inadvertently left behind. The forgotten or lost artifacts can help paint a vibrant picture of the past inhabitants of the house. Much can be learned from excavating the remains of an abandoned house and archeologists approach this type of research with a well-organized plan and in consultation with local First Nations communities. There are many ways to approach excavating a pithouse and it depends on the time available and the goals of the excavation. If it is not feasible or possible to excavate the house in its entirety, it is common to excavate a trench across the centre of the house or to excavate half of the house. In these scenarios, archeologists lay out a grid across all or a portion of the house in one-metre squares and then excavate each one-metre by one-metre unit in carefully measured increments. The digging is precise and detailed and often completed with small hand tools and trowels. A particular focus is placed on noting changes in the sediment layers. Artifacts are collected and recorded based on the location of the find from within each one-meter by onemeter unit. Archeologists are looking for evidence of structural elements of the house to help explain how the house was constructed and organized. As crews delve deeper into digging inside the pithouse, it can be determined how many times the house was occupied and rebuilt, how the interior of the house was organized (e.g., hearth locations, sleeping areas,

PHOEBE MURPHY republicofarcheology.ca

W

inter pithouses, often clustered along river and lake shores, were commonplace within the B.C. Interior for millennia. Pithouses were constructed from thousands of years ago to as recently as the 1900s and built by digging a foundation in the ground before building a wooden structural frame. The wooden frame was then covered with hides, bark, sod, piled sediment and tree boughs. After the houses were abandoned, the roof would eventually collapse inward, leaving a distinctive oval-, circular- or rectangular-shaped depression in the ground. Developments within the last 50 years have adversely impacted, if not completely destroyed, many pithouses within the B.C. Interior. Nevertheless, occasionally the undisturbed remains of winter pithouses are encountered by archeologists. In these instances, archeologists are sometimes afforded the opportunity to excavate a portion or all of a pithouse. Ideally, the pithouses that remain throughout the province would be recorded and mapped, but not dug, as digging archeological sites essentially destroys the integrity of the sites. Archeological sites are considered an important link to the past and site preservation is typically the preference. However, if development is encroaching on the pithouse or if First Nations communities would like to learn more about a particular site, sometimes a pithouse will be excavated. Similar to when people move houses in the present day, the majority of possessions within the pithouse were packed up and taken with the occupants

ABOVE: There are many ways to approach excavating a pithouse and it depends on the time available and the goals of the excavation. LEFT: Archeology students at the site of a pithouse near Little Shuswap Lake. PHOEBE MURPHY PHOTOS

entrance ways), how many people likely occupied the house and what types of activities were taking place and so forth. Collected samples can highlight what type of foods were eaten by the occupants, what types of plant and animal resources were used and how long ago the house was inhabited. Finding personal items

that were left behind can be particularly revealing; for instance, uncovering a drilled shell pendant or a bone whistle tucked beneath a sleeping area. Archeology provides a view into the past and excavating a family’s home from thousands of years ago provides a personal connection to past residents of the Southern Interior.

Planning a Garage Sale? Let Us Help By advertising your garage sale in Kamloops This Week you’ll receive a garage sale kit and a free lunch from Subway!

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Phoebe Murphy is a Kamloopsbased archeologist. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca. Dig It is KTW’s regularly published column on the history beneath our feet in the Kamloops region. A group of nine professional archeologists living and working in the area contribute columns to KTW’s print edition and online at kamloopsthisweek.com.

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PG18 A18

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL NEWS

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

RIVER RIDING IN PLAIN VIEW

The annual Ride Don’t Hide event was held on Sunday, with participants leaving from and returning to Riverside Park. The event is a nationwide fundraising bike ride that brings mental health into the open and raises money for mental-health programs and initiatives. Last year, the Kamloops Ride Don’t Hide event raised $42,000. This year’s goal is $60,000 and, as of Tuesday — with donations still being counted — there had been $31,000 raised. For more information, and to donate, search Kamloops Ride Don’t Hide on Facebook.

TRUDEAU LEANS ON TRUMP TO HELP CANADIANS DETAINED IN CHINA KRISTY KIRKUP

CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will lean on the power and influence of the mercurial Donald Trump to raise the issue of two detained Canadians during a bilateral meeting with the Chinese president at a G20 summit in Japan this week — something the U.S. president publicly committed to doing at “Justin’s request.” The summit comes at a critical moment for Trudeau, just months ahead of the October election and as Canada continues to push for the release of the Canadians in China — Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor. Earlier this month in Normandy, France, Trudeau said

he was looking forward to attending the G20 and that the “opportunity to engage with the Chinese president directly is certainly something that we are looking at.” So far, however, no such meeting has been confirmed by the Prime Minister’s Office. Trudeau’s staff will only say they expect to have information soon on which leaders Trudeau will meet in Osaka, where key themes include the global economy, trade and investment and innovation. Trump pledged his support during a meeting with Trudeau last week in the Oval Office, where the two leaders sat together in bright yellow armchairs and the president vowed to bring up the issue in a sit-down with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“Are you trying to get a meeting?” Trump asked of Trudeau in response to a reporter’s question, to which the prime minister replied: “We’ve got a lot of things to discuss.” “Anything I can do to help Canada, I will be doing,” Trump said. Trudeau needs that assistance. The detentions of Kovrig and Spavor are largely viewed as retaliation for the December arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, where she awaits extradition to the U.S. to face allegations of fraud in violating Iran sanctions. David Mulroney, a former Canadian ambassador to China, said it should not come as a surprise that China is not interested

in a meeting between its president and the prime minister. Trump will be Canada’s best shot to address the issue of the detentions, said Mulroney. “That would be the strongest card that could be played in our interests,” he said. “It would be an American card played to say ... ‘If you want a normal relationship with us, you’ll leave our allies alone.’” Mulroney said he would also use the G20 to talk to other leaders who face similar challenges with China and are susceptible to its bullying. “If we can build this sense of shared purpose in pushing back against China, in not allowing ourselves to be isolated like this, that’s a big step forward,” he said.

“It is in America’s interest and it is in the interest of a lot of other countries to see China pull back from hostage diplomacy and bullying. .. The only way to counter that is through collective action and that is a long, hard slog.” Christopher Sands, the director of the Center for Canadian Studies at John Hopkins University, said Canada doesn’t play offence very much but he agreed it would be advisable for Canada to talk to other leaders about the detained Canadians. Beyond asking for Trump’s support, countries like Japan, South Korea and perhaps India might be willing to do the same, Sands said, adding that would only strengthen the U.S. president’s commitment to the cause.

Vancouver Aquarium will stay RCMP drones take off VANCOUVER — The Vancouver Aquarium will remain in Stanley Park for another 35 years under a new agreement it has reached with the parks board. Lasse Gustavsson, CEO of aquarium operator Ocean Wise, said the agreement provides the foundation for its five-year strategic plan, with a focus on conservation and public education. The aquarium has been in the park since 1956. It has been locked in a legal battle over the board’s ban on whales and dolphins at the facility, but Ocean Wise said in a statement that it has dropped the legal action. It said the lease agreement confirms a commitment it made last year to no longer display cetaceans.

The organization said it will also continue to invest in research programs. “Ocean Wise aspires to become a global ocean conservation organization and wants to inspire people in every corner of the planet to participate in creating healthy oceans,” Gustavsson said, “But for most people, the ocean is ‘out of sight, out of mind.’ “There are many threats to the ocean, but the greatest threat is that many believe someone else is going to save it. Ocean Wise has an important role to bring the ocean to the people and the people to the ocean, and the Vancouver Aquarium is one of the best tools we have to do that.” — Canadian Press

OTTAWA — Newly disclosed records show the RCMP has assembled a fleet of more than 200 flying drones — eyes in the sky that officers use for everything from accident-scene investigation to protecting VIP visitors. The compact airborne devices are equipped with tools, including video cameras and thermalimage detectors. An RCMP privacy assessment of the technology said the force is committed to protecting any personal information the drones collect and that officers strive to

comply with federal laws. But privacy expert Michael Vonn of the British Columbia civil Liberties Association said the assessment provides few details about the technical capabilities of the cameras attached to the drones. She said there are legitimate policing uses for drones, but also potentially invasive ones, such as taking photos at public events so they can be electronically run against images in databases. — Canadian Press


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A19

BUSINESS 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Trades funding for TRU

Children’s Circle Daycare Society, the non-profit that operates a day care, announced alongside Arpa Investments and the City of Kamloops plans to build a new $2.5-million 12,000-square-foot facility at 1430 Ninth Ave., at the corner of McMurdo Drive and Ninth Avenue in South Kamloops. From left: James Rodger and daughter Sophia, Children’s Circle board of directors secretary Amy Pannett and daughters Lucy and Alice and Arpa Investments partner Joshua Knaak. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

Day care may rise from property swap JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Children’s Circle Childcare Centre won’t be moving to Valleyview, after all. On Friday morning, Children’s Circle Daycare Society, the non-profit that operates the day care, announced alongside Arpa Investments and the City of Kamloops plans to build a new $2.5-million 12,000-square-foot facility at 1430 Ninth Ave. on the corner of McMurdo Drive and Ninth Avenue in South Kamloops. During a press event with a mountain view, board of directors secretary Amy Pannett called it a “dream location.” The downtown day care will be displaced at the end of the year due to Royal Inland Hospital expansion. The society said the proposed location on Ninth Avenue is ideal due to its proximity to Kamloops School of the Arts and Lloyd George elementary, lot size, green space and convenience for families already accessing the day care’s services downtown. The facility would also allow expansion by at least 50 spaces and include after-school care for kids to age 12. Pannett said more than 300 people are on the non-profit’s waitlist. “It’s a huge stress on families to not have childcare,” she said. The new location comes in light of a land swap deal between the city and Arpa.

Arpa had purchased two lots in Valleyview — located at 1642 and 1646 Valleyview Dr. — to help the day care after news broke that it needed help finding a new home. However, Arpa Investments partner Joshua Knaak said the Valleyview lots caused the city concern about high traffic volumes, in terms of dropping off kids and having vehicles turning in and out of an already busy area. The lots are also located immediately next door to McCracken Station Pub and liquor store. “This [McMurdo Drive and Ninth Avenue] is a location where it’s primed for pick-up and drop-off and the reality is the hours for the day care are offset by the peak hours for the school,” Knaak said. “So you’re not going to be getting that much more traffic. It’s just going to start a little bit earlier and perhaps end a little bit later. It’s issues like that that are more easily solved here than solved there.” City of Kamloops real estate manager Dave Freeman said the land swap will cost the city $250,000 to service the South Kamloops site. He said the Valleyview lots were serviced, so the city decided it is a fair deal The money will come out of the city’s affordable housing reserve, which is sitting at about $1.4 million. The two Valleyview lots will go into the city’s land reserve and are not yet earmarked for anything in particular, Freeman said, though he noted the significance of the lots in a commercial zone. Also included in Arpa’s development plans are between eight and 10 affordable housing units.

We’ll show you it’s possible.

The Ninth Avenue location was pegged for a 30-unit affordable housing project in 2011, but plans changed after the city received opposition from from area residents. Knaak underlined the fact the housing has been scaled back — likely townhouses instead the previously pitched apartments — but said details have yet to be shored up. “We just know that there’s a separate lot and down the road, there’s the potential for that,” Knaak said. “Again, just like we did with Spirit Square [in North Kamloops], you look at the community as a whole, what works and what’s a good fit — and then work with an agency or organization. That will be dealt with later. The priority is to get shovels in the ground for the day care.” Knaak said he hopes to break ground this fall on the day care, following public consultation. Arpa will cover costs of construction and arrange a lease to own agreement with Children’s Circle Daycare Society. The property requires a site-specific rezoning to allow a day care as a permitted use. The area on Ninth Avenue eyed for development is at the back of a large vacant space used frequently by the neighbourhood as a dog park. It is also home to an underground water reservoir, which cannot be built upon. A dirt road along the back would likely become the new entryway into the day care, but the ridge trail above would not be impacted.

Thompson Rivers University and Merritt’s Nicola Valley Institute of Technology are among 19 schools in B.C. that each received $160,000 to buy up-to-date equipment for trades and technology programs. Government funding for this year totalled $3 million. Melanie Mark, the province’s minister of advanced education, skills and training, said trades and technology workers are in high demand, noting the 2018 B.C. Labour Market Outlook projects about 82,300 tech-related job openings and about 71,000 trades openings in the province in the next decade.

Bridging the gaps Permanent bridges are now open, and reinforcing armour is in place, on two roads in the Cherry Creek area that were washed out by spring flooding in 2017. During that spring, culverts on Rodeo Drive and Greenstone Road west of Kamloops were washed out, with additional damage to the shoulder of Highway 1. The new creek crossings include rock armouring designed to protect them from potential damage during future flooding. Cost for the work is $3 million.

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A20

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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BUSINESS Pipe destined for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project sits on rail cars on westbound tracks in downtown Kamloops in April 2018. More pipe has been shuttled through the city in recent days following the federal government’s decision to re-approve the project, construction on which is expected to begin this fall. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

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While the federal government’s re-approval last week of its Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project was expected, reaction from some on Kamloops council varied. Mayor Ken Christian said he is excited about the decision, citing positive spinoffs for the economy, employment and environment. Economically, he said, the project will aid in sustainability of the oil industry, with impacts on Kamloops residents who work in Alberta. He said utility improvements will increase tax dollars to Kamloops and pointed to the city’s $750,000 community benefits agreement with Trans Mountain, which now has 28.4 kilometres of pipeline through the city. Christian hopes the pipeline expansion project will lessen the blow taken by many in the region via mill closures and shift cutbacks. “It’s not going to offset it, but it could be potential employment for those people who are being displaces due to changes in the forest industry,” he said. Christian said the decision is also good for the environment because the government has committed to reinvesting the profits into weaning the country off fossil fuels and into greener energy sources. He said it is also less dangerous to ship bitumen by pipeline than by rail, an issue particularly sensitive in a community with two

railroads travelling through it and along waterways. Coun. Denis Walsh said he is not surprised by the decision, in light of the federal government purchasing the pipeline, but he is disappointed. He suggested replacing the line, rather than twin the route. “Everybody is aware of climate change issues and stuff like that and so I think it’s the wrong direction for the government to be going,” Walsh said. “I think it’s going to create a lot of headaches — political headaches for the government.” In August 2018, the federal government bought the Trans Mountain pipeline from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion. The decision to re-approve the project comes nine months after the Federal Court of Appeal ripped up the original federal approval, citing incomplete Indigenous consultations and a faulty environmental review. The Liberals ordered the National Energy Board to look at marine shipping impacts and Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi started another round of consultations with Indigenous communities affected by the project. Last week’s decision also comes the day after the Liberals passed a motion in the House of Commons declaring climate change a national emergency that would require more cuts to emissions than have already been promised. In 2016, the National Energy Board said the production of another 590,000 barrels of oil, which would maximize the

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twinned pipeline’s capacity, could generate 14-million to 17-million more tonnes of greenhouse gases each year, which means Canada would have to find ways to cut more from other sectors to meet and then exceed its current targets. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he is sympathetic to concerns about the environment and the need to transition to cleaner sources of energy, but added that in order to fund that transition, Canada needs to take advantage of its natural resources while they are still needed. The government will require that every dollar in federal revenue coming from the project be reinvested in clean energy and green technology. That includes an estimated $500 million a year in new annual corporate tax revenues once the pipeline is in service, as well as any revenues from the promised sale of the entire expanded pipeline back to the private sector. Trudeau said construction will restart this construction season, but there is no specific date yet. Trans Mountain Canada will have to apply a second time for all the necessary federal, provincial and municipal permits before breaking ground. The federal cabinet is also requiring another consultation with Indigenous communities affected by the project to determine how they can potentially become economic partners in the project. — with files from Canadian Press

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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A21

SPORTS kamloopsthisweek.com | Marty Hastings: 778-471-7536

DRAFT-DAY DELIGHT MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Quinn Schmiemann was on stage at Athol Murray College of Notre Dame on Saturday in Wilcox, Sask., a few minutes away from accepting his high school diploma. The momentous day took an unforgettable turn with a thumbs-up motion that rivals anything Don Cherry and Phil Mickelson have produced. “I was graduating and I was up on stage while people were doing their speeches,” said Quinn, a 17-year-old Kamloops Blazers’ defenceman. “I didn’t have my phone on me. You’re not supposed to have your phone. “I looked at my mom and she gave me a thumbs up from where she was sitting. I knew I was drafted.” Angela Schmiemann was itching to get more information to her son, who was picked by the

Tampa Bay Lighting 182nd overall in Round 6 of the NHL Draft. “I thought, I see a mom I know up in the front row,” said Angela, a teachers’ assistant who lives in Wilcox. “I’m going to text her and she can whisper to the kid in the front row. That’s what she did. They whispered until it finally got to Quinn. “The first thing I thought was, ‘Oh, this is going to be like the bad game of telephone you play as a kid, where the message comes out really wrong.” Any confusion was stamped out when Quinn reached his phone, which was working overtime to record voice mails and text messages. “I had like 20 phone calls and like 40 texts,” Quinn said. “It was just crazy. There were so many things going on. It was definitely a thing I won’t forget.” Oma and Opa were there to bask in the moment. “It was pretty dang cool,” Angela said.

Schmiemann, who turns 18 on July 27, shared with Josh Pillar the Blazers’ Rookie of the Year Award for 2018-2019 after racking up five goals and 28 points in 58 games. He was 94th among North American skaters on NHL Central Scouting’s final rankings, released in April. The 6-foot-2, 185-pound blue liner has processed news of the Blazers’ coaching shuffle — Serge Lajoie has been replaced by head coach Shaun Clouston, with Darryl Sydor sliding into the associate coach position — and is expecting big things in 2019-2020. “I’m excited to work with Shaun,” Quinn said. “He seems like a personable guy. He sent me a text as soon as he got hired, which I really appreciated. I’ve heard nothing but good things about him. “Syd knows a lot. We kind of built a relationship last year and I think all the guys love him in the room.” The whirlwind weekend fin-

25th Annual PROGRESS

KTW FILE PHOTO Quinn Schmiemann’s NHL Draft story took a twist during his high-school graduation ceremony on Saturday in Wilcox, Sask.

ished with a trip to Florida for the Lightning’s development camp, which is underway in Tampa Bay. “I just want to make the most of it, get some experience and take it into the summer and make a good first impression,” Quinn told KTW from his hotel room in Tampa. Angela has another son who plays in the WHL, 20-year-old Tri-City Americans’ defenceman Dom Schmiemann. Flipping between WHL Live broadcasts has not proven to be her strong suit. “Without fail, I always miss the big play because I watch the other kid or I go back and I go, ‘Where’s my kid?’ and he’s in the penalty box.” She didn’t miss a thing on Saturday. The stage belonged to Quinn. “He’s had this goal in mind and he’s willing to work for it,” Angela said. “It’s been a long road and it’s a long road yet to come.”

PANTHERS SNARE LUDVIG The Florida Panthers selected Kamloops product John Ludvig 63rd overall in Round 3 of the NHL Draft on Saturday. Ludvig, a 6-foot-1, 196-pound defenceman for the Portland Winterhawks, will turn 19 on Aug. 2 and was passed over in last year’s draft. He racked up five goals and 18 points, along with 77 penalty minutes, in 58 games with Portland last season. Ludvig is the son of former NHLer Jan Ludvig. His sister, Katie Ludvig, plays volleyball for the TRU WolfPack. In 2015-2016, Ludvig played for the major midget Thompson Blazers. He joined the junior B Kamloops Storm for the 20162017 campaign. Ludvig, who could not be reached for comment before KTW’s press deadline on Tuesday, caught on with Portland in 20172018.

AMLOOPS TRANSFORMED

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A22

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Housemates, teammates duel at ITF junior event MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

An emotional Paige Grice was finding it hard to take positives away from a loss to a friend and rival on Tuesday at the Kamloops Tennis Centre. Naomi Schraeder of Kelowna erased a one-set deficit to score a 4-6, 6-2, 6-3 victory over Grice and advance to Round 2 of the International Tennis Federation World Tennis Tour Junior Circuit event. “I started playing way too tentative,” said Grice, a 16-yearold NorKam secondary student. “I wasn’t going for my shots as much. I was missing a lot so I kind of lost my confidence, which I shouldn’t have done.” Schraeder, 13, is staying with the Grice family this week. A shift in household dynamics might have been felt when Grice and Schraeder, who knew they would be doubles partners, found out on Monday night they would be Round 1 opponents on Tuesday. “It’s too bad because I want us

both to do well and it’s just weird that out of everyone I could have played …,” Grice said. “I’m really happy for her because she played really well, but at the same time, I’m just really disappointed that I played so bad.” Grice, who was patient and opportunistic in Set 1, appeared frustrated between lost games and points in the second set. Discontent grew along with her unforced-error count and festered in the deciding set. “I feel like I should have won that match,” Grice said. “I’ve beaten this player before and I kind of had high expectations for myself.” Added Schraeder: “It was tough playing each other in the first place and it’s tough to see her lose, as well. It was a good match.” Schraeder and Grice embraced at the net before leaving the court. “She was playing good, applying pressure on me and I was making those unforced errors,” Schraeder said. “I needed to clean that up and I did that.

“It was different. We were together lots and we warmed each other up this morning, but when you’re playing against someone, you’re there to compete.” The Kamloops tournament marks the first ITF event for both players, who will be in doubles action on Wednesday. Find the schedule for that match and Schraeder’s Round 2 singles clash online at itftennis.com. “Right now, I’m feeling kind of emotional, but I’m going to be able to shake it off later,” Grice said. “It was just one match and my first ITF. “There will be more I can play in.” Grice, along with Thomas and Justin Friesen, are the Kamloops Tennis Centre products who entered the ITF event. Read about the Friesens on page A24. Paige Grice of Kamloops in action at the International Tennis Federation junior tournament being held this week at the Kamloops Tennis Centre. Semifinals will get underway on Friday, with finals scheduled for Saturday. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

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A23

SPORTS

First-round pick Lindgren signs with Blazers MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

General manager Matt Bardsley chose to see through the ghost of Mazzimo Rizzo at the 2019 WHL Bantam Draft in May. Ghastly reaction was readily available on social media when his Kamloops Blazers selected a pair of players verbally committed to the University of Michigan — Mats Lindgren, seventh overall, and Connor Levis, 20th overall. The picks took a big step toward looking like ghoulish draft robbery on Tuesday when Lindgren signed with the Blazers.

“Sometimes, if you go the safe route, you might get a player, but you want to get what you feel is the best player,” said Bardsley, who is entering his second season as the Blazers’ GM. “Am I relieved? I don’t know about relieved, but I’m very happy for our organization and real happy for Mats, as well. It’s going to be a great fit for both sides.” Lindgren, a 5-foot-8, 140-pound defenceman from North Vancouver, is, in

Bardsley’s opinion, an elite defenceman who can be a cornerstone of his club. The book on his skating is pretty much unanimous — it’s off the charts. “The staff and everyone since development camp, they’ve been so welcoming to me,” Lindgren said. “They really made me feel part of the team.” Bardsley tried to find the fine line between wooing and badgering the Lindgrens. “We stayed in communication, but it I wasn’t calling every day

— what are you doing? What are you thinking?” Bardsley said. The Blazers and Lindgrens met at the NHL Draft last weekend in Vancouver, where Bardsley got a good feeling about the decision to come. The contract came through on Monday. “It’s outstanding how much they care about me,” Lindgren said. “They’ve been really nice to me with everything and letting me take my time to make the big decision.” Hiring Shaun Clouston as head coach

and retaining associate coach Darryl Sydor — an elite NHL defenceman in his prime — may have influenced the Lindgrens’ final call. “We hear lots of great things about him [Clouston],” Lindgren said. “I’m very excited to be coached by him. Hopefully, I get up for a few games next season. And Darryl Sydor, I’ve heard lots of great things about him, as well. I can’t wait to put the Blazers jersey on.” Levis, a 6-foot-1, 170-pound forward from Vancouver,

remains in Bardsley’s crosshairs. “With Mats signing, I’m sure they’ll look at that, but I’m not sure if that will have any influence on them,” Bardsley said, noting he also met with the Levises at the draft last weekend in Vancouver. “People say, well, maybe they’re a package deal. For us, they’re still individuals. I still feel confident that Connor is going to be a Kamloops Blazer.” Will Lindgren’s commitment spur Levis to sign? “That’s up to him,”

Lindgren said. “It’s hard to say. I don’t know.” Had neither of them signed, some might have wondered if the GM’s tenure was destined to be a brief apparition. If Levis inks, Bardsley will look something like the Phantom of the WHL Draft. “As far as relief, yeah, I guess you could say we stuck our necks out there by drafting them, but I feel confident,” Bardsley said. “If you want to be the best, you need the best players.”

Dog Days of Summer

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Free event! Join us July 25th 11am to 3pm Bring the family and come meet your local SPCA Ambassadors - dogs that have been successfully adopted through the SPCA. Enjoy treats and tours while B-100 radio broadcasts the event live from The Residence. Bring a donation for the SPCA and you’ll also be entered to win the gift basket! Please RSVP to Charmaine: gm@theresidencekamloops.com 778-362-9525

3300 Valleyview Drive, Kamloops | 778.362.9525 | www.theresidencekamloops.com


A24

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A25

City of Kamloops

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS The City is transitioning to a new registration system, PerfectMind, which will launch on March 6, 2019. To learn more and to set up your new account, visit Kamloops.ca/PerfectMind Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

Pottery Camp

Ages: 8–13

Your child will learn hand-building techniques, how to use the potter’s wheel, and glazing and decorating techniques to finish their work. Clay and related firing costs are included in the class fee. Redemption Pottery Studio Mon–Fri Jul 8–12 9:00–10:30 am 5/$125

Dance Camp

Ages: 11–16

This four-day dance camp is a wonderful introduction to new forms of dance as well as an opportunity to expand on existing dance experience. What a great way to keep active and develop new friendships this summer! Kamloops Performance Company Tue-Fri Jul 16-19 10:00 am–3:00 pm 4/$160

Beginner Pickleball Participants will be introduced to the sport of Pickleball. Learn the basic skills, techniques, and rules of the game, with an emphasis on fun! In partnership with the Kamloops Pickleball Club. Riverside Park Pickleball Court Wed Jul 3–24 6:00–8:00 pm 4/$30

Cheese Making–Mozzarella, Burrata, and Bocconcini Now here’s something cheesy—join an expert to learn to make your own artisan cheese. This class is run in a demonstration style (taste, touch, feel), and you’ll receive the instructions and ingredients to make over 4 lbs of cheese at home. Heritage House Thu Jul 25 3:00–5:00 pm 1/$71.43

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Kamloops RiverDogs’ catcher Matt Coxon fought a gust of wind to make this catch in weekend B.C. Baseball College Prep League action on Mac Isle.

RiverDogs win three of four Lochlan Scholefield, Mitch Coxon and Austin Coyle were winning pitchers for the Kamloops RiverDogs in weekend B.C. Baseball College Prep League action on

McArthur Island. The Dogs posted a 3-1 record against the Richmond Chuckers, winning 11-5, 8-7 and 12-2, and losing 4-2. League standings: Chilliwack (25-5),

RiverDogs will play host to the Daley and Company exhibition tournament this weekend on Mac Isle. Kamloops will open its slate against Sherwood Park on

Friday, with game time set for 7 p.m. at Norbrock Stadium. Township will host doubleheaders against Kamloops in Walnut Grove in league play on July 6 and July 7.

Friesen of Kamloops runs into Bay Area roadblock MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Justin Friesen was counting on his thundering first serve in Round 1 action of an International Tennis Federation World Tennis Tour Junior Circuit matchup on Monday at the Kamloops Tennis Centre. The weapon misfired too often and the 16-year-old South Kamloops secondary student fell in straight sets (6-4, 6-2) to Farzan Amiri of San Francisco. “I was struggling, for sure,” Friesen told KTW after the match, played in front of

about 50 spectators at 758 Front St. “I couldn’t find a rhythm out there.” Amiri, 16, broke the Kamloopsian’s serve four times in the first set and held a 5-2 lead, but Friesen fought back to make it close. He won the next two games, showing off serve-andvolley prowess that made him confident heading into the match, but Amiri held serve to close out the first set of the best-of-three match. “In the first set, I was very nervous and making lots of errors,” Amiri said. “I was able to finish it off and got more relaxed and

was playing a lot better.” Both competitors, each standing about 6-foot-2, went to the clubhouse to regroup between sets. Friesen seemed poised to build on the late first-set surge, but was unable to hold serve in Game 1, tripped up by unforced errors. Amiri used his fierce serve and a wicked forehand to snare a 2-0 cushion. “It was hard to break his serve, especially in the second set,” Amiri said. “After I broke him and went up 2-0, I felt, OK, just hold my serve and it doesn’t even matter on the return.” Amiri held serve the rest of

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Cloverdale (25-6), Kelowna (17-15), Ridge Meadows (1817), Tri-Cities (13-14), Richmond (13-19), Kamloops (12-20) and Township (0-27). The under-18

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the way and broke Friesen to take a 5-2 stranglehold on the set and match. “It would have been nice to play a lot better, but I put everything out there on the court,” said Friesen, who was playing in his first ITF event against an opponent once heralded among California’s top juniors. “It is what it is.” Friesen’s younger brother, 14-year-old Thomas, lost an extended tiebreaker to fall 2-1 to Harshvardan Chopra of the U.S. in a qualifying-round match on Sunday. Semifinals will be played on Friday. Finals are scheduled for Saturday.

Kamloops Realty

WE BUY estates, art, chairs, postcards, paper items, rusty things & curious objects

We will be visiting the Kamloops and Merritt/Nicola areas monthly.

Inquiries or for an appointment: Please call, text or email

Leanne 1-250-488-0850 • René 1-250-462-4969

info@4thmeridian.ca

Coming to Penticton?

Visit our warehouse shop in the Cannery Trade Centre

#104 - 1475 Fairview Road, Penticton

Tuesday - Friday 11 - 4 Saturdays 12 - 3

Jessica MARVIN 250.374.3022

je-matt@hotmail.com JessicaMattRealEstate.ca

250.319.8784 mmatt@shaw.ca

RealEstateKamloops.ca Member of Kamloops Chamber of Commerce


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A25

WEEKLY CROSSWORDS

CLUES ACROSS 1. Stores 6. Worthless entertainment 9. Where scientists work 13. Pretty flower 14. A way to act 15. Double-reed instrument 16. Type of acid 17. Famed astronomer 18. Smooth, shiny fabric 19. Profited from 21. Secret clique 22. Infections 23. Crony 24. Teens go here every day (abbr.) 25. Suitable 28. Fresh Price of __ Air 29. Ancient city of Egypt 31. Basketball move 33. Polished 36. There’s a north and a south 38. Egg of a louse

CLUES DOWN 1. Draw out wool 2. Give someone a job 3. Chemical and ammo manufacturer 4. Footsteps 5. The Palmetto State 6. Books have lots of them 7. Diverse Israeli city 8. It’s mightier than the sword 9. Confines 10. First month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year 11. Idaho’s highest peak 12. Prevents from seeing 14. Determine time 17. Father children 20. Tab on a key ring 21. Dog genus 23. Peter’s last name 25. Request 26. Walk heavily 27. Allowances 29. English football squad

39. Once-ubiquitous department store 41. Portray precisely 44. Thick piece of something 45. Period between eclipses 46. Indicates near 48. Investment account 49. England, Scotland, N. Ireland, and Wales (abbr.) 51. Beak 52. Void of skill 54. Walked back and forth 56. A display of passion 60. Geological times 61. Type of restaurant 62. Spacious 63. Edible seaweed 64. Utah city 65. Tropical tree 66. Nervous tissue compound 67. Body part 68. Muscles and tendons

30. Fish-eating aquatic mammals 32. South Pacific island region 34. Unaccounted for 35. Small taste of whiskey 37. Ventilated 40. Helps little firms 42. One of means 43. Fencing swords 47. Inches per minute (abbr.) 49. Turn upside down 50. S. African semi desert 52. Dutch names of Ypres 53. Instruct 55. Oily freshwater fish 56. Italian river 57. Sneaker giant 58. The men who man a ship 59. Some need glasses 61. Body part 65. Indicates position

MATH MIND BENDER

Cookies

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A24

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

You have a 12-inch by 17-inch baking sheet and you want to make cookies. You are going to bake either 1.5-inch, 2-inch, 2.5-inch or 3-inch cookies. They should be properly spaced (at least a half-inch apart) and arranged in rows and columns. Which size of cookie should you bake if you want the most amount of cookie baked on that baking sheet? (Note that this question is for the most amount of cookie.)

ANSWERS

Answer to last week’s THE FRUIT BASKET PUZZLE: Your fruit basket contains 17 apples, seven donuts, three cherries and one blueberry. THIS PUZZLE IS BY GENE WIRCHENKO Find more puzzles, articles, and full solutions online at genew.ca

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, are you up to stepping outside of your comfort zone? Embrace the challenge and try something completely different from your normal routine. You just may like it.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Let problems flow over you like water off of a duck’s back, Taurus. Worrying will only make things worse, and it’s completely unproductive anyway.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Work on nurturing a relationship that has been pushed to the side for some time, Gemini. Rekindling communication is a great way to start things off anew.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Keep an open mind when someone presents an idea to you, Cancer. It’s easy to blow it off without a thought, but you should be more amenable to listening and advising.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Now may be the time to share responsibilities with others, Leo. This is especially true if you are facing deadlines and simply cannot meet them in time.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 Accept help when it is offered, Virgo. This makes helpful people feel good that they can do you a service. You will have an opportunity to reciprocate in time.

JUNE 26 - JULY 2, 2019 LIBRA

- Sept 23/Oct 23 Not everyone is on board with your new plan, Libra. You may have to present it a few times before you get a few takers. Be persistent to win others over.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, even though it seems like there are many obstacles in your path, you will be able to get through relatively unscathed if you have the right people on your side.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Let others in your family know how you are feeling. You don’t have to put on a show or mask your emotions, Capricorn. They’ll love and support your decisions.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Have faith in your decisions even if they don’t entirely make sense on paper, Aquarius. You will have a line of supporters waiting in your corner in no time at all.

PISCES

Sagittarius, relaxation is essential right now, as you have had many things on your plate. Do not feel like you are slacking off if you take some time to give yourself a break.

- Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, things are changing rapidly in your life and you may feel like you have to play catch up. Target some areas to focus your attention.

THE PERFECT SUMMER JOB! Kamloops This Week has openings for temporary route coverage in all areas of the city this summer, for as little as a week or up to the whole summer! • Two days per week (Wednesdays & Fridays) • Most routes take one hour or less - take multiple routes to earn more money • Earn spending money to enjoy the rest of your summer!

For information on routes in your area, call 250-374-0462 or email circulation@kamloopsthisweek.com


A26

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949

INDEX

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

Anniversaries

REGULAR RATES

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday

Based on 3 lines

FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

1 Week . . . . . . . . . $2500

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classiďŹ ed ads.

Career Opportunities

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300 1 Month . . . . . . . . $8000 ADD COLOUR . . $2500 to your classiďŹ ed add Tax not included

Kamloops This Week will be closed on Monday, July 1st, 2019 for the Canada Day Statutory Holiday.

Share your event KamloopsThisWeek.com /events

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

t4BX'JMFSTt)FBWZ%VUZ.FDIBOJDT t$FSUJmFE.JMMXSJHIUT Interfor is one of the largest lumber companies in the world and we’re moving in exciting directions. Come be a part of our success. We are currently recruiting for Saw Filers, Heavy Duty Mechanics and Millwrights for our sawmill in Castlegar, BC. What You Oer Saw Filer t"CMFUPNBJOUBJOKPCTBGFUZ RVBMJUZBOEFĂś DJFODZ t1SFWJPVTTBXmMJOHFYQFSJFODFSFRVJSFE t3PVOETBXPS#FODIUJDLFUSFRVJSFE Heavy Duty Mechanic t3FE4FBM)FBWZ%VUZ.FDIBOJDDFSUJmDBUJPOSFRVJSFE t8PSLJOHLOPXMFEHFPG$BUFSQJMMBSBOE%FUSPJUEJFTFMFOHJOFT t7BMJE$MBTTESJWFSTMJDFOTFSFRVJSFE CertiďŹ ed Millwright t3FE4FBM.JMMXSJHIUDFSUJmDBUJPOSFRVJSFE t4BXNJMM QMBOFSBOELJMONBJOUFOBODFFYQFSJFODFJTBOBTTFU t4USPOHTBGFUZCBDLHSPVOE t,OPXMFEHFPGQPXFSUSBOTNJTTJPONBDIJOFSZQBSUTJODMVEJOHHFBSCPYFT  chains and bearings is an asset

"QQMZPOMJOFBU www.interfor.com/careers

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CLASSIFIEDS Put the power of 8.3 Million Ń´-vvbC;7-7v|o‰ouh=ou‹o†Ĵ ĹŽ  bm7t†-Ń´bC;7;lrŃ´o‹;;v ĹŽ o‰;u‹o†u‰;0vb|; ĹŽ ";Ń´Ń´ruo7†1|v=-v|Ä´ ĹŽ o-v|ĹŠ|oĹŠ1o-v|ou ruoˆbm1;0‹ruoˆbm1; ĹŽ ";Ń´;1||_;u;]bom|_-|Ä˝v ub]_|=ou‹o†u0†vbm;vv

Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com GARAGE SALE

$

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

$

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

3500

EMPLOYMENT

12 Friday - 3 lines or less 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less 50

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue. . . . . . . $1638

$

BONUS (pick up only):

1 Week . . . . . . $3150

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6� Sub compliments of

1 Month . . . $10460

Tax not included

Tax not included

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Anniversaries

Information

Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Word ClassiďŹ ed Deadlines •

10:00am Tuesday for Wednesday’s Paper.

•

10:00am Thursday for Friday’s Paper.

Advertisements should be read on the ďŹ rst publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the ďŹ rst insertion. It is agreed by any Display or ClassiďŹ ed Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement. RUN TIL RENTED 250-371-4949 Ĺ–!;v|ub1াomv-rrѴ‹

Coming Events

If you have an

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

Career Opportunities 9186677

)

ONE CALL  "$Ä´

|

RUN UNTIL RENTED

Landscape Maintenance Company To Hire Labourers CANADA DAY

Fax: 250-374-1033

RUN UNTIL SOLD

Career Opportunities

Covers complete landscape services. mowing, line trimming, pruning, yard u;moˆ-াomvġ1om1u;|;‰ouhġr-ˆ;uvġ 0Ń´o1h‰-Ń´Ń´vġ;|1Äş †v|_-ˆ;|u-mvrou|-াom|o];||o l-bmvb|;Äş)ouhbm]‰b|_1u;‰l-|;vÄş $16-20 depending on experience. Ѳlov;uĸC7-mÂŒ-Ĺžv_-‰ĸ1-

|

HUNTER & FIREARMS PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

2 Days Per Week call 250-374-0462

Personals Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Travel

Housesitting Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 374-6007.

Employment Business Opportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Career Opportunities

Certified Dental Assistant

Our busy downtown dental clinic is seeking a full-time CDA. We are a “paperless� office, and you would have the opportunity to work with up to two different dentists. The ideal candidate will have a great work ethic, ability to handle multiple priorities and is a self starter. If you are a team player and want to join a great dental team, please reply by emailing your resume, or stop in to chat. email:martinev@telus.net

Kamloops # recruitment agency

1

250-374-3853

Education/Trade Schools AAA - Pal & Core

courses mid-week & weekends. NEW - Intro to Reloading & Bear Aware courses on demand. For schedules see www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

Career Opportunities

Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. July 27th and 28th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. July 8th & 9th evenings. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Bill

250-376-7970

Help Wanted Bella Coola/OfďŹ ce Manager Required at Bella Coola Grizzly Tours and Adventure Resort Inc. On site accommodations provided at Resort and fair wages. www. bcgrizzlytours.com Country living at its finest. Office Manager is responsible for answering e-mails, telephone, bookings & reservations, processing CC payments, meeting and greeting Guests, keeping office area tidy and some housekeeping. Excellent computer skills required. Position available immediately. Please send cover letter and resume by e mail att: Leonard Ellis / Owner info@bcgrizzlytours.com I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679 Looking for part-time stylist to work 2 days/week at RiverBend Seniors Home. 250-8511959.

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

Career Opportunities

WE'RE GROWING Nuleaf produce market is looking for a high '2'8+@8'£-!#£'-2&-=-&<!£v(38!(<££ -m7r-u|;-1'639-;-32!9!produce clerk. This fast paced environment is ideal for a person with retail sales experience and '?$'6ধ32!£$<9;31'89'8=-$'90-££9W

July 6-7

'683=-&'!$316'ধধ='>!+'T*'?-#£' work environment and opportunity for !&=!2$'1'2;W (;,-993<2&9£-0'!639-ধ32(38@3<T>'y& £-0';3,'!8(831@3<W

LIZ SPIVEY Ć&#x2022;Ć&#x2022;ŃśŇ&#x192;Ć&#x201C;Ć&#x2022;Ć?Ň&#x192;Ć&#x2022;Ć&#x201D;Ć&#x2019;Ć&#x2022;

APPLY IN PERSON ħ2V '81!2 Nuleaf Produce Market Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021; 38;<2'8-='T!1ÂŁ3369

Only short listed candidates >-ÂŁÂŁ#'$32;!$;'&W


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Looking for Carriers KIDS & ADULTS NEEDED!

ABERDEEN

Rte 503 - Fleming Circ, Hampshire Dr & Pl, Hector Dr. – 48 p. Rte 527 - Hunter Pl, Huntleigh Cres. – 28 p.

BATCHELOR

Rte 175 – 1800-1899 Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 180 - 807-1104 Quail Dr, Quails Roost Crt. & Dr. – 80 p. Rte 184 - 2077-2097 Saddleback Dr, 2001-2071 Stagecoach Dr. – 30 p Rte 186 – Saddleback Crt. – 28 p.

BROCKLEHURST/ NORTH KAMLOOPS

Rte 10 - 2310-2398 Glenview Ave, 715-896 Schreiner St, Shelan Pl. – 62 p. Rte 21 - 2300-2397 Fleetwood Ave, Fleetwood Crt, Fleetwood Pl, 1003-1033 Schreiner St, 1020-1050 Westgate St – 53 p Rte 101 - 805-1280 Sherbrooke St. – 63 p. Rte 113 - 379-781 Ivy Ave, 301-341 Kenora Rd, Pender Pl, Powell Pl, Sherwood Dr, 718-791 Stewart Ave. – 79 p. Rte 114 - 233 Sherwood Dr. – 18 p. Rte 121 - 103-105 Dot St, 501-556 MacKenzie Ave, 290-381 Maple St, 102-196 Yew St – 60 p. Rte 142 - Alder Ave. Cypress Ave, 300-348 & 430 Fortune Dr, Juniper Ave, 325-439 Schubert Dr, Spruce Ave. – 67 p.

DALLAS/BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 - 5317-5356 Freda Ave, 601-906 Klahanie Dr, 5310-5430 Morris Pl, 5300-5399 ShellyDr, 901-935 Todd Rd. – 92 p. Rte 706 - 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, 1001-1095 Mo-Lin Pl.-29 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl-31p Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley, Melrose, Yarrow. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p.

Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p.

DOWNTOWN

Rte 308 – 355 9TH Ave, 703977 St. Paul St. – 36 p. Rte 317 - 535-649 7th Ave. 702-794 Columbia St,(evenside)702-799 Nicola St.-46 p Rte 319 - 545 6th Ave, 609-690 Columbia St,(evenside), 604-692 Nicola St.-16 p Rte 320 – 483-587 9th Ave, 801-991 Battle St, 804-992 Columbia St (Even), 803995 Nicola St. -51 p. Rte 322 - 694 11th Ave, 575-694 13th Ave, 1003-1091 Battle St, 1008-1286 Columbia St, 1004-1314 Nicola St. – 61p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805979 Columbia St(odd), 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St.-65p Rte 327 – 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. – 38 p. Rte 334 – 975 13th Ave, 1104-1276 Pine St, 1201-1274 Pleasant St. – 43 p. Rte 380 - Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 71 p Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 41 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 24 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W. Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 43 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W. Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 27 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 46 p.

JUNIPER RIDGE

Rte 655 - 2202-2458 Finlay Ave, 2202-2385 Skeena Dr , 2406-2458 Skeena Dr. – 36 p. Rte 671 – 1830-1997 Qu’Appelle Blvd, Myra Pl.

Rte 470 – Farnham Wynd, 102298 Waddington Dr. – 67 p. Rte 475 - 102-194 Castle Towers Dr, 160-190 Sedgewick Crt, 18011938 Sedgewick Dr.-44 p Rte 478 - 191-299 Chancellor Dr, 20252085 Sentry Pl, 2021-2099 Sovereign Crt, 1904-1992 The Pinnacles – 42 p. & Panorama Crt.- 76 p. Rte 481 – Robson Lane, Whistler Dr, Crt & Pl. – 68 p.

MT DUFFERIN

Rte 584 - 1752-1855 Hillside Dr.-33 p. Rte 586 - 1505-1584 Mt. Dufferin Cres, 1575 Park Way, 1537-1569 Plateau Pl.-27 p. Rte 588 - 1675-1695 Davies Pl, 1680-1751 Hillside Dr, 1407-1499 Hillside Pl, 1645-1665 Monterey Pl, 1751-1793 Scott Pl. – 45 p. Rte 590 - 1397 Copperhead Dr, Saskatoon Pl. - 36 p.

PINEVIEW VALLEY

Rte 562 - Englemann Crt, 18021890 Lodgepole Dr. - 64 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 831 - 4904-5037 Cammeray Dr, Mason Pl, Pinantan Pl, Reighmount Dr. & Pl.-62 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

WESTSYDE

Rte 253 - Irving Pl, 2401-2477 Parkview Dr, Rhonmohr Cres, 2380 & 2416 Westsyde Rd.-54 p. Rte 257 - Alpine Terr, Community Pl, 21922207 Grasslands Blvd, Grasslands Pl, 881936 McQueen Dr, Woodhaven Dr. – 53 p. Rte 258 - 806-879 McQueen Dr, Perryville Pl. – 36 p. Rte 260 - 2040–2185 Westsyde Rd. – 24 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI

Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 250-374-0462

Livestock

Work Wanted

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111 Help Wanted

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-374-0462

Planerman Planerman required for

North Okanagan Sawmill. We offer competitive wages and benefit package as well as the opportunity to live in one of BC’s most beautiful areas. Please email resume: netimber@junction.net

THERE’S MORE ONLINE

Help Wanted

RN’s and LPN’s Casual Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses needed for in home 1:1 pediatric respite care for medically fragile children in your area. Offering union wages, paid training and full support. For full details and to apply visit: www.resourceability.ca

HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774. Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. gene@shaw.ca

Pets

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

PETS For Sale?

TRI-CITY SPECIAL!

for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm. (250)371-4949

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com *some restrictions apply.

3500

SOLD $ RUN TIL

+ TAX

TURN YOUR STUFF INTO CA$H 250-371-4949

*RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Temporary/ PT/Seasonal

Purebred male boxer puppy for sale. Ready to go to a new home this week, original buyer had to back out last minute. Tails and dew claws done. $900. Call or text at 250-819-1122.

Merchandise for Sale

KamloopsThisWeek.com

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

Merchandise for Sale

Antiques / Vintage

Misc. for Sale

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca Wrought iron beds $300/each. Floor lamp $50. High chair $30. Cedar Hope Chest $400. Rocking chair $150. Oak dresser with mirror $475. 250-372-8177.

$500 & Under Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949 *some restrictions apply

Antiques / Vintage Antique Furniture solid wood and collectible’s. Power tools. Everything must go! 571-7177

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive

Fruit & Vegetables #1 Cherries for sale. $2.00/lb. Call Gus 250-376-3480 anytime or lvg message.

Firewood/Fuel ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250) 377-3457.

8ft Antique Couch $900. Round dining room table w/4chairs & 2 bar stools. $700. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933.

Heavy Duty Machinery Cummings Gen Set Ford 6cyl 300 cu/in single and 3 phase pwr $5000 (250) 376-6607

Misc. for Sale 5th wheel hitch $250. Ford air flow tailgate w/lock black $140. 250-374-8285. 6hp Evinrude O/B motor. $600. John Deere Lawn tractor $650. 70 CFM air compressor. $750. 250-574-3794. Butcher-Boy commercial meat grinder 3-hp. 220 volt. c/w attachments. $1600. 250318-2030. Dual 701 Direct Drive turntable easily converted to USB. $700. Garry 250-554-4279

Shop Rider Scooter. Good battery Low Mileage Red $1200 250-554-4427 aft 5pm.

Misc. Wanted (250)-864-3521 Collector Buying Royal Canadian Mint coins, collections, old coins, paper money, pre 1968 silver coins, bars, world collections.+ ANYTHING

Able buyer of all your old coins, coin collections, Collector COINS, all silver, gold, rare, common, old money, bullion.+ Todd the Coin Guy (250)-864-3521 Christine is Buying Vintage Jewellery, Gold, Silver, Coins, Sterling, China, Estates, etc. 1-778-281-0030 Housecalls. Genuine Coin Collector Buying Coins,Collections, Gold & Silver Coins, + Chad The Coin Expert 250-863-3082

Real Estate Commercial/ Industrial Property

EARN EXTRA $$$

Eclipse Lift chair remote control, like new. Dark rose colour. $1,000/obo. 250-3764813. Fishing Kayak 10ft. $450. 778-471-1096. Fuel tank w/pump $1,000. Electric boat loader. $1,000. 250-579-9550. Greeting cards made in England each cellophane wrapped 90,000 for $17,000 (250) 376-6607 Hockey Gear fits 5’4” 120 lbs, brand new + skates 6.5 size. Serious inquires only $650/obo. for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992. La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 10. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. Lowes 12ft. alum boat $600. Utility trailer 5x10 inside, 10 ply tires. $1,050. 573-1808. New 4WD Invacare Pegasus Scooter. Brand new. $2500/obo. 250-376-1933. New in box Coleman Focus 3 propane heater $10 obo 250376-4884

Scrap Car Removal

Please recycle this newspaper.

Mobile Homes & Parks

HOME & LAND PACKAGE STARTING AT

5% Down

$615 Bi-Weekly Custom Floor Plan Call us at

250.573.2278 or toll free at

Recreation **BOOK NOW FOR BEST WEEKS IN 2019** Shuswap Lake! 5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek BC. REST & RELAX ON THIS PRIVATE CORNER LOT. Newer 1bdrm, 1-bath park model sleeps 4 . Tastefully decorated guest cabin for 2 more. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor store & Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot tubs, Adult & Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Only $1,400 week. BOOK NOW! Rental options available for 3 & 4 day, 1 week, 2 week & monthly. Call for more information. 1-250-371-1333.

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866.573.1288 KamloopsThisWeek.com

eaglehomes.ca

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Shared Accommodation For quiet non-smoking mature male, in downtown apartment. $600/mo. 236-425-1499.

Suites, Lower Vacant 2bdrms in N.Kam with C/A, sep entr, patio. $1,000 +DD. 250-376-0633.

Transportation Antiques / Classics 1953 Meteor, standard, runs well. $7,000. (Williams Lake). 250-392-2193. 1956 Plymouth, auto, runs well. $4,000. (Williams Lake). 250-392-2193.

“Our Family Protecting Your Family”

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250-371-4949 Ŗ!;v|ub1ঞomv-rrѴ‹ KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462

Scrap Car Removal

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GOLD & SILVER Todd The Coin Guy (250)-864-3521

Furniture

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE? Livestock

Merchandise for Sale

A27

For Sale By Owner For Sale By Owner $55.00 Special!

The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run for one week (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops every Wednesday and Friday.

Call or email us for more info:

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classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

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1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794.

Cars - Domestic 1992 Cadillac Allante Convertible. 77,000kms. Mint cond. $7,700. 250-371-4801. 2002 Subaru Outback. 279,000kms. New fuel pump, all options. $3,250. 319-5849 2003 Chevy Impala LS. 4dr, auto, fully loaded. 123,650 kms. $3,500. 250-573-5965.

2bdrms, 1-bath in RiverBend (55+). Close to all amenities. $2100/mo. 250-376-6502.

Northland Apartments

Renovated Bachelor Suites $1,000 Renovated 1&2 Bedroom Suites with New Fixtures; SS Appliances; Luxury Plank Flooring. Adult Oriented, No Pets, No Smoking Elevators / Common Laundry $1,100 - 1,650 per month. North Shore 250-376-1427 South Shore 250-314-1135 nnkamloops@northland.ca nskamloops@northland.ca

Sahali 2bdrm apt. , 2-baths. Small pet okay. $1200/mo. DD, Ref’s. 250-320-4870.

Bed & Breakfast BC Best Buy Classifieds Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC. Call 250-371-4949 for more information

2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Excellent condition. $14,900. 250-374-1541. 2016 Honda Civic EX. Auto. 7,600kms. Exec condition. $18,800. 250-299-7928.

RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Cars - Sports & Imports 2007 Solstice GXP Roadster. Auto, Immaculate cond. 75,300kms. $14,500/obo. 250376-5194.

Motorcycles 81 Honda 500 Silverwing, hardbags, fairing, carb rebuilt. $1,650/obo. 250-579-3205. Wanted: HARLEY GEAR. Chaps, Jacket, Vest and Gloves. Ladies Medium and Mens Xlg. Send pics to: rajol@telus.net


A28

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BUSINESSES BUSINESSES & & SERVICES SERVICES Services Services Fitness/Exercise Fitness/Exercise

Services Services

Handy Persons Handy Persons RICKS’S SMALL RICKS’S SMALL HAUL HAUL

WE will pay you to exercise! WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 2 issues a week! Only 2 issues a week!

For all Deliveries & Dump For all Deliveries Dump Runs. Extra large&dump Runs. Extrafor large dump trailers rent. trailers rent. Dumpfor Truck Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!! Long and Short Hauls!!

call 250-374-0462 call for a250-374-0462 route near you! for a route near you!

Garden Garden & & Lawn Lawn ** Lawn Lawn Mowing Mowing

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Renovations Renovations Electrical Electrical (Red (Red Seal) Seal) Painting, Flooring Painting, Flooring Drywall, Bathrooms Bathrooms Drywall, & much more

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Concrete & Placing

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GarageSale DIRECTORY DIRECTORY DUFFERIN DUFFERIN Sat, June 29th. 9am-2pm. Sat, 29th.Court. 9am-2pm. 1325 June Sunshine Hshld 1325 Sunshine Court. Hshld items, paintings +more. items, paintings +more. NORTH SHORE NORTH SHORE MultiApartment Building. Apartment Building. MultiFamily. Family. Saturday, Saturday, June June 29th. 29th. 9am-2pm. 685 Sydney 9am-2pm. 685 Sydney Ave. Ave. (In Community Community Room). Room). Lots Lots of of (In items items for for everyone. everyone. WESTSYDE WESTSYDE Sat, Sat, June June 29th. 29th. 8am-Noon. 8am-Noon. 850 Ida Ida Lane. Lane. Boat, Boat, motor, motor, 850 trailer, antique antique dresser, dresser, toys, toys, trailer, hshld items, garden tools etc. hshld items, garden tools etc.

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PETER’S PETER’S YARD YARD SERVICE SERVICE

Coolman repairs, installs Coolman repairs, installs home home and and automobile automobile Air Air ConConditioners. ditioners. Call Call 250-852-3569. 250-852-3569. JA ENTERPRISES ENTERPRISES JA Furniture Furniture Moving Moving and and Rubbish Rubbish Removal Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943 778-257-4943

Time Time to to Trim Trim Your Your Hedges Hedges Tree Tree Pruning Pruning or or Removal Removal Yard clean-up,

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Security/Alarm Security/Alarm Systems Systems

CHOOSE LOCAL CHOOSE LOCAL “Our Family Protecting Your Family” “Our Family Protecting Your Family” PRESTIGE PRESTIGE LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION LOCAL ALARM MONITORING STATION

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UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS FREE ESTIMATES FOR SYSTEM UPGRADES OR SWITCH-OVERS LIVE ANSWER | EFFICIENT

KamloopsThisWeek.com /events /events

Mini Excavator and Dump Trailer for hire, stump Mini Excavator and removal Dump trenching, and stump small removal demo Trailer for hire, jobs $65 per Excavator trenching, andhr for small demo or perper hr hr for for Dump Trailer jobs$85 $65 Excavator and Excavator 554-4467 or $85 per hr (250) for Dump Trailer and Excavator (250) 554-4467

10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops 10-989 McGill Pl. Kamloops

Recreational/Sale Recreational/Sale

Recreational/Sale Recreational/Sale

Scrap Car Removal Scrap Car Removal

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COSTLIVE EFFECTIVE COMPANY ANSWER| |LOCAL EFFICIENT COST EFFECTIVE | LOCAL COMPANY

250-374-0916 250-374-0916

Run until sold New Price $56.00+tax Run until sold

1970 GMC PD-4108 Buffalo style bus conversion, 8V71 1970 PD-4108 EngineGMC rebuilt in Buffalo March. style conversion, 2014. bus Power steering, 8V71 auto, Engine in March. air brakes,rebuilt Jake brake, good 2014. many Power steering, tires, extras, auto, runs air brakes, JakeCan. brake,Call good great. $15,000 or tires, many extras, runs text: 604-219-8430. Vangreat. $15,000 Can. Call or couver, BC. text: 604-219-8430. Vancouver,Arctic BC. Cat Quad. 800 2003 miles. Like New. $5,000. 2502003 Arctic Cat Quad. 800 372-8177. miles. Like New. $5,000. 2502005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, 372-8177. sleeps 6, appl incld, fully load2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, ed, $16,900. 236-421-2251 sleeps 6, appl incld, fully load2006 Terry 28ft. 5th wheel. ed, $16,900. 236-421-2251 12ft. slide-out. Good cond. $15,000/obo. 2006 Terry 250-554-2528. 28ft. 5th wheel. 12ft. 2013 slide-out. Keystone Good Fusion cond. Toy $15,000/obo. Hauler slps 9,250-554-2528. 41ft 12ft garage asking $55,000 250-374-4723 2013 Keystone Fusion Toy Hauler slps 9, 41ftLite 12ftCamper garage 9.6ft Northern asking $55,000 250-374-4723 c/w alum sport utility trailer plus alum boat, merc 9.6ft 12ft Northern Lite 9.9 Camper motor, elecsport motor oars. c/w alum utility& trailer $25,000/all. 250-318-9134. plus 12ft alum boat, 9.9 merc motor, elec motor & oars. $25,000/all. 250-318-9134.

1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Slide, V-10, Jacks, Solar, 1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Slide, V-10,Inverter Jacks, Solar, Vacuum, etc. Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Low kms. $29,900 Vacuum, Inverter etc. 250-828-0466 Low kms. $29,900 250-828-0466

2010 Jayco 31’ Travel Trailer Rear Kitchen, 14’ slide, 2010 Jayco Queen31’bed, Travelsolar Trailer panel, electric awning &14’hitch. 1 Rear Kitchen, slide, owner, Queen very bed, clean solar $16,000 panel, Call:250-573-6397 electric awning & hitch. 1 owner, very clean $16,000 Call:250-573-6397

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, New Price $56.00+tax or trailer to sell? With our Run Do you specials have a vehicle, til sold you pay boat, one flrv, at or trailer to sell? With rate and we will run yourour adRun until sold specials you pay one flat til your vehicle sells.* rate and we(boxed will run ad un• $56.00 ad your with photo) til vehicle sells.*3 line ad) • your $35.00 (regular

• •

$56.00 (boxed ad with photo) Call: 250-371-4949

$35.00 (regular 3 line ad) *Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Terry Resort 5th wheel. Great condition gently used. New upgrades electric A/C, Terry Resort 5th awning, wheel. Great new brakes & bearings, comes condition gently used. New upwith hitch, etc...too many A/C, exgrades electric awning, tras to list. &$8,000/obo. 250new brakes bearings, comes 256-4934. with hitch, etc...too many extras to list. $8,000/obo. 250256-4934.

THERE’S MORE ONLINE THERE’S MORE ONLINE KamloopsThisWeek.com

Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

KamloopsThisWeek.com

Trucks & Vans Trucks & Vans 1995 Chev 2500, 4x4, 5std

Canopy, w/tires on rims 1995 Chev 2500, 4x4, 5std $3000obo 250-579-8675 Canopy, w/tires on rims 2000 Dodge Dakota 4x4 auto $3000obo 250-579-8675 with canopy. $3500/obo. 2502000 Dodge Dakota 4x4 auto 851-4338. with canopy. $3500/obo. 2502005 Chev Colorado, 5spd 851-4338. manual, canopy. 128,000kms. 2005 Chev250-372-9323. Colorado, 5spd $3,300/obo. manual, canopy. 128,000kms. 2010 Chevy Express Van. $3,300/obo. 250-372-9323. 12/15 passenger. Good 2010 Needs Chevy transmission Express Van. shape. re12/15$4500.passenger. pair. 250-376-4163.Good shape. Needs transmission repair. $4500. 250-376-4163.

RUN TIL RENTED RUN TIL RENTED

53 53

00 $ + TAX 00 $ ƒ "҃ƐƑ) "

+ TAX Add an extra line to your ad for $10

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IT’S IT’S GARAGE GARAGE SALE TIME SALE TIME Call and ask us about our Call and ask us about our GARAGE SALE SPECIAL GARAGE SALE SPECIAL

community paper paper & & community comment comment online. online.

ONLY ONLY $12.50 $12.50 FOR FOR 3 3 LINES LINES (Plus (Plus Tax) Tax) ($1 per additional line) ($1 per additional line)

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classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com Garage Sale deadline is Garage Sale deadline is Thursday 10am for Friday Thursday 10am for Friday Call Tuesday Call Tuesday before before 10am 10am for for our our 2 2 day day special special for for $17.50 $17.50 for for

Wednesday Wednesday and and Friday Friday Garage Garage Sale Sale Packages Packages must must be be picked picked up Prior to the Garage up Prior to the Garage Sale. Sale.

KamloopsThisWeek.com

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2014 2014 Ford Ford Platinum Platinum 4x4 4x4 Immaculate Immaculate F150 F150 SuperSupercrew, crew, 3.5 3.5 Ecoboost, Ecoboost, Sun Sun Roof, Roof, white, white, brown brown leather, leather, Fully Loaded Only $33,300 Fully Loaded Only $33,300 250-319-8784 250-319-8784

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

PAPER

ROUTES

AVAILABLE

Boats Boats 14ft. Runabout boat. 40hp 14ft. Runabout 40hp Johnson motor boat. on trailer. Johnson on trailer. $1500/obo. motor 778-469-5434. $1500/obo. 778-469-5434. 16ft Crestliner and trailer, 16ft Crestliner trailer, both completelyand re-newed. both Mercury completely re-newed. 20hp 4 stroke, new 20hp Mercury 4 stroke, consul and controls, finew shconsul and controls, fi shfinder, anchor, floor boards finder,mats, anchor, boards and bilge floor pump, new and mats, bilge pump, new seats, rod-holders, downrigseats, rod-holders, gers, trailer has newdownrigbunks, gers, trailer new wheels, bunks, rollers, axles,has spring rollers,spare axles,drawbar, spring wheels, new winch, new spare drawbar, lights, double covers.winch, Firm lights, double covers. $8,000. 250-578-7638. Firm $8,000. 250-578-7638. 2016 Lowe Pontoon. 20ft. 10 2016 Lowe 20ft. hrs. 10 person, 115Pontoon. hp, low $39,500. person, 1-250-551-8666. 115 hp, low hrs. $39,500. 1-250-551-8666.

Obituaries Obituaries OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Obituaries Obituaries 22 col col cc 6” 6” AD AD SPACE SPACE FOR FOR OBIT OBIT OVERFLOW OVERFLOW

NOTICE OF SALE WAREHOUSE NOTICE OFLIEN SALEACT ByWAREHOUSE the virtue ofLIEN the ACT Warehouse’s of By the Lien virtueAct, of contents the Warethe storage unit, belonging house’s Lien Act, contents of to: Marie and Carson Johnthe storage unit, belonging son of Skyline Motel, JohnKamto: Marie and Carson loops, son ofBC. Skyline Motel, KamThe goods will be sold on or loops, BC. after July 5, will 2019. The goods be sold on or Central Storage after July 5, 2019. Ltd., 1236 Salish Kamloops, BC, Central Rd, Storage Ltd., 1236 V2H 1K1. 250-314-9522. Salish Rd, Kamloops, BC, V2H 1K1. 250-314-9522. WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT 2006 ICBC Wrote off WAREHOUSE LIEN Subaru Baja 4 drACT 2006 ICBC Wrote off VIN:4S4BT62C067105532. Subaru Baja dr NO: MFG 06/13 Isuzu 4VIN VIN:4S4BT62C067105532. 54DC4W1B2DS802334 MFG 06/13 Isuzu$980.19 VIN NO: Monies Owed 54DC4W1B2DS802334 by VC Wide Towing: Monies Owed $980.19 ViJay Mann to GB Trucks by & VCServices Wide Towing: Sales Ltd., 570 ViJay Mann to GB Trucks West Athabasca St. Sales & Services 570 Kamloops, BC willLtd., be sold West Athabasca separately on July 10,St. 2019 Kamloops, BC will be sold @ 8:30am separately on July 10, 2019 @ 8:30am

Bill is survived by his loving wife Lola, children Anne (John), Donna (Harvey), Gordon (Lorraine), Wanda (Sheldon), Kevin (Carol) and sister Rhoda. He will be missed by numerous grandchildren, greatgrandchildren as well as many nieces and nephews.

Legal Legal Legal Notices Legal Notices

PAPER PAPER ROUTES

AVAILABLE ROUTES AVAILABLE

250-374-7467 250-374-7467 1bu1†Ѵ-ঞomŠh-lѴoorv|_bv‰;;hĺ1ol 1bu1†Ѵ-ঞomŠh-lѴoorv|_bv‰;;hĺ1ol

In Loving Memory Of

John William “Bill” Cameron September 11, 1925 – April 29, 2019

John William Cameron of the Gemstone Care Centre in Kamloops, British Columbia passed away peacefully at the age of 93. Bill was born on September 11, 1925 in the Cameron Settlement in Nova Scotia.

Bill was predeceased by his brothers Howard and Ken and son Dougal. There will be a Celebration of Life for Bill on August 17, 2019 at 11:00 am in the Barriere Seniors Centre. MaryAnn Shewchuk to Officiate. Light refreshments will be served and later a family gathering at Anne and John’s house. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

250-374-7467

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250-374-7467

(250) 377-8225


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A29

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Ellen Berg We are sad to announce the passing of our Mother, Grandmother and GreatGrandmother Ellen Berg on June 19, 2019 with her loving family by her side. She will be loving remembered by her children Barb (John), David (Laura), Bruce (Pearl), Linda (Murray), Sheila and Dale, grandchildren Trish (Doug), Christine (Brian), Terri (Eli), Nicole (Trevor), Cody (Megan), Cathrine (Ryan), Samantha, Kevin, Kyle, John (Whit), Michael (Lisa), great-grandchildren Kirstin, Levi, Willem, Thomas, Daniel, Rylee, Ricky, Lucy, Amelia, Charlotte, Bailey, Jake, Mady and Spencer. Predeceased by husband Alfred in 2004. Mom will be missed greatly by her family and many friends. Celebration of Life to be held on Thursday, June 27, 2019 from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm at Ponderosa Place, 421 Columbia Street, Kamloops. No flowers please, donations to a charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577 Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Roberta Ruth Baker With heavy hearts, we announce the passing of our beloved Roberta Ruth Baker after a year and a half battle with cancer on March 14, 2019 with family by her side. Roberta always had a positive attitude and handled everything that came at her with dignity and grace. Roberta is survived by her sweetie Doug Hoas, her children Jason and Sean and families and stepson Sean and his wife Lyssa. She also leaves behind her three sisters Susan, Penny, Nancy and their families which includes numerous nieces and nephews. Roberta was predeceased by her parents Fred and Ruby Amor and her husband Murray. Roberta loved spending time at her “happy place” which was Magna Bay on the Shuswap. She always enjoyed being there but the last seven years of retirement were her favourite. She loved potlucks, sitting by the fire, the company of friends and playing cards. She was lovingly nicknamed “Miss Rules.” Roberta was kind and loving and was always welcoming to anyone who stopped in for a bevvie. There will be a Celebration of Life in her honour on Sunday, June 30, 2019 at her happy place, Magna Bay Resort starting at 3:00 pm. Please join us and bring your memories and stories of Roberta. Donations can be made to the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice Home.

250-554-2577

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Joan Sherman Weir April 21, 1928 – June 15, 2019

With great sadness we announce the passing of the author Joan Sherman Weir, who died peacefully at Cedarview Lodge in North Vancouver on the evening of June 15, 2019 surrounded by family. She leaves four sons Ian (Jude), Paul (Sandra), Michael and Richard (Coleen), grandchildren Christina, Rachelle, Mitchell, Amy, Alexandra, Andrew, Jeannie, Taylor and Houston and eight great-grandchildren. Joan was born April 21, 1928 in Calgary, the youngest of four children of the Anglican Bishop Ralph Sherman and his wife Carolyn (née Gillmor). She was educated there and in Winnipeg, where the family moved when her father became Archbishop of Rupert’s Land. Graduating from the University of Manitoba with a B.A. in English and History, she worked for several years creating radio broadcasts for children as part of the advertising department at Eaton’s. In May of 1955, she married the surgeon Dr. Ormond Weir and in 1959 they moved to Kamloops, BC, where they lived for nearly 50 years. Given the constraints of the era, she deferred her writing aspirations until the day her youngest son started grade one. Then she launched her career in earnest and went on to write sixteen young adult novels, notably The Brideship and The Principal’s Kid, which won the BC Centennial Book Award in 2000,

Trudy Conway On June 8, 2019 at the age of 96 our beautiful Mom, Granny and Great-Grandmother fell into a very long sleep. Everyone who loved her to the moon and back were there surrounding her with love and thanks for her gentle and caring ways in everything she did.

Celebration of Life Philip Moyer

She loved the outdoors, when she was younger she would canoe on the ocean with her mom and sister to different islands as they grew up in Victoria. They would build a lean-to and sleep on evergreen boughs, they were very strong women, later she went on many amazing vacations. What a baker, cook and gardener. Her favourite flower was Lily of the Valley, and could beat anyone in a game of poker. Granny loved Kamloops and all four seasons, she adored her home and was the most content person we have all known. She simply and generously loved all of her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren as well as all of our furry family members. She is in us all, her family and friends. Thanks for all the traditions, stories, memories and T.L.C. Forever and ever! Amen. Thanks to all the care givers on 4-North at the Royal Inland Hospital and everyone at the Hospice House. A celebration of Mom’s life will be held in the future. Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324

A Celebration of Philip Moyer’s Life will be held on Friday, June 28, 2019 from 11:30 am to 2:30 pm at St. Andrews on the Square, 159 Seymour Street, Kamloops, BC. Sharing of happy memories, followed by a luncheon.

Condolences may be expressed to the

family from www.myalternatives.ca

If price matters, see us at First Memorial Funeral Services and join the Memorial Society of BC for Kamloops’ best prices! along with six books of history. She was a proud member of The Writers’ Union of Canada and for many years she taught English and Creative Writing at the University College of the Cariboo (later Thompson Rivers University), where she is remembered by many as a mentor and inspiration. In 2004, she was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Letters degree. For half a century, Joan was an active member of the congregation at St. Paul’s Cathedral. An avid horsewoman, she loved riding in the hills on her horse Rajah, or else hiking with a sequence of beloved yellow labs (four generations’ worth). She was predeceased by her siblings Laurence, Barbara (Cantlie), and L.R. (Bud) Sherman and in 2007 by Orm, her husband of 52 years. The family is deeply grateful to the nurses, care aides and long-time companions at Cedarview Lodge, where Joan coped with great courage and spirit with the onset of dementia. There will be a Funeral Service at 11:00 am on Saturday July 6, 2019 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Kamloops. Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

schoeningfuneralservice.com GREEN, Terry Douglas 1954 - 2019

Terry Douglas Green, age 65, passed away suddenly June 6, 2019, surrounded by his family at Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops. Terry is profoundly missed by his loving wife, Ruth; his children, Graham (Carmen) & Nathan; grandchildren Brooklyn & Elliot; his mother Jessie; brother Morris; sister Bev (Wes); sister-in-law, Joyce. He will be forever remembered by his many nieces, nephews, cousins and great nieces & nephews, all of whom he cherished. Terry was predeceased by his father, Morris Loring; his father, Bob Green; & nephew, BJ Henry. Terry grew up in Salmon Arm and spent many summers in Canoe enjoying time at the cabin with his extended family. He graduated from Salmon Arm High School in 1972 and spent two summers as a seasonal firefighter prior to joining the BC Forest Service where he enjoyed a 41 year career, retiring in 2014. He shared many great memories of his time with the Forest Service and enjoyed reminiscing about the work and the people he worked with. Terry was a family man. He made the most of every opportunity he had to spend time on Shuswap Lake, camping, fishing, hunting, and houseboating with his beloved family over the years. He especially enjoyed boating and towing his children, nieces & nephews, and later on his grandchildren & great nieces & nephews around behind the boat. Terry’s zest for adventure and family fun will forever be cherished by all those he spent time with. A Celebration of Life Service will be held at Bowers Funeral Service in Salmon Arm, on Saturday June 29th at 1:00 pm. Friends are invited to share their memories of Terry with his family at a reception afterwards. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you consider a donation to the Cancer Society or Royal Inland Hospital Foundation. On line condolences may be sent to the family at Terry’s obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com


A30

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Edward James Stewart Duncan It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Stewart Duncan on May 27, 2019 at the age of 94 years in Kamloops, BC.

In Loving Memory of

Guy Lucien Martin

June 24, 2014

Guy passed away peacefully at The Hamlets, his home of nearly ten years, on June 21, 2019. Guy was predeceased by his loving wife Peggy Barbara Martin on July 22, 2017. Guy was cherished by his loving children Linda (Gary) Walker, Dean Martin, and Claude (Shawn) Martin and grandchildren Aaron (Val) Walker, Nicole (Travis) and step-grandchild Eden (Kieran).

Martha Vereschagin

Stew was born in Crystal City, MB on March 15, 1925 to William Robert Duncan and Rosina (Seibert) Duncan.

Guy was born in Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec and raised in Montreal with his siblings Jaqueline, Marcel, Pierrette, Charlotte, Albert, Jack and Johnny. At an early age, he joined the RCAF and was stationed at St. Hubert’s Air Force base in Montreal, where he met the love of his life Peggy. They were married after leaving the Air Force, then moved to Halifax where their first child Linda was born. After a couple years, Peggy felt the call to come back to BC and be closer to her mother, the late Mary Darwin. They moved to Vancouver where their first son Claude was born. After moving onto Nelson, Revelstoke and Penticton, they eventually settled in Kamloops where their second son Dean was born.

He is predeceased by his wife of 37 years Ella (Ander) Duncan, brothers Gordon (Gertie) of Stoney Creek, ON, Henry (Peggy) of Pilot Mound, MB, Harvey (Ruth) of Winnipeg, MB., Chester (Vi) of Calgary, AB, Donnie (Bea) of Belle River, ON, Maynard (Pat) of Sherwood Park, AB, Dave (Jean) of Qualicum Beach, BC, sister May Lund (Tom) of Birtle, MB and sister-inlaw Dorothy Klyne (Danny) of The Pas, MB. Stew is survived by his brother Herman (Lou) of Calgary, AB, sister Dorothy Snider (Jerry) of Napanee, ON, brothers-in-law George Ander (Alma) of Surrey, BC and Harvey Ander (Doreen) of The Pas, MB and many nieces and nephews. Stewart bids a fond farewell to the many friends he leaves behind at Chartwell and The Shores retirement residences, Teamsters Union Local 213, the RCAF and his bowling and golfing buddies, as well as those he met while living from Crystal City through Winnipeg, Calgary, Whitehorse and Kamloops. Special thanks to friend Eileen Ambler for her years of support. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Muriel Florence Griffiths (née Kelly)

Born in Archerwill, Saskatchewan September 30, 1936 With much sadness, we announce that Muriel passed away at the Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops on June 21, 2019. She is predeceased by her father Else, mother Nora, brothers Jack and Marvin, brothers-in-law Ed (Wanda) Fairless and Vern (Gwen) Miller, third son Gregory, nephew Tim Kelly and her lifelong love Richard (Dick) Griffiths. She is survived by brother Wayne, sisters Gwen, Betty and Wanda, sisters-in-law Audrey (Jack), Linda (Wayne) and Liz (Marvin), brother-in-law George (Betty) and her six sons Kevin, Ken (Deb), Kraig (Heather), Tracy (Elizabeth), Rick and Robert, as well as many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. After a time in Archerwill, then Geraldton, ON, Muriel grew up in Salmo, BC and while a teenager working as a waitress, met a tall, dark and handsome man from Ladner, BC who was in town working on a paving crew. He was 19, she was 17 when they eloped. The next eight years were quite busy as she had seven sons in that time, moved to Nelson, then back to Salmo and finally to Merritt in 1959. As if raising six boys was not busy enough, she also belonged to the Royal Purple and helped with minor baseball when they were young and then did all of the

February 1, 1932 – June 20, 2019

Those we love don’t go away, they walk beside us every day... Unseen, unheard, but always near. Still loved, still missed and very near. You Are My Sunshine

With their family now complete, Guy and Peg built a wonderful life in Kamloops where they went on to meet many wonderful lifetime friends. Guy worked his entire career for CNCP Telecommunications, where he was liked and respected by colleagues. Guy was a wonderful husband, father and family man always being there for anyone in need. He was a community contributor, having coached hockey and baseball for many years. He was also known around the neighborhood for building a backyard hockey rink where many games were played. With help from his brother Jack he built a swimming pool in the backyard, where again all were welcome to come and enjoy. Guy and Peggy were avid golfers and enjoyed many years with their friends at KGGC. Dad had a jovial spirit, crazy sense of humour, and kind heart. He will be forever missed, always loved, never forgotten. The family would like to express our sincere gratitude to the staff on B1 at The Hamlets for their enduring professionalism, love and kindness. You made our dad’s final years as comfortable as could possibly be. We are forever grateful. A celebration of Guy and Peggy’s life will be held in early fall, details to follow. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

books for her husband’s Diamond Drilling Company (Rainbow Drilling).

Richard (Rick) Wade Thompson

She enjoyed hunting and fishing with Dick and excelled at golfing, holding the Merritt club championship many times. She also once fell on the course during a tournament, broke her arm but continued to finish and won the tournament – no problem.

We are deeply saddened with the loss of our beloved son Richard (Rick) Thompson on June 7, 2019.

Super Mom, Muriel (“Bub” to her siblings) loved family and did everything for all who needed it and never lost the knack of cooking and caring for a large group of people. When Dick fell ill, she spent many years ensuring that he was cared for as best as could be, till he passed away. Very generous and caring in nature, she spent her life fulfilling the promise to do something to help someone every day. A shout out to her “Bling Girls”, who keep the local restaurant scene properly reviewed and thanks to the staff at the Florentine and Dr. Errol Van Der Merwe, along with all of the others that helped her along the way, including some very nice nurses. A very wise and kind person, who maintained her sharp and humorous wit till the very end. She will be greatly missed and remembered. In lieu of flowers, a donation to The Heart & Stroke Foundation or your local soup kitchen would be appreciated. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Online condolences may be expressed at www.merritfuneralchapel.com

September 5, 1965 - June 7, 2019

Left to mourn his passing are his loving parents Roger and Shirley Thompson and his loving brother Brian Thompson. Rick was predeceased by his brother Dennis and his grandparents John and Anne Scott, Bill and Nina Thompson and his cousin Steven Nelson. He also leaves to cherish his memory his aunts, uncles, cousins and his dear friends Brenda and Colton Solberg and all his other friends too numerous to mention by name. Rick loved people. Rick was born in Vancouver and lived in Port Alberni, Kamloops, Calgary and Whiskey Creek on Vancouver Island, where he bought property in 1989, calling it a little bit of heaven where he could unwind and relax. Rick enjoyed canoeing, camping, fishing (with his grandad), fixing cars and fixing anything else broken. He loved spending time with his friends, telling stories and creating art. Rick was an architectural glass artist and a master craftsman. His work can be seen on display at The Vancouver International Airport, The Four Seasons Hotel in Vancouver, Fluor Industries in Calgary, BC Biomedical Labs in Surrey and in private homes and businesses throughout the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, Kamloops and Texas. His other commissioned works include numerous glass trophy’s, a wonderful metal May Pole (where children can interact) and glass sculpture in Leigh Square in Port Coquitlam. Rick also worked as the Art director at The Enchanted Forest and really enjoyed his time there. It is with great sadness that we are saying Good Bye. Rick will be missed, loved and never forgotten. He truly was “one of a kind”. Please join us for a Celebration of Life on June 30, 2019 at 1:00 pm at Seventh Day Adventist Church, 364 Fortune Dr., Kamloops, BC. In lieu of flowers, please donate to a charity of your choice or Royal Inland Hospital Fund.

Murial Florence Griffiths September 30, 1936 - June 21, 2019

In memory Richard Thomas (Dick) Griffiths May 3, 1934 – March 9, 2015

The family would like to express their gratitude to friends for showing their love and support through this difficult time. Online condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com


WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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g n i s i t r e v d i K ORTYF R A L L O “D , NINE-DAY RDS!” A W D O O W

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DAB’LL DO YA!”

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epending on your age, you probably recognized one or more of those famous taglines from advertising. (You might even have sung along to that Woodwards one.) Advertising and marketing has an impact on all of us from an early age. From Saturday morning cartoons to ads for Sea Monkeys and X-Ray Specs in the back of your comic books to singing along with jingles on the radio, for better or for worse, we have all been exposed to advertising early and often. Today’s kids are smart, savvy, more brand aware (and more exposed to advertising messages) than any generation before them. So we decided to work with them to teach them a bit more about the world of advertising – and also to point out the value of shopping locally. The result is this special section you see here today – Kidvertising. We partnered with three classrooms of bright young people in Grades 5 and 6 at Pacific Way Elementary and Aberdeen Elementary schools. Kamloops This Week account executive Kate Potter gave a presentation to each class to talk about how advertising works in print media, along with some principles of marketing and design.

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Then we asked the students to create ads for local businesses of their choice, and we took those ad drawings – more than 60 different ads – to the local businesses and offered to run them in this special section. For every business that bought an ad, we’ve taken $50 from the cost of each ad and are presenting it to the school’s Parent Advisory Council to use to support activities at their schools. Thanks to the generous and community-minded businesses who participated, that means that this section results in $950 going to these two local schools. This was probably one of the most fun projects we’ve done this past year. Not only were our student designers talented artists, as you’ll see in these pages, they also demonstrated their awareness of the world of advertising that surrounds them, asking intelligent questions along the way. Thanks so much to Mr. Hine from Aberdeen Elementary and Mrs. Galloway and Mrs. Collins from Pacific Way Elementary for helping us put this great project together. - Tim Shoults Operations Manager, Kamloops This Week

Mr Hines’s Class - Aberdeen Elementary

Mrs Collins’s Class - Pacific Way Elementa ry

Mrs Galloway’s class - Pacific Way Elementary


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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

By Aiden McCallum - Pacific Way Elementary School By Cooper Hatch, Grade 6, Pacific Way Elementary

9 Locations in Kamloops! A proud part of the community for over 30 years!

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

By Tate Laursen, Grade 6, Aberdeen Elementary By Kiana Hayhurst - Aberdeen Elementary School

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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By Kylie Na, Grade 5, Pacific Way Elementary

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B6

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

By Tate Laursen, Grade 6, Aberdeen Elementary By Riddick Feely - Aberdeen Elementary School

Denning Health Group Mercedes-Benz Kamloops, 695C Laval Crescent Toll Free 855-984-6603, Mercedes-Benz-kamloops.ca

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Kamloops This Week us Ask would like to thank all the students for their wonderful artwork.

By Siaya Gill - Pacific Way Elementary School

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WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

PLAYCATION

B7

PLAYCATION

Canada Day fireworks light up the sky above the Spirit of Kamloops 2141 steam train during 2017 Canada Day celebrations downtown. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

On track for celebrating Canada and more

T

ake a staycation by climbing aboard a steam train that draw visitors from around the world. The 2141 Spirit of Kamloops is ready for another year of runs along the tracks, beginning with the always popular Fireworks Special on Canada Day. Passengers will enjoy a two-hour, eight-kilometre excursion, during which they will step off the train and enjoy the celebratory fireworks display along the South Thompson River. The heritage train’s regular schedule will resume this summer, with Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening departures scheduled. July will feature 7:30 p.m. departures, while the train will leave the station at 7 p.m. in August.

The eight-kilometre trips last about one hour, starting from the historic former CNR station just east of Sandman Centre. While aboard the train, passengers may encounter a visit from feisty saloon girls and possibly even Bill Miner, the infamous train robber, who usually travels on horseback with his Bad Land Bandittas. Other journeys include Ales and Rails on July 27 and Aug. 10, the Sip and Steam Wine Train on Aug. 24, the Ghost Train in late October and the Christmas Train in December. Fares aboard the Spirit of Kamloops include train ride, entertainment, drink and snack. For information on seat availability and to buy tickets to any of the 2141’s excursions, go online to kamrail.com or call 250-374-2141.

SIX SESSIONS TO CHOOSE FROM

Week 1 • July 2 – 5 (4 days) Week 2 • July 8 – 12 (5 days) Week 3 • July 15 – 19 (5 days)

Week 4 • July 22 – 26 (5 days) Week 5 • July 29 – Aug 2 (5 days) Week 6 • Aug 6 – 9 (4 days)

SUMMER CAMP

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Fun out-of-pool activities!

cardboard boat building | mini-olympics water-fights & games | outdoor activities will be done indoors in case of smoke

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LIFESAVING CAMPS

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B8

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NOMINATIONS CLOSE FRIDAY!

Kamloops’s original and biggest contest to decide who’s the best of the best in our community is now open for nominations! Nominate your favourite business today in more than 150 categories to be entered to win an AMAZING Luv’n The Loops prize package from Tourism Kamloops!

READERSCHOICE.KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM All ballots must be received or entered online. Employees of Kamloops This Week and their immediate families are not eligible. Nominations close Friday June 28, 2019 • Voting starts Monday July 1, 2019

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Kamloops This Week June 26, 2019  

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